WorldWideScience

Sample records for anticipated radiological impacts

  1. Evolving protected-area impacts in Panama: impact shifts show that plans require anticipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protected areas (PAs) are the leading forest conservation policy, so accurate evaluation of future PA impact is critical in conservation planning. Yet by necessity impact evaluations use past data. Here we argue that forward-looking plans should blend such evaluations with anticipation of shifts in threats. Applying improved methods to evaluate past impact, we provide rigorous support for that conceptual approach by showing that PAs’ impacts on deforestation shifted with land use. We study the Republic of Panama, where species-dense tropical forest faces real pressure. Facing variation in deforestation pressure, the PAs’ impacts varied across space and time. Thus, if shifts in pressure levels and patterns could be anticipated, that could raise impact. (paper)

  2. Evolving protected-area impacts in Panama: impact shifts show that plans require anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruna, Akiko; Pfaff, Alexander; van den Ende, Sander; Joppa, Lucas

    2014-03-01

    Protected areas (PAs) are the leading forest conservation policy, so accurate evaluation of future PA impact is critical in conservation planning. Yet by necessity impact evaluations use past data. Here we argue that forward-looking plans should blend such evaluations with anticipation of shifts in threats. Applying improved methods to evaluate past impact, we provide rigorous support for that conceptual approach by showing that PAs’ impacts on deforestation shifted with land use. We study the Republic of Panama, where species-dense tropical forest faces real pressure. Facing variation in deforestation pressure, the PAs’ impacts varied across space and time. Thus, if shifts in pressure levels and patterns could be anticipated, that could raise impact.

  3. Anticipated Radiological Dose to Worker for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP - Project W-460

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, E V

    2000-01-01

    This report provides estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose, expressed as dose equivalent (DE), to workers conducting planned plutonium (Pu) stabilization processes at the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The report is based on a time and motion dose study commissioned for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, to provide personnel exposure estimates for construction work in the PFP storage vault area plus operation of stabilization and packaging equipment at PFP.

  4. Preparation of environmental impact statements: radiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive analysis of potential radiological impact needs to be developed in nuclear power reactor impact statements. The analysis should examine the pathways that may result in radioactive material from effluents and waste streams interacting with man and biota. Each facility location and proposed mode of operation needs independent study to establish the principal and significant pathways of radiation exposure

  5. Anticipating the organizational impacts of electric industry restructuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various aspects of restructuring in the electric industry, and what can be done to anticipate them, were reviewed, based on the California experience. Major issues that will affect the industry organizationally were discussed, with several examples of alternative structural models. Current issues and likely changes in competition at the wholesale level were described, along with the most probable changes in the way electricity will be marketed at the retail level. Potential benefits, and major concerns about retail access were defined. The structure of the industry in California was summarized (the Independent System Operator (ISO), and the Power Exchange (PX) being the principal features). The system's governance, present and future structure, the still evolving nature of regulation, problems with stranded costs and alternative methods for computing them, the transition process itself, the California approach to transition cost recovery, and what all this means to customers, were some of the topics that have received attention

  6. Radiological impact of an intense fusion economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamacher, T. E-mail: hamacher@ipp.mpg.de; Korhonen, R.; Aquilonius, K.; Cabal, H.; Hallberg, B.; Lechon, Y.; Lepicard, S.; Saez, R.M.; Schneider, T.; Ward, D

    2001-11-01

    The radiological impact of an intense fusion economy, a 1000 GW operating capacity for a 1000 years, were investigated regarding the isotopes {sup 14}C and tritium. Both isotopes participate in global material cycles, the carbon and the water cycle. If a retention time of 10000 years is assumed for the stored waste, {sup 14}C emissions from the repositories dominate the radiation impacts. While the cumulated collective doses over a long term period are rather high and according to the discount rate selected would lead to significant external costs, the individual doses are small compared with the doses associated with the natural background radiation.

  7. Modeling anticipated climate change impact on biogeochemical cycles of an acidified headwater catchment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benčoková, A.; Hruška, Jakub; Krám, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, S (2011), S6-S8. ISSN 0883-2927 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : modeling anticipated * climate change * biogeochemical cycles * acidified headwater catchment Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2011

  8. Dirty bombs: assesment of radiological impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In some countries, regulatory control of radioactive sources, used extensively in medicine and industry, remains weak. Global concerns about the security and safety of radioactive sources escalated following the September 11 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States. There are fears that some radioactive sources could be used by terrorists as radiological dispersal devices (RDD's), or so called 'dirty bombs'. The radioactive material dispersed, depending on the amount and intensity, could cause radiation sickness for a limited number of people nearby if, for example, they inhaled large amounts of radioactive dust. But the most severe tangible impacts would likely be the economic costs and social disruption associated with the evacuation and subsequent clean-up of contaminated property. It has been shown that usage of realistic data in a first response decision making as to avoid inappropriate public reaction accompanied by economic and social consequences is necessary.(author)

  9. Radionuclides in coal and its radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the closure Ignalina NPP other sources of fuel will be needed for the generation of electricity. One of the possible sources is coal. Coal is a fuel which might cause the radiological impact of non-nuclear industries which process or produce materials containing enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides. All types of coal contain small levels of natural radionuclides -potassium-40 and the radionuclides in the uranium-238, uranium-235 and thorium-232 decay chains. Combustion of coal in a coal-fired plant results in a release of gaseous radionuclides, and in the increased concentrations of non-gaseous radionuclides in the ash. The subject of this work is the radiological impact of the ash, which contains enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides, and the atmospheric release of gaseous radionuclides. A fraction of the ash that is formed is released to atmosphere. The remaining ash is disposed to landfill or may be used in the manufacture of construction industry. Ash may be accumulated prior to disposal or use. There are therefore a variety of potential exposure scenarios. In these work we take into account only the exposure of members of the public to atmospheric release from the stack due to inhalation, external exposure of deposited radionuclides and food chains. Collective doses to the population from stack releases of ash have been determined. Information on the quantities of ash which could be generated at coal-fired station, radionuclide content of coal and ash were obtained from number of sources. Individual doses from the release ash to atmosphere from the stack were determined using elements of the PC CREAM suite of models. Predicted individual doses for individuals living in the local area is 0,2 μSv year1. The collective dose is equal to 0,132 man Sv and is 11 times larger than that caused due to Ignalina NPP activity. (author)

  10. Long term radiological impact of thorium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium extraction produces a certain amount of radioactive wastes. Potential long term radiological impact of these residues has been calculated using the recent ICRP-68 ingestion dose factors in connection with the computing code DECAY, developed at Orsay and described in this work. This code solves the well known Bateman's equations which govern the time dependence of a set of coupled radioactive nuclei. Monazites will be very likely the minerals to be exploited first, in case of an extensive use of thorium as nuclear fuel. Because monazites contain uranium as well, mining residues will contain not only the descendants of 232Th and a certain proportion of non-extracted thorium (taken here to be 5%), but also this uranium, if left in the wastes for economical reasons. If no uranium would be present at all in the mineral, the potential radiotoxicity would strongly decrease in approximately 60 years, at the pace of the 5.8 years period of 228Ra, which becomes the longest-lived radionuclide of the 4n radioactive family in the residues. Moreover, there is no risk due to radon exhalation, because of the very short period of 220Rn. These significant differences between uranium and thorium mining have to be considered in view of some estimated long term real radiological impacts due to uranium residues, which could reach a value of the order of 1 mSv/year, the dose limit recommended for the public by the recent ICRP-60. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs., 43 appendices

  11. Comparison of the radiological impacts of thorium and uranium nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report compares the radiological impacts of a fuel cycle in which only uranium is recycled, as presented in the Final Generic Environmental Statement on the Use of Recycle Plutonium in Mixed Oxide Fuel in Light Water Cooled Reactors (GESMO), with those of the light-water breeder reactor (LWBR) thorium/uranium fuel cycle in the Final Environmental Statement, Light Water Breeder Reactor Program. The significant offsite radiological impacts from routine operation of the fuel cycles result from the mining and milling of thorium and uranium ores, reprocessing spent fuel, and reactor operations. The major difference between the impacts from the two fuel cycles is the larger dose commitments associated with current uranium mining and milling operations as compared to thorium mining and milling. Estimated dose commitments from the reprocessing of either fuel type are small and show only moderate variations for specific doses. No significant differences in environmental radiological impact are anticipated for reactors using either of the fuel cycles. Radiological impacts associated with routine releases from the operation of either the thorium or uranium fuel cycles can be held to acceptably low levels by existing regulations

  12. Radiological impact assessment within the IAEA Arctic Assessment Project (IASAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, E.M.; Gurbutt, P.; Harmes, I.;

    1998-01-01

    As part of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) of IAEA, a working group was created to model the dispersal and transfer of radionuclides released from radioactive waste disposed of in the Kara Sea and bays of Novaya Zemlya and to assess the radiological impact. Existing models...... were extended, and new models developed to incorporate several features of the area (including ice formation and transport) which present modelling challenges. An extensive inter-model comparison involving both compartmental and 3-D hydrodynamic models was then carried out. Finally, the radiological...... models developed, highlights the general features of the inter-comparison and discusses the radiological impact assessment and conclusions based on it....

  13. Radiological impact assessment within the IAEA Arctic Assessment Project (IASAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, E.M.; Gurbutt, P.; Harmes, I.; Heling, R.; Kinehara, Y.; Nielsen, S.P.; Osvath, I.; Preller, R.; Sazykina, T.; Wada, A.; Sjoeblom,K.L.

    As part of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) of IAEA, a working group was created to model the dispersal and transfer of radionuclides released from radioactive waste disposed of in the Kara Sea and bays of Novaya Zemlya and to assess the radiological impact. Existing models...... were extended, and new models developed to incorporate several features of the area (including ice formation and transport) which present modelling challenges. An extensive inter-model comparison involving both compartmental and 3-D hydrodynamic models was then carried out. Finally, the radiological...... models developed, highlights the general features of the inter-comparison and discusses the radiological impact assessment and conclusions based on it....

  14. Parallel computing for radiological impacts assessment during nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex implementation of Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model into real time running system ESTE was performed and is presented in the paper. The implementation is based on methods of parallel computing. The real time calculation of atmospheric dispersion of a great number of particles, based on Monte Carlo simulation, is performed with utilization of graphical card. The final results of the calculations are radiological impacts of a real or predicted release to the atmosphere: doses and dose rates caused by various irradiation pathways, and potential or averted doses. Innovative aspect of presented results is in implementation of particle dispersion model into real time emergency system and in developed radiological upgrade of the particle model. The upgrade results in new built model for simulation and calculation of full set of radiological parameters which are used as criteria for radiological protective measures in case of nuclear emergency. Results of this work are implemented in the decision support system ESTE, which is real time system intended for nuclear emergency response, assessing the source term, calculating radiological impacts and assessing the urgent protective measures. Systems ESTE are used by various crisis centers in Slovakia. Czech Republic, Austria and Bulgaria. Online running system is connected to numerical weather prediction data, relevant data from nuclear installations and radiological monitoring network. As weather prediction data, the ECMWF Deterministic Atmospheric Model or ALADIN is applied in the model. As radiological monitoring network data, the EURDEP is used. All results of real time modeling are presented as geodata in frame of GIS platform. (author)

  15. Assessment of the radiological impact of contaminated discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeck, L.; Zeevaert, T.

    1996-09-18

    A biosphere model has been used to calculate the release of radionuclides from contaminated soils and their dose impact on critical individuals in the environment. Normal evolution and accidental scenarios are considered. The objective of the model is to provide an indication of the radiological risk rather than to predict its future impact.

  16. Current status of US programs for training clinical laboratory scientists and anticipated impact of healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M G; Sacks, D B

    1995-06-01

    We surveyed directors of medical technology (MT) and postdoctoral clinical chemistry (CC) training programs and of clinical pathology (CP) and combined anatomic/clinical pathology (AP/CP) residency programs regarding the number, quality, training emphasis, and job-placement experience of trainees for 1985-95 as well as the directors' opinions on the impact of "healthcare reform." Responses were received from directors of 94 of 249 (38%) MT programs, 14 of 15 (93%) CC programs, and 63 of 138 (46%) pathology residency programs. In all four categories the numbers of trainees have increased steadily over the last 5 to 7 years but are expected to remain stable or decrease slightly. Directors of MT and CC programs expect increasing difficulty placing their graduates; directors of AP/CP and CP residency programs do not. Although > 60% of MT graduates have entered private hospitals, this is anticipated to decrease, with a concomitant increase in university hospital placements. Of the AP/CP residents, > 60% and < 5% accepted service- and research-oriented positions, respectively. In contrast, 83% of CP residents entered university hospitals, with half of these taking research-oriented positions. Among CC graduates, 41% joined university hospitals and 10-15% accepted positions in each of either private hospitals or industry or reference laboratories. The emphasis of training varies, with clinical service and pathophysiology the major focus in AP/CP programs. CP and CC programs take two distinct approaches--some accentuating management, and others emphasizing research. Finally, MT program directors appear the most optimistic regarding the opportunities that healthcare reform may present. PMID:7768016

  17. A probabilistic approach to Radiological Environmental Impact Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since a radiological environmental impact assessment typically relies on limited data and poorly based extrapolation methods, point estimations, as implied by a deterministic approach, do not suffice. To be of practical use for risk management, it is necessary to quantify the uncertainty margins of the estimates as well. In this paper we discuss how to work out a probabilistic approach for dealing with uncertainties in assessments of the radiological risks to non-human biota of a radioactive contamination. Possible strategies for deriving the relevant probability distribution functions from available empirical data and theoretical knowledge are outlined

  18. Should anticipated impacts of climate change on hydrology modify water management practices?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last few decades the scientific community has closely monitored climatologic trends and developed theories to better model interactions between the many factors that govern changes in climate. Although climate evolves naturally, evidence continues to mount that rapidly increasing concentrations of greenhouse gasses are causing accelerated changes: there is now a worldwide consensus about the general warming trend caused by this phenomenon, and now countries are initiating efforts to reduce emission rates, identify the potential impacts, and plan adaptation measures. The electric industry in general is investing in renewable energy sources, low-emission technologies, and emission offsets. More particularly, hydroelectric generators are getting prepared to face the challenge in anticipation of modified temporal and spatial distributions of precipitation, along with possible changes in overall precipitation volumes. Current industry practices in determining expected annual production levels rely 'in almost all instances upon the use of historical streamflow records'. The same survey also shows that 'in no case did respondents indicate that they currently reduce the length of available historical record in order to reflect recent trends in precipitation'. Relying on historical observations is also common practice to forecast inflows for periods longer than a few weeks in the future. Given that changes in precipitation patterns will modify the availability of water, it should be expected that the pattern of production from hydroelectric stations will be altered in a variety of ways: total annual production volumes, seasonal distributions of energy, changes in reservoir management rules caused by extreme events or competing needs for water, and so on, may all be affected. The utility of historical series in predicting the future may decline, and current work practices will potentially need to be modified accordingly. At the same time, electric system operators

  19. A report on CERN’s radiological impact

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Swiss and French authorities have just published a report showing that CERN’s radiological impact is negligible. The CERN Safety Commission’s Environment Team inspects the river Allondon. Since its foundation more than 50 years ago, questions about the Laboratory’s hypothetical radiological impact have been asked repeatedly by the public. These questions are partly due to the name CERN which, for historical reasons, contains the word nuclear. On 16 October, the Swiss and French authorities published a report that takes stock of CERN’s true radiological impact, providing a detailed and documented answer for all those who wonder about the risks of radioactivity. In their report, the Swiss Office fédéral de la santé publique (OFSP) and the French Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire (IRSN), the two bodies responsible for monitoring radiological risks in CERN’s Host States, concluded that CERN’s impac...

  20. Impact of radiological effluents in surface waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects of the impact of radioactive effluents in surface waters are outlined. The following topics are included under the heading, transfer of radionuclides from water to man: radionuclide input; fate of radionuclides in water; biological uptake of radionuclides; loss of radioactivity by aquatic organisms; and pathways. The following topics are included under the heading, biological impact of radionuclides in aquatic environments: radiation stress; standards for radionuclides in water; AEC appendix 1 to 10 CFR, Part 50; radiation measurement; effects on man; and risk estimates. (U.S.)

  1. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report describing diagnostic techniques used in radiology. It describes the equipment necessary for, and the operation of a radiological department. Also is described the standard methods used in radiodiagnosis. (K.A.E.)

  2. Radiological Impact of Phosphogypsum Application in Agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum (PG) contains radionuclides from 238U and 232Th decay series. Due to the presence of these radionuclides, many countries restricted the use of PG in agriculture, however there is not such restriction in Brazil. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the impact of PG application on 226Ra (238U) and 228Ra (232Th) concentrations in soil. Gamma-spectrometry was carried out using HPGe detector. No increment of 226Ra and 228Ra was observed for increasing PG doses. Average values found for 226Ra and 228Ra were respectively 37 Bq kg-1 and 57 Bq kg-1. The results showed that the increasing PG doses in the specific conditions of the experiment did not cause a significant increment of radionuclides.

  3. Radiological environmental impact of phosphogypsum- an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major radionuclide present in phosphogypsum from fertilizer manufacturing process is 226Ra. Amount of phosphogypsum disposed on land is about 100 MT the world over accounting for an activity of 100 T Bq per year. In India over 4 T Bq (approx. 100 Ci) of 226Ra is disposed off through phosphogypsum every year by various fertilizer units. The concentration of 226Ra in the aquatic environment near phosphogypsum piles vary from 0.002 to 0.04 Bq l-1, however the movement of activity through soil is negligible. Higher uptake is reported in biological material resulting in enhanced population dose. Direct exposure from gypsum piles is estimated to give a per capita dose of about 3 mSv per year. Studies on the occupational and environmental radiation exposure in the phosphate fertilizer industry and environmental impact of phosphogypsum disposal in the country needs detailed study. (author). 29 refs., 6 tabs

  4. ICT AND NIGERIAN BANKS REFORMS: ANALYSIS OF ANTICIPATED IMPACTS IN SELECTED BANKS

    OpenAIRE

    Osabuohien Evans S.C

    2008-01-01

    Banking has become highly Information Communication Technology (ICT) based and due to its intersectoral link, is reaping the benefits of technological revolution as evidenced by its application in most of its operations. This study empirical analyzes the anticipated role ICT has in enhancing the operations of selected Nigerian banks in the light of current reforms. Primary data was employed, which was analyzed using cross-tabulations and regression technique built on the framework of technica...

