WorldWideScience

Sample records for anticipated radiological impacts

  1. Anticipated radiological impacts from the mining and milling of thorium for the nonproliferative fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.R.; Till, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    Recent emphasis on proliferation-resistant fuel cycles utilizing thorium--uranium-233 fuels has necessitated evaluation of the potential radiological impact of mining and milling thorium ore. Therefore, an analysis has been completed of hypothetical mine-mill complexes using population and meteorological data representative of a thorium resource site in the Lemhi Pass area of Idaho/Montana, United States of America. Source terms for the site include thorium-232 decay chain radionuclides suspended as dusts and radon-220 and daughters initially released as gas. Fifty-year dose commitments to maximally exposed individuals of 2.4 mrem to total body, 9.5 mrem to bone, and 35 mrem to lungs are calculated to result from facility operation. Radium-228, thorium-228, thorium-232 and lead-212 (daughter of radon-220) are found to be the principal contributors to dose. General population doses for a 50-mile radius surrounding the facility are estimated to be 0.05 man-rem to total body, 0.1 man-rem to bone, and 0.7 man-rem to lungs. Generally speaking, the results of this study indicate that the radiological aspects of thorium mining and milling should pose no significant problems with regard to implementation of thorium fuel cycles

  2. Impact of anticipation in dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlee, P.; Tunstrøm, K.; Lundh, T.; Wennberg, B.

    2017-12-01

    Many animals, including humans, have predictive capabilities and, presumably, base their behavioral decisions—at least partially—upon an anticipated state of their environment. We explore a minimal version of this idea in the context of particles that interact according to a pairwise potential. Anticipation enters the picture by calculating the interparticle forces from linear extrapolations of the particle positions some time τ in the future. Simulations show that for intermediate values of τ , compared to a transient time scale defined by the potential and the initial conditions, the particles form rotating clusters in which the particles are arranged in a hexagonal pattern. Analysis of the system shows that anticipation induces energy dissipation and we show that the kinetic energy asymptotically decays as 1 /t . Furthermore, we show that the angular momentum is not necessarily conserved for τ >0 , and that asymmetries in the initial condition therefore can cause rotational movement. These results suggest that anticipation could play an important role in collective behavior, since it may induce pattern formation and stabilizes the dynamics of the system.

  3. Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

    2011-09-01

    This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 μg m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were

  4. The impact of group composition and attitudes towards diversity on anticipated outcomes of diversity in groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oudenhoven-van der Zee, Karen; Paulus, Paul; Vos, Menno; Parthasarathy, Niveditha

    In two studies, students evaluated group pictures of workgroups of varying ethnic and gender composition with respect to anticipated affective and productive outcomes. The impact of level of diversity, faultlines and individual differences in diversity attitudes on anticipated outcomes were

  5. Anticipated SWOT Observations of Human Impacts on the Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, E.; Andreadis, K.; Moller, D.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The impoundment of water behind dams alters the timing and magnitude of the discharge of rivers to the ocean, and hence sea level, as well as evaporation from the global land areas, and, through irrigation, the storage of water on land in the soil column. The impact of these effects on the global hydrologic cycle globally is difficult to estimate given currently available (and shared) observations of temporally varying reservoir storage. The upcoming joint U.S.-France Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission* will measure terrestrial surface water storage dynamics with unprecedented global coverage for managed reservoirs, as well as natural lakes and rivers. Previous studies have investigated SWOT's potential ability to measure storage change for some lakes; however, because reservoirs are typically located in flooded river valleys, they tend to be more elongate than the high latitude lakes that have been studied, and have more complex shorelines (and hence a longer land-water boundary). Furthermore, for reservoirs in mountainous regions, SWOT observations will be prone to topographic layover effects. Finally, the temporal variability of water levels in reservoirs is determined by management goals (i.e., hydropower, flood control, irrigation, supply, recreation), rather than climate, as in the case of natural lakes. We report an investigation of the potential accuracy of SWOT observations of storage change over selected managed reservoirs in the United States. First, we developed a time series of water height maps over each reservoir by combining available bathymetry data with observations of reservoir storage. We then simulated realistic SWOT observations of water level over these water bodies, given the planned SWOT orbital parameters, anticipated noise, and topographic layover errors. We also simulated a realistic tropospheric delay, modeled from daily MERRA reanalysis data. From these synthetic observations, we estimate the number of overpasses needed

  6. Anticipated Radiological Dose to Worker for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP - Project W-460

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose, expressed as dose equivalent (DE), to workers conducting planned plutonium (Pu) stabilization processes at the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The report is based on a time and motion dose study commissioned for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, to provide personnel exposure estimates for construction work in the PFP storage vault area plus operation of stabilization and packaging equipment at PFP

  7. Anticipated Radiological Dose to Worker for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP - Project W-460

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, E V

    2000-01-01

    This report provides estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose, expressed as dose equivalent (DE), to workers conducting planned plutonium (Pu) stabilization processes at the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The report is based on a time and motion dose study commissioned for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, to provide personnel exposure estimates for construction work in the PFP storage vault area plus operation of stabilization and packaging equipment at PFP.

  8. Evolving protected-area impacts in Panama: impact shifts show that plans require anticipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruna, Akiko; Pfaff, Alexander; Van den Ende, Sander; Joppa, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are the leading forest conservation policy, so accurate evaluation of future PA impact is critical in conservation planning. Yet by necessity impact evaluations use past data. Here we argue that forward-looking plans should blend such evaluations with anticipation of shifts in threats. Applying improved methods to evaluate past impact, we provide rigorous support for that conceptual approach by showing that PAs’ impacts on deforestation shifted with land use. We study the Republic of Panama, where species-dense tropical forest faces real pressure. Facing variation in deforestation pressure, the PAs’ impacts varied across space and time. Thus, if shifts in pressure levels and patterns could be anticipated, that could raise impact. (paper)

  9. Anticipated climate change impacts on flood characteristics : Moisie River application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dore, I.; Desrochers, G.E.; Roy, R.; Chaumont, D.

    2006-01-01

    The issue of global warming was discussed with particular reference to the changes that may occur in the hydrological regime within the coming decades in response to predicted changes in climate. Flood events for the 2050 time horizon were investigated along with the consequences on water management and dam safety. Dams operated by Hydro-Quebec are used for flood control, water supply, recreational activities and hydroelectricity. As such, the electric utility relies on methods to evaluate the adaptability of current management plans to climate change. This paper presented the results of a study conducted at the Moisie River watershed, located in northern Quebec. The HSAMI hydrologic model was used to evaluate and compare the occurrences where stream flows and water levels exceed critical values in order to assess the effectiveness of management plans in both current and climate change scenarios. The study considered two different approaches on existing and future anticipated meteorological scenarios based on different criteria. The purpose was to optimize future hydroelectric generation, reduce floods and improve the safety of hydraulic structures. Preliminary results suggest a possible increase in flood risk and fewer low water level occurrences. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  10. The impact of tech aides in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sferrella, Sheila M; Story, Cathleen P

    2004-01-01

    As the staffing shortage continues to impact radiology departments and outpatient imaging centers, managers look for ways to solve staffing issues internally. Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network investigated the feasibility of adding a position of radiology tech aide. This proposal was driven by a desire to improve retention of staff, improve employee satisfaction and reduce turnover. A 6-month pilot program was conducted at the network's highest-volume facility. One tech aide underwent extensive training and eventually began performing some of the tasks identified in the analysis. Each area within radiology worked with an intern to identify each step in its work process. Each step identified led to the question, "What happens if?" The workflow process provided a detailed look a the number of steps required for a technologist to perform a study from start to finish. In May 2002, the administrator submitted a project proposal to management engineering to evaluate radiologic technologists' workloads and identify tasks that could be performed by a tech aide. Activity-Based Management (ABM)--a process that emphasizes activities over resources--was utilized to study work activities. The analysis identified the appropriate tasks and revealed that 5 FTEs were needed to assist the technologists in all areas of radiology. A workflow was completed for each area within radiology. Some areas identified bottlenecks, which caused delays in the process and some redundant work for the staff. Data were presented to the network administration. Staffing realities, labor pool availability within the existing network staff, and detailed task identifications also were provided. A total of 5 FTE tech aides were approved. The final program included in-depth tech-aide training; effective and open communication between management and technologists; and a collaborative, education-oriented relationship between technologists and tech aides.

  11. Anticipated impacts of climate warming on ecosystems in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, T. A.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Astley, B. N.; Downer, C. W.; Jorgenson, T. T.; Bagley, C.; Burks-Copes, K.

    2011-12-01

    Future climate scenarios predict a roughly 5 degree increase in mean annual air temperatures for the Alaskan Interior over the next 80 years. This is expected to be enough to initiate permafrost degradation in Interior Alaska which could lead to widespread thermokarst and talik development and potentially a thicker seasonally thawed (active) layer. These changes could dramatically affect hydrology, ground surface topography and vegetation. Forecasting ecological responses to climate warming is complicated by many factors including variations in soil type, precipitation, surface and ground water hydrology, vegetation, slope, aspect, fire prevalence, and the thermal state of permafrost. We are making field measurements and time series repeat imagery at upland and lowland landscapes to determine where and what ecosystem processes may be most susceptible for rapid or unpredictable changes with climate warming or changing land use activities. By integrating existing cryospheric (permafrost and snow), hydrologic and vegetation succession modeling capabilities we hope to enhance our ability to predict how climate change and other stressors may affect ecosystem dynamics and fire susceptibility. We will include the effects of non-climate related anthropogenic stressors like changes in land use activities and infrastructure development. Numerous electrical resistivity geophysical measurements have been made across a variety of landscapes to investigate how vegetation, soils, and land use relates to permafrost distribution. Our project results will be synthesized into a spatially-explicit decision support system to assist with land use management decision-making for Interior Alaska. This Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based tool is being developed through a combination of field work and modeling. We will identify challenges for management activities given the projected ecosystem response to anticipated climate change by the end-of-the century. This presentation will

  12. Anticipating the psychosocial impact of disasters and crises: the need for an interdisciplinary social science framework.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dückers, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    Study/Objective: An interdisciplinary social science framework is presented to answer the question: how to anticipate the psychosocial impact of disasters and crises? Background: The scientific knowledge on health effects, and the quality of aftercare in a disaster context is strongly rooted in

  13. Modeling anticipated climate change impact on biogeochemical cycles of an acidified headwater catchment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benčoková, A.; Hruška, Jakub; Krám, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, S (2011), S6-S8 ISSN 0883-2927 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : modeling anticipated * climate change * biogeochemical cycles * acidified headwater catchment Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2011

  14. Dirty bombs: assesment of radiological impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunovic, D.; Koukouliou, V.

    2009-01-01

    In some countries, regulatory control of radioactive sources, used extensively in medicine and industry, remains weak. Global concerns about the security and safety of radioactive sources escalated following the September 11 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States. There are fears that some radioactive sources could be used by terrorists as radiological dispersal devices (RDD's), or so called 'dirty bombs'. The radioactive material dispersed, depending on the amount and intensity, could cause radiation sickness for a limited number of people nearby if, for example, they inhaled large amounts of radioactive dust. But the most severe tangible impacts would likely be the economic costs and social disruption associated with the evacuation and subsequent clean-up of contaminated property. It has been shown that usage of realistic data in a first response decision making as to avoid inappropriate public reaction accompanied by economic and social consequences is necessary.(author)

  15. Long term radiological impact of thorium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, S.; Schapira, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Thorium extraction produces a certain amount of radioactive wastes. Potential long term radiological impact of these residues has been calculated using the recent ICRP-68 ingestion dose factors in connection with the computing code DECAY, developed at Orsay and described in this work. This code solves the well known Bateman's equations which govern the time dependence of a set of coupled radioactive nuclei. Monazites will be very likely the minerals to be exploited first, in case of an extensive use of thorium as nuclear fuel. Because monazites contain uranium as well, mining residues will contain not only the descendants of 232 Th and a certain proportion of non-extracted thorium (taken here to be 5%), but also this uranium, if left in the wastes for economical reasons. If no uranium would be present at all in the mineral, the potential radiotoxicity would strongly decrease in approximately 60 years, at the pace of the 5.8 years period of 228 Ra, which becomes the longest-lived radionuclide of the 4n radioactive family in the residues. Moreover, there is no risk due to radon exhalation, because of the very short period of 220 Rn. These significant differences between uranium and thorium mining have to be considered in view of some estimated long term real radiological impacts due to uranium residues, which could reach a value of the order of 1 mSv/year, the dose limit recommended for the public by the recent ICRP-60. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs., 43 appendices

  16. The impact of anticipated stigma on psychological and physical health problems in the unemployed group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling T. O'Donnell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has demonstrated that the unemployed suffer increased psychological and physical health problems compared to their employed counterparts. Further, unemployment leads to an unwanted new social identity that is stigmatizing, and stigma is known to be a stressor causing psychological and physical health problems. However, it is not yet known whether being stigmatized as an unemployed group member is associated with psychological and physical health in this group. The current study tested the impact of anticipated stigma on psychological distress and physical health problems, operationalized as somatic symptoms, in a volunteer sample of unemployed people. Results revealed that anticipated stigma had a direct effect on both psychological distress and somatic symptoms, such that greater anticipated stigma significantly predicted higher levels of both. Moreover, the direct effect on somatic symptoms became non-significant when psychological distress was taken into account. Thus, to the extent that unemployed participants anticipated experiencing greater stigma, they also reported increased psychological distress, and this psychological distress predicted increased somatic symptoms. Our findings complement and extend the existing literature on the relationships between stigmatized identities, psychological distress and physical health problems, particularly in relation to the unemployed group. This group is important to consider both theoretically, given the unwanted and transient nature of the identity compared to other stigmatized identities, but also practically, as the findings indicate a need to orient to the perceived valence of the unemployed identity and its effects on psychological and physical health.

  17. Comparison of the radiological impacts of thorium and uranium nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.R.; Witherspoon, J.P.; McBride, J.P.; Frederick, E.J.

    1982-03-01

    This report compares the radiological impacts of a fuel cycle in which only uranium is recycled, as presented in the Final Generic Environmental Statement on the Use of Recycle Plutonium in Mixed Oxide Fuel in Light Water Cooled Reactors (GESMO), with those of the light-water breeder reactor (LWBR) thorium/uranium fuel cycle in the Final Environmental Statement, Light Water Breeder Reactor Program. The significant offsite radiological impacts from routine operation of the fuel cycles result from the mining and milling of thorium and uranium ores, reprocessing spent fuel, and reactor operations. The major difference between the impacts from the two fuel cycles is the larger dose commitments associated with current uranium mining and milling operations as compared to thorium mining and milling. Estimated dose commitments from the reprocessing of either fuel type are small and show only moderate variations for specific doses. No significant differences in environmental radiological impact are anticipated for reactors using either of the fuel cycles. Radiological impacts associated with routine releases from the operation of either the thorium or uranium fuel cycles can be held to acceptably low levels by existing regulations

  18. Radiological impact of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.J.; Migliori de Beninson, Ambreta.

    1985-01-01

    The radiological impacts from management of wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle have been estimated for several alternative fuel cycle strategies. The impacts are expressed as collective effective dose equivalent commitments. Mill tailings make an important contribution, which depends on the uranium requirements for each reference fuel cycle, being the largest for once-through cycles. Disposal of high level waste or spent fuel is also an important contribution, usually larger for once-through cycle where the entire actinide inventory is disposed off. Although at present conversion and enrichment tailing are not considered wastes, they have assumed to be wastes in the reference cycle. In this case, their relative contribution is significant for fuel cycles using enriched uranium. The totals for waste management and disposal are of the same order of magnitude as the collective dose commitments from occupational and public exposures arising from the operation of the nuclear fuel cycle installations. The incomplete collective dose commitments from waste management and disposal assessed by integrating the collective dose rate over a fixed period of time (usually selected as 500 years), at time when the integral is maximum, are also comparable with the corresponding quantity arising from the operation of the fuel cycle installations. The maximum per caput doses predicted for the far future are small, usually a small fraction of the relevant dose limits. The maximun future doses in the critical groups in the vicinity of the repositories will be very low, of about a few percents of that experienced from the exposure to natural radiation sources. (M.E.L.) [es

  19. Islamic Education: A Principle to Develop Religious Society to Anticipate Negative Impact of Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Solihin Nasrudin

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to analyze how the Islamic education is able to be the principle of inter-religious harmony to  anticipate  negative impact of social media use. Islam as a universal religion has proven its ability  to encourage the development of science and technology. Social media has emerged along with the development of information technology. The social media is able to facilitate  community to communicate and  to exchange information, but at the same time social media may also threat th...

  20. Citation Impact of Collaboration in Radiology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Parikh, Ujas; Duszak, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Team science involving multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration is increasingly recognized as a means of strengthening the quality of scientific research. The aim of this study was to assess associations between various forms of collaboration and the citation impact of published radiology research. In 2010, 876 original research articles published in Academic Radiology, the American Journal of Roentgenology, JACR, and Radiology were identified with at least one radiology-affiliated author. All articles were manually reviewed to extract features related to all authors' disciplines and institutions. Citations to these articles through September 2016 were extracted from Thomson Reuters Web of Science. Subsequent journal article citation counts were significantly higher (P citations were authors from multiple countries (β = 9.14, P = .002), a nonuniversity collaborator (β = 4.80, P = .082), and at least seven authors (β = 4.11, P = .038). With respect to subsequent journal article citations, various forms of collaboration are associated with greater scholarly impact of published radiology research. To enhance the relevance of their research, radiology investigators are encouraged to pursue collaboration across traditional disciplinary, institutional, and geographic boundaries. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of the radiological impact of contaminated discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeck, L.; Zeevaert, T.

    1996-09-18

    A biosphere model has been used to calculate the release of radionuclides from contaminated soils and their dose impact on critical individuals in the environment. Normal evolution and accidental scenarios are considered. The objective of the model is to provide an indication of the radiological risk rather than to predict its future impact.

  2. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edholm, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  3. Derivation of irrigation requirements for radiological impact assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almahayni, Talal; Crout, Neil M J

    2016-11-01

    When assessing the radiological impacts of radioactive waste disposal, irrigation using groundwater contaminated with releases from the disposal system is a principal means of crop and soil contamination. In spite of their importance for radiological impact assessments, irrigation data are scarce and often associated with considerable uncertainty for several reasons including limited obligation to measure groundwater abstraction and differences in measuring methodologies. Further uncertainty arises from environmental (e.g. climate and landscape) change likely to occur during the assessment long time frame. In this paper, we derive irrigation data using the crop growth AquaCrop model relevant to a range of climates, soils and crops for use in radiological impact assessments. The AquaCrop estimates were compared with actual irrigation data reported in the literature and with estimates obtained from simple empirical methods proposed for use in radiological impact assessments. Further, the AquaCrop irrigation data were analysed using mixed effects modelling to investigate the effects of climate, soil and crop type on the irrigation requirement. Irrigation estimates from all models were within a reasonable range of the measured values. The AquaCrop estimates, however, were at the higher end of the range and higher than those from the empirical methods. Nevertheless, they may be more appropriate for conservative radiological assessments. The use of mixed effects modelling allowed for the characterisation of crop-specific variability in the irrigation data, and in contrast to the empirical methods, the AquaCrop and the mixed effects models accounted for the soil effect on the irrigation requirement. The approach presented in this paper is relevant for obtaining irrigation data for a specific site under different climatic conditions as well as for generic dose assessments. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the most comprehensive analyses of irrigation data in

  4. Radiological and related chemical health impact assessments of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There had been no serious radiological and related chemical health impact assessments of pipe borne water in the country. Water samples were collected from five waterworks across Lagos Metropolis and a single crystal NaI (Tl) detector was used to determine the activity concentration of 238U radionuclide in the water.

  5. A probabilistic approach to Radiological Environmental Impact Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Rodolfo; Larsson, Carl-Magnus

    2001-01-01

    Since a radiological environmental impact assessment typically relies on limited data and poorly based extrapolation methods, point estimations, as implied by a deterministic approach, do not suffice. To be of practical use for risk management, it is necessary to quantify the uncertainty margins of the estimates as well. In this paper we discuss how to work out a probabilistic approach for dealing with uncertainties in assessments of the radiological risks to non-human biota of a radioactive contamination. Possible strategies for deriving the relevant probability distribution functions from available empirical data and theoretical knowledge are outlined

  6. A report on CERN’s radiological impact

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Swiss and French authorities have just published a report showing that CERN’s radiological impact is negligible. The CERN Safety Commission’s Environment Team inspects the river Allondon. Since its foundation more than 50 years ago, questions about the Laboratory’s hypothetical radiological impact have been asked repeatedly by the public. These questions are partly due to the name CERN which, for historical reasons, contains the word nuclear. On 16 October, the Swiss and French authorities published a report that takes stock of CERN’s true radiological impact, providing a detailed and documented answer for all those who wonder about the risks of radioactivity. In their report, the Swiss Office fédéral de la santé publique (OFSP) and the French Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire (IRSN), the two bodies responsible for monitoring radiological risks in CERN’s Host States, concluded that CERN’s impac...

  7. The radiological impact of electronuclear cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.; Tort, V.

    1997-01-01

    For the whole cycle during exploitation, the impacts on workers are the most important., in individual and collective term with radiations doses reaching several milli-sieverts for individual doses. For the public exposure during the exploitation phase, the radiations doses coming from releases, are very small with a corresponding risk considered as insignificant (if admitted as hypothesis a linear relation without threshold at low doses). For the exposure in the long term for future generations, the individual impacts stay negligible ( for releases or wastes storage). In term of global impact, the collective doses can be estimated and never exceed some man-sievert by generation. In term of very long term, uncertainties coming from the difficulties to control environment are still to be studied. (N.C.)

  8. Radiological impact assessment within the IAEA Arctic Assessment Project (IASAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, E.M.; Gurbutt, P.; Harmes, I.

    1998-01-01

    impact was assessed based on several release scenarios prepared by the IASAP Sources working group. These included 'best estimate' release, 'plausible worst case' and 'worst case' scenarios. Collective dose as well as individual dose to identified populations were calculated. This paper reviews......As part of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) of IAEA, a working group was created to model the dispersal and transfer of radionuclides released from radioactive waste disposed of in the Kara Sea and bays of Novaya Zemlya and to assess the radiological impact. Existing models...... the models developed, highlights the general features of the inter-comparison and discusses the radiological impact assessment and conclusions based on it....

  9. Radiological Impact of Phosphogypsum Application in Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Nivea M. P.; Caires, Eduardo F.; Pires, Luiz F.; Bacchi, Marcio A.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. N.

    2010-08-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) contains radionuclides from 238U and 232Th decay series. Due to the presence of these radionuclides, many countries restricted the use of PG in agriculture, however there is not such restriction in Brazil. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of PG application on 226Ra (238U) and 228Ra (232Th) concentrations in soil. Gamma-spectrometry was carried out using HPGe detector. No increment of 226Ra and 228Ra was observed for increasing PG doses. Average values found for 226Ra and 228Ra were respectively 37 Bq kg-1 and 57 Bq kg-1. The results showed that the increasing PG doses in the specific conditions of the experiment did not cause a significant increment of radionuclides.

  10. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  11. The Economic Impact of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    which occurred in Goiania, Brazil near the end of 1987 was one of the most serious radiological accidents to have occurred to date (IAEA, 1988...construction sites” 9 (Boyle, 2002). In the Goiania case, the Cs-137 was acquired from an abandoned radiation-therapy unit when a private radiotherapy ...and 4 deaths (IAEA,1988). Economic and Psychological Impacts The Goiania accident is one of many examples where a contamination event can impose

  12. Phosphate gypsum wastes in Venice lagoon. Radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, M; Blasi, M; Guogang, J.; Rosamilia, S.; Sansone, U.; Biancotto, R.; Bidoli, P.; Sepulcri, D.

    2000-03-01

    The phosphoric minerals utilized in phosphoric acid production, presents high concentrations of radioactive materials: U238, Th 232, K 40. The phosphogypsum is the waste material obtained in the phosphoric acid production in wet process. This type of production method is employed for many years in Venice lagoon (Porto Marghera chemical plants). In this paper are reported evaluations of radiological impact on aquatic environment of lagoon [it

  13. Assessment of radiological impact due to postulated radioactivity dispersal by radiological dispersal device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.S.; Meena, T.R.; Murali, S.

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive Dispersal Device (RDDs) also called as 'dirty bomb' is a potentially serious threat in the present day scenario. Certain radioactive material is mixed with conventional explosives (eg. Dynamite, TNT) to cause wide spread radioactive contamination by detonation of such device. It is a 'Weapon of Mass Disruption', where radio-contamination and public anxiety cum fear are the major objectives for terrorists/adversaries. Assessment of radiological impact is necessary for quick and effective response

  14. Should anticipated impacts of climate change on hydrology modify water management practices?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Jean, R. [Energie Renouvelable Brookfield, Gatineau, Quebec (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Over the last few decades the scientific community has closely monitored climatologic trends and developed theories to better model interactions between the many factors that govern changes in climate. Although climate evolves naturally, evidence continues to mount that rapidly increasing concentrations of greenhouse gasses are causing accelerated changes: there is now a worldwide consensus about the general warming trend caused by this phenomenon, and now countries are initiating efforts to reduce emission rates, identify the potential impacts, and plan adaptation measures. The electric industry in general is investing in renewable energy sources, low-emission technologies, and emission offsets. More particularly, hydroelectric generators are getting prepared to face the challenge in anticipation of modified temporal and spatial distributions of precipitation, along with possible changes in overall precipitation volumes. Current industry practices in determining expected annual production levels rely 'in almost all instances upon the use of historical streamflow records'. The same survey also shows that 'in no case did respondents indicate that they currently reduce the length of available historical record in order to reflect recent trends in precipitation'. Relying on historical observations is also common practice to forecast inflows for periods longer than a few weeks in the future. Given that changes in precipitation patterns will modify the availability of water, it should be expected that the pattern of production from hydroelectric stations will be altered in a variety of ways: total annual production volumes, seasonal distributions of energy, changes in reservoir management rules caused by extreme events or competing needs for water, and so on, may all be affected. The utility of historical series in predicting the future may decline, and current work practices will potentially need to be modified accordingly. At the same time

  15. Should anticipated impacts of climate change on hydrology modify water management practices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St-Jean, R.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few decades the scientific community has closely monitored climatologic trends and developed theories to better model interactions between the many factors that govern changes in climate. Although climate evolves naturally, evidence continues to mount that rapidly increasing concentrations of greenhouse gasses are causing accelerated changes: there is now a worldwide consensus about the general warming trend caused by this phenomenon, and now countries are initiating efforts to reduce emission rates, identify the potential impacts, and plan adaptation measures. The electric industry in general is investing in renewable energy sources, low-emission technologies, and emission offsets. More particularly, hydroelectric generators are getting prepared to face the challenge in anticipation of modified temporal and spatial distributions of precipitation, along with possible changes in overall precipitation volumes. Current industry practices in determining expected annual production levels rely 'in almost all instances upon the use of historical streamflow records'. The same survey also shows that 'in no case did respondents indicate that they currently reduce the length of available historical record in order to reflect recent trends in precipitation'. Relying on historical observations is also common practice to forecast inflows for periods longer than a few weeks in the future. Given that changes in precipitation patterns will modify the availability of water, it should be expected that the pattern of production from hydroelectric stations will be altered in a variety of ways: total annual production volumes, seasonal distributions of energy, changes in reservoir management rules caused by extreme events or competing needs for water, and so on, may all be affected. The utility of historical series in predicting the future may decline, and current work practices will potentially need to be modified accordingly. At the same time, electric system operators

  16. Indexes to anticipate negative impacts of heat waves in urban Mediterranean environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, A. M.; Carvalho, C. V.; Velho, S. V.; Sousa, C. S.

    2012-04-01

    This study intention is to understand what might be the better indexes to anticipate health deterioration during temperature extreme events in a urban Mediterranean environment like Porto. To do this we look to the effects of the July 2006 Heat Wave using the Heat Index on the Mortality (All Causes) and Morbidity (All Causes, Respiratory and Circulatory diseases) in general, and in people over 74 years and by Gender, in Porto. The Poisson Generalized Additive Regression model was used in order to estimate the impact of Apparent Temperature (Heat Index) and Daily Mortality and Morbidity during the July 2006 Heat Wave. Daily Mortality, Morbidity and Heat Index was correlated with lags of Apparent Temperature up to 7 days using Pearson correlation. For a 1°C increase in mean Apparent Temperature we observed a 2.7% (95%CI:1.7-3.6%) increase in Mortality (for All Causes), 1.7% (95%CI:0.6-2.9%) in Respiratory Morbidity, 2,2% (95%CI:0.4-4.1%) in Women Respiratory Morbidity, 5,4% (95%CI:1.1-6.6%) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Morbidity and 7,5% (95%CI:1.3-14.1%) in Women Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Morbidity, for the entire population. For people ≥ 75 years, our work showed a 3,3% increase (95%CI:1.7-5.0%) in Respiratory Morbidity, 2,7% (95%CI:0.4-5.1%) in Men Respiratory Morbidity, 3,9% (95%CI:1.6-6.3%) in Women Respiratory Morbidity, 7.0% (95%CI:1.1-13.2%) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and 9.0% (95%CI:0.3-18.5%) in Women Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. We conclude that the use of Heat Index in a Mediterranean Tempered Climate enabled the identification of the effects of the July 2006 Heat Wave in Mortality due to All Causes and in Respiratory Morbidity of the General Population, as well as in Respiratory Morbidity of individuals with more than 74 years of age.

  17. Long term radiological impact of a uranium mine restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, Veronica; Bordonaba Marisa; Sanchez Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    During the 1990s, many uranium mines were closed as consequence of low prices of this mineral. It was due to a decrease in the demand for uranium and an increase in the overall supply. The resulting was a further complicated implementation of sites restorations. This report deals with one of the relevant aspects of the radiological protection scope: 'the evaluation of the long term radiological impact in the population due to the uranium mine restoration activities' for the uranium mine sited in Saelices el Chico (Salamanca, Spain). These restoration activities have basically consisted of recovering the original site by filling the old open pits with the material stockpiled in the waste dumps. The main problems associated with this material include radon release and particles emission. The strategy used to solve this problem has been covered these structures with a layer with beds of clay material rock, waste material and a cover tree. The pathways considered for the radiological impact have been: 1) Inhalation; 2) Ingestion of contaminated water, milk, vegetables and meat; 3) External exposure from clouds immersion, grounds concentrations and direct gamma radiation. Three computer codes have been used with the object of evaluating the above-mentioned impact. Two of them are well-known NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) codes: RESRAD 6.30 and MILDOS-AREA. We have also applied DOEFLURA, developed in ENUSA [1, 2, 3]. Four scenarios have been studied: Resident Farmer Scenario, Resident scenario, Livestock pasture scenario and Forest scenario, Estimation of radioactive doses for the member of the public in the different scenarios has been calculated with this programme. A period of 3500 years from now has been studied. (author)

  18. Radiological impact assessment of building materials on ordinary houses dwellers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, M.P. de.

    1994-01-01

    The radiological impact due to building materials on habitants living in the Santo Andre district of Sao Paulo state, Brazil, was assessed through the total effective dose equivalent rate determination, for external and internal irradiation. The effective dose equivalent rate for external irradiation was calculated by the gamma spectrometry determination of natural radionuclides specific activity in the dwelling materials. The effective dose equivalent rate due to 222 Rn inhalation was calculated through the radon indoor activity determination by using solid state nuclear track detectors. (author). 46 refs, 6 figs, 14 tabs

  19. The radiological impact of the LEP project on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, K.

    1981-01-01

    The siting of the large electron-positron (LEP) accelerator, its experimental areas, and its supporting infrastructure are discussed with respect to the radiological impact on the surrounding areas and on the population in the Pays de Gex and the Canton de Geneve. The final conclusions are based on work done by the former LEP Study Group and by the LEP Radiation Working Group. The calculations and estimates show that the stray ionizing radiation, the radioactivity, and the radiation-induced noxious chemical products released by the LEP installation will have only an insignificant impact on the area, the individual members of the public, and the population as a whole. This result for LEP 'phase 85' can also be extrapolated under reasonable assumptions for LEP 125 - a possible future development phase of the present project. (orig.)

  20. Discussion on the method of environmental radiological impact assessment for the highway construction project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Guohua

    2008-01-01

    Based on the characteristics and environmental radiological impact of the highway construction project, the basic procedure of environmental radiological impact assessment for the highway construction project is put forward, including analysis and determination of contamination sources, selection of evaluation factors, determination of assessment range and dose limit, environmental investigation, environmental impact prediction and assessment. The working method of each procedure is analyzed. (authors)

  1. Anticipated regret

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeelenberg, M.; Parrott, R.

    2018-01-01

    Regret is the prototypical decision related emotion. It is felt when the outcome of a non-chosen alternative is better than the outcomes obtained. Regret is a functional emotion that helps people to correct mistakes. It is also functional because people can anticipate regret beforehand, then choose

  2. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  3. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose

  4. Radiological impact of the application of phosphogypsum in agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzilli, B.P.; Saueia, C.H.R., E-mail: chsaueia@ipen.b, E-mail: mazzilli@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab de Radiometria Ambiental

    2011-07-01

    Phosphogypsum is a TENORM waste and one possible of this application is in agriculture. This paper aims to evaluate the dose due to ingestion of natural radionuclides present in phosphogypsum that could be incorporated in the food chain. For this evaluation, a conservative scenario was defined, considering a theoretical long term exposure due to annual applications of phosphogypsum in agriculture. This scenario covers estimation of the increment of radionuclides activity concentration in soil due to phosphogypsum applications; the uptake from soil by edible portions of vegetable and crops and activity concentration of radionuclides in milk and meat as part of the food chain; based on a model, transfer factors and conversion factors provided by IAEA and ICRP. The higher doses were found for the ingestion of vegetables and grain crop, up to 4.2 10-1 mSv per year. It is concluded that the radiological impact of this practice is negligible. (author)

  5. Radiological impact of high-energy accelerators on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1978-08-01

    The potential radiological impact of high-energy, high-intensity accelerators in the environment is discussed. It is shown that there are three sources of radiation exposure to the general public resulting from the operation of high-energy accelerators. In order of importance these are (a) the prompt radiation field, produced when the accelerator is operating; (b) the release of radionuclides and aerosols into the atmosphere; and (c) the production of radionuclides in the groundwater system around the accelerator. Of these three sources, (a) is dominant and typically exceeds (b) by about an order of magnitude. To date, experience at many accelerator laboratories has shown that the quantity of accelerator-produced radionuclides released to nearby groundwater systems (c) is either extremely small or immeasurable. The population dose equivalent resulting from the operation of several large high-energy facilities is compared

  6. Radiological impact of the application of phosphogypsum in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzilli, B.P.; Saueia, C.H.R.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphogypsum is a TENORM waste and one possible of this application is in agriculture. This paper aims to evaluate the dose due to ingestion of natural radionuclides present in phosphogypsum that could be incorporated in the food chain. For this evaluation, a conservative scenario was defined, considering a theoretical long term exposure due to annual applications of phosphogypsum in agriculture. This scenario covers estimation of the increment of radionuclides activity concentration in soil due to phosphogypsum applications; the uptake from soil by edible portions of vegetable and crops and activity concentration of radionuclides in milk and meat as part of the food chain; based on a model, transfer factors and conversion factors provided by IAEA and ICRP. The higher doses were found for the ingestion of vegetables and grain crop, up to 4.2 10-1 mSv per year. It is concluded that the radiological impact of this practice is negligible. (author)

  7. Fukushima - radiological impact on the Central Europe simulated by the system ESTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carny, P.; Suchon, D.; Smejkalova, E.; Chyly, M.; Krpelanova, M.; Liptak, L.

    2011-01-01

    Radiological impact of the events at nuclear installations Fukushima Dai-ichi on the Central Europe were modelled by system ESTE. Events in Fukushima and their radiological impacts are modelled mainly due to verification of our approaches, algorithms and models of ESTE. (authors)

  8. Radiological impact of the PARR-1 operation on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtyar, S.; Raza, S.S.; Tayyab, M.; Pervez, S.; Salahuddin, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a study related to the assessment of the radiological impact on the environment due to the operation of the Pakistan research reactor-1 (PARR-1) at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad. The parameters studied include the radioactivity releases in a gaseous form and also those originating from the liquid and solid wastes produced due to the operation of this research facility. The analysis is based on the environmental monitoring data for the last 10 years (1992-2002) and the conclusions have been drawn for the impact of the PARR-1 operation on the occupational workers as well as the general public living in the vicinity of the reactor site. Further, on the basis of this data, yearly average doses and the cumulative doses for the expected life of PARR-1, due to different radiation sources have been estimated. The analysis indicated that the maximum yearly doses at ground level for the occupational workers as well as for the public are a fraction of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) defined limiting values. It is, therefore, concluded that the impact of the PARR-1 normal operation on the environment is negligible and it can be regarded as ''safe to the public as well as the occupational workers''. (orig.)

  9. Impact of Aluminum on Anticipated Corrosion in a Flooded spent nuclear fuel Multi -Canister Overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion reactions in a flooded MCO are examined to determine the impact of aluminum corrosion products (from aluminum basket grids and spacers) on bound water estimates and subsequent fuel/environment reactions during storage. The mass and impact of corrosion products were determined to be insignificant, validating the choice of aluminum as an MCO component and confirming expectations that no changes to the Technical Databook or particulate mass or water content are necessary

  10. Impact of Aluminum on Anticipated Corrosion in a Flooded SNF Multi Canister Overpack (MCO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-06

    Corrosion reactions in a flooded MCO are examined to determine the impact of aluminum corrosion products (from aluminum basket grids and spacers) on bound water estimates and subsequent fuel/environment reactions during storage. The mass and impact of corrosion products were determined to be insignificant, validating the choice of aluminum as an MCO component and confirming expectations that no changes to the Technical Databook or particulate mass or water content are necessary.

  11. Managing social impact in design : Tools and methods for anticipating consequences of technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jantine Bouma

    2013-01-01

    Presentatie voor de lunchlezing bij het Kenniscentrum NoorderRuimte 'Managing Social Impact in Design' van 26 september 2013. Het lijkt zo evident. Technologie kan leiden tot veranderingen in ons gedrag en hoe we met anderen omgaan. Email, telefoons, auto’s hebben ons leven geheel veranderd. Wordt

  12. The quality and impact of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in radiology case-based learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore (1) clinical years students' perceptions about radiology case-based learning within a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) setting, (2) an analysis of the collaborative learning process, and (3) the learning impact of collaborative work on the radiology cases. Methods: The first part of this study focuses on a more detailed analysis of a survey study about CSCL based case-based learning, set up in the context of a broader radiology curriculum innovation. The second part centers on a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 52 online collaborative learning discussions from 5th year and nearly graduating medical students. The collaborative work was based on 26 radiology cases regarding musculoskeletal radiology. Results: The analysis of perceptions about collaborative learning on radiology cases reflects a rather neutral attitude that also does not differ significantly in students of different grade levels. Less advanced students are more positive about CSCL as compared to last year students. Outcome evaluation shows a significantly higher level of accuracy in identification of radiology key structures and in radiology diagnosis as well as in linking the radiological signs with available clinical information in nearly graduated students. No significant differences between different grade levels were found in accuracy of using medical terminology. Conclusion: Students appreciate computer supported collaborative learning settings when tackling radiology case-based learning. Scripted computer supported collaborative learning groups proved to be useful for both 5th and 7th year students in view of developing components of their radiology diagnostic approaches.

  13. Management strategies in anticipation of climatic change and the resulting impact on wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay, R.; Neraasen, T.; Coley, R.

    1991-01-01

    Two significant impacts of climate change could affect waterfowl. Climate changes that induce dryness and reduce surface water would have a detrimental effect on waterfowl production capabilities. Global warming could also increase sea levels and flood critical waterfowl overwintering habitat. Strategies undertaken by Ducks Unlimited, a waterfowl conservation organization, to respond to the threat posed by global warming to waterfowl are reviewed. Ducks Unlimited will continue to assist with wetland restoration and preservation throughout the Great Plains. Strategies to enhance retention include converting marginally arable land to permanent forage, forage backflooding, and encouragement of zero and minimum tillage operations. Improved efficiency of irrigation projects is important to foster water conservation. Widespread surface water drainage should be discouraged, by combinations of legislation and economic incentives. Ducks Unlimited is refocusing its activites on parts of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba that are likely to have relatively wetter conditions under climatic warming

  14. Radiological impact of coal-fired power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camplin, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The radiological impact of atmospheric discharges of activity from a hypothetical coal-fired power station is briefly discussed. This analysis involved estimating the amount of each radionuclide released annually to the atmosphere, modelling the dispersion of activity in the atmosphere and subsequently through the terrestrial environment, and calculating the collective dose commitment to the population of Great Britain and annual committed doses to the most highly exposed individuals. A summary of the dose estimates indicated that the maximum annual committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual is 230 μSv mainly from ingestion of foodstuffs contaminated with 210 Pb, 231 Pa and 210 Po. The collective effective dose equivalent commitment to the population of Great Britain from the operation of the plant for 30 years is 340 man Sv or 10 man Sv per GW(e)y. The pathways giving the highest contributions to the collective dose are inhalation and ingestion. In conclusion, the maximum assessed levels of individual dose are small but not insignificant. (U.K.)

  15. Potential radiological impact of the phosphate industry on wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Vives i Batlle, Jordi; Sweeck, Lieve

    2015-01-01

    The activities of the phosphate industry may lead to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radioactivity in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We performed a preliminary environmental risk assessment (ERA) of environmental contamination resulting from the activities of 5 phosphate fertiliser plants (located in Belgium, Spain, Syria, Egypt, Brazil), a phosphate-mine and a phosphate-export platform in a harbour (both located in Syria). These sites were selected because of the availability of information on concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in the surrounding environments. Assessments were generally performed considering highest environmental concentrations reported in the studies. The ERICA Tool, operating in a Tier 2 assessment mode, was used to predict radiation dose rates and associated risk to the selected reference organisms using the ERICA default parameter setting. Reference organisms were those assigned as default by the ERICA Tool. Potential impact is expressed as a best estimate risk quotient (RQ) based on a radiation screening value of 10 μGy h −1 . If RQ ≤ 1, the environment is considered unlikely to be at risk and further radiological assessment is not deemed necessary. Except for one of the cases assessed, the best estimate RQ exceeded 1 for at least one of the reference organisms. Internal exposure covered for 90–100 % of the total dose. 226 Ra or 210 Po were generally the highest contributors to the dose. The aquatic ecosystems in the vicinity of the phosphate fertiliser plants in Tessenderlo (Belgium), Huelva (Spain), Goiás (Brazil) and the terrestrial environment around the phosphate mine in Palmyra (Syria) are the ecosystems predicted to be potentially most at risk. - Highlights: • The adjusted highlights Environmental radionuclide enrichment from P-industry warrants risk assessment. • 226 Ra and 210 Po are the most dose contributing radionuclides. • The total dose rate is strongly driven by the internal

  16. Clinical and radiological evaluation of inverse impaction of supernumerary teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurklu, Esma; Gencay, Koray; Ak, Gulsum

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and radiological features of children with inverted supernumerary teeth. Study Design: Thirty eight patients with inverted supernumerary teeth (ST) were enrolled in this descriptive and restrospective study. Data from patient records including age, gender, status of dentition, number of ST, number of ST in inverted position, coexistence of ST in inverted and normal direction of eruption, location, orientation, morphology, clinical complications, management and radiography were assessed during 3-years period. Results: Thirty eight patients with a mean age of 9.10±1.97 years (range:6-13) and a strong male preponderance of 3.7:1 (male:30, female:8) had a total of 69 ST, of which 41 were in inverted position. Thirty five patients had one (92.1%) inverted tooth, whereas 3 patients had two inverted teeth per case (7.9%). All cases were located in the maxilla. Midline was the most frequent site for the single inverted supernumerary tooth in 18 (47.4%) patients, followed equally by the right and left premaxillary region in 10 patients each (26.3%). Regarding morphology, 30 patients had conical (78.9%) and 8 (21.1%) had incisiform ST. No tuberculate shaped ST was detected. There was no statistically significant difference between number of inverted teeth and delayed tooth eruption, diastema, local malocclusion, palatinal swelling (p>0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between complications and age (p>0.05). Surgical removal at the time of diagnosis with subsequent follow-up during completion of permanent dentition was the treatment approach in all cases. Conclusions: Thorough clinical examination followed by a comprehensive radiographic screening is the crucial determinant of an accurate diagnosis of an impacted ST. Early diagnosis and timely management are key factors to prevent or minimize the complications, which may influence function and esthetics of the teeth and even psychological condition of the growing

  17. Evaluation of long term radiological impact on population close to remediated uranium mill tailings storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerouanton, David; Delgove, Laure

    2008-01-01

    A methodology is elaborated in order to evaluate the long term radiological impact of remediated uranium mill tailings storage. Different scenarios are chosen and modelled to cover future evolution of the tailings storages. Radiological impact is evaluated for different population such as adults and children living in the immediate vicinity or directly on the storage, road workers or walkers on the storage. Equation and methods are detailed. (author)

  18. An assessment of the radiological impact of uranium mining in northern Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    This report presents the findings of a study which investigated the regional radiological impact of uranium mining in northern Saskatchewan. The study was performed by IEC Beak Consultants Ltd. under a contract awarded by Environment Canada in partnership with the Atomic Energy Control Board. This preliminary assessment suggests there is a negligible combined regional radiological impact from simultaneous operation of the three operating mines investigated as part of the present study. The mines are spaced too far apart for any superposition of emissions to be significantly greater than a small fraction of background levels. The most exposed individual not directly associated with any of the mining operations is estimated to receive a total radiation dose equal to about 3% of the dose due to natural background radiations. This increment is equivalent to the increment in natural background that would be received by an individual moving from Vancouver to Wollaston Post, before mining began in the area, as a result of reduced atmospheric shielding from cosmic radiation. Radiological impacts on biota are estimated to have insignficant effects on natural populations in all cases. However, since the study only investigates the effects of operational releases of radionuclides, the results do not imply that uranium mining developments will or will not have significant long-term radiological impact on northern Saskatchewan. Radiological impact assessments described in this report are estimates only. There are some uncertainties in the available data and modelling methodology. The radiological impact of abandoned tailings areas was not included in this study

  19. The radiological impact of the Belgian phosphate industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanmarcke, H.; Paridaens, J. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2006-07-01

    The Belgian phosphate industry processes huge amounts of phosphate ore (1.5 to 2 Mton/year) for a wide range of applications, the most important being the production of phosphoric acid, fertilizers and cattle food. Marine phosphate ores show high specific activities of the natural uranium decay series (usually indicated by Ra-226) (e.g. 1200 to 1500 Bq/kg for Moroccan ore). Ores of magmatic origin generally contain less of the uranium and more of the thorium decay series (up to 500 Bq/kg). These radionuclides turn up in by-products, residues or product streams depending on the processing method and the acid used for the acidulation of the phosphate rock. Sulfuric acid is the most widely used, but also hydrochloric acid and nitric acid are applied in Belgium. For Flanders, the northern part of Belgium, we already have a clear idea of the production processes and waste streams. The five Flemish phosphate plants, from 1920 to 2000, handled 54 million ton of phosphate ore containing 65 TBq of radium-226 and 2.7 TBq of thorium- 232. The total surface area of the phosphogypsum and calcium fluoride sludge deposits amounts to almost 300 ha. There is also environmental contamination along two small rivers receiving the waste waters of the hydrochloric production process: the Winterbeek (> 200 ha) and the Grote Laak (12 ha). The data on the impact of the phosphate industry in the Walloon provinces in Belgium is less complete. A large plant produced in 2004 0.8 Mton of phosphogypsum, valorizing about 70 % of the gypsum in building materials (plaster, cement), in fertilizers, and in other products such as paper. The remainder was stored on a local disposal site. The radiological impact of the Belgian phosphate industry on the local population will be discussed. At present most contaminated areas are still recognizable as waste deposits and inaccessible to the population. However as gypsum deposits and other contaminated areas quickly blend in with the landscape, it is

  20. Support for biomedical research and its impact on radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, D G; Hendee, W R

    1994-12-01

    Research in medical imaging has experienced substantial growth during the past decade. Still, research is a small fraction of the budget of the typical academic radiology program. Few radiology faculty participate in hypothesis-driven research projects. Funding of research will be more difficult to secure in the future, since clinical subsidies will diminish or disappear, support from industry is decreasing, and funds from private foundations and philanthropists are not likely to increase. Support from the NIH will probably remain about level in constant dollars. In response to these constraints, radiology will have to be both more creative and more opportunistic to tap the limited remaining resources of research support. An excellent compilation of some major resources was recently published by Williams and Holden (9). Efforts of the Conjoint Committee will continue to be critical for continuing support of the LDRR, encouraging the allocation of intramural and extramural resources of the NCI to medical imaging, guiding the development of the American Academy of Radiologic Research, providing research training opportunities for physicians and scientists in radiology, and leading the research effort in medical imaging in general (10). Within individual institutions and departments, imaging research must continue to be acknowledged as a priority despite increasing pressures to generate clinical revenue. Enhanced efforts are warranted to nurture the research interests of younger faculty and selected residents and fellows, including pairing them with research mentors and providing them with opportunities to develop skills in areas such as research design, statistical analysis, and evaluative techniques. The long-term well-being of radiology and its important contributions to patient care are dependent on its continued investment in research and development.

  1. The quality and impact of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in radiology case-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V; Verstraete, Koenraad L; Valcke, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this research was to explore (1) clinical years students' perceptions about radiology case-based learning within a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) setting, (2) an analysis of the collaborative learning process, and (3) the learning impact of collaborative work on the radiology cases. The first part of this study focuses on a more detailed analysis of a survey study about CSCL based case-based learning, set up in the context of a broader radiology curriculum innovation. The second part centers on a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 52 online collaborative learning discussions from 5th year and nearly graduating medical students. The collaborative work was based on 26 radiology cases regarding musculoskeletal radiology. The analysis of perceptions about collaborative learning on radiology cases reflects a rather neutral attitude that also does not differ significantly in students of different grade levels. Less advanced students are more positive about CSCL as compared to last year students. Outcome evaluation shows a significantly higher level of accuracy in identification of radiology key structures and in radiology diagnosis as well as in linking the radiological signs with available clinical information in nearly graduated students. No significant differences between different grade levels were found in accuracy of using medical terminology. Students appreciate computer supported collaborative learning settings when tackling radiology case-based learning. Scripted computer supported collaborative learning groups proved to be useful for both 5th and 7th year students in view of developing components of their radiology diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anticipated affect and behavioral choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, R.; van der Pligt, J.; de Vries, N.K.

    1996-01-01

    Most research on the impact of affect on attitudes and behavior emphasizes the effect of past and present affective reactions. In this article we focus on anticipated, postbehavioral, affective reactions. The influence of anticipated affective reactions on a number of behaviors was investigated in

  3. Hypothetical influence of non-indexed Spanish journals on the impact factor of radiological journals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miguel-Dasit, Alberto; Aleixandre, Rafael; Valderrama, Juan C.; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Sanfeliu, Pilar

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the hypothetical changes in the 2001 impact factor of 52 radiological journals included in the Science Citation Index-Journal Citation Reports by also counting cites proceeding from 73 Spanish journals on different medical specialties. Also, to estimate the possible impact factor of the official Spanish radiology journal, Radiologia, not included in this database. Materials and methods: A modified 2001 impact factor of 52 radiological journals and Radiologia was obtained by adding the number of cites in 1999 and 2000 from the medical Spanish journals. Data were obtained by consulting the 2001 edition of the Journal Citation Reports in the 'Web of Science' database. Results: The 16,985 bibliographical references were analysed (232 of them to radiological journals). The journal with the largest increase in its 2001 impact factor (from 1.83 to 1.90) was Radiologic Clinics of North America. European Journal of Radiology was the European journal with the highest increase (from 1.084 to 1.110) in the difference between the 2001 modified and original impact factor. The modified 2001 impact factor of the 34 American journals was statistically higher (P = 0.016) than that of the 18 European journals (1.64 versus 0.93). Differences between the 2001 modified and original impact factor were slightly higher in the American journals (no statistically significant difference). The 2001 impact factor of Radiologia was 0.056. Discussion: Differences between the 2001 original and modified impact factor were small, but larger in the American journals. The 2001 impact factor of Radiologia was modest, although similar to other publications included in the Journal Citation Reports

  4. The Impact of a Combined Cognitive-Affective Intervention on Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes, Knowledge, and Anticipated Professional Behaviors regarding Homosexuality and Gay and Lesbian Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Angela D.; Rosenthal, Amy R.; Smith-Bonahue, Tina

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a cognitive-affective intervention the attitudes, knowledge, and anticipated professional behaviors regarding homosexuality and gay and lesbian issues of pre-service teachers in the United States. Sixty-seven participants were randomly assigned either to a control group (n=34) or an…

  5. Critical review of methodology and application of risk ranking for prioritisation of food and feed related issues, on the basis of the size of anticipated health impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Asselt, van E.D.; Raley, M.; Poulsen, M.; Korsgaard, H.; Bredsdorff, L.; Nauta, M.; Flari, V.; Agostino, D' M.; Coles, D.G.; Frewer, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to critically review methodologies for ranking of risks related to feed/food safety and nutritional hazards, on the basis of their anticipated human health impact. An extensive systematic literature review was performed to identify and characterize the available methodologies for

  6. Relativity Screens for Misvalued Medical Services: Impact on Noninvasive Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Silva, Ezequiel; Hawkins, C Matthew

    2017-11-01

    In 2006, the AMA/Specialty Society Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC) introduced ongoing relativity screens to identify potentially misvalued medical services for payment adjustments. We assess the impact of these screens upon the valuation of noninvasive diagnostic radiology services. Data regarding relativity screens and relative value unit (RVU) changes were obtained from the 2016 AMA Relativity Assessment Status Report. All global codes in the 2016 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule with associated work RVUs were classified as noninvasive diagnostic radiology services versus remaining services. The frequency of having ever undergone a screen was compared between the two groups. Screened radiology codes were further evaluated regarding the RVU impact of subsequent revaluation. Of noninvasive diagnostic radiology codes, 46.0% (201 of 437) were screened versus 22.2% (1,460 of 6,575) of remaining codes (P < .001). Most common screens for which radiology codes were identified as potentially misvalued were (1) high expenditures (27.5%) and (2) high utilization (25.6%). The modality and body region most likely to be identified in a screen were CT (82.1%) and breast (90.9%), respectively. Among screened radiology codes, work RVUs, practice expense RVUs, and nonfacility total RVUs decreased in 20.3%, 65.9%, and 75.3%, respectively. All screened CT, MRI, brain, and spine codes exhibited decreased total RVUs. Policymakers' ongoing search for potentially misvalued medical services has disproportionately impacted noninvasive diagnostic radiology services, risking the introduction of unintended or artificial shifts in physician practice. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anticipated regret and precautionary sexual behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, R.; de Vries, N.K.; van der Pligt, J.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of anticipated regret on precautionary sexual behavior. 317 female and 134 male 18-48 yr old college students completed questionnaires assessing behavioral expectations regarding casual sexual behavior, anticipated regret, perceived behavioral control, attitudes,

  8. Comparative Study on Radiological Impact Due To Direct Exposure to a Radiological Dispersal Device Using A Sealed Radiation Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, one of the most serious terrorist threats implies radiological dispersal devices (RDDs), the so-called dirty bombs, that combine a conventional explosive surrounded by an inflammatory material (like thermit) with radioactive material. The paper objective is to evaluate the radiological impact due to direct exposure to a RDD using a sealed radiation source (used for medical and industrial applications) as radioactive material. The simulations were performed for 60Co, 137Cs and 192Ir radiation sources. In order to model the contamination potential level and radiation exposure due to radioactive material spreading from RDD, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's HOTSPOT 2.07 computer code was used. The worst case scenario has been considered, calculations being performed for two radioactive material dispersion models, namely General radioactive Plume and General Explosion. Following parameters evolution with distance from the radiation source was investigated: total effective dose equivalent, time-integrated air concentration, ground surface deposition and ground shine dose rates. Comparisons between considered radiation sources and radioactive material dispersion models have been performed. The most drastic effects on population and the environment characterize 60Co sealed radiation source use in RDD.

  9. Radiological impact assessment of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.

    2000-02-01

    This thesis presents improved methods for predicting and assessing the dose to humans resulting from uranium mining and milling operations with the primary focus being on the local and regional component of dose to members of the public. Throughout, examples are presented from operating (Ranger) and rehabilitated (Nabarlek) uranium mine in the tropical Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Four major pathways are examined with relation to the Ranger mine dispersion of radionuclides in creek waters with uptake into the food chain, dispersion of radionuclides in groundwater, atmospheric transport of radon and radon progeny, and wet and dry deposition of activity on airborne dust. An improved model has been developed for the prediction of dose following release of wastewaters from Ranger into the Magela Creek system. The available data on radionuclide uptake into organism of the creek system were reviewed for incorporation into the model. Calculations using the model indicate that the most important organism for radiological impact are freshwater mussels, followed by fish. The behaviour of U, Ra, Th and Ac in the groundwater system in the vicinity of the Ranger tailings dam has been investigated using alpha- and gamma-spectrometry techniques. Ra, U and Ac isotope concentrations have increased with time in some bores, but this is shown in the case of Ra to be due to removal of native Ra from the aquifer rocks by increasing cation concentrations. Formation of barite is also occurring in the vicinity of some bores, leading to a removal of some Ra from solution. The situation with U is less clear. U-234/U-238 ratios have decreased with increasing U-238 concentrations in a number of bores, but generally remain above the tailings dam water value of 1.00. The most likely explanation is that the increasing size of mine structures such as waste rock dumps and ore stockpile has led to a change in conditions in the aquifer such that U ha become

  10. Environmental radiological impact of some Portuguese uranium mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvao, J.P.; Bettencourt, A.O.; Teixeira, M.M.G.R.; Elias, M.D.T.

    1988-01-01

    An environmental radiological surveillance programme has been in progress around the most significant Portuguese uranium mines, from 1976 to 1983. A short description is given of the mines of Urgeirica (including uranium milling), Freixiosa, Pinhal de Souto and Bica. The results of the surveillance programme developed in the vicinity of these facilities are presented and the identified critical pathways are discussed. One of these pathways is the consumption of cabbage, which is an important component in the diet of the Portuguese population. The exposure of the critical groups, due to the intake of /sup 226/Ra through the diet, calculated from the results of this monitoring programme, range from 0.02 to 1.5 mSv.y/sup -1/ for the different mines under study. (author).

  11. Living with a concealable stigmatized identity: the impact of anticipated stigma, centrality, salience, and cultural stigma on psychological distress and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Diane M; Chaudoir, Stephenie R

    2009-10-01

    The current research provides a framework for understanding how concealable stigmatized identities impact people's psychological well-being and health. The authors hypothesize that increased anticipated stigma, greater centrality of the stigmatized identity to the self, increased salience of the identity, and possession of a stigma that is more strongly culturally devalued all predict heightened psychological distress. In Study 1, the hypotheses were supported with a sample of 300 participants who possessed 13 different concealable stigmatized identities. Analyses comparing people with an associative stigma to those with a personal stigma showed that people with an associative stigma report less distress and that this difference is fully mediated by decreased anticipated stigma, centrality, and salience. Study 2 sought to replicate the findings of Study 1 with a sample of 235 participants possessing concealable stigmatized identities and to extend the model to predicting health outcomes. Structural equation modeling showed that anticipated stigma and cultural stigma were directly related to self-reported health outcomes. Discussion centers on understanding the implications of intraindividual processes (anticipated stigma, identity centrality, and identity salience) and an external process (cultural devaluation of stigmatized identities) for mental and physical health among people living with a concealable stigmatized identity. 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Living With a Concealable Stigmatized Identity: The Impact of Anticipated Stigma, Centrality, Salience, and Cultural Stigma on Psychological Distress and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, Diane M.; Chaudoir, Stephenie R.

    2009-01-01

    The current research provides a framework for understanding how concealable stigmatized identities impact people's psychological well-being and health. The authors hypothesize that increased anticipated stigma, greater centrality of the stigmatized identity to the self, increased salience of the identity, and possession of a stigma that is more strongly culturally devalued all predict heightened psychological distress. In Study 1, the hypotheses were supported with a sample of 300 participant...

  13. Radiological impact of commercial nuclear power plant releases in the United States: a 12-year study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Jason T.; Miller, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants release gaseous and liquid radiological effluents as a byproduct of electrical generation. These releases are monitored by agencies to ensure compliance of regulatory limits. Although these federal entities track effluent releases, they do not currently compile or analyze the entire industry data. Because of this, international organizations, like the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), have not had a reliable source of U.S. effluent data for the last several years. These organizations require the data for evaluating trends and determining population dose. A comprehensive evaluation and analysis of U.S. commercial nuclear power radiological effluents and radiological environmental monitoring programs was conducted for the 12 year period of 1995-2006. Effluent activities were compiled and analyzed and trends were identified using the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test to show long-term U.S. nuclear industry effluent release patterns. Using UNSCEAR and U.S. NRC dose methodologies, the average collective effective doses and doses to maximally exposed individuals were calculated. Summary data from every plant's radiological environmental monitoring programs were studied to identify the impact of radiological releases. Results of this portion of the research led to an on-site evaluation at one nuclear power plant. The research showed that the entire industry effluent releases have mostly remained level over the study period. Both collective effective doses and doses to maximally exposed individuals were well below regulatory limits. Analysis of the radiological environmental monitoring programs demonstrated that overall, the routine operation of all facilities had no significant or measurable radiological impact to the environment or human health for the study time period. (author)

  14. The Impact Factor of Radiological Journals: Associations with Journal Content and Other Characteristics Over a Recent 12-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Ayoola, Abimbola

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the trends in the impact factor (IF) of radiological journals over a recent 12-year period, including associations between IF and journal topic. Journal Citation Reports (JCR) was used to identify all biomedical journals and all radiological journals (assigned a JCR category of "Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, & Medical Imaging"), along with journal IF, in 2003 and 2014. Radiological journals were manually classified by topic. Trends in median IF (mIF) were assessed. The number of radiological journals increased from 83 (2003) to 125 (2014) (all biomedical journals: 5907 to 8718, respectively). mIF of radiological journals increased from 1.42 (2003) to 1.75 (2014) (all biomedical journals: 0.93 to 1.46, respectively). The most common topic among new radiological journals was general (nonspecialized) radiology (8). Five new radiological journals in 2014 were in topics (cancer imaging and molecular imaging) having no journals in 2003. mIF of general radiological journals was 1.49. Topics having highest mIF were cardiac imaging (2.94), optics (2.86), molecular imaging (2.77), radiation oncology (2.60), and neuroradiology (2.25). Topics with lowest mIF were ultrasound (1.19) and interventional radiology (1.44). Topics with the largest increase in mIF were cardiac imaging (from 1.17 to 2.94) and neuroradiology (from 1.07 to 2.25). Radiological journals exhibited higher mIF than biomedical journals overall. Among radiological journals, subspecialty journals had highest mIF. While a considerable number of new radiological journals since 2003 were general radiology journals having relatively low IF, there were also new journal topics representing emerging areas of subspecialized radiological research. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiological impact of high activity wastes disposal in a granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.A.; Palacios, E.

    1987-01-01

    This work analyzes, by a simplified model, the radiological impact due to radioactive wastes release when engineering and geologic barriers individually fail. Doses are calculated resulting from the individuals of a hypothetical critical group and the potential collective dosis for each one of the considered situations. (Author) [es

  16. Assessment of the radiological impact of the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    In order to facilitate the assessment of the radiological impact of transport, and to guide the collection of data for future assessments, the IAEA convened a technical committee (The Technical Committee on the Assessment of the Radiological Impact from the Transport of Radioactive Materials; TC-556) in Vienna, Austria on 21-25 October 1985. The Terms of Reference called for this committee ''to collect and assess data on the radiation exposure of workers and the public during the transport of radioactive material, and to develop a summary statement, reflecting current practice and current state of knowledge, on the radiological impact of transport.'' This technical document provides the summary statement developed by TC-556. The statement should be viewed as an interim assessment since it utilized only data then available, or made available, to the committee. This document consists of three Sections: Section I - Background Information to the Summary Statement (prepared by the Secretariat); Section II - The Summary Statement on the Radiological Impact of the Transport of Radioactive Materials (developed by TC-556); and Section III - Recommendations for Future Assessments (a summary of statements and conclusions provided in the TC-556 Chairman's Report)

  17. Study on the radiological Impact of Coal Fired Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, D.; Robles, B.; Mora, J. C.; Baeza, A.; Corbacho, J. A.; Vasco, J.; Guillen, J.

    2008-01-01

    The study is part of the goal set forth in Title VII of the European Basic Safety Standards and the Spanish regulations on radiation protection related to work activities that may involve a significant increase in exposure of workers and the public to natural radiation. Coal contains small quantities of radionuclides in the series of uranium, thorium and potassium which in the industrial process can lead to radiological exposure. This work presents the measurements and evaluations conducted in one of the power plants object of study: The Unidad Termica de Produccion de Litoral in the Almeria Province. The maximum dose assessed for workers are in the order of 0.14 mSv per year and in the order of 0.05 mSv per year for the public in the realistic scenarios considered. These values are well below the 1mSv per year reference levels, recommended in Europe to have some interest from the radiation protection point of view. (Author) 52 refs

  18. Radiologic Management Of Impacted Coin In The Oesophagus – A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Long standing foreign body impaction with weight loss, consolidated lungs and failure to thrive are documented presentations of FB in the oesophagus5. We present a case of a 20 year old male who inadvertently swallowed a coin which got impacted at the thoracic inlet – one of the conventional areas of constriction.

  19. The radiological impact of actinides discharged to the Irish Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.J.; Smith, B.D. [CEFAS Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk (United Kingdom)

    1999-08-01

    This paper describes the radiological effects of releases of actinides to the Irish Sea from Sellafield, the major source. Exposure pathways to man since the commencement of discharges in 1952 are reviewed; the importance of actinides began to increase with increased discharges in the 1970s. With the demise of the porphyra/laverbread pathway due to transport difficulties, the pathway due to fish and shellfish consumption became critical, particularly for actinides through molluscan shellfish. A reassessment on the current basis of effective dose shows that peak exposures to the critical group of about 2 mSv yr{sup -1} were received in the mid-1970s, about 30% of which was due to actinides. Effective doses have since reduced but the relative importance of actinides is greater, due to the interplay of discharges of radionuclides from Sellafield and their behaviour in the environment. Additive doses through sea food due to releases of natural radionuclides from the Marchon phosphate plant at Whitehaven are also considered, although the actinide component from this source has been small. Exposures due to actinides from Sellafield via other pathways are shown to be much lower than those involving sea food. Collective doses are also considered; these peaked at about 300 man-Sv to the European population (including the UK) in 1979, with only a few percent due to actinides. As in the case of critical group doses, the relative importance of actinides has increased in recent years within the decreasing total collective dose. For both critical group and collective doses, therefore, the actinide component needs to be kept under review. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. The radiological impact of actinides discharged to the Irish Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.; Smith, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the radiological effects of releases of actinides to the Irish Sea from Sellafield, the major source. Exposure pathways to man since the commencement of discharges in 1952 are reviewed; the importance of actinides began to increase with increased discharges in the 1970s. With the demise of the porphyra/laverbread pathway due to transport difficulties, the pathway due to fish and shellfish consumption became critical, particularly for actinides through molluscan shellfish. A reassessment on the current basis of effective dose shows that peak exposures to the critical group of about 2 mSv yr -1 were received in the mid-1970s, about 30% of which was due to actinides. Effective doses have since reduced but the relative importance of actinides is greater, due to the interplay of discharges of radionuclides from Sellafield and their behaviour in the environment. Additive doses through sea food due to releases of natural radionuclides from the Marchon phosphate plant at Whitehaven are also considered, although the actinide component from this source has been small. Exposures due to actinides from Sellafield via other pathways are shown to be much lower than those involving sea food. Collective doses are also considered; these peaked at about 300 man-Sv to the European population (including the UK) in 1979, with only a few percent due to actinides. As in the case of critical group doses, the relative importance of actinides has increased in recent years within the decreasing total collective dose. For both critical group and collective doses, therefore, the actinide component needs to be kept under review. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Assessment of the radiological impact of intermediate level waste disposed on the seabed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobbs, S.F.; Hill, M.D.

    1982-12-01

    This report outlines the methodology to be used in radiological assessments of disposal of waste on the ocean bed and describes the set of integrated models needed for such assessments. During the period covered by the contract considerable progress was made towards developing a new, compartment-type, model for dispersion of radionuclides in the deep ocean. The basic structure of this model was defined, and the mathematical techniques to be used in calculating the water flow rates between compartments were identified. Calculations of these flow rates are about to begin. When further progress has been made on the deep ocean model, more effort will be devoted to the other two models which are seen to be of high priority. These are the waste package model and the sedimentation model. It is anticipated that a first set of integrated models will be available for use in 1983, and will be refined thereafter. (author)

  2. Radiological and related Chemical Health Impact Assessments of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ogunjo Samuel

    concentrations obtained and the relation from United State Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the chemical health impact such as life average daily dose (LADD) ... about 1,386 million cubic kilometers [1]. Only 3 percent of the world's .... Using Equation 2, the elemental concentrations in pipe born water samples ...

  3. The radiological impact on the Greater London population of postulated accidental releases from the Sizewell PWR

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N; Charles, D; Hemming, C R

    1983-01-01

    This report contains an assessment of the radiological impact on the Greater London population of postulated accidental releases from the Sizewell PWR. Three of the degraded core accident releases postulated by the CEGB are analysed. The consequences, conditional upon each release, are evaluated in terms of the health impact on the exposed population and the impact of countermeasures taken to limit the exposure. Consideration is given to the risk to the Greater London population as a whole and to individuals within it. The consequences are evaluated using the NRPB code MARC (Methodology for Assessing Radiological Consequences). The results presented in this report are all conditional upon the occurrence of each release. In assessing the significance of the results, due account must be taken of the frequency with which such releases may be predicted to occur.

  4. The psychological impact of the radiological accident in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, A.B. de.

    1988-01-01

    This work describes the psychological impact of an accident caused by the violation of a capsule containing Cesium 137 in the city of Goiania, Goias, Brazil, in September of 1987. Its object is to confirm the importance of having mental health teams working, not only with accident victims, but also side by side with the rescue teams in the event of radiation accidents. (author) [pt

  5. Non-radiological impacts of transporting radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.K.; Wilmot, E.L.; Luna, R.E.

    1982-02-01

    Estimates of health effects that result from exposure to air pollutants generated during normal (accident-free) transport of radioactive materials and from accidents are provided for use in preparation of environmental impact statements. The results are presented for truck and rail modes and uncertainties associated with these results are discussed. Since these health effects have no relation to the radioactive material being hauled, their measure is applicable to shipments of all similar weight loads. The pollutant health effects are calculated for and applicable to urban areas only while the accident health effects are averages over all population zones in the US

  6. Radiological impact assessment on non-human species from the radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Castillo, Reinaldo; Peralta Vital, Jose L.; Leiva Bombuse, Dennys

    2008-01-01

    The paper shows the use of a methodology in order to carry out the radiological impact assessment in non-human species (animals and plants) from a planned radioactive waste disposal facility. The application of modelling tools to simulate the behaviour (release and transport) of the radionuclides through the engineered barriers and the geosphere, and its final access to the soil and a river are described too. To evaluate the compliance with the adopted biota dose limits, were used the calculated maximum radionuclide concentrations for different environmental compartments (water, soil and sediment). Preliminary, the results showed that the Radiological Biota impacts are acceptable according to the adopted criteria (Radionuclides concentrations below the Biota Concentration Guides). The results showed that according theirs impact the more important radionuclides were: 241 Am/ 226 Ra/ 137 Cs/ 60 Co. The Riparian animals were the more exposed Biota organism. The results support the decision making process since could be identified the relevant radiological impact in the environment (plants and animals) near to a disposal facility (real or planned). Also the paper identified methodological tools useful to evaluate the site acceptance, for the early stages of disposal facilities (site selection process, licensing, etc), in absence of real data of radionuclides concentrations in the environment. (author)

  7. Below Regulatory Conern Owners Group: Radiologic impact of accidents and unexpected events from disposal of BRC waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.A.; Dolan, M.M.; Rish, W.R.; Rossi, A.J.; McCourt, J.E.

    1989-07-01

    This report determines the radiological impact of accidents and unexpected events in the disposal of Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) waste. The accident analysis considers the transportation, incineration, and disposal of BRC waste as municipal solid waste. The potential greatest radiological impact for each type of accident is identified through the use of event trees. These accident events are described in terms of the generic waste property(ies) (e.g., flammability, dispersibility, leachability, and solubility) that cause the greatest radiological impact. 7 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs

  8. Impact on Quality When Pediatric Urgent Care Centers Are Staffed With Radiology Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, J Herman; Orth, Robert C; Yen, Terry A; Schallert, Erica K; Zhang, Wei; Donnelly, Lane F

    2018-02-02

    The proliferation of pediatric urgent care centers has increased the need for diagnostic imaging support, but the impact of employing radiology technologists at these centers is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiographic impact and quality at urgent care centers with and without radiology technologists. A retrospective case-control study was conducted comparing 235 radiographic examinations (study) performed without and 83 examinations (control) performed with a radiology technologist at the authors' pediatric urgent care centers. Studies were evaluated for quality using a five-point, Likert-type scale (1 = poor, 5 = best) regarding field of view, presentation, and orthogonal view orientation. Studies were also evaluated for the incidence of positive results, need for repeat imaging, and discrepancies between initial study and follow-up. Imaging quality comparisons between study and control groups were statistically different for field of view (3.98 versus 4.29, P = .014), presentation (4.39 versus 4.51, P = .045), and orthogonal view orientation (4.45 versus 4.69, P = .033). The incidence of repeat imaging was similar (4.7% versus 2.4%, P = 0.526), as well as the discrepancy rates (3.4 versus 2.4%, P = 1.00). The incidence of abnormal radiographic findings for the study and control groups was similar (40.9% versus 34.9%, P = .363). Radiography is an important triage tool at pediatric urgent care centers. It is imperative to have optimal radiographic imaging for accurate diagnosis, and imaging quality is improved when radiology technologists are available. If not feasible or cost prohibitive, it is important that physicians be given training opportunities to bridge the quality gap when using radiographic equipment and exposing children to radiation. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Measuring and modelling the radiological impact of a phosphogypsum deposition site on the surrounding environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bituh, Tomislav; Petrinec, Branko; Skoko, Božena; Vučić, Zlatko; Marović, Gordana

    2015-03-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a waste product (residue) from the production of phosphoric acid characterized by technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. Croatia's largest PG deposition site is situated at the edge of Lonjsko Polje Nature Park, a sensitive ecosystem possibly endangered by PG particles. This field study investigates two aspects relevant for the general radiological impact of PG: risk assessment for the environment and risk assessment for occupationally exposed workers and local inhabitants. Activity concentrations of natural radionuclides ((238)U, (235)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, and (40)K) were measured in the PG (at the deposition site), soil, and grass samples (in the vicinity of the site). The ERICA Assessment Tool was used to estimate the radiological impact of PG particles on non-human biota of the Lonjsko Polje Nature Park. The average annual effective dose for occupationally exposed workers was 0.4 mSv which was within the worldwide range.

  10. The differential radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the light-water reactor fuel cycle: effluent discharges during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouville, A.; Guetat, P.; Jones, J.A.; Kelly, G.N.; Legrand, J.; White, I.F.

    1980-01-01

    The radiological impact of a light-water reactor fuel cycle utilizing enriched uranium fuel may be altered by the recycle of plutonium. Differences in impact may arise during various operations in the fuel cycle: those which arise from effluents discharged during normal operation of the various installations comprising the fuel cycle are evaluated in this study. The differential radiological impact on the population of the European Communities (EC) of effluents discharged during the recycling of 10 tonnes of fissile plutonium metal is evaluated. The contributions from each stage of the fuel cycle, i.e. fuel fabrication, reactor operation and fuel reprocessing and conversion, are identified. Separate consideration is given to airborne and liquid effluents and account is taken of a wide range of environmental conditions, representative of the EC, in estimating the radiological impact. The recycle of plutonium is estimated to result in a reduction in the radiological impact from effluents of about 30% of that when using enriched uranium fuel

  11. The radiological impact of the normal rail transport of radioactive materials in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mairs, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Recently the NRPB, under contract to the Health and Safety Executive, and in association with the British Railways Board, has assessed the radiological impact of consignments transported on the British Rail system. The work has shown the radiation exposure of British Rail staff and of the public to be low. This paper identifies the types of radioactive materials transported by rail, outlines the methods used to assess the doses to persons exposed and presents the results of these assessments. (author)

  12. Multidisciplinary team meetings and their impact on workflow in radiology and pathology departments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2007-01-01

    The development of multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs) for radiology and pathology is a burgeoning area that increasingly impacts on work processes in both of these departments. The aim of this study was to examine work processes and quantify the time demands on radiologists and pathologists associated with MDTM practices at a large teaching hospital. The observations reported in this paper reflect a general trend affecting hospitals and our conclusions will have relevance for others implementing clinical practice guidelines.

  13. Integrated assessment of the phosphate industry. [Radiological impact of uranium extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, M.T.; Cotter, S.J.

    1980-05-01

    The phosphate industry in the United States includes three major activities, namely, mining and milling of phosphate rock, phosphate product manufacture, and phosphate product use. Phosphatic materials contain uranium, thorium, and their decay products in greater than background amounts. This assessment of the radiological impacts associated with the redistribution of radioactive components of phosphate materials may provide insight into the effects of uranium extraction from phosphate materials for use in the nuclear fuel cycle.

  14. Radiological impact due to natural radionuclides (U and Th-isotopes) in soils from Salamanca, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandujano G, C. D.; Sosa, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Loma del Bosque 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Mantero, J.; Manjon, G.; Garcia T, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Grupo en Fisica Nuclear Aplicada, Av. Reina Mercedes No. 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Costilla, R., E-mail: cmandujano@fisica.ugto.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias de la Vida, Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales, Ex-Hacienda El Copal Km 9 Irapuato-Silao, 36500 Irapuato, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Activity concentrations of U ({sup 238}U, {sup 234}U) and Th ({sup 232}Th, {sup 230}Th) radionuclides in samples of superficial urban soils surrounding an industrial complex in Salamanca, Mexico have been determined. Levels of naturally occurring radionuclides (Norm) in the environment may be affected due to the presence of different industrial activities in this zone, representing a potential radiological risk for the population which should be evaluated. Alpha-particle Spectrometry with Pips detectors has been used for the radiometric characterization. A well established radiochemical procedure was used for the isolation of the radionuclides of interest. Alkali fusion for sample digestion, liquid-liquid extraction with Tbp (tri-butyl-phosphate) for U and Th isolation and electrodeposition in stainless steel dishes for measurement conditioning has been used. The results cover the ranges of 10-42, 12-60, 12-52 and 11-51 Bq·kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th respectively, being not observed any clear anthropogenic increments in relation with the values normally found in unaffected soils. Although there is disequilibrium between U isotopes and {sup 230}Th in some soil samples, it can be attributed to natural processes. The radiological impact of the industrial activities in the surrounding soils can be then evaluated as very low. Hence, from the Radiological Protection point of view, the soils studied do not represent a radiological risk for the health of the population. (Author)

  15. Impact of Anticipated Bias from Healthcare Professionals on Perceived Successful Aging Among Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ruth V; Powers, Sara M; Witten, Tarynn M

    2017-12-01

    Transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) persons have routinely experienced high rates of violence and discrimination. Discrimination in healthcare can affect the ability of TGNC persons to age successfully as it often deters them from seeking care. The purpose of this study was to determine if anticipation of bias from healthcare professionals, as well as other variables, predicted perceived successful aging in a sample of TGNC adults. A total of 384 (of the original 1963) participants older than 50 years completed the relevant parts of an 83-item online survey as part of the Trans MetLife Survey on Later-Life Preparedness and Perceptions in Transgender-Identified Individuals. Larger social support networks and higher levels of confidence that a healthcare professional will treat them with dignity and respect as a TGNC person at the end of their life were associated with increased odds of perceiving that they were aging successfully. With high rates of discrimination and prejudice toward TGNC persons in various contexts (e.g., healthcare, education, and housing), it is imperative that practitioners, researchers, policymakers, and institutions work together to eradicate healthcare disparities, promote social change, and support an environment that encourages successful aging. This calls for a coordinated, proactive outreach effort to put trust back into a system that has historically let down an entire subset of the population.

  16. Selection of nuclide decay chains for use in the assessment of the radiological impact of geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, M.C.

    1982-12-01

    The criteria for selecting nuclide decay chains for use in the assessment of the radiological impact of geological repositories for radioactive waste are given. The reduced chains recommended for use with SYVAC are described. (author)

  17. Radiological assessment of depleted uranium impact locations in Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.; Brown, R.

    2006-01-01

    Although the monitoring that could be carried out during this brief reconnaissance was neither entirely systematic nor completely representative of overall environmental conditions, it is interesting to compare the activity concentrations of D.U. (depleted uranium) found in this work with what would be considered benchmark quantities. This has been done in some of the following sections, but it must be recognised that the data is not of the quality needed for robust generalised statements about D.U. contamination or any possible health consequences. D.U. mainly consists of 238 U, 235 U and 234 U. All of these isotopes have different radioactive decay characteristics and therefore different dose per unit intake factors. However, for dose assessment purposes, it can easily be shown that the assumption that D.U. is composed entirely of 238 U will result in an insignificant error in estimating the likely magnitude of any radiation dose. For example, for the limiting (i.e. highest) dose per unit intake factors given in ICRP 72 [2] for each isotope, this assumption gives rise to differences of about 1% and 10% for inhalation and ingestion respectively. This approximation has been used in the following discussions. 7.2 General observations Four D.U. contaminated tanks and one anti-aircraft gun were located and surveyed during the reconnaissance, together with two areas of contaminated land. There were also visual indications of D.U. impacts on two other tanks and an armored personnel carrier, but time constraints and hazards from unstable structures and unexploded ordnance prevented investigation of these vehicles. The most surprising finding was that there was relatively little loose contamination on or in the tanks. A more detailed interpretation of the results follows. 7.3 Smear samples All smears were subject to α and β counting and the results of the α counting converted to an equivalent removable surface contamination level, expressed in terms of Bq cm -2 , by

  18. Radiological assessment of depleted uranium impact locations in Iraq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.; Brown, R. [Dstl Environmental Sciences Dept., Crescent Road, Alverstoke, Gosport, Hants PO12 2DL (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Although the monitoring that could be carried out during this brief reconnaissance was neither entirely systematic nor completely representative of overall environmental conditions, it is interesting to compare the activity concentrations of D.U. (depleted uranium) found in this work with what would be considered benchmark quantities. This has been done in some of the following sections, but it must be recognised that the data is not of the quality needed for robust generalised statements about D.U. contamination or any possible health consequences. D.U. mainly consists of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 234}U. All of these isotopes have different radioactive decay characteristics and therefore different dose per unit intake factors. However, for dose assessment purposes, it can easily be shown that the assumption that D.U. is composed entirely of {sup 238}U will result in an insignificant error in estimating the likely magnitude of any radiation dose. For example, for the limiting (i.e. highest) dose per unit intake factors given in ICRP 72 [2] for each isotope, this assumption gives rise to differences of about 1% and 10% for inhalation and ingestion respectively. This approximation has been used in the following discussions. 7.2 General observations Four D.U. contaminated tanks and one anti-aircraft gun were located and surveyed during the reconnaissance, together with two areas of contaminated land. There were also visual indications of D.U. impacts on two other tanks and an armored personnel carrier, but time constraints and hazards from unstable structures and unexploded ordnance prevented investigation of these vehicles. The most surprising finding was that there was relatively little loose contamination on or in the tanks. A more detailed interpretation of the results follows. 7.3 Smear samples All smears were subject to {alpha} and {beta} counting and the results of the {alpha} counting converted to an equivalent removable surface contamination level

  19. Monitoring techniques for the impact assessment during nuclear and radiological emergencies: current status and the challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2003-01-01

    Preparedness and response capability for Nuclear and Radiological emergencies, existing world over, are mainly based on the requirement of responding to radiation emergency caused by nuclear or radiological accidents. Cosmos satellite accident, plutonium contamination at Polaris, nuclear accidents like Kystium, Windscale, TMI and Chernobyl, radiological accidents at Goiania etc have demonstrated the requirement of improved radiation monitoring techniques. For quick decision making, state of the art monitoring methodology which can support quantitative and qualitative impact assessment is essential. Evaluation of radiological mapping of the area suspected to be contaminated needs ground based as well as aerial based monitoring systems to predict the level of radioactive contamination on ground. This will help in delineating the area and deciding the required countermeasures, based on the quantity and type of radionuclides responsible for it. The response can be successful with the effective use of i) Early Warning System ii) Mobile Monitoring System and iii) Aerial Gamma Spectrometric System. Selection of the monitoring methodology and survey parameters and assessment of situation using available resources etc. are to be optimized depending on the accident scenario. Recently, many countries and agencies like IAEA have expressed the requirement for responding to other types of nuclear/radiological emergencies i.e, man made radiation emergency situations aimed at harming public at large that can also lead to environmental contamination and significant exposure to public. Reports of lost / misplaced / stolen radioactive sources from many countries are alarming as safety and security of these radioactive sources are under challenge. The monitoring methodology has to take into account of the increase in such demands and more periodic monitoring in suspected locations is to be carried out. Detection of orphan sources possible amidst large heap of metallic scraps may pose

  20. Multidisciplinary team meetings and their impact on workflow in radiology and pathology departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Briain D Sean

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs for radiology and pathology is a burgeoning area that increasingly impacts on work processes in both of these departments. The aim of this study was to examine work processes and quantify the time demands on radiologists and pathologists associated with MDTM practices at a large teaching hospital. The observations reported in this paper reflect a general trend affecting hospitals and our conclusions will have relevance for others implementing clinical practice guidelines. Methods For one month, all work related to clinical meetings between pathology and radiology with clinical staff was documented and later analysed. Results The number of meetings to which pathology and radiology contribute at a large university teaching hospital, ranges from two to eight per day, excluding grand rounds, and amounts to approximately 50 meetings per month for each department. For one month, over 300 h were spent by pathologists and radiologists on 81 meetings, where almost 1000 patients were discussed. For each meeting hour, there were, on average, 2.4 pathology hours and 2 radiology hours spent in preparation. Two to three meetings per week are conducted over a teleconferencing link. Average meeting time is 1 h. Preparation time per meeting ranges from 0.3 to 6 h for pathology, and 0.5 to 4 for radiology. The review process in preparation for meetings improves internal quality standards. Materials produced externally (for example imaging can amount to almost 50% of the material to be reviewed on a single patient. The number of meetings per month has increased by 50% over the past two years. Further increase is expected in both the numbers and duration of meetings when scheduling issues are resolved. A changing trend in the management of referred patients with the development of MDTMs and the introduction of teleconferencing was noted. Conclusion Difficulties are being experienced by

  1. MINT's experience in carrying out radiological impact assessment on NORM/TENORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Khairuddin Kontol

    1999-01-01

    NORM and TENORM are occurred naturally in low concentration in our environment and they have been there since this world came into being. However, technological development has changed the situation where excessive exploitation of natural resources has resulted in enhancement of NORM/TENORM concentration in some of the materials. In Malaysia, most of the NORM/TENORM problems are associated with tin mining, mineral sand processing and oil production activities. Previous studies indicate that as a result of these activities, the concentration of NORM in some by-products has increased (enhanced) quite significantly to a level that some of them can become hazardous to health and need to be properly control. Thus, there is a need to carry out a radiological impact assessment on any new activity to prove that the associated exposure risk is low before an approval is given. There are limited national and international regulations and guidelines available that can be used to address radiological problems associated with NORM/TENORM. However, with the necessary expertise and facilities available in MINT, such problems faced by the local industries could be overcome as has been proven in previous consultant work provided by the institute to a few companies. In this paper, MINT's experience in carrying out the consultant work on radiological impact assessment for tin slag disposal, oil sludge treatment and recycling of TENORM contaminated plant components are elaborated and shared with the audience. (Author)

  2. Alternative Metrics ("Altmetrics") for Assessing Article Impact in Popular General Radiology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Ayoola, Abimbola; Singh, Kush; Duszak, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Emerging alternative metrics leverage social media and other online platforms to provide immediate measures of biomedical articles' reach among diverse public audiences. We aimed to compare traditional citation and alternative impact metrics for articles in popular general radiology journals. All 892 original investigations published in 2013 issues of Academic Radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology, Journal of the American College of Radiology, and Radiology were included. Each article's content was classified as imaging vs nonimaging. Traditional journal citations to articles were obtained from Web of Science. Each article's Altmetric Attention Score (Altmetric), representing weighted mentions across a variety of online platforms, was obtained from Altmetric.com. Statistical assessment included the McNemar test, the Mann-Whitney test, and the Pearson correlation. Mean and median traditional citation counts were 10.7 ± 15.4 and 5 vs 3.3 ± 13.3 and 0 for Altmetric. Among all articles, 96.4% had ≥1 traditional citation vs 41.8% for Altmetric (P Facebook (10.7%), and news outlets (8.4%). Citations and Altmetric were weakly correlated (r = 0.20), with only a 25.0% overlap in terms of articles within their top 10th percentiles. Traditional citations were higher for articles with imaging vs nonimaging content (11.5 ± 16.2 vs 6.9 ± 9.8, P impact compared to traditional citation counts. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Arctic as a model for anticipating, preventing, and mitigating climate change impacts on host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Susan J; Jenkins, Emily J; Veitch, Alasdair M; Ducrocq, Julie; Polley, Lydden; Elkin, Brett; Lair, Stephane

    2009-08-07

    Climate change is influencing the structure and function of natural ecosystems around the world, including host-parasite interactions and disease emergence. Understanding the influence of climate change on infectious disease at temperate and tropical latitudes can be challenging because of numerous complicating biological, social, and political factors. Arctic and Subarctic regions may be particularly good models for unraveling the impacts of climate change on parasite ecology because they are relatively simple systems with low biological diversity and few other complicating anthropogenic factors. We examine some changing dynamics of host-parasite interactions at high latitudes and use these to illustrate a framework for approaching understanding, preventing, and mitigating climate change impacts on infectious disease, including zoonoses, in wildlife.

  4. Radiological impact of co-location of the VLLW and LILW repository at Mochovce site - 59152

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanusik, V.; Kusovska, Z.; Moravek, J.; Balaz, J.; Chren, O.

    2012-01-01

    JAVYS, the Nuclear Decommissioning Company owner and operator of National Radioactive Waste Repository (NRR) at Mochovce, is planning the enlargement of the existing NRR. The enlargement consists of the construction of new structures (double rows) like the ones existing for LILW and of the new facility for the disposal of Very Low Level Waste (VLLW). A VLLW disposal site is being planned in Mochovce where a LILW disposal site is already located. As a part of ongoing licensing process for this change in utilization of the NRR we have updated the already existing assessment of potential radiological impact to members of the public after closure of the site, both from the migration of leachate in groundwater from the site and from possible inadvertent intrusion into the site, including future residence on the material excavated for the construction of the road. The radionuclides from the ground water reach the biosphere through a spring flowing into the lake. It is conservatively assumed that individual in the critical group uses biosphere of the lake (for irrigations, fishing and recreation). In the case of unintentional intrusion into the repository, the exposed group consists of a small number of workers who excavate or examine repository materials. The assessment is based on preliminary conceptual design for VLLW module, estimation of future volumes for the different waste classes and their radiological inventories and considers some common aspects and potential interactions between both disposal systems, such as radiological criteria, critical group definition, institutional period, site environment, total activity inventory. (authors)

  5. Radiological Impacts and Regulation of Rare Earth Elements in Non-Nuclear Energy Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Ault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy industries account for a significant portion of total rare earth usage, both in the US and worldwide. Rare earth minerals are frequently collocated with naturally occurring radioactive material, imparting an occupational radiological dose during recovery. This paper explores the extent to which rare earths are used by various non-nuclear energy industries and estimates the radiological dose which can be attributed to these industries on absolute and normalized scales. It was determined that typical rare earth mining results in an occupational collective dose of approximately 0.0061 person-mSv/t rare earth elements, amounting to a total of 330 person-mSv/year across all non-nuclear energy industries (about 60% of the annual collective dose from one pressurized water reactor operated in the US, although for rare earth mining the impact is spread out over many more workers. About half of the collective dose from non-nuclear energy production results from use of fuel cracking catalysts for oil refining, although given the extent of the oil industry, it is a small dose when normalized to the energy equivalent of the oil that is used annually. Another factor in energy industries’ reliance on rare earths is the complicated state of the regulation of naturally occurring radiological materials; correspondingly, this paper also explores regulatory and management implications.

  6. Impact of the geological substrate on the radiological content of Galician waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, J J; Cortina, D; Durán, I; Sorribas, R

    2013-02-01

    Galicia (NW of Spain) is home to a highly-fractured soil rich in (238)U minerals, being the widest radon-prone area of the Iberian Peninsula. High precipitation levels confer a rich variety and abundance of both surface and groundwaters, which are extensively used for human consumption. Nevertheless, there exists no comprehensive body of information about the impact of the high environmental radioactivity on the radiological content of Galician waters. Measurements of (222)Rn, gross alpha/beta, (226, 224)Ra and (3)H activity were undertaken over a significant range of traditional springs, waters for spas and bottling plant wells. A seasonal survey was also performed for five network water suppliers to the largest Galician cities. The main outcome of this study has been the determination of statistical correlations between the water's radiological content and different environmental factors. Water measured at bottling plants reveal radiological values exceeding the U.E. limits, however this is eliminated in the industrial bottling process before reaching the consumer. Neither significant values nor seasonal variations were obtained for network waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anticipated Impact of In-Car Mobile Calls on the Electromagnetic Interaction of Handset Antenna and Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah I. Yahya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the impact of the in-car mobile call on the electromagnetic interaction of the mobile handset antenna and user’s head. This impact was evaluated from two different perspectives; First, the antenna performance, e.g., total isotropic sensitivity and total efficiency, and second, the specific absorption rate (SAR induced in the user's head. A Yee-FDTD based electromagnetic solver was used to simulate a mobile phone in hand close proximity to head at cheek and tilt positions, and working at a frequency of 1900 MHz (GSM 1900/PCS while making a call inside a car. A Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin (SAM was used to simulate the user’s head, a generic phone was used to simulate the mobile phone, a semi-realistic model with three tissues, i.e., skin, bone and muscle, was used to simulate the user’s hand, and a CAD model of Ferrari F430-brand was used to simulate the car. The results showed a considerable degradation in the mobile phone antenna performance while making a mobile phone call inside a car that may drive the mobile phone increases its radiated power to establish a successful connection with the base-station antenna, and consequently increases the induced specific absorption rate in the user’s head.

  8. Critical review of methodology and application of risk ranking for prioritisation of food and feed related issues, on the basis of the size of anticipated health impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Fels-Klerx, H. J.; van Asselt, E. D.; Raley, M.

    This study aimed to critically review methodologies for ranking of risks related to feed/food safety and nutritional hazards, on the basis of their anticipated human health impact. An extensive systematic literature review was performed to identify and characterize the available methodologies...... for risk ranking in the fields of feed and food safety and nutritional hazards, as well as the socio-economic field. Risk ranking methods from the environmental field were studied as well to determine whether approaches used in this field could also be applied for ranking human health risks related to feed...... assessment, comparative risk assessment, risk ratio method, scoring method, cost of illness, DALY/QALY, willingness to pay, multi criteria decision analysis, risk matrix, flow charts/decision trees and expert judgment methods. Based on the characteristics of the individual methods and the method categories...

  9. "Flipping" the introductory clerkship in radiology: impact on medical student performance and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Lily M; Bartolotta, Roger J; Giambrone, Ashley E; Davi, Caryn; Min, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Among methods of "blended learning" (ie, combining online modules with in-class instruction), the "flipped classroom" involves student preclass review of material while reserving class time for interactive knowledge application. We integrated blended learning methodology in a "flipped" introductory clerkship in radiology, and assessed the impact of this approach on the student educational experience (performance and perception). In preparation for the "flipped clerkship," radiology faculty and residents created e-learning modules that were uploaded to an open-source website. The clerkship's 101 rising third-year medical students were exposed to different teaching methods during the course, such as blended learning, traditional lecture learning, and independent learning. Students completed precourse and postcourse knowledge assessments and surveys. Student knowledge improved overall as a result of taking the course. Blended learning achieved greater pretest to post-test improvement of high statistical significance (P value, .0060) compared to lecture learning alone. Blended learning also achieved greater pretest to post-test improvement of borderline statistical significance (P value, .0855) in comparison to independent learning alone. The difference in effectiveness of independent learning versus lecture learning was not statistically significant (P value, .2730). Student perceptions of the online modules used in blended learning portions of the course were very positive. They specifically enjoyed the self-paced interactivity and the ability to return to the modules in the future. Blended learning can be successfully applied to the introductory clerkship in radiology. This teaching method offers educators an innovative and efficient approach to medical student education in radiology. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of h-index of Editorial Board Members and Impact Factor among Radiology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnafi, Solmaz; Gunderson, Tina; McDonald, Robert J; Kallmes, David F

    2017-02-01

    h-Index has been proposed as a useful bibliometric measure for quantifying research productivity. In this current study, we analyzed h-indices of editorial board members of Radiology journals and tested the hypothesis that editorial board members of Radiology journals with higher impact factors (IF) have higher h-indices. Sixty-two Radiology journals with IF >1 were included. Editorial board members were identified using the journals' websites. Editors' affiliations and research fields of interest were used to distinguish investigators with similar names. Bibliometric indices including number of publications, total citations, citations per publication, and h-index for each editorial board member were obtained using the Web of Science database. Chi-square or Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to test for differences in bibliographic measures or demographics between groups. Among the editorial boards of 62 journals, the median [interquartile range] board h-index was 26 [18, 31] and had 36 [17, 56] members. The median journal IF was 2.27 [1.74, 3.31]. We identified a total of 2204 distinct editors; they had a median [interquartile range] h-index of 23 [13, 35], 120 [58, 215] total publications, 1938 [682, 4634] total citations, and an average of 15.7 [9.96, 24.8] citations per publication. The boards of journals with IF above the median had significantly higher h-indices (P = .002), total publications (P = .01), and total and average citations (both any [P = .003, .009] and nonself-citations [P = .001, .002]) than journals below the median. Our data indicate that board members of Radiology journals with higher IF have greater h-indices compared to lower IF journals. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Focused process improvement events: sustainability of impact on process and performance in an academic radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Lawson, Kirk; Ally, Rosina; Chen, David; Donno, Frank; Rittberg, Steven; Rodriguez, Joan; Recht, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate sustainability of impact of rapid, focused process improvement (PI) events on process and performance within an academic radiology department. Our department conducted PI during 2011 and 2012 in CT, MRI, ultrasound, breast imaging, and research billing. PI entailed participation by all stakeholders, facilitation by the department chair, collection of baseline data, meetings during several weeks, definition of performance metrics, creation of an improvement plan, and prompt implementation. We explore common themes among PI events regarding initial impact and durability of changes. We also assess performance in each area pre-PI, immediately post-PI, and at the time of the current study. All PI events achieved an immediate improvement in performance metrics, often entailing both examination volumes and on-time performance. IT-based solutions, process standardization, and redefinition of staff responsibilities were often central in these changes, and participants consistently expressed improved internal leadership and problem-solving ability. Major environmental changes commonly occurred after PI, including a natural disaster with equipment loss, a change in location or services offered, and new enterprise-wide electronic medical record system incorporating new billing and radiology informatics systems, requiring flexibility in the PI implementation plan. Only one PI team conducted regular post-PI follow-up meetings. Sustained improvement was frequently, but not universally, observed: in the long-term following initial PI, measures of examination volume showed continued progressive improvements, whereas measures of operational efficiency remained stable or occasionally declined. Focused PI is generally effective in achieving performance improvement, although a changing environment influences the sustainability of impact. Thus, continued process evaluation and ongoing workflow modifications are warranted. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology

  12. Negative impacts of high temperatures on growth of black spruce forests intensify with the anticipated climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardin, Martin P; Hogg, Edward H; Bernier, Pierre Y; Kurz, Werner A; Guo, Xiao Jing; Cyr, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    An increasing number of studies conclude that water limitations and heat stress may hinder the capacity of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) trees, a dominant species of Canada's boreal forests, to grow and assimilate atmospheric carbon. However, there is currently no scientific consensus on the future of these forests over the next century in the context of widespread climate warming. The large spatial extent of black spruce forests across the Canadian boreal forest and associated variability in climate, demography, and site conditions pose challenges for projecting future climate change responses. Here we provide an evaluation of the impacts of climate warming and drying, as well as increasing [CO2 ], on the aboveground productivity of black spruce forests across Canada south of 60°N for the period 1971 to 2100. We use a new extensive network of tree-ring data obtained from Canada's National Forest Inventory, spatially explicit simulations of net primary productivity (NPP) and its drivers, and multivariate statistical modeling. We found that soil water availability is a significant driver of black spruce interannual variability in productivity across broad areas of the western to eastern Canadian boreal forest. Interannual variability in productivity was also found to be driven by autotrophic respiration in the warmest regions. In most regions, the impacts of soil water availability and respiration on interannual variability in productivity occurred during the phase of carbohydrate accumulation the year preceding tree-ring formation. Results from projections suggest an increase in the importance of soil water availability and respiration as limiting factors on NPP over the next century due to warming, but this response may vary to the extent that other factors such as carbon dioxide fertilization, and respiration acclimation to high temperature, contribute to dampening these limitations. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Reproduced with

  13. Radiological impact from airborne routine discharges of Coal-Fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norasalwa Zakaria; Rohyiza Baan; Kathiravale, Sivapalan

    2010-01-01

    Radioactivity exists everywhere in nature. We are exposed to intense and continuous natural radiation coming from the sun, cosmic radiation, telluric radiation and even to the internal radiation of our own body. The fly ash emitted from burning coal for electricity by a power plant carries into the surrounding environment 100 times more radiation than a nuclear power plant producing the same amount of energy. This paper presents the information of studies on the radiological impact from airborne routine discharge of coal-fired power plants. (author)

  14. Radiological impact of surface water and sediment near uranium mining sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, K; Stojanovska, Z; Badulin, V; Kunovska, B; Yovcheva, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the radiological impact of surface water and sediment around uranium mining sites 20 years after their closing. The areas under observations are 31 former classical underground uranium mining and exploratory sites in Bulgaria, named as objects. The extraction and processing of uranium ores in the Republic of Bulgaria were ended in 1992. To assess the radiological impact of radionuclides field expeditions were performed to sample water and bottom sediment. The migration of uranium through surface water was examined as one of the major pathways for contamination spread. The range of uranium concentration in water flowing from the mining sites was from 0.012 to 6.8 mgU l(-1) with a geometric mean of 0.192 mgU l(-1). The uranium concentrations in water downstream the mining sites were approximately 3 times higher than the background value (upstream). The concentrations of Unat, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, and (232)Th in the sediment of downstream river were higher than those upstream by 3.4, 2.6, 2, and 1.7 times, respectively. The distribution coefficient of uranium reflects its high mobility in most of the sites. In order to evaluate the impact on people as well as site prioritization for more detailed assessment and water management, screening dose assessments were done.