  5. Managing social impact in design: tools and methods for anticipating consequences of technology

    OpenAIRE

    Bouma, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    The use of email communication, mobile phones and cars has had wide-ranging social consequences. What is more, designers are plainly not always aware of all social consequences of technology, despite practicing user-centred design. Modern technology creates possibilities to influence social behaviour. Once a designer aims at defined social changes, the consequences of technology for practices become a responsibility, too. The present research is aimed at providing tools and methods to anticip...

  6. Radiological impact of Fukushima nuclear emergencies: lessons learnt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study on the radiological impact following the release of radioactivity from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants after Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on 11th March 2011 has been made based on various radiation data published by IAEA, MEXT, NNSA etc. The incident severely affected four nuclear reactors at Fukushima where three of them were in operation and one was under shut down condition. The major release of radionuclides in Fukushima were mainly fission product noble gases and volatile radionuclides compared to Chernobyl where significant level of particulate activity was also released into the environment. Though the estimated releases from Fukushima reactors are high ( >1x1016 of Bq of 131I and 137Cs), the level of radioactive contamination within Japan land as well as radiation exposure to citizens of Japan were low to cause any immediate radiation injury or significant health hazard. This is mainly due to the fact that wind direction was predominantly towards East - Pacific Ocean. Though food, milk and water samples showed the presence of 137Cs and 131I activity, the consumption of the same would not have caused very high radiation exposure to the public. Though the radioactivity was detected by highly sensitive CTBT monitoring systems installed in U.S. and Europe, the environmental impact was too small to be quantified. Based on the distance from Japan, the release was not expected to have any radiological impact in India after dispersion over long distance and time. This was confirmed by the routine measurements of environmental dose rates, radioactivity in air, water and vegetation samples by DAE's Environmental Survey Laboratories (ESLs) located at various parts of the country. The precautionary emergency protective measures like sheltering and evacuation implemented immediately after the Fukushima accident reduced the public exposure significantly. Compared to the radiological impact on the environment and members of the public, the

  7. Long term radiological impact of a uranium mine restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 1990s, many uranium mines were closed as consequence of low prices of this mineral. It was due to a decrease in the demand for uranium and an increase in the overall supply. The resulting was a further complicated implementation of sites restorations. This report deals with one of the relevant aspects of the radiological protection scope: 'the evaluation of the long term radiological impact in the population due to the uranium mine restoration activities' for the uranium mine sited in Saelices el Chico (Salamanca, Spain). These restoration activities have basically consisted of recovering the original site by filling the old open pits with the material stockpiled in the waste dumps. The main problems associated with this material include radon release and particles emission. The strategy used to solve this problem has been covered these structures with a layer with beds of clay material rock, waste material and a cover tree. The pathways considered for the radiological impact have been: 1) Inhalation; 2) Ingestion of contaminated water, milk, vegetables and meat; 3) External exposure from clouds immersion, grounds concentrations and direct gamma radiation. Three computer codes have been used with the object of evaluating the above-mentioned impact. Two of them are well-known NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) codes: RESRAD 6.30 and MILDOS-AREA. We have also applied DOEFLURA, developed in ENUSA [1, 2, 3]. Four scenarios have been studied: Resident Farmer Scenario, Resident scenario, Livestock pasture scenario and Forest scenario, Estimation of radioactive doses for the member of the public in the different scenarios has been calculated with this programme. A period of 3500 years from now has been studied. (author)

  8. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this text-book basic knowledge about radiology, biomedical diagnostic methods (radiography, computer tomography), nuclear medicine and safety and radiation protection of personnel on the radiodiagnostic place of work are presented

  9. Radiological impact assessment for near surface disposal of thorium waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium (232Th) itself is not fissile and so is not directly usable in a thermal neutron reactor. However, it is fertile and upon absorbing a neutron will transmute to uranium-233 (233U), which is a fissile fuel material. The thorium fuel fabrication may lead to low level waste comprising of 232Th. This waste may be disposed of in the Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF). The very low probability event of leaching of the waste may lead to contamination of the groundwater system. This paper deals with the estimation of the radiological impact of thorium waste disposal in NSDF through groundwater drinking pathway using the Multiple Area Source Model (MASOM). (author)

  10. The radiological impact of the UK nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the radiological impact on the population of the UK of all routine discharges of radionuclides from UK civil nuclear sites up to and including those in 1986, all solid radioactive waste disposals at Drigg up until the end of 1985 and all solid radioactive waste disposals by sea dumping. It is shown that the main contributor from these practices to the collective exposure of the UK population up to the year 2500 is routine discharges from the reprocessing plant at Sellafield. The maximum collective dose rate from routine discharges and solid waste disposals was about 220 man Sv/year in 1979. The figure for 1986 is lower, about 80 man Sv/year, and this reduction is largely due to decreased levels of liquid discharges from Sellafield. These collective dose rates can be compared with the annual collective dose of about 105 man Sv delivered to the UK population from natural radioactivity. The doses to the most exposed individuals from routine releases or solid radioactive waste disposals are also discussed. In all cases they are lower than the relevant dose limit. Doses to typical individuals living near coastal nuclear sites are also presented as they provide a means of giving a perspective on the radiological impact of routine discharges. (author)

  11. Impact of Aluminum on Anticipated Corrosion in a Flooded spent nuclear fuel Multi -Canister Overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion reactions in a flooded MCO are examined to determine the impact of aluminum corrosion products (from aluminum basket grids and spacers) on bound water estimates and subsequent fuel/environment reactions during storage. The mass and impact of corrosion products were determined to be insignificant, validating the choice of aluminum as an MCO component and confirming expectations that no changes to the Technical Databook or particulate mass or water content are necessary

  12. Impact of Aluminum on Anticipated Corrosion in a Flooded SNF Multi Canister Overpack (MCO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-06

    Corrosion reactions in a flooded MCO are examined to determine the impact of aluminum corrosion products (from aluminum basket grids and spacers) on bound water estimates and subsequent fuel/environment reactions during storage. The mass and impact of corrosion products were determined to be insignificant, validating the choice of aluminum as an MCO component and confirming expectations that no changes to the Technical Databook or particulate mass or water content are necessary.

  13. The radiological impact of the LEP project on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The siting of the large electron-positron (LEP) accelerator, its experimental areas, and its supporting infrastructure are discussed with respect to the radiological impact on the surrounding areas and on the population in the Pays de Gex and the Canton de Geneve. The final conclusions are based on work done by the former LEP Study Group and by the LEP Radiation Working Group. The calculations and estimates show that the stray ionizing radiation, the radioactivity, and the radiation-induced noxious chemical products released by the LEP installation will have only an insignificant impact on the area, the individual members of the public, and the population as a whole. This result for LEP 'phase 85' can also be extrapolated under reasonable assumptions for LEP 125 - a possible future development phase of the present project. (orig.)

  14. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  15. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose

  16. Anticipating plug-in hybrid vehicle energy impacts in California: Constructing consumer-informed recharge profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Axsen, Jonn; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) can be powered by gasoline, grid electricity, or both. To explore potential PHEV energy impacts, a three-part survey instrument collected data from new vehicle buyers in California. We combine the available information to estimate the electricity and gasoline use under three recharging scenarios. Results suggest that the use of PHEV vehicles could halve gasoline use relative to conventional vehicles. Using three scenarios to represent plausible conditi...

  17. Post closure radiological impact of the LIL waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Saligny site has been chosen as a disposal site for Low and Intermediate Level (LIL) waste generated from Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant. Near surface disposal is an option suitable for short lived LILW that contain mainly radionuclides which decay up to radiological insignificant levels within decades or centuries; LILW that contain limited concentrations of long lived radionuclides may also be suitable for near surface disposal. The span of post-closure institutional controls should be around a few hundred years. The main radionuclides in short lived LILW are 137Cs and 90Sr and therefore a period of 300 years would correspond to about ten half-lives of these radionuclides. The longer lived radionuclides, such as 14C, will continue to be released even after that period due to degradation of the engineered barriers . This paper mainly contains a description of scenarios considered important for the radiological impact assessment, the pathways through which the human is exposed to the radionuclides, and the result obtained in dose assessment for each selected scenario. (authors)

  18. Assessment of the radiological impact of oil refining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of radiation protection and corresponding national and international regulations has evolved to ensure safety in the use of radioactive materials. Oil and gas production processing operations have been known to cause naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) to accumulate at elevated concentrations as by-product waste streams. A comprehensive radiological study on the oil refining industry in Egypt was carried out to assess the radiological impact of this industry on the workers. Scales, sludge, water and crude oil samples were collected at each stage of the refining process. The activity concentration of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were determined using high-resolution gamma spectrometry. The average activity concentrations of the determined isotopes are lower than the IAEA exempt activity levels for NORM isotopes. Different exposure scenarios were studied. The average annual effective dose for workers due to direct exposure to gamma radiation and dust inhalation found to be 0.6 μSv and 3.2 mSv, respectively. Based on the ALARA principle, the results indicate that special care must be taken during cleaning operations in order to reduce the personnel's exposure due to maintenance as well as to avoid contamination of the environment.

  19. Radiological impact of the application of phosphogypsum in agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzilli, B.P.; Saueia, C.H.R., E-mail: chsaueia@ipen.b, E-mail: mazzilli@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab de Radiometria Ambiental

    2011-07-01

    Phosphogypsum is a TENORM waste and one possible of this application is in agriculture. This paper aims to evaluate the dose due to ingestion of natural radionuclides present in phosphogypsum that could be incorporated in the food chain. For this evaluation, a conservative scenario was defined, considering a theoretical long term exposure due to annual applications of phosphogypsum in agriculture. This scenario covers estimation of the increment of radionuclides activity concentration in soil due to phosphogypsum applications; the uptake from soil by edible portions of vegetable and crops and activity concentration of radionuclides in milk and meat as part of the food chain; based on a model, transfer factors and conversion factors provided by IAEA and ICRP. The higher doses were found for the ingestion of vegetables and grain crop, up to 4.2 10-1 mSv per year. It is concluded that the radiological impact of this practice is negligible. (author)

  20. Radiological impact of the application of phosphogypsum in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum is a TENORM waste and one possible of this application is in agriculture. This paper aims to evaluate the dose due to ingestion of natural radionuclides present in phosphogypsum that could be incorporated in the food chain. For this evaluation, a conservative scenario was defined, considering a theoretical long term exposure due to annual applications of phosphogypsum in agriculture. This scenario covers estimation of the increment of radionuclides activity concentration in soil due to phosphogypsum applications; the uptake from soil by edible portions of vegetable and crops and activity concentration of radionuclides in milk and meat as part of the food chain; based on a model, transfer factors and conversion factors provided by IAEA and ICRP. The higher doses were found for the ingestion of vegetables and grain crop, up to 4.2 10-1 mSv per year. It is concluded that the radiological impact of this practice is negligible. (author)

  1. Management strategies in anticipation of climatic change and the resulting impact on wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two significant impacts of climate change could affect waterfowl. Climate changes that induce dryness and reduce surface water would have a detrimental effect on waterfowl production capabilities. Global warming could also increase sea levels and flood critical waterfowl overwintering habitat. Strategies undertaken by Ducks Unlimited, a waterfowl conservation organization, to respond to the threat posed by global warming to waterfowl are reviewed. Ducks Unlimited will continue to assist with wetland restoration and preservation throughout the Great Plains. Strategies to enhance retention include converting marginally arable land to permanent forage, forage backflooding, and encouragement of zero and minimum tillage operations. Improved efficiency of irrigation projects is important to foster water conservation. Widespread surface water drainage should be discouraged, by combinations of legislation and economic incentives. Ducks Unlimited is refocusing its activites on parts of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba that are likely to have relatively wetter conditions under climatic warming

  2. Fukushima - radiological impact on the Central Europe simulated by the system ESTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological impact of the events at nuclear installations Fukushima Dai-ichi on the Central Europe were modelled by system ESTE. Events in Fukushima and their radiological impacts are modelled mainly due to verification of our approaches, algorithms and models of ESTE. (authors)

  3. Radiological impact of the PARR-1 operation on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a study related to the assessment of the radiological impact on the environment due to the operation of the Pakistan research reactor-1 (PARR-1) at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad. The parameters studied include the radioactivity releases in a gaseous form and also those originating from the liquid and solid wastes produced due to the operation of this research facility. The analysis is based on the environmental monitoring data for the last 10 years (1992-2002) and the conclusions have been drawn for the impact of the PARR-1 operation on the occupational workers as well as the general public living in the vicinity of the reactor site. Further, on the basis of this data, yearly average doses and the cumulative doses for the expected life of PARR-1, due to different radiation sources have been estimated. The analysis indicated that the maximum yearly doses at ground level for the occupational workers as well as for the public are a fraction of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) defined limiting values. It is, therefore, concluded that the impact of the PARR-1 normal operation on the environment is negligible and it can be regarded as ''safe to the public as well as the occupational workers''. (orig.)

  4. Radiological impact of the PARR-1 operation on the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtyar, S.; Raza, S.S.; Tayyab, M.; Pervez, S.; Salahuddin, A. [Nuclear Engineering Div., PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a study related to the assessment of the radiological impact on the environment due to the operation of the Pakistan research reactor-1 (PARR-1) at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Sciences and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad. The parameters studied include the radioactivity releases in a gaseous form and also those originating from the liquid and solid wastes produced due to the operation of this research facility. The analysis is based on the environmental monitoring data for the last 10 years (1992-2002) and the conclusions have been drawn for the impact of the PARR-1 operation on the occupational workers as well as the general public living in the vicinity of the reactor site. Further, on the basis of this data, yearly average doses and the cumulative doses for the expected life of PARR-1, due to different radiation sources have been estimated. The analysis indicated that the maximum yearly doses at ground level for the occupational workers as well as for the public are a fraction of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) defined limiting values. It is, therefore, concluded that the impact of the PARR-1 normal operation on the environment is negligible and it can be regarded as ''safe to the public as well as the occupational workers''. (orig.)

  5. The quality and impact of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in radiology case-based learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore (1) clinical years students' perceptions about radiology case-based learning within a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) setting, (2) an analysis of the collaborative learning process, and (3) the learning impact of collaborative work on the radiology cases. Methods: The first part of this study focuses on a more detailed analysis of a survey study about CSCL based case-based learning, set up in the context of a broader radiology curriculum innovation. The second part centers on a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 52 online collaborative learning discussions from 5th year and nearly graduating medical students. The collaborative work was based on 26 radiology cases regarding musculoskeletal radiology. Results: The analysis of perceptions about collaborative learning on radiology cases reflects a rather neutral attitude that also does not differ significantly in students of different grade levels. Less advanced students are more positive about CSCL as compared to last year students. Outcome evaluation shows a significantly higher level of accuracy in identification of radiology key structures and in radiology diagnosis as well as in linking the radiological signs with available clinical information in nearly graduated students. No significant differences between different grade levels were found in accuracy of using medical terminology. Conclusion: Students appreciate computer supported collaborative learning settings when tackling radiology case-based learning. Scripted computer supported collaborative learning groups proved to be useful for both 5th and 7th year students in view of developing components of their radiology diagnostic approaches.

  6. Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnostic radiology is still the foremost of all innovative medical disciplines. This has many advantages but also some handicaps, e.g. the siting problem of medical equipment whose clinical potential is not fully known. This applies in particular to nuclear spin tomography, where the Laender governments and the Scientific Council seen to agree that all universities should have the appropriate equipment as soon as possible in order to intensify interdisciplinary research. Formerly, in the case of computerized tomography, there was less readiness. As a result, the siting of CT equipment is less organically structured. A special handicap of innovative fields is the problem of training and advanced training. The Chamber of Medicine and the Association of Doctors Participating in the Health Insurance Plan have issued regulations aimed at a better standardisation in this field. (orig.)

  7. Radioactive wastes of the nuclear industry: radiological impact and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These conference days, organized by the French society of radioprotection (SFRP), aim at presenting the radioprotection aspects linked with the management of radioactive wastes coming from the nuclear industry, at identifying the stakes of their radiological characterization, and at describing applicable methods adapted to the needs. The principles of characterization are developed and a large place is given to the experience feedback of the industrial applications of measurements performed on wastes coming from the exploitation and dismantling of various facilities (reactors, fuel cycle plants, reprocessing plants). The strategy enforced in Spain is analyzed through the experience of wastes characterization at the El Cabril storage center. A round table on the perspectives of evolution of the management of low and medium activity wastes with respect to the protection needs closes the conference. Content: 1 - characterization needs and stakes: definition of industrial radioactive wastes; radioprotection aspects linked with wastes; regulatory aspects liked with waste management and the associated studies; 2 - wastes management examples: application at Cogema; application at EdF: zoning; main nuclear waste files at the CEA; 3 - inventory of wastes from different origins and the associated radioprotection: wastes from EdF's reactors exploitation and the radioprotection aspects; nuclear wastes generated by the exploitation of La Hague plant; management of dismantling wastes at the Monts d'Arree site; 4 - radioprotection aspects linked with nuclear industry wastes: radioprotection impact of Socodei activities; impact on the public of long-term waste storage facilities; 5 - methods of radiological characterization: destructive and non-destructive analysis for wastes characterization; description of surface contamination measurement techniques; description of gamma activities and gamma imaging measurement techniques; description of neutron activation measurement

  8. Proceedings of the symposium on radiological impacts from nuclear facilities on non-human species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This symposium is on the Radiological Impacts from Nuclear Facilities on Non-Human Species, hosted by the Canadian Radiological Protection Association and the Canadian Nuclear Society. The presentations include topics of Canadian environmental actions, proposed and existing; ecological risk assessment to radionuclides, the exposures from the releases, the dosimetry, the ecosystem function and the risks in the environmental exposure pathway; impacts of current Nuclear facilities to the environment and the impact of nuclear fuel waste management

  9. Radiological environmental impact of the nuclear industry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1955, the nuclear industry has become a comprehensive industrial system in China, for which the radiological impact assessment began in 1981. Within 80 km region of each facility, investigation of population distribution, crop distribution, and food consumption has been made. Meteorological, hydrological, and geological data as well as effluent and environmental monitoring data have been obtained and analyzed. All the calculations were performed through the Y3001 computer code. The effective dose equivalents to all the critical groups near the region nuclear facilities are below the dose limits. The dose to about 80% of the critical groups are less than 1/10 of those caused by natural radiation exposure (2.3 mSv y-1). The total annual average collective effective dose equivalent resulting form the nuclear industry as a whole is 23 person Sv y-1, which is less than 0.01% of that from natural radiation and far below the detriment resulting from non-nuclear industries or other human activities. According to the nuclear industry planning in China, by about the year 2000, it is estimated that the total annual collective effective dose equivalent resulting from the nuclear industry would be 59 person Sv. 18 refs., 3 figs., 29 tabs

  10. Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following a postulated accident in PHWRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, N.; Kansal, M.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K. [Reactor Safety and Analysis, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Nabhkiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai Maharashtra 400094 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following postulated accident i.e Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with failed Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), performed as part of the reactor safety analysis of a typical 700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). The rationale behind the assessment is that the public needs to be protected in the event that the postulated accident results in radionuclide release outside containment. Radionuclides deliver dose to the human body through various pathways namely, plume submersion, exposure due to ground deposition, inhalation and ingestion. The total exposure dose measured in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is the sum of doses to a hypothetical adult human at exclusion zone boundary by all the exposure pathways. The analysis provides the important inputs to decide upon the type of emergency counter measures to be adopted during the postulated accident. The importance of the various pathways in terms of contribution to the total effective dose equivalent(TEDE) is also assessed with respect to time of exposure. Inhalation and plume gamma dose are the major contributors towards TEDE during initial period of accident whereas ingestion and ground shine dose start dominating in TEDE in the extended period of exposure. Moreover, TEDE is initially dominated by I-131, Kr-88, Te-132, I-133 and Sr-89, whereas, as time progresses, Xe-133,I-131 and Te-132 become the main contributors. (authors)

  11. Radiological impact of LIL waste repository in abnormal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Low and Intermediate level waste generated by Cernavoda NPP will be disposed in a near-surface repository. The site selected to host it, Saligny, is located in the NPP proximity. The major question at the moment is: are this site and the disposal concept good enough to ensure the human safety not only now but for a very long time? The information regarding the repository could be lost after the institutional control ends and the site is released for unrestricted use. Then, a family could decide to built a residential house right above the repository, drill a well and work the land to cover almost all their needs. Or, for different reasons, a future generation could decide to build a road crossing the disposal site. The climate change could also bring higher precipitation rates and increase the water table level. These are the worst scenarios that could happen for the Saligny site, grouping both geological aspects and human intrusion. The paper presents the radiological impact for both abnormal scenarios and discusses the contribution of each exposure pathway to the individual dose. (authors)

  12. Evaluating variability and uncertainty in radiological impact assessment using SYMBIOSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SYMBIOSE is a modelling platform that accounts for variability and uncertainty in radiological impact assessments, when simulating the environmental fate of radionuclides and assessing doses to human populations. The default database of SYMBIOSE is partly based on parameter values that are summarized within International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) documents. To characterize uncertainty on the transfer parameters, 331 Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) were defined from the summary statistics provided within the IAEA documents (i.e. sample size, minimal and maximum values, arithmetic and geometric means, standard and geometric standard deviations) and are made available as spreadsheet files. The methods used to derive the PDFs without complete data sets, but merely the summary statistics, are presented. Then, a simple case-study illustrates the use of the database in a second-order Monte Carlo calculation, separating parametric uncertainty and inter-individual variability. - Highlights: • Parametric uncertainty in radioecology was derived from IAEA documents. • 331 Probability Distribution Functions were defined for transfer parameters. • Parametric uncertainty and inter-individual variability were propagated

  13. Potential radiological impact of the phosphate industry on wildlife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the phosphate industry may lead to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radioactivity in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We performed a preliminary environmental risk assessment (ERA) of environmental contamination resulting from the activities of 5 phosphate fertiliser plants (located in Belgium, Spain, Syria, Egypt, Brazil), a phosphate-mine and a phosphate-export platform in a harbour (both located in Syria). These sites were selected because of the availability of information on concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in the surrounding environments. Assessments were generally performed considering highest environmental concentrations reported in the studies. The ERICA Tool, operating in a Tier 2 assessment mode, was used to predict radiation dose rates and associated risk to the selected reference organisms using the ERICA default parameter setting. Reference organisms were those assigned as default by the ERICA Tool. Potential impact is expressed as a best estimate risk quotient (RQ) based on a radiation screening value of 10 μGy h−1. If RQ ≤ 1, the environment is considered unlikely to be at risk and further radiological assessment is not deemed necessary. Except for one of the cases assessed, the best estimate RQ exceeded 1 for at least one of the reference organisms. Internal exposure covered for 90–100 % of the total dose. 226Ra or 210Po were generally the highest contributors to the dose. The aquatic ecosystems in the vicinity of the phosphate fertiliser plants in Tessenderlo (Belgium), Huelva (Spain), Goiás (Brazil) and the terrestrial environment around the phosphate mine in Palmyra (Syria) are the ecosystems predicted to be potentially most at risk. - Highlights: • The adjusted highlights Environmental radionuclide enrichment from P-industry warrants risk assessment. • 226Ra and 210Po are the most dose contributing radionuclides. • The total dose rate is strongly driven by the internal exposure.

  14. Radiological mapping for impact prediction and response during emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of large area contamination following any severe nuclear accidents, fast and accurate assessment of radiological impact is essential to enable quick decision making on the implementation of the optimum countermeasures. Physical monitoring of the affected area and generating contour maps showing spatial distribution of the contamination can facilitate immediate emergency response as well as long-term management of affected area. Considering the statistical nature of radioactivity, first, the mesh point values at the nodes of an imposed regular grid are estimated from N distinct irregularly spaced sampled data points Pi = (xi, yi) with sampling values zi by using Distance Weighted Moving Average Technique. A weighting factor w (di2) = exp (-di2/davg2 )/ di2 (davg: average distance of the all considered data points from the mesh point and di: distance of considered data point from mesh point) of general nature has been considered. A maximum of 12 sectors around each mesh point have been considered to minimize the anisotropy. The nearest data point within the radius of influence of each sector is considered for estimation of mesh point value. Various distance weighting factors, sectors and radius of influence have been tested. Utilizing these mesh point values, Bicubic Spline is evaluated for each cell of the imposed grid in the second step automatically. The Bicubic Spline of respective cell of the grid is used for contouring and mapping purposes. This paper is presenting the results obtained from two sets of data. These radiological maps are continuous in value, slope and curvature for whole surveyed area. With control over the weighting factors, mesh size, number of sectors and the radius of influence, better results are achieved for a given data set range and pattern at the cost of computation. The inverse distance square weighting factors give comparatively better results than the inverse distance weighting factor for both the data set. The choice of no

  15. The potential radiological impact from a Brazilian phosphate facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the semiarid region of Brazil, a facility for the production of phosphoric acid for fertilizer is in the last stages of the planning phase. The raw feedstock of Santa Quiteria has a very high level of uranium associated with the phosphate in form of apatite. The reaction by which phosphoric acid is produced generates phosphogypsum (PG) as a by-product. The ratio of phosphogypsum to phosphoric acid is approximately 5 to 1. After all of the phosphate has been extracted and processed, it is expected that some 37 million tons of phosphogypsum will be produced, containing 13 Bq/g of 226Ra and 11 Bq/g of 210Pb. To assess the potential impact of this PG stack on the surrounding inhabitants, a generic impact assessment was performed using a modeling approach. We estimated the amount and shape of the residue stack and used computational codes for assessing the radiological impact in a prospective risk assessment. A hypothetical farmer scenario was used to calculate two potential doses, one near the site boundary and another directly over the stack piles after the project is shut down. Using a conservative approach, the potential public dose was estimated to be 2.8 mSv/y. This study identified the rainfall erosion index, dissolution rate of PG, radionuclide distribution coefficients and fish consumption rate as parameters where improved information could enhance the quality of the dose assessment. The disposal and shape of the stack is of major concern, since the PG erosion might be the main pathway for the environmental contamination; therefore, studies should be carried out to determine a suitable shape and disposal of the stack. Furthermore, containment barriers should be evaluated for their potential to reduce or avoid environmental contamination by runoff. In addition, the onsite public dose underscores the importance of a planning for remediation of the area after the plant is shut down to assure that neither the public nor the environmental health will be affected

  16. Critical review of methodology and application of risk ranking for prioritisation of food and feed related issues, on the basis of the size of anticipated health impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Asselt, van E.D.; Raley, M.; Poulsen, M.; Korsgaard, H.; Bredsdorff, L.; Nauta, M.; Flari, V.; Agostino, D' M.; Coles, D.G.; Frewer, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to critically review methodologies for ranking of risks related to feed/food safety and nutritional hazards, on the basis of their anticipated human health impact. An extensive systematic literature review was performed to identify and characterize the available methodologies for ri

  17. The Impact of a Combined Cognitive-Affective Intervention on Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes, Knowledge, and Anticipated Professional Behaviors regarding Homosexuality and Gay and Lesbian Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Angela D.; Rosenthal, Amy R.; Smith-Bonahue, Tina

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a cognitive-affective intervention the attitudes, knowledge, and anticipated professional behaviors regarding homosexuality and gay and lesbian issues of pre-service teachers in the United States. Sixty-seven participants were randomly assigned either to a control group (n=34) or an…

  18. Radiological impact of surface water and sediment near uranium mining sites

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanova, Kremena; STOJANOVSKA Zdenka; Badulin, Viktor; Kunovska, Bistra; Yovcheva, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the radiological impact of surface water and sediment around uranium mining sites 20 years after their closing. The areas under observations are 31 former classical underground uranium mining and exploratory sites in Bulgaria, named as objects. The extraction and processing of uranium ores in the Republic of Bulgaria were ended in 1992. To assess the radiological impact of radionuclides field expeditions were performed to sample water and b...

  19. Evaluation of long term radiological impact on population close to remediated uranium mill tailings storages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology is elaborated in order to evaluate the long term radiological impact of remediated uranium mill tailings storage. Different scenarios are chosen and modelled to cover future evolution of the tailings storages. Radiological impact is evaluated for different population such as adults and children living in the immediate vicinity or directly on the storage, road workers or walkers on the storage. Equation and methods are detailed. (author)

  20. An assessment of the radiological impact of uranium mining in northern Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the findings of a study which investigated the regional radiological impact of uranium mining in northern Saskatchewan. The study was performed by IEC Beak Consultants Ltd. under a contract awarded by Environment Canada in partnership with the Atomic Energy Control Board. This preliminary assessment suggests there is a negligible combined regional radiological impact from simultaneous operation of the three operating mines investigated as part of the present study. The mines are spaced too far apart for any superposition of emissions to be significantly greater than a small fraction of background levels. The most exposed individual not directly associated with any of the mining operations is estimated to receive a total radiation dose equal to about 3% of the dose due to natural background radiations. This increment is equivalent to the increment in natural background that would be received by an individual moving from Vancouver to Wollaston Post, before mining began in the area, as a result of reduced atmospheric shielding from cosmic radiation. Radiological impacts on biota are estimated to have insignficant effects on natural populations in all cases. However, since the study only investigates the effects of operational releases of radionuclides, the results do not imply that uranium mining developments will or will not have significant long-term radiological impact on northern Saskatchewan. Radiological impact assessments described in this report are estimates only. There are some uncertainties in the available data and modelling methodology. The radiological impact of abandoned tailings areas was not included in this study

  1. Science and values in radiological protection: impact on radiological protection decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This work summarises the main ideas and achievements of the Science and Values in Radiological Protection Workshop that was held on 15-17 January 2008 in Helsinki, Finland. In the view of developing of new radiological applications and emerging scientific phenomena it has been recognized a need to develop a shared understanding of emerging challenges for radiological protection among scientific and regulatory communities, public and other concerned stake holders. In response to this the Committee of Radiation Protection and Public Health of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland tried to initiate a process of longer-term reflection on scientific and societal issues that might challenge radiological protection in the coming years. Among general issues like radiological policy issues, improvement of understanding between research and policy communities, sharing views on emerging scientific issues, there were addressed several scientific issues, like non-targeted effects, individual sensitivity; and circulatory diseases. The main focus of these discussions was to elaborate potential 'what if' scenarios and propose feasible solutions at various levels. These discussions addressed effects that are not direct and evident consequence of the initial lesions produced at the cellular and DNA level like bystander responses, genomic instability, gene induction, adaptive responses and low dose. Particular interest was paid to an extrapolation of risk estimates to low doses and role of Linear Non-Threshold theory in setting regulatory principles. Individual radio-sensitivity and identification of genes that are suspected of having an influence on it were also discussed in one of the Breakout Sessions. Another Breakout Session addressed circulatory diseases. There is emerging evidence in the A-bomb survivors and in other exposed groups that ionising radiation also causes other diseases than cancer, such as circulatory

  2. Anticipated affect and behavioral choice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Richard; J. van der Pligt; N.K. de Vries

    1996-01-01

    Most research on the impact of affect on attitudes and behavior emphasizes the effect of past and present affective reactions. In this article we focus on anticipated, postbehavioral, affective reactions. The influence of anticipated affective reactions on a number of behaviors was investigated in t

  3. The radiological impact of the Belgian phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Belgian phosphate industry processes huge amounts of phosphate ore (1.5 to 2 Mton/year) for a wide range of applications, the most important being the production of phosphoric acid, fertilizers and cattle food. Marine phosphate ores show high specific activities of the natural uranium decay series (usually indicated by Ra-226) (e.g. 1200 to 1500 Bq/kg for Moroccan ore). Ores of magmatic origin generally contain less of the uranium and more of the thorium decay series (up to 500 Bq/kg). These radionuclides turn up in by-products, residues or product streams depending on the processing method and the acid used for the acidulation of the phosphate rock. Sulfuric acid is the most widely used, but also hydrochloric acid and nitric acid are applied in Belgium. For Flanders, the northern part of Belgium, we already have a clear idea of the production processes and waste streams. The five Flemish phosphate plants, from 1920 to 2000, handled 54 million ton of phosphate ore containing 65 TBq of radium-226 and 2.7 TBq of thorium- 232. The total surface area of the phosphogypsum and calcium fluoride sludge deposits amounts to almost 300 ha. There is also environmental contamination along two small rivers receiving the waste waters of the hydrochloric production process: the Winterbeek (> 200 ha) and the Grote Laak (12 ha). The data on the impact of the phosphate industry in the Walloon provinces in Belgium is less complete. A large plant produced in 2004 0.8 Mton of phosphogypsum, valorizing about 70 % of the gypsum in building materials (plaster, cement), in fertilizers, and in other products such as paper. The remainder was stored on a local disposal site. The radiological impact of the Belgian phosphate industry on the local population will be discussed. At present most contaminated areas are still recognizable as waste deposits and inaccessible to the population. However as gypsum deposits and other contaminated areas quickly blend in with the landscape, it is

  4. Use of the phosphogypsum wastes in agriculture soils : radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphate fertilizer industry produce an important amount of phosphogypsum (PG) as a residue of its activity. Its is well known that such wastes contain significant amounts of natural radionuclides from the U, Th and K series. The raw material for the production (phosphate rock) has uranium activity concentrations of around 1 kBq Kg -1 from which about 15 % passes to the PG. At the Huelva industrial area (SW Spain) the wastes produced per year can reach some 3.10 6 Mg, but in spite of the recent scientific efforts its accumulation still being a problem of great concern for the area. In the other hand, reclamation of sodic soils for agriculture users requires a Ca amendment to diminish Na saturation. Then, PG (with a high proportion of CaSO4 -2H2O) is an effective amendment that has been widely used in the saline-sodic marsh soils from SW Spain. Using PG as an amendment dilutes the radionuclides down to background levels, becoming this practice a possible way to eliminate these wastes with a considerable additional value for the agricultural process. However, it is necessary to study the amount of radioisotopes that can move to water and plants to ensure the radiological safety of the amendment. PG has relatively high concentration of 226 Ra and other radionuclides, with an special concern due to the 22Rn emissions. These wastes could be used to improve the fertility of agriculture soils in a large former marsh area of the Guadalquivir river. Thus, it is interesting to study the levels and behaviour of natural radionuclides within this system to evaluate the radioactive impact if this amendment. An agronomical test is being conducted by one of the authors in an experimental farm in Lebrija (Seville). The soils are treated with 13 and 26 t ha-1 of PG, 30 t ha-1 of manure. Each treatment was repeated twice and continued for two years with beetroot and cotton plant production. We are measuring 226Ra (by alpha counting and gamma spectrometry) and U isotopes (by

  5. Hypothetical influence of non-indexed Spanish journals on the impact factor of radiological journals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel-Dasit, Alberto [MR Section, La Plana de Vila-Real Hospital, Castellon (Spain); Aleixandre, Rafael [Institute of History of Science and Documentation Lopez Pinero, University of Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Valderrama, Juan C. [Institute of History of Science and Documentation Lopez Pinero, University of Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Department of Radiology, MR Section, Dr. Peset University Hospital, Avenida Gaspar Aguilar 90, E-46017 Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: marti_lui@gva.es; Sanfeliu, Pilar [Cardenal Herrera-CEU University, Alfara, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-06-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the hypothetical changes in the 2001 impact factor of 52 radiological journals included in the Science Citation Index-Journal Citation Reports by also counting cites proceeding from 73 Spanish journals on different medical specialties. Also, to estimate the possible impact factor of the official Spanish radiology journal, Radiologia, not included in this database. Materials and methods: A modified 2001 impact factor of 52 radiological journals and Radiologia was obtained by adding the number of cites in 1999 and 2000 from the medical Spanish journals. Data were obtained by consulting the 2001 edition of the Journal Citation Reports in the 'Web of Science' database. Results: The 16,985 bibliographical references were analysed (232 of them to radiological journals). The journal with the largest increase in its 2001 impact factor (from 1.83 to 1.90) was Radiologic Clinics of North America. European Journal of Radiology was the European journal with the highest increase (from 1.084 to 1.110) in the difference between the 2001 modified and original impact factor. The modified 2001 impact factor of the 34 American journals was statistically higher (P = 0.016) than that of the 18 European journals (1.64 versus 0.93). Differences between the 2001 modified and original impact factor were slightly higher in the American journals (no statistically significant difference). The 2001 impact factor of Radiologia was 0.056. Discussion: Differences between the 2001 original and modified impact factor were small, but larger in the American journals. The 2001 impact factor of Radiologia was modest, although similar to other publications included in the Journal Citation Reports.