  15. Radiological impacts of spent nuclear fuel management options. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Given its potential significance for public health and the environment, the impact of radioactive releases during important steps of nuclear energy production must be considered when selecting among different fuel cycles. With this in mind, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has undertaken a comparative study to the radiological impacts of two main fuel cycle options : one with and one without reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The study compares the respective impacts of the two options based on generic models and assumptions as well as actual data. It concludes that the difference between them is not significant. A wealth of recent data assembled and evaluated by an international expert team is provided in annex. (authors)

  16. Study of anticipated impact on DOE programs from proposed reductions to the external occupational radiation exposure limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Many years of radiation exposure experience in all phases of nuclear energy applications were surveyed to evaluate the impact of reducing the present DOE limit of 5 rem/yr. Conclusions drawn are: (1) Reduction of the occupational exposure limit would result in significant increase in total accumulated exposure to the current radiation worker population and could require an increase in the work force with attending personnel and administrative problems. (2) Important programs/facilities would have to be abandoned. (3) Some engineering technology is not sufficiently developed to design or operate at the 0.5 rem/yr limit. (4) Exposure reduction to 2.5 rem/yr would significantly increase costs and would result in a small increase in total exposure to the work force. (5) Significant initial capital cost plus increased annual costs would result. (6) The major emphasis in controlling occupational exposure should be on continued work toward further reduction of total man-rem. This should involve continued development of ALAP programs along with improvements in dose measurement and recording methods, more sophisticated exposure records, and containment, handling and remote maintenance techniques. (7) Radiation protection practices at DOE facilities have maintained exposures of the bulk of the nuclear work force substantially below current limits for many years. (8) The current standards of 5 rem/yr is used only as a limit. For example, 97% of the employees receive less than 0.5 rem/yr

  17. Study of anticipated impact on DOE programs from proposed reductions to the external occupational radiation exposure limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    A study of the impact of reducing the occupational radiation exposure limit from 5 rem/yr to 2.5, 1.0 and 0.5 rem/yr, respectively produced the following conclusions: reduction of the occupational exposure limit would result in significant increase in total accumulated exposure to the current radiation worker population and could require an increase in the work force; important programs would have to be abandoned at a planned exposure limit of 0.5 rem/yr; some engineering technology is not sufficiently developed to design or operate at the 0.5 rem/yr limit; even a factor of 2 reduction (2.5 rem/yr) would significantly increase costs and would result in an increase in total exposure to the work force; in addition to a significant one-time initial capital cost resulting from a 0.5 rem/yr limit, there would be a significant increase in annual costs; the major emphasis in controlling occupational exposure should be on further reduction of total man-rem; and current standards are used only as a limit. For example, 97% of the employees receive less than 0.5 rem/yr

  18. [Clinical-radiological evaluation of the impaction allografting and cemented rod technique in revision knee surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Negreira, J; López-Cuello, P; Pipa-Muñiz, I; Rodríguez García, N; Murcia-Mazón, A; Suárez-Suárez, M A

    2016-01-01

    Long term clinical and radiological evaluation of results, survival, and peri- operative and post-operative complications of the patients who have been operated on for revision total hip arthroplasty using the impaction allografting and cemented rod technique. An observational, analytical, prospective and non-random study was conducted on 26 patients who underwent revision total hip arthroplasty in our Hospital (1997-98). They were clinically and radiologically assessed, and a survival analysis of the implant was performed. Statistically significant differences were identified in the pre- and post-operative values, according to Harris and Merle D́Aubigne scores. The femoral components survival was considered as an endpoint of the revision replacement, which was 84% at a mean of 13 years. There were 9 intraoperative complications (6 were fractures) and they significantly affected the length of hospital stay. No post-operative complications were observed in 70% of the patients. None of the analysed variables had any influence on the radiological subsidence of the femoral component. Several techniques aim to solve the bone stock deficiency in revision total hip arthroplasty, but only impaction grafting attempts to recover it. The Ling's technique shows an improvement over the Merle D́Aubigne and Harris scores, in the medium-long term. The intraoperative complications are mainly an increase in the length of hospital stay and the number of days needed to be able to sit down. Ling's technique is a good option to consider in young patients where it is foreseeable that there is a new revision surgery in the future. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Anticipation and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    In this book, practicing physicians and experts in anticipation present arguments for a new understanding of medicine. Their contributions make it clear that medicine is the decisive test for anticipation. The reader is presented with a provocative hypothesis: If medicine will align itself with the anticipatory condition of life, it can prompt the most important revolution in our time. To this end, all stakeholders—medical practitioners, patients, scientists, and technology developers—will have to engage in the conversation. The book makes the case for the transition from expensive, and only marginally effective, reactive treatment through “spare parts” (joint replacements, organ transplants) and reliance on pharmaceuticals (antibiotics, opiates) to anticipation-informed healthcare. Readers will understand why the current premise of treating various behavioral conditions (attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity, schizophrenia) through drugs has to be re-evaluated from the perspective of anticipation...

  20. NOAA's contribution to an informed society anticipating and responding to climate and its impacts through Climate.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepold, F.

    2012-12-01

    Societal concern about the impacts of climate change is growing. Citizens in public and private sectors want easy access to credible climate science information to help them make informed decisions affecting their lives and livelihoods. Weather and climate influences almost every sector of society, and affects up to 40 percent of the United States' 10 trillion annual economy. (NRC report, 2003 entitled "Satellite Observations of the Earth's Environment: Accelerating the Transition of Research to Operations"). As the leading provider of climate, weather, and water information to the nation and the world, NOAA is a logical source for citizens to turn to for climate information. NOAA must expand and improve the way it communicates, educates, reaches out to, and engages with public stakeholders to better meet the nation's needs for timely, authoritative climate data and information. Citizens are increasingly going online to seek credible, authoritative climate information. However, users report having difficulty locating and using NOAA's online data products and services. Thus, resolving this online accessibility issue will be one of the Climate Portal's main benefits. The use of portal technology and emerging data integration and visualization tools provide an opportunity for NOAA to bring together multiple datasets from diverse disciplines and sources to deliver a more comprehensive picture of climate in the context of affected resources, communities and businesses. Additional benefits include wider extension of NOAA's data to other media such as television and free-choice learning venues, thereby increasing public exposure and engagement. The Climate Portal teams take an audience-focused approach to promoting climate science literacy among the public. The program communicates the challenges, processes, and results of NOAA-supported climate science through stories and data visualizations on the Web and in popular media. They provide information to a range of

  1. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries.

  2. Estimation of the radiological impact in the use of phosphate fertilizer in citric plantations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerquera, J.T.; Prendes A, M.; Alonso J, M.T.; Perez S, D.

    1996-01-01

    The use of fertilizers in the agriculture is a potential danger of environmental contamination, because the elements contained in them could suffer an important redistribution in the environment. This is the case of radioactive elements of natural origin, like K-40 and nuclides of U and Th series, present in the ores used in the production of industrial fertilizers. Phosphoric rocks used in fertilizers contain, generally, important concentrations of radioactive elements greater than other rocks of the earth core. In Cuba, preliminary determinations of Ra-226 concentrations in phosphoric rocks reveal results in the order of 2.7 Bq/kg. These values are greater than the mean of the rest of soils of the country. Due to this fact, a study on the radiological impact of this practice was developed. The study was carried out in citric plantations of the province of Pinar del Rio, where phosphate fertilizer is widely used. Samples of different parts of the plant were taken and analyzed by means of gamma spectrometric techniques. The paper presents values for Ra-226 that are in the range 27-40 Bq/kg. These results show that the use of fertilizers does not imply a significant radiological impact. Punctual valves of transfer coefficients of Ra-226 in soil -stem-leave-peel and - juice chains were estimated. (authors). 6 refs., 4 tabs

  3. The disposal of high level radioactive waste and the need for assessing the radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, G.; Haegg, C.

    1990-01-01

    Different options for the disposal of high level radioactive waste are being considered in several different countries. When assessing the possible future impact of these disposal concepts, very large uncertainties are associated with the predictions. These uncertainties include scenario representation, conceptual and mathematical modelling, parameter evaluation and finally the interpretation of the results. Some of these uncertainties cannot be eliminated regardless of research efforts, e.g. the evolution of the society and the environment. The paper discusses in general terms to what extent uncertainties in the predictions could be reduced and in the light of this discussion the authors present their point of view regarding the fruitfulness of assessing radiological impact in the far future. (orig.)

  4. The radiological impact of radionuclides dispersed on a regional and global scale: Methods for assessment and their application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The basic features of models, developed to assess the radiological impact of radionuclides that become dispersed on a regional or global scale, have been reviewed. Particular attention has been given to identifying the important processes that need to be modelled in order to make a reliable estimate of the radiological impact, rather than attempting to judge which models are the most appropriate. Judgements on the latter will be sensitive to the particular application; in some cases a very simple approach may be sufficient, whereas in others a more rigorous analysis may be necessary. Two aspects are important in assessing the radiological impact: these are the exposure of critical groups, and the collective dose in the exposed population

  5. Anticipation across disciplines

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Never before was anticipation more relevant to the life and activity of humankind than it is today. “It is no overstatement to suggest that humanity’s future will be shaped by its capacity to anticipate….” (Research Agenda for the 21st Century, National Science Foundation). The sciences and the humanities can no longer risk explaining away the complexity and interactivity that lie at the foundation of life and living. The perspective of the world that anticipation opens justifies the descriptor “the post-Cartesian Revolution.” If anticipation is a valid research domain, what practical relevance can we await? Indeed, anticipation is more than just the latest catch-word in marketing the apps developed by the digital technology industry. Due to spectacular advances in the study of the living, anticipation can claim a legitimate place in current investigations and applications in the sciences and the humanities. Biology, genetics, medicine, as well as politics and cognitive, behavioral, and social sci...

  6. Foods Found in the Wild Around Nuclear Sites: An Evaluation of Radiological Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Wilkins, B.T.; Hammond, D.J.; Davidson, M.F.; Richmond, S.; Brooker, S.

    2001-01-01

    Habit surveys were carried out around four licensed nuclear sites to identify people who collect foodstuffs from the wild (so-called 'free foods'). In total, around 800 collectors were readily identified, most of whom collected more than one free food. The data indicated that estimates of higher than average doses could reasonably be based on the three foodstuffs of most importance. Foods were selected for further study on the basis of either the number of collectors or the amount consumed. The radionuclides of interest were identified using published information on the discharges from each site. The resultant average and higher than average doses were estimated using the site-specific habit data. For all sites, doses from the consumption of free foods were low and of no radiological importance. Assessments based solely on data for cultivated foods would not therefore have underestimated radiological impact significantly. However, given the wide utilisation of free foods found in this study, for rigorous assessments it would be prudent to take account of the consumption of foods from the wild. (author)

  7. Anticipating Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Simon

    This study reports on the extended time period prior to the introduction of the largest ever Health IT implementation in Denmark – Sundhedsplatformen. The focus of the dissertation is on organizational implications of introducing new technology and more specifically the anticipation of organizati......This study reports on the extended time period prior to the introduction of the largest ever Health IT implementation in Denmark – Sundhedsplatformen. The focus of the dissertation is on organizational implications of introducing new technology and more specifically the anticipation...

  8. Impact of Communication Errors in Radiology on Patient Care, Customer Satisfaction, and Work-Flow Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Bettina; Brook, Olga R; Hochman, Mary; Eisenberg, Ronald L

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of communication errors on patient care, customer satisfaction, and work-flow efficiency and to identify opportunities for quality improvement. We performed a search of our quality assurance database for communication errors submitted from August 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014. Cases were analyzed regarding the step in the imaging process at which the error occurred (i.e., ordering, scheduling, performance of examination, study interpretation, or result communication). The impact on patient care was graded on a 5-point scale from none (0) to catastrophic (4). The severity of impact between errors in result communication and those that occurred at all other steps was compared. Error evaluation was performed independently by two board-certified radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and kappa statistics. Three hundred eighty of 422 cases were included in the study. One hundred ninety-nine of the 380 communication errors (52.4%) occurred at steps other than result communication, including ordering (13.9%; n = 53), scheduling (4.7%; n = 18), performance of examination (30.0%; n = 114), and study interpretation (3.7%; n = 14). Result communication was the single most common step, accounting for 47.6% (181/380) of errors. There was no statistically significant difference in impact severity between errors that occurred during result communication and those that occurred at other times (p = 0.29). In 37.9% of cases (144/380), there was an impact on patient care, including 21 minor impacts (5.5%; result communication, n = 13; all other steps, n = 8), 34 moderate impacts (8.9%; result communication, n = 12; all other steps, n = 22), and 89 major impacts (23.4%; result communication, n = 45; all other steps, n = 44). In 62.1% (236/380) of cases, no impact was noted, but 52.6% (200/380) of cases had the potential for an impact. Among 380 communication errors in a radiology department, 37

  9. Application study of RESRAD program in radiological impact assessment of very low level waste landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Aihua; Huang Dan; Jia Chuanzhao; Shen Haibo; Huang Kedong

    2014-01-01

    The radiological impact assessment of release utilizing a very low level waste landfill at home was carried out by using RESRAD program. The basic principles, sub-models and calculation method of RESRAD program were outlined. The selection and processing of site-specific parameters were analyzed. Selecting resident farmer scenario, the effective dose of the resident was calculated after the landfill was open, and the critical pathway as well as the critical nuclides was analyzed further. The results show that, for this landfill the maximum effective dose per year is 0.003 mSv, 0.13% of the average global public natural background radiation dose. There is small dose contribution for radioactive nuclides with short life, but large dose contribution for the nuclides with small retardation factor and middle or long-life. For the latter, the main exposure pathway is the underwater route, and enhancing indoor ventilation is an effective way to eliminate radiation dose of radon. (authors)

  10. Radiological impact from the transport of radiopharmaceuticals of the IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Demerval Leonidas

    2009-01-01

    When a package is shipped, people who work, live or travel in the route used for transportation of radioactive materials are irradiated, as well as those who are inside vehicles that travel in the same or opposite directions. Therefore, the proposed work has as main objective to estimate the radiological impact of the transportation of radiopharmaceuticals of IPEN/CNEN-SP to some predefined destinations. The doses in individuals who are in the public streets and in vehicles that travel close to the means of transportation, along the route traveled by packages, during the transport of radiopharmaceuticals were estimated. The doses were also estimated for drivers, from both the operation of driving the vehicle, and the loading and unloading of packages, because these tasks are performed by the drivers. (author)

  11. The radiological impact of past and present practices of the mineral sands industry in Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, E.G.; Stewart, N.D.; Wallace, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the introduction of uniform Australian national Codes of Practice for radiation protection in the mining and milling of radioactive ores in the early 1980's has led to the mining and health regulatory authorities implementing the provisions of the Codes. Deficiencies involving dust and external gamma radiation levels in the mineral sands industry have led to various administrative and engineering controls being introduced to reduce the levels of radiation doses to employees well below 20 mSv/y limit. There are guidelines for screening the radioactivity of tailings released into the environment and some products for industrial use. Future activities by the regulatory authorities and industry will involve an optimisation of radiation protection, ongoing remedial programs, register of data about contaminated lands and assessments of the environmental, occupational and the public radiological impacts from downstream processing of mineral sands. The latter involves synthetic rutile, zircon flour, rare earth and refractory technologies. 7 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  12. Radiological impact during the extraction, processing and use of phosphate minerals in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerquera, Juan T.; Prendes Alonso, Miguel; Ramos Biltres, Odalys

    2008-01-01

    The use of phosphates for the production of fertilisers is a practice broadly diffused in the world. Their wide use is associated to the contribution of this material to formulation of Nk fertilisers. It is known in turn that phosphates have in their composition appreciable quantities of radioactive elements of natural origin. For this reason the use of phosphates in the composition of fertilizers can cause a radiological impact to both workers and public during all the phases of extraction and processing of phosphates, as well as during the production and application of these fertilizers. Finally the transfer of radionuclides contained in the fertilizers to the products of human consumption (vegetables, milk, meat) can produce an additional radiological impact on population. In Cuba there exist six locations of phosphoric rocks, located in the counties of Pinar del Rio, Havana, Matanzas, Sancti-Spiritus and Holguin. From these deposits there were studied the two ones which are in exploitation: 'La Pimienta' deposit, located in the West part of the country and 'Trinidad de Guedes' deposit, located in the Centre-West of Cuba. Paper shows the results obtained by the Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) in the determination of radionuclides concentrations in collected in the sites samples. Based on these results and taking into account both the features of routine works carried out in the sites and the later use of collected mineral as fertilizer, doses to mining workers and to members of the public were estimated. Estimated doses are in the range 0.3 - 2.70 mSv per year for workers and in the range 1.3 - 17 μSv per year. (author)

  13. Radiochemical characterization and environmental radiological impact in tin and lead processing from cassiterite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Marcia Aparecida Antico

    2009-01-01

    The tin and lead industry located in Pirapora do Bom Jesus in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, is responsible for the production of about 7000 ton year-1 of tin and 350 ton year-1 of lead. The raw material used in this facility is cassiterite, which presents in its composition concentrations of natural radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series up to 660 kBq kg -1 and 450 kBq kg -1 , respectively. The smelting and refining processes may lead to concentrations of these radionuclides, mainly in the precipitated dust and in slag. In the operational process, intermediate refining and final slag are obtained and are stored in piles in open air. It is estimated that the amount of waste stored is about 600000 ton. This work aims to study the environmental radiological impact of the operation of this facility and to establish its Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program. In order to accomplish this task the content of radioactivity was determined in the raw material, products, byproducts, residue, deposition pond and exhausting systems. Although in the raw material the radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series are almost in equilibrium, during the processing this equilibrium is disrupted and the radionuclides migrate according to their chemical properties. Concentrations up to 31 kBq kg -1 for 238 U, 69 kBq kg -1 for 226 Ra, 2.5 kBq kg -1 for 210 Pb, 130 kBq kg -1 for 232 Th and 120 kBq kg -1 for 228 Ra were obtained in the slag. The environmental radiological impact was established by measuring the radionuclides in the critical compartments that is the ones that may cause exposure to the public. If the residue pile is considered, the critical pathways are the internal exposition from the dust inhalation and the water ingestion, due to re suspension and dispersion of the pile dust and groundwater contamination, respectively; and external exposure due to immersion in the radioactive cloud and soil contamination. For the emission of gaseous and particulate

  14. A comparison between various radiological techniques in the localization and analysis of impacted and supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Christoph M; Klimowicz, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of different types of commercial cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) devices are available for three-dimensional (3D) imaging in the field of dental and maxillofacial radiology. When removing impacted or supernumerary teeth, surgical teams often operate adjacent significant anatomical structures such as nerves, vessels, adjacent teeth roots, and paranasal sinuses. It is therefore important to choose the appropriate surgical approach to avoid iatrogenic damage to the essential anatomical neighbouring structures. CBCT, also called digital volume tomography (DVT), can visualize impacted and supernumerary teeth in all standard planes, as well as multisectional 3D views. These devices have shown to be highly beneficial in the assessment of small bony lesions and maxillofacial injuries. However, it is still necessary to determine the effectiveness of such devices in the assessment of impacted and supernumerary teeth, in comparison to the conventional radiological methods of intraoral X-rays and panoramic X-rays. During a period of 2 years, a total of 61 patients of whom majority had impacted teeth or supernumerary elements in the frontal maxillary region were studied with CBCT and treated at the St. Olavs University Hospital. Patients were referred to our Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with both conventional and digital intraoral X-rays and/or panoramic X-rays. None had any acute infections or odontogenic abscesses, and most presented with asymptomatic impacted tooth. A comparison between the preoperative conventional and the CBCT images, the resulting diagnoses, and the intraoperative findings as "gold standard" were made and recorded in a compiled scoring sheet. The objects of interest were researched with the magnification method. Each patient was identified only with a patient number. In contrast to the conventional X-rays, the pre-surgical evaluation with the CBCT revealed detailed imaging of significant anatomical structures and

  15. A comparison between various radiological techniques in the localization and analysis of impacted and supernumerary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph M Ziegler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: An increasing number of different types of commercial cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT devices are available for three-dimensional (3D imaging in the field of dental and maxillofacial radiology. When removing impacted or supernumerary teeth, surgical teams often operate adjacent significant anatomical structures such as nerves, vessels, adjacent teeth roots, and paranasal sinuses. It is therefore important to choose the appropriate surgical approach to avoid iatrogenic damage to the essential anatomical neighbouring structures. CBCT, also called digital volume tomography (DVT, can visualize impacted and supernumerary teeth in all standard planes, as well as multisectional 3D views. These devices have shown to be highly beneficial in the assessment of small bony lesions and maxillofacial injuries. However, it is still necessary to determine the effectiveness of such devices in the assessment of impacted and supernumerary teeth, in comparison to the conventional radiological methods of intraoral X-rays and panoramic X-rays. Materials and Methods: During a period of 2 years, a total of 61 patients of whom majority had impacted teeth or supernumerary elements in the frontal maxillary region were studied with CBCT and treated at the St. Olavs University Hospital. Patients were referred to our Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with both conventional and digital intraoral X-rays and/or panoramic X-rays. None had any acute infections or odontogenic abscesses, and most presented with asymptomatic impacted tooth. A comparison between the preoperative conventional and the CBCT images, the resulting diagnoses, and the intraoperative findings as "gold standard" were made and recorded in a compiled scoring sheet. The objects of interest were researched with the magnification method. Each patient was identified only with a patient number. Results: In contrast to the conventional X-rays, the pre-surgical evaluation with

  16. Study and radiological impact assessment produced by activities of different non-nuclear industries. Titanium dioxide industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Manjon, G.; Abril, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    After a careful study and evaluation of radiological impact, the conclusion is that these industries do not need to be subject to control, and it is not necessary any corrective action to reduce the exposition and/or to apply any radiation protection measures.

  17. Radiological impact of airborne effluents of coal-fired and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, J.P.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Blanco, R.E.

    1977-06-01

    Radiological impact of naturally occurring radionuclides in airborne effluents of a model coal-fired steam plant is evaluated assuming a release to the atmosphere of 1 percent of the ash in the coal burned and compared with the impact of radioactive materials in the airborne effluents of model light-water reactors. The principal exposure pathway for radioactive materials released from both types of plants is ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. For nuclear plants immersion in the airborne effluents is also a significant factor in the dose commitment. Assuming that the coal burned contains 1 ppM uranium and 2 ppM thorium together with their decay products and using the same impact analysis methods used in evaluating nuclear facilities, the maximum individual dose commitments from the coal plant for the whole body and most organs (except the thyroid) are shown to be greater than those from a pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and, with the exception of the bone and kidney doses, less than those from a boiling-water reactor (BWR). With the exception of the bone dose, the maximum individual dose commitments from the coal plant are less than the numerical design guideline limits listed for light-water reactors (LWRs). Population dose commitments from the coal plant are higher than those from either nuclear plant

  18. The Use of Twitter by Radiology Journals: An Analysis of Twitter Activity and Impact Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brendan S; Redmond, Ciaran E; Nason, Gregory J; Healy, Gerard M; Horgan, Niall A; Heffernan, Eric J

    2016-11-01

    Medical journals use social media as a means to disseminate new research and interact with readers. The microblogging site Twitter is one such platform. The aim of this study was to analyze the recent use of Twitter by the leading radiology journals. The top 50 journals by Impact Factor were included. Twitter profiles associated with these journals, or their corresponding societies, were identified. Whether each journal used other social media platforms was also recorded. Each Twitter profile was analyzed over a one-year period, with data collected via Twitonomy software. Klout scores of social media influence were calculated. Results were analyzed in SPSS using Student's t test, Fisher contingency tables, and Pearson correlations to identify any association between social media interaction and Impact Factors of journals. Fourteen journals (28%) had dedicated Twitter profiles. Of the 36 journals without dedicated Twitter profiles, 25 (50%) were associated with societies that had profiles, leaving 11 (22%) journals without a presence on Twitter. The mean Impact Factor of all journals was 3.1 ± 1.41 (range, 1.7-6.9). Journals with Twitter profiles had higher Impact Factors than those without (mean, 3.37 vs 2.14; P Impact Factors of the journals with dedicated Twitter profiles and those associated with affiliated societies (P = .47). Since joining Twitter, 7 of the 11 journals (64%) experienced increases in Impact Factor. A greater number of Twitter followers was correlated with higher journal Impact Factor (R 2  = 0.581, P = .029). The investigators assessed the prevalence and activity of the leading radiology journals on Twitter. Radiology journals with Twitter profiles have higher Impact Factors than those without profiles, and the number of followers of a journal's Twitter profile is positively associated with Impact Factor. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiological scenario modeling using the Hotspot code and potential financial impact of treatment of radiation induced cancer to the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Gabriel Fidalgo Queiroz da; Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Rebello, Wilson Freitas; Araujo, Olga Maria Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    The work aims to develop a methodology that is able to estimate the financial impact in a radiological emergency events, considering the radiation induced cancer, particularly leukemia. Considering a RDD - Radiological Dispersive Device, consisting of explosives and cesium-137 as radioactive material, a scenario building on the Rio de Janeiro was modeled. The convergence of a risk modeling platform (HotSpot 3.0), the analysis of excess relative risks for humans (BEIR V-Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V), considering scenarios composed of contaminated areas, are secondary goals

  20. Radiological impact to the population of the three major accidents happened in the civil nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz M, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    The greatest fear of the population before a nuclear accident, is the radiological impact to the health of people, due to the exposure to the liberated radioactive material during the accident, this fear is generally exaggerated or not well managed by the media. The best estimate in the received doses and their possible effects is carried out based on the information obtained during a certain time after the accident event. This work contains a summary of the information in the topic that at the present time has presented institutions as: the World Health Organization (Who), the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the World Nuclear Association, among others. The considered accidents are: first, the Unit-2 of the nuclear power plant of the Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, USA occurred 28 March of 1979, in the Reactor TMI-2, type PWR of 900 M We; the second accident was 26 April of 1986, in the Unit-4 of the nuclear power plant of Chernobyl, in Ukraine, the involved reactor was type BRMK, of 1000 M We moderated by graphite and cooled with light water, the power plant is located to 100 Km to the northwest of Kiev; 25 years later occurred the third accident in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Dai-ichi, in Japan, affecting at four of the six reactors of the power plant. A brief description of the accident is presented in each case, including the magnitude of the provoked liberations of radioactive material, the estimate doses of the population and the affected workers are presented, as well as the possible consequences of these doses on the health. The objective of this diffusion work is to give knowledge to the nuclear and radiological community of the available information on the topic, in order to be located in the appropriate professional context. (author)

  1. Radiological health review of the final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volumes 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Department of Energy has provided in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) a comprehensive review of the potential radiological impact of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, referred to in the FEIS as, the authorized alternative. The EEG has reviewed this document to determine (a) the changes made in comparison with the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS); (b) the adequacy of the DOE's evaluation of the potential radiological impact; (c) the thoroughness of the DOE's response to the comments of the EEG on the DEIS; and (d) other issues which should be addressed by DOE more fully prior to beginning construction of the WIPP. Based on our review of the FEIS, the Department of Energy has incorporated and addressed the majority of the concerns, questions and recommendations that the EEG provided to them in our August 1979 review of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement on WIPP and the FEIS provides a generally satisfactory evaluation of the potential radiological impact. There are, however, a number of areas that have yet to be adequately treated by DOE and should be acted upon and resolved prior to beginning construction of the WIPP. The more important issues are included and are discussed in more detail in our December 8, 1980 and January 15, 1981 comments on the FEIS

  2. Radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the fuel cycle of LWR type reactors: professional exposure during mormal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, I.F.; Kelly, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    The radiological impact of the fuel cycle of light water type reactors using enriched uranium may be changed by plutonium recycle. The impact on human population and on the persons professionally exposed may be different according to the different steps of the fuel cycle. This report analyses the differential radiological impact on the different types of personnel involed in the fuel cycle. Each step of the fuel cycle is separately studied (fuel fabrication, reactor operation, fuel reprocessing), as also the transport of the radioactive materials between the different steps. For the whole fuel cycle, one estimates that, with regard to the fuel cycle using enriched uranium, the plutonium recycle involves a small increase of the professional exposure

  3. A Vertically Integrated Online Radiology Curriculum Developed as a Cognitive Apprenticeship: Impact on Student Performance and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim-Dunham, Jennifer E; Ensminger, David C; McNulty, John A; Hoyt, Amy E; Chandrasekhar, Arcot J

    2016-02-01

    The principles of Collins' cognitive apprenticeship model were used to design a radiology curriculum in which medical students practice radiological skills using online case-based modules. The modules are embedded within clinical third-year clerkships, and students are provided with personalized feedback from the instructors. We describe the development of the vertical online radiology curriculum and evaluate its impact on student achievement and learning process using a mixed method approach. The curriculum was developed over a 2-year period. Student participation was voluntary in the first year and mandatory in the second year. For quantitative curriculum evaluation, student metrics for voluntary versus mandatory groups were assessed using independent sample t tests and variable entry method regression analysis. For qualitative analysis, responses from a survey of students about the value of the curriculum were organized into defined themes using consensus coding. Mandatory participation significantly improved (p = .001) the mean radiology examination score (82 %) compared to the voluntary group (73%), suggesting that mandatory participation had a beneficial effect on student performance. Potential preexisting differences in underlying general academic performance were accounted for by including mean basic science grades as the first variable in the regression model. The significant increase in R(2) from .16 to .28 when number of radiology cases completed was added to the original model, and the greater value of the standardized beta for this variable, suggest that the curriculum made a significant contribution to students' radiology examination scores beyond their baseline academic performance. Five dominant themes about curricular characteristics that enhanced student learning and beneficial outcomes emerged from consensus coding. These themes were (1) self-paced design, (2) receiving feedback from faculty, (3) clinical relevance of cases, (4) gaining

  4. Impacted Mandibular Third Molars: Review of Literature and a Proposal of a Combined Clinical and Radiological Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, P

    2015-01-01

    Tooth impaction is a pathological situation where a tooth fails to attain its normal functional position. Impacted third molars are commonly encountered in routine dental practice. The impaction rate is higher for third molars when compared with other teeth. The mandibular third molar impaction is said to be due to the inadequate space between the distal of the second mandibular molar and the anterior border of the ascending ramus of the mandible. Impacted teeth may remain asymptomatic or may be associated with various pathologies such as caries, pericoronitis, cysts, tumors, and also root resorption of the adjacent tooth. Even though various classifications exist in the literature, none of those address the combined clinical and radiologic assessment of the impacted third molar. Literature search using the advanced features of various databases such as PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Google Scholar, Directory of Open Access Journals and Cochrane electronic databases was carried out. Keywords like impaction, mandibular third molar, impacted mandibular third molar, complications, anatomy, inferior alveolar nerve injury, lingual nerve injury were used to search the databases. A total of 826 articles were screened, and 50 articles were included in the review which was obtained from 1980 to February 2015. In the present paper, the authors have proposed a classification based on clinical and radiological assessment of the impacted mandibular third molar. PMID:26229709

  5. Radiological impact of the exploitation of the CENTRACO nuclear facility of SOCODEI; Impact radiologique de l'exploitation de l'INB CENTRACO de SOCODEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, Ch. [SOCODEI, Dir. Surete Qualite, 95 - Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2001-07-01

    In spite of a experience feedback still limited, the two first years of operation show that the radiological impact of the exploitation of Centraco is low both at the level of dosimetry for workers and level of radioactive release in environment. (N.C.)

  6. Coal-fired power stations - the radiological impact of effluent discharges to atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camplin, W.C.

    1980-06-01

    An assessment is made of the radiological impact of atmosphere discharges from a hypothetical 2000 MWe power station sited in Great Britain. The exposure pathways considered are external irradiation from the plume and from activity deposited on the ground, inhalation of material in the plume and material resuspended from land surfaces, and ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. The reduction in radiation exposure due to naturally-occurring 14 C by releases of stable carbon from the power station is also considered. The ingestion pathway is found to result in the highest individual doses, whereas the inhalation pathway makes the dominant contribution to collective dose. The most important radionuclides are 210 Pb, 210 Po and the thorium isotopes 232 Th, 230 Th and 228 Th. For 30 years operation of the power-station, the collective effective dose equivalent commitment truncated to 500 years is estimated to be 340 man Sv. The maximum annual committed effective dose equivalent to an individual is evaluated as 230 μSv, though it is considered improbable that this level of dose would be found in practice. (author)

  7. Radiological impact of the application of phosphogypsum in civil construction: an overview of Brazilian studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Marcia P.; Nisti, Marcelo B.; Maduar, Marcelo F.; Mazzilli, Barbara P., E-mail: mpcampos@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (lPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In the last decades considerable attention has been given to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Within this frame, of particular concern is the phosphate fertilizer industry. In Brazil, four main industries (Ultrafertil, Copebras, Fosfertil and Bunge Fertilizantes) are responsible for the production of 1.2 x 10{sup 6} tons per year of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Phosphogypsum is the byproduct of the phosphoric acid industry, obtained by reacting phosphate rock with sulphuric acid. This waste is stockpiled in the surrounding environment of the facilities at a rate of 5.5 x 10{sup 6} tons per year. The level of radioactivity present in the phosphogypsum, among other impurities, prevents its reuse for a variety of purposes. All the countries that produce phosphate fertilizer by acid wet processing of phosphate rock are facing the same problem of finding solutions for the safe application of phosphogypsum, in order to minimize the impact caused by its disposal. This paper aims to present a review of the research carried out at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, Brazil, focusing in the radiological implications of using Brazilian phosphogypsum as building material: bricks and plaster. The results and conclusions achieved can contribute to the development or national standards and guidelines concerning the safe use and management or phosphogypsum as a building material. (author)

  8. Radiological impact of the long-lived Chernobyl fallout isotopes in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostakis, M. J.; Petropoulos, N. P.; Hinis, E. P.; Simopoulos, S. E.

    1997-01-01

    During the period May-November 1986, 1242 soil samples of 1 cm thick surface were collected all over Greece. The samples were analyzed giving detailed mapping of the deposits of 1 37 Cs, 1 34 Cs, 1 25 Sb, 1 10 Ag, 9 5 Zr, 1 41 Ce, 1 44 Ce, 1 03 Ru, 1 06 Ru and 5 4 Mn. Mapping of the fission products 1 37 Cs, 1 34 Cs, 1 25 Sb, 1 44 Ce and 1 06 Ru allowed localisation of the three most contaminated areas in the country, near the city of Karditsa, Trikala and Naoussa. The 1 37 Cs deposits in those areas was 65 -150 kBq m - 2. The mean value all over Greece was estimated to 8-9 kBq m - 2. This deposits mapping can be used for investigation of accident radiological impact on Greek population. A computer code was developed to calculate the dose due to external irradiation and ingestion of contaminated food. The dosimetric results are reported for a number of radionuclides and exposure pathways. Committed effective dose due to ingestion over a period of 50 years of he average exposed 20 years old adult who consumed contaminated food during the firs year after the accident is estimated to about 548 μSv, and the respective value due to external irradiation was 67 μ Sv for the first year and 917 μ Sv over a period of 50 years

  9. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Narcea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. a.; Corbacho, J. a.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Narcea coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  10. Politics, economics, and the law: Impact on and responses by radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillman, B.J.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Recent changes in government regulation and third-party reimbursement, and the rapid development of alternative health care delivery systems, are having large impact on the practice of radiology. In the first half of this course we examine the origins of these changes and evaluate the current and future strategies of the major instigators. Initiatives intended to reduce health care costs will be discussed in the context of their effect on radiologists' access to patients and equipment. Topics will include the regulation of expensive imaging technology and such alternative physician payment mechanisms as MD-DRGs, RAPs, relative value scales, and capitation. Government and third-party payors' efforts to instill market mechanisms to reduce physician costs will also be discussed. The second part of the program will focus on potential responses of radiologists to the changing milieu. Using a case method approach, the authors discuss the benefits and dangers associated with such possibilities as exclusive contracts and entrapreneurial ventures, and how such considerations as liability, fiscal, responsibility for technology, and antitrust legislation impinge on radiologists' decisions

  11. Investigation of whether various types of radioactive waste are equivalent in terms of the radiological impact associated with their disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearn, H.S.; Smith, G.M.; Davis, J.P.; Hill, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility that various types of waste are equivalent in terms of the risks associated with their disposal in so far as they are viewed by different sections of society. If such a framework can be established it could be used as an aid to decisions as to whether central disposal facilities, to accept waste from several countries, should be constructed. Details are presented of assumed radionuclide inventories for a representative range of radioactive wastes, calculations and results of the radiological impacts of their disposal, and illustrative methods for weighting the various components of impact which when summed provide an overall measure of impact. Five sets of weighting factors have been devised which are intended to represent the views of a) the radiological protection community, b) those with a pro-nuclear industry view, c) those who oppose nuclear power on safety grounds, d) the inhabitants of the country receiving wastes for disposal, and e) the inhabitants of the country dispatching wastes. On the basis of the calculated weighted radiological impacts it is demonstrated how conclusions can be drawn about general views on the disposal of each waste, about likely attitudes to the export of wastes from one country for disposal in another, and attitudes to exchanging wastes between countries. The study is preliminary and of limited scope. However, the results show that the general methodology is practicable and could be applied in a wider ranging investigation

  12. Environmental Health Impacts of Nuclear Fuel Cycle With Emphasis to Monitoring and Radiological Safety Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gad Allah, A.A.; El- Shanshory, A.I.

    2010-01-01

    facilities, as well as their health impacts instruments and monitors systems for radiological control have been reviewed and evaluated

  13. Anticipated backward stochastic differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Shige; Yang, Zhe

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we discuss new types of differential equations which we call anticipated backward stochastic differential equations (anticipated BSDEs). In these equations the generator includes not only the values of solutions of the present but also the future. We show that these anticipated BSDEs have unique solutions, a comparison theorem for their solutions, and a duality between them and stochastic differential delay equations.

  14. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  15. Impact of Simulation-Based Training on Radiology Trainee Education in Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Ashley A; Ebuoma, Lilian O; Ortiz-Perez, Tamara; Sepulveda, Karla A; Severs, Frederick J; Wang, Tao; Benveniste, Ana Paula; Sedgwick, Emily L

    2017-12-05

    The aim of this study is to determine the impact of a simulation-based ultrasound-guided (USG) breast biopsy training session on radiology trainee procedural knowledge, comfort levels, and overall procedural confidence and anxiety. Twenty-one diagnostic radiology residents from a single academic institution were recruited to participate in an USG breast biopsy training session. The residents filled out a questionnaire before and after the training session. Ten multiple-choice questions tested general knowledge in diagnostic breast ultrasound and USG breast biopsy concepts. Subjective comfort levels with ultrasound machine and biopsy device functionality, patient positioning, proper biopsy technique, image documentation, needle safety and overall procedural confidence and anxiety levels were reported on a 5-point Likert scale before and after training. Participants demonstrated significant improvement in number of correctly answered general knowledge questions after training (P simulation-based USG breast biopsy training session may improve radiology trainee procedural knowledge, comfort levels, and overall procedural confidence. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Practical impact of the evolution and changes of ICRP recommendations on radiological protection in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, S.; Almen, A. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1995-12-31

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has given recommendations concerning the radiological protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy, as well as of the worker in medicine and dentistry. In spite of these earlier recommendations, the situation in medicine is far from optimal showing a wide distribution of patient doses among various departments and hospitals without any similar variation in diagnostic information. There is a special need to emphasise such areas, which have the potential of high patient dose and/or high risk, e.g. interventional radiography, computed tomography, and paediatric radiology. For medical exposures, ICRP (Publication 60) still indicates that if the practice is justified and the protection optimised, dose limits should not be applied. However, it does recommend the development of reference levels as a quantitative guide to optimisation. Consideration should also be given to potential accidents and intervention. (Author).

  17. A regulatory perspective on the radiological impact of NORM industries: the case of the Spanish phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Talavera, M.; Matarranz, J.L.M.; Salas, R.; Ramos, L.

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive and chemical risks coexist in NORM industries although they are usually addressed separately by regulations. The European Union (EU) has developed extensive legislation concerning both matters, which has been diversely reflected in national policies. We consider the case of the Spanish phosphate industry and analyse to which extent regulatory mandates have reduced the historical and ongoing radiological impact on the environment of phosphate facilities. Although no specific radiological constraints on effluent monitoring and release or on waste disposal have yet been imposed on NORM industries in Spain, other environmental regulations have achieved a substantial reduction on the phosphate industry impact. Nevertheless, a more efficient control could be established by eliminating the current conceptual and practical separation of chemical and radioactive risks in NORM industries. We highlight research needs to accomplish so and propose shorter-term measures that require active cooperation among the regulatory bodies involved. - Research highlights: → The radiological impact of the Spanish phosphate industry has substantially decreased as a side result of environmental regulations on chemical pollution.→ A more efficient control of NORM industries could be established by eliminating the current conceptual and practical separation of chemical and radioactive risks.→ Further research is needed on how interactions between radiation and chemicals might affect regulatory limits and on a systematic way to input stakeholder preferences in MCDA.→ On shorter-term, administrative measures that require active cooperation among the regulatory bodies involved can be taken.

  18. Socio-economic and other non-radiological impacts of the near surface disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this report is to introduce, in a generic sense, the elements that could comprise a socio-economic and non-radiological environmental impact assessment. The various social, economic and environmental impacts that could be associated with surface and near surface disposal are discussed through factors that could apply at the local, regional or national level. Impact management is also discussed. The report also introduces concepts to help Member States develop their own approaches to undertaking impact assessment and management. The report is intended to complement IAEA documents on the technology and safety aspects of the near surface disposal of radioactive waste. The scope of this report includes a discussion of a range of social, economic and nonradiological environmental impacts relevant to surface and near surface disposal and illustrations of some impact management measures

  19. Responses of adults who stutter to the anticipation of stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Eric S; Yaruss, J Scott; Quesal, Robert W; Terranova, Valerie; Whalen, D H

    2015-09-01

    Many people who stutter experience the phenomenon of anticipation-the sense that stuttering will occur before it is physically and overtly realized. A systematic investigation of how people who stutter respond to anticipation has not been previously reported. The purposes of this study were to provide self-report evidence of what people do in response to anticipation of stuttering and to determine the extent to which this anticipation occurs. Thirty adults who stutter indicated on a Likert rating scale the extent to which they anticipate stuttering and answered three open-ended (written) questions regarding how they respond to anticipation. All participants reported experiencing anticipation at least "sometimes," and 77% of the participants reported experiencing anticipation "often" or "always." The extent to which participants reported experiencing anticipation was not related to stuttering severity, impact, or treatment history. Analysis of written responses revealed 24 major categories, which were heuristically divided into action or non-action responses. Categories representing avoidance and self-management strategies were further divided into 14 and 19 subcategories, respectively. Participants were just as likely to view anticipation as helpful as they were to view it as harmful. Findings demonstrate that most, if not all, adults who stutter experience anticipation, and the majority of adults who stutter report doing so at least often. Adults who stutter respond to this anticipation by altering the speech production process in various ways. Results highlight the importance of the role that anticipation plays in how stuttering behaviors manifest themselves. The reader will be able to: (a) summarize existing literature on the anticipation of stuttering; (b) describe the role and extent of anticipation of stuttering in adults; (c) describe the various ways that adults who stutter respond to anticipation; (d) describe the importance of measuring anticipation in

  20. Environmental radiological impact of a Brazilian deactivated Uranium Mine along the period 1999-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S., E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (FCN/GMR/INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica de Combustivel Nuclear. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, A., E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Silva, A.X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Corrdenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to assess the environmental radiological impact (ERI) from the release of wastewaters used by the Mining Industrial Complex at Poços de Caldas (CIPC), today called Ore Treatment Unit (UTM) in Caldas, MG, Brazil, during the period 1999-2009. The effluent waters were analyzed once a week at point 014 (associated with the mine and waste pile 8). Critical radionuclides are {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Ra. The {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th were analyzed by spectrophotometry. The {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 228}Ra, in turn, were analyzed by radiochemical separation methods and subsequent radiometry. The dose estimates were based on the model proposed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for a hypothetical critical group associated with the point of effluents release into the river Ribeirao das Antas (point 014). The maximum dose rate allowed by CNEN for release is equal to 0.3 mSv·y{sup -1}for individuals of the critical group. Our calculations were performed using the average concentration along the ten years period study. The estimated dose value for the individual of the critical group was 0.12 mSv·y{sup -1}. It may be concluded that the reference levels established by CNEN were not reached. This indicates that the treatment of effluents generated by the CIPC/UTM was conducted efficiently, ensuring the safety of the population living in the surroundings of the Ore Processing Unit (UTM) at Caldas. (author)

  1. Radiological impact assessment at the hypothetical release from submerged transport package of high level radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Tsubono, Takaki; Saegusa, Toshiari

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive materials (spent fuel, high level waste and fresh MOX fuel) have been transported safely on the sea under the IMO and the IAEA standards. Radiological impact assessments have been made by assuming that a transport package might be sunk into the sea to gain the supplementary public acceptance for these transports since 1970s. Evaluations of the value of radionuclide concentrations and their distributions are important in this assessment. A state-of-the-arts ocean circulation models can estimate realistic distributions of the radionuclides concentrations. The progress of ocean general circulation models are rapid in the research field of global warming projection partly due to the increasing of computer resources. We employed the Parallel Ocean Program (POP) and the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS) for coastal and global area, respectively. These model's resolutions are higher than the previous models. Although previous regional model simulates only for Japan Sea this regional model simulates all around Japan. We simulated tracer concentrations at the release from sea bottoms for coastal and global area. These models provide useful information where tracer transported in the ocean. Simulated tracer concentrations in the coastal and global area can convert to the nuclides concentration at the release from spent fuel, high level waste and fresh MOX fuel. The converted concentrations were quite smaller than the background concentration by the fallouts. And then, we estimated the dose equivalent for the public by the ingestion of seafood from the contaminated area. The estimated dose equivalents were quite smaller than the ICRP recommendation (1mSv/year). (author)

  2. Radiological impact of almost a century of phosphate industry in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paridaens, J; Vanmarcke, H

    2008-10-01

    In Belgium, since about 1920, the phosphate industry has been an important industrial activity. It is principally situated in Flanders, the northern part of Belgium, and produces mainly phosphoric acid, fertilizers, and cattle food. At its height, between 1980 and 1990, it processed between 1.5 and 2.0 Mt of phosphate ore of varying origin per year. In total, more than 60 Mt of ore were handled, containing about 72 TBq of 226Ra and 3.5 TBq of 232Th. Three different processing techniques in six large production sites gave rise to 50 Mt of phosphogypsum and 2.7 Mt of calcium fluoride sludge, all mainly stored on large deposits. In addition, limited recycling of phosphogypsum as building material has occurred in the past. Also, 10 Mt of phosphogypsum was discharged into a large tidal river. One plant still produces 0.25 Mt of gypsum per year. Liquid effluents, containing 13 TBq of radium chloride, were discharged into two small rivers, thus contaminating over 200 ha of land. Approximately 8 TBq of 226Ra and 0.6 TBq thorium ended up in finished products such as fertilizers. Despite these large production figures, so far the radiological impact for the Flemish population has been limited, but this might worsen in the future. The major risk consists in establishing residential areas on land that is contaminated with 226Ra because of liquid effluents or on forgotten gypsum deposits. Doing so might lead to enhanced indoor radon concentrations. In three isolated cases, we found houses built on gypsum deposits where the increased indoor radon levels raised the annual radiation dose to the inhabitants by about 4 mSv.

  3. Criteria and actions facing a radiological environmental contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Jose; Montero, Milagros

    2008-01-01

    An approach to improve the management of the radiological risk due to an environmental contamination is presented. The experience gained in emergency response has clearly demonstrated the importance to have an efficient emergency system including planning, procedures and operational internally consistent criteria. The lack of these components in the emergency system could lead to important radiological and non radiological consequences. The setting of internationally agreed criteria and guides is very important in the anticipated emergency response plan. The paper firstly reviews the approaches proposed by international recommendations and norms. From this review, a substantial coincidence on the basic principles is stated, in spite of small differences in its formulation. Also, a need for harmonization is endorsed. So, generic levels, in terms of imparted dose or avoided dose due to intervention, and, in some cases, derived levels, in terms of activity concentration, are proposed. Numerical values for emergency actions are also identified. The second part deals with the adaptation of the existing prediction and decision systems to the above radiological criteria. Relations among deposition, activity concentrations and annual doses for different scenarios, exposure pathways and age groups are established. Also, the sensibility of the radiological impact against different characteristics of the intervention scenarios is stated. This makes easy to assess the radiological significance of different contamination situations by comparison to the existing action generic levels. Furthermore, the radiological impact can be numerically incorporated in a decision system which includes non radiological aspects of the applicable intervention options. Agricultural, urban and mixed scenarios are presented and solved for a 137 Cs contamination. The results can be further used to develop a methodology guide for setting action generic levels in post-accidental interventions and

  4. Activity Schedule And Anticipation Training As Counselling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the impact of Activity Schedule and Anticipation Training as counselling strategies in managing mild depression among Nigerian adolescents. Six Senior Secondary Schools were randomly selected from three Education Districts in Lagos State. The total population of SS 2 students available for the ...