  6. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: Involvement and impact on radiology at a kidney stone center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 1,222 extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ECSW) procedures performed on 925 patients (600 males, 325 females), 85% were unilateral and 35% were bilateral treatments. Treated were 446 calyceal, 345 pelvic, 172 uretral, and 108 staghorn calculi. The impact of this new technology to the radiology department was studied. An average of 6.3 KUB studies and 1.2 renal US studies were performed per treatment session. Six percent of patients required post-ESWL excretory urography of CT; 10% required percutaneous nephrostomy. Patients with treated staghorn calculi required the most radiologic procedures (34% performed for partial staghorn calculi, 56% for complete staghorn calculi). By comparison, 3%, 8%, and 11% of radiologic procedures were performed for calyceal, pelvic, and ureteral stones, respectively. The impact of ESWL on the radiology department can be substantial. When staghorn calculi are treated by ESWL, a radiologist skilled in interventional techniques is essential

  7. Clinical and radiological evaluation of impaction of supernumerary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Tuna, Elif-Bahar; Kurklu, Esma; Gencay, Koray; Ak, Gulsum

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the clinical and radiological features of children with inverted supernumerary teeth. Study Design: Thirty eight patients with inverted supernumerary teeth (ST) were enrolled in this descriptive and restrospective study. Data from patient records including age, gender, status of dentition, number of ST, number of ST in inverted position, coexistence of ST in inverted and normal direction of eruption, location, orientation, morphology, clinical...

  8. Clinical and radiological evaluation of inverse impaction of supernumerary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Tuna, Elif B.; Kurklu, Esma; Gencay, Koray; Ak, Gulsum

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and radiological features of children with inverted supernumerary teeth. Study Design: Thirty eight patients with inverted supernumerary teeth (ST) were enrolled in this descriptive and restrospective study. Data from patient records including age, gender, status of dentition, number of ST, number of ST in inverted position, coexistence of ST in inverted and normal direction of eruption, location, orientation, morphology, clinical complications, management ...

  9. Radiological impact of the future CERN program (LEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the radiation problems which are the radiological influences of LEP which interest the majority of the members of the personnel. The first studies done in this domain are achieved, and the results are published this summer, among others the doses of radiation and of radioactivity and equally the concentration of hoxions gases on the exterior of the enclosure of future installations. The results are the object of discussions and are compared with the norms of radioprotection and with the actual situation in this region. (orig.)

  10. Impact of PACS On The Organization Of Radiology Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, Jason S.

    1983-05-01

    The radiologist serves as a consultant to other physicians in the practice of clinical medicine; the image obtained and the reported interpretation of that image represent the service rendered and are therefore of major importance (medically, legally and economically) to the radiologist. Because many radiology departments are organized along subspecialty lines or (in the case of a single department serving several institutions) along combined institutional and subspecialty lines, many patients may undergo diagnostic evaluation sequences in which several studies are performed and multiple simultaneous consultations may result. In the past, the lack of availability of multiple copies of the study (for multiple interested parties) has prevented the effective tailoring of subsequent examinations until the prior exam results were available; the advent of digital networks for PACS may result in a significant change in this procedure and, accordingly, in the pattern of interpretation, internal referral and organization of radiology departments. In addition, since clinicians may have access to studies directly and, possibly, prior to official interpretation, the nature of the relationship between the clinician and the radiologist may be altered by PACS.

  11. Radiological impact assessment of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents improved methods for predicting and assessing the dose to humans resulting from uranium mining and milling operations with the primary focus being on the local and regional component of dose to members of the public. Throughout, examples are presented from operating (Ranger) and rehabilitated (Nabarlek) uranium mine in the tropical Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Four major pathways are examined with relation to the Ranger mine dispersion of radionuclides in creek waters with uptake into the food chain, dispersion of radionuclides in groundwater, atmospheric transport of radon and radon progeny, and wet and dry deposition of activity on airborne dust. An improved model has been developed for the prediction of dose following release of wastewaters from Ranger into the Magela Creek system. The available data on radionuclide uptake into organism of the creek system were reviewed for incorporation into the model. Calculations using the model indicate that the most important organism for radiological impact are freshwater mussels, followed by fish. The behaviour of U, Ra, Th and Ac in the groundwater system in the vicinity of the Ranger tailings dam has been investigated using alpha- and gamma-spectrometry techniques. Ra, U and Ac isotope concentrations have increased with time in some bores, but this is shown in the case of Ra to be due to removal of native Ra from the aquifer rocks by increasing cation concentrations. Formation of barite is also occurring in the vicinity of some bores, leading to a removal of some Ra from solution. The situation with U is less clear. U-234/U-238 ratios have decreased with increasing U-238 concentrations in a number of bores, but generally remain above the tailings dam water value of 1.00. The most likely explanation is that the increasing size of mine structures such as waste rock dumps and ore stockpile has led to a change in conditions in the aquifer such that U ha become

  12. Anticipating and assessing health care technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents a case study of the potential impact of PACS on world radiology. The dramatic change in radiology after the clinical introduction of computed tomography is described. The potentials for change are analyzed

  13. Assessing the possible radiological impact of routine radiological discharges from proposed nuclear power stations in England and Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to assess the possible radiological impact on the population of the United Kingdom (UK) from new nuclear power stations proposed for up to eight sites in England and Wales. The radiological impact was measured in terms of collective dose to the UK, European and world populations from a single year’s discharge integrated to 500 and 100 000 years and the annual dose to an average member of the UK population (known as the per-caput dose). The doses were calculated for two reactor types, UK EPR™ and AP1000™, using the annual expected discharges estimated by the designers of the reactors and assuming two reactors per site. In addition, typical individual doses to adults living close to the sites were calculated on the basis of continuous discharges for 60 years (the assumed lifetime of the reactors). The dose to a representative person (previously known as the critical group) was not calculated, as this has been done elsewhere. The assessments were carried out using the software program PC-CREAM 08® which implements the updated European Commission methodology for assessing the radiological impact of routine releases of radionuclides to the environment. The collective dose truncated to 500 years to the UK population was estimated to be 0.5 manSv assuming UK EPR reactors on all sites and 0.6 manSv assuming AP1000s on three sites with UK EPRs on the other sites. The most significant contribution to the collective dose to the UK population is due to the global circulation of carbon-14 released to the atmosphere. The annual dose to an average member of the UK population from all sites was calculated to be around 10 nSv y−1 and would therefore contribute little to an individual’s total radiation dose. All the calculated doses to a typical adult living near the sites assuming continuous discharges for 60 years were found to be below 1 μSv y−1. (paper)

  14. Comparative Study on Radiological Impact Due To Direct Exposure to a Radiological Dispersal Device Using A Sealed Radiation Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, one of the most serious terrorist threats implies radiological dispersal devices (RDDs), the so-called dirty bombs, that combine a conventional explosive surrounded by an inflammatory material (like thermit) with radioactive material. The paper objective is to evaluate the radiological impact due to direct exposure to a RDD using a sealed radiation source (used for medical and industrial applications) as radioactive material. The simulations were performed for 60Co, 137Cs and 192Ir radiation sources. In order to model the contamination potential level and radiation exposure due to radioactive material spreading from RDD, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's HOTSPOT 2.07 computer code was used. The worst case scenario has been considered, calculations being performed for two radioactive material dispersion models, namely General radioactive Plume and General Explosion. Following parameters evolution with distance from the radiation source was investigated: total effective dose equivalent, time-integrated air concentration, ground surface deposition and ground shine dose rates. Comparisons between considered radiation sources and radioactive material dispersion models have been performed. The most drastic effects on population and the environment characterize 60Co sealed radiation source use in RDD.

  15. Evaluation of radiological impact due to direct exposure to a radiological dispersal device using spent fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, one of the most serious terrorist threats implies radiological dispersal devices (RDDs), so-called 'dirty bombs', which combine a conventional explosive surrounded by an inflammatory material (like Thermit) with radioactive material. The paper objective is to assess the radiological impact due to direct exposure to a RDD using a spent nuclear fuel assembly as radioactive material. Simulations were performed for TRIGA LEU fuel assembly, CANDU standard and CANDU SEU fuel bundles. The source term for fuel burnup simulation in specific conditions was obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code, included in ORNL's SCALE6 programs package. The contamination potential level and radiation exposure due to radioactive material spreading from RDD was modelled by means of LLNL's HOTSPOT 2.06 computer code. The worst case scenario has been considered, simulations being performed for General radioactive Plume and General Explosion dispersion models. The specific parameters (total effective dose equivalent, time-integrated air concentration, ground surface deposition, ground shine dose rates and time of radioactive plume arrival in a specific location) evolution as a function of distance from the radiation source has been investigated. Comparisons between fuel projects and radioactive material dispersion models have been also performed. The most drastic effects on population and environment characterize TRIGA LEU spent fuel assembly use in RDD. Whereas in CANDU spent fuel the total inventory of fission products, at the end of irradiation, is much higher than the TRIGA spent fuel one, the volatile fission gases inventory (Kr, Xe, I) is smaller. (authors)

  16. Radiological impact of commercial nuclear power plant releases in the United States: a 12-year study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial nuclear power plants release gaseous and liquid radiological effluents as a byproduct of electrical generation. These releases are monitored by agencies to ensure compliance of regulatory limits. Although these federal entities track effluent releases, they do not currently compile or analyze the entire industry data. Because of this, international organizations, like the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), have not had a reliable source of U.S. effluent data for the last several years. These organizations require the data for evaluating trends and determining population dose. A comprehensive evaluation and analysis of U.S. commercial nuclear power radiological effluents and radiological environmental monitoring programs was conducted for the 12 year period of 1995-2006. Effluent activities were compiled and analyzed and trends were identified using the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test to show long-term U.S. nuclear industry effluent release patterns. Using UNSCEAR and U.S. NRC dose methodologies, the average collective effective doses and doses to maximally exposed individuals were calculated. Summary data from every plant's radiological environmental monitoring programs were studied to identify the impact of radiological releases. Results of this portion of the research led to an on-site evaluation at one nuclear power plant. The research showed that the entire industry effluent releases have mostly remained level over the study period. Both collective effective doses and doses to maximally exposed individuals were well below regulatory limits. Analysis of the radiological environmental monitoring programs demonstrated that overall, the routine operation of all facilities had no significant or measurable radiological impact to the environment or human health for the study time period. (author)

  17. Radiological impact of high activity wastes disposal in a granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work analyzes, by a simplified model, the radiological impact due to radioactive wastes release when engineering and geologic barriers individually fail. Doses are calculated resulting from the individuals of a hypothetical critical group and the potential collective dosis for each one of the considered situations. (Author)

  18. Assessment of the radiological impact of the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to facilitate the assessment of the radiological impact of transport, and to guide the collection of data for future assessments, the IAEA convened a technical committee (The Technical Committee on the Assessment of the Radiological Impact from the Transport of Radioactive Materials; TC-556) in Vienna, Austria on 21-25 October 1985. The Terms of Reference called for this committee ''to collect and assess data on the radiation exposure of workers and the public during the transport of radioactive material, and to develop a summary statement, reflecting current practice and current state of knowledge, on the radiological impact of transport.'' This technical document provides the summary statement developed by TC-556. The statement should be viewed as an interim assessment since it utilized only data then available, or made available, to the committee. This document consists of three Sections: Section I - Background Information to the Summary Statement (prepared by the Secretariat); Section II - The Summary Statement on the Radiological Impact of the Transport of Radioactive Materials (developed by TC-556); and Section III - Recommendations for Future Assessments (a summary of statements and conclusions provided in the TC-556 Chairman's Report)

  19. Radiological impact of the use of calcium hydroxylapatite dermal fillers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To report a case series in which the radiological features of the subcutaneous use of calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHa) dermal fillers are described for the first time. Materials and methods: Five patients with facial hyperattenuating hypermetabolic subcutaneous lesions were identified on 2- [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), who gave a history of facial injections to augment physical appearance. Correlation with additional imaging studies was performed. Results: All cases had subcutaneous high attenuation material on CT (range 280-700 HU), which was FDG avid on PET, with a standardized uptake value (SUV) range of 2.9-13.4. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a heterogeneous intermediate signal intensity subcutaneous lesion with enhancement post-gadolinium in one case. Conclusions: CaHa dermal filler is hyperattenuating on CT, hypermetabolic on FDG-PET imaging, of intermediate signal intensity on MRI, and is a potential cause of a false-positive imaging study.

  20. Comparative Case Study as Social Impact Assessment: Possibilities and Limitations for Anticipating Social Change in the Far North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Jodie; Parkins, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Social impact assessment (SIA) is increasingly an accepted component of environmental impact assessment and project evaluation throughout North America. Tools and methodologies utilized to conduct such assessments vary greatly and continue to evolve with time and experience. This paper follows the evolution of case study methods in social impact…

  1. Radiological Impact Assessment on a Sabotage of Spent Fuel Handling in a Pyro processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Robby; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A demonstration facility termed PRIDE (PyRoprocess Integrated inactive DEmonstration facility) has been built to study and prepare for the construction of the active facility. Prior to that, a radiological impact assessment must be conducted to establish a safe and secure facility design. Research have been done to identify possible accident scenarios and their impact thereof to the surrounding environment. However these studies were based on the notion of internal accidents which extent was defined by the process characteristics. There has yet a study on externally induced radiological consequences, for example by malicious acts launched towards the facility. This paper attempts to close the gap by analyzing a certain malicious attack scenario and its radiological consequences. It may provide support for identification of vital areas in the facility and to achieve a security-by design objective. Based on the results, an attack launched on a single transport cask fully loaded with spent fuel as described in the scenario did not cause a radiological impact which exceeds regulatory limits. The limits were surpassed when there were two or more spent fuel casks involved. This result might be used as a basis not to aggregate loaded transport casks either during transport or during handling in the laydown area.

  2. How does radiology report format impact reading time, comprehension and visual scanning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Reiner, Bruce; Siegel, Eliot

    2014-03-01

    The question of whether radiology report format influences reading time, comprehension of information, and/or scannig behavior was examined. Three radiology reports were reformatted to three versions: conventional free text, structured text organized by organ system, and hierarchical structured text organized by clinical significance. Five radiologists, 5 radiology residents, 5 internal medicine clinicians and 5 internal medicine residents read the reports. They then answered a series of questions about the report content. Reading time was recorded. Participants also reported reading preferences. Eye-position was also recorded. There were no significant diffrences for reading time as a function of format, but there was for attending versus resident, and radiology versus internal medicine. There was no significant difference for percent correct scores on the questions for report format or for attending versus resident, but there was for radiology versus internal medicine with the radiologists scoring higher. Eye-position results showed that although patterns tended to be indeosynchratic to readers, there were differences in the overall search patterns as a function of report format, with the free text option yielding more regular scanning and the other two formats yielding more "jumping" from one section to another. Report format does not appear to impact viewing time or percent correct answers, but there are differences in both for specialty and level of experience. There were also differences between the four groups of participants with respect to what they focus on in a radiology report and how they read reports (skim versus read in detail). Eye-position recording also revealed differences in report coverage patterns. The way that radiology reports are read is quite variable as individual preferences differ widely, suggesting that there may not be a single format acceptable to all users.

  3. Impact of the geological substrate on the radiological content of Galician waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia (NW of Spain) is home to a highly-fractured soil rich in 238U minerals, being the widest radon-prone area of the Iberian Peninsula. High precipitation levels confer a rich variety and abundance of both surface and groundwaters, which are extensively used for human consumption. Nevertheless, there exists no comprehensive body of information about the impact of the high environmental radioactivity on the radiological content of Galician waters. Measurements of 222Rn, gross alpha/beta, 226,224Ra and 3H activity were undertaken over a significant range of traditional springs, waters for spas and bottling plant wells. A seasonal survey was also performed for five network water suppliers to the largest Galician cities. The main outcome of this study has been the determination of statistical correlations between the water's radiological content and different environmental factors. Water measured at bottling plants reveal radiological values exceeding the U.E. limits, however this is eliminated in the industrial bottling process before reaching the consumer. Neither significant values nor seasonal variations were obtained for network waters. - Highlights: ► Radiological survey of waters in an important prone area of the Iberian Peninsula. ► U.E. action limits exceeded, especially on waters intended for bottling. ► No significant levels on networks and bottled water after processing. ► 238U and 232Th chain descendants contribution depends on the water type. ► Correlations between radiological content and environmental gamma exposure rate.