  5. Assessing radiological impacts (exposures and doses) associated with the mining and milling of radioactive ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The basic units and concepts applicable to radiological assessment are presented. Data relevant to the assessment of radiological exposures from the mining and milling phases of uranium and thorium ores are discussed. As a guide to the assessment of environmental exposures to members of the public, concepts such as the critical group are defined. Environmental transport and exposure pathways are presented in general terms, together with a discussion of the use of mathematical models. The dose assessment procedures defined in the 1987 Code of Practice are described. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  6. L'anticipation comme actualisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondeme, Chloé

    2018-01-01

    It is commonly stated that anticipation is a phenomenon that is prior to a given action or situation, both time-wise and logically speaking. In this article, we focus in detail on how anticipation reconfigures the very action being anticipated. By ‘in detail’, we mean through the meticulous...... observation and analysis of ordinary interactions. The corpus is constituted of learning interactions, between dog educator and dogs in formation, in which anticipating an action, notably by assessing it before it happens, contributes in a large part to (re)configure it. This point leads us to develop...

  7. Evaluation of radiological impacts of tenorm in the Tunisian petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrichi, Hajer; Baccouche, Souad; Belgaied, Jamel-Eddine

    2013-01-01

    The health impacts associated with uncontrolled release of TENORM in products and wastes released in the petroleum industry are of great concern. In this study, evaluation of TENORM in the Tunisian petroleum products and wastes is presented. Fourteen products samples, twelve waste samples and three samples from the surrounding environment were collected from the Tunisian Refinery STIR site and from two onshore production oilfields. The activity concentrations of 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K for all samples were determined using gamma-ray spectrometry with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of 224 Ra were calculated only for scale samples. The radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, absorbed doses rates in air and annual effective dose were also estimated. It was noticed that maximum value of Ra eq activity was found to be 398 Bq/kg in scale (w8) collected from an onshore production oilfield which exceeds the maximum Ra eq value of 370 Bq/kg recommended for safe use. All hazard indices indicated that scale samples (w6, w7, w8 and w11) could be a significant waste problem especially sample (w8). In this study, the radium isotopic data were used to provide an estimate of scale samples ages by the use of the 224 Ra/ 228 Ra activity ratio dating method. Ages of collected scales were found to be in the range 0.91–2.4 years. In this work, radioactivity (NORM contamination) in samples collected from the refinery STIR are showed to be insignificant if compared to those from onshore oilfield production sites. - Highlights: ► We followed 232 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K concentrations in Tunisian petroleum products and wastes. ► Radium isotopic data were used to estimate the age of scales deposited in the petroleum production equipments. ► Samples collected from refinery installation did not represent radiological risk. ► Scale samples collected from oil fields installation exceeded UNSCEAR rules.

  8. The impact of European research ethics legislation on UK radiology research activity: a bibliometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.A.; Toms, A.P.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether there is evidence of a reduction in radiology research activity in the UK following the implementation of the European research ethics legislation, which came in to force in 2001 and has been widely criticised as an impediment to research. Materials and methods: A bibliometric analysis was performed by searching PubMed for all first-author publications from UK departments of 'radiology' or 'medical imaging' between 1995 and 2007. Results were subcategorized into those papers published in the highest cited general radiology journals and by publication type: original research, reviews, and case reports. Results: From 1995 to 2007 the total number of publications rose by 6.5% from 137 to 146 with the increase occurring in non-general radiology journals. Original articles fell from 18 in 1995 to 12 in 2003, but then rose to 24 by 2007 (33% rise). This dip was paralleled by a fall and then recovery in case report publications. The most dramatic change has been in the number of review articles, which has increased more than eightfold from seven in 1995 to 65 in 2007 to become the most common form of publication. Conclusion: The overall number of original scientific articles, published by first-author UK radiologists, has increased slightly over the last 12 years despite a temporary fall associated with the introduction of new research ethics legislation.

  9. Real practice radiation dose and dosimetric impact of radiological staff training in body CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolicchi, Fabio; Faggioni, Lorenzo; Bastiani, Luca; Molinaro, Sabrina; Caramella, Davide; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the radiation dose of the main body CT examinations performed routinely in four regional diagnostic centres, the specific contribution of radiologists and technologists in determining CT dose levels, and the role of radiological staff training in reducing radiation doses. We retrospectively evaluated the radiation dose in terms of dose-length product (DLP) values of 2,016 adult CT examinations (chest, abdomen-pelvis, and whole body) collected in four different centres in our region. DLP values for contrast-unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations performed at each centre were compared for each anatomical area. DLP values for CT examinations performed before and after radiological staff training were also compared. DLP values for the same CT examinations varied among centres depending on radiologists' preferences, variable training of technologists, and diversified CT image acquisition protocols. A specific training programme designed for the radiological staff led to a significant overall reduction of DLP values, along with a significant reduction of DLP variability. Training of both radiologists and technologists plays a key role in optimising CT acquisition procedures and lowering the radiation dose delivered to patients. • The effective dose for similar CT examinations varies significantly among radiological centres. • Staff training can significantly reduce and harmonise the radiation dose. • Training of radiologists and technologists is key to optimise CT acquisition protocols.

  10. Radiology resident teaching skills improvement: impact of a resident teacher training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Teaching is considered an essential competency for residents to achieve during their training. Instruction in teaching skills may assist radiology residents in becoming more effective teachers and increase their overall satisfaction with teaching. The purposes of this study were to survey radiology residents' teaching experiences during residency and to assess perceived benefits following participation in a teaching skills development course. Study participants were radiology residents with membership in the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology or the Siemens AUR Radiology Resident Academic Development Program who participated in a 1.5-hour workshop on teaching skills development at the 2010 Association of University Radiologists meeting. Participants completed a self-administered, precourse questionnaire that addressed their current teaching strategies, as well as the prevalence and structure of teaching skills training opportunities at their institutions. A second postcourse questionnaire enabled residents to evaluate the seminar and assessed new knowledge and skill acquisition. Seventy-eight residents completed the precourse and postcourse questionnaires. The vast majority of respondents indicated that they taught medical students (72 of 78 [92.3%]). Approximately 20% of residency programs (17 of 78) provided residents with formal didactic programs on teaching skills. Fewer than half (46.8%) of the resident respondents indicated that they received feedback on their teaching from attending physicians (36 of 77), and only 18% (13 of 78) routinely gave feedback to their own learners. All of the course participants agreed or strongly agreed that this workshop was helpful to them as teachers. Few residency programs had instituted resident teacher training curricula. A resident teacher training workshop was perceived as beneficial by the residents, and they reported improvement in their teaching skills. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by

  11. The impact of partial sleep deprivation on military naval officers' ability to anticipate moral and tactical problems in a simulated maritime combat operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Olav Kjellevold; Pallesen, Ståle; Espevik, Roar

    2013-01-01

    The current research investigated how long-term partial sleep deprivation influenced naval officers' ability to generate anticipations of potentially critical problems at the entry of an operation. The study was organised as a balanced experimental design, testing the officers both in a rested and a sleepless condition during a complex naval simulator exercise. The results showed that lack of sleep severely impaired the officers' ability to foresee important problems within both the moral and tactical domain of the operation.These findings indicate that lack of sleep may obstruct planning and preparations in maritime operations in a way that may increase the risk of accidents and fatal errors, which again underscores the importance of sleep and rest as an integrated element of maritime operations and leadership.

  12. Impact of case-based radiology education on first-year medical students knowledge, perceptions, and interests in the field of radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Rohr

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Medical training institutions utilize a variety of approaches to present specialty educational material such as radiology. Typically, this material is introduced during the latter years of medical school and includes interactive modules, individual contexts, and case-based learning. This is a quasi-experimental study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of case-based radiology education presented to first-year medical students. Pre- and post-surveys were administered to measure changes in knowledge, perceptions of, and career interest in radiology. The results suggest that the use of case-based learning may improve medical students’ perceived knowledge of radiology and perceived importance of radiologists in the patient care process.

  13. The radiological impact of the quarry industry: A case study of Irepodun quarry, Awo Egbedore lga of Osun State, Nigeria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinloye, M.K.; Adiat, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the radiation exposure rates in the vicinity of Irepodun quarry located in Egbedore Local Government Area of Osun State, Nigeria were undertaken with a view to determining the average effective dose a person working in the environment will receive. The radiation levels of four villages that surround the quarry were also monitored to determine the radiological impact of this industry on the inhabitants in the vicinity of the quarry. The measurements were carried out by means of calibrated gamma-ray scintillometer. The results obtained averagely indicate that the radiation levels fall within a normal background radiation level (0.478 nSv/yr)

  14. Qualitative evaluation of environmental radiological impact in a phosphate associated uranium conventional mine: Santa Quiteria Project, CE, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Rocio G. dos; Santo, Aline Sa E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and evaluate qualitatively the main potential sources of mineral and installation terms of Santa Quiteria, CE, Brazil, evaluating their possible impacts on the environment. The key terms sources in the production of phosphoric acid are usually: the dig of the mines, tailings dams and phospho plaster stack. Thus, this work intends to inform the academic community about this issue, as well as the population in general and also, acting proactively in order to warn about the possible environmental impacts, so that actions to compensate, minimize or avoid these radiological impacts on the environment, can be included in the planning of the industrial mineral project of Santa Quiteria (author)

  15. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 7. Cost and radiological impact associated with near-surface disposal of reactor waste (French concept)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malherbe, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the determination of the cost and the radiological impact associated with a near-surface disposal site (French concept) for low and medium-level radioactive waste generated during operation of a 20 GWe nuclear park composed of LWRs for 30 years. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  16. Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Lantz, P.M.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.

    1979-12-01

    Uranium-mill tailings at an inactive site near Shiprock, New Mexico, contain an estimated 950 curies (Ci) of /sup 226/Ra together with its radioactive daughters. A radiological survey was conducted at this site in February 1976. Decontamination work and tailings stabilization performed at the site since that time have greatly changed conditions there and little effort was applied to quantification of potential health effects in comparison to the earlier consideration of the site at Salt Lake City. The present report delineates the radiological conditions that existed at the time of the survey including information on the surface and below-surface distribution of /sup 226/Ra. The data presented support the conclusion that diffusion of radon and inhalation of radon daughters is the principal mode of exposure of offsite population groups.

  17. Impact of ICRP 117 recommendations in the operational protection of vascular radiology unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Pablo Luis; Fernandez, Manuel; Verde, Jose Maria; Perez, Maria Esperanza; Gomez, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    This paper lists and discusses the results obtained in the teams of the different specialties: traumatology, gastroenterology, hemodynamics, vascular radiology and neurosurgery at different care centres with various care portfolios and notable differences of technical resources. The results show a noticeable difference between the equipment used in gastroenterology, vascular radiology and hemodynamic reference services with other services and disciplines. Taking into account the recent 117 of ICRP publication it has been initiated a procedure for the estimation of dose of foot and ankle of the vascular radiologists and in crystalline. This paper shows the results obtained as well as the correlations between the mentioned area dose and values of dose of lapel, wrist, ankles and crystalline of the professionals

  18. Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Lantz, P.M.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.

    1979-12-01

    Uranium-mill tailings at an inactive site near Shiprock, New Mexico, contain an estimated 950 curies (Ci) of 226 Ra together with its radioactive daughters. A radiological survey was conducted at this site in February 1976. Decontamination work and tailings stabilization performed at the site since that time have greatly changed conditions there and little effort was applied to quantification of potential health effects in comparison to the earlier consideration of the site at Salt Lake City. The present report delineates the radiological conditions that existed at the time of the survey including information on the surface and below-surface distribution of 226 Ra. The data presented support the conclusion that diffusion of radon and inhalation of radon daughters is the principal mode of exposure of offsite population groups

  19. Real practice radiation dose and dosimetric impact of radiological staff training in body CT examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Paolicchi, Fabio; Faggioni, Lorenzo; Bastiani, Luca; Molinaro, Sabrina; Caramella, Davide; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the radiation dose of the main body CT examinations performed routinely in four regional diagnostic centres, the specific contribution of radiologists and technologists in determining CT dose levels, and the role of radiological staff training in reducing radiation doses. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the radiation dose in terms of dose-length product (DLP) values of 2,016 adult CT examinations (chest, abdomen-pelvis, and whole body) collected in four different c...

  20. Radiological impact of natural radioactivity in Egyptian phosphate rocks, phosphogypsum and phosphate fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bahi, S M; Sroor, A; Mohamed, Gehan Y; El-Gendy, N S

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the activity concentrations of the natural radionuclides in phosphate rocks and its products were measured using a high- purity germanium detector (HPGe). The obtained activity results show remarkable wide variation in the radioactive contents for the different phosphate samples. The average activity concentration of 235 U, 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K was found as (45, 1031, 786, 85 and 765Bq/kg) for phosphate rocks, (28, 1234, 457, 123 and 819Bq/kg) for phosphate fertilizers, (47, 663, 550, 79 and 870Bq/kg) for phosphogypsum and (25, 543, 409, 54 and 897Bq/kg) for single super phosphate respectively. Based on the measured activities, the radiological parameters (activity concentration index, absorbed gamma dose rate in outdoor and indoor and the corresponding annual effective dose rates and total excess lifetime cancer risk) were estimated to assess the radiological hazards. The total excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) has been calculated and found to be high in all samples, which related to high radioactivity, representing radiological risk for the health of the population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Medical radiation exposure and its impact on occupational practices in Korean radiologic technologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seul Ki; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The use of radiology examinations in medicine has been growing worldwide. Annually an estimated 3.1 billion radiologic exams are performed. According to this expansion of medical radiation exposure, it has been hard to pay no attention to the effects of medical radiation exposures in the exposure from different types of radiation source. This study, therefore, was aimed to assess the association of medical and occupational radiation exposure in Korean radiologic technologists and evaluate necessity for its consideration in occupational studies. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure. This study did not show the strong association between medical radiation exposure and occupational radiation exposure except several modalities with specific frequency. These results are preliminary but certainly meaningful for interpretation of epidemiologic finding, therefore, we need further evaluation specially for the repeatedly exposed imaging tests and high dose procedures that presented somewhat weak relationship in this study linked with health outcomes of radiation exposure.

  2. Radiological clerkships as a critical curriculum component in radiology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Valcke, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore the perceived value of clinical clerkships in the radiology curriculum as well as the impact of radiology clerkship on students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole and as a career. Methods: This study is a sequel to a previous survey in which student perceptions about radiology curriculum components were investigated. The present study focuses on a further analysis of a subsection in this study, based on 14 statements about radiology clerkship and two statements about radiology as a career. Results: Perceived usefulness of the aspects of radiology clerkship as 'radiology examination', 'skills development' and 'diagnosis focus' were awarded the highest scores. The predict value of the subscale 'radiology examination' on the level of performance was very high (adjusted R 2 = 0.19, p < .001). Conclusion: Students expressed highly favorable evaluation of clerkship as a learning environment to learn to order and to interpret imaging studies as well as an unique possibility to attend various radiological examinations and to access to specific radiology software systems, as well as to get a better view on radiology and to improve image interpretation skills. This positive attitude towards clerkship is closely tied to students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole. These aspects of dedicated radiology clerkship are crucial for effective and high-quality education as well as for the choice of radiology as a career.

  3. Radioactive characterization of the main materials involved in the titanium dioxide production process and their environmental radiological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantero, J; Gazquez, M J; Bolivar, J P; Garcia-Tenorio, R; Vaca, F

    2013-06-01

    A study about the distribution of several radionuclides from the uranium and the thorium series radionuclides along the production process of a typical NORM industry devoted to the production of titanium dioxide has been performed. With this end the activity concentrations in raw materials, final product, co-products, and wastes of the production process have been determined by both gamma-ray and alpha-particle spectrometry. The main raw material used in the studied process (ilmenite) presents activity concentrations of around 300 Bq kg(-1) for Th-series radionuclides and 100 Bq kg(-1) for the U-series ones. These radionuclides in the industrial process are distributed in the different steps of the production process according mostly to the chemical behaviour of each radioelement, following different routes. As an example, most of the radium remains associated with the un-dissolved material waste, with activity concentrations around 3 kBq kg(-1) of (228)Ra and around 1 kBq kg(-1) of (226)Ra, while the final commercial products (TiO2 pigments and co-products) contain negligible amounts of radioactivity. The obtained results have allowed assessing the possible public radiological impact associated with the use of the products and co-products obtained in this type of industry, as well as the environmental radiological impact associated with the solid residues and liquid generated discharges. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential radiological impact assessment related to the visit of nuclear submarines to the port of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose Francisco; Rochedo, Elaine R.R.

    2005-01-01

    Brazil is signatory of international protocols for receiving the visit of nuclear ships and submarines. Such naval units, during their stays in Brazilian ports, inform that there is no release of radioactive material to the environment. However, there is always the possibility of an accident, leading to environmental release of radioactive material. This work had the objective of assessing the potential radiological environmental impact due to the eventual occurrence of an accident during the permanence of ships and submarines of nuclear propulsion in the port of the city of Rio de Janeiro, in Guanabara Bay. The accident scenarios considered include releases to the marine environment and to the atmosphere. Previous results indicated that, in normal operation conditions, no significant radiological impact is foreseen due to the visits of nuclear submarines to the city, even if small routine radionuclide releases occur. The analysis of the accidental releases, however, indicates that the anchorage points should be located at a minimum distance of 2,5 km of inhabited areas in the contour the Bay. (author)

  5. Introducing first-year radiology residents to the ACR at the AMCLC from 2009-2011: the potential impact for ACR and state radiological society memberships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Ryan; McMenomy, Brendan; Chauhan, Anil; Siebert, Derrick; Smith, Kevin; Eckmann, David R

    2013-05-01

    This study was designed to determine if first-year radiology resident attendance at the ACR AMCLC over a period of 3 years from 2009 to 2011 led to increased resident knowledge regarding the ACR and Minnesota Radiological Society (MRS), and whether resident involvement in the conference would influence their decisions to participate in the ACR and state radiological societies in the future. All first-year radiology residents from the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic residency programs were invited to attend the ACR AMCLC from 2009 to 2011. Local radiology and radiation oncology groups provided funding for travel and hotel expenses, and both residency programs granted residents one day off from clinical duties to travel. Preconference and postconference questionnaires were used to assess residents' knowledge of the general structure and function of the ACR and MRS. Postconference questionnaires were also used to assess residents' satisfaction with the conference and determine their likelihood of joining the ACR and MRS in the future. A total of 46 residents from the residency programs attended the conference over this time period. Residents' knowledge regarding the ACR and MRS increased after the conference, with improved performance on postconference objective and subjective responses. The number of issues residents identified as important to radiology increased after the conference. The vast majority of residents had a very positive experience at the conference and were "highly likely" or "likely" to join the ACR and MRS in the future. Results from the first 3 years of this ongoing study indicate that attending the ACR AMCLC has been an overwhelmingly positive experience for first-year radiology residents from the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic programs. Residents' knowledge regarding the ACR and MRS increased nearly 2-fold following the conference. Future state radiological society and ACR membership rates among the participants in our

  6. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  7. Generic environmental impact statement in support of rulemaking on radiological criteria for license termination of NRC-licensed nuclear facilities. Final report, main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The action being considered in this Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) is an amendment to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR Part 20 to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. Under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), all Federal agencies must consider the effect of their actions on the environment. To fulfill NRC's responsibilities under NEPA, the Commission is preparing this GEIS which analyzes alternative courses of action and the costs and impacts associated with those alternatives. In preparing the final GEIS, the following approach was taken: (1) a listing was developed of regulatory alternatives for establishing radiological criteria for decommissioning; (2) for each alternative, a detailed analysis and comparison of incremental impacts, both radiological and nonradiological, to workers, members of the public, and the environment, and costs, were performed; and (3) based on the analysis of impacts and costs, conclusions on radiological criteria for decommissioning were provided. Contained in the GEIS are results and conclusions related to achieving, as an objective of decommissioning ALARA, reduction to preexisting background, the radiological criterion for unrestricted use, decommissioning ALARA analysis for soils and structures containing contamination, restricted use and alternative analysis for special site specific situations, and groundwater cleanup. In its analyses, the final GEIS includes consideration of comments made on the draft GEIS during the public comment period

  8. The impact of education on occupational radiation exposure reduction in a diagnostic radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, R.J.; Gray, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Patient load, number of radiographic exams, complexity of some exams, and associated potential occupational radiation exposure of medical personnel have increased significantly in the past decade. Efforts to reduce exposure through employee education and awareness have resulted in significant reduction in occupational exposure for most diagnostic radiographic areas at Mayo Clinic. This paper reviews trends in occupational radiation exposure from diagnostic x- rays at Mayo Clinic over the past ten years. Changes in employee radiation dose equivalents are correlated with patient workload, complexity of exams, increased interventional radiology and cardiology, and efforts to reduce employee radiation exposure

  9. Sampling on radiological protection training in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaona, E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiological security aspects were evaluated in radiology departments from Mexico City. The study was carried out in two stages, the first one evaluated 40 departments just before the implementation of the new Official Mexican Standards related to Radiological Security and Quality Control in Radiology; in the second stage 33 departments were evaluated 2 years after those standards were implanted, showing a favorable impact of the training programs for the type of answers obtained [es

  10. Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1979-12-01

    Results of a radiological survey that was conducted at the inactive uranium-mill site at Monument Valley, Arizona, in March 1976, in cooperation with a team from Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc., are presented. Consideration of these data and of previously published information on radiological conditions at the site lead to the conclusion that potential health effects from exposure to radionuclides in the mill tailings are relatively small. The occupants of three residences within 0.8 km (0.5 mile) of the tailings constitute the principal population at risk, but direct gamma-exposure rate measurements near the two residences closest to the tailings and calculations of radon dispersion indicate that the tailings do not raise either pathway of radiation exposure significantly above the background level. Data are not available to evaluate fully other possible exposure pathways, but the available information indicates that it is unlikely that doses through these pathways will add significantly to the total population dose. The low estimates of potential health effects from exposure to direct radiation and to exposure to radionuclides in the Monument Valley tailings piles are ascribed to the low /sup 226/Ra inventory, to almost complete absence of small particles that are readily moved by wind and water, and to a small population in the vicinity of the tailings.

  11. Augmenting the impact of technology adoption with financial incentive to improve radiology report signature times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Katherine P; Prevedello, Luciano M; Dufault, Allen; Pezeshk, Parham; Bransfield, Robert; Hanson, Richard; Doubilet, Peter M; Seltzer, Steven E; Khorasani, Ramin

    2010-03-01

    Radiology report signature time (ST) can be a substantial component of total report turnaround time. Poor turnaround time resulting from lengthy ST can adversely affect patient care. The combination of technology adoption with financial incentive was evaluated to determine if ST improvement can be augmented and sustained. This prospective study was performed at a 751-bed, urban, tertiary care adult teaching hospital. Test-site imaging volume approximated 48,000 examinations per month. The radiology department has 100 trainees and 124 attending radiologists serving multiple institutions. Over a study period of 4 years and 4 months, three interventions focused on radiologist signature performance were implemented: 1) a notification paging application that alerted radiologists when reports were ready for signature, 2) a picture archiving and communications systems (PACS)-integrated speech recognition report generation system, and 3) a departmental financial incentive to reward radiologists semiannually for ST performance. Signature time was compared before and after the interventions. Wilcoxon and linear regression statistical analyses were used to assess the significance of trends. Technology adoption (paging plus speech recognition) reduced median ST from >5 to 24 to 15 to 18 hours (P financial incentive further improved 80th-percentile ST to 4 to 8 hours (P Technology interventions coupled with financial incentive can result in synergistic and sustainable improvement in radiologist report-signing behavior. The addition of a financial incentive leads to better performance than that achievable through technology alone.

  12. Radiological impact of the reactor accident at Chernobyl on the Hungarian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztanyik, L.B.; Kanyar, B.; Koeteles, G.J.; Nikl, I.; Stur, D.

    1988-01-01

    The accident of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant at the end of April 1986 has resulted in the release of radioactive substances in considerable amounts. The meteorological conditions that prevailed at the time of the accident and during the subsequent days facilitated dispersion of the airborne pollution and contamination of the environment over almost the whole continent. The first contaminated air masses appeared over the territory of Hungary from north-east during the night from 29 to 30 April. A second, somewhat smaller and a third, somewhat higher contamination occurred from the south - south-east direction on 3 May and between 6-8 May, respectively. In determination of the magnitude of the environmental contamination and assessment of its radiological significance as well as in elaboration of recommendations on the measures which were believed to be necessary for the protection of the public, surveillance systems and institutes of several national authorities and organisations have participated, including also the Radiological Controlling and Data Providing Network of the Ministry of Health. Results of radioactivity and radiation measurements, assessment of the situation developed and recommendations on protection of the population made by this system are summarised

  13. Radiological impact assessment to the environment due to waste from disposal of porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsi, Tarek; Hegazy, Rehab; Badawy, Wael

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the radiological parameters from gamma rays due to the uncontrolled disposal of porcelain waste to the environment. Qualitative and quantitative identification of radionuclides in the investigated samples was carried out by means of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The average activity concentrations of the local porcelain samples were measured as 208.28 Bq/kg for 226 Ra, 125.73 Bq/kg for 238 U, 84.94 Bq/kg for 232 Th and 1033.61 Bq/kg for 40 K, respectively. The imported samples had an average activity of 240.57 Bq/kg for 226 Ra, 135.56 Bq/kg for 238 U, 115.74 Bq/kg for 232 Th and 1312.49 Bq/kg for 40 K, respectively. Radiological parameters and the radium equivalent Ra eq for the investigated samples were calculated. The external and internal hazard indices, representative level index (I γ ), alpha index (I α ), and the exemption level (I x ), were estimated to be higher than the recommended value (unity), while the average activity concentrations for the studied samples were higher than recommended levels. In conclusion, we are concerned that disposal of porcelain in the environment might be a significant hazard.

  14. Scenarios of radiological impacts in the long-term safety analysis of radioactive waste disposal at the Vector Site located in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybalka, N.; Mykolaichuk, O. [State Nuclear Regulatory Inspectorate of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Alekseeva, Z.; Kondratiev, S.; Nikolaev, E. [State Scientific and Technical Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    In Ukraine, at the Vector site in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, it is planned to dispose of large amounts of radioactive wastes, including those of Chernobyl origin, containing transuranium elements. The paper analyzes the main possible scenarios of radiological impacts of the Vector site for a long-term period after expiration of its active administrative control taking into account location of the Vector site in the exclusion zone. In the paper, assessment of total activities that can be disposed of on site is demonstrated, based on non-exceeding of admissible radiological impacts. (orig.)

  15. The clinical impact of the radiology report in wheezing and nonwheezing febrile children: a survey of clinicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spottswood, Stephanie E.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Liaw, Kevin [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Moore, Paul E. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Pulmonary, Allergy and Immunology, Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Patterson, Barron [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatrics, Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Chen, Heidi [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The chest radiograph is commonly used in the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with respiratory illness. The language used to describe the findings is important to ensure appropriate communication with the referring clinician and thereby optimize patient management. In this study we attempted to determine how clinicians interpret specific terms commonly used in a chest radiograph report, and to assess how these terms impact the management of children with respiratory symptoms. An online survey was distributed to 562 pediatric practitioners asking their interpretation of the terms ''peripheral airway disease (PAD),'' ''focal airspace consolidation,'' and ''focal infiltrate'' in a febrile child with or without wheezing. There were 112 respondents. Most practitioners defined the term ''PAD'' as viral pneumonia (61.5%) or asthma (56.9%), ''consolidation'' as atelectasis (83%) followed by pneumonia (69.6%), and ''infiltrate'' as pneumonia (100%), followed by atelectasis (22.3%). Practitioners were more likely to treat a nonwheezing child with antibiotics if the report stated ''focal airspace consolidation'' (80%) or ''focal infiltrate'' (100%; P=0.001). Some radiologic descriptors may lead to diverse and sometimes unintended diagnostic conclusions. Our findings support continued effort to structure and standardize the radiology report and our descriptive terminology. (orig.)

  16. The clinical impact of the radiology report in wheezing and nonwheezing febrile children: a survey of clinicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spottswood, Stephanie E.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Hilmes, Melissa A.; Kan, J.H.; Liaw, Kevin; Moore, Paul E.; Patterson, Barron; Chen, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    The chest radiograph is commonly used in the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with respiratory illness. The language used to describe the findings is important to ensure appropriate communication with the referring clinician and thereby optimize patient management. In this study we attempted to determine how clinicians interpret specific terms commonly used in a chest radiograph report, and to assess how these terms impact the management of children with respiratory symptoms. An online survey was distributed to 562 pediatric practitioners asking their interpretation of the terms ''peripheral airway disease (PAD),'' ''focal airspace consolidation,'' and ''focal infiltrate'' in a febrile child with or without wheezing. There were 112 respondents. Most practitioners defined the term ''PAD'' as viral pneumonia (61.5%) or asthma (56.9%), ''consolidation'' as atelectasis (83%) followed by pneumonia (69.6%), and ''infiltrate'' as pneumonia (100%), followed by atelectasis (22.3%). Practitioners were more likely to treat a nonwheezing child with antibiotics if the report stated ''focal airspace consolidation'' (80%) or ''focal infiltrate'' (100%; P=0.001). Some radiologic descriptors may lead to diverse and sometimes unintended diagnostic conclusions. Our findings support continued effort to structure and standardize the radiology report and our descriptive terminology. (orig.)

  17. Palatable meal anticipation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia T Hsu

    Full Text Available The ability to sense time and anticipate events is a critical skill in nature. Most efforts to understand the neural and molecular mechanisms of anticipatory behavior in rodents rely on daily restricted food access, which induces a robust increase of locomotor activity in anticipation of daily meal time. Interestingly, rats also show increased activity in anticipation of a daily palatable meal even when they have an ample food supply, suggesting a role for brain reward systems in anticipatory behavior, and providing an alternate model by which to study the neurobiology of anticipation in species, such as mice, that are less well adapted to "stuff and starve" feeding schedules. To extend this model to mice, and exploit molecular genetic resources available for that species, we tested the ability of wild-type mice to anticipate a daily palatable meal. We observed that mice with free access to regular chow and limited access to highly palatable snacks of chocolate or "Fruit Crunchies" avidly consumed the snack but did not show anticipatory locomotor activity as measured by running wheels or video-based behavioral analysis. However, male mice receiving a snack of high fat chow did show increased food bin entry prior to access time and a modest increase in activity in the two hours preceding the scheduled meal. Interestingly, female mice did not show anticipation of a daily high fat meal but did show increased activity at scheduled mealtime when that meal was withdrawn. These results indicate that anticipation of a scheduled food reward in mice is behavior, diet, and gender specific.

  18. Palatable Meal Anticipation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cynthia T.; Patton, Danica F.; Mistlberger, Ralph E.; Steele, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to sense time and anticipate events is a critical skill in nature. Most efforts to understand the neural and molecular mechanisms of anticipatory behavior in rodents rely on daily restricted food access, which induces a robust increase of locomotor activity in anticipation of daily meal time. Interestingly, rats also show increased activity in anticipation of a daily palatable meal even when they have an ample food supply, suggesting a role for brain reward systems in anticipatory behavior, and providing an alternate model by which to study the neurobiology of anticipation in species, such as mice, that are less well adapted to “stuff and starve” feeding schedules. To extend this model to mice, and exploit molecular genetic resources available for that species, we tested the ability of wild-type mice to anticipate a daily palatable meal. We observed that mice with free access to regular chow and limited access to highly palatable snacks of chocolate or “Fruit Crunchies” avidly consumed the snack but did not show anticipatory locomotor activity as measured by running wheels or video-based behavioral analysis. However, male mice receiving a snack of high fat chow did show increased food bin entry prior to access time and a modest increase in activity in the two hours preceding the scheduled meal. Interestingly, female mice did not show anticipation of a daily high fat meal but did show increased activity at scheduled mealtime when that meal was withdrawn. These results indicate that anticipation of a scheduled food reward in mice is behavior, diet, and gender specific. PMID:20941366

  19. Introduction to the Natural Anticipator and the Artificial Anticipator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Daniel M.

    2010-11-01

    This short communication deals with the introduction of the concept of anticipator, which is one who anticipates, in the framework of computing anticipatory systems. The definition of anticipation deals with the concept of program. Indeed, the word program, comes from "pro-gram" meaning "to write before" by anticipation, and means a plan for the programming of a mechanism, or a sequence of coded instructions that can be inserted into a mechanism, or a sequence of coded instructions, as genes or behavioural responses, that is part of an organism. Any natural or artificial programs are thus related to anticipatory rewriting systems, as shown in this paper. All the cells in the body, and the neurons in the brain, are programmed by the anticipatory genetic code, DNA, in a low-level language with four signs. The programs in computers are also computing anticipatory systems. It will be shown, at one hand, that the genetic code DNA is a natural anticipator. As demonstrated by Nobel laureate McClintock [8], genomes are programmed. The fundamental program deals with the DNA genetic code. The properties of the DNA consist in self-replication and self-modification. The self-replicating process leads to reproduction of the species, while the self-modifying process leads to new species or evolution and adaptation in existing ones. The genetic code DNA keeps its instructions in memory in the DNA coding molecule. The genetic code DNA is a rewriting system, from DNA coding to DNA template molecule. The DNA template molecule is a rewriting system to the Messenger RNA molecule. The information is not destroyed during the execution of the rewriting program. On the other hand, it will be demonstrated that Turing machine is an artificial anticipator. The Turing machine is a rewriting system. The head reads and writes, modifying the content of the tape. The information is destroyed during the execution of the program. This is an irreversible process. The input data are lost.

  20. NIF: Impacts of chemical accidents and comparison of chemical/radiological accident approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, M.A.; Policastro, A.J.; Rhodes, M.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The goals of the NIF are to (1) achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory for the first time by using inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology based on an advanced-design neodymium glass solid-state laser, and (2) conduct high-energy-density experiments in support of national security and civilian applications. The primary focus of this paper is worker-public health and safety issues associated with postulated chemical accidents during the operation of NIF. The key findings from the accident analysis will be presented. Although NIF chemical accidents will be emphasized, the important differences between chemical and radiological accident analysis approaches and the metrics for reporting results will be highlighted. These differences are common EIS facility and transportation accident assessments

  1. An assessment of the radiological impact of brachytherapy application in Metro Manila hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palattao, M.V.B.; Venida, L.L.; Loterina, R.A.; Espiritu, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most important uses of radioactive sources in medicine is the application of brachytherapy technology. Brachytherapy is a method of radiation therapy where an encapsulated radioactive source delivers gamma or beta radiation into a tumor site. The paper describes different categories of brachytherapy applications involving manual insertion or afterloading and remote afterloading techniques. A list of five hospitals in Metro Manila practicing different techniques of brachytherapy are enumerated. Because of the widespread uses of radioactive sources in brachytherapy technology in medicine, inadequate control in its use had led to a number of incidents resulting to unnecessary exposure of radiation workers, patients and general public. This study was initiated to determine the radilogical hazards involved in brachytherapy applications. It presents contingency scenarios and their projected radiological consequences. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs

  2. Teaching and Working With Millennial Trainees: Impact on Radiological Education and Work Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Ana P; Cronan, John J

    2017-01-01

    Many feel that the generational differences encountered with Millennial trainees are novel; the reality is that prior generations have always bemoaned generational differences. This is not a new problem; some of the same things may even have been said about us during our own training! There are a variety of myths and misconceptions about the Millennial generation (also known as Generation Y). In this article we review some of the differences frequently encountered as we educate and work alongside our Millennial colleagues, dispelling some of the myths and misconceptions. With increased understanding of this talented group of individuals, we hope to be more effective teachers and have more successful professional relationships. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents. Critical infrastructure and economic impact considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, David Oliver [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Yang, Lynn I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hammer, Ann E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  4. Radiological impact evaluation on the aquatic ecosystems surrounding IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacomino, Vanusa F.; Maduar, Marcelo F.; Bellintani, Sandra A.; Mazzilli, Barbara P.

    1996-01-01

    In order to control the discharge of radioactive materials into the aquatic system surrounding IPEN-CNEN/SP, an monitoring program has been carried out on a routine basis. All the liquid effluent generated by the IPEN facilities are released into the Pinheiros river at two different discharge points located 2 km apart. In the present paper the source term measured during the period 1985 to 1984 is presented, as well as the effective equivalent dose received by public individuals for each critical pathway. These results showed that the total activity released into the Pinheiros river is just a small fraction of the receiving capacity of the environment. The estimated annual doses during the period of study were always below 1/10 of the primary limit for the public individual as established by the International Commission of Radiological Protection, which is 1 mSv/year. (author)

  5. Assessment of the radiological impact of disposal of low and intermediate level wastes on the seabed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobbs, S.F.; Delow, C.E.; Hill, M.D.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes progress in the development of models for use in a radiological assessment of the disposal of low and intermediate level waste on the ocean floor. In particular the report describes the waste package model, the ocean dispersion model and the sedimentation model. Five types of waste package have been identified and models have been developed for them. A flow pattern for the Atlantic Ocean has been derived from the existing distribution of temperature and salinity in the Atlantic Ocean. However a number of discrepancies between the calculated and predicted pattern were found; the model has been extended to include all the world's oceans to correct this. The sedimentation model describes two types of scavenging particles in the water column, a well mixed benthic boundary layer and the top two metres of the bed sediments. Good agreement with the GESAMP ocean model results has been found. (author)

  6. Radiological and environmental impact of amang, a TENORM industry in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail Bahari

    1997-01-01

    The processing of amang, a by-product of tin mining industry has been going on in Malaysia for a very long time. The process of extracting valuable minerals from amang has resulted in the production of Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Material (TENORM). Radiological studies conducted on amang workers have shown that they have a higher risk of being exposed to ionising radiation. Chromosomal aberration studies have shown that there is a significant increase of dicentrics among amang workers compared to the control. Processed and unprocessed amang also showed cytotoxic and cytogenetic properties on plants. Waters of ponds from neighbouring amang plants have been shown to be very acidic and together with other changes in the water quality of the pond have contributed to some cytotoxic and mutagenic changes in plant

  7. The radiological assessment of pelvic obliquity in cerebral palsy and the impact on hip development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, C; Hollander, K; Wawrzuta, J; Molesworth, C; Willoughby, K; Thomason, P; Khot, A; Graham, H K

    2015-10-01

    Pelvic obliquity is a common finding in adolescents with cerebral palsy, however, there is little agreement on its measurement or relationship with hip development at different gross motor function classification system (GMFCS) levels. The purpose of this investigation was to study these issues in a large, population-based cohort of adolescents with cerebral palsy at transition into adult services. The cohort were a subset of a three year birth cohort (n = 98, 65M: 33F, with a mean age of 18.8 years (14.8 to 23.63) at their last radiological review) with the common features of a migration percentage greater than 30% and a history of adductor release surgery. Different radiological methods of measuring pelvic obliquity were investigated in 40 patients and the angle between the acetabular tear drops (ITDL) and the horizontal reference frame of the radiograph was found to be reliable, with good face validity. This was selected for further study in all 98 patients. The median pelvic obliquity was 4° (interquartile range 2° to 8°). There was a strong correlation between hip morphology and the presence of pelvic obliquity (effect of ITDL on Sharpe's angle in the higher hip; rho 7.20 (5% confidence interval 5.59 to 8.81, p < 0.001). This was particularly true in non-ambulant adolescents (GMFCS IV and V) with severe pelvic obliquity, but was also easily detectable and clinically relevant in ambulant adolescents with mild pelvic obliquity. The identification of pelvic obliquity and its management deserves closer scrutiny in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  8. Methodology for and uses of a radiological source term assessment for potential impacts to stormwater and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teare, A.; Hansen, K.; DeWilde, J.; Yu, L.; Killey, D.

    2001-01-01

    A Radiological Source Term Assessment (RSTA) was conducted by Ontario Power Generation Inc. (OPG) at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS). Tritium had been identified in the groundwater at several locations under the station, and OPG initiated the RSTA as part of its ongoing efforts to improve operations and to identify potential sources of radionuclide impact to groundwater and stormwater at the station. The RSTA provides a systematic approach to collecting information and assessing environmental risk for radioactive contaminants based on a ranking system developed for the purpose. This paper provides an overview of the RSTA focusing on the investigative approach and how it was applied. This approach can find application at other generating stations. (author)

  9. The reaction of stock market returns to anticipated unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Taamouti, Abderrahim; Gonzalo Muñoz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    We empirically investigate the short-run impact of anticipated and unanticipated unemployment rates on stock prices. We particularly examine the nonlinearity in stock market's reaction to unemployment rate and study the effect at each individual point (quantile) of stock return distribution. Using nonparametric Granger causality and quantile regression based tests, we find that, contrary to the general findings in the literature, only anticipated unemployment rate has a strong impact on stock...

  10. A preliminary assessment of the radiological impact of the Chernobyl reactor accident on the population of the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, M.; Brown, J.; Williams, J.A.; Crick, M.J.; Simmonds, J.R.; Hill, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident the Commission of the European Communities asked the National Radiological Protection Board to carry out a preliminary assessment of the radiological consequences of the accident on the population of the European Community (EC). The aim of the study was to review information on the environmental contamination measured in member states of the EC; to make a preliminary assessment of individual and population doses for each country; to make an estimate of the resulting health impact and to indicate the effects of the various countermeasures taken by member states in terms of the reductions in both individual and population exposure which they produced. All of the main pathways by which people have been and will be exposed to radiation as a result of the accident were included in the assessment. The impact estimate is based on environmental measurements made during the month after the accident, and on calculations made using mathematical models of radionuclide transfer through the environment. The calculated effective doses to average individuals in EC countries from exposure over the next 50 years range from 0.3 μSv (in Portugal) to between about 300 and 500 μSv (in the FRG, Italy and Greece). The total collective effective dose to the population of EC countries, integrated over all time, is estimated to be about 80 000 man Sv. This may be compared to the collective effective dose from natural background radiation of about 500 000 man Sv every year. In some countries, the restrictions placed on consumption of some foods are estimated to have been effective in reducing doses to the most exposed individuals; the reduction being up to about a factor of 2. The results presented in this paper should therefore be regarded as preliminary

  11. Control of radiological impacts in deactivated uranium mine - the portuguese experience; Controlo dos impactes radiologicos em minas de uranio desactivadas - a experiencia portuguesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Alcides; Neves, Luis, E-mail: apereira@dct.uc.p, E-mail: luis.neves@dct.uc.p [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de Ciencias da Terra. Instituto do Mar

    2011-10-26

    The exploration of radioactive ores occurred in Portugal during around 100 years, and on that period 4370 tons were produced of uranium concentrate, and an estimated total of 13 millions of tons of residues, of various type and variable dangerous grade. From the year 2000 that the government has been performed studies on environmental characterization at the mining areas and remediation project as well. The precise evaluation of the environmental impacts implies the the knowledge of prior work situation, nonexistent for the case of Portuguese mines. This work proposes a methodology for exceeding that limitation focused on selection of area sited at the same metallogenetic province, and considered representative of background. The radiological impacts are checked by the effective dose calculated for reference groups of the exposed population, at this region and in the principal mining area at Portugal (Urgeirica), at the end of exploration and after the finalization of some remediation works

  12. Nuclear and energies nr 57. Japan, another glance. The environmental and radiological impact. The international impact. The illusion of renewable energies in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    2011-07-01

    The contributions of this publication first address the Japanese local context (organization, mentality, cultural background, thinking and action modes), and secondly the environmental and radiological impact of the Fukushima accident, notably in comparison with Chernobyl (contamination is much more localized, sometimes higher; a larger concerned population but quicker and more efficient protection measures; more severe consequences due to population displacement). The third article discusses the international impact of the accident: known or foreseen consequences on nuclear programs, discussion on safety strengthening and on governance, evolution of public opinion, possible consequences on climate negotiations. The last article proposes an overview of the current situation of Japan which must mobilize all the available energy resources to face the difficulties in electricity supply

  13. Radiological controls integrated into design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindred, G.W. [Cleveland Electric Illuminating Co., Perry, OH (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Radiological controls are required by law in the design of commercial nuclear power reactor facilities. These controls can be relatively minor or significant, relative to cost. To ensure that radiological controls are designed into a project, the health physicist (radiological engineer) must be involved from the beginning. This is especially true regarding keeping costs down. For every radiological engineer at a nuclear power plant there must be fifty engineers of other disciplines. The radiological engineer cannot be an expert on every discipline of engineering. However, he must be knowledgeable to the degree of how a design will impact the facility from a radiological perspective. This paper will address how to effectively perform radiological analyses with the goal of radiological controls integrated into the design package.

  14. Generic environmental impact statement in support of rulemaking on radiological criteria for decommissioning of NRC-licensed nuclear facilities. Main report; Draft report for comment: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The action being considered in this draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) is an amendment to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR Part 20 to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. Under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), all Federal agencies must consider the effect of their actions on the environment. To fulfill NRC's responsibilities under NEPA, the Commission is preparing this GEIS which analyzes alternative courses of action and the costs and impacts associated with those alternatives. In preparing the GEIS, the following approach was taken: (1) a listing was developed of regulatory alternatives for establishing radiological criteria for decommissioning; (2) for each alternative, a detailed analysis and comparison of incremental impacts, both radiological and nonradiological, to workers, members of the public, and the environment, and costs, were performed; and (3) based on the analysis of impacts and costs, preliminary recommendations were provided. Contained in the GEIS are recommendations related to the definition of decommissioning, the scope of rulemaking, the radiological criteria, restrictions on use, citizen participation, use of the GEIS in site-specific cases, and minimization of contamination

  15. Generic environmental impact statement in support of rulemaking on radiological criteria for decommissioning of NRC-licensed nuclear facilities. Appendices; Draft report for comment -- Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The action being considered in this draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) is an amendment to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR Part 20 to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. Under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), all Federal agencies must consider the effect of their actions on the environment. To fulfill NRC's responsibilities under NEPA, the Commission is preparing this GEIS which analyzes alternative courses of action and the costs and impacts associated with those alternatives. In preparing the GEIS, the following approach was taken: (1) a listing was developed of regulatory alternatives for establishing radiological criteria for decommissioning; (2) for each alternative, a detailed analysis and comparison of incremental impacts, both radiological and nonradiological, to workers, members of the public, and the environment, and costs, were performed; and (3) based on the analysis of impacts and costs, preliminary recommendations were provided. Contained in the GEIS are recommendations related to the definition of decommissioning, the scope of rulemaking, the radiological criteria, restrictions on use, citizen participation, use of the GEIS in site-specific cases, and minimization of contamination

  16. Comparison of the waste management aspects of spent fuel disposal and reprocessing: post-disposal radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobbs, S.F.; Harvey, M.P.; Martin, J.S.; Mayall, A.; Jones, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    A joint project involving contractors from France, Germany and the UK was set up by the Commission of the European Communities to assess the implications of two waste management options: the direct disposal of spent fuel and reprocessing of that fuel. This report describes the calculation of the radiological impact on the public of the management and disposal of the wastes associated with these two options. Six waste streams were considered: discharge of liquid reprocessing effluents, discharge of gaseous reprocessing effluents, disposal of low-level solid wastes arising from reprocessing, disposal of intermediate-level solid wastes arising from reprocessing, disposal of vitrified high-level reprocessing wastes, and direct disposal of spent fuel. The results of the calculations are in the form of maximum annual doses and risks to individual members of the public, and collective doses to four population groups, integrated over six time periods. These results were designed for input into a computer model developed by another contractor, Yard Ltd, which combines costs and impacts in a multi-attribute hierarchy to give an overall measure of the impact of a given option

  17. Liturgy as space for anticipation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-05-04

    May 4, 2011 ... The famous play, Waiting for Godot, by Samuel Beckett, has become iconic for depicting people who are waiting for nothing.1 Or perhaps we should say that they do expect someone (something?) called Godot, but that he orshe orit never shows up. It is anticipation without answer; expectation without event ...

  18. Production and consumption of foods in Spain, for its applications in radiological impact evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, B.; Suanez, A.; Vazquez, C.

    1994-01-01

    This work is focussed on characterization, organization and analysis for the most relevant regional parameters used in dose assessment models when a food pathway contamination occurs. It was carried in the framework of a contract with a several European Institutions (CEA-IPSN, NRPB) for the development of a general methodology for the evaluation of the radiological consequences caused by accidentally radioactive releases into the environment. Spain, a member of the mediterranean country group, has a remarkably diverse climate which determines crop production agricultural practices, and consequently the animal and human diets. This project intention in to study in depth these particular characteristics and their consequences so that the estimated dose received by an individual reflects a variety of factors, therefore, the production and consumption of the five autonomous Mediterranean regions have been compared individually and globally with the national production and consumption averages. These data have been used in committed dose evaluation exercise applied to the ingestion of contaminated food throughout the first year after an accidental release of Caesium-137. This exercise was realized within the TARRAS (Transfer of Accidentally Released of Radionuclides in Agricultural Systems) project, financed by CE, ENRESA and CSN. (Author) 6 ref

  19. Informatics support for analysing the radiological impact of areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shershakov, V.M.; Baranov, A.Yu.; Borodin, R.V.; Golubenkov, A.V.; Godko, A.M.; Kosykh, V.S.; Korenev, A.I.; Meleshkin, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The organisation and management of data banks generated using data from monitoring the radiological situation after the Chernobyl accident is of key importance to health care and rehabilitation in the contaminated areas. Measures following the accident were based on large scale studies involving analysis and prediction of radioactive contamination. These studies included measurements of radioactivity in air, soil and water, modelling and prediction of radionuclides transport and transformation. This required the development of a computer system RECASS (RadioEcological Analysis Support System) which is currently being developed in SPA ''Typhoon''. The main tasks of RECASS are to integrate data on existing characteristics of the environment, and data on air, soil, water and biota-contamination with numerical models that account for radionuclide behaviour in all environmental media and with radiation dose formations that are based on geographic information system (GIS) principles. The data bank of the system includes the following databases: a data base with measurement of radioactive contamination levels in environmental media (soil, air, water); a meteorological data base; and a data base with administrative and demographic data. A set of models for radionuclide transfer in various environments incorporated in the chain permits short or long-term predictions to be made. The results of implementing RECASS to reconstruct the time and space picture of contamination in the first days after the Chernobyl accident are presented. (Author)

  20. Alkali-activated concrete with Serbian fly ash and its radiological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccetelli, Cristina; Trevisi, Rosabianca; Ignjatović, Ivan; Dragaš, Jelena

    2017-03-01

    The present paper reports the results of a study on different types of fly ash from Serbian coal burning power plants and their potential use as a binder in alkali-activated concrete (AAC) depending on their radiological and mechanical properties. Five AAC mixtures with different types of coal burning fly ash and one type of blast furnace slag were designed. Measurements of the activity concentrations of 40 K, 226 Ra and 232 Th were done both on concrete constituents (fly ash, blast furnace slag and aggregate) and on the five solid AAC samples. Experimental results were compared by using the activity concentration assessment tool for building materials - the activity concentration index I, as introduced by the EU Basic Safety Standards (CE, 2014). All five designed alkali-activated concretes comply with EU BSS screening requirements for indoor building materials. Finally, index I values were compared with the results of the application of a more accurate index - I(ρd), which accounts for thickness and density of building materials (Nuccetelli et al., 2015a). Considering the actual density and thickness of each concrete sample index - I(ρd) values are lower than index I values. As an appendix, a synthesis of main results concerning mechanical and chemical properties is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative study of dentascan and radiography for radiological evaluation of impacted teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandak, Shruti; Shetty, Chandrakant M

    2014-07-01

    Impacted teeth present a very common problem in dentistry due to the variable numbers of problems they cause. They have previously been imaged by radiography which is very inaccurate. Dental CT is an upcoming modality which very accurately images the teeth. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of Dental CT with radiography in assessing the morphology of the impacted tooth and its relation to adjacent structures. We conducted a hospital based prospective study in which all patients with impacted teeth who underwent Dental CT and Radiographic evaluation were evaluated. The morphology of all the teeth was well visualized on CT. Resorption of adjacent tooth was missed in 7 teeth by radiography. In a significant number of cases (10/30) the relation of the impacted tooth with the mandibular canal could not be visualized on the radiographs. We concluded that Dental CT yields markedly better information than radiographs regarding impacted teeth with respect to divergence of the roots, relation of the impacted tooth with the adjacent tooth, nasal floor, maxillary sinus and mandibular canal. However, Dental CT was found to be only marginally better than Radiographs for assessment of number of roots, inclination of the impacted tooth and relation of the tooth with alveolar crest. Dental CT was also proved to be an indispensable diagnostic tool for the determination of the buccolingual inclination and relationsof the impacted tooth.