  4. The psychological impact of the radiological accident in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the psychological impact of an accident caused by the violation of a capsule containing Cesium 137 in the city of Goiania, Goias, Brazil, in September of 1987. Its object is to confirm the importance of having mental health teams working, not only with accident victims, but also side by side with the rescue teams in the event of radiation accidents. (author)

  5. Assessment of the radiological impact of intermediate level waste disposed on the seabed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlines the methodology to be used in radiological assessments of disposal of waste on the ocean bed and describes the set of integrated models needed for such assessments. During the period covered by the contract considerable progress was made towards developing a new, compartment-type, model for dispersion of radionuclides in the deep ocean. The basic structure of this model was defined, and the mathematical techniques to be used in calculating the water flow rates between compartments were identified. Calculations of these flow rates are about to begin. When further progress has been made on the deep ocean model, more effort will be devoted to the other two models which are seen to be of high priority. These are the waste package model and the sedimentation model. It is anticipated that a first set of integrated models will be available for use in 1983, and will be refined thereafter. (author)

  6. Radiological impact assessment on non-human species from the radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper shows the use of a methodology in order to carry out the radiological impact assessment in non-human species (animals and plants) from a planned radioactive waste disposal facility. The application of modelling tools to simulate the behaviour (release and transport) of the radionuclides through the engineered barriers and the geosphere, and its final access to the soil and a river are described too. To evaluate the compliance with the adopted biota dose limits, were used the calculated maximum radionuclide concentrations for different environmental compartments (water, soil and sediment). Preliminary, the results showed that the Radiological Biota impacts are acceptable according to the adopted criteria (Radionuclides concentrations below the Biota Concentration Guides). The results showed that according theirs impact the more important radionuclides were: 241Am/226Ra/137Cs/60Co. The Riparian animals were the more exposed Biota organism. The results support the decision making process since could be identified the relevant radiological impact in the environment (plants and animals) near to a disposal facility (real or planned). Also the paper identified methodological tools useful to evaluate the site acceptance, for the early stages of disposal facilities (site selection process, licensing, etc), in absence of real data of radionuclides concentrations in the environment. (author)

  7. Impact of generational differences on the future of radiology: proceedings of the 11th annual ACR Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaraj, Arun; Weinreb, Jeffrey C; Ellenbogen, Paul H; Patti, John A; Hillman, Bruce J

    2012-02-01

    The 2011 ACR Forum focused on the impact of generational differences on the future of radiology, seeking to inform ACR leadership and members on how best to address the influence of the new integrated workforce on the specialty of radiology and on individual practices. PMID:22305696

  8. Impact of new operational quantities on the calibration of personnel and environmental monitoring systems and radiological protection instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There was no internationally agreed and unified operational dose quantity for use in radiological protection for some time. The impact of new operational quantities on the calibration of personnel and environmental monitoring systems and radiological protection instruments are discussed. 4 refs., 1 tab

  9. The differential radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the light-water reactor fuel cycle: effluent discharges during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological impact of a light-water reactor fuel cycle utilizing enriched uranium fuel may be altered by the recycle of plutonium. Differences in impact may arise during various operations in the fuel cycle: those which arise from effluents discharged during normal operation of the various installations comprising the fuel cycle are evaluated in this study. The differential radiological impact on the population of the European Communities (EC) of effluents discharged during the recycling of 10 tonnes of fissile plutonium metal is evaluated. The contributions from each stage of the fuel cycle, i.e. fuel fabrication, reactor operation and fuel reprocessing and conversion, are identified. Separate consideration is given to airborne and liquid effluents and account is taken of a wide range of environmental conditions, representative of the EC, in estimating the radiological impact. The recycle of plutonium is estimated to result in a reduction in the radiological impact from effluents of about 30% of that when using enriched uranium fuel

  10. Monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Set up at the beginning of the site's operations, in 1962, the monitoring of the radiological environmental impact of the AREVA site of Tricastin has evolved over time to meet more specifically the multiple objectives of environmental monitoring: to prove the respect of the commitments required by the authorities, to be able to detect a dysfunction in the observed levels, to enable the assessment of impacts of industrial activities, to ensure the balance between environmental quality and the use made by the local population and to inform the public of the radiological state of the environment. Thousands of data were acquired on the radioactivity of all environmental compartments as well as on the functioning of local ecosystems. Today, the Network of Environmental Monitoring of AREVA Tricastin goes beyond the requirements of routine monitoring to provide innovative solutions for monitoring the radioactivity (especially for uranium) in the environment. (author)

  11. Radiological impact of shallow land burial: sensitivity to site characteristics and engineered features of burial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in disposal of low-level solid radioactive wastes in engineered trenches located at shallow depth. This report describes an assessment of the radiological impact of disposal by shallow burial of low-level wastes in two kinds of low permeability geological media sited either inland or on the coast. Radionuclide release mechanisms include contact by ground-water and human intrusion. Calculations have been carried out for disposal of unit quantities of radionuclides and for disposal of notional quantities of LWR and Magnox reactor operating wastes. The sensitivity of the predicted radiological impact has been examined in relation to assumptions for repository design and to assumptions for the hydrogeological properties of the engineered barriers and for waste packaging or conditioning

  12. Multidisciplinary team meetings and their impact on workflow in radiology and pathology departments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kane, Bridget

    2007-01-01

    The development of multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs) for radiology and pathology is a burgeoning area that increasingly impacts on work processes in both of these departments. The aim of this study was to examine work processes and quantify the time demands on radiologists and pathologists associated with MDTM practices at a large teaching hospital. The observations reported in this paper reflect a general trend affecting hospitals and our conclusions will have relevance for others implementing clinical practice guidelines.

  13. Integrated assessment of the phosphate industry. [Radiological impact of uranium extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, M.T.; Cotter, S.J.

    1980-05-01

    The phosphate industry in the United States includes three major activities, namely, mining and milling of phosphate rock, phosphate product manufacture, and phosphate product use. Phosphatic materials contain uranium, thorium, and their decay products in greater than background amounts. This assessment of the radiological impacts associated with the redistribution of radioactive components of phosphate materials may provide insight into the effects of uranium extraction from phosphate materials for use in the nuclear fuel cycle.

  14. Radiological impact of the Chernobyl accident in EEC countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of an evaluation of the impact of radioactive substances escaped during the Chernobyl accident, on the population in EEC countries. The results have been processed from data provided by all member countries and relate to the most dangerous radionuclides namely 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs. The population was divided into three groups: one-year olds, 10 year olds and adults. Assessed were external whole-body irradiation by the radioactive cloud and material deposited on the body surface, and internal irradiation with regard to the human food chain. The irradiation of the thyroid was assessed separately. As for 131I, the most endangered group were the infants with the exception of Italy where 10 year olds were the most affected group. Values calculated for the individual countries are given of the effective dose equivalent for the first year, the dose equivalent for the thyroide, the dose commitment in the first year, the collective effective dose equivalent and the collective dose equivalent for the thyroid gland. Measures taken to reduce the irradiation of the population (restrictions on distribution and consumption of milk, dairy products and leafy vegetables, feeding cattle with preserved feeds, etc.) reduced the collective dose equivalent by a mere 5% and the collective dose equivalent for the thyroid by 26%. (E.S.). 3 tabs

  15. Radiological impact due to natural radionuclides (U and Th-isotopes) in soils from Salamanca, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Activity concentrations of U (238U, 234U) and Th (232Th, 230Th) radionuclides in samples of superficial urban soils surrounding an industrial complex in Salamanca, Mexico have been determined. Levels of naturally occurring radionuclides (Norm) in the environment may be affected due to the presence of different industrial activities in this zone, representing a potential radiological risk for the population which should be evaluated. Alpha-particle Spectrometry with Pips detectors has been used for the radiometric characterization. A well established radiochemical procedure was used for the isolation of the radionuclides of interest. Alkali fusion for sample digestion, liquid-liquid extraction with Tbp (tri-butyl-phosphate) for U and Th isolation and electrodeposition in stainless steel dishes for measurement conditioning has been used. The results cover the ranges of 10-42, 12-60, 12-52 and 11-51 Bq·kg-1 for 238U, 234U, 230Th, and 232Th respectively, being not observed any clear anthropogenic increments in relation with the values normally found in unaffected soils. Although there is disequilibrium between U isotopes and 230Th in some soil samples, it can be attributed to natural processes. The radiological impact of the industrial activities in the surrounding soils can be then evaluated as very low. Hence, from the Radiological Protection point of view, the soils studied do not represent a radiological risk for the health of the population. (Author)

  16. Radiological impact due to natural radionuclides (U and Th-isotopes) in soils from Salamanca, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandujano G, C. D.; Sosa, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Loma del Bosque 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Mantero, J.; Manjon, G.; Garcia T, R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Grupo en Fisica Nuclear Aplicada, Av. Reina Mercedes No. 2, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Costilla, R., E-mail: cmandujano@fisica.ugto.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias de la Vida, Departamento de Ciencias Ambientales, Ex-Hacienda El Copal Km 9 Irapuato-Silao, 36500 Irapuato, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Activity concentrations of U ({sup 238}U, {sup 234}U) and Th ({sup 232}Th, {sup 230}Th) radionuclides in samples of superficial urban soils surrounding an industrial complex in Salamanca, Mexico have been determined. Levels of naturally occurring radionuclides (Norm) in the environment may be affected due to the presence of different industrial activities in this zone, representing a potential radiological risk for the population which should be evaluated. Alpha-particle Spectrometry with Pips detectors has been used for the radiometric characterization. A well established radiochemical procedure was used for the isolation of the radionuclides of interest. Alkali fusion for sample digestion, liquid-liquid extraction with Tbp (tri-butyl-phosphate) for U and Th isolation and electrodeposition in stainless steel dishes for measurement conditioning has been used. The results cover the ranges of 10-42, 12-60, 12-52 and 11-51 Bq·kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th respectively, being not observed any clear anthropogenic increments in relation with the values normally found in unaffected soils. Although there is disequilibrium between U isotopes and {sup 230}Th in some soil samples, it can be attributed to natural processes. The radiological impact of the industrial activities in the surrounding soils can be then evaluated as very low. Hence, from the Radiological Protection point of view, the soils studied do not represent a radiological risk for the health of the population. (Author)

  17. Negative impacts of high temperatures on growth of black spruce forests intensify with the anticipated climate warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardin, M. P.; Hogg, T.; Kurz, W.; Bernier, P. Y.; Guo, X. J.; Cyr, G.

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of studies conclude that water limitations and heat stress may hinder the capacity of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) trees, a dominant species of Canada's boreal forests, to grow and assimilate atmospheric carbon. However, there is currently no scientific consensus on the future of these forests over the next century in the context of widespread climate warming. The large spatial extent of black spruce forests across the Canadian boreal forest and associated variability in climate, demography and site conditions pose challenges for projecting future climate change responses. Here we provide an evaluation of the impacts of climate warming and drying, as well as increasing [CO2], on the aboveground productivity of black spruce forests across Canada south of 60ºN for the period 1971 to 2100. We use a new extensive network of tree-ring data obtained from Canada's National Forest Inventory, spatially-explicit simulations of Net Primary Productivity (NPP) and its drivers, and multivariate statistical modelling. We found that soil water availability is a significant driver of black spruce inter-annual variability in productivity across broad areas of the western to eastern Canadian boreal forest. Inter-annual variability in productivity was also found to be driven by autotrophic respiration in the warmest regions. In most regions, the impacts of soil water availability and respiration on inter-annual variability in productivity occurred during the phase of carbohydrate accumulation the year preceding tree ring formation. Results from projections suggest an increase in the importance of soil water availability and respiration as limiting factors on NPP over the next century due to warming, but this response may vary to the extent that other factors such as carbon dioxide fertilization, and respiration acclimation to high temperature, contribute to dampening these limitations.

  18. Negative impacts of high temperatures on growth of black spruce forests intensify with the anticipated climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardin, Martin P; Hogg, Edward H; Bernier, Pierre Y; Kurz, Werner A; Guo, Xiao Jing; Cyr, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    An increasing number of studies conclude that water limitations and heat stress may hinder the capacity of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) trees, a dominant species of Canada's boreal forests, to grow and assimilate atmospheric carbon. However, there is currently no scientific consensus on the future of these forests over the next century in the context of widespread climate warming. The large spatial extent of black spruce forests across the Canadian boreal forest and associated variability in climate, demography, and site conditions pose challenges for projecting future climate change responses. Here we provide an evaluation of the impacts of climate warming and drying, as well as increasing [CO2 ], on the aboveground productivity of black spruce forests across Canada south of 60°N for the period 1971 to 2100. We use a new extensive network of tree-ring data obtained from Canada's National Forest Inventory, spatially explicit simulations of net primary productivity (NPP) and its drivers, and multivariate statistical modeling. We found that soil water availability is a significant driver of black spruce interannual variability in productivity across broad areas of the western to eastern Canadian boreal forest. Interannual variability in productivity was also found to be driven by autotrophic respiration in the warmest regions. In most regions, the impacts of soil water availability and respiration on interannual variability in productivity occurred during the phase of carbohydrate accumulation the year preceding tree-ring formation. Results from projections suggest an increase in the importance of soil water availability and respiration as limiting factors on NPP over the next century due to warming, but this response may vary to the extent that other factors such as carbon dioxide fertilization, and respiration acclimation to high temperature, contribute to dampening these limitations. PMID:26507106

  19. Selection of nuclide decay chains for use in the assessment of the radiological impact of geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criteria for selecting nuclide decay chains for use in the assessment of the radiological impact of geological repositories for radioactive waste are given. The reduced chains recommended for use with SYVAC are described. (author)

  20. Radiological assessment of depleted uranium impact locations in Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the monitoring that could be carried out during this brief reconnaissance was neither entirely systematic nor completely representative of overall environmental conditions, it is interesting to compare the activity concentrations of D.U. (depleted uranium) found in this work with what would be considered benchmark quantities. This has been done in some of the following sections, but it must be recognised that the data is not of the quality needed for robust generalised statements about D.U. contamination or any possible health consequences. D.U. mainly consists of 238U, 235U and 234U. All of these isotopes have different radioactive decay characteristics and therefore different dose per unit intake factors. However, for dose assessment purposes, it can easily be shown that the assumption that D.U. is composed entirely of 238U will result in an insignificant error in estimating the likely magnitude of any radiation dose. For example, for the limiting (i.e. highest) dose per unit intake factors given in ICRP 72 [2] for each isotope, this assumption gives rise to differences of about 1% and 10% for inhalation and ingestion respectively. This approximation has been used in the following discussions. 7.2 General observations Four D.U. contaminated tanks and one anti-aircraft gun were located and surveyed during the reconnaissance, together with two areas of contaminated land. There were also visual indications of D.U. impacts on two other tanks and an armored personnel carrier, but time constraints and hazards from unstable structures and unexploded ordnance prevented investigation of these vehicles. The most surprising finding was that there was relatively little loose contamination on or in the tanks. A more detailed interpretation of the results follows. 7.3 Smear samples All smears were subject to α and β counting and the results of the α counting converted to an equivalent removable surface contamination level, expressed in terms of Bq cm-2, by using

  1. Radiological assessment of depleted uranium impact locations in Iraq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.; Brown, R. [Dstl Environmental Sciences Dept., Crescent Road, Alverstoke, Gosport, Hants PO12 2DL (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Although the monitoring that could be carried out during this brief reconnaissance was neither entirely systematic nor completely representative of overall environmental conditions, it is interesting to compare the activity concentrations of D.U. (depleted uranium) found in this work with what would be considered benchmark quantities. This has been done in some of the following sections, but it must be recognised that the data is not of the quality needed for robust generalised statements about D.U. contamination or any possible health consequences. D.U. mainly consists of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 234}U. All of these isotopes have different radioactive decay characteristics and therefore different dose per unit intake factors. However, for dose assessment purposes, it can easily be shown that the assumption that D.U. is composed entirely of {sup 238}U will result in an insignificant error in estimating the likely magnitude of any radiation dose. For example, for the limiting (i.e. highest) dose per unit intake factors given in ICRP 72 [2] for each isotope, this assumption gives rise to differences of about 1% and 10% for inhalation and ingestion respectively. This approximation has been used in the following discussions. 7.2 General observations Four D.U. contaminated tanks and one anti-aircraft gun were located and surveyed during the reconnaissance, together with two areas of contaminated land. There were also visual indications of D.U. impacts on two other tanks and an armored personnel carrier, but time constraints and hazards from unstable structures and unexploded ordnance prevented investigation of these vehicles. The most surprising finding was that there was relatively little loose contamination on or in the tanks. A more detailed interpretation of the results follows. 7.3 Smear samples All smears were subject to {alpha} and {beta} counting and the results of the {alpha} counting converted to an equivalent removable surface contamination level

  2. Transmission dynamics of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and anticipated impact of infection control strategies in a surgical unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vana Sypsa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (CPKP has been established as important nosocomial pathogen in many geographic regions. Transmission from patient to patient via the hands of healthcare workers is the main route of spread in the acute-care setting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Epidemiological and infection control data were recorded during a prospective observational study conducted in a surgical unit of a tertiary-care hospital in Greece. Surveillance culture for CPKP were obtained from all patients upon admission and weekly thereafter. The Ross-Macdonald model for vector-borne diseases was applied to obtain estimates for the basic reproduction number R(0 (average number of secondary cases per primary case in the absence of infection control and assess the impact of infection control measures on CPKP containment in endemic and hyperendemic settings. Eighteen of 850 patients were colonized with CPKP on admission and 51 acquired CPKP during hospilazation. R(0 reached 2 and exceeded unity for long periods of time under the observed hand hygiene compliance (21%. The minimum hand hygiene compliance level necessary to control transmission was 50%. Reduction of 60% to 90% in colonized patients on admission, through active surveillance culture, contact precautions and isolation/cohorting, in combination with 60% compliance in hand hygiene would result in rapid decline in CPKP prevalence within 8-12 weeks. Antibiotics restrictions did not have a substantial benefit when an aggressive control strategy was implemented. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Surveillance culture on admission and isolation/cohorting of colonized patients coupled with moderate hand hygiene compliance and contact precautions may lead to rapid control of CPKP in endemic and hyperendemic healthcare settings.

  3. Radiological Impact on EC Member States of Routine Discharges into the Mediterranean Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological impact of liquid discharges released into the Mediterranean Sea from European civil nuclear plants in the period 1980-1991 has been assessed. This assessment was part of the achievement of a group of experts set up in 1992 by the Commission of the European Communities to examine the overall radiological impact on the European population from natural and man-made nuclides in the Mediterranean Sea (Project MARINA-MED). A mathematical model, ATOMED, was used to predict the dispersion of radionuclides in the Mediterranean Sea, the transfers to the biota and sediments, and to assess the radiological exposure of the population of the European Community. Annual liquid discharges from each site and seafood catch statistics were provided by experts involved in the MARINA-MED project. The total collective dose commitment truncated at 500 years delivered to the EC population following the discharge of liquid radioactive effluents in the period 1980-1991 has been calculated to be 1.96 man Sv. (author)

  4. Multidisciplinary team meetings and their impact on workflow in radiology and pathology departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Briain D Sean

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTMs for radiology and pathology is a burgeoning area that increasingly impacts on work processes in both of these departments. The aim of this study was to examine work processes and quantify the time demands on radiologists and pathologists associated with MDTM practices at a large teaching hospital. The observations reported in this paper reflect a general trend affecting hospitals and our conclusions will have relevance for others implementing clinical practice guidelines. Methods For one month, all work related to clinical meetings between pathology and radiology with clinical staff was documented and later analysed. Results The number of meetings to which pathology and radiology contribute at a large university teaching hospital, ranges from two to eight per day, excluding grand rounds, and amounts to approximately 50 meetings per month for each department. For one month, over 300 h were spent by pathologists and radiologists on 81 meetings, where almost 1000 patients were discussed. For each meeting hour, there were, on average, 2.4 pathology hours and 2 radiology hours spent in preparation. Two to three meetings per week are conducted over a teleconferencing link. Average meeting time is 1 h. Preparation time per meeting ranges from 0.3 to 6 h for pathology, and 0.5 to 4 for radiology. The review process in preparation for meetings improves internal quality standards. Materials produced externally (for example imaging can amount to almost 50% of the material to be reviewed on a single patient. The number of meetings per month has increased by 50% over the past two years. Further increase is expected in both the numbers and duration of meetings when scheduling issues are resolved. A changing trend in the management of referred patients with the development of MDTMs and the introduction of teleconferencing was noted. Conclusion Difficulties are being experienced by

  5. Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy

    CERN Document Server

    Petraglia, A; De Cesare, M; De Cesare, N; Quinto, F; Terrasi, F; D'Onofrio, A; Steier, P; Fifield, L K; Esposito, A M; 10.1051/radiopro/2012010

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

  6. NOAA's contribution to an informed society anticipating and responding to climate and its impacts through Climate.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepold, F.

    2012-12-01

    Societal concern about the impacts of climate change is growing. Citizens in public and private sectors want easy access to credible climate science information to help them make informed decisions affecting their lives and livelihoods. Weather and climate influences almost every sector of society, and affects up to 40 percent of the United States' 10 trillion annual economy. (NRC report, 2003 entitled "Satellite Observations of the Earth's Environment: Accelerating the Transition of Research to Operations"). As the leading provider of climate, weather, and water information to the nation and the world, NOAA is a logical source for citizens to turn to for climate information. NOAA must expand and improve the way it communicates, educates, reaches out to, and engages with public stakeholders to better meet the nation's needs for timely, authoritative climate data and information. Citizens are increasingly going online to seek credible, authoritative climate information. However, users report having difficulty locating and using NOAA's online data products and services. Thus, resolving this online accessibility issue will be one of the Climate Portal's main benefits. The use of portal technology and emerging data integration and visualization tools provide an opportunity for NOAA to bring together multiple datasets from diverse disciplines and sources to deliver a more comprehensive picture of climate in the context of affected resources, communities and businesses. Additional benefits include wider extension of NOAA's data to other media such as television and free-choice learning venues, thereby increasing public exposure and engagement. The Climate Portal teams take an audience-focused approach to promoting climate science literacy among the public. The program communicates the challenges, processes, and results of NOAA-supported climate science through stories and data visualizations on the Web and in popular media. They provide information to a range of

  7. Controlling the radiological impact in the nuclear fuel cycle: a cost/benefit analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods that are used to control the radiological impact of the nuclear fuel cycle are discussed. This control is exercised through the application of a series of Federal laws and regulations that are used as the basis for licensing nuclear facilities. These licenses contain technical specifications which define the limits for the release of radioactive materials. The control is exercised more directly in a technical sense by the use of radwaste treatment equipment at the nuclear facilities to limit the release of radioactive materials. The first part of this paper contains a summary of the principal Federal laws and regulations that apply to nuclear fuel cycle facilities and a description of how they are applied in licensing procedures. A detailed discussion is presented of the amounts of radioactive materials that may be released from licensed facilities, and the radiological doses that individuals and populations surrounding these facilities would receive from these releases. These doses are then compared with the radiological doses received from natural background radiation to put them in perspective. Cost/benefit engineering surveys which are being made to determine the cost (in dollars) and the effectiveness of radwaste systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from model fuel cycle facilities, and to determine the benefits in terms of reduction in dose commitment to individuals and populations in surrounding areas are described

  8. Impact of the geological substrate on the radiological content of Galician waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, J J; Cortina, D; Durán, I; Sorribas, R

    2013-02-01

    Galicia (NW of Spain) is home to a highly-fractured soil rich in (238)U minerals, being the widest radon-prone area of the Iberian Peninsula. High precipitation levels confer a rich variety and abundance of both surface and groundwaters, which are extensively used for human consumption. Nevertheless, there exists no comprehensive body of information about the impact of the high environmental radioactivity on the radiological content of Galician waters. Measurements of (222)Rn, gross alpha/beta, (226, 224)Ra and (3)H activity were undertaken over a significant range of traditional springs, waters for spas and bottling plant wells. A seasonal survey was also performed for five network water suppliers to the largest Galician cities. The main outcome of this study has been the determination of statistical correlations between the water's radiological content and different environmental factors. Water measured at bottling plants reveal radiological values exceeding the U.E. limits, however this is eliminated in the industrial bottling process before reaching the consumer. Neither significant values nor seasonal variations were obtained for network waters. PMID:23103575

  9. Radiological Impacts and Regulation of Rare Earth Elements in Non-Nuclear Energy Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Ault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Energy industries account for a significant portion of total rare earth usage, both in the US and worldwide. Rare earth minerals are frequently collocated with naturally occurring radioactive material, imparting an occupational radiological dose during recovery. This paper explores the extent to which rare earths are used by various non-nuclear energy industries and estimates the radiological dose which can be attributed to these industries on absolute and normalized scales. It was determined that typical rare earth mining results in an occupational collective dose of approximately 0.0061 person-mSv/t rare earth elements, amounting to a total of 330 person-mSv/year across all non-nuclear energy industries (about 60% of the annual collective dose from one pressurized water reactor operated in the US, although for rare earth mining the impact is spread out over many more workers. About half of the collective dose from non-nuclear energy production results from use of fuel cracking catalysts for oil refining, although given the extent of the oil industry, it is a small dose when normalized to the energy equivalent of the oil that is used annually. Another factor in energy industries’ reliance on rare earths is the complicated state of the regulation of naturally occurring radiological materials; correspondingly, this paper also explores regulatory and management implications.

  10. Radiological impact of co-location of the VLLW and LILW repository at Mochovce site - 59152

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAVYS, the Nuclear Decommissioning Company owner and operator of National Radioactive Waste Repository (NRR) at Mochovce, is planning the enlargement of the existing NRR. The enlargement consists of the construction of new structures (double rows) like the ones existing for LILW and of the new facility for the disposal of Very Low Level Waste (VLLW). A VLLW disposal site is being planned in Mochovce where a LILW disposal site is already located. As a part of ongoing licensing process for this change in utilization of the NRR we have updated the already existing assessment of potential radiological impact to members of the public after closure of the site, both from the migration of leachate in groundwater from the site and from possible inadvertent intrusion into the site, including future residence on the material excavated for the construction of the road. The radionuclides from the ground water reach the biosphere through a spring flowing into the lake. It is conservatively assumed that individual in the critical group uses biosphere of the lake (for irrigations, fishing and recreation). In the case of unintentional intrusion into the repository, the exposed group consists of a small number of workers who excavate or examine repository materials. The assessment is based on preliminary conceptual design for VLLW module, estimation of future volumes for the different waste classes and their radiological inventories and considers some common aspects and potential interactions between both disposal systems, such as radiological criteria, critical group definition, institutional period, site environment, total activity inventory. (authors)

  11. Personal anticipated information need

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, H

    2005-01-01

    Background. The role of personal information collections is a well known feature of personal information management. The World Wide Web has introduced to such collections ideas such as filing Web pages or noting their existence in 'Bookmarks' and 'Favourites'. Argument. It is suggested that personal information collections are created in anticipation of some future need for that information-personal, anticipated information need, which also underlies the design of formal information systems. ...

  12. An analysis of radiological research publications in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, You Jin [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dae Young, E-mail: evee0914@chollian.net [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Eun Joo [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Sora [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Kyoung Ja; Seo, Young Lan; Choi, Chul Soon; Bae, Sang Hoon [Department of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 445 Gil-dong Kangdong-Gu, Seoul 134-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► Radiologists published only 0.2% of articles in five general medical journals. ► Most original articles from radiologists were funded and were prospective studies. ► Radiology researchers from only 11 countries published at least one original article. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate scientific papers published by radiologists in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010. Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed in five high impact general medical journals (AIM, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and NEJM) for all articles of which a radiologist was the first author between 1996 and 2010. The following information was abstracted from the original articles: radiological subspecialty, imaging technique used, type of research, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study outcome, declared funding, number of authors, collaboration, and country of the first author. Results: Of 216 (0.19%) articles were published by radiologists in five general medical journals between 1996 and 2010, 83 were original articles. Fifteen (18.1%) original articles were concerned with the field of vascular/interventional radiology, 24 (28.9%) used combined imaging techniques, 76 (91.6%) were clinical research, 63 (75.9%) had a sample size of >50, 65 (78.3%) were prospective, 78 (94.0%) performed statistical analysis, 83 (100%) showed positive study outcomes, 57 (68.7%) were funded, 49 (59.0%) had from four to seven authors, and 79 (95.2%) were collaborative studies. Conclusions: A very small number (0.19%) in five high impact general medical journals was published by radiologists between 1996 and 2010.

  13. An analysis of radiological research publications in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Radiologists published only 0.2% of articles in five general medical journals. ► Most original articles from radiologists were funded and were prospective studies. ► Radiology researchers from only 11 countries published at least one original article. -- Abstract: Objective: To evaluate scientific papers published by radiologists in high impact general medical journals between 1996 and 2010. Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed in five high impact general medical journals (AIM, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and NEJM) for all articles of which a radiologist was the first author between 1996 and 2010. The following information was abstracted from the original articles: radiological subspecialty, imaging technique used, type of research, sample size, study design, statistical analysis, study outcome, declared funding, number of authors, collaboration, and country of the first author. Results: Of 216 (0.19%) articles were published by radiologists in five general medical journals between 1996 and 2010, 83 were original articles. Fifteen (18.1%) original articles were concerned with the field of vascular/interventional radiology, 24 (28.9%) used combined imaging techniques, 76 (91.6%) were clinical research, 63 (75.9%) had a sample size of >50, 65 (78.3%) were prospective, 78 (94.0%) performed statistical analysis, 83 (100%) showed positive study outcomes, 57 (68.7%) were funded, 49 (59.0%) had from four to seven authors, and 79 (95.2%) were collaborative studies. Conclusions: A very small number (0.19%) in five high impact general medical journals was published by radiologists between 1996 and 2010

  14. Radiological impacts of spent nuclear fuel management options. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given its potential significance for public health and the environment, the impact of radioactive releases during important steps of nuclear energy production must be considered when selecting among different fuel cycles. With this in mind, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has undertaken a comparative study to the radiological impacts of two main fuel cycle options : one with and one without reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The study compares the respective impacts of the two options based on generic models and assumptions as well as actual data. It concludes that the difference between them is not significant. A wealth of recent data assembled and evaluated by an international expert team is provided in annex. (authors)

  15. Calculations of the radiological impact of disposal of unit activity of selected radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work described is to provide estimates of the radiological impact following disposal of unit activity via each of several options, including disposal on the deep ocean bed, shallow burial, engineered trench disposal, disposal in a geologic repository and disposal in off-shore boreholes. Results are presented for a range of important representative radionuclides. In the course of the calculations it was necessary to make a number of simplifying assumptions. The implications of these are discussed in the context of use of the results for comparative assessments of waste management options. (author)

  16. Radiological impact assessment for landfill disposal of NORM wastes in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Malaysia, a radiological impact assessment (RIA) report has to be compiled in order to comply with the Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984, Act 304 and the Guidelines LEM/TEK/30 SEM.2, September 1996 for activity related to the landfill disposal of NORM wastes. Most of the NORM problems in Malaysia are associated with tin mining, mineral sands processing and oil production activities. The Malaysian Nuclear Agency has experience in conducting the RIAs for the disposal of NORM wastes by landfill. This paper describes an example of RIAs to dispose of tin slag at a specified site in the northern region of Malaysia. (author)

  17. Calculations of the radiological impact of disposal of unit activity of selected radionuclides for use in waste management system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work described is to provide estimates of the radiological impact following disposal of unit activity via each of several options, including shallow burial, engineered trench disposal, disposal in a geologic repository and disposal on the deep ocean bed. Results are presented for a range of important representative radionuclides. No single option is clearly the best from the radiological point of view. However, in conjunction with waste inventory data the results may be used to provide a preliminary view of the relative radiological merits of the various disposal options. (author)

  18. Age dependent food consumption data provided for the computation of the radiological impact via the ingestion pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averaged age dependent food consumption data are compiled and evaluated to provide input data for the computation of the radiological impact via the ingestion pathway. For special population groups (self-suppliers e.g.) factors are provided, by which the consumption for special foods may be exceeded. The evaluated data are compared with those of the 'USNRC-Regulatory Guide 1.109 (revised 1977)' and those of the 'Recommendation of the German Commission on Radiological Protection (Draft 1977)'. (orig.)

  19. Estimation of the environmental or radiological impact in the event of accidental release of radionuclides in a DCLL fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium production and activation in the LiPb products can pose a radiological risk in the event of accidental release in a fusion reactor. Within the research programme Consolider TECNOFUS (CSD2008-079) fusion technology has developed a design for a reactor with regenerative wrap with dual refrigeration (DCLL). The purpose of this communication is to present estimates of the radiological impact derived from an accidental release of radionuclides from the circuit of LiPb provinients. (Author)

  20. Radiological impact assessment at the hypothetical submergence of radioactive material. Comparison with radiological oceanic pollution at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive materials (spent fuel, high level waste and fresh MOX fuel) have been transported safely on the sea by a purpose-build ship and a transport cask under the IMO and the IAEA standards. In the interest of keeping the radiological impacts as low as reasonably achievable should a submergence accident occur, the requirement for a 200 m water submersion test was originally added to the 1985 edition of the Regulations. Radiological impact assessments by ingestion of contaminated seafood for the public have been made by assuming that a transport package might be sunk into the sea to gain the supplementary public acceptance mainly at the coastal states along the transport route since 1970s. Radioactive materials were released to the environment from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant as a result of the reactor accident after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011. We used a regional ocean model to simulate oceanic pollution. And then, we compared oceanic pollution by the Fukushima accident with the one the hypothetical release of radioactive materials from submerged transport cask. Radiological impact of the transport accident was smaller than the one of the Fukushima accident. (author)

  1. Radiological impact of drinks intakes of naturally occurring radionuclides on adults of central zone of Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty three samples of different types of imported and locally produced drinks consumed in central zone of Malaysia were analyzed using gamma-ray spectrometry system. The measurement was conducted for 12 hours using a Canberra p-type high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer with 30 % relative efficiency resolution of 1.8 keV at 1.33 MeV. The detector was connected to a computer with MCA card (Accuspec B) and Genie-2000 Analysis software of Canberra Industries, USA. The geometric means of daily intakes of 238U, 232Th and 40K were 0.05, 0.08 and 27.23 respectively. Also the values give annual committed effective doses of 0.8, 6.5 and 61.53 μSv yr-1 for 238U, 232Th and 40K, respectively for population in central zone of Malaysia. The net radiological impact of these radionuclides is 68.83 μSv yr-1. This value gives cancer risk factor of 1.72 x 10-7. Also the value of net radiological impact gives loss of life expectancy of 0.43 days only. Whereas ICRP cancer risk factor for general public is 2.5 x 10-3 and total risk involve from the all natural radiation sources based on global average annual radiation dose of 2.4 mSv yr-1 is 6.0 x 10-3 . The estimated cancer risk shows that probability of increase of cancer risk from daily Malaysian drinks is only a minor fraction of ICRP values. Therefore the drink samples investigated here does not pose any significant health hazard and is considered radiologically safe for human consumption. (author)

  2. Remediation and corresponding radiological impact of French uranium mining and milling sites (COGEMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As French uranium mines and mills are progressively ceasing operation, COGEMA has developed since 1991 an extensive remediation programme (see map for location and year of end of remediation work). The paper describes the radiological (and non radiological) monitoring system used to assess the radiological impact of uranium mining remaining after remediation. This includes air quality measurement (mainly gamma activity and radon 222 alpha potential energy), water and food chain sampling and analysis (uranium 238, radium 226 and lead 210). The monitoring network is particularly comprehensive around industrial sites grouping mines, mills and uranium mill tailings storage facilities. Different examples of real continuous measurement results collected before and after remediation and plotted on curves are presented. Main observations and evolutions are discussed highlighting some of the main issues related to uranium mines and mill remediation. Differences in gamma measurement due to geological environment or seasonal variations in radon 222 alpha potential energy stress the difficulty of choosing a background station. Radon 222 alpha potential energy concentration evolution may be linked to the placement of the cover on top of the mill tailings pile. Evolution of quality from the drainage system to the release in the river measures the efficiency of the water treatment plant which may become useless as the water quality naturally improves. Highest total added doses to members of the public, using realistic scenario and dose factors as recommended by European Directive 96/29 should be near 1 mSv. In the environment of uranium mines and mill tailings storages, measurement and dose to members of the public are low (compared to some modelisation results) and remediation improves and perpetuate this limited impact. (author)

  3. Anticipation across disciplines

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Never before was anticipation more relevant to the life and activity of humankind than it is today. “It is no overstatement to suggest that humanity’s future will be shaped by its capacity to anticipate….” (Research Agenda for the 21st Century, National Science Foundation). The sciences and the humanities can no longer risk explaining away the complexity and interactivity that lie at the foundation of life and living. The perspective of the world that anticipation opens justifies the descriptor “the post-Cartesian Revolution.” If anticipation is a valid research domain, what practical relevance can we await? Indeed, anticipation is more than just the latest catch-word in marketing the apps developed by the digital technology industry. Due to spectacular advances in the study of the living, anticipation can claim a legitimate place in current investigations and applications in the sciences and the humanities. Biology, genetics, medicine, as well as politics and cognitive, behavioral, and social sci...