  2. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  3. RSVP radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirks, D.R.; Chaffee, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops a relative scale of value for pediatric radiology (RSVPR). Neither the HCFA/ACA Relative Value Scale nor the Workload Measurement System developed by Health and Welfare Canada specifically addressed pediatric radiologic examinations. Technical and professional charges for examinations at Children's Hospital Medical Center were reviewed and compared with time and cost analysis. A scale was developed with chest radiography (PA and lateral views) assigned a value of 1. After review by pediatric radiologic technologists, radiologic administrators, pediatric radiologists, and chairs of departments of children's hospitals, this proposed scale was modified to reflect more accurately relative value components of pediatric radiologic and imaging examinations

  4. Evaluation of the radiological impact in the aquatic system in the surrounding of IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacomino, V.M.F.; Gordon, A.M.P.L.; Venturini, L.

    1989-12-01

    In order to control the discharges of radioactive material in the aquatic system (Jaguare stream and Pinheiros river) in the vicinity of IPEN-CNEN/SP an effluent monitoring program was established on a routine basis. This control is carried out by measuring the activity of the radionuclides present in the liquid effluents (source term) using gamma spectrometry and/or spectrophotometry. The results obtained are then compared with the discharge limits adopted by CNEN when a decision is made upon the discharge of the effluent under consideration. In 1988 the total activity discharged by the nuclear installations available was 1997, 9x10 6 Bq in a total volume of 2421,4 m 3 . The next step was to evaluate the effective equivalent dose in the general public by using the results of the source term and the information available concerning the environment. It was assumed that the only critical pathway is the external gamma irradiation of the people that work in the nearby of the discharge points in Pinheiros river. The effective equivalent dose obtained was 39,4η Sv and the most relevant radionuclides that should be considered 60 Co, 137 Cs, 131 I and 226 Ra. This result is less than 1/10 of the maximum admissible dose limit adopted by the Radiological Protection Standards which is 10 -3 Sv/year. In order to measure the level of radioactivity in the environment, samples of ground water, water and sediments of Pinheiros river were collected and analyzed by using gamma spectrometry and fluorimetry. The radionuclides found were 226 Ra, 22228 Ra, U Nat, 40 K and 7 Be with activities corresponding to the background levels. The analysis of these results and the evaluation of the equivalent dose show that the radiological impact in the aquatic systems considered is insignificant. (author) [pt

  5. Development of an integrated system for evaluation of environmental radiologic impact during emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Luiz Fernando de Carvalho

    2002-03-01

    An integrated system for performing environmental dose assessment after nuclear or radiological emergencies has been developed, as a tool for decision making process. The system includes databases such as those describing radionuclide decay, dose conversion factors for several environmental geometries and radionuclides with emitted radiation and energies. It includes several models for predicting environmental behaviour at the short,medium and long terms, for both rural and urban environments and is flexible enough for simulating the exposure of members of the public due to small accidents involving individual sources up to large scale nuclear accidents with complex source terms to the environment. The model has been built in a way that can perform assessment of actual exposures or make forecasts for future exposure based on dynamic simulation of the fate of radionuclides in environmental and potential exposure pathways to members of the public, taking into account he kind of contaminated environment and the age groups of exposed persons. Input data may come from a predicted source term or information on environmental concentration based on dispersion models or on environmental measurements, including on line monitoring systems, environmental surveys, direct measurements by in situ gamma spectrometry or analysis of environmental samples. Outputs of the model are dose estimates to members of the public as a function of the exposure pathway, time after the contamination and age group, for different groups of members of the public and kind of use of the environment. Time dependent kerma rates in air and concentrations in environmental compartments such as soil and foodstuff are also available, including the simulation of the effect of protective measures, to support the decision making process. (author)

  6. The radiological impact of naturally-occurring radionuclides in foods from the wild

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Hammond, D.J.; Davidson, M.F.; Wilkins, B.T.; Williams, B.

    2002-01-01

    Habit surveys have been conducted to identify people who make use of foodstuffs collected from the wild (free foods) in two areas of the UK: in the area around Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire, where levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides in soil were expected to be typical of the UK, and in the vicinity of Okehampton in Devon, where levels were known to be elevated. Individuals who make regular use of these foodstuffs were specifically identified, so that an estimate of typical and higher than average consumption rates could be derived. The naturally-occurring radionuclides of interest were 210 Po, 210 Pb, 234 U, 235 U, 238 U, 230 Th, 232 Th and 226 Ra. Samples of important foodstuffs were collected and the radionuclides of interest determined. The consumption rates were combined with the measured activity concentrations and published dose coefficients to estimate doses to average and higher than average consumers. These doses were compared with estimated doses reported in the Food Standards Agency's ongoing monitoring programme and with average doses to the population of the UK reviewed by NRPB. In total, 400 people were identified and between them they collected 54 different types of free food. Blackberries were by far the most common species collected, although various types of mushroom and nuts were also popular. On average, each collector from around Chipping Norton collected 2.1 different foods, and each from around Okehampton collected 2.2. On the basis of the habit survey, therefore, it would be reasonable to expect that any site, nuclear or otherwise, chosen for habit surveys, whether for radiological purposes or for any other contaminant, could have substantial numbers of people collecting free foods. In addition, the pattern of foods collected was very similar to previous studies, indicating similarities across England and Wales. (author)

  7. Randomized clinical trial on the use of antispasmodic drugs in barium enema: impact on radiological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goei, Reginald; Kessels, Alphons H.; Nix, Maarten; Knipschild, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the willingness of radiologists to change their practice when the results of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) on the use of antispasmodic drugs in barium enema are presented. Materials and Methods: During the years 1994 and 1995 two postal questionnaires were sent to 481 practicing radiologists who were all members of the Netherlands Society of Radiology. In the first questionnaire the respondents were asked to give the characteristics of their practices in performing daily barium enema. The data from this questionnaire was used as a reference. The second questionnaire was sent to the respondents together with an abstract on the randomized clinical trial supporting the use of antispasmodic drugs in barium enema. We also indicated a preference for Buscopan over Glucagon as the antispasmodic drug. The willingness to change prescription habits was measured by comparing the data of the two questionnaires. Results: Of 481 practicing radiologists, 312 responded to the first questionnaire and gave information of their prescription habits (response rate 64%). These 312 responders were sent an abstract of the RCT and were asked to fill out a second questionnaire to determine their willingness to change their practice. Two hundred and sixty-seven radiologists responded (response rate 86%). A significant number of 119 (51%) were willing to increase the use of antispasmodic drugs. A significant number of 128 (55%) chose to increase the use of Buscopan, while a significant number of 81 (32%) were willing to decrease the use of Glucagon. Conclusion: Direct exposure to the results of an RCT recommending the use of antispasmodic drugs in barium enema, especially Buscopan, is likely to increase its use by practicing radiologists

  8. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  9. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In-One

    2014-01-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  10. The radiological impact of naturally-occurring radionuclides in foods from the wild

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Hammond, D.J.; Davidson, M.F.; Wilkins, B.T.; Williams, B.

    2002-01-01

    Habit surveys have been conducted to identify people who make use of foodstuffs collected from the wild (free foods) in two areas of the UK: in the area around Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire, where levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides in soil were expected to be typical of the UK, and in the vicinity of Okehampton in Devon, where levels were known to be elevated. Individuals who make regular use of these foodstuffs were specifically identified, so that an estimate of typical and higher than average consumption rates could be derived. The naturally-occurring radionuclides of interest were 210 Po, 210 Pb, 234 U, 235 U, 238 U, 230 Th, 232 Th and 226 Ra. Samples of important foodstuffs were collected and the radionuclides of interest determined. The consumption rates were combined with the measured activity concentrations and published dose coefficients to estimate doses to average and higher than average consumers. These doses were compared with estimated doses reported in the Food Standards Agency's ongoing monitoring programme and with average doses to the population of the UK reviewed by NRPB. In total, 400 people were identified and between them they collected 54 different types of free food. Blackberries were by far the most common species collected, although various types of mushroom and nuts were also popular. On average, each collector from around Chipping Norton collected 2.1 different foods, and each from around Okehampton collected 2.2. On the basis of the habit survey, therefore, it would be reasonable to expect that any site, nuclear or otherwise, chosen for habit surveys, whether for radiological purposes or for any other contaminant, could have substantial numbers of people collecting free foods. In addition, the pattern of foods collected was very similar to previous studies, indicating similarities across England and Wales. Doses from the consumption of free foods were estimated. The annual doses estimated to have been received by a typical

  11. Liturgy as space for anticipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Cilliers

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes that the notion of liturgical space, understood in conjunction with the original Greek concept of space, is not only a quantitative, physical locality, but also a primary qualitative possibility for existence, a meaningful womb, a neighbourhood for imagination and a space for anticipation. Three consequences of this proposal are discussed, namely liturgy as waiting on the elusive presence (presence of absence of God, celebration as (metaphorical dance of hope, and the need for liturgical refiguring.

  12. An assessment of the radiological impact of coastal erosion of the UK Low-Level Waste Repository - 59137

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumerling, Trevor; Shevelan, John; Cummings, Richard; Fish, Paul; Towler, George; Penfold, James

    2012-01-01

    The UK Low Level Waste Repository Ltd submitted an Environmental Safety Case for the disposal of low-level waste to our regulator, the Environment Agency, on the 1 May 2011. This includes assessments of the long-term radiological safety of past and future disposals. A particular feature of the Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) is that, because of its proximity to the coast, the site is vulnerable to coastal erosion. Our present understanding is that the site will be eroded on a timescale of a few hundred to a few thousand years, with consequent disruption of the repository, and dispersal of the wastes. We have undertaken a programme of scientific research and monitoring to characterise the evolution and function of the current coastal system that provides a basis for forecasting its future evolution. This has included modelling of contemporary hydrodynamics, geo-morphological mapping, repeat LiDAR and aerial photographic surveys to detect patterns and rates of change, coastal inspections and reconstructions of post-glacial (i.e. last 15, 000 years) sea levels and sediment budgets. Estimates of future sea-level rise have been derived from international sources and consideration given to the impact of such on the local coastline. Two alternative models of coastal recession have then been applied, one empirical and one physical-process based, taking account of the composition of Quaternary-age sediments between the coast and the site and uncertainties in future local sea level change. Comparison of the ranges of calculated times to site contact with sea-level rise indicate that the repository is most likely to be disrupted by undercutting of the engineered vaults and of the trenches. A novel and flexible radiological assessment model has been developed to analyse the impacts of the erosion of the repository and subsequent dispersal of wastes. The model represents the spatial layout of the site and distribution of radionuclides within the repository and is able to take

  13. Anticipating Climate Change Impacts on Army Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    3.1 35.6 2.0 NCAR CSM 2.2 36.9 2.7 35.6 2.0 ERDC SR-11-1 25 Figure 9 shows a comparison of the 16 models for temperatures and pre- cipitation...Research Activities in Atmospheric and Oceanic Modelling. Report No. 21, WMO/ TD -No. 665. World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland...Modelling. Report No. 21, WMO/ TD -No. 665. World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. Cai, W., M. A. Collier, P. D. Durack, H. B

  14. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  15. Radiological impact of a national repository for radioactive waste: the italian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrangeli, G.

    2002-01-01

    Type of repository: It is assumed that the disposal structure is similar to the French one in l'Aube or to the Spanish one in El Cabril. The waste are assumed to comply with the ANPA Technical Guide (T.G.) n. 26 and are, therefore, conditioned in a concrete matrix with compression strength of at least 50 Kg/cm 2 . Reference impact: It is assumed that the reference impact produces a conical crater having an angle of 90 o and a depth of 4 m. The cause of the impact is, moreover assumed to be undefined; it could be eventually identified, however, with a plane crash, with the launch of a projectile or with the blast of an internal or external explosive charge. The 4 m deep crater has been chosen as it can be related with an explosive projectile of medium size (discussion at the Hannover Congress on the nuclear underground sites). The volume of material expelled from the crater would then be of about 70 m 3 corresponding to a weight of about 140 tons. These values can be compared with the effect of mining explosives and with the effect of a plane crash. The amount of rock (hard limestone rock) demolished in an open air mine is of the order of 7-10 tons of rock per Kg of explosive. The 140 tons of rock considered above would then correspond (in ideal conditions) to about 20 Kg of explosive, an amount to be considered modest. The effect of an aeroplane crash, then, may cause, according to usual assumptions, a load of about 10 000 tons on a surface area of 7 m 2 , corresponding to about 150 Kg/cm 2

  16. Implementation of a competency check-off in diagnostic fluoroscopy for radiology trainees: impact on reducing radiation for three common fluoroscopic exams in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Sweta; Desouches, Stephane L.; Lowe, Lisa H.; Kasraie, Nima; Reading, Brenton

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is an important tool for diagnosis in the pediatric population, but it carries the risk of radiation exposure. Because radiology resident education and experience in the use of fluoroscopy equipment in children vary, we implemented an intervention to standardize fluoroscopy training. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing a fluoroscopy competency check-off for radiology resident trainees aimed at decreasing radiation exposure in three common pediatric fluoroscopic studies. A fluoroscopy competency check-off form was developed for radiology resident trainees performing pediatric procedures. Techniques used to limit radiation exposure for common pediatric radiologic studies were reviewed as part of the check-off process. Pediatric radiologists supervised each trainee until they demonstrated competence to independently perform three specified procedures. Radiation dose was recorded for the three procedures, upper GI (UGI), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and oropharyngeal (OPM) exams, over 6 months preceding and 6 months following implementation of the competency check-off. The mean cumulative dose for each procedure was compared before and after implementation of competency check-off using a Kruskal-Wallis test. During the 12-month study period doses from 909 fluoroscopic procedures were recorded. In the 6 months preceding competency check-off implementation, procedures were performed by 24 radiology resident trainees including 171 UGI, 176 VCUG and 171 OPM exams. In the 6 months following competency check-off, 23 trainees performed 114 UGI, 145 VCUG and 132 OPM exams. After competency check-off implementation, a statistically significant reduction in average radiation dose was found for all three studies (P < 0.001). Median cumulative doses (mGy) were decreased by 33%, 36% and 13% for UGIs, VCUGs and OPMs, respectively. Implementation of a competency check-off for radiology resident trainees can reduce average radiation

  17. Natural radionuclides in zircon and related radiological impacts in mineral separation plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridasan, P P; Pillai, P M B; Khan, A H; Puranik, V D

    2006-01-01

    The activity concentration of uranium and thorium present in zircon obtained from mineral sand industries are presented. External gamma radiation levels and inhalation of airborne dust are found to be the significant routes of radiation exposure to occupational workers. The annual average dose attributed to zircon processing is estimated to be 2.3 mSv in the plants under study. This paper presents the results of external gamma measurements, estimation of airborne radioactivity in zircon process locations and radon and thoron in the occupational environment of two mineral separation plants in India. Analyses of the solid wastes and liquid effluent generated and resultant environmental impacts are indicated.

  18. Impact of Breast Density Legislation on Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Supplemental Screening: A Survey of 110 Radiology Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Lina; Miyake, Kanae K; Leung, Jessica W T; Price, Elissa R; Liu, Yueyi I; Joe, Bonnie N; Sickles, Edward A; Thomas, William R; Lipson, Jafi A; Daniel, Bruce L; Hargreaves, Jonathan; Brenner, R James; Bassett, Lawrence W; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Lindfors, Karen K; Feig, Stephen A; Ikeda, Debra M

    2016-09-01

    Breast density notification laws, passed in 19 states as of October 2014, mandate that patients be informed of their breast density. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of this legislation on radiology practices, including performance of breast cancer risk assessment and supplemental screening studies. A 20-question anonymous web-based survey was emailed to radiologists in the Society of Breast Imaging between August 2013 and March 2014. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. Around 121 radiologists from 110 facilities in 34 USA states and 1 Canadian site responded. About 50% (55/110) of facilities had breast density legislation, 36% of facilities (39/109) performed breast cancer risk assessment (one facility did not respond). Risk assessment was performed as a new task in response to density legislation in 40% (6/15) of facilities in states with notification laws. However, there was no significant difference in performing risk assessment between facilities in states with a law and those without (p legislation, 33% (16/48), 6% (3/48), and 6% (3/48) of facilities in states with laws implemented handheld whole breast ultrasound (WBUS), automated WBUS, and tomosynthesis, respectively. The ratio of facilities offering handheld WBUS was significantly higher in states with a law than in states without (p legislation, more than 33% of facilities are offering supplemental screening with WBUS and tomosynthesis, and many are performing formal risk assessment for determining patient management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Scenarios for 14C release to the atmosphere by the world nuclear industry and estimated radiological impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, J.E.; Killough, G.G.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the radiation dose to the world population and the associated potential health effects from three scenarios of 14 C releases by the nuclear industry between 1975 and 2020. Measures of health impact are derived from source terms through the use of a multicompartment model of the global carbon cycle, dose-rate factors based on 14 C specific activity in various organs of man, and health-effect incidence factors recently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The scenarios for worldwide 14 C releases considered are (1) a pessimistic scenario in which all the 14 C projected to be produced in fuel cycles is released, (2) an optimistic scenario that assumes a decontamination factor of 100 for fuel reprocessing, and (3) an intermediate scenario that simulates a phased improvement in effluent treatment technology at reprocessing plants. The estimates of cumulative potential health effects are based on integrations over infinite time. Comparisons with estimated effects from naturally formed 14 C are shown

  20. Integrating the Radiology Information System with Computerised Provider Order Entry: The Impact on Repeat Medical Imaging Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio, Elia; Georgiou, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Repeat and redundant procedures in medical imaging are associated with increases in resource utilisation and labour costs. Unnecessary medical imaging in some modalities, such as X-Ray (XR) and Computed Tomography (CT) is an important safety issue because it exposes patients to ionising radiation which can be carcinogenic and is associated with higher rates of cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of implementing an integrated Computerised Provider Order Entry (CPOE)/Radiology Information System (RIS)/Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) system on the number of XR and CT imaging procedures (including repeat imaging requests) for inpatients at a large metropolitan hospital. The study found that patients had an average 0.47 fewer XR procedures and 0.07 fewer CT procedures after the implementation of the integrated system. Part of this reduction was driven by a lower rate of repeat procedures: the average inpatient had 0.13 fewer repeat XR procedures within 24-hours of the previous identical XR procedure. A similar decrease was not evident for repeat CT procedures. Reduced utilisation of imaging procedures (especially those within very short intervals from the previous identical procedure, which are more likely to be redundant) has implications for the safety of patients and the cost of medical imaging services.

  1. Some aspects of radiological impact in phosphate fertilizer industry. A case study of Itataia, Ceara State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, Samir.

    1995-10-01

    The present study presents severalk aspects related to the phosphate industry from the origin of the raw materials to the final products. Emphasis is given in the approach of problems associated with the radiological impact and inherent risks when non monitorated products are used. Considerations are made on geological, geochemical and radiometrical characteristics of the main world deposits of phosphatic rocks. The critical patways of U-238 and Th-232 radionuclides are analysed from its origin to the final products. World-wide statistical data on several industrial phosphate branches are presented, and suggestions are made to draw attention to governmental organizations on the need for establishing specific technological development programs for the extraction of radionuclides from phosphate industrial products. The Itataia's project of industrial mining and milling, located in the state of Ceara, is focused here in great detail considering that is represents one of the biggest world concentrations of uranium associated with phosphatic rocks. Results from field studies performed in Itataia's mine are presented and analytical results from laboratory studies in samples from Itataia's (CE) and Barreiro's (MG) phosphatic rocks and Guaramicim's (PE) phospholite are also discussed. Finally, the study proposes a series of necessary actions to implement a national environmental monitoring plan i order to minimize the risks due to the radioactivity arising from phosphatic rocks and from derived fertilizers industry. (author). 37 refs., 31 figs., 37 tabs

  2. Need to monitoring the particulate components and gaseous components of the I-131 in air, on Radiological monitoring networks. impact of the accident of Fukushima Dai-chi in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza Espasa, A.; Caballero Andrada, M.; Corbacho Merino, J. A.; Ontalba Salamanca, M. A.; Rodriguez Perulero, A.; Valencia Corrales, D.; Vasco Vargas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Following a nuclear accident with significant overseas evacuations, it should be accurately determined concentration radio iodines into the atmosphere, given its important contribution to the radiological impact produced. Automatic networks radiation monitoring aim to provide as quickly as possible, reliable information on these radiological changes, to take necessary countermeasures. (Author)

  3. Radiological impact of the French nuclear program over the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maccia, C.; Fagnani, F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a practical assessment of environmental and health impact associated with the normal operation of the different facilities within the French uranium fuel cycle. (Only the PWR's are taken into account.) Fundamentally three objectives are considered in this impact assessment: the environment, the general public and the workers. The French nuclear program projected for 1990 consists in 50 reactors (PWR), distributed on about 24 sites, and is able to satisfy a demand of 304,5 TWh. Concerning each step of the uranium fuel cycle (mine, mill, conversion, enrichment, fuel abrication, reactor, reprocessing and transportation) the following health and physical indicators are used: 1) Liquid and gaseous activities annually released from normal operation of the facility. 2) Individual whole body dose-equivalent at the site boundary. 3) Collective dose equivalent for the general public 20-50 km from the site. 4) Individual and collective occupational radiation exposures. 5) Health effects estimated over the year 1990 by application of the last ICRP's coefficients (Publication No.26). Finally an application of the environmental commitment dose concept is included for the long half-life radionuclides released. (H.K.)

  4. An assessment of the radiological impact of human intrusion at the UK Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) - 59356

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, Tim; Baldwin, Tamara; Cummings, Richard; Sumerling, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The UK Low Level Waste Repository Ltd submitted an Environmental Safety Case for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) to the Environment Agency on the 1 May 2011. The Environmental Safety Case (ESC) presents a complete case for the environmental safety of the Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) both during operations and in the long term (Cummings et al, in these proceedings). This includes an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of the facility, including an assessment of the potential consequences of human intrusion at the site. The human intrusion assessment is based on a cautiously realistic approach in defining intrusion cases and parameter values. A range of possible human intrusion events was considered based on present-day technologies and credible future uses of the site. This process resulted in the identification of geotechnical investigations, a housing development and a smallholding as requiring quantitative assessment. A particular feature of the site is that, because of its proximity to the coast and in view of expected global sea-level rise, it is vulnerable to coastal erosion. During such erosion, wastes and engineered barrier materials will be exposed, and could become targets for investigation or recovery. Therefore, human intrusion events have been included that are associated with such activities. A radiological assessment model has been developed to analyse the impacts of potential human intrusion at the site. A key feature of the model is the representation of the spatial layout of the disposal site, including the engineered cap design and the large-scale spatial heterogeneity of radionuclide concentrations within the repository. The model has been used to calculate the radiation dose to intruders and to others following intrusion at different times and at different locations across the site, for the each of the selected intrusion events, considering all relevant exposure modes. Potential doses due to radon and its daughters in

  5. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaskar, S.N.

    1982-01-01

    The book presents the radiological manifestations of the maxillodental region in a suitable manner for fast detection and correct diagnosing of diseases of the teeth, soft tissue, and jaws. Classification therefore is made according to the radiological manifestations of the diseases and not according to etiology. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Radiological impact assessment of arc welding supplies rutile; Evaluacion del impacto radiologico de la soldadura por arco con consumibles de rutilo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozas Guinea, S.; Herranz Soler, M.; Perez Marin, C.; Idoeta Hermandorena, R.; Alegria gutierrez, N.; Nunez-Lagos Rogla, R.; Legarda Ibanez, F.

    2013-07-01

    Consumables for welding containing rutile, the coating of the electrode or the filling of tubular thread, are the most widely used and also the most radioactive since the rutile is a mineral containing traces of natural radionuclides, and is therefore considered Normal Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). As these electrodes and wire are consumed, small particles, aerosols and gases are emitted to the atmosphere of work, and may be inhaled by the welder. Therefore, and also according to the current regulatory framework and work carried out previously by the author on the radiological impact of the process of manufacture and storage of coated rutile electrodes, the objectives are: 1Calcular the internal dose for inhalation during two types of welding, one with electrodes coated and the other with thread. 2 calculate the external dose due to the deposition of particles in the work environment, slag and the immersion of the soldering iron in the cloud of smoke. 3 to assess the radiological impact. (Author)

  7. Evaluation guideline for the study of the radiological impact of based nuclear installations (INB) presented in support of releases authorization demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, M.; Despres, A.; Supervil, S.; Conte, D.; Hubert, P.; Oudiz, A.; Champion, D.

    2002-10-01

    In the case of a license demand for the effluents release and water taking for a nuclear installation, the operating must realize a study of the nuclear effluents radiological impact on the environment and the public health. In this context, the study presents technical and methodological specifications which led the Direction of the Nuclear Installations Safety (DSIN) and the General Direction of the Health (DGS) to ask the IPSN the elaboration of a guideline to help these studies evaluation. The guideline presents the regulatory context, the description of the installations, the treatment and the control processes, the rules of management, the description of the environment, the estimation of the radiological impacts and the environment control system definition. (A.L.B.)

  8. Radiological impact of phosphogypsum surface application in a no-till system in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivea Maria Piccolomini Dias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the impact of phosphogypsum application on 226Ra and 228Ra activities in the soil and on their accumulation in soybean grains. A field experiment was carried out in Paraná state, Brazil, on a loamy Typic Hapludox, under no-till system, with increasing phosphogypsum rates: 4, 8, and 12 Mg ha-1. GammA ray spectrometry was carried out using HPGe detectors with 45 and 10% relative efficiencies, for soybean grains and soil, respectively. No increment of 226Ra and 228Ra activities was observed due to the increase in phosphogypsum rates in the soil, and a small reduction was noticed in the grains. Average values found for 226Ra and 228Ra activities were 37 and 57 Bq kg-1 in the soil and 1.44 and 3.19 Bq kg-1 in soybean grains. The application of phosphogypsum for no-till soybean production is a safe practice regarding the risks of radiation damage to human health

  9. A comparison of the radiological impact of energy production by fission and fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancillac, F.; Despres, A.

    1990-04-01

    The impacts of respectively a light water reactor and a planned fusion reactor, for which tritium-deuterium fusion reactions will act as energy source have been compared. The comparison is made on the basis of a generated capacity of 1 GWe.year, using the following criteria: fuel inventories, radioactive releases, collective effective dose equivalent commitments to the public and the volume of wastes. The accidental risk is not introduced. Fusion reactor parameters are still subject to uncertainties, which prevent accurate quantification of radionuclide releases (tritium apart) from the nuclear plant. Only orders of magnitude extrapolated from values for the NET tokamak are given. Despite these uncertainties, it would seem more interesting, from the dosimetric point of view, to use fusion reactors to produce electricity, although problems of radioactive releases, handling and long-term storage of radioactive waste would remain. Fusion reactors also generate generate high-level wastes with long-term exposure rates that are lower than those of light water reactors [fr

  10. Radiological impact of phosphogypsum discharged into the Venice lagoon: 222Rn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasson A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For about 20 years, between the 60 ’s and the 80 ’s of the last century, in the Passo a Campalto area (Lagoon of Venice - Italy about 400,000 m3 of phosphogypsum (PG were deposited at the border of the lagoon and next to urban areas without any environmental control. These materials are a by-product formed during the wet processing of phosphate rocks by sulphuric acid and have a significant environmental impact due to their abundance and their chemical-physical and radiochemical characteristics. The PG contains both chemical elements, which are considered dangerous for the ecosystems and natural radionuclides whose concentrations are much higher if compared to those typical for the Earth’s crust. These discarded materials caused for many years the dispersion of radionuclides in the environment due to the tidal erosion, the re-suspension of radioactive inhalable dusts, the uncontrolled radon exhalation and the bioaccumulation of some radionuclides in the lagoon environment. After a decision of the appointed authorities, the Venice Water Authority (Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport, planned a permanent safety control of the site resulting in the complete isolation of the entire volume of contaminated materials from the environmental system. The entire project was specific for the particular features of the site and it required the improvement of analytical, sampling and measurement techniques in order to verify the effectiveness of the safety action. The radon assessment, in particular the check of the effectiveness of the inhibition of radon exhalation, is part of a more complex study, covering many other aspects of the management of a permanent disposal; they will be the object of further notes. The ultimate results of this study prove the efficacy of the intervention: radon concentrations in air and exhalation values from the restored area, measured during surveys, have been proved to be well in agreement with those of non

  11. Radiological impact of phosphogypsum discharged into the Venice lagoon: 222Rn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantaluppi, C.; Ceccotto, F.; Cianchi, A.; Fasson, A.; Degetto, S.

    2012-04-01

    For about 20 years, between the 60 's and the 80 's of the last century, in the Passo a Campalto area (Lagoon of Venice - Italy) about 400,000 m3 of phosphogypsum (PG) were deposited at the border of the lagoon and next to urban areas without any environmental control. These materials are a by-product formed during the wet processing of phosphate rocks by sulphuric acid and have a significant environmental impact due to their abundance and their chemical-physical and radiochemical characteristics. The PG contains both chemical elements, which are considered dangerous for the ecosystems and natural radionuclides whose concentrations are much higher if compared to those typical for the Earth's crust. These discarded materials caused for many years the dispersion of radionuclides in the environment due to the tidal erosion, the re-suspension of radioactive inhalable dusts, the uncontrolled radon exhalation and the bioaccumulation of some radionuclides in the lagoon environment. After a decision of the appointed authorities, the Venice Water Authority (Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport), planned a permanent safety control of the site resulting in the complete isolation of the entire volume of contaminated materials from the environmental system. The entire project was specific for the particular features of the site and it required the improvement of analytical, sampling and measurement techniques in order to verify the effectiveness of the safety action. The radon assessment, in particular the check of the effectiveness of the inhibition of radon exhalation, is part of a more complex study, covering many other aspects of the management of a permanent disposal; they will be the object of further notes. The ultimate results of this study prove the efficacy of the intervention: radon concentrations in air and exhalation values from the restored area, measured during surveys, have been proved to be well in agreement with those of non contaminated soils.

  12. Evaluation of radiological impacts of tenorm in the Tunisian petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrichi, Hajer; Baccouche, Souad; Belgaied, Jamel-Eddine

    2013-01-01

    The health impacts associated with uncontrolled release of TENORM in products and wastes released in the petroleum industry are of great concern. In this study, evaluation of TENORM in the Tunisian petroleum products and wastes is presented. Fourteen products samples, twelve waste samples and three samples from the surrounding environment were collected from the Tunisian Refinery STIR site and from two onshore production oilfields. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K for all samples were determined using gamma-ray spectrometry with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of (224)Ra were calculated only for scale samples. The radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, absorbed doses rates in air and annual effective dose were also estimated. It was noticed that maximum value of Ra(eq) activity was found to be 398 Bq/kg in scale (w8) collected from an onshore production oilfield which exceeds the maximum Ra(eq) value of 370 Bq/kg recommended for safe use. All hazard indices indicated that scale samples (w6, w7, w8 and w11) could be a significant waste problem especially sample (w8). In this study, the radium isotopic data were used to provide an estimate of scale samples ages by the use of the (224)Ra/(228)Ra activity ratio dating method. Ages of collected scales were found to be in the range 0.91-2.4 years. In this work, radioactivity (NORM contamination) in samples collected from the refinery STIR are showed to be insignificant if compared to those from onshore oilfield production sites. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiological impact assessment of the shut-down Salaspils nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riekstina, D.; Berzins, J.; Veveris, O.; Alksnis, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to gain an overview about the background level of radioactivity and gamma radiation in the 3x3 km area around the Salaspils (Latvia) nuclear reactor after its shutting down. The ultimate design of the project is to assess the impact environmental background level during its 37 years long working time. For this purpose we have carried out: 1) the determination of radioactivity in soils; 2) the determination of radioactivity in groundwater; 3) the measurement of gamma-ray background in the checkpoints. The net density for the collection of soil samples (5 cm thick layer was gathered) and the gamma background measuring was 500x500 m and the total number of checkpoints was 113. The gamma-spectrometric analysis of the groundwater taken from 34 places: in the reactor territory (4-10 m depth) and from the wells of surrounding farms (8-12 m depth) was performed. The soil samples were dried at the temperature 105 0 C until the constant weight, and sifted. The high-resolution gamma spectrometry was used for measurement within the energy range of 50-2000 keV; the time of measuring - 20 hours. The uncertainty of measurements is within a range of 3-10%, but the minimal detectable activity - from 0.3 up to 1 Bq/kg. Cs-137 and natural radionuclides Th-232, U-238, K-40 were detected in soils. The concentration of Cs-137 varies in the range 0.3-227 Bq/kg or 20-1940 Bq/m 2 . It was established that the concentration of Cs-137 in neighbouring checkpoints can differ significantly. It could be explained by the type of soil and the collection place (coniferous or leafy forest, grassland, plough land etc.). The differences of the U-238, Th-232, and K-40 content in samples taken from various places are due to the type of soil and the fertilizers used. The concentration of these radionuclides is significantly lower in the turf. In all water samples the concentration of Cs-137 was lower than the minimal detectable activity. The determined radionuclide

  14. Radiological colpocephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landman, J.; Dulitzki, F.; Sirota, L.; Aloni, D.; Bar-Ziv, J.; Weitz, R.; Shuper, A.; Gadoth, N.

    1989-01-01

    The term colpocephaly, meaning disproportional enlargement of the occipital horns of the lateral ventricles, was considered in the past to be a distinct congenital malformation acquired in early intrauterine life. During the last few years several causes were reported in whom a variety of intrauterine and perinatal causes could be associated with this radiological picture. We report on 9 children with radiological colpocephaly in whom intrauterine and/or perinatal injury to the developing brain seemed to be the cause of colpocephaly. It is evident from our observations that 'radiological colpocephaly' is a non-specific finding caused frequently by CNS damage acquired during intrauterine and perinatal life. (author)

  15. The Introduction of an Undergraduate Interventional Radiology (IR) Curriculum: Impact on Medical Student Knowledge and Interest in IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, M. [Bradford Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Bradford Teaching Hospital Foundation Trust (United Kingdom); Shaygi, B. [Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (United Kingdom); Asadi, H., E-mail: asadi.hamed@gmail.com; Thanaratnam, P.; Pennycooke, K.; Mirza, M.; Lee, M., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2016-04-15

    IntroductionInterventional radiology (IR) plays a vital role in modern medicine, with increasing demand for services, but with a shortage of experienced interventionalists. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a recently introduced IR curriculum on perception, knowledge, and interest of medical students regarding various aspects of IR.MethodsIn 2014, an anonymous web-based questionnaire was sent to 309 4th year medical students in a single institution within an EU country, both before and after delivery of a 10-h IR teaching curriculum.ResultsSeventy-six percent (236/309) of the respondents participated in the pre-IR module survey, while 50 % (157/309) responded to the post-IR module survey. While 62 % (147/236) of the respondents reported poor or no knowledge of IR compared to other medical disciplines in the pre-IR module survey, this decreased to 17 % (27/157) in the post-IR module survey. The correct responses regarding knowledge of selected IR procedures improved from 70 to 94 % for venous access, 78 to 99 % for uterine fibroid embolization, 75 to 97 % for GI bleeding embolization, 60 to 92 % for trauma embolization, 71 to 92 % for tumor ablation, and 81 to 94 % for angioplasty and stenting in peripheral arterial disease. With regard to knowledge of IR clinical roles, responses improved from 42 to 59 % for outpatient clinic review of patients and having inpatient beds, 63–76 % for direct patient consultation, and 43–60 % for having regular ward rounds. The number of students who would consider a career in IR increased from 60 to 73 %.ConclusionDelivering an undergraduate IR curriculum increased the knowledge and understanding of various aspects of IR and also the general enthusiasm for pursuing this specialty as a future career choice.

  16. Radiological characterisation - Know your objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindow, Veronica; Moeller, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    When developing a programme for mapping the radiological characteristics of a facility to be decommissioned it is important to take into account the objectives of the programme. Will the results be used to plan for radiological control and selection of appropriate decontamination and dismantling techniques? Will the radiological inventory be used for dimensioning of future waste repositories? These are two examples of the applications for such studies, which could require that a radiological characterisation programme be adapted to provide the data appropriate to the intended use. The level of detail and scope needed for a radiological characterisation will also vary depending on how the data will be used. An application to free-release a facility requires a comprehensive survey and well documented analysis in order to ensure that no radioactive contamination above prescribed levels is present. A bounding calculation to determine the maximum anticipated volumes and activity of radioactive waste requires a different approach. During the past few years, older decommissioning studies for the Swedish nuclear power plants have been updated (or are in the process of being updated). The decommissioning study's main purpose is to estimate the cost for decommissioning. The cost estimation is based on material and activity inventories, which in turn is based on previous and, in some cases, updated radiological characterisations of the facilities. The radiological inventory is an important part of the study as it affects the cost of decommissioning but also the uncertainties and accuracy of the cost estimation. The presentation will discuss the challenges in specifying a radiological characterisation programme with multiple objectives, together with insights on how data delivered can be applied to yield results suitable for the intended purpose, without introducing excessive conservatism. The intent of the presentation is to define issues that can be of use in various aspects

  17. Radiological optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.

    1998-01-01

    Radiological optimization is one of the basic principles in each radiation-protection system and it is a basic requirement in the safety standards for radiation protection in the European Communities. The objectives of the research, performed in this field at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, are: (1) to implement the ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for optimization techniques in decision-aiding; (3) to optimize radiological assessment models by validation and intercomparison; (4) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (5) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (6) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (7) to investigate existing software programmes in the domain of multi criteria analysis. The main achievements for 1997 are given

  18. Canadian Association of Radiologists White Paper on Artificial Intelligence in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Tam, Roger; Cadrin-Chênevert, Alexandre; Guest, Will; Chong, Jaron; Barfett, Joseph; Chepelev, Leonid; Cairns, Robyn; Mitchell, J Ross; Cicero, Mark D; Poudrette, Manuel Gaudreau; Jaremko, Jacob L; Reinhold, Caroline; Gallix, Benoit; Gray, Bruce; Geis, Raym

    2018-05-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is rapidly moving from an experimental phase to an implementation phase in many fields, including medicine. The combination of improved availability of large datasets, increasing computing power, and advances in learning algorithms has created major performance breakthroughs in the development of AI applications. In the last 5 years, AI techniques known as deep learning have delivered rapidly improving performance in image recognition, caption generation, and speech recognition. Radiology, in particular, is a prime candidate for early adoption of these techniques. It is anticipated that the implementation of AI in radiology over the next decade will significantly improve the quality, value, and depth of radiology's contribution to patient care and population health, and will revolutionize radiologists' workflows. The Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) is the national voice of radiology committed to promoting the highest standards in patient-centered imaging, lifelong learning, and research. The CAR has created an AI working group with the mandate to discuss and deliberate on practice, policy, and patient care issues related to the introduction and implementation of AI in imaging. This white paper provides recommendations for the CAR derived from deliberations between members of the AI working group. This white paper on AI in radiology will inform CAR members and policymakers on key terminology, educational needs of members, research and development, partnerships, potential clinical applications, implementation, structure and governance, role of radiologists, and potential impact of AI on radiology in Canada. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the atmospheric stability and it influence in the radiological environmental impact of the treatment plant and radioactive waste storage (PTDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos V, E.O.; Cornejo D, N.

    2006-01-01

    It is well-known that the meteorological variables as the atmospheric stability, influence in the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants, for that as regards radiological safety, it constitutes a demand the evaluation of their impact in the process before mentioned. The present work exposes the results of the study of the radiological impact of our PTDR that it allowed to know the influence of this meteorological parameter in the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants in its location. To such effects they were processed by means of the methodology of Pasquill - Gifford, data of time zone observations of this meteorological variable obtained in the proximities of the installation, being modeled the worst conditions in atmospheric liberation of their radionuclides inventory, valuing stops the 2 critical considered population groups the doses received by inhalation of polluted air and ingestion of water and polluted products, as well as, for external irradiation from the radioactive cloud and the floor. The obtained annual effective doses due to the modeling situation reach until a mSv, except for the Ra-226 that are lightly superior, implying a risk radiological acceptable chord to the international standard. To the above-mentioned a reduced probability of occurrence of events initiators of the evaluated accidental sequence is added. (Author)

  20. Citation trend and suggestions for improvement of impact factor of Journal of Korean Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Hwang, Seong Su; Ahn, Myeong Im; Jeong, So Na

    2006-01-01

    To analyze the recent citation trend and to find a way to improve impact factor (IF) of the Journal of Korean Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JKSTRO) by analysis of Korean Medical Citation index (KoMCI) citation data of JKSTRO and comparison with that of mean citation data of all journals enlisted on KoMCI (KoMCI journals) during 2000-2005. All citation data of entire journals enlisted on KoMCI and JKSTRO from 2000 to 2005 were obtained from KoMCI. The trend of total and annual number of published articles and reference citations, total citations and self-citations per paper, IF and impact factor excluding self-citations (ZIF) were described and compared on both KoMCI journals an JKSTRO. Annual number of published articles was decreased for 6 years on both KoMCI journals and JKSTRO (32% and 38% reduction rate). The number of Korean journal references per article is 1.6 papers of JKSTRO comparing to 2.0 papers on KoMCI journals. The percentage of Korean references/total references increased from 5.0% in 2000 to 7.7% in 2005 on JKSTRO and from 8.5% in 2000 to 10.1% on KoMCI journals. The number of total citations received/paper on JKSTRO (average 1.333) is smaller than that of KoMCI journals (average 1.694), there was an increased rate of 67% in 2005 comparing to 2000. The percentage of self-citations/total citations (average 72%) on JKSTRO is slightly higher than that of KoMCI journals (average 61%)/ IF of JKSTRO was gradually improved and 0.144, 0.125, 0.088, 0.107, 0.187 and 0.203 in 2000-2005 respectively. However, ZIF of JKSTRO is steadily decreased from 0.038 in 2000 to 0.013 in 2005 except 0.044 in 2004. IF of JKSTRO was slightly improved but had some innate problem of smaller number of citations received . To make JKSTRO as a highly cited journal, the awareness of academic status of JKSTRO and active participation of every member of JKSTRO including encouraging self-citations of papers published recent 2 years and submission of English written papers, and

  1. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V.; Valcke, Martin; Verstraete, Koenraad L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  2. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V., E-mail: elena.kourdioukova@ugent.be [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Valcke, Martin [Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  3. Impact of a PACS/RIS-integrated speech recognition system on radiology reporting time and report availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trumm, C.G.; Glaser, C.; Paasche, V.; Kuettner, B.; Francke, M.; Nissen-Meyer, S.; Reiser, M.; Crispin, A.; Popp, P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of the impact of a PACS/RIS-integrated speech recognition system (SRS) on the time expenditure for radiology reporting and on hospital-wide report availability (RA) in a university institution. Material and Methods: In a prospective pilot study, the following parameters were assessed for 669 radiographic examinations (CR): 1. time requirement per report dictation (TED: dictation time (s)/number of images [examination] x number of words [report]) with either a combination of PACS/tape-based dictation (TD: analog dictation device/minicassette/transcription) or PACS/RIS/speech recognition system (RR: remote recognition/transcription and OR: online recognition/self-correction by radiologist), respectively, and 2. the Report Turnaround Time (RTT) as the time interval from the entry of the first image into the PACS to the available RIS/HIS report. Two equal time periods were chosen retrospectively from the RIS database: 11/2002-2/2003 (only TD) and 11/2003-2/2004 (only RR or OR with speech recognition system [SRS]). The midterm (≥24 h, 24 h intervals) and short-term (< 24 h, 1 h intervals), RA after examination completion were calculated for all modalities and for Cr, CT, MR and XA/DS separately. The relative increase in the mid-term RA (RIMRA: related to total number of examinations in each time period) and increase in the short-term RA (ISRA: ratio of available reports during the 1st to 24th hour) were calculated. Results: Prospectively, there was a significant difference between TD/RR/OR (n=151/257/261) regarding mean TED (0.44/0.54/0.62 s [per word and image]) and mean RTT (10.47/6.65/1.27 h), respectively. Retrospectively, 37 898/39 680 reports were computed from the RIS database for the time periods of 11/2002-2/2003 and 11/2003-2/2004. For CR/CT there was a shift of the short-term RA to the first 6 hours after examination completion (mean cumulative RA 20% higher) with a more than three-fold increase in the total number of available

  4. [Impact of a PACS/RIS-integrated speech recognition system on radiology reporting time and report availability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumm, C G; Glaser, C; Paasche, V; Crispin, A; Popp, P; Küttner, B; Francke, M; Nissen-Meyer, S; Reiser, M

    2006-04-01

    Quantification of the impact of a PACS/RIS-integrated speech recognition system (SRS) on the time expenditure for radiology reporting and on hospital-wide report availability (RA) in a university institution. In a prospective pilot study, the following parameters were assessed for 669 radiographic examinations (CR): 1. time requirement per report dictation (TED: dictation time (s)/number of images [examination] x number of words [report]) with either a combination of PACS/tape-based dictation (TD: analog dictation device/mini-cassette/transcription) or PACS/RIS/speech recognition system (RR: remote recognition/transcription and OR: online recognition/self-correction by radiologist), respectively, and 2. the Report Turnaround Time (RTT) as the time interval from the entry of the first image into the PACS to the available RIS/HIS report. Two equal time periods were chosen retrospectively from the RIS database: 11/2002 - 2/2003 (only TD) and 11/2003 - 2/2004 (only RR or OR with speech recognition system [SRS]). The mid-term (> or = 24 h, 24 h intervals) and short-term (reports during the 1st to 24th hour) were calculated. Prospectively, there was a significant difference between TD/RR/OR (n = 151/257/261) regarding mean TED (0.44/0.54/0.62 s [per word and image]) and mean RTT (10.47/6.65/1.27 h), respectively. Retrospectively, 37 898/39 680 reports were computed from the RIS database for the time periods of 11/2002 - 2/2003 and 11/2003 - 2/2004. For CR/CT there was a shift of the short-term RA to the first 6 hours after examination completion (mean cumulative RA 20 % higher) with a more than three-fold increase in the total number of available reports within 24 hours (all modalities). The RIMRA for CR/CT/MR was 3.1/5.8/4.0 in the first 24 hours, and 2.0 for XA/DS in the second 24-hour interval. In comparison to tape-based dictation, an SRS results in a significantly higher primary time expenditure and a modified report dictation workflow. In a university institution

  5. Anticipated emotions and effort allocation in weight goal striving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelissen, R.M.A.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Zeelenberg, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to investigate the influence of anticipated emotions on preventive health behaviour if specified at the level of behavioural outcomes. Consistent with predictions from a recently developed model of goal pursuit, we hypothesized that the impact of emotions on effort levels

  6. Evaluating the impact of a Canadian national anatomy and radiology contouring boot camp for radiation oncology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswal, Jasbir; D'Souza, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Tay, KengYeow; Fung, Kevin; Nichols, Anthony; Landis, Mark; Leung, Eric; Kassam, Zahra; Willmore, Katherine; D'Souza, David; Sexton, Tracy; Palma, David A

    2015-03-15

    Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course ("boot camp") designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, Pradiology in addition to enhancing their confidence and accuracy in contouring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interactive Radiological Anatomy eLearning Solution for First Year Medical Students: Development, Integration, and Impact on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexandra Louise; Choi, Sunhea

    2014-01-01

    A technology enhanced learning and teaching (TELT) solution, radiological anatomy (RA) eLearning, composed of a range of identification-based and guided learning activities related to normal and pathological X-ray images, was devised for the Year 1 nervous and locomotor course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Its…

  8. The development of biosphere codes for use in assessment of the radiological impact of geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.; Kane, P.; Thorne, M.C.