  4. Estimation of the radiological impact in the use of phosphate fertilizer in citric plantations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of fertilizers in the agriculture is a potential danger of environmental contamination, because the elements contained in them could suffer an important redistribution in the environment. This is the case of radioactive elements of natural origin, like K-40 and nuclides of U and Th series, present in the ores used in the production of industrial fertilizers. Phosphoric rocks used in fertilizers contain, generally, important concentrations of radioactive elements greater than other rocks of the earth core. In Cuba, preliminary determinations of Ra-226 concentrations in phosphoric rocks reveal results in the order of 2.7 Bq/kg. These values are greater than the mean of the rest of soils of the country. Due to this fact, a study on the radiological impact of this practice was developed. The study was carried out in citric plantations of the province of Pinar del Rio, where phosphate fertilizer is widely used. Samples of different parts of the plant were taken and analyzed by means of gamma spectrometric techniques. The paper presents values for Ra-226 that are in the range 27-40 Bq/kg. These results show that the use of fertilizers does not imply a significant radiological impact. Punctual valves of transfer coefficients of Ra-226 in soil -stem-leave-peel and - juice chains were estimated. (authors). 6 refs., 4 tabs

  5. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries. PMID:23949935

  6. The environmental radiological atmospheric impact modelling system (ERAIMS) at ANSTO, Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decision-makers managing the emergency response to an actual or potential release of airborne radionuclides from the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) require real-time estimates of the trajectory and dispersion of any released radionuclides. Complex terrain surrounding the LHSTC has an impact on the downwind trajectory and atmospheric dispersion of released radionuclides. Under certain atmospheric conditions, the released cloud could be transported into the valley without direct impact on the nearest population. This entrapment in the steep sided, narrow valley, might mean that the cloud could remain more concentrated and cause impacts on more distant receptor populations down the valley. Alternatively, the cloud could disperse directly across the valley to the nearest residential population without any significant entrainment into, or impact, on the valley. The Environmental Radiological Atmospheric Impact Modelling System (ERAIMS) is a realtime response model which has been developed for the LHSTC. It estimates downwind impacts based on a pre-set source term, prevailing meteorological conditions which are measured every 15 minutes, receptor characteristics and exposure pathways. This paper describes the total system, from collection and calibration of meteorological data, to the running of the models in the ANSTO emergency response facility and display of data for controllers of any emergency. The current assessment of different atmospheric dispersion models available for use in this facility will also be discussed in terms of atmospheric tracer studies conducted in the region and International Best Practice. Copyright (2000) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  7. Investigation of the radiological impact on the coastal environment surrounding a fertilizer plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation was carried out in order to assess the marine environmental radioactive pollution and the radiological impact caused by a large production plant of phosphate fertilizer, located in the Lebanese coastal zone. Natural radionuclides (238U, 235U, 232Th, 226Ra, 210Po, 210Pb, 40K) and anthropogenic 137Cs were measured by alpha and gamma spectrometry in seawater, sediment, biota and coastal soil samples collected from the area impacted by this industry. The limited environmental monitoring program within 2 km of the plant indicates localized contamination with radionuclides of the uranium decay chain mainly due to the transport, the storage of raw materials and the free release of phosphogypsum waste

  8. The disposal of high level radioactive waste and the need for assessing the radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different options for the disposal of high level radioactive waste are being considered in several different countries. When assessing the possible future impact of these disposal concepts, very large uncertainties are associated with the predictions. These uncertainties include scenario representation, conceptual and mathematical modelling, parameter evaluation and finally the interpretation of the results. Some of these uncertainties cannot be eliminated regardless of research efforts, e.g. the evolution of the society and the environment. The paper discusses in general terms to what extent uncertainties in the predictions could be reduced and in the light of this discussion the authors present their point of view regarding the fruitfulness of assessing radiological impact in the far future. (orig.)

  9. National Ignition Facility: Impacts of chemical accidents and comparison of chemical and radiological accident approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An environmental assessment was conducted to estimate potential impacts or consequences associated with constructing and operating the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The multidisciplinary assessment covered topics ranging from radiological and chemical health and safety to socioeconomic and land-use issues. The impacts of five chemical accidents that could occur at NIF are compared, and the extent of their consequences for workers and off-site populations are discussed. Each of the five accident scenarios was modeled by a chemical release and dispersion model with a toxicological criterion for evaluating potential irreversible human health effects. Results show that most of the chemical release scenarios considered will not impair the general public in taking protective actions in the event of an accidental release. The two exceptions are the mercury release (equipment failure) scenarios for the conceptual design and the enhanced design. In general, the predicted maximum threat zones are significantly less than the distance to the point of nearest public access

  10. The radiological impact of radionuclides dispersed on a regional and global scale: Methods for assessment and their application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic features of models, developed to assess the radiological impact of radionuclides that become dispersed on a regional or global scale, have been reviewed. Particular attention has been given to identifying the important processes that need to be modelled in order to make a reliable estimate of the radiological impact, rather than attempting to judge which models are the most appropriate. Judgements on the latter will be sensitive to the particular application; in some cases a very simple approach may be sufficient, whereas in others a more rigorous analysis may be necessary. Two aspects are important in assessing the radiological impact: these are the exposure of critical groups, and the collective dose in the exposed population

  11. Description of the operation and radiological impact of a spanish coastal coal-fired power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Litoral' Coal-Fired Power Plant (LCFPP) is situated in the town of Carboneras (Almeria) in southern Spain. Its nominal output power is 1589 M We. The fuel used is imported sub-bituminous coal supplied by collier vessels, and unloaded in a port annexed to the plant. The climate of the area is semi-arid mediterranean, with particularly low rainfall. The plant's radiological impact was studied considering various exposure pathways for the workers and the general public. In particular, inhalation and external exposure contributions to the effective dose due to the different materials involved in the operation (coals, fly ash, and bottom ash) were evaluated. Alpha spectrometry was used to characterize radiologically the airborne particulates collected in aerosol filters at points within the installation, and to determine 210Po levels in aerosols collected in filters placed around the power station. High resolution gamma spectrometry was used to characterize coal and ash samples from the plant, and soil samples collected outside the installation within a radius of 5 km. A dose rate monitor was used to measure the ambient dose equivalent at different points inside and outside the plant. Samples of the seawater used in the plant and of products for human consumption produced nearby were also collected and characterized radiologically. The effective dose was evaluated following a realistic approach based principally on experimental measurements and in situ observations, complemented with mathematical models when necessary. The resulting estimated effective doses for selected representative groups of workers and general public were all below the reference levels used in this work. (author)

  12. Description of the operation and radiological impact of a Spanish coastal coal-fired power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Litoral' Coal-Fired Power Plant (LCFPP) is situated in the town of Carboneras (Almeria) in southern Spain. Its nominal output power is 1589 MWe. The fuel used is imported sub-bituminous coal supplied by collier vessels, and unloaded in a port annexed to the plant. The climate of the area is semi-arid mediterranean, with particularly low rainfall. The plant's radiological impact was studied considering various exposure pathways for the workers and the general public. In particular, inhalation and external exposure contributions to the effective dose due to the different materials involved in the operation (coals, fly ash, and bottom ash) were evaluated. Alpha spectrometry was used to characterize radiologically the airborne particulates collected in aerosol filters at points within the installation, and to determine 210Po levels in aerosols collected in filters placed around the power station. High resolution gamma spectrometry was used to characterize coal and ash samples from the plant, and soil samples collected outside the installation within a radius of 5 km. A dose rate monitor was used to measure the ambient dose equivalent at different points inside and outside the plant. Samples of the seawater used in the plant and of products for human consumption produced nearby were also collected and characterized radiologically. The effective dose was evaluated following a realistic approach based principally on experimental measurements and in situ observations, complemented with mathematical models when necessary. The resulting estimated effective doses for selected representative groups of workers and general public were all below the reference levels used in this work. (author)

  13. The PRECOS framework: Measuring the impacts of the global changes on soils, water, agriculture on territories to better anticipate the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolard, Fabienne; Bourrié, Guilhem; Baillieux, Antoine; Buis, Samuel; Chanzy, André; Clastre, Philippe; Closet, Jean-François; Courault, Dominique; Dangeard, Marie-Lorraine; Di Virgilio, Nicola; Dussouilliez, Philippe; Fleury, Jules; Gasc, Jérémy; Géniaux, Ghislain; Jouan, Rachel; Keller, Catherine; Lecharpentier, Patrice; Lecroart, Jean; Napoleone, Claude; Mohammed, Gihan; Olioso, Albert; Reynders, Suzanne; Rossi, Federica; Tennant, Mike; de Vicente Lopez, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In a context of increased land and natural resources scarcity, the possibilities for local authorities and stakeholders of anticipating evolutions or testing the impact of envisaged developments through scenario simulation are new challenges. PRECOS's approach integrates data pertaining to the fields of water and soil resources, agronomy, urbanization, land use and infrastructure etc. It is complemented by a socio-economic and regulatory analysis of the territory illustrating its constraints and stakes. A modular architecture articulates modeling software and spatial and temporal representations tools. It produces indicators in three core domains: soil degradation, water and soil resources and agricultural production. As a territory representative of numerous situations of the Mediterranean Basin (urban pressures, overconsumption of spaces, degradation of the milieus), a demonstration in the Crau's area (Southeast of France) has allowed to validate a prototype of the approach and to test its feasibility in a real life situation. Results on the Crau area have shown that, since the beginning of the 16th century, irrigated grasslands are the cornerstones of the anthropic-system, illustrating how successfully men's multi-secular efforts have maintained a balance between environment and local development. But today the ecosystem services are jeopardized firstly by urban sprawl and secondly by climate change. Pre-diagnosis in regions of Emilia-Romagna (Italy) and Valencia (Spain) show that local end-users and policy-makers are interested by this approach. The modularity of indicator calculations and the availability of geo-databases indicate that PRECOS may be up scaled in other socio-economic contexts. PMID:27423772

  14. The impact of radiology expertise upon the localization of subtle pulmonary lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, John W.; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Lewis, Sarah J.

    2016-03-01

    Rationale and objectives: This study investigates the influence of radiology expertise in the correct localization of lesions when radiologists are requested to complete an observer task. Specifically, the ability to detect pulmonary lesions of different subtleties is explored in relation to radiologists' reported specialty. Materials and Methods: Institutional ethics was granted. Ten radiologists (5 thoracic, 5 non-thoracic) interpreted 40 posterior-anterior (PA) chest x-rays (CXRs) consisting of 21 normal and 19 abnormal cases (solitary pulmonary nodule). The abnormal cases contained a solitary nodule with an established subtlety (subtlety 5 = obvious to subtlety 1 = extremely subtle). Radiologists read the test set and identified any pulmonary nodule using a 1-5 confidence scale (1=no pulmonary nodule to 5=highest confidence case contains a pulmonary lesion). The radiologists interpreted the image bank twice and the cases were randomized for each reader between reads. Results: The Kruskal-Wallis test identified that subtlety of nodules significantly influenced the sensitivity of nonthoracic radiologists (P=radiology does significantly impact upon the sensitivity of radiologists in detecting pulmonary lesions of varying subtlety. Thoracic radiologists had a consistently higher sensitivity with subtle, very subtle and extremely subtle nodules.

  15. Foods Found in the Wild Around Nuclear Sites: An Evaluation of Radiological Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habit surveys were carried out around four licensed nuclear sites to identify people who collect foodstuffs from the wild (so-called 'free foods'). In total, around 800 collectors were readily identified, most of whom collected more than one free food. The data indicated that estimates of higher than average doses could reasonably be based on the three foodstuffs of most importance. Foods were selected for further study on the basis of either the number of collectors or the amount consumed. The radionuclides of interest were identified using published information on the discharges from each site. The resultant average and higher than average doses were estimated using the site-specific habit data. For all sites, doses from the consumption of free foods were low and of no radiological importance. Assessments based solely on data for cultivated foods would not therefore have underestimated radiological impact significantly. However, given the wide utilisation of free foods found in this study, for rigorous assessments it would be prudent to take account of the consumption of foods from the wild. (author)

  16. Evaluation of environmental radiological impact of 137 Cs repository area, site of Abadia de Goias, using the RESRAD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological impacts under a conservative approach were assessed for the final deposition of 137 Cs at the repository site of Abadia de Goias, in the State of Goias. This site was selected as the definitive storage location for the wastes generated in the radiological accident occurred in the definitive storage location for the wastes generated in the radiological accident occurred in the nearby city of Goiania, in September of 1987. The wastes are composed of various different materials, with an estimated radioactive inventory of about 1250 Ci of 137 Cs, and will be deposited definitively in a repository box of concrete with a volume of 3900 m3 approximately. A conservative approach was considered in this study and the contaminated zone was simplified as an isotropic block of soil, of 3900 m3 of volume, containing 1250 Ci of 137 Cs homogeneously distributed within the whole volume. Several potential exposure scenarios were considered for the assessment of the future radiological impacts predicted at the repository site, depending on the level of institutional control maintained at the site, its future use, the time spent at the site and the sources of food. A comparative analysis of the resulting radiological impacts from all these future potential scenarios was performed using a microcomputer program named RESRAD. The simulated results indicated that the external exposure to gamma radiation, directly from the contaminated soil, is the most significant exposure pathway. The maximum predicted annual dose was below 7 mrem. (author). 5 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  17. The differential radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the fuel cycle of LWR type reactors: accidental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological impact of the fuel cycle of LWR type reactors using enriched uranium may be changed by plutonium recycle. The differences, which result from accidents which may occur in the different stages of the fuel cycle, are estimated in this study. The differential radiological impact on the population of the European Community is estimated for the recycle of 10t of plutonium metal, taking into consideration some characteristic accidents of each stage of the fuel cycle: fuel fabrication, reactor operation, fuel reprocessing and conversion, and, transport between the different units of the fuel cycle. Each unit is supposed built on an European ''average'' site (mean distributions of the populations and of the agricultural productions, reference meteorological situations). The recycle of plutonium in the fuel cycle involves a few per cent decrease of the radiological impact of the accident choosed for the nuclear power plants. The accidents of transport of plutonium, of new fuels and of plutonium wastes, as also thoses choosed for the fuel fabrication plant involve an increase of the impact for these types of transport and this plant. Finally, the differential radiological impact of the fuel reprocessing plant is positive but low

  18. Cells anticipate periodic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of periodic events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized periodicity. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.

  19. Radiological impact from the transport of radiopharmaceuticals of the IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a package is shipped, people who work, live or travel in the route used for transportation of radioactive materials are irradiated, as well as those who are inside vehicles that travel in the same or opposite directions. Therefore, the proposed work has as main objective to estimate the radiological impact of the transportation of radiopharmaceuticals of IPEN/CNEN-SP to some predefined destinations. The doses in individuals who are in the public streets and in vehicles that travel close to the means of transportation, along the route traveled by packages, during the transport of radiopharmaceuticals were estimated. The doses were also estimated for drivers, from both the operation of driving the vehicle, and the loading and unloading of packages, because these tasks are performed by the drivers. (author)

  20. Development of radiological impact assessments for the Drigg low-level radioactive waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Drigg low-level waste disposal site has developed from simple trenches cut in clay, accepting loosely tipped waste, to an engineered vault constructed of reinforced concrete receiving containerised waste. The paper describes the associated development of the radiological impact assessments and how those assessments have been influenced by the development of legislation and Government policy. The current deterministic risk assessment is described and the major conclusions presented. The successor to this model is based on a 3-D network approach to the representation of site specific engineering and geological features, with compartmental modelling of the biosphere. The development of this model, which will be used in deterministic and probabilistic modes for the next assessment, is described. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  1. Radiological impact of the management of radioactive waste arising from the Argentine Nuclear Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argentine nuclear programme, as it stands at present, provides for the construction of four nuclear power plants in addition to those of Atucha I and Embalse and for the establishment of such fuel cycle facilities as are required to supply all of these plants. This paper evaluates the radiological impact (collective dose commitment) expected from the management of the radioactive wastes arising in the facilities mentioned above throughout the useful life of the reactors. The maximum individual doses to be expected as a result of the planned high-level-waste repository are also estimated. The evaluations presented are partly specific to the sites under consideration, but they also include estimates of the total collective dose commitments resulting from the management of radioactive waste under the Argentine nuclear programme. (author)

  2. Amoebae Anticipate Periodic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigusa, Tetsu; Tero, Atsushi; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Kuramoto, Yoshiki

    2008-01-01

    When plasmodia of the true slime mold Physarum were exposed to unfavorable conditions presented as three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, they reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When the plasmodia were subsequently subjected to favorable conditions, they spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time when the next unfavorable episode would have occurred. This implied the anticipation of impending environmental change. We explored the mechanisms underlying these types of behavior from a dynamical systems perspective.