    1982-12-01

    A statement of radiological protection criteria and measures of dose, forms the preface to a review of extant biosphere codes. Consideration is given to the implementation of the codes FOODII and NEPTUN for use with SYVAC. The selection of nuclides for consideration in SYVAC is discussed. Detailed specifications are provided for biosphere model developments desirable in the longer term. (author)

  9. Assessment of radiological impact in mineral industrial plants caused by deposition of wastes with U{sup 238} and/or Th{sup 232} associated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladeira, Paula C.; Alves, Rex Nazare, E-mail: rexnazare@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ruperti Junior, Nerbe J., E-mail: nruperti@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DIREJ/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Rejeitos Radioativos

    2011-07-01

    The industrial-mining facilities constantly produce, in Brazil and in abroad, wastes from its production, many times containing uranium and/or thorium associated. Due to the large quantities generated, these wastes are usually deposited at the site of the facility, close to the place where they were produced. Since the chains of radioactive U{sup 238} and Th{sup 232} with alpha-emitting radionuclides have long half-life, waste deposits associated with these elements may cause radiological impact on the man and on the environment, even in the long term. Mathematical models are often used to represent the biosphere and the transport of radionuclides near to the surface. Thus, it was decided, through the software {sup M}athematica{sup ,} to present a methodology based on the solution of Bateman equations for the calculation of radiological impact on individuals from the public exposed to contamination. The radiological impact appraisal was carried out considering a scenario of intrusion into landfills containing U{sup 238} and / or Th{sup 232} in post-operational phase of an industrial-mining installation. The critical group examined was represented by farmers who used water from an artesian well for daily consumption and which feed themselves on vegetables locally grown in clay soil. As a result, there was the exposure in pathways evaluated, a minor contribution of dose for ingestion of contaminated water. The conclusion of this work, show us that calculated doses were within the accepted international limits for the intrusion scenario. Parameters associated with mathematical models defining the choice of project to build a landfill for the purpose of deposition, whereas rates of doses can be estimated in each of the scenarios proposed. (author)

  10. A parametric model for analyzing anticipation in genetically predisposed families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Klaus; Petersen, Janne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    Anticipation, i.e. a decreasing age-at-onset in subsequent generations has been observed in a number of genetically triggered diseases. The impact of anticipation is generally studied in affected parent-child pairs. These analyses are restricted to pairs in which both individuals have been affected....... The suggested model corrects for incomplete observations and considers families rather than affected pairs and thereby allows for studies of large sample sets, facilitates subgroup analyses and provides generation effect estimates.......)/Lynch syndrome family cohort from the national Danish HNPCC register. Age-at-onset was analyzed in 824 individuals from 2-4 generations in 125 families with proved disease-predisposing mutations. A significant effect from anticipation was identified with a mean of 3 years earlier age-at-onset per generation...

  11. Radiological protection in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, R.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) reduces the need for many traditional interventions, particularly surgery, so reducing the discomfort and risk for patients compared with traditional systems. IR procedures are frequently performed by non-radiologist physicians, often without the proper radiological equipment and sufficient knowledge of radiation protection. Levels of doses to patients and staff in IR vary enormously. A poor correlation exists between patient and staff dose, and large variations of dose are reported for the same procedure. The occurrence of deterministic effects in patients is another peculiar aspect of IR owing to the potentially high skin doses of some procedures. The paper reviews the use of IR and the radiological protection of patients and staff, and examines the need for new standards for IR equipment and the training of personnel. (author)

  12. Whither Radiology?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15 Mei 1974 ... cess of those audible to animals. Sonar should not be confused with X-rays, which have biological effects due to the production of ionising radiation, whereas ultrasound is vibrational or mechanical energy of an ultrahigh frequency. Ultrasound has taken over from conventional radiology in quite a few ...

  13. Radiologic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, L.O.

    1987-01-01

    An increasing variety of imaging modalities as well as refinements of interventional techniques have led to a resurgence of radiologic interest and participation in urolithiasis management. Judicious selection of the diagnostic examination, close monitoring during the procedure, consultation with urologic colleagues, and a careful regard for radiation safety guidelines define the role of the radiologist in renal stone disease

  14. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindera, Sebastian T; Treier, Reto; von Allmen, Gabriel; Nauer, Claude; Trueb, Philipp R; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt

    2011-10-01

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose.

  15. Evaluation of the environmental radiological impact of Brazilian phosphogypsum and leachability of Ra-226 and Pb-210

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Adir Janete Godoy dos

    2002-01-01

    Phosphogypsum is a by-product produced by the phosphoric acid industry, it is formed by precipitation during wet sulphuric acid processing of phosphate rock. Although phosphogypsum is mainly calcium sulphate dihydrate, it contains elevated levels of impurities, which originate from the source phosphate rock used in the phosphoric acid production. Among these impurities, radionuclides from 238 U and 232 Th decay series, particularly 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 210 Pb and Th isotopes are of most concern due to their radiotoxicity. Elemental characterization of stockpiled phosphogypsum from the two main producers of phosphoric acid, Copebras Ltda and Ultrafertil S.A. named A and C respectively, located in Cubatao, was performed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Phosphogypsum samples are enriched in rare earths elements, specifically Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb and the elements Ba and Th. Radiological characterization of stockpiled phosphogypsum was performed by gamma-ray spectrometry. Activity concentrations (2,3 +- 0,5) x 10 2 Bq kg -1 for 228 Ra, (8,5 +- 2,4) x 10 2 Bq kg -1 for 226 Ra and (8,4 +- 2,4) x 10 2 Bq kg -1 for 210 Pb were observed for industry A phosphogypsum. For industry C phosphogypsum, activity concentrations obtained were (1,6 +- 0,6) x 10 2 Bq kg - ''1 for 226 Ra, (3,6 +- 1,2) x 10 2 Bq kg -1 for 226 Ra and (3,4 +- 1,2) x 10 2 Bq kg -1 for 210 Pb. The radiochemical and elemental characterization of the phosphogypsum from industry A and C show that the stacks are quite homogeneous and mainly dependent upon the origin of the phosphatic rock used as raw material. The environmental radiological impact assessment of stockpiled phosphogypsum from industry C was evaluated by taking into account internal and external doses. The critical pathways considered were contamination of groundwater, emanation of radon and direct external exposure due to the radionuclides present in the phosphogypsum. The activity concentrations obtained in the monitor wells

  16. The role and impact of reference doses on diagnostic radiology, how to use them at the national level?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.; Horvathova, M.; Karkus, R.

    2003-01-01

    Results of patient dose audits reported in this paper for several types of examinations and various technical units have shown the importance of applications of reference dose levels in radiological practice. On the basis of national surveys slightly lower or higher standard dose reference levels (DRL) values could be justified. Continuing revision of DRL values and their extension to other types of radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations is needed

  17. Creation and implementation of department-wide structured reports: an analysis of the impact on error rate in radiology reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, C Matthew; Hall, Seth; Zhang, Bin; Towbin, Alexander J

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare textual error rates and subtypes in radiology reports before and after implementation of department-wide structured reports. Randomly selected radiology reports that were generated following the implementation of department-wide structured reports were evaluated for textual errors by two radiologists. For each report, the text was compared to the corresponding audio file. Errors in each report were tabulated and classified. Error rates were compared to results from a prior study performed prior to implementation of structured reports. Calculated error rates included the average number of errors per report, average number of nongrammatical errors per report, the percentage of reports with an error, and the percentage of reports with a nongrammatical error. Identical versions of voice-recognition software were used for both studies. A total of 644 radiology reports were randomly evaluated as part of this study. There was a statistically significant reduction in the percentage of reports with nongrammatical errors (33 to 26%; p = 0.024). The likelihood of at least one missense omission error (omission errors that changed the meaning of a phrase or sentence) occurring in a report was significantly reduced from 3.5 to 1.2% (p = 0.0175). A statistically significant reduction in the likelihood of at least one comission error (retained statements from a standardized report that contradict the dictated findings or impression) occurring in a report was also observed (3.9 to 0.8%; p = 0.0007). Carefully constructed structured reports can help to reduce certain error types in radiology reports.

  18. Anticipating urgent surgery in operating room departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lans, M.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; Wullink, Gerhard; van Houdenhoven, M.; Kazemier, G.

    2005-01-01

    Operating Room (OR) departments need to create robust surgical schedules that anticipate urgent surgery, while minimizing urgent surgery waiting time and overtime, and maximizing utilization. We consider two levels of planning and control to anticipate urgent surgery. At the tactical level, we study

  19. Evaluating the Impact of a Canadian National Anatomy and Radiology Contouring Boot Camp for Radiation Oncology Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaswal, Jasbir [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); D' Souza, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Tay, KengYeow [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences, London, Ontario (Canada); Fung, Kevin; Nichols, Anthony [Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Victoria Hospital, London, Ontario (Canada); Landis, Mark [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences, London, Ontario (Canada); Leung, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Kassam, Zahra [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care London, London, Ontario (Canada); Willmore, Katherine [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); D' Souza, David; Sexton, Tracy [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Background: Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course (“boot camp”) designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. Methods: The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Results: Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, P<.001). Across all contoured structures, there was a 0.20 median improvement in students' average Dice score (P<.001). For individual structures, significant Dice improvements occurred in 10 structures. Residents self-reported an improved ability to contour OARs and interpret radiographs in all anatomic sites, 92% of students found the MDT format effective for their learning, and 93% found the boot camp

  20. Evaluating the Impact of a Canadian National Anatomy and Radiology Contouring Boot Camp for Radiation Oncology Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaswal, Jasbir; D'Souza, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie; Tay, KengYeow; Fung, Kevin; Nichols, Anthony; Landis, Mark; Leung, Eric; Kassam, Zahra; Willmore, Katherine; D'Souza, David; Sexton, Tracy; Palma, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course (“boot camp”) designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. Methods: The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Results: Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, P<.001). Across all contoured structures, there was a 0.20 median improvement in students' average Dice score (P<.001). For individual structures, significant Dice improvements occurred in 10 structures. Residents self-reported an improved ability to contour OARs and interpret radiographs in all anatomic sites, 92% of students found the MDT format effective for their learning, and 93% found the boot camp

  1. Preliminary Scoping and Assessment Study of the Potential Impacts of Community-wide Radiological Events and Subsequent Decontamination Activities on Drinking Water and Wastewater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; Tomasko, D.; Chen, S.Y.; Hais, A.; MacKinney, J.; Janke, R.

    2006-01-01

    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, there has been a great deal of concern about further attacks within the United States, particularly attacks using weapons of mass destruction (WMD) or other unconventional weapons, such as a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or 'dirty bomb', which is a type of RDD. During all phases of an RDD event, secondary impacts on drinking water and wastewater systems would be possible. Secondary impacts refer to those impacts that would occur when the water systems were not the direct or intended target of the specific event. Secondary impacts would include (1) fallout from an event occurring elsewhere on water supply reservoirs and (2) runoff into storm water and sewer systems during precipitation events or as a result of cleanup and decontamination activities. To help address potential secondary impacts, a scoping and assessment study was conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Homeland Security Research Center to support its water security program. The study addresses the potential impacts on water resources and infrastructure that could result from the use of an RDD, including potential impacts from the initial attack as well as from subsequent cleanup efforts. Eight radionuclides are considered in the assessment: Am-241, Cf-252, Cs-137, Co-60, Ir-192, Pu-238, Ra-226, and Sr-90. (authors)

  2. Evaluation guide for the radiological impact study of a basic nuclear installation (BNI) as a support for the authorization application of releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, Mr.; Despres, A.; Supervil, S.; Conte, D.; Hubert, P.; Oudiz, A.; Champion, D.

    2002-10-01

    At the time of a licence application of effluent releases and water pumping of basic nuclear facilities (BNF), the operator of the installation must in particular provide a radiological impact study of the radioactive effluent releases coming from the installation on the environment and on public health. An impact study of the radioactive releases represents technical and conditional specifications. It was for this reason that the French Safety Authority (ASN then DSIN) and the Directorate-General of Health Services (DGS) requested IRSN (then IPSN), in April 1999, to develop a guide facilitating the review of such a study, as well for the services implied in the examination of the licence applications, as for all the concerned parties in this field. The objective of the guide is to take into account the regulatory context which underlies the development of the impact studies (decree no. 95-540 of May 4, 1995, modified by the decree no. 2002-460 of April 4, 2002, and the Euratom guideline 96/29 of May 13, 1996, known as 'the basic standard guideline', accompanied by its transposition texts in French law). In this precise context, the guide proposes to assess the radiological impact study of a BNF from three different angles: - the description and the quantification of the produced effluents, by taking account of the triggering processes, of the different processing measures and of the procedures to optimise the reduction of the produced effluents; - the estimate of the dosimetric impact of the planned releases on the population, taking into account the environmental characteristics of the installation; - the definition of the conditions to monitor the releases and the environment. This guide provides a general condition logical framework adaptable to any particular situation met

  3. Dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

  4. Genitourinary radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClennan, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review of genitourinary radiology highlights new findings in the field that have occurred in the past year. The physiology of contrast media, and the occasional life-threatening contrast medial reaction are discussed. Common urologic problems such as stones, infection, and obstruction are examined in order to interpret static radiographs in a more meaningful way. The field of interventional uroradiology continues to expand, with new procedures being tried and new indications for old procedures being developed. (KRM)

  5. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  6. Brain Responses during the Anticipation of Dyspnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, M. Cornelia; Esser, Roland W.; Büchel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is common in many cardiorespiratory diseases. Already the anticipation of this aversive symptom elicits fear in many patients resulting in unfavorable health behaviors such as activity avoidance and sedentary lifestyle. This study investigated brain mechanisms underlying these anticipatory processes. We induced dyspnea using resistive-load breathing in healthy subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blocks of severe and mild dyspnea alternated, each preceded by anticipation periods. Severe dyspnea activated a network of sensorimotor, cerebellar, and limbic areas. The left insular, parietal opercular, and cerebellar cortices showed increased activation already during dyspnea anticipation. Left insular and parietal opercular cortex showed increased connectivity with right insular and anterior cingulate cortex when severe dyspnea was anticipated, while the cerebellum showed increased connectivity with the amygdala. Notably, insular activation during dyspnea perception was positively correlated with midbrain activation during anticipation. Moreover, anticipatory fear was positively correlated with anticipatory activation in right insular and anterior cingulate cortex. The results demonstrate that dyspnea anticipation activates brain areas involved in dyspnea perception. The involvement of emotion-related areas such as insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala during dyspnea anticipation most likely reflects anticipatory fear and might underlie the development of unfavorable health behaviors in patients suffering from dyspnea. PMID:27648309

  7. Radiology Design Project Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Raymond W; Teshima, Satoshi; Hogan, Laurie; Davidson, Scott

    2017-12-21

    The design of hospital environments is receiving increased attention as an important contributor to patient satisfaction and experience, which have a direct impact on reimbursement. Well-designed health care environments can decrease stress, improve concentration, and contribute to improved patient outcomes and enhanced staff morale. Most radiologists and business directors lack formal training in design and may feel they have little to contribute to design planning, yet creating an optimal environment for patients requires a strong understanding of local demographics and both patient and staff needs, which is a core responsibility of radiology leadership. This article presents practical guidelines for selecting a design partner for an imaging construction project, developing a design theme and design sensibilities, and engaging a multidisciplinary radiology team in working with a designer; the goal is to enable radiology leadership to collaborate with designers to cocreate health care environments that aspire to be integral components of patient-centered care and experience. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A study of inventiveness among Society of Interventional Radiology members and the impact of their social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kieran J; Elias, Gavin; Jaffer, Hussein; Mandani, Rashesh

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the nature of inventiveness among members of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and learn what influenced the inventors and assisted their creativity. The membership directory of the SIR was cross-referenced with filings at the United States Patent and Trademark Organization (USPTO) and the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT). The inventors were queried with an online survey to illuminate their institutions of training and practice as well as enabling or inhibiting factors to their inventiveness. Responses were analyzed through the construction of social network maps and thematic and graphical analysis. It was found that 457 members of the SIR held 2,492 patents or patent filings. After 1986, there was a marked and sustained increase in patent filings. The online survey was completed by 73 inventors holding 470 patents and patent filings. The social network maps show the key role of large academic interventional radiology departments and individual inventors in the formation of interconnectivity among inventors and the creation of the intellectual property (IP). Key inhibitors of the inventive process include lack of mentorship, of industry contacts, and of legal advice. Key enablers include mentorship, motivation, and industry contacts. Creativity and inventiveness in SIR members stem from institutions that are hubs of innovation and networks of key innovators; inventors are facilitated by personal motivation, mentorship, and strong industry contacts. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An assessment of the radiological impact of the operation of selected industrial gamma radiography facilities in Metro Manila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loterina, Roel A.; Espiritu, Raquel T.; Palattao, Ma. Visitacion B.

    1998-01-01

    Observations and radiation monitoring were done during radiographic operations conducted by eleven (11) industrial radiography institutions in 8 installations and in 4 project sites in Metro Manila, Batangas, and Antipolo. Radiological hazards involved during routine normal operations were evaluated in terms of potential doses to radiography workers and members of the public. Based on radiation monitoring results, radiography workers involved in routine and normal operations got whole body dose exposures ranging from 0.03 to 27.96 mSv/year. These are doses lower than the 50 mSv annual limit for radiation workers. Radiological consequences to radiography workers during abnormal occurrences and accident conditions were projected to be from as low as 0.03 mSv to as high as 7,500 mSv or 150 times the annual limit. Dose exposures of members of the public involved or affected were estimated to be from 0.08 mSv to doses easily exceeding the annual limit of 5 mSv. The upper limit of these doses greatly exceeds the half-lethal dose value of 4.5 Gy. This study recommends some measures to ensure safety of operating personnel from undue exposure to radiation during routine normal operations as well as during abnormal occurrences and accident conditions. (Author)

  10. Assessment of the radiological impact of gamma and radon dose rates at former U mining sites in Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespukh, E; Stegnar, P; Usubalieva, A; Solomatina, A; Tolongutov, B; Beishenkulova, R

    2013-09-01

    An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to gamma radiation, radon and thoron was carried out at the former uranium mining and processing sites in Shekaftar, Minkush and Kadji Sai in Kyrgyzstan. Gamma dose rate measurements were made using various field instruments and radon/thoron measurements were carried out using discriminative radon ((222)Rn)/thoron ((220)Rn) solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time including at least three seasonal periods in a year, in different outdoor and indoor public and residential environments at the selected uranium legacy sites. The results showed that gamma, Rn and Tn doses were in general low, which consequently implies a low/relatively low radiological risk. The major radiation hazard is represented by abandoned radioactive filtration material that was being used as insulation by some Minkush residents for a longer period of time. Annual radiation doses of several hundred mSv could be received as a consequence of using this material in their houses. The radiation doses deriving from external radiation (gamma dose rate), indoor radon and thoron with their short-lived progenies in several cases exceeded national as well as international standards. Current doses of ionizing radiation do not represent any serious hazard to the health of the resident public, but this issue should be adequately addressed to further reduce needless exposure of resident public to ionizing radiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindera, Sebastian T.; Allmen, Gabriel von; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Treier, Reto; Trueb, Philipp R. [Federal Office of Public Health, Radiation Protection Division, Berne (Switzerland); Nauer, Claude [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P < 0.001), 9% for the brain (982 vs. 896 mGycm, P < 0.05), 24% for the chest (425 vs. 322 mGycm, P < 0.05) and 42% for the pulmonary arteries (352 vs. 203 mGycm, P < 0.001). No significant change in DLP was found for abdominal CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose. (orig.)

  12. [Telecommunications, health and radiology: potential synergies for the new millennium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagalla, R

    2001-01-01

    Healthcare telematics, or telemedicine, is a new methodology that applies the potentialities of telecommunications technologies to the needs of medicine, thereby greatly contributing to improving the management of clinical data and medical information for the benefit of the individual patient and the community at large. The fields of application of Telemedicine are becoming increasingly vast, and this gives rise to technical problems (interconnections) as well as professional, ethical, medico-legal and legal problems. The dissemination of Telemedicine will require changes to be made to the organisation and delivery of the medical/administrative services connected to the management of patient data, the remote provision of care, and the impact of Telemedicine itself (e.g. need to standardise the nomenclature for telemedicine services). In addition, it will also call for a careful analysis of costs and benefits for both healthcare providers and patients. One of the most interesting experiences in terms of impact is Teleradiology. This is neither a new discipline nor a (sub)specialty: the practice of Teleradiology must comply with the rules regulating any radiological medical act, the primary aim of which is to contribute to establishing - rapidly and accurately - a diagnosis that will affect treatment strategies. It may be anticipated that in some situations Teleradiology will significantly change the working practices of Radiology Specialists and Radiology Technicians. Because it is better to anticipate problems rather than wait for them to arise, our Scientific Society, which is always sensitive to emerging issues, intends to propose the following recommendations/guidelines for the use of Teleradiology in the common interest of the community and healthcare workers. The invitation to take part in the initiative proposed by the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM), the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine (AIMN) and the Italian Association of Neuroradiology

  13. Anticipation Behavior Upstream of a Bottleneck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duives, D.C.; Daamen, W.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Whether pedestrian movements do or do not follow similar patterns as vehicular traffic while experiencing congestion is not entirely understood. Using data gathered during bottleneck experiments under laboratory conditions, the phenomenon of anticipation before entering congestion is studied. This

  14. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticipation (ie, an earlier age at onset in successive generations) is linked to repeat expansion in neurodegenerative syndromes, whereas its role in hereditary cancer is unclear. We assessed anticipation in Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), in which DNA...... mismatch repair (MMR) defects cause early and accelerated tumor development with a broad tumor spectrum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the population-based Danish HNPCC registry, 407 MMR gene mutation carriers who had developed cancer associated with Lynch syndrome, were identified. These individuals formed 290...... parent-child pairs in which age at the first cancer diagnosis was assessed. A paired t-test and a specifically developed bivariate model were used to assess a possible role of anticipation. RESULTS: Both methods revealed anticipation with children developing cancer mean 9.8 years (P

  15. Using the model release ARTM associated with resources for simulation geoprocessing radiological environmental impact of atmospheric emissions from a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Simone Fonseca

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge of the dispersion of radionuclides emissions into the atmosphere arising from a nuclear reactor, in normal operation, is an important step in the process of the nuclear and environmental assessment study. These processes require an assessment study of the radiological environmental impact. However, to estimate this impact a simulation of the transport mechanisms and deposition of pollutants released into the atmosphere is required. The present study aimed at the application of the dispersion model ARTM (Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model), together with the powerful tools of the GIS (Geographic Information System) for the environmental impact assessment of a radiological nuclear reactor under typically routine and conditions. Therefore some important information from the national project for a research reactor known as Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) was considered. The information of the atmospheric emissions of the reactor, needed for the simulation of this project, was based on data of the Open Pool Australian Light Water (OPAL).Other important data that had to be collected and analyzed were the source term, the topography, the meteorology and the environmental data. The radionuclides analyzed as pollutants were 41 Ar; 140 Ba; 51 Cr; 137 Cs; 131 I; 133 I; 85m Kr; 87 Kr; 88 Kr; 140 La; 133 Xe; 135 Xe; 3 H; 90 Sr. The model was run for two chronological scenarios according to their meteorological data for the years 2009 and 2010, respectively. The adoption of GIS techniques was relevant in planning, data preprocessing and in the post-processing of results as well. After pre-processing, the input data were processed by the ARTM dispersion model. Maps, charts, and tables were then produced and evaluated. According to the simulated and evaluated scenarios it could be concluded that exposure pathways that mostly contributed to the dose for individual public were 41 Ar, for immersion in the plume, and 133 I, for inhalation. Nevertheless, even

  16. Radioactivity of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs in beach sand and sediment near to desalination plant in eastern Saudi Arabia: Assessment of radiological impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimh Alshahri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sand and sediment samples were collected from different locations along the beach near to desalination plant, which is one of the oldest and largest reverse osmosis desalination plants in Saudi Arabia, where the fluid waste is discharged. The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs were measured using gamma-ray spectrometry. Radiation hazard indices were calculated to evaluate the radiological risk for the public and environment. This study is the first to evaluate the radiological impacts in the area under investigation. The mean values of radium equivalent activity (Raeq were 74.1 Bq kg−1 for surface sand samples, 78.8 Bq kg−1 for subsurface sand samples and 78.1 Bq kg−1 for sediments. The mean values of gamma absorbed dose rate (D in air and annual effective dose (E for analyzed samples were lower than the acceptable values. The external radiation hazard indices were lower than unity for all samples.

  17. WSPEEDI (worldwide version of SPEEDI): A computer code system for the prediction of radiological impacts on Japanese due to a nuclear accident in foreign countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chino, Masamichi; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Nagai, Haruyasu; Moriuchi, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ishikawa, Hirohiko

    1995-09-01

    A computer code system has been developed for near real-time dose assessment during radiological emergencies. The system WSPEEDI, the worldwide version of SPEEDI (System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) aims at predicting the radiological impact on Japanese due to a nuclear accident in foreign countries. WSPEEDI consists of a mass-consistent wind model WSYNOP for large-scale wind fields and a particle random walk model GEARN for atmospheric dispersion and dry and wet deposition of radioactivity. The models are integrated into a computer code system together with a system control software, worldwide geographic database, meteorological data processor and graphic software. The performance of the models has been evaluated using the Chernobyl case with reliable source terms, well-established meteorological data and a comprehensive monitoring database. Furthermore, the response of the system has been examined by near real-time simulations of the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX), carried out over about 2,000 km area in Europe. (author).

  18. WSPEEDI (worldwide version of SPEEDI): A computer code system for the prediction of radiological impacts on Japanese due to a nuclear accident in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chino, Masamichi; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Nagai, Haruyasu; Moriuchi, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Hirohiko.

    1995-09-01

    A computer code system has been developed for near real-time dose assessment during radiological emergencies. The system WSPEEDI, the worldwide version of SPEEDI (System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) aims at predicting the radiological impact on Japanese due to a nuclear accident in foreign countries. WSPEEDI consists of a mass-consistent wind model WSYNOP for large-scale wind fields and a particle random walk model GEARN for atmospheric dispersion and dry and wet deposition of radioactivity. The models are integrated into a computer code system together with a system control software, worldwide geographic database, meteorological data processor and graphic software. The performance of the models has been evaluated using the Chernobyl case with reliable source terms, well-established meteorological data and a comprehensive monitoring database. Furthermore, the response of the system has been examined by near real-time simulations of the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX), carried out over about 2,000 km area in Europe. (author)

  19. Diagnostic radiology 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture

  20. Radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    An International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization was held in Malaga, Spain, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The Government of Spain hosted this Conference through the Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, the Junta de Andalucia, the Universidad de Malaga and the Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica de la Universidad de Malaga (PRUMA). The Conference was organized in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the following professional societies: International Organization of Medical Physicists (IOMP), International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), International Society of Radiation Oncology (ISRO), International Society of Radiology (ISR), International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB). This publication contains contributed papers submitted to the Conference Programme Committee. The papers are in one of the two working languages of this Conference, English and Spanish. The topics covered by the Conference are as follows: Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (radiography), Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (fluoroscopy), Radiological protection issues in specific uses of diagnostic radiology, such as mammography and computed tomography (with special consideration of the impact of digital techniques), Radiological protection in interventional radiology, including fluoroscopy not carried out by radiologists, Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine, Developing and

  1. Radiology education: a glimpse into the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarsbrook, A.F.; Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    The digital revolution in radiology continues to advance rapidly. There are a number of interesting developments within radiology informatics which may have a significant impact on education and training of radiologists in the near future. These include extended functionality of handheld computers, web-based skill and knowledge assessment, standardization of radiological procedural training using simulated or virtual patients, worldwide videoconferencing via high-quality health networks such as Internet2 and global collaboration of radiological educational resources via comprehensive, multi-national databases such as the medical imaging resource centre initiative of the Radiological Society of North America. This article will explore the role of e-learning in radiology, highlight a number of useful web-based applications in this area, and explain how the current and future technological advances might best be incorporated into radiological training

  2. Interactive radiological anatomy eLearning solution for first year medical students: Development, integration, and impact on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexandra Louise; Choi, Sunhea

    2014-01-01

    A technology enhanced learning and teaching (TELT) solution, radiological anatomy (RA) eLearning, composed of a range of identification-based and guided learning activities related to normal and pathological X-ray images, was devised for the Year 1 nervous and locomotor course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Its effectiveness was evaluated using a questionnaire, pre- and post-tests, focus groups, summative assessment, and tracking data. Since introduced in 2009, a total of 781 students have used RA eLearning, and among them 167 Year 1 students in 2011, of whom 116 participated in the evaluation study. Students enjoyed learning (77%) with RA eLearning, found it was easy to use (81%) and actively engaged them in their learning (75%), all of which were associated to the usability, learning design of the TELT solution and its integration in the curriculum; 80% of students reported RA eLearning helped their revision of anatomy and 69% stated that it facilitated their application of anatomy in a clinical context, both of which were associated with the benefits offered by the learning and activities design. At the end of course summative assessment, student knowledge of RA eLearning relevant topics (mean 80%; SD ±16) was significantly better as compared to topics not relevant to RA eLearning (mean 63%; SD ±15) (mean difference 18%; 95% CI 15% to 20%; P application, integration, and contextualization of anatomy and radiology to create a blended learning environment. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  3. Outcome of residual mediastinal masses of thoracic lymphomas in children: impact on management and radiological follow-up strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisse, H.; Pacquement, H.; Burdairon, E.; Plancher, C.; Neuenschwander, S.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Following treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, patients with thoracic lymphomas may demonstrate benign residual mediastinal masses, composed of inflammatory, fibrous or necrotic tissue. Because of the potential risk of viable tumour cells within the mass, histological verification of the nature of these masses may be requested. Objective. To study the outcome of thoracic lymphomas in children in order to optimise the radiological follow-up strategy of residual mediastinal masses (RMM). Materials and methods. A retrospective study of 39 children [24 with Hodgkin's disease (HD), 10 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and 5 with anaplastic lymphoma (AL)]. The results of chest X-rays (CXR) and thoracic CT performed at the time of re-assessment were compared with the histology of the residual masses (n = 11) or the clinical course (n = 28). Results. At the time of re-evaluation, 16/39 patients had residual mediastinal enlargement (RME) on CXR, and 18/39 patients had RMM on CT. Good concordance was observed between the two imaging modalities (K = 0.69). Two children with a RMM died from extra-mediastinal progression. Two children with NHL had active residual mediastinal lesions but neither had RMM. Sixteen cases of RMM were observed in the remaining 35 children and 9 of these masses were histologically verified as benign. A favourable course was observed in these 35 cases. Conclusions. RMM are frequent and generally benign. They are well shown on CXR and have a non-specific appearance on CT. Except when required by a treatment protocol, they could be submitted to further radiological follow-up before contemplating surgical verification. (orig.)

  4. Demonstration of mobile radiation monitoring methodology for quick assessment of radiological impact of Mumbai City Using road, rail and sea routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, M.K.; Divkar, J.K.; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    The study of background radiation levels by suitable mobile monitoring methodology through different routes (road, rail and sea) with the help of state of the art monitoring systems has been initiated with an objective to demonstrate the effectiveness of monitoring methodologies for quick radiological impact assessment during any radiological emergency and to detect the presence of orphan source(s), if any. The other objective was to establish a reliable base line data on the background radiation levels. The study was carried out in Mumbai city through different available routes. Mumbai is a densely populated city and everyday millions of commuters are crossing across the city using rail and road routes. In case of any unwarned radiological emergency in public domain, a large section of people of the city may get concerned of radioactive contamination/ high radiation exposure. In such scenario, environmental radiation monitoring and quick assessment of contamination in public domain will be a challenging task for the civil authorities. The monitoring techniques used for quick radiological impact assessment and the established base line dose rate data of Mumbai city will be very useful for planning counter measures, if required. During mobile monitoring programme of this highly populated city, the monitoring routes, selection and placement of different monitoring instruments/system within the mobile platform, data acquisition time of the respective monitoring equipments, speed of mobile monitoring station etc were optimized. State-of-the-art systems like Portable Mobile Gamma Spectrometry System (PMGSS), Compact Radiation Monitoring System integrated with GPS, Gammatracers, Portable low/high range survey meters and hand held spectrometers were used. The average of the dose rates recorded during monitoring through road routes and railway routes of Mumbai city were 60±10 nGy.h -1 and 65±15 nGy.h -1 respectively, which are attributable to terrestrial and cosmic

  5. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  6. Protecting against natural hazards - Information seeking behaviour in anticipation of severe weather events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, Jelmer

    2011-01-01

    Protection against natural hazards - Information seeking behaviour in anticipation of severe weather events Severe weather events can have considerable impact on society, including tourism organisations and tourists. Providing accurate and timely information about possible risks due to environmental

  7. Digital radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallas, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is vital to the life-saving efforts of surgeons and other physicians, but precious time can be lost generating the images and transferring them to and from the operating room. Furthermore, hospitals are straining under the task of storing and managing the deluge of diagnostic films produced every year. A 300-bed hospital generates about 1 gigabyte (8 x 10 9 bits) of picture information every day and is legally bound to hold it for three to seven years--30 years in the case of silicosis or black lung disease, illnesses that may have relevance to future lawsuits. Consequently, hospital warehouses are filling with x-ray film and written reports that are important for analysis of patient histories, for comparison between patients, and for analyzing the progress of disease. Yet only a fraction of the information's potential is being used because access is so complicated. What is more, films are easily lost, erasing valuable medical histories

  8. Docritfab: A program to assess the radiological impact in accidental emissions of a nuclear fuel factory in real time; Docritfab: Un programa para evaluar en tiempo real el impacto radiologico en emisiones accidentales de una fabrica de combustible nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J. G.; Ortiz, D.; Lopez, J.

    2014-07-01

    Docrit is a program developed for the manufacture of fuels of oxides of uranium Juzbado allowing an estimate in real time of the radiological impact in the case of accidental emissions from gaseous effluents (emissions of aerosols of UO{sub 2} and criticality accidents).

  9. Anticipation in Soccer: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves Eder

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The present study aimed to examine the current methods employed to assess anticipation in soccer players as well as to elicit the main findings of recent studies. Methods. The study was carried out in systematic review form and its sample comprised nine scientific papers published in academic journals. Only the studies involving soccer players (professionals and amateurs, except goalkeepers were included in this review. Results and conclusions. We observed that most of the studies employed video footage obtained from soccer matches, which are occluded at a given point for study participants to quickly and precisely elicit the positions of opponents, teammates and the ball as well as anticipate actions (dribbling, shooting, passing from surrounding players (teammates and opponents. In addition, the studies compared the performance of players from both high and low competitive levels in anticipation tasks.

  10. Assessment of radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings pile at Salt Lake City, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Perdue, P.T.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    One of the largest inactive uranium mill tailings piles in the United States is located within metropolitan Salt Lake City, Utah. A radiological survey was performed at this site during the fall of 1975. A series of field and laboratory analyses were performed to characterize the spread of contamination from the tailings pile to surrounding areas. These analyses provided a basis for discussion of the important pathways for transport of radioactivity to man. Measurements of radionuclide concentrations in soil indicated that radium had migrated up to one meter into soil beneath the tailings. Tailings material was found out to distances of several hundred meters, mostly in the prevailing wind directions. Elevated levels of 226 Ra, 238 U, 230 Th, and 210 Pb were found in sediments of streams running through the mill site; but in Jordan River samples, radionuclide concentrations were of the same magnitude as background samples collected in other parts of the Salt Lake Valley. Atmospheric dispersion of radon gas, which emanates from the pile continuously, was calculated. Potential health effects for continuous exposure to radon progeny and external gamma radiation from the pile in its current state were estimated using risk estimators presented in the BEIR report. For the 400,000 residents within 11 km (7 mi) of the pile, 0.4 cases of lung cancer per year were estimated. For the same population exposed to natural levels of radon progeny, 7.2 cases per year were estimated

  11. Transportation radiological risk assessment for the programmatic environmental impact statement: An overview of methodologies, assumptions, and input parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monette, F.; Biwer, B.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.Y.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is considering a broad range of alternatives for the future configuration of radioactive waste management at its network of facilities. Because the transportation of radioactive waste is an integral component of the management alternatives being considered, the estimated human health risks associated with both routine and accident transportation conditions must be assessed to allow a complete appraisal of the alternatives. This paper provides an overview of the technical approach being used to assess the radiological risks from the transportation of radioactive wastes. The approach presented employs the RADTRAN 4 computer code to estimate the collective population risk during routine and accident transportation conditions. Supplemental analyses are conducted using the RISKIND computer code to address areas of specific concern to individuals or population subgroups. RISKIND is used for estimating routine doses to maximally exposed individuals and for assessing the consequences of the most severe credible transportation accidents. The transportation risk assessment is designed to ensure -- through uniform and judicious selection of models, data, and assumptions -- that relative comparisons of risk among the various alternatives are meaningful. This is accomplished by uniformly applying common input parameters and assumptions to each waste type for all alternatives. The approach presented can be applied to all radioactive waste types and provides a consistent and comprehensive evaluation of transportation-related risk

  12. Deep Learning in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Morgan P; Awan, Omer A; Colucci, Andrew T; Ghobadi, Comeron W; Kadom, Nadja; Kansagra, Akash P; Tridandapani, Srini; Auffermann, William F

    2018-03-29

    As radiology is inherently a data-driven specialty, it is especially conducive to utilizing data processing techniques. One such technique, deep learning (DL), has become a remarkably powerful tool for image processing in recent years. In this work, the Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on Deep Learning provides an overview of DL for the radiologist. This article aims to present an overview of DL in a manner that is understandable to radiologists; to examine past, present, and future applications; as well as to evaluate how radiologists may benefit from this remarkable new tool. We describe several areas within radiology in which DL techniques are having the most significant impact: lesion or disease detection, classification, quantification, and segmentation. The legal and ethical hurdles to implementation are also discussed. By taking advantage of this powerful tool, radiologists can become increasingly more accurate in their interpretations with fewer errors and spend more time to focus on patient care. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of the environmental or radiological impact in the event of accidental release of radionuclides in a DCLL fusion reactor; Estimacion del impacto radiologico ambiental en caso de liberacion accidental de radionucleidos en un reactor de fusion DCLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palermo, I.; Gomez Ros, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Mota, F.

    2013-07-01

    Tritium production and activation in the LiPb products can pose a radiological risk in the event of accidental release in a fusion reactor. Within the research programme Consolider TECNO{sub F}US (CSD2008-079) fusion technology has developed a design for a reactor with regenerative wrap with dual refrigeration (DCLL). The purpose of this communication is to present estimates of the radiological impact derived from an accidental release of radionuclides from the circuit of LiPb provinients. (Author)

  14. Radiological scenario modeling using the Hotspot code and potential financial impact of treatment of radiation induced cancer to the public; Modelagem de cenario radiologico utilizando o codigo Hotspot e potenciais impactos financeiros para tratamento de cancer radioinduzido ao publico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gabriel Fidalgo Queiroz da; Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Rebello, Wilson Freitas; Araujo, Olga Maria Oliveira de, E-mail: profgabriel.fisica@gmail.com, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: olgafisica2013@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The work aims to develop a methodology that is able to estimate the financial impact in a radiological emergency events, considering the radiation induced cancer, particularly leukemia. Considering a RDD - Radiological Dispersive Device, consisting of explosives and cesium-137 as radioactive material, a scenario building on the Rio de Janeiro was modeled. The convergence of a risk modeling platform (HotSpot 3.0), the analysis of excess relative risks for humans (BEIR V-Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V), considering scenarios composed of contaminated areas, are secondary goals.

  15. Radiologic protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco Jimenez, R.E.; Bermudez Jimenez, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    With this work and employing the radioprotection criterion, the authors pretend to minimize the risks associated to this practice; without losing the quality of the radiologic image. Odontology should perform the following criterions: 1. Justification: all operation of practice that implies exposition to radiations, should be reweighed, through an analysis of risks versus benefits, with the purpose to assure, that the total detriment will be small, compared to resultant benefit of this activity. 2. Optimization: all of the exposures should be maintained as low as reasonable possible, considering the social and economic factors. 3. Dose limit: any dose limit system should be considered as a top condition, nota as an admissible level. (S. Grainger)

  16. Anticipated ethical challenges with growing molecular prenatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prenatal diagnostic testing is gaining more anticipated acceptance in Nigeria as more expectant mothers are offered tests to detect presence or absence of monogenetic disorders associated with foetus such as sickle cell disease. It is however known that many ethical quandaries are related to the process. These issues ...

  17. Anticipating drug side effects by comparative pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Serna, Ricard; Mestres, Jordi

    2010-10-01

    Anticipating the likely side effect profile of drugs is an aspect of key importance in current drug discovery, development and marketing. It was recently shown that drug pairs having similar side effect profiles had also affinity for a common target. Acknowledging that most drugs have a rich polypharmacology, we provide proof that drugs related by side effect similarity have in fact affinities for multiple common targets beyond their primary targets and set the basis for the use of comparative pharmacology to anticipate drug side effects. Nomenclature issues to be able to identify and properly store drugs, targets and side effects from multiple public sources; the construction of drug networks from side effect similarity and the inference of common targets among them; polypharmacology and data completeness; methods for in silico target profiling; and comparative pharmacology and inference of common side effects. The reader is provided with a detailed step-by-step analysis of the entire process from predicting the target profile of a compound to anticipating its side effect profile, and a discussion on the particular needs and limitations found at each stage of the process through illustrative examples. Comparing preclinical pharmacology data obtained in vitro but also predicted in silico using modern virtual screening methods represents an attractive strategy to anticipate clinical drug side effects.

  18. [The anticipated organ donation approach in hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libot, Jérôme

    2016-09-01

    In end-of-life situations it is important to avoid futile transfers to intensive care and to respect the wishes of the patient. To this end, it is possible to talk about the approaching death and organ donation with the family, in an 'anticipated' support approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Learning and Anticipation in Online Dynamic Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.N. Bosman (Peter); S. Yang; Y.S. Ong; Y. Jin

    2007-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this chapter we focus on the importance of the use of learning and anticipation in (online) dynamic optimization. To this end we point out an important source of problem-difficulty that has so far received significantly less attention than the traditional shifting of optima.

  20. Anticipating and Managing Change in Educational Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfro, William L.; Morrison, James L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the design and operation of an information scanning system to alert school systems about emerging issues in the areas of social, technical, economic, and legislative/regulatory developments and to enable administrators to anticipate and respond to these issues. (MLF)

  1. Why the Economic Crisis Was Not Anticipated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    An article in the October 11 "New York Times" attributed the almost universal failure to anticipate the current economic crisis to "insanity"--more precisely, to a psychological inability to give proper weight to past events, so that if there is prosperity today people assume that it will last forever, even though they know that in the past booms…

  2. The Argonne Radiological Impact Program (ARIP). Part II. MONITOR: A Program and Data Base for Retrieval and Utilization of Pollutant Monitoring Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerman, Keith F.; Stowe, Ralph F.; Frigerio, Norman A.

    1977-02-01

    The Argonne Radiological Impact Program (ARIP) is an ongoing project of the Laboratory's Division of Environmental Impact Studies that aims at developing methodologies for assessing the carcinogenic hazards associated with nuclear power development. The project's first report (ANL/ES-26, Part I), published in September.l973, discussed models of radiation carcinogenesis and the contribution of U .. S. background radiation levels to hazardous dose rates. The current report (Part II) treats the storage and access of available data on radiation and radioactivity levels in the u. S. A compute-r code. (the MONITOR program) is prf!sented, which can serve as a ready-access data. bank for all monitoring data acquired over the past two decades. The MONITOR program currently stores data on monitoring locations, types of monitoring efforts, and types of monitoring data. reported in Radiation Data and Reports by the various state and federal ne-tworks; expansion of this data base to include nuclear power facilities in operation or on order is ongoing ·. The MONITOR code retrieves information within a search radius, or rectangl.e ,. circumscribed by parameters of latitude and longitude, and l:.ists or maps the data_as: requested. The code, with examples, is given in full in the report ..

  3. Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records

  4. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  5. From Discrimination to Internalized Mental Illness Stigma: The Mediating Roles of Anticipated Discrimination and Anticipated Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Diane M.; Williams, Michelle K.; Weisz, Bradley M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Internalizing mental illness stigma is related to poorer well-being, but less is known about the factors that predict levels of internalized stigma. This study explored how experiences of discrimination relate to greater anticipation of discrimination and devaluation in the future, and how anticipation of stigma, in turn predicts greater stigma internalization. Method Participants were 105 adults with mental illness who self-reported their experiences of discrimination based on their mental illness, their anticipation of discrimination and social devaluation from others in the future, and their level of internalized stigma. Participants were approached in several locations and completed surveys on laptop computers. Results Correlational analyses indicated that more experiences of discrimination due to one’s mental illness were related to increased anticipated discrimination in the future, increased anticipated social stigma from others, and greater internalized stigma. Multiple serial mediator analyses showed that the effect of experiences of discrimination on internalized stigma was fully mediated by increased anticipated discrimination and anticipated stigma. Conclusion and Implications for Practice Experiences of discrimination over the lifetime may influence not only how much future discrimination people with mental illness are concerned with but also how much they internalize negative feelings about the self. Mental health professionals may need to address concerns with future discrimination and devaluation in order to decrease internalized stigma. PMID:25844910

  6. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny von Salomé

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have an earlier onset compared to the general population. However, age at first primary cancer varies within families and genetic anticipation, i.e. decreasing age at onset in successive generations, has been suggested in LS. Anticipation is a well-known phenomenon in e.g neurodegenerative diseases and several reports have studied anticipation in heritable cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine whether anticipation can be shown in a nationwide cohort of Swedish LS families referred to the regional departments of clinical genetics in Lund, Stockholm, Linköping, Uppsala and Umeå between the years 1990-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2 families, and 2 MLH1+PMS2 families comprising 1028 at-risk carriers were identified among the Swedish LS families, of which 1003 mutation carriers had available follow-up information and could be included in the study. Using a normal random effects model (NREM we estimate a 2.1 year decrease in age of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171, or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years/generation for NREM and hazard ratio of 1.33 for COX-R and PMS2 (7.3 years/generation and hazard ratio of 1.86. The estimated anticipation effects for MLH1

  7. Determination of Radionuclide Activity and Radiological Impact from the Intake of Milk, Wheat Flour, Tea and Coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nik Nadia Hazwani Nek Kamal; Norafatin Khalid; Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul Bahri; Amran Ab Majid

    2015-01-01

    is considered radiological safe to be taken by humans. (author)

  8. Anticipation: Beyond synthetic biology and cognitive robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Nasuto, Slawomir J.; Hayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose that current robotic technologies cannot have intentional states any more than is feasible within the sensorimotor variant of embodied cognition. It argues that anticipation is an emerging concept that can provide a bridge between both the deepest philosophical theories about the nature of life and cognition and the empirical biological and cognitive sciences steeped in reductionist and Newtonian conceptions of causality. The paper advocates that in order t...

  9. Anticipation in the constructivist theory of cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasersfeld, Ernst

    1998-07-01

    Much of what we call knowledge is based on the assumption that past experience can provide clues about future experience. The practice of living and learning consequently involves the anticipation of events and situations at almost every step. In my talk I shall present the constructivist approach to the epistemological prerequisites and some of the psychological mechanisms that seem necessary in order to explain such an otherwise mysterious capability of foresight.

  10. Partial observation control in an anticipating environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeksendal, B; Sulem, A

    2004-01-01

    A study is made of a controlled stochastic system whose state X(t) at time t is described by a stochastic differential equation driven by Levy processes with filtration {F t } telementof[0,T] . The system is assumed to be anticipating, in the sense that the coefficients are assumed to be adapted to a filtration {G t } t≥0 with F t subset of equal G t for all t element of [0,T]. The corresponding anticipating stochastic differential equation is interpreted in the sense of forward integrals, which naturally generalize semimartingale integrals. The admissible controls are assumed to be adapted to a filtration {E t } telementof[0,T] such that E t subset of equal F t for all t element of [0,T]. The general problem is to maximize a given performance functional of this system over all admissible controls. This is a partial observation stochastic control problem in an anticipating environment. Examples of applications include stochastic volatity models in finance, insider influenced financial markets, and stochastic control of systems with delayed noise effects. Some particular cases in finance, involving optimal portfolios with logarithmic utility, are solved explicitly

  11. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  12. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Lada; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Lada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of 238{sup U}, 235{sup U}, 232{sup T}h and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Lada coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  13. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Anllares; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Anllares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Anllares coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  14. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Velilla; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Velilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Mora, J. c.; Trueba, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Baeza, A.; Corbacho, J. a.; Guillen, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of 238U, 235U, 232Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the non-combustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Velilla coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  15. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Meirama; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Meirama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Meirama coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  16. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of La Robla; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de La Robla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the La Robla coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  17. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of La Robla; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de La Robla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Mora, J. C.; Trueba, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Baeza, A.; Corbacho, J. A.; Guillen, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of 238{sup U}, 235{sup U}, 232{sup T}h and also the 40{sup K}, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the non-combustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the La Robla coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  18. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Abono; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Abono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the {sup 4}0K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Abono coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  19. Need to monitoring the particulate components and gaseous components of the I-131 in air, on Radiological monitoring networks. impact of the accident of Fukushima Dai-chi in Spain; Necesidad de monitorizar las componentes particulada y gaseosa del {sup 1}31I en aire, en redes de vigilancia radiologica. Impacto en Espana del accidente de Fukushima DAI-ICHI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza Espasa, A.; Caballero Andrada, M.; Corbacho Merino, J. A.; Ontalba Salamanca, M. A.; Rodriguez Perulero, A.; Valencia Corrales, D.; Vasco Vargas, J.

    2013-07-01

    Following a nuclear accident with significant overseas evacuations, it should be accurately determined concentration radio iodines into the atmosphere, given its important contribution to the radiological impact produced. Automatic networks radiation monitoring aim to provide as quickly as possible, reliable information on these radiological changes, to take necessary countermeasures. (Author)

  20. Interventional Radiology Readiness Assessment Tool for Global Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. Kline

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Interventional Radiology Readiness Assessment Tool for Global Health is a new tool to methodically evaluate the environment of a medical institution for interventional radiology services given the existing infrastructure. Global health provides an exciting opportunity for interventional radiology to impact health outcomes in developing countries. A systematic and thoughtful approach to integrating interventional radiology services in the health care institutions of resource poor countries is needed in order to maximize global health efforts and outcomes.

  1. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs

  2. Is quality and completeness of reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in high impact radiology journals associated with citation rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pol, Christian B; McInnes, Matthew D F; Petrcich, William; Tunis, Adam S; Hanna, Ramez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether study quality and completeness of reporting of systematic reviews (SR) and meta-analyses (MA) published in high impact factor (IF) radiology journals is associated with citation rates. All SR and MA published in English between Jan 2007-Dec 2011, in radiology journals with an IF >2.75, were identified on Ovid MEDLINE. The Assessing the Methodologic Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) checklist for study quality, and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist for study completeness, was applied to each SR & MA. Each SR & MA was then searched in Google Scholar to yield a citation rate. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationship between AMSTAR and PRISMA results with citation rate. Multivariate analyses were performed to account for the effect of journal IF and journal 5-year IF on correlation with citation rate. Values were reported as medians with interquartile range (IQR) provided. 129 studies from 11 journals were included (50 SR and 79 MA). Median AMSTAR result was 8.0/11 (IQR: 5-9) and median PRISMA result was 23.0/27 (IQR: 21-25). The median citation rate for SR & MA was 0.73 citations/month post-publication (IQR: 0.40-1.17). There was a positive correlation between both AMSTAR and PRISMA results and SR & MA citation rate; ρ=0.323 (P=0.0002) and ρ=0.327 (P=0.0002) respectively. Positive correlation persisted for AMSTAR and PRISMA results after journal IF was partialed out; ρ=0.243 (P=0.006) and ρ=0.256 (P=0.004), and after journal 5-year IF was partialed out; ρ=0.235 (P=0.008) and ρ=0.243 (P=0.006) respectively. There is a positive correlation between the quality and the completeness of a reported SR or MA with citation rate which persists when adjusted for journal IF and journal 5-year IF.

  3. Effective radiological safety program for electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, W.P.

    1980-10-01

    An outline is presented of some of the main elements of an electron accelerator radiological safety program. The discussion includes types of accelerator facilities, types of radiations to be anticipated, activity induced in components, air and water, and production of toxic gases. Concepts of radiation shielding design are briefly discussed and organizational aspects are considered as an integral part of the overall safety program

  4. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  5. Machine Learning in Radiology: Applications Beyond Image Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Paras; Prater, Adam B; Hutson, R Kent; Andriole, Kathy P; Dreyer, Keith J; Morey, Jose; Prevedello, Luciano M; Clark, Toshi J; Geis, J Raymond; Itri, Jason N; Hawkins, C Matthew

    2018-02-01

    Much attention has been given to machine learning and its perceived impact in radiology, particularly in light of recent success with image classification in international competitions. However, machine learning is likely to impact radiology outside of image interpretation long before a fully functional "machine radiologist" is implemented in practice. Here, we describe an overview of machine learning, its application to radiology and other domains, and many cases of use that do not involve image interpretation. We hope that better understanding of these potential applications will help radiology practices prepare for the future and realize performance improvement and efficiency gains. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Does the Method of Radiologic Surveillance Impact Survival Following Resection of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Traves D.; Puri, Varun; Chen, Simon B.; Gierada, David S.; Bell, Jennifer M.; Broderick, Stephen; Krupnick, A. Sasha; Kreisel, Daniel; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Controversy persists regarding appropriate radiographic surveillance strategies following lung cancer resection. We compared the impact of surveillance CT scan (CT) vs. chest radiograph (CXR) in patients who underwent resection for stage I lung cancer. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients undergoing resection for pathologic stage I lung cancer from January 2000–April 2013. After resection, follow-up included routine history and physical exam in conjunction with CXR or CT at the discretion of the treating physician. Identification of successive lung malignancy (i.e. recurrence at any new site or new primary) and survival were recorded. Results There were 554 evaluable patients with 232 undergoing routine postoperative CT and 322 receiving routine CXR. Postoperative five-year survival was 67.8% in the CT group vs. 74.8% in the CXR group (p = 0.603). Successive lung malignancy was found in 27% (63/232) of patients undergoing CT vs. 22% (72/322) receiving CXR (p = 0.19). The mean time from surgery to diagnosis of successive malignancy was 1.93 years for CT vs. 2.56 years for CXR (p = 0.046). For the CT group, 41% (26/63) of successive malignancies were treated with curative intent vs. 40% (29/72) in the CXR group (p = 0.639). Cox-proportional hazard analysis indicated imaging modality (CT vs. CXR) was not associated with survival (p = 0.958). Conclusion Surveillance CT may result in earlier diagnosis of successive malignancy vs. CXR in stage I lung cancer, although no difference in survival was demonstrated. A randomized trial would help determine the impact of postoperative surveillance strategies on survival. PMID:25218540

  7. Virtual radiology rounds: adding value in the digital era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fefferman, Nancy R.; Strubel, Naomi A.; Prithiani, Chandan; Chakravarti, Sujata; Caprio, Martha; Recht, Michael P. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To preserve radiology rounds in the changing health care environment, we have introduced virtual radiology rounds, an initiative enabling clinicians to remotely review imaging studies with the radiologist. We describe our initial experience with virtual radiology rounds and referring provider impressions. Virtual radiology rounds, a web-based conference, use remote sharing of radiology workstations. Participants discuss imaging studies by speakerphone. Virtual radiology rounds were piloted with the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and the Congenital Cardiovascular Care Unit (CCVCU). Providers completed a survey assessing the perceived impact and overall value of virtual radiology rounds on patient care using a 10-point scale. Pediatric radiologists participating in virtual radiology rounds completed a survey assessing technical, educational and clinical aspects of this methodology. Sixteen providers responded to the survey; 9 NICU and 7 CCVCU staff (physicians, nurse practitioners and fellows). Virtual radiology rounds occurred 4-5 sessions/week with an average of 6.4 studies. Clinicians rated confidence in their own image interpretation with a 7.4 average rating for NICU and 7.5 average rating for CCVCU. Clinicians unanimously rated virtual radiology rounds as adding value. NICU staff preferred virtual radiology rounds to traditional rounds and CCVCU staff supported their new participation in virtual radiology rounds. Four of the five pediatric radiologists participating in virtual radiology rounds responded to the survey reporting virtual radiology rounds to be easy to facilitate (average rating: 9.3), to moderately impact interpretation of imaging studies (average rating: 6), and to provide substantial educational value for radiologists (average rating: 8.3). All pediatric radiologists felt strongly that virtual radiology rounds enable increased integration of the radiologist into the clinical care team (average rating: 8.8). Virtual radiology rounds are a

  8. Anticipation in Law and Social Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston P. Nagan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores a particular aspect of the role of anticipation in social and legal processes. The program begins by recognizing that social interaction happens within a time-space manifold of events. This means that society functions in terms of events located on the plane of time and the situation of space. This means that social process is a dynamic. As an ancient philosopher put it, change is so ubiquitous that you cannot jump into the same river twice. Since we tend to look at social dynamics in a more static way, one major theorist reminds us that the stable in social process is a special case of the unstable. The article underscores a point that the anticipatory perspective is a ubiquitous part of social dynamics and change. Indeed, it is a critical component of social coexistence. To briefly illustrate, if the members of a governing group come into power, they will immediately have to anticipate the security needs, the economic needs, the educational needs, the health and well-being needs, the skill and labor needs, the food needs of the body politic, the requirements of effective family relationships, the requirements of morality and ethics and the needs of aesthetics. The paper provides a framework in which anticipation is used to predict the problems that emerge from the social process. The value of a social science that facilitates anticipation before problems occur provides opportunities on the time-space manifold of society to develop problem-solving strategies with a better chance of those strategies being successful. To utilize this approach, the authors provide the sophisticated model of social process developed by WAAS Fellows Lasswell and McDougal: Human beings pursue values through institutions based on resources. Using this model the authors provide a provisional map of the social process with key markers at points likely to generate important problems. The markers in the maps are as follows: participators

  9. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    mismatch repair (MMR) defects cause early and accelerated tumor development with a broad tumor spectrum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the population-based Danish HNPCC registry, 407 MMR gene mutation carriers who had developed cancer associated with Lynch syndrome, were identified. These individuals formed 290....... The effect remained when cancers diagnosed at surveillance were excluded, applied to maternal as well as paternal inheritance, and was independent of the MMR gene mutated. CONCLUSION: The effect from anticipation demonstrated in this large, population-based Lynch syndrome cohort underscores the need...

  10. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have...... of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R) estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171), or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years...

  11. Radiology applications of financial accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibenhaut, Mark H

    2005-03-01

    A basic knowledge of financial accounting can help radiologists analyze business opportunities and examine the potential impacts of new technology or predict the adverse consequences of new competitors entering their service area. The income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement are the three basic financial statements that document the current financial position of the radiology practice and allow managers to monitor the ongoing financial operations of the enterprise. Pro forma, or hypothetical, financial statements can be generated to predict the financial impact of specific business decisions or investments on the profitability of the practice. Sensitivity analysis, or what-if scenarios, can be performed to determine the potential impact of changing key revenue, investment, operating cost or financial assumptions. By viewing radiology as both a profession and a business, radiologists can optimize their use of scarce economic resources and maximize the return on their financial investments.

  12. Interventional Radiology: Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Government affairs Global outreach Publications Annual Report IR Quarterly Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology Newsletters Practice Resources Quality Improvement Clinical practice MACRA Matters Health Policy, Economics, Coding Toolkits Society of Interventional Radiology 3975 Fair ...

  13. Radiological diagnostics in hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moedder, U.; Kuhn, F.P.; Gruetzner, G.

    1991-01-01

    The most important radiologically detectable effects of the primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism of the skeletal system and the periarticular soft tissue structures are presented. In the following sensitivity and specificity of radiological imaging - sonography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, arteriography and selective venous sampling - in the preoperative diagnostic of the parathyroid adenomas are discussed. Therefore, radiological imaging can be omitted before primary surgery. It was only in secondary surgery that radiological process proved useful and a guide during surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  14. Radiological impact of the Chernobyl accident through ingestion in Europe. Ingestion doses determined by whole-body counting of radiocesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    Reports mainly concerning the internal exposure caused by Chernobyl Accident (CA, 1986) are discussed for reference to deal with the radiation impact on public of Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant Accident. Data of the internal exposure measured by the whole body counter are particularly noted. In adults, 1 kBq of Cs-137/body/year is equivalent to the internal exposure dose of 0.03 mSV/y. The CA released Cs-137 of total 8.5 PBq, which was then partially ingested through food to result in the internal exposure to European. For instance, in the old Soviet, the exposure was reported to amount to about 100 kBq/body (1987) of residents living in the highly contaminated area (Bryansk and others). In southern Germany like Bavaria State, the amount >1 kBq/body was recorded in 1987. In Cumbria, UK, residents had about 700 Bq of Cs-137 in June, 1986, which decreased to 450 Bq a month later. In Sami people living in Lapland area of northern Scandinavia, several tens kBq/body were found as they took the meat of reindeer of which diet was the contaminated lichen. The amount of internal Cs-137 peaked in 1987 and lowered thereafter with half lives of 1-2 years, which was thought to be partly due to various protection means conducted. The internal half life tended to elongate in people who had ingested the food harvested from such sites as difficult to get rid of the contamination like forest. Overall, the internal amount/dose of Cs-137 due to CA were at a similar level to those to the nuclear experiments in open air done in 1960s. The author, based on his experience, thinks that it can be one of relevant ways to observe the time course of the internal dose change of certain typical residents in Fukushima by measuring with the whole body counter, followed by announcement and explanation of data to the public. (T.T.)

  15. Anticipating the interaction between technology and morality: a scenario study of experimenting with humans in bionanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boenink, M.; Swierstra, T.E.; Stemerding, D.

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades several tools have been developed to anticipate the future impact of new and emerging technologies. Many of these focus on ‘hard,’ quantifiable impacts, investigating how novel technologies may affect health, environment and safety. Much less attention is paid to what might

  16. Radiology systems architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibel, S R; Greenes, R A

    1996-05-01

    This article focuses on the software requirements for enterprise integration in radiology. The needs of a future radiology systems architecture are examined, both at a concrete functional level and at an abstract system-properties level. A component-based approach to software development is described and is validated in the context of each of the abstract system requirements for future radiology computing environments.

  17. Anticipation: Beyond synthetic biology and cognitive robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuto, Slawomir J; Hayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose that current robotic technologies cannot have intentional states any more than is feasible within the sensorimotor variant of embodied cognition. It argues that anticipation is an emerging concept that can provide a bridge between both the deepest philosophical theories about the nature of life and cognition and the empirical biological and cognitive sciences steeped in reductionist and Newtonian conceptions of causality. The paper advocates that in order to move forward, cognitive robotics needs to embrace new platforms and a conceptual framework that will enable it to pursue, in a meaningful way, questions about autonomy and purposeful behaviour. We suggest that hybrid systems, part robotic and part cultures of neurones, offer experimental platforms where different dimensions of enactivism (sensorimotor, constitutive foundations of biological autonomy, including anticipation), and their relative contributions to cognition, can be investigated in an integrated way. A careful progression, mindful to the deep philosophical concerns but also respecting empirical evidence, will ultimately lead towards unifying theoretical and empirical biological sciences and may offer advancement where reductionist sciences have been so far faltering. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Locomotor Behavior of Chickens Anticipating Incline Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal LeBlanc

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Keel bone damage (KBD is prevalent in hens raised for egg production, and ramps between different tiers in aviaries have potential to reduce the frequency of falls resulting in KBD. Effective use of ramps requires modulation of locomotion in anticipation of the incline. Inadequate adaptive locomotion may be one explanation why domestic layer hens (Gallus gallus domesticus exhibit high rates of KBD. To improve understanding of the capacity of hens to modulate their locomotion in anticipation of climbing, we measured the effects of incline angle upon the mechanics of the preparatory step before ascending a ramp. Because the energetic challenge of climbing increases with slope, we predicted that as angle of incline increased, birds during foot contact with the ground before starting to climb would increase their peak force and duration of contact and reduce variation in center of pressure (COP under their foot. We tested 20 female domestic chickens on ramp inclines at slopes of +0°, +40°, and +70° when birds were 17, 21, 26, 31, and 36 weeks of age. There were significantly higher vertical peak ground reaction forces in preparation at the steepest slope, and ground contact time increased significantly with each increase in ramp angle. Effects upon variation in COP were not apparent; likewise, effects of limb length, age, body mass were not significant. Our results reveal that domestic chickens are capable of modulating their locomotion in response to incline angle.

  19. Radiological Dispersion Devices: are we prepared?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohier, Alain; Hardeman, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Already before the events of September 11th 2001 concern was raised about the spread of orphan sources and their potential use in Radiological Dispersion Devices by terrorist groups. Although most of the simulated scenarios foresee a rather limited direct health impact on the population, the affected region would suffer from the indirect consequences such as social disruption, cleanup requirements and economic costs. The nature of such a radiological attack would anyway be different compared to conventional radiological accidents, basically because it can happen anywhere at any time. Part of the response resides in a general preparedness scheme incorporating attacks with Radiological Dispersion Devices. Training of different potential intervention teams is essential. The response would consist of a prioritised list of actions adapted to the circumstances. As the psychosocial dimension of the crisis could be worse than the purely radiological one, an adapted communication strategy with the public aspect would be a key issue

  20. Anticipation learning from the past the Russian/Soviet contributions to the science of anticipation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the work of leading scientists from Russia, Georgia, Estonia, Lithuania, Israel, and the USA, revealing major insights long unknown to the scientific community. Without any doubt their work will provide a springboard for further research in anticipation. Until recently, Robert Rosen (Anticipatory Systems) and Mihai Nadin (MIND – Anticipation and Chaos) were deemed forerunners in this still new knowledge domain. The distinguished neurobiologist, Steven Rose, pointed to the fact that Soviet neuropsychological theories have not on the whole been well received by Western science. These earlier insights as presented in this volume make an important contribution to the foundation of the science of anticipation. It is shown that the daring hypotheses and rich experimental evidence produced by Bernstein, Beritashvili, Ukhtomsky, Anokhin, and Uznadze, among others—extend foundational work to aspects of neuroscience, physiology, motorics, education.

  1. Application of fisheries management techniques to assessing impacts: task I report. [Assessment of chemical, radiological, and thermal impacts of nuclear power plants on fish populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Baker, K.S.; Fickeisen, D.H.; Metzger, R.M.; Skalski, J.R.

    1979-03-01

    Task I efforts examined the available fisheries management techniques and assessed their potential application in a confirmatory monitoring program. The objective of such monitoring programs is to confirm that the prediction of an insignificant impact (usually made in the FES) was correct. Fisheries resource managers have developed several tools for assessing the fish population response to stress (exploitation) and they were thought potentially useful for detecting nuclear power plant impacts. Techniques in three categories were examined; catch removal, population dynamics, and nondestructive censuses, and the report contains their description, examples of application, advantages, and disadvantages. The techniques applied at nuclear power plant sites were examined in detail to provide information on implementation and variability of specific approaches. The most suitable techniques to incorporate into a monitoring program confirming no impact appear to be those based on Catch Per Unity Effort (CPUE) and hydroacoustic data. In some specific cases, age and growth studies and indirect census techniques may be beneficial. Recommendations for task II efforts to incorporate these techniques into monitoring program designs are presented. These include development of guidelines for; (1) designing and implementing a data collection program; (2) interpreting these data and assessing the occurrence of impact, and (3) establishment of the monitoring program's ability to detect changes in the affected populations.

  2. Evaluating the impact of an integrated multidisciplinary head & neck competency-based anatomy & radiology teaching approach in radiation oncology: a prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Modern radiation oncology demands a thorough understanding of gross and cross-sectional anatomy for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Complex anatomic sites present challenges for learners and are not well-addressed in traditional postgraduate curricula. A multidisciplinary team (MDT) based head-and-neck gross and radiologic anatomy program for radiation oncology trainees was developed, piloted, and empirically assessed for efficacy and learning outcomes. Methods Four site-specific MDT head-and-neck seminars were implemented, each involving a MDT delivering didactic and case-based instruction, supplemented by cadaveric presentations. There was no dedicated contouring instruction. Pre- and post-testing were performed to assess knowledge, and ability to apply knowledge to the clinical setting as defined by accuracy of contouring. Paired analyses of knowledge pretests and posttests were performed by Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Results Fifteen post-graduate trainees participated. A statistically significant (p < 0.001) mean absolute improvement of 4.6 points (17.03%) was observed between knowledge pretest and posttest scores. Contouring accuracy was analyzed quantitatively by comparing spatial overlap of participants’ pretest and posttest contours with a gold standard through the dice similarity coefficient. A statistically significant improvement in contouring accuracy was observed for 3 out of 20 anatomical structures. Qualitative and quantitative feedback revealed that participants were more confident at contouring and were enthusiastic towards the seminars. Conclusions MDT seminars were associated with improved knowledge scores and resident satisfaction; however, increased gross and cross-sectional anatomic knowledge did not translate into improvements in contouring accuracy. Further research should evaluate the impact of hands-on contouring sessions in addition to dedicated instructional sessions to develop competencies. PMID

  3. Phosphategypsum wastes in Venice lagoon. Radiological impact; Le discariche di fosfogessi nella laguna di Venezia. Valutazioni preliminari dell'impatto radiologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, M; Blasi, M; Guogang, J.; Rosamilia, S.; Sansone, U. [Agenzia Nazionale per la Protezione dell' Ambiente, Rome (Italy); Biancotto, R.; Bidoli, P.; Sepulcri, D. [Agenzia Regionale di Prevenzione e Protezione del Veneto, Venice (Italy). Dipt. provinciale di Venezia; Cavolo, F. [Smilax, Mira, VE (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The phosphoric minerals utilized in phosphoric acid production, presents high concentrations of radioactive materials: U238, Th 232, K 40. The phosphogypsum is the waste material obtained in the phosphoric acid production in wet process. This type of production method is employed for many years in Venice lagoon (Porto Marghera chemical plants). In this paper are reported evaluations of radiological impact on aquatic environment of lagoon. [Italian] Con il termine di fosfogessi si intende comunemente il materiale di risulta che si ottiene nella produzione di acido fosforico attraverso la via umida (attacco acido). Questa tipologia di produzione che ha operato per diversi decenni a Porto Marghera, e' finalizzata allo scopo di ottenere acido fosforico principalmente per l'industria dei fertilizzanti e quindi come prodotto intermedio per la chimica e per le preparazioni alimentari. Il fosforo, elemento principale della reazione, era ricavato da rocce fosfatiche di origine sedimentaria marina provenienti per lo piu' dall'Africa settentrionale. Il sistema produttivo utilizzato negli impianti di Porto Marghera era basato su una reazione principale, che partendo dal minerale attraverso un attacco acido, produceva acido fosforico: Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} (Minerale Fosforico) + 3H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (Acido Solforico) + 3H{sub 2}O (Acqua) {yields} 2H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} (Acido fosforico) + 3CaSO{sub 4}H{sub 2}O (Solfato di calcio (gesso)). In particolare il minerale era preventivamente macinato e vagliato, quindi si procedeva alla sua miscelazione con l'acido fosforico ed alla successiva reazione del composto ottenuto.

  4. Radiology and fine art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Slobodan; Stošić-Opinćal, Tatjana; Tomić, Oliver

    2012-07-01

    The radiologic aesthetics of some body parts and internal organs have inspired certain artists to create specific works of art. Our aim was to describe the link between radiology and fine art. We explored 13,625 artworks in the literature produced by 2049 artists and found several thousand photographs in an online image search. The examination revealed 271 radiologic artworks (1.99%) created by 59 artists (2.88%) who mainly applied radiography, sonography, CT, and MRI. Some authors produced radiologic artistic photographs, and others used radiologic images to create artful compositions, specific sculptures, or digital works. Many radiologic artworks have symbolic, metaphoric, or conceptual connotations. Radiology is clearly becoming an original and important field of modern art.

  5. Anticipated Activities in Maritime Work, Process Control, and Business Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2004-01-01

    Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory.......Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory....

  6. Modelling of the radiological impact of radioactive waste dumping in the Arctic Seas. Report of the Modelling and Assessment Working Group of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The work is summarized carried out by the Modelling and Assessment Working Group in 1994-1996. The Modelling and Assessment Working Group was established within the framework of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) launched by the IAEA in 1993 with the objectives of modelling the environmental dispersal and transport of nuclides to be potentially released from the dumped objects and of assessing the associated radiological impact on man and biota. Models were developed to model the dispersal of the pollutants and for the assessment of the radiological consequences of the releases from the dumped wastes in the Arctic. The results of the model intercomparison exercise were used as a basis on which to evaluate the estimate of concentration fields when detailed source term scenarios were used and also to assess the uncertainties in ensuing dose calculations. The descriptions and modelling work was divided into three main phases: description of the area, collection of relevant and necessary information; extension to and development of predictive models including an extensive model inter-comparison and finally prediction of radiological impact, used in the evaluation of the need and options for remediation

  7. Managing traumatic stress in children anticipating parental death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldinger, Amy; Cain, Albert; Porterfield, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    QUALITATIVE EVIDENCE drawn from a community study of 58 parentally bereaved school-age children and their surviving parents provides a descriptive exploration of one of the most difficult challenges faced by families in anticipated deaths: managing the stress of a child's exposure to the graphic physical, emotional, and mental deterioration of the dying parent. The concept of traumatic stress is broadly defined to include exposure to the "fact" of impending death itself, that is, the anxiety that comes from knowing that one may lose a close other. Included, as well, is an exploration of secondary traumatic stress, defined here to cover the notion of the stress of watching other loved ones in the family succumb to terror and anxiety about the impending death. Emphasis is placed on a child's unique vulnerability to traumatic stressors and on the role of parenting in mediating child exposure to parental decline. In contrast to the anticipatory grief literature which emphasizes the advantages of forewarning in cushioning postmortem adjustment, this study documents the adverse impact of a child's exposure to graphic stimuli. These findings underscore the need for clinicians to attend to the traumatic stress of "ordinary" anticipated deaths, rather than maintaining an exclusive grief orientation.

  8. Genetic anticipation in Swedish Lynch syndrome families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Salomé, Jenny; Boonstra, Philip S; Karimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Among hereditary colorectal cancer predisposing syndromes, Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 is the most common. Patients with LS have an increased risk of early onset colon and endometrial cancer, but also other tumors that generally have......-2013. We analyzed a homogenous group of mutation carriers, utilizing information from both affected and non-affected family members. In total, 239 families with a mismatch repair gene mutation (96 MLH1 families, 90 MSH2 families including one family with an EPCAM-MSH2 deletion, 39 MSH6 families, 12 PMS2...... of diagnosis per generation. An alternative analysis using a mixed-effects Cox proportional hazards model (COX-R) estimates a hazard ratio of exp(0.171), or about 1.19, for age of diagnosis between consecutive generations. LS-associated gene-specific anticipation effects are evident for MSH2 (2.6 years...

  9. Intent, Future, Anticipation: A Semiotic, Transdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeckenhoff, Hellmut

    2008-10-01

    Encouraged e.g. by chaos theory and (bio-)semiotics science is trying to attempt a deeper understanding of life. The paradigms of physics alone prove not sufficient to explain f. ex. evolution or phylogenesis and ontogenesis. In complement, research on life systems reassesses paradigmatic models not only for living systems and not only on the strict biological level. The ontological as well as the epistemological base of science in toto is to be reconsidered. Science itself proves a historical and cultural phenomenon and can be seen as shaped by evolution and semiosis. -Living systems are signified by purpose, intent and, necessarily, by the faculty to anticipate e.g. the cyclic changes of their environment. To understand the concepts behind a proposal is developed towards a model set constituting a transdisciplinary approach. It rests e.g. on concepts of systems, evolution, complexity and semiodynamics.

  10. Needs of anticipation for transport operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galtier, J.

    2005-01-01

    COGEMA LOGISTICS (formerly Transnucleaire) has designed and manufactured several thousands of casks, and owns fleet of more than 4000 casks. Benefiting from more than 40 years of experience in cask shipment COGEMA LOGISTICS has demonstrated an outstanding performance in transportation and has integrated all feed back from past successful operations in current ones. Early anticipation of needs, i.e. at preliminary design step, is of major importance from a technical point of view (capacity, interface, handling means, licensing), and also in terms of political and public acceptance issues from the design step. This paper will highlight for each step required for the implementation of an optimal transport and storage system: Decision to proceed (including political aspects)-Design of casks to be used (including operational interface)-Licensing process-Manufacturing process-Transport plan, Public Acceptance-Loading Operations-Transport-Maintenance operations. (authors)

  11. Anticipating flow assurance challenges through geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flannery, M. [Fluid Evaluation and Sampling Technologies (FEAST) Team, Shell International Exploration and Production (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The behaviour of reservoir fluids pose a challenge at all stages of petroleum production, from the reservoir to refinery. The challenges sometimes stem from sub-optimal operations or inappropriate system design, with assumptions of similar fluid properties across the field. Hydrocarbon fluid phase behaviour is the product of local PVT conditions and the geochemical identity of the fluids. An appropriate development scenario along with anticipation of production challenges, can benefit from early integration of engineering and geochemical understanding of hydrocarbon fluids. This paper presented field examples of how the kerogen type and maturity, and later post-generation alteration processes such as biodegradation, water washing, TSR can influence likely flow assurance challenges in the production stream. The confounding issues of multiple charges and overlaying signatures were also discussed.

  12. Time discounting and pain anticipation. Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brañas Garza, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with pain anticipation experienced before medical procedures. our experimental results show that individuals with lower time discount factors are more prone to suffer pain in advance. We provide a framework to rationalize the connection between pain anticipation and impatience. in this set up, more impatient subjects, who only value very near events, mainly take into account the present negative effects of medical procedures (the costs, whereas more patient individuals have a net positive valuation of medical events, given that they are able to value both the cost incurred now and all the benefits to be accrued in the future.

    Este artículo trata de la anticipación del dolor experimentada antes de los procedimientos médicos. nuestros resultados experimentales muestran que los individuos con factor de descuento temporal más bajo son más proclives a sufrir dolor por adelantado. el artículo proporciona un marco en el que racionalizar la relación existente entre impaciencia y anticipación del dolor. en este marco, los sujetos más impacientes, que evalúan sólo los eventos muy próximos en el tiempo, focalizan su atención principalmente en los efectos negativos de los procedimientos médicos (sólo los costes, mientras que los individuos más pacientes tienen una valoración neta positiva de los actos médicos puesto que valoran tanto el coste en el que se incurre en el presente como los beneficios que se obtendrán en el futuro.

  13. Research and development in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butragueno, J. L.; Villota, C.; Gutierrez, C.; Rodriguez, A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of Radiological Protection is to guarantee that neither people, be they workers or members of the public, or the environment are exposed to radiological risks considered by society to be unacceptable. Among the various resources available to meet this objective is Research and Development (R and D), which is carried out in three areas: I. Radiological protection of persons: (a) knowledge of the biological effects of radiations, in order to determine the relationship that exists between radiation exposure dose and its effects on health; (b) the development of new personal dosimetry techniques in order to adapt to new situations, instrumental techniques and information management technologies allowing for better assessment of exposure dose; and (c) development of the principle of radiological protection optimisation (ALARA), which has been set up internationally as the fundamental principle on which radiological protection interventions are based. II. Assessment of environmental radiological impact, the objective of which is to assess the nature and magnitude of situations of exposure to ionising radiations as a result of the controlled or uncontrolled release of radioactive material to the environment, and III.Reduction of the radiological impact of radioactive wastes, the objective of which is to develop radioactive material and waste management techniques suitable for each situation, in order to reduce the risks associated with their definitive management or their release to the environment. Briefly described below are the strategic lines of R and D of the CSN, the Electricity Industry, Ciemat and Enresa in the aforementioned areas. (Author)

  14. Site identification: environmental and radiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Radiological and environmental considerations are recognized as being of utmost importance in planning, siting, licensing, operating, and decommissioning a high-level nuclear waste repository. In such a complex undertaking, it is important to identify the major concerns anticipated to arise in all of these phases in order to address them as early as possible in the program. Three representative activities/studies are summarized which will identify some of the important radiological and environmental considerations which must be addressed through this prolonged sequence of events and will indicate how these considerations are being addressed. It should be emphasized that these are only three of many which could have been chosen. The three key activities/studies are: (1) the NWTS Program criteria for identifying repository sites, (2) the generic guide for preparing environmental evaluations for deep drilling and (3) a preliminary environmental assessment for disposal of mined rock during excavation of a repository

  15. Unravelling nocebo effect: the mediating effect of anxiety between anticipation and pain at wound dressing change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Kevin Y

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of anxiety in the relationship between anticipation and pain in people with chronic wounds. Pain is common in people with chronic wounds. Anticipation or negative expectation of discomfort has been shown to have an augmenting effect on pain; also known as nocebo hyperalgesia. This was a cross-sectional study with repeated measures. Prior to dressing change, anticipatory pain level was evaluated by a 11-point numerical rating scale and anxiety by the Six-items State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-6). During wound dressing changes, pain was measured before dressing removal, at dressing removal, at cleansing and dressing application using the numerical scale. Analysis was completed based on the data from a convenience sample of 96 patients. Participants reported more pain at cleansing and dressing removal than baseline. High levels of anticipation, anxiety and pain at dressing change for wounds were related to heavy exudate and wound that were covered with necrotic tissue. Finally, the relationship between anticipation and pain perception was mediated by anxiety. Anticipation of pain triggers anxiety that can lead to increased pain. There is a need to incorporate evaluation of anxiety and personal expectations as part of comprehensive pain assessment. Clinicians should be aware of the impact of emotions and anticipation on overall pain experience. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The rise of sea level. To understand and to anticipate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    By proposing and briefly commenting graphs and drawings, this publication propose brief presentations of the main issues related to sea level rise: global warming and climate disturbance, description of the phenomenon of sea level rise (difference between sea ice and ground ice, melting of glaciers), increase of sea level rise during the twentieth century, territories at risk (examples of Greenland, Tuvalu, Shanghai), acceleration of ice melting during the twenty first century with many coastal areas at risk, already noticed and possible future impacts in France (glaciers runoff, threatened coasts, example of the Xynthia tempest), how to be united and to anticipate (a threat for millions of people, adaptation to sea level rise, limitation of global warming to limit sea level rise)

  17. Anticipation, teamwork and cognitive load: chasing efficiency during robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Kevin; Johnson, Amanda; Gotsch, Amanda; Hussein, Ahmed A; Cavuoto, Lora; Guru, Khurshid A

    2018-02-01

    Robot-assisted surgery (RAS) has changed the traditional operating room (OR), occupying more space with equipment and isolating console surgeons away from the patients and their team. We aimed to evaluate how anticipation of surgical steps and familiarity between team members impacted efficiency. We analysed recordings (video and audio) of 12 robot-assisted radical prostatectomies. Any requests between surgeon and the team members were documented and classified by personnel, equipment type, mode of communication, level of inconvenience in fulfilling the request and anticipation. Surgical team members completed questionnaires assessing team familiarity and cognitive load (National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Task Load Index). Predictors of team efficiency were assessed using Pearson correlation and stepwise linear regression. 1330 requests were documented, of which 413 (31%) were anticipated. Anticipation correlated negatively with operative time, resulting in overall 8% reduction of OR time. Team familiarity negatively correlated with inconveniences. Anticipation ratio, per cent of requests that were non-verbal and total request duration were significantly correlated with the console surgeons' cognitive load (r=0.77, p=0.006; r=0.63, p=0.04; and r=0.70, p=0.02, respectively). Anticipation and active engagement by the surgical team resulted in shorter operative time, and higher familiarity scores were associated with fewer inconveniences. Less anticipation and non-verbal requests were also associated with lower cognitive load for the console surgeon. Training efforts to increase anticipation and team familiarity can improve team efficiency during RAS. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Utilization management in radiology, part 2: perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszak, Richard; Berlin, Jonathan W

    2012-10-01

    Increased utilization of medical imaging in the early part of the last decade has resulted in numerous efforts to reduce associated spending. Recent initiatives have focused on managing utilization with radiology benefits managers and real-time order entry decision support systems. Although these approaches might seem mutually exclusive and their application to radiology appears unique, the historical convergence and broad acceptance of both programs within the pharmacy sector may offer parallels for their potential future in medical imaging. In this second installment of a two-part series, anticipated trends in radiology utilization management are reviewed. Perspectives on current and future potential roles of radiologists in such initiatives are discussed, particularly in light of emerging physician payment models. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board...... of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology....

  20. Socioeconomic trends in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barneveld Binkhuysen, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    For radiology the socioeconomic environment is a topic of increasing importance. In addition to the well-known important scientific developments in radiology such as interventional MRI, several other major trends can be recognized: (1) changes in the delivery of health care, in which all kinds of managed care are developing and will influence the practice of radiology, and (2) the process of computerization and digitization. The socioeconomic environment of radiology will be transformed by the developments in managed care, teleradiology and the integration of information systems. If radiologists want to manage future radiology departments they must have an understanding of the changes in the fields of economics and politics that are taking place and that will increasingly influence radiology. Some important and recognizable aspects of these changes will be described here. (orig.)

  1. Making the link between radiological assessment, nuclear safety assessment and environmental impact assessment, as applied to unloading of the Lepse spent fuel storage vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham M.; Sneve, Malgorzata K.; Markarov, Valentine G.

    2000-01-01

    Planning and optimisation of radioactive waste management operations is a complicated task involving scientific, technical and social issues. There are many factors which have to be balanced, involving trade-offs such as those between safety now and long term safety; between protection of human health and protection of the environment as a whole; between protection of workers and protection of the public; and between mitigation of risks of major accidents and mitigation of routine low-level but certain to occur risks. Managing the spent fuel currently stored on the Lepse vessel in Murmansk offers as big a challenge as any other in this context. The Russian Federation state regulatory process imposes strict requirements on operators to demonstrate adequate safety, environmental and human health protection. Practically, however, there is little experience in Russia or elsewhere on how to combine all the issues referred to above within an overall assessment that leads to informed decision making. The paper will describe the components of assessment work being considered within the context of the regulatory planning of Lepse unloading operations. The scope will focus on radiation protection issues but also include non-radioactive pollution risks and other safety issues have to be taken into account if a truly optimal allocation and application of resources is to be made. Consideration will be given to radiation worker dose and other health risk assessments for routine operations, safety assessments of special operations such as spent fuel handling; and the radiological and other environmental and human health impacts of planned releases of effluents to the biosphere. The need to identify and collate particular relevant information will discussed and the links between the different components of the overall assessment will be identified with a view to improving the overall effectiveness of the assessment process. The problem of combining all the information coherently

  2. Reinterpretation of radiological imaging in patients referred to a tertiary referral centre with a suspected pancreatic or hepatobiliary malignancy: impact on treatment strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilleman, Esther H.B.M.; Gulik, Thomas M. van; Gouma, Dirk J.; Phoa, Saffire S.K.S.; Delden, Otto M. van; Lameris, Johan S.; Rauws, Erik A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the clinical importance of reinterpretation of radiological investigations performed in a referring hospital and the value of additional investigations in a referral centre. A panel of four experts retrospectively evaluated the technical quality of radiological investigations and made reinterpretation reports, of 78 patients referred with a suspected pancreatic or hepatobiliary malignancy. The value of additional radiological investigations performed in the referral centre was assessed. The quality of ultrasound and CT examinations was sufficient for reinterpretation in (36 of 69) 52% and (42 of 60) 70%, respectively. The reinterpretation reports of the ultrasound investigations were scored as ''in accordance'' in (30 of 36) 83%, as ''minor discordance'' in (3 of 36) 8% and as ''major discordance'' in (3 of 36) 8%. For CT proportions of (29 of 42) 69%, (8 of 42) 19% and (5 of 42) 12%, respectively, were found. Additional ultrasound (n=55) showed no additional findings in 16%, minor additional findings in 53% and major additional findings in 31% of cases. For additional spiral CT scan (n=47) results were of 21, 47 and, 32%, respectively. Reinterpretation of ultrasound and CT resulted in a change in treatment strategy for 7 patients (9%). Additional ultrasound or CT resulted in a change in treatment strategy for 24 patients (30%). Improved communication and reinterpretation of radiological investigations may reduce unnecessary referral. (orig.)

  3. Emergency pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carty, H. [ed.

    1999-11-01

    This unique book covers the main clinical presentations of children to an emergency room and considers in detail the radiological investigation of such emergencies. Numerous high-quality illustrations of the radiological manifestations of acutely presenting illness in children ensure that the volume will serve as a rapid reference source for both pediatricians and radiologists. All of the authors are specialist pediatric radiologists who provide emergency radiological services on a daily basis, and the text reflects this level of expertise. (orig.)

  4. Essentials of skeletal radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yochum, T.R.; Rowe, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics of skeletal radiology: Positioning of patients for diagnostic radiology and normal anatomy; congenital malformations of skeleton; measurements in radiology; spondylolisthesis; metabolic and endocrine diseases of bone and their diagnostic aspects; image processing of vertebrae, skeleton, bone fractures evaluations and epidemiological and social aspects of some bone diseases. Various modalities as CT scanning, NMR imaging, ultrasonography and biomedical radiography are briefly discussed in relation to bone pathology.

  5. Anticipating the perceived risk of nanotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Terre; Kandlikar, Milind; Beaudrie, Christian E H; Conti, Joseph; Herr Harthorn, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    Understanding emerging trends in public perceptions of nanomaterials is critically important for those who regulate risks. A number of surveys have explored public perceptions of their risks and benefits. In this paper we meta-analyse these surveys to assess the extent to which the following four hypotheses derived from previous studies of new technologies might be said to be valid for nanotechnologies: risk aversion will prevail over benefit appreciation; an increase in knowledge will not result in reduced aversion to risks; judgements will be malleable and subject to persuasion given risk-centric information; and contextual, psychometric and attitudinal predictors of perceived risk from prior studies can help anticipate future perceptions of nanotechnologies. We find that half the public has at least some familiarity with nanotechnology, and those who perceive greater benefits outnumber those who perceive greater risks by 3 to 1. However, a large minority of those surveyed (44%) is unsure, suggesting that risk judgements are highly malleable. Nanotechnology risk perceptions also appear to contradict some long-standing findings. In particular, unfamiliarity with nanotechnology is, contrary to expectations, not strongly associated with risk aversion and reduced 'knowledge deficits' are correlated with positive perceptions in this early and controversy-free period. Psychometric variables, trust and affect continue to drive risk perceptions in this new context, although the influence of both trust and affect is mediated, even reversed, by demographic and cultural variables. Given the potential malleability of perceptions, novel methods for understanding future public responses to nanotechnologies will need to be developed.

  6. Anticipated consumer reaction to irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction on first hearing of food irradiation is horror, revulsion, and disbelief that we could seriously anticipate such a thing. Ignorance coupled with fear of anything to do with the nuclear industry is the reason for such extreme reaction. Before anyone rushes into marketing irradiated foods, a lot of careful preparation must be done. A consumer education program is essential. The consumers must be told why it is proposed to irradiate food, what benefits it will bring to the public. Enough need will have to be demonstrated to overcome the supposed risk factor. Symbol on all irradiated foods must not be used to alert or alarm the consumer but rather as a piece of information. It will be necessary to be ever vigilant, to keep up the diligent training of food irradiators, food handlers and food inspectors. Irradiation is not a substitute for good manufacturing practice. So by using a different name or symbol, irradiated foods will soon be a part of our lives

  7. Swiss nation-wide survey on radiation doses in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aroua, A.; Valley, J.F.; Vader, J.-P.; Burnand, B.

    2001-01-01

    A nation-wide survey on radiation doses in diagnostic radiology was conducted in Switzerland in 1998-1999. More than 250 types of examinations were considered, covering conventional and interventional radiology, angiography, CT, mammography, osteodensitometry, conventional tomography and dental radiology. This survey aimed at establishing the collective radiological impact of radiodiagnostics on the Swiss population. The methodology of the survey is described. The examination frequencies and integral dosimetric results associated with diagnostic radiology in Switzerland are presented. (author)

  8. Machine Learning and Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  9. Radiological Emergency Response Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Quality Data Asset includes all current and historical emergency radiological response event and incident of national significance data and surveillance, monitoring,...

  10. Machine learning and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Mobile computing for radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. User questionnaire to evaluate the radiological workspace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Koesoema, Allya P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years, an increase in digitalization of radiology departments can be seen, which has a large impact on the work of the radiologists. This impact is not only demonstrated by the increased use of digital images but also by changing demands on the whole reading environment. In this

  13. Will Marriage Matter? Effects of Marriage Anticipated by Same-Sex Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Julie L.; Gotta, Gabrielle; Green, Robert-Jay

    2012-01-01

    The current study used an online survey to explore the anticipated impact of legalized marriage on partners in same-sex couples living in California. These data were gathered prior to the California Supreme Court decision in May 2008 legalizing same-sex marriage, which held sway for 5 months before California Proposition 8 eliminating same-sex…

  14. Resilience Training for Hospital Workers in Anticipation of an Influenza Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Andria; Khayeri, Michelle Young-Eun; Raja, Shreyshree; Peladeau, Nathalie; Romano, Donna; Leszcz, Molyn; Maunder, Robert G.; Rose, Marci; Adam, Mary Anne; Pain, Clare; Moore, Andrea; Savage, Diane; Schulman, Rabbi Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Background: Well before the H1N1 influenza, health care organizations worldwide prepared for a pandemic of unpredictable impact. Planners anticipated the possibility of a pandemic involving high mortality, high health care demands, rates of absenteeism rising up to 20-30% among health care workers, rationing of health care, and extraordinary…

  15. Qualitative evaluation of environmental radiological impact in a phosphate associated uranium conventional mine: Santa Quiteria Project, CE, Brazil; Avaliacao qualitativa do impacto radiologico ambiental em uma mineracao convencional de fosfato com uranio associado: o Projeto Santa Quiteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Rocio G. dos; Santo, Aline Sa E., E-mail: rocio@ird.gov.br, E-mail: alinesah@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and evaluate qualitatively the main potential sources of mineral and installation terms of Santa Quiteria, CE, Brazil, evaluating their possible impacts on the environment. The key terms sources in the production of phosphoric acid are usually: the dig of the mines, tailings dams and phospho plaster stack. Thus, this work intends to inform the academic community about this issue, as well as the population in general and also, acting proactively in order to warn about the possible environmental impacts, so that actions to compensate, minimize or avoid these radiological impacts on the environment, can be included in the planning of the industrial mineral project of Santa Quiteria (author)

  16. Physics of Radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Harold Elford

    1983-01-01

    Authority, comprehensivity and a consummate manner of presentation have been hallmarks of The Physics of Radiology since it first saw publication some three decades past. This Fourth Edition adheres to that tradition but again updates the context. It thoroughly integrates ideas recently advanced and practices lately effected. Students and professionals alike will continue to view it, in essence, as the bible of radiological physics.

  17. Radiological concept of spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingg, G.; Karbowski, A.

    1985-07-01

    The destructive discovertebral lesions of ankylosing spondylitis are discussed. Their evaluation in the literature is compared with the newer histologic and radiologic results. The X-ray findings in rheumatoid arthritis are also presented. Using radiographs from 16 of our own patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis and 5 with rheumatoid arthritis, the analyse the radiological appearance inquestion.

  18. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Won; Park, Jae Hyung; Yoon, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  19. Radiological concept of spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingg, G.; Karbowski, A.

    1985-01-01

    The destructive discovertebral lesions of ankylosing spondylitis are discussed. Their evaluation in the literature is compared with the newer histologic and radiologic results. The X-ray findings in rheumatoid arthritis are also presented. Using radiographs from 16 of our own patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis and 5 with rheumatoid arthritis, the analyse the radiological appearance inquestion. (orig.) [de

  20. Characterization of radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper identifies conditions that should be considered by the designers of mobile teleoperator equipment intended for service in radiological emergencies. We include a definition of radiological emergency and a taxonomy of emergencies. We will indicate the range of operating conditions that an equipment designer should consider and the type of operations that his machine might be expected to perform. 2 refs., 1 tab

  1. The impact of quality assurance in medical radiology in raising the quality of life and the role of medical physicist in this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieve, F.E.

    2004-01-01

    The goal on establishing quality assurance programmes in diagnostic radiology at the European level is to provide explanations on regulations, which had been developed by International Organizations on the level of the existing knowledge on the use of ionizing radiation for medical diagnosis. Since it is well known that diagnostic radiological users often produce poor quality images and are applying to patients unnecessary high radiation exposure the criteria for performance characteristics related to good imaging quality and patient exposure had been established. The correct application of the principles of quality assurance and quality control in relation to patient exposure needs to be standardised on a general European level, since radiographs should be generally comparable. The implementation of quality assurance programmes and quality control methods could lead to more accurate diagnosis and better informed decisions regarding treatment. The role and responsibility of medical physicists in the process of image production, radiation exposure and quality assurance in diagnostic radiology is now implemented in this Directive. The tasks of the medical physicist in this process had been identified and explained. (author)

  2. Proposed Nuclear Power Plants in the UK-Potential Radiological Implications for Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, C.; Kelleher, K.; McGinnity, P.; Organo, C.; Smith, K.; Currivan, L.; Ryan, T.

    2013-05-01

    The UK Government has identified up to eight locations for the construction of new nuclear power plants by 2025. Five of these locations are on the Irish Sea coast. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, RPII was requested by the Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government to undertake an assessment of the potential radiological impacts on Ireland from this New Build Programme. This report presents the findings of the potential impacts on Ireland of both the anticipated routine radioactive discharges and of a range of postulated nuclear accident scenarios. The following points are the principal findings of the report. Given the prevailing wind direction in Ireland, radioactive contamination in the air, either from routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants or accidental releases, will most often be transported away from Ireland. The routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants will have no measurable radiological impact on Ireland or the Irish marine environment. The severe accident scenarios assessed ranged in their estimated frequency of occurrance from 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 33 million per year. The assessment used a weather pattern that maximised the transfer of radioactivity to Ireland. For the severe accident scenarios assessed, food controls or agriculture protective measures would generally be required in Ireland to reduce exposure of the population so as to mitigate potential long-term health effects. In the accident scenario with an estimated 1 in 33 million chance of occurring, short-term measures such as staying indoors would also be advised as a precautionary measure. In general, the accidents with higher potential impact on Ireland are the ones least likely to occur. Regardless of the radiological impact, any accident at the proposed nuclear power plants leading to an increase of radioactivity levels in Ireland would have a socio-economic impact on Ireland. A major accidental release of radioactivity to

  3. 210Pb and 210Po concentrations in the Venice lagoon ecosystem (Italy) and the potential radiological impact to the local public and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guogang Jia; Belli, M.; Sansone, U.; Rosamilia, S.; Blasi, M.

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate the possible radiological impact to the local public and environment from a phosphogypsum stockpile, 210 Po and 210 Pb concentrations in river water, lagoon water, suspended matter, superficial sediment, algae and bivalves samples collected in Venice lagoon area have been investigated. The results show that the mean 210 Po and 210 Pb concentrations in river water are 1.42 ± 0.36 mBq x l -1 and 1.46 ± 0.39 mBq x l -1 with a mean 210 Po/ 210 Pb ratio of 0.98 ± 0.17 and about 60% of them are associated with the particulate; 210 Po and 210 Pb contribution from the phosphogypsum stockpile to the river water is negligible. Higher 210 Po (2.61-5.67 mBq x l -1 ) and 210 Pb (1.31-3.62 mBq x l -1 ) concentrations in the lagoon waters have been observed if compared with the literature values. About 60% of 210 Po and 210 Pb are found in the soluble form with a mean 210 Po/ 210 Pb ratio of 1.79 ± 1.47. 210 Po and 210 Pb concentrations in 28 out 37 sediment samples ranged from 26 to 45 Bq x kg -1 (dry weight), only 9 sediments with 210 Po and 210 Pb concentrations greater than 45 Bq x kg -1 are found and most of them are located 1-4 km near the phosphogypsum stockpile. The elevated 210 Po and 210 Pb concentrations in the sediments may be due to the contamination from the phosphogypsum stockpile. The mean 210 Po/ 210 Pb ratio (0.986 ± 0.049) in the sediments shows that 210 Po and 210 Pb exist in nearly secular equilibrium. 210 Po and 210 Pb concentrations in algae vary with different species. The mean 210 Po and 210 Pb concentrations in Gracilaria compress and Ulva laetevirens which show a similar behavior, are 3.18 ± 1.23 Bq x kg -1 and 2.42 ± 1.26 Bq x kg -1 (fresh weight), respectively, with a mean 210 Po/ 210 Pb ratio of 1.45 ± 0.34. The mean concentration factors with respect to the filtered water are 1096 ± 424 for 210 Po and 1299 ± 680 for 210 Pb. The mean 210 Po and 210 Pb concentrations in the soft part of Mytilus edulis are 23.2 ± 9.7 Bq

  4. Anticipated transients without scram for light water reactors. Appendices. Staff report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    Information is presented concerning scram failure probability, rod drive failure data, ATWS rule and ATWS requirements, treatment of steam generator tube failures in ATWS evaluation, radiological consequences assessments, ATWS study to include parameter variations and equipment reliability in probabilistic accident analysis, PWR MTC for ATWS, safety valve flows, ATWS contribution to risk, fuel integrity, value-impact analysis, and analytical methods

  5. Anticipating Public Acceptance : The Hydrogen Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Ruggero, O.

    2014-01-01

    Current energy related issues, such as climate change or the oil depletion, demand technological and societal change towards new ways of producing and using energy. One of the challenges coming with the development of these new solutions relates to the impact that these technologies will have on

  6. Fractal Rock Slope Dynamics Anticipating a Collapse

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paluš, Milan; Novotná, Dagmar; Zvelebil, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70 (2004), 036212 ISSN 1063-651X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/00/1055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : fractal * scaling * unstable rock slope * collapse prediction * engineering geology Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.352, year: 2004

  7. Subspecialized Radiological Reporting Expedites Turnaround Time of Radiology Reports and Increases Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Christoph; Boehm, Thomas; Seifert, Burkhardt; Kawel-Boehm, Nadine

    2018-02-15

     To assess the impact of changing from general to subspecialized reporting on turnaround time of radiology reports (TAT), the fraction of radiology reports available within 24 hours (RReporting workflow in our radiology department was changed from general reporting (radiologists report imaging studies of all areas [neuroradiological, abdominal, musculoskeletal imaging et cetera]) to subspecialized reporting (radiologists solely report imaging studies of their subspecialty field [e. g. musculoskeletal]). TAT, Rreporting (January-December 2012) and compared to a 12-month period of subspecialized reporting (April 2014-March 2015) using Mann Whitney U-test, Pearson chi-square test and odds ratios, respectively.  Report TAT decreased from a median of 17:04 hours (h) during general reporting to 3:38 h during subspecialized reporting, resulting in a 4.7-fold improvement (p report being available reporting. Productivity increased from a median of 301 to 376 (reports/full-time radiologist/month) (p = 0.001).  Changing the workflow from general to subspecialized reporting significantly improved the turnaround time of radiology reports, the fraction of radiology reports available within 24 hours and productivity.   · Changing the radiology reporting workflow from general to subspecialized reporting is feasible.. · Implementation of subspecialized reporting yielded significant improvement of radiology report turnaround time.. · Implementation of subspecialized reporting substantially increased the fraction of radiology reports available reporting.. · Stern C, Boehm T, Seifert B et al. Subspecialized Radiological Reporting Expedites Turnaround Time of Radiology Reports and Increases Productivity. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2018; DOI: 10.1055/s-0044-100728. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. 4 CFR 201.10 - Notice of anticipated fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 201.10 Notice of... be considered received until the requestor makes a firm commitment to pay the anticipated total fee... Board's notice. If the requestor does not provide a firm commitment to pay the anticipated fee within 60...

  9. Addressing anticipated countermoves as a persuasive form of strategic manoeuvring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amjarso, B.; van Eemeren, F.H.; Williams, D.C.; Zagar, I.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Addressing anticipated countermoves is a commonplace practice in argumentative discourse. A speaker in a discussion may anticipate the objections of an opponent and deal with them in advance. Likewise, a writer can make it clear to his readers that he does not expect them to take his views

  10. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP......Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP...

  11. Marketing a Radiology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David C; Rao, Vijay M; Flanders, Adam E; Sundaram, Baskaran; Colarossi, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    In addition to being a profession, the practice of radiology is a business, and marketing is an important part of that business. There are many facets to marketing a radiology practice. The authors present a number of ideas on how to go about doing this. Some marketing methods can be directed to both patients and referring physicians. Others should be directed just to patients, while still others should be directed just to referring physicians. Aside from marketing, many of them provide value to both target audiences. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Referral expectations of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.L.; Altmaier, E.; Berberoglu, L.; Morris, K.

    1989-01-01

    The expectation of the referring physician are key to developing a successful practice in radiology. Structured interviews with 17 clinicians in both community care and academic practice documented that accuracy of the radiologic report was the single most important factor in clinician satisfaction. Data intercorrelation showed that accuracy of report correlated with frequency of referral (r = .49). Overall satisfaction of the referring physician with radiology correlated with accuracy (r = .69), patient satisfaction (r = .36), and efficiency in archiving (r = .42). These data may be weighted by departmental managers to allocate resources for improving referring physician satisfaction

  13. Anticipating Public Acceptance: The Hydrogen Case

    OpenAIRE

    Di Ruggero, O.

    2014-01-01

    Current energy related issues, such as climate change or the oil depletion, demand technological and societal change towards new ways of producing and using energy. One of the challenges coming with the development of these new solutions relates to the impact that these technologies will have on society, and how people will react to these technologies. This phenomenon is often referred to as public acceptance. The relevance of considering public acceptance of emerging technologies is self-evi...

  14. A new car-following model considering velocity anticipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun-Fang, Tian; Bin, Jia; Xin-Gang, Li; Zi-You, Gao

    2010-01-01

    The full velocity difference model proposed by Jiang et al. [2001 Phys. Rev. E 64 017101] has been improved by introducing velocity anticipation. Velocity anticipation means the follower estimates the future velocity of the leader. The stability condition of the new model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. Theoretical results show that the stability region increases when we increase the anticipation time interval. The mKdV equation is derived to describe the kink–antikink soliton wave and obtain the coexisting stability line. The delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density are obtained in this model. Numerical simulations exhibit that when we increase the anticipation time interval enough, the new model could avoid accidents under urgent braking cases. Also, the traffic jam could be suppressed by considering the anticipation velocity. All results demonstrate that this model is an improvement on the full velocity difference model. (general)

  15. A new car-following model considering velocity anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Fang; Jia, Bin; Li, Xin-Gang; Gao, Zi-You

    2010-01-01

    The full velocity difference model proposed by Jiang et al. [2001 Phys. Rev. E 64 017101] has been improved by introducing velocity anticipation. Velocity anticipation means the follower estimates the future velocity of the leader. The stability condition of the new model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. Theoretical results show that the stability region increases when we increase the anticipation time interval. The mKdV equation is derived to describe the kink-antikink soliton wave and obtain the coexisting stability line. The delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density are obtained in this model. Numerical simulations exhibit that when we increase the anticipation time interval enough, the new model could avoid accidents under urgent braking cases. Also, the traffic jam could be suppressed by considering the anticipation velocity. All results demonstrate that this model is an improvement on the full velocity difference model.

  16. Evaluation guideline for the study of the radiological impact of based nuclear installations (INB) presented in support of releases authorization demands; Guide d'examen pour l'etude de l'impact radiologique d'une installation nucleaire de base (INB) fournie a l'appui des demandes d'autorisation de rejets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, M.; Despres, A.; Supervil, S.; Conte, D.; Hubert, P.; Oudiz, A.; Champion, D

    2002-10-01

    In the case of a license demand for the effluents release and water taking for a nuclear installation, the operating must realize a study of the nuclear effluents radiological impact on the environment and the public health. In this context, the study presents technical and methodological specifications which led the Direction of the Nuclear Installations Safety (DSIN) and the General Direction of the Health (DGS) to ask the IPSN the elaboration of a guideline to help these studies evaluation. The guideline presents the regulatory context, the description of the installations, the treatment and the control processes, the rules of management, the description of the environment, the estimation of the radiological impacts and the environment control system definition. (A.L.B.)

  17. Decision Strategy: Radiological Evaluations: Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohier, A.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on off-site emergency management are (1) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological impact to the population and the environment during a nuclear emergency; (2) to support and advise the Belgian authorities on specific problems concerning existing and potential hazards from exposure to ionising radiation in normal and accidental conditions; (3) to organise training courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in 1999 are reported on

  18. A Survey of Preoperative Radiological Investigation Among Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Survey of Preoperative Radiological Investigation Among Dental Professionals carrying out Impacted Lower third Molar Surgery in Eastern Nigeria. ... West African Journal of Radiology. Journal Home ... Fortyeight were returned anonymously representing 85.7% response rate, which were used in our data analysis.

  19. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppelt, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  20. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and signi......Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP...... and significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP...

  1. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 2 (2005) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 17, No 1 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Radiological assessment and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeevaert, T.; Sohier, A.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised

  4. American College of Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 Meeting & Course Calendar Where ACR Exhibits ACR Data Science Institute Structures AI Advances DSI framework to help ... Announcements Upcoming Meetings 11/16/2017 The ACR Data Science Institute™ Structures Artificial Intelligence Development to Optimize Radiology ...

  5. Radiology Architecture Project Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Raymond W; Hogan, Laurie; Teshima, Satoshi; Davidson, Scott

    2017-12-19

    The rapid pace of technologic advancement and increasing expectations for patient- and family-friendly environments make it common for radiology leaders to be involved in imaging remodel and construction projects. Most radiologists and business directors lack formal training in architectural and construction processes but are expected to play significant and often leading roles in all phases of an imaging construction project. Avoidable mistakes can result in significant increased costs and scheduling delays; knowledgeable participation and communication can result in a final product that enhances staff workflow and morale and improves patient care and experience. This article presents practical guidelines for preparing for and leading a new imaging architectural and construction project. We share principles derived from the radiology and nonradiology literature and our own experience over the past decade completely remodeling a large pediatric radiology department and building a full-service outpatient imaging center. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiological considerations for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    It has been said, by those uninitiated to decommissioning work, that radiological considerations required for decommissioning are the same as those for an operating facility. In reality, nothing could be further from the truth. The act of decommissioning can be likened to cutting off a tree limb while sitting on it. This paper discusses some of the unique radiological aspects that are associated with implementing a decommissioning health physics program. There are physical constraints that may cause major differences between a normal operational and a decommissioning health physics program. Throughout the decommissioning process, the installed equipment and services that were needed to support an operational program are constantly being removed or may already be disabled due to the age of the facility. Those affecting radiological protection programs typically would include radiation shielding, ventilation systems, breathing air supply for respiratory protection, and radiological monitoring systems

  7. Radiology and the law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Law of Medical Malpractice: An Overview; The Radiologist as Defendant; The Radiologist as an Expert Witness; The Missed Diagnosis; Legalities of the Radiograph; and Angiography and Interventional Radiology

  8. Radiology capital asset management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, G N; Pridlides, A J

    1993-01-01

    Radiology administrators are expected not only to take on the ultimate accountability for meeting the needs and challenges of present day-to-day operations, but also to plan for the future. Computer Aided Facility Management (CAFM), as a tool, enables radiology managers to obtain up-to-date data to manage their services. Using Autocad on a unix-based minicomputer as the graphical base generator and integrating information from a MUMPS-based minicomputer, the CAFM process can define areas to be studied for productivity and life cycle costs. From an analysis of radiology service, management was able to make solid judgement calls for equipment replacement and facility project renovation to effectively manage radiology resources.

  9. Ergonomics in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, N. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.uk; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations.

  10. Radiological assessment and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaert, T.; Sohier, A

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised.

  11. Ergonomics in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, N.; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V.

    2009-01-01

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations

  12. Dimensions of Anticipated Reaction in Information Management: Anticipating Responses and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsamen-Conrad, Kate

    Many models, theories, and frameworks of information management (e.g., privacy, disclosure, secrets) incorporate the concept of receiver response, both anticipated and actual. Although most if not all information management literature highlights the importance of the response variable, each perspective conceptualizes and/or operationalizes response differently. The lack of consistency across perspectives limits research design, theory testing, and scholars' ability to make comparisons among and across theoretical frameworks, as well as their ability to evaluate research findings within the broader context of information management theory. This project presents a review and synthesis of receiver response within the context of information sharing and decision making, including both immediate responses and longer-term outcomes of sharing the information.

  13. Radiologic science for technologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushong, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides in-depth coverage of physics, biology and protection for the radiologic technology student. It presents a significant portion of all of the science required of radiologic technology students under one cover. Chapter content reflects a readable and practical organization with outlines listed on the first page of each chapter and sample problems at the end. New to this edition are: new and expanded sections on radiation techniques, digital imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound

  14. Radiological protection act, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act provides for the establishment of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and dissolves An Bord Fuinnimh Nuicleigh (the Board), transferring its assets and liabilities to the Institute. It sets out a range of radiation protection measures to be taken by various Ministers in the event of a radiological emergency and gives effect at national level to the Assistance Convention, the Early Notification Convention and the Physical Protection Convention. The Institute is the competent Irish authority for the three Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  15. INTRODUCTION: Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard P.; Liepert, Beate G.

    2010-06-01

    intensification of precipitation (O'Gorman and Schneider 2009) and analysis of observed and simulated changes in extreme rainfall for Europe (Lenderink and van Mijgaard 2008) and over tropical oceans by Allan et al (2010) appear to corroborate this. Radiative absorption by water vapour (Previdi 2010, Stephens and Ellis 2008) also provides a thermodynamic feedback on the water cycle, and explains why climate model projections of global precipitation and evaporation of around 1-3% K-1 are muted with respect to the expected 7% K-1 increases in low-level moisture. Climate models achieve dynamical responses through reductions in strength of the Walker circulation (Vecchi et al 2006) and small yet systematic changes in the atmospheric boundary layer over the ocean that modify evaporation (Richter and Xie 2008). A further consequence is anticipated sub-tropical drying (Neelin et al 2006, Chou et al 2007); Allan et al (2010) confirm a decline in dry sub-tropical precipitation while the wet regions become wetter both in model simulations and satellite-based observations. Discrepancies between observed and climate model simulated hydrological response to warming (Wentz et al 2007, Yu and Weller 2007) are of immediate concern in understanding and predicting future responses. Over decadal time-scales it is important to establish whether such discrepancies relate to the observing system, climate modeling deficiencies, or are a statistical artifact of the brevity of the satellite records (Liepert and Previdi 2009). Techniques for extracting information on century-scale changes in precipitation are emerging (Smith et al 2009) but are also subject to severe limitations. Past decadal-scale changes in the water cycle may be further influenced by regionally and temporally varying forcings and resulting feedbacks which must be represented realistically by models (Andrews et al 2009). The radiative impact of aerosols and their indirect effects on clouds and precipitation (Liepert et al 2004) provide

  16. Diagnostic and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J. [Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reith, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Rummeny, Ernst J. (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2016-08-01

    This exceptional book covers all aspects of diagnostic and interventional radiology within one volume, at a level appropriate for the specialist. From the basics through diagnosis to intervention: the reader will find a complete overview of all areas of radiology. The clear, uniform structure, with chapters organized according to organ system, facilitates the rapid retrieval of information. Features include: Presentation of the normal radiological anatomy Classification of the different imaging procedures according to their diagnostic relevance Imaging diagnosis with many reference images Precise description of the interventional options The inclusion of many instructive aids will be of particular value to novices in decision making: Important take home messages and summaries of key radiological findings smooth the path through the jungle of facts Numerous tables on differential diagnosis and typical findings in the most common diseases offer a rapid overview and orientation Diagnostic flow charts outline the sequence of diagnostic evaluation All standard procedures within the field of interventional radiology are presented in a clinically relevant and readily understandable way, with an abundance of illustrations. This is a textbook, atlas, and reference in one: with more than 2500 images for comparison with the reader's own findings. This comprehensive and totally up-to-date book provides a superb overview of everything that the radiology specialist of today needs to know.

  17. Rethinking radiology informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Marc; Dreyer, Keith J; Geis, J Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Informatics innovations of the past 30 years have improved radiology quality and efficiency immensely. Radiologists are groundbreaking leaders in clinical information technology (IT), and often radiologists and imaging informaticists created, specified, and implemented these technologies, while also carrying the ongoing burdens of training, maintenance, support, and operation of these IT solutions. Being pioneers of clinical IT had advantages of local radiology control and radiology-centric products and services. As health care businesses become more clinically IT savvy, however, they are standardizing IT products and procedures across the enterprise, resulting in the loss of radiologists' local control and flexibility. Although this inevitable consequence may provide new opportunities in the long run, several questions arise. What will happen to the informatics expertise within the radiology domain? Will radiology's current and future concerns be heard and their needs addressed? What should radiologists do to understand, obtain, and use informatics products to maximize efficiency and provide the most value and quality for patients and the greater health care community? This article will propose some insights and considerations as we rethink radiology informatics.

  18. The radiological impact of 50 years of uranium mining in France. The necessity of a site satisfying restructuring by Cogema-Areva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In a first text, the author briefly describes the radioprotection risks related to uranium mining, gives an overview of the characteristics of extraction residues in uranium extraction factories. Then, after having presented the case of the Limousin region in France, he outlines the high level of contamination of the environment of the mining sites, recalls the extraction process and discusses the careless use of the extracted radioactive rocks and materials. He outlines the insufficient management and processing of liquid effluents, the risk associated with the dispersal of contaminated scrap metals and of radioactive ores. He also discusses air contamination due to dusts and radioactive gases. He comments the issue of long term storage of uranium mining residues. He outlines the responsibility of the Administration and comments the trial against Cogema which took place in 2005. He outlines how restructuring of all the concerned sites is a challenging issue for our future. A second text in English describes radiological hazards from uranium mining (uranium by-products, radiological situation before and during extraction, long term contamination after mines closure, problems posed by tailing disposal)

  19. ''Public impact of long term wastes storage links'' between wastes radiological characterization and public impact evaluation at short and long term; ''Impact sur le public des stockages a long terme des dechets'' liens entre caracterisation radiologique des dechets et evaluations d'impact pour le public a court et a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillion, E. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs ANDRA, 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2001-07-01

    The food for thought of these days SFRP being the wastes characterisation, this presentation will put the emphasis on the radioisotopes that interest ANDRA because they are important for their contribution to radiological impact calculated for some scenario. The approach of storage safety and the impact evaluations are presented, for the short term safety, for the long term safety in the case of a surface storage concerning the low and intermediate level radioactive waste, the long term safety in deep storage for high level and years living radioactive waste. (N.C.)

  20. Moral Disengagement, Anticipated Social Outcomes and Adolescents' Alcohol Use: Parallel Latent Growth Curve Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Catherine A; Bussey, Kay

    2015-10-01

    Moral disengagement is a social cognitive process that has been extensively applied to transgressive behaviors, including delinquency, aggression and illicit substance use. However, there has been limited research on moral disengagement as it relates to underage drinking. The current study aimed to examine moral disengagement contextualized to underage drinking and its longitudinal relationship to alcohol use. Moreover, the social context in which adolescent alcohol use typically occurs was also considered, with a specific emphasis on the social sanctions, or social outcomes, that adolescents anticipate receiving from friends for their alcohol use. Adolescents were assessed across three time-points, 8 months apart. The longitudinal sample consisted of 382 (46% female) underage drinkers (12-16 years at T1). Parallel latent growth curve analysis was used to examine the bi-directional influence of initial moral disengagement, anticipated social outcomes, and alcohol use on subsequent growth in moral disengagement, anticipated social outcomes and alcohol use. The interrelation of initial scores and growth curves was also assessed. The findings revealed that, in the binary parallel analyses, initial moral disengagement and anticipated social outcomes both significantly predicted changes in alcohol use across time. Moreover, initial anticipated social outcomes predicted changes in moral disengagement. These findings were not consistently found when all three process analyses were included in a single model. The results emphasize the impact of social context on moral disengagement and suggest that by targeting adolescents' propensity to justify or excuse their drinking, as well as the social outcomes adolescents anticipate for being drunk, it may be possible to reduce their underage drinking.

  1. EPA's Sustainable Port Communities: Anticipating Changes in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port Communities Face Many Challenges: • Climate change – Sea Level Rise, Extreme Events: “Assets” become Vulnerabilities; Nuisance flooding; Changes in waste water and stormwater capacity; Changes in near-shore ecology and water quality • Port Expansion: Increasing multi-modal cargo transport, bigger ships; Energy use, transport; Invasive species; Homeland security; Increased development pressure (land use); Population growth • EJ Communities: Hazardous waste, cargo; Changes in emissions (amount, type, distribution) Changes in demographics, real estate values Disproportionately impacted by climate change • Competing Economic Interests Tourism and historical resources Protection of ecosystem services To make other federal agencies involved in resilience research aware of our study and to solicit collaboration.

  2. Collective motion with anticipation: Flocking, spinning, and swarming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Alexandre; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Eloy, Christophe; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the collective dynamics of self-propelled particles able to probe and anticipate the orientation of their neighbors. We show that a simple anticipation strategy hinders the emergence of homogeneous flocking patterns. Yet anticipation promotes two other forms of self-organization: collective spinning and swarming. In the spinning phase, all particles follow synchronous circular orbits, while in the swarming phase, the population condensates into a single compact swarm that cruises coherently without requiring any cohesive interactions. We quantitatively characterize and rationalize these phases of polar active matter and discuss potential applications to the design of swarming robots.

  3. Anticipated Regret and Omission Bias in HPV Vaccination Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Holm

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated effects of anticipated regret on parents’ HPV vaccination intentions and effects of omission bias on HPV vaccination intentions and vaccine uptake. An online survey was completed by 851 parents of adolescent girls in Denmark, a country where HPV vaccine safety is currently...... in a hypothetical vaccination vignette as a significant negative predictor of HPV vaccination intention as well as vaccine uptake. Finally, the study tested effects of anticipated regret and omission bias on evaluations of two extisting Danish pro-vaccine campaign videos. Here, the result revealed anticipated...

  4. Collective motion with anticipation: flocking, spinning, and swarming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Alexandre; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Eloy, Christophe; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the collective dynamics of self-propelled particles able to probe and anticipate the orientation of their neighbors. We show that a simple anticipation strategy hinders the emergence of homogeneous flocking patterns. Yet anticipation promotes two other forms of self-organization: collective spinning and swarming. In the spinning phase, all particles follow synchronous circular orbits, while in the swarming phase, the population condensates into a single compact swarm that cruises coherently without requiring any cohesive interactions. We quantitatively characterize and rationalize these phases of polar active matter and discuss potential applications to the design of swarming robots.

  5. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis: Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted State(s) and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division (M ampersand A) is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC M ampersand A and the content and preparation of the manual

  6. White paper from the ACR Task Force on Print Media in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszak, Richard; Haines, G Rebecca; Van Duyn Wear, Vanessa; Lexa, Frank James; Bashir, Mustafa; D'Souza, Sharon; Carlos, Ruth; Chen, James Yen-Yu; King, Bernard F; Wald, Christoph

    2011-10-01

    The rapidly changing technological and business environment in which scientific journals are published will necessitate ongoing reassessment of operations, goals, and priorities. In this white paper, the ACR Task Force on Print Media in Radiology reviews the history and role of print media in radiology; discusses current and anticipated societal, technological, and financial challenges; and explores a variety of strategies to help ensure the relevance of professional society publishing in the future. Copyright © 2011 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A model for assessing the radiological impacts of deep sea disposal of radioactive wastes: development of the model and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulin, M.; Chartier, M.; Durrieu de Madron, X.

    1987-10-01

    A new numerical model has been developed in France to assess the radiological consequences of low level radioactive waste disposal on the sea bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. It is a box model covering the world ocean with a finer resolution in the North Atlantic and near the Nuclear Energy Agency dumpsite. The main processes involved in the nuclides transfer from the drums to man are modelled or parameterized: time variations of the nuclides release, advection and diffusion by the ocean fluid, adsorption-desorption on particles, sedimentation and burial of sediments, transfers through organisms living in the sea (fishes, crustaceans, molluscs, seaweeds, plankton,...). The dose equivalent to critical group members and the collective dose equivalent are assessed. A sensitivity analysis of the model has been performed to assess the reliability of the dose calculations. An intercomparison exercise has been achieved with two other independent models on a benchmark problem

  8. Picture archiving and communication systems in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piqueras Pardellans, J.; Carreno Pedemonte, J.C.; Lucaya Layret, J.

    1994-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) constitute a data processing tool that offers new working methods of diagnostic radiology. The definitive aim of a PACS is to allow a radiology service to operate without film images or documents on paper, integrating images and clinical information. Different image acquisition, viewing and storage systems, linked by communications networks, are arranged around a central management and storage system. Their components are described and the advantages, drawbacks and limitations are discussed from the technological point of view and considering their impact on health care, while a critical review is provided of the 1993 status of this issue

  9. The Sleeping Infant Brain Anticipates Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Manuela; Wilhelm, Ines; Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan; Friederici, Angela D

    2017-08-07

    From the age of 3 months, infants learn relations between objects and co-occurring words [1]. These very first representations of object-word pairings in infant memory are considered as non-symbolic proto-words comprising specific visual-auditory associations that can already be formed in the first months of life [2-5]. Genuine words that refer to semantic long-term memory have not been evidenced prior to 9 months of age [6-9]. Sleep is known to facilitate the reorganization of memories [9-14], but its impact on the perceptual-to-semantic trend in early development is unknown. Here we explored the formation of word meanings in 6- to 8-month-old infants and its reorganization during the course of sleep. Infants were exposed to new words as labels for new object categories. In the memory test about an hour later, generalization to novel category exemplars was tested. In infants who took a short nap during the retention period, a brain response of 3-month-olds [1] was observed, indicating generalizations based on early developing perceptual-associative memory. In those infants who napped longer, a semantic priming effect [15, 16] usually found later in development [17-19] revealed the formation of genuine words. The perceptual-to-semantic shift in memory was related to the duration of sleep stage 2 and to locally increased sleep spindle activity. The finding that, after the massed presentation of several labeled category exemplars, sleep enabled even 6-month-olds to create semantic long-term memory clearly challenges the notion that immature brain structures are responsible for the typically slower lexical development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Barriers to Adult Learning: Does Anticipation Match Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Donna L.; Witten, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    Examined barriers to learning in adult students (N=111) using the Adult Student Survey. Results indicated that in many cases students were able to predict barriers before enrolling. Lack of time was the most difficult barrier to anticipate correctly. (JAC)

  11. Anticipating the uncertain: economic modeling and climate change policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Svenn

    2012-11-01

    With this thesis I wish to contribute to the understanding of how uncertainty and the anticipation of future events by economic actors affect climate policies. The thesis consists of four papers. Two papers are analytical models which explicitly consider that emissions are caused by extracting scarce fossil fuels which in the future must be replaced by clean technologies. The other two are so called numerical integrated assessment models. Such models represent the world economy, the climate system and the interactions between those two quantitatively, complementing more abstract theoretical work. Should policy makers discriminate between subsidizing renewable energy sources such as wind or solar power, and technologies such as carbon capture and storage (CCS)? Focusing only on the dynamic supply of fossil fuels and hence Co{sub 2}, we find here that cheaper future renewables cause extraction to speed up, lower costs of CCS may delay it. CCS hence may dampen the dynamic inefficiency caused by the absence of comprehensive climate policies today. Does it matter whether uncertainty about future damage assessment is due to scientific complexities or stems from the political process? In paper two, I find that political and scientific uncertainties have opposing effects on the incentives to investment in renewables and the extraction of fossil fuels: The prospect of scientific learning about the climate system increases investment incentives and, ceteris paribus, slows extraction down; uncertainty about future political constellations does the opposite. The optimal carbon tax under scientific uncertainty equals expected marginal damages, whereas political uncertainty demands a tax below marginal damages that decreases over time. Does uncertainty about economic growth impact optimal climate policy today? Here we are the first to consistently analyze how uncertainty about future economic growth affects optimal emission reductions and the optimal social cost of carbon. We

  12. The Future of Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Margulis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been my good fortune to live and practice radiology during a long period of momentous change – to see the transformation of the discipline from a supportive service into a mainstream, essential branch of clinical medicine. I remember wearing red goggles to adapt my vision before performing fluoroscopy; observing the horrible, now thankfully obsolete, practice of ventriculography, which was considered advanced neuroradiology; and performing other, now rarely prescribed procedures, such as double-contrast barium enemas and intravenous pyelography. Witnessing the beginnings of interventional radiology, I suggested its name in an editorial. I also had the good fortune to see the introduction of computed tomography (CT and a technology first known as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Together with fellow members of a committee of the American College of Radiology and editors of prestigious radiological journals, I took part in changing the name of the latter modality to MRI, freeing it from threatening implications. Looking back on these experiences, one lesson stands out above all: Innovation and transformation never cease. Looking forward, it is clear that radiology, along with the rest of medicine, is now undergoing further momentous changes that will affect the future of all those already practicing as well as those yet to start their careers.

  13. Radiological assessment of the impact on human populations and the environment of the 1949 to 1982 dumping of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in the deep North-East Atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, M.; Menard, F.

    1990-12-01

    A thorough radiological assessment of the impact of the 1949 to 1982 dumping of low- and intermediate- level radioactive waste in the deep North-East Atlantic is performed with the numerical compartmental REJMAR model. The calculations include the assessment of the dose equivalent to the individuals of a theoretical critical group through a large set of pathways, and the collective dose to mankind through the ingestion pathways. The complete dumping performed in the deep North-East Atlantic is taken into account. The assumptions of biological short-circuit through marin food chains are tested. The order of magnitude of the dose delivered to marine organisms living near the dumping site is assessed [fr

  14. Ten years after the radiological accident of Goiania, a reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouailhetas, Y.; Xavier, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    This work contains a reflection on the impact of the radiological protection measures taken in the city of Goiania in the aftermath of the accident involving caesium-137, along with a discussion on the biological foundation of these actions. (author)

  15. Dynamic Analytical Capability to Better Understand and Anticipate Extremist Shifts Within Populations under Authoritarian Regimes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Michael Lewis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to create a generalizable data- and theory-supported capability to better understand and anticipate (with quantifiable uncertainty): 1) how the dynamics of allegiance formations between various groups and society are impacted by active conflict and by third-party interventions and 2) how/why extremist allegiances co-evolve over time due to changing geopolitical, sociocultural, and military conditions.

  16. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio, E-mail: vittorio.iaccarino@unina.it; Venetucci, Pietro [University of Naples ' Federico II' , Diagnostic Imaging Department-Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  17. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  18. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio; Venetucci, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  19. KAERI Radiological Emergency Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oui, Khang Byung; Lee, Goan Yup; Lee, Jong Tai

    2004-06-15

    The Radiological Emergency Plan of KAERI is to draw up based on the Civil Defence Law, the Disaster and Safety Management Law, the Act of Physical Protection and Emergency Preparedness in Nuclear Facilities, the National Radiological Emergency Plan, and made reference to the DOE order and IAEA TECDOC etc. This plan describes the preventive measures, emergency response, re-entry and restoration to ensure adequate response capabilities to the nuclear accidents which would cause a significant risk to the KAERI staffs and the public near to the site. And the Operation of Radiological Emergency Management System is included in this plan to test the effectiveness of this plan and to improve the response capabilities of the emergency staffs against nuclear accidents.

  20. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Ramon; Khong, Pek-Lan; Ringertz, Hans

    2013-01-01

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  1. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Ramon [University of Michigan Hospital, Department of Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Khong, Pek-Lan [The University of Hong Kong, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Ringertz, Hans [Linkoeping University Hospital, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  2. Radiology's value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  3. Radiological incidents in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobzova, L.; Novotny, J.

    2008-01-01

    In many countries a reporting system of radiological incidents to national regulatory body exists and providers of radiotherapy treatment are obliged to report all major and/or in some countries all incidents occurring in institution. State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) is providing a systematic guidance for radiotherapy departments from 1997 by requiring inclusion of radiation safety problems into Quality assurance manual, which is the basic document for obtaining a license of SONS for handling with sources of ionizing radiation. For that purpose SONS also issued the recommendation 'Introduction of QA system for important sources in radiotherapy-radiological incidents' in which the radiological incidents are defined and the basic guidance for their classification (category A, B, C, D), investigation and reporting are given. At regular periods the SONS in co-operation with radiotherapy centers is making a survey of all radiological incidents occurring in institutions and it is presenting obtained information in synoptic communication (2003 Motolske dny, 2005 Novy Jicin). This presentation is another summary report of radiological incidents that occurred in our radiotherapy institutions during last 3 years. Emphasis is given not only to survey and statistics, but also to analysis of reasons of the radiological incidents and to their detection and prevention. Analyses of incidents in radiotherapy have led to a much broader understanding of incident causation. Information about the error should be shared as early as possible during or after investigation by all radiotherapy centers. Learning from incidents, errors and near misses should be a part of improvement of the QA system in institutions. Generally, it is recommended that all radiotherapy facilities should participate in the reporting, analyzing and learning system to facilitate the dissemination of knowledge throughout the whole country to prevent errors in radiotherapy.(authors)

  4. Radiological findings of pulmonary aspergillosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kounn Sik; Im, Chung Kie

    1985-01-01

    The pulmonary aspergillosis is a group of three separate disease, comprising invasive aspergillosis, aspergilloma, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, or a disease process in which one of three entities overlap with another process such as mucoid impaction, pulmonary infiltration with eosinophilia, bronchocentric granulomatosis, microgranulomatous hypersensitivity, or asthma. The radiological findings of 24 cases of pulmonary aspergillosis diagnosed and treated at Seoul National University Hospital during the past 7 years were analyzed retrospectively. The results were as follows: 1. Final diagnosis of 24 cases of pulmonary aspergillosis was aspergilloma in 16 cases, invasive aspergillosis in 2 cases, variant form of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in 3 cases, and endobronchial aspergillosis in 3 cases. 2. The underlying causes of the aspergilloma were healed tuberculous cavity in 6 cases, bronchiectasis in 8 cases, and no underlying cause were found in 2 cases. All the 16 cases of aspergilloma were correctly diagnosed without difficultly by demonstrating the intracavitary mass or air meniscus. 3. Radiological findings of the invasive aspergillosis in kidney transplant patients were multiple round nodules with early cavitation and formation of aspergilloma which shows slowly progressive cavitation over 13 months in one case, and diffusely scattered miliary nodules with occasional cavitation in the other case. 4. Classic allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis were not found in our series but variant form of ABPA was found in 3 young female patients. All the three patients shows some degree of central bronchiectasis and combined aspergilloma was found in 2 cases. 5. Three patients diagnosed as endobronchial aspergillosis-saprophytic infection of aspergillus in the bronchial tree-by bronchoscopic biopsy shows nonspecific radiological findings

  5. Radiology education: a radiology curriculum for all medical students?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, Laura; Kok, E.M.; van der Gijp, Anouk

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic errors in radiology are frequent and can cause severe patient harm. Despite large performance differences between radiologists and non-radiology physicians, the latter often interpret medical images because electronic health records make images available throughout the hospital. Some

  6. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste

  7. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Sonnenberg, E.; Casola, G.; Varney, R.R.; D'Agostino, H.B.; Zornow, M.; Mazzie, W.

    1989-01-01

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  8. Practical interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, J.; Schreyer, H.

    1991-01-01

    The book is intended as a practical guide and manual for interventional radiology applications. Main emphasis is placed on the performance of the various techniques, with explanations of the various steps to be taken, illustrated by drawings or pictures. Indications, contra-indications and clinical achievements are given in brief. There is one chapter each for the following techniques: angioplasty - intra-arterial fibrinolysis - vascular stents - neuroembolisation - embolisation of other vessels - biliary interventions - abscess drainage - nephrostomy and ureteral manipulations -percutaneous fine-needle biopsy - vena cava filters - interventional radiology in infants. (orig.)

  9. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  10. Synopsis of radiologic anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschan, I.

    1987-01-01

    The book is a compact version of earlier publications that appeared in 1975 as a one- and a two-volume issue under the title 'Atlas of Radiologic Anatomy'. A chapter on computed tomography has been added as this novel technique requires a new approach to radiologic anatomy. The radiologist will find all the information on the anatomic conditions he needs for analysing radiographs and CT pictures. More than 600 radiographs and CT pictures are given that illustrate typical and rare findings. The book also is useful as a source of reference for making good radiographs and evaluating the quality of radiographs or CT pictures. With 1413 figs., 18 tabs [de

  11. Gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.N.J.; Perriss, R.W.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    This is the fifth in the series of short reviews of internet-based radiological learning resources and will focus on gastrointestinal (GI) and hepatobiliary radiology. Below are details of a few of the higher quality resources currently available. Most of the sites cater for medical students and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, but may be also be of interest to specialists, especially for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (May 2006)

  12. Radiological worker training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance

  13. Normal radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.B.

    1987-01-01

    This book is intended for learners in radiology, presenting a wealth of normal radiological findings together with a systematic guide for appraisal and interpretation, and for formulation of reports. The text examples and criteria given will help beginners in learning to 'read' a radiograph, and to verify their conclusions by means of checklists and standard reports. The case material covers numerous illustrations from the following sectors: Skeletal radiography, mammography, tomography, contrast radiography, organ examination by intravenous techniques, arthrography and angiography, and specialized radiography, (ECB) With 184 figs [de

  14. Radiological sciences dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Dowsett, David

    2009-01-01

    The Radiological Sciences Dictionary is a rapid reference guide for all hospital staff employed in diagnostic imaging, providing definitions of over 3000 keywords as applied to the technology of diagnostic radiology.Written in a concise and easy to digest form, the dictionary covers a wide variety of subject matter, including:· radiation legislation and measurement · computing and digital imaging terminology· nuclear medicine radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals· radiographic contrast agents (x-ray, MRI and ultrasound)· definitions used in ultrasound and MRI technology· statistical exp

  15. Human performance in radiological survey scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Abelquist, E.W. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The probability of detecting residual contamination in the field using portable radiological survey instruments depends not only on the sensitivity of the instrumentation used in scanning, but also on the surveyor`s performance. This report provides a basis for taking human performance into account in determining the minimum level of activity detectable by scanning. A theoretical framework was developed (based on signal detection theory) which allows influences on surveyors to be anticipated and understood, and supports a quantitative assessment of performance. The performance of surveyors under controlled yet realistic field conditions was examined to gain insight into the task and to develop means of quantifying performance. Then, their performance was assessed under laboratory conditions to quantify more precisely their ability to make the required discriminations. The information was used to characterize surveyors` performance in the scanning task and to provide a basis for predicting levels of radioactivity that are likely to be detectable under various conditions by surveyors using portable survey instruments.

  16. Human performance in radiological survey scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.S.; Abelquist, E.W.

    1998-03-01

    The probability of detecting residual contamination in the field using portable radiological survey instruments depends not only on the sensitivity of the instrumentation used in scanning, but also on the surveyor's performance. This report provides a basis for taking human performance into account in determining the minimum level of activity detectable by scanning. A theoretical framework was developed (based on signal detection theory) which allows influences on surveyors to be anticipated and understood, and supports a quantitative assessment of performance. The performance of surveyors under controlled yet realistic field conditions was examined to gain insight into the task and to develop means of quantifying performance. Then, their performance was assessed under laboratory conditions to quantify more precisely their ability to make the required discriminations. The information was used to characterize surveyors' performance in the scanning task and to provide a basis for predicting levels of radioactivity that are likely to be detectable under various conditions by surveyors using portable survey instruments

  17. Evaluation the Prevalence of Impacted Teeth in Patients Referred to Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology of Yazd Dental School in years 1392-1394

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ezoddini-Ardakani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tooth impaction is a common anomaly. Several local and systemic factors may result in tooth impaction. Among the permanent dentition third molar, maxillary canine, maxillary and mandibular premolar and maxillary central incisors have the most probability of impaction. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of impacted teeth in the patients referred to Yazd Dental School in 1392 to 1394. Methods: In this retrospective study, 600 digital panoramic radiographies of the patients over 15 years old were examined. The patients with dent of axial abnormalities, other syndromes or particular pathology, edentulous and traumatized patients were extracted from the study. Data were statistically analyzed using SPSS software (version 22.0 for Windows, Chicago, IL, USA, Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. Results: Out of total 600 patients were examined, 99 patients (16.5% presented with at least one impacted tooth. Mandibular third molars were the most prevalent (52.26 % impacted teeth, followed by impacted maxillary third molar (27.7%, maxillary canine (13.8% and mandibular canine (4.86%. The highest prevalence of tooth impaction was seen in 22-30 years age group. There was no statistically significant difference between tooth impaction and gender (p-value=0.91. Conclusion: Tooth impaction has a relatively high prevalence in Yazd  (16.5%. The highest prevalence of tooth impaction is seen in third molars followed by canine teeth of both jaws. So, in case of delayed eruption of canine teeth, radiographic examination is suggested to evaluation their impaction and applying proper managements.

  18. Study and radiological impact assesstment produced by activities of different non-nuclear industries. Titanium dioxide industries; Estudio y evaluacion del impacto radiologico producido por las actividades de diversas industrias no nucleares en el sur de Espana. Industrias de dioxido de titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Manjon, G.; Abril, J.M. (and others)

    2010-07-01

    After a careful study and evaluation of radiological impact, the conclusiono is that these industries do not need to be subject to control, and it is not necessary any corrective action to reduce the exposition and/or to apply any radiation protection measures.

  19. Study and radiological impact assessment produced by activities of different non-nuclear industries. Titanium dioxide industries; Estudio y evaluacion del impacto radiologico producido por las actividades de diversas industrias no nucleares en el sur de Espana. Industrias de dioxido de titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Manjon, G.; Abril, J.M.

    2010-07-01

    After a careful study and evaluation of radiological impact, the conclusion is that these industries do not need to be subject to control, and it is not necessary any corrective action to reduce the exposition and/or to apply any radiation protection measures.

  20. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook

  1. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  2. Guidelines for a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This manual presents guidelines for hospitals on a radiology quality assurance and dose measurement audit program and a system of planned actions that monitor and record the performance and effectiveness of the radiological service

  3. Program of environmental radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    This Regulation refers to the requirement of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', as expressed in the section 5.14, related to the Program of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (PMRA)

  4. American Society of Radiologic Technologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Technology Job Bank Job Search Resources Radiologic Assistant Salary Estimator About ASRT Contact ASRT Membership Mission & Vision ... Now Open Nov 13, 2017 Libraries in New Mexico Recognize National Radiologic Technology Week® Nov 07, 2017 ...

  5. The effect of current and anticipated body pride and shame on dietary restraint and caloric intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troop, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Studies have established a link between body shame and eating disorder symptoms and behaviours. However, few have differentiated current feelings of body shame from those anticipated with weight change and none has examined the effects of these on subsequent eating behaviour. In this paper, a measure of body pride and shame was developed (Study 1) for the purposes of using it in a subsequent longitudinal study (Study 2). Two hundred and forty two women were recruited from a university and the general population and participated in Study 1, completing the Body Pride and Shame (BPS) scale either online or offline, as well as a number of validating measures. In Study 2, 40 female students completed the BPS, as well as a measure of dietary restraint, and subsequently recorded their dietary intake everyday for the next seven days. Study 1 identified and validated subscales of current body pride/shame as well as pride/shame that is anticipated were the individual to gain weight or lose weight. In Study 2, over and above levels of dietary restraint, current feelings of body shame predicted eating more calories over the next 7 days while the anticipation of shame with weight gain predicted eating fewer calories. Although previous research has only measured current feelings of body shame, the present studies showed that anticipated shame also impacts on subsequent behaviour. Interventions that regulate anticipated as well as current emotions, and that do not merely challenge cognitions, may be important in changing eating behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how well your body is responding to a treatment you are receiving for your disease or condition Screen for different illnesses, such as breast cancer, colon cancer, or heart disease The most common types of diagnostic radiology exams include: Computed tomography (CT), also known ...

  7. German radiological congress 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubitz, B.; Stender, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    The publication contains the abstracts of the 261 papers read at the meeting and the 82 further papers announced, and 37 brief descriptions of the contributions to the scientific exhibition. The papers were on the subjects of radiology, nuclear medicine and to a certain extent, also radiobiology. (MG) [de

  8. Radiologic Career Ladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    of operating fixed and mobile radiologic equipment; routine and special radiographic positioning; theory and practice of special radiographic...defined as training provided by resident technical schools, field training detachments (FTD), mobile training teams (MTT), formal OJT, or any other...TISSUE STUDIES 81 1316 PERFORM HUMERUS RADIOGRAPHIC EXAMINATIONS 81 1306 PERFORM COCCYX RADIOGRAPHIC EXAMINATIONS 81 1329 PERFORM PARANASAL SINUS

  9. SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radiology examination as a diagnostic aid in presentations with wide differential diagnoses: Case report of new Hodgkin's lymphoma on a background of poorly controlled HIV · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Rachel Hubbard, Jalpa Kotecha, Thomas ...

  10. Radiological protective screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flaugnatti, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    A radiological screen for placing on a patient's skin is discussed, comprising a flat jacket containing a fine particulate filler and a settable resin binder, the fine particulate filler being of a material which absorbs medical radiation, and the jacket including a window to transmit such radiation through the flat jacket. 16 claims, 4 drawing figures

  11. Radiological analysis of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Crustacean and Sediment Samples from Fresh and Marine. Water in Oil Exploration Area of Ondo State, Nigeria. J. A. Ademola1* and S. I. Ehiedu2. 1. Department of Physics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. 2. National Institute of Radiation Protection and Research, Ibadan, Nigeria. ABSTRACT: Radiological analysis ...

  12. The radiological technologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiologists rely upon the talents of the technologists with whom they work. Indeed, a good technologist will only enhance the radiologist's performance. Radiological technologists no longer solely take radiographs, but are involved in many more detailed areas of imaging, such as computered tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear radiology, ultrasound, angiography, and special procedures. They are also required to make decisions that affect the radiological examination. Besides the degree in radiological technology (RT), advanced degrees in nuclear medicine technology (NMT) and diagnostic medical sonography (RDMS) are attainable. The liability of the technologist is not the same as the radiologist involved, but the liability is potentially real and governed by a subdivision of jurisprudence known as agency law. Since plaintiffs and attorneys are constantly searching for new frontiers of medical liability, it is wise for the radiologist and technologist to be aware of the legalities governing their working relationship and to behave accordingly. The legal principles that apply to this working relationship are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of some relevant and interesting cases that have been litigated

  13. ERC Radiological Glovebag Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1997-07-01

    This document establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the standardized methods for installation, use, and dismantlement of glovebags within the Hanford Site Environmental Contractor Radiological Glovebag Program. This document addresses the following topics: Containment selection and fabrication, Glovebag fabrication, Containment installation and inspection, General glovebag containment work practices, Emergency situations, and Containment removal

  14. Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

    2009-10-01

    One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health.

  15. Highly cited works in radiology: the top 100 cited articles in radiologic journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagni, Matthew; Khan, Nickalus R; Cohen, Harris L; Choudhri, Asim F

    2014-08-01

    The number of citations a publication receives can be used to show its impact on a field of study. It may indicate the educational interest in a given population or underline a perceived or real educational gap. This article identifies and characterizes the 100 top cited publications in radiologic journals as of May 2013. All clinical radiologic journals listed by Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports in 2011 were identified. A total of 46 journals were identified, and all articles published within these journals were analyzed for citation counts. The top 100 highly cited articles were recorded. The most frequently cited radiologic articles appeared in 9 of the 46 journals. These included 59 articles in Radiology, 17 in Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 9 in the American Journal of Roentgenology, 5 in the British Journal of Radiology, 4 in Investigative Radiology, 2 in American Journal of Neuroradiology, 2 in European Radiology, 2 in Radiologic Clinics of North America, 1 in the Seminars in Nuclear Medicine, and 1 in Pediatric Radiology. The citation values ranged from 422 to 7506 with a mean of 751. Publication dates ranged from 1967 to 2006 with the 5-year period between 1986 and 1990 accounting for the largest percentage of articles. The most frequently studied radiologic modality was magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 28 articles), followed by vascular/interventional (19 articles) and nuclear medicine (13 articles). The central nervous system was the most frequently studied organ system (22 articles), followed by mixed organ systems (14 articles) and liver (12 articles). The top cited articles in radiologic journals span a wide range of imaging modalities, subspecialties, and organ systems. Topics that occurred frequently in the top 100 cited articles included contrast and radiopharmaceutical characterization, MRI of motion, percutaneous radiofrequency ablation in the liver and percutaneous vertebroplasty. We present a methodology that uses citation analysis to

  16. Lessons learned in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodenough, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper reviews aspects of the history of radiology with the goal of identifying lessons learned, particularly in the area of radiological protection of the patient in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. It is pointed out that since the days of Roentgen there has been a need not only to control and quantify the amount of radiation reaching the patient but also to optimize the imaging process to offer the greatest diagnostic benefit within allowable levels of patient dose. To this end, in diagnostic radiology, one finds the development of better films, X rays tubes, grids, screens and processing techniques, while in fluoroscopy, one sees the increased luminance of calcium tungstate. In interventional radiology, one finds an improvement in catheterization techniques and contrast agents. In nuclear medicine, the development of tracer techniques into modern cameras and isotopes such as technetium can be followed. In radiotherapy, one sees the early superficial X rays and radium sources gradually replaced with radon seeds, supervoltage, 60 Co and today's linear accelerators. Along with the incredible advances in imaging and therapeutic technologies comes the growing realization of the potential danger of radiation and the need to protect the patient (as well as physicians, ancillary personnel and the general population) from unnecessary radiation. The important lesson learned is that we must walk a tightrope, balancing the benefits and risks of any technology utilizing radiation to produce the greatest benefits at the lowest acceptable risk. The alternative techniques using non-ionizing radiation will have to be considered as part of the general armamentarium for medical imaging whenever radiation consequences are unacceptable. (author)

  17. Recent trend of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.Y.; Kim, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    Present status and recent trend of diagnostic radiology have been reviewed. The interrelationships and Characteristics of various fields of radiology such as computed tomography, X-ray radiology, and nuclear medicine were discussed. The mevit of computed tomography and the promising use of short lived, accelerator produced radionuclides, and radiotherapy in nuclear medicine were emphasized. (author)

  18. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 2 study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this training course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. Radiological Worker H Training, for the worker whose job assignment involves entry into Radiological Buffer Areas and all types of Radiation Contamination and Airborne Radioactivity Areas. This course is designed to prepare the worker to work safely in and around radiological areas and present methods to use to ensure individual radiation exposure is maintained As Low As Reasonably Achievable

  19. Web-based radiology: a future to be created.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadè, Adolfo; Palladino, Francesco; Pitzalis, Gianluca; Campioni, Paolo; Marano, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    The impact of Internet on Medicine and Surgery is certainly remarkable, however the influence it had on Diagnostic Imaging was even stronger. The standardization of digital images acquired by the different medical imaging equipment has further facilitated the diffusion, transmission and communication in radiology within hospitals as well as on WEB. Radiology departments are bound to become "filmless" and with the present "tablet PC" radiological images will be directly transferred to the patient's bed in the relative electronic patient report. For radiology, interactive education could be envisaged with a tutor who guides the student(s) through the network. The Internet is an inexhaustible source of radiologic educational and information material with a number of sites of clinical cases, tutorial and teaching files, journals and magisterial lectures on-line. In a near future, the Internet could be applied in the simulation of clinicoradiologic cases or in applications of artificial intelligence with expert systems to support the solution of most complex cases.

  20. Radiological impact to the population of the three major accidents happened in the civil nuclear industry; Impacto radiologico a la poblacion de los tres mayores accidentes ocurridos en la industria nuclear civil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz M, J. R., E-mail: Acamb33@hotmail.com [Sociedad Nuclear Mexicana, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The greatest fear of the population before a nuclear accident, is the radiological impact to the health of people, due to the exposure to the liberated radioactive material during the accident, this fear is generally exaggerated or not well managed by the media. The best estimate in the received doses and their possible effects is carried out based on the information obtained during a certain time after the accident event. This work contains a summary of the information in the topic that at the present time has presented institutions as: the World Health Organization (Who), the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the World Nuclear Association, among others. The considered accidents are: first, the Unit-2 of the nuclear power plant of the Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, USA occurred 28 March of 1979, in the Reactor TMI-2, type PWR of 900 M We; the second accident was 26 April of 1986, in the Unit-4 of the nuclear power plant of Chernobyl, in Ukraine, the involved reactor was type BRMK, of 1000 M We moderated by graphite and cooled with light water, the power plant is located to 100 Km to the northwest of Kiev; 25 years later occurred the third accident in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Dai-ichi, in Japan, affecting at four of the six reactors of the power plant. A brief description of the accident is presented in each case, including the magnitude of the provoked liberations of radioactive material, the estimate doses of the population and the affected workers are presented, as well as the possible consequences of these doses on the health. The objective of this diffusion work is to give knowledge to the nuclear and radiological community of the available information on the topic, in order to be located in the appropriate professional context. (author)