  3. Radiological impact of radionuclide uptake by plants in the land application area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide concentrations in fruits and foliage of plants can increase as the result of irrigation with effluent water from a uranium mine. The significance of this pathway is discussed with respect to radiological impact from consumption of food and from the generation of ash as a result of bush fires. During the irrigation phase, radionuclide uptake by plants is expected to be via roots only. It is important to make a distinction between the contribution of these two systems, because radiological impact on humans via the vegetation pathways is likely to take place after rehabilitation, when the area could be occupied by humans. This distinction has been achieved through comparison of radionuclide concentrations in the vegetation harvested from an experimental plot, before, during and after irrigation with the simulated Retention Pond 2 (RP2) water of the Ranger Uranium Mine. The consumption of terrestrial food by the Aboriginal people is small and annual land application is likely to result in a dose increment of 3 μSv y-1 during future occupancy of the land application area. Bush fires immediately after irrigation may generate ash material 30-40 times more radioactive than the soil material, but subsequent bush fires will produce less radioactive ash. With the exception of uranium in foliage, the measured concentration factors agree within a factor of two with the default values recommended by IAEA. The uranium concentration factor for foliage material was found to be 2-8 times higher than the IAEA default value. 14 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  4. Radiological impact during the extraction, processing and use of phosphate minerals in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of phosphates for the production of fertilisers is a practice broadly diffused in the world. Their wide use is associated to the contribution of this material to formulation of Nk fertilisers. It is known in turn that phosphates have in their composition appreciable quantities of radioactive elements of natural origin. For this reason the use of phosphates in the composition of fertilizers can cause a radiological impact to both workers and public during all the phases of extraction and processing of phosphates, as well as during the production and application of these fertilizers. Finally the transfer of radionuclides contained in the fertilizers to the products of human consumption (vegetables, milk, meat) can produce an additional radiological impact on population. In Cuba there exist six locations of phosphoric rocks, located in the counties of Pinar del Rio, Havana, Matanzas, Sancti-Spiritus and Holguin. From these deposits there were studied the two ones which are in exploitation: 'La Pimienta' deposit, located in the West part of the country and 'Trinidad de Guedes' deposit, located in the Centre-West of Cuba. Paper shows the results obtained by the Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) in the determination of radionuclides concentrations in collected in the sites samples. Based on these results and taking into account both the features of routine works carried out in the sites and the later use of collected mineral as fertilizer, doses to mining workers and to members of the public were estimated. Estimated doses are in the range 0.3 - 2.70 mSv per year for workers and in the range 1.3 - 17 μSv per year. (author)

  5. Radiological Impact During the Extraction, Processing and Use of Phosphate Minerals in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of phosphates for the production of fertilisers is a practice broadly diffused in the world. Their wide use is associated to the contribution of this material to formulation of NPK fertilisers. It is known in turn that phosphates have in their composition appreciable quantities of radioactive elements of natural origin. For this reason the use of phosphates in the composition of fertilizers can cause a radiological impact to both workers and public during all the phases of extraction and processing of phosphates, as well as during the production and application of these fertilizers. Finally the transfer of radionuclides contained in the fertilizers to the products of human consumption (vegetables, milk, meat) can produce an additional radiological impact on population. In Cuba there exist six locations of phosphoric rocks, located in the counties of Pinar del Rio, Havana, Matanzas, Sancti-Spiritus and Holguin. From these deposits there were studied the two ones which are in exploitation: 'La Pimienta' deposit, located in the West part of the country and 'Trinidad de Guedes' deposit, located in the Centre-West of Cuba. Paper shows the results obtained by the Center for Radiation Protection and Hygiene (CPHR) in the determination of radionuclides concentrations in collected in the sites samples. Based on these results and taking into account both the features of routine works carried out in the sites and the later use of collected mineral as fertilizer, doses to mining workers and to members of the public were estimated. Estimated doses are in the range 0.3 - 2.70 mSv per year for workers and in the range 1.3 - 17μ Sv per year. (author)

  6. A comparison between various radiological techniques in the localization and analysis of impacted and supernumerary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph M Ziegler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: An increasing number of different types of commercial cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT devices are available for three-dimensional (3D imaging in the field of dental and maxillofacial radiology. When removing impacted or supernumerary teeth, surgical teams often operate adjacent significant anatomical structures such as nerves, vessels, adjacent teeth roots, and paranasal sinuses. It is therefore important to choose the appropriate surgical approach to avoid iatrogenic damage to the essential anatomical neighbouring structures. CBCT, also called digital volume tomography (DVT, can visualize impacted and supernumerary teeth in all standard planes, as well as multisectional 3D views. These devices have shown to be highly beneficial in the assessment of small bony lesions and maxillofacial injuries. However, it is still necessary to determine the effectiveness of such devices in the assessment of impacted and supernumerary teeth, in comparison to the conventional radiological methods of intraoral X-rays and panoramic X-rays. Materials and Methods: During a period of 2 years, a total of 61 patients of whom majority had impacted teeth or supernumerary elements in the frontal maxillary region were studied with CBCT and treated at the St. Olavs University Hospital. Patients were referred to our Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery with both conventional and digital intraoral X-rays and/or panoramic X-rays. None had any acute infections or odontogenic abscesses, and most presented with asymptomatic impacted tooth. A comparison between the preoperative conventional and the CBCT images, the resulting diagnoses, and the intraoperative findings as "gold standard" were made and recorded in a compiled scoring sheet. The objects of interest were researched with the magnification method. Each patient was identified only with a patient number. Results: In contrast to the conventional X-rays, the pre-surgical evaluation with

  7. Radiochemical characterization and environmental radiological impact in tin and lead processing from cassiterite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tin and lead industry located in Pirapora do Bom Jesus in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, is responsible for the production of about 7000 ton year-1 of tin and 350 ton year-1 of lead. The raw material used in this facility is cassiterite, which presents in its composition concentrations of natural radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series up to 660 kBq kg-1 and 450 kBq kg-1, respectively. The smelting and refining processes may lead to concentrations of these radionuclides, mainly in the precipitated dust and in slag. In the operational process, intermediate refining and final slag are obtained and are stored in piles in open air. It is estimated that the amount of waste stored is about 600000 ton. This work aims to study the environmental radiological impact of the operation of this facility and to establish its Environmental Radiological Monitoring Program. In order to accomplish this task the content of radioactivity was determined in the raw material, products, byproducts, residue, deposition pond and exhausting systems. Although in the raw material the radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series are almost in equilibrium, during the processing this equilibrium is disrupted and the radionuclides migrate according to their chemical properties. Concentrations up to 31 kBq kg-1 for 238U, 69 kBq kg-1 for 226Ra, 2.5 kBq kg-1 for 210Pb, 130 kBq kg-1 for 232Th and 120 kBq kg-1 for 228Ra were obtained in the slag. The environmental radiological impact was established by measuring the radionuclides in the critical compartments that is the ones that may cause exposure to the public. If the residue pile is considered, the critical pathways are the internal exposition from the dust inhalation and the water ingestion, due to re suspension and dispersion of the pile dust and groundwater contamination, respectively; and external exposure due to immersion in the radioactive cloud and soil contamination. For the emission of gaseous and particulate effluents

  8. The impact of anticipated HIV stigma on delays in HIV testing behaviors: findings from a community-based sample of men who have sex with men and transgender women in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Sarit A; Gamarel, Kristi E

    2013-11-01

    Treatment as prevention (TaSP) is a critical component of biomedical interventions to prevent HIV transmission. However, its success is predicated on testing and identifying undiagnosed individuals to ensure linkage and retention in HIV care. Research has examined the impact of HIV-associated stigma on HIV-positive individuals, but little work has explored how anticipated HIV stigma-the expectation of rejection or discrimination against by others in the event of seroconversion-may serve as a barrier to HIV testing behaviors. This study examined the association between anticipated stigma and HIV testing behaviors among a sample of 305 men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women living in New York City. Participants' mean age was 33.0; 65.5% were racial/ethnic minority; and 50.2% earned <$20,000 per year. Overall, 32% of participants had not had an HIV test in the past 6 months. Anticipated stigma was negatively associated with risk perception. In multivariate models, anticipated stigma, risk perception, and younger age were significant predictors of HIV testing behaviors. Anti-HIV stigma campaigns targeting HIV-negative individuals may have the potential to significantly impact social norms around HIV testing and other biomedical strategies, such pre-exposure prophylaxis, at a critical moment for the redefinition of HIV prevention. PMID:24138486

  9. Radiological scenario modeling using the Hotspot code and potential financial impact of treatment of radiation induced cancer to the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work aims to develop a methodology that is able to estimate the financial impact in a radiological emergency events, considering the radiation induced cancer, particularly leukemia. Considering a RDD - Radiological Dispersive Device, consisting of explosives and cesium-137 as radioactive material, a scenario building on the Rio de Janeiro was modeled. The convergence of a risk modeling platform (HotSpot 3.0), the analysis of excess relative risks for humans (BEIR V-Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V), considering scenarios composed of contaminated areas, are secondary goals

  10. Radiological impact assessment of routine atmospheric releases of MAAMORA Nuclear Research Center (MNRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CNESTEN is the main national operator of nuclear facilities within the MAAMORA Nuclear Research Center (MNRC) in Morocco. MNRC is presently holding a radioisotopes production facility, radioactive waste treatment and storage facilities and several laboratories using nuclear techniques and radioactive sources. The construction of a TRIGA Mark II research reactor is still on going. In compliance with national regulations with regard of the licensing process, CNESTEN has performed a radiological impact assessment for the routine atmospheric releases of Maamora Nuclear Research Center facilities in order to obtain the first licence for environmental discharge. The objective of the study is to propose to the national nuclear safety authority the atmospheric release limits and conduct the assessment of radiological consequences to the population reference groups which will be compared to the 1 mSv regulatory annual limit to the public. A conservative estimation has been developed for: the source term of the annual atmospheric releases, the release conditions at the stacks, the local meteorological data, exposure pathways scenarios of population reference groups. The dose assessment has been performed using two different calculation codes: GASCON (France/Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) and CAP88 (USA/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory). Under the conditions and the assumptions related to the routine radioactive atmospheric releases of MNRC, both of the calculation codes had given comparable estimations of individual and collective effective doses to the members of the public. The highest individual effective dose is estimated to 6.80 x 10-4 mSv per year which represents 0.07% of the 1 mSv regulatory annual limit to the public. (author)

  11. Radiological impact to the population of the three major accidents happened in the civil nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The greatest fear of the population before a nuclear accident, is the radiological impact to the health of people, due to the exposure to the liberated radioactive material during the accident, this fear is generally exaggerated or not well managed by the media. The best estimate in the received doses and their possible effects is carried out based on the information obtained during a certain time after the accident event. This work contains a summary of the information in the topic that at the present time has presented institutions as: the World Health Organization (Who), the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the World Nuclear Association, among others. The considered accidents are: first, the Unit-2 of the nuclear power plant of the Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, USA occurred 28 March of 1979, in the Reactor TMI-2, type PWR of 900 M We; the second accident was 26 April of 1986, in the Unit-4 of the nuclear power plant of Chernobyl, in Ukraine, the involved reactor was type BRMK, of 1000 M We moderated by graphite and cooled with light water, the power plant is located to 100 Km to the northwest of Kiev; 25 years later occurred the third accident in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Dai-ichi, in Japan, affecting at four of the six reactors of the power plant. A brief description of the accident is presented in each case, including the magnitude of the provoked liberations of radioactive material, the estimate doses of the population and the affected workers are presented, as well as the possible consequences of these doses on the health. The objective of this diffusion work is to give knowledge to the nuclear and radiological community of the available information on the topic, in order to be located in the appropriate professional context. (author)

  12. Radiological impacts of natural radioactivity in Abu-Tartor phosphate deposits, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate and environmental samples were collected from Abu Tartor phosphate mine and the surrounding region. The activity concentration of 226Ra (238U) series, 232Th series and 40K were measured using a gamma-ray spectrometer. The activities of uranium isotopes (238U, 235U and 234U) and 210Pb were measured using an alpha spectrometer and a low-background proportional gas counting system, respectively, after radiochemical separation. The results are discussed and compared with the levels in phosphate rocks from different countries. It seems that the Abu Tartor phosphate deposit has the lowest radioactivity level of exploited phosphate of sedimentary origin. 226Ra/238U, 210Pb/226Ra, 234U/238U and 226Ra/228Ra activity ratios were calculated and are discussed. The radioactivity levels in the surrounding region and the calculated exposure dose (nGy/h) will be considered as a pre-operational baseline to estimate the possible radiological impacts due to mining, processing and future phosphate industrial activities. To minimize these impacts, the processing wastes should be recycled to the greatest possible extent

  13. The Impact of Anticipated HIV Stigma on Delays in HIV Testing Behaviors: Findings from a Community-Based Sample of Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender Women in New York City

    OpenAIRE

    Golub, Sarit A.; Gamarel, Kristi E.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment as prevention (TaSP) is a critical component of biomedical interventions to prevent HIV transmission. However, its success is predicated on testing and identifying undiagnosed individuals to ensure linkage and retention in HIV care. Research has examined the impact of HIV-associated stigma on HIV-positive individuals, but little work has explored how anticipated HIV stigma–the expectation of rejection or discrimination against by others in the event of seroconversion—may serve as a ...

  14. Radiological impact of plutonium recycle in the fuel cycle of LWR type reactors: professional exposure during mormal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological impact of the fuel cycle of light water type reactors using enriched uranium may be changed by plutonium recycle. The impact on human population and on the persons professionally exposed may be different according to the different steps of the fuel cycle. This report analyses the differential radiological impact on the different types of personnel involed in the fuel cycle. Each step of the fuel cycle is separately studied (fuel fabrication, reactor operation, fuel reprocessing), as also the transport of the radioactive materials between the different steps. For the whole fuel cycle, one estimates that, with regard to the fuel cycle using enriched uranium, the plutonium recycle involves a small increase of the professional exposure

  15. Impacted Mandibular Third Molars: Review of Literature and a Proposal of a Combined Clinical and Radiological Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, P

    2015-01-01

    Tooth impaction is a pathological situation where a tooth fails to attain its normal functional position. Impacted third molars are commonly encountered in routine dental practice. The impaction rate is higher for third molars when compared with other teeth. The mandibular third molar impaction is said to be due to the inadequate space between the distal of the second mandibular molar and the anterior border of the ascending ramus of the mandible. Impacted teeth may remain asymptomatic or may be associated with various pathologies such as caries, pericoronitis, cysts, tumors, and also root resorption of the adjacent tooth. Even though various classifications exist in the literature, none of those address the combined clinical and radiologic assessment of the impacted third molar. Literature search using the advanced features of various databases such as PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Google Scholar, Directory of Open Access Journals and Cochrane electronic databases was carried out. Keywords like impaction, mandibular third molar, impacted mandibular third molar, complications, anatomy, inferior alveolar nerve injury, lingual nerve injury were used to search the databases. A total of 826 articles were screened, and 50 articles were included in the review which was obtained from 1980 to February 2015. In the present paper, the authors have proposed a classification based on clinical and radiological assessment of the impacted mandibular third molar. PMID:26229709

  16. Anticipated backward stochastic differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Shige; Yang, Zhe

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss new types of differential equations which we call anticipated backward stochastic differential equations (anticipated BSDEs). In these equations the generator includes not only the values of solutions of the present but also the future. We show that these anticipated BSDEs have unique solutions, a comparison theorem for their solutions, and a duality between them and stochastic differential delay equations.

  17. Investigation of whether various types of radioactive waste are equivalent in terms of the radiological impact associated with their disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility that various types of waste are equivalent in terms of the risks associated with their disposal in so far as they are viewed by different sections of society. If such a framework can be established it could be used as an aid to decisions as to whether central disposal facilities, to accept waste from several countries, should be constructed. Details are presented of assumed radionuclide inventories for a representative range of radioactive wastes, calculations and results of the radiological impacts of their disposal, and illustrative methods for weighting the various components of impact which when summed provide an overall measure of impact. Five sets of weighting factors have been devised which are intended to represent the views of a) the radiological protection community, b) those with a pro-nuclear industry view, c) those who oppose nuclear power on safety grounds, d) the inhabitants of the country receiving wastes for disposal, and e) the inhabitants of the country dispatching wastes. On the basis of the calculated weighted radiological impacts it is demonstrated how conclusions can be drawn about general views on the disposal of each waste, about likely attitudes to the export of wastes from one country for disposal in another, and attitudes to exchanging wastes between countries. The study is preliminary and of limited scope. However, the results show that the general methodology is practicable and could be applied in a wider ranging investigation

  18. Evaluation of the radiological impact from radwaste transportation in Taiwan by using code RADSHIP-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RADSHIP-2 is a computer code developed under the support of Radwaste Administration of Atomic Energy Council, Republic of China to evaluate the radiological impact to the environment from the radwaste transportation in Taiwan area. RADSHIP-2 was basically based on RADTRAN code but allowing more exposure pathways to be considered especially through the sea transport. Falling-off factors to take account for the dose decreasing away from the transport package were provided by using QAD-CG code and built into RADSHIP-2 for the population dose assessment during truck shipment. The physical dispersive process of radwaste released in a bay and coastal water were also modelled for pier operation and sea shipment contaminated accidents. The results calculated for Taipower's radwaste transportation in Taiwan were compared with those from RADTRAN. It can be found that even considering more exposure pathways specific in Taiwan area, the resulted annual doses to the general population under normal condition is 0.8763 man-rem and the expected number of annual latent cancer fatalities under accident conditions is only 4.855x10/sup -5/

  19. Radiological impact of the application of phosphogypsum in civil construction: an overview of Brazilian studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Marcia P.; Nisti, Marcelo B.; Maduar, Marcelo F.; Mazzilli, Barbara P., E-mail: mpcampos@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (lPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In the last decades considerable attention has been given to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Within this frame, of particular concern is the phosphate fertilizer industry. In Brazil, four main industries (Ultrafertil, Copebras, Fosfertil and Bunge Fertilizantes) are responsible for the production of 1.2 x 10{sup 6} tons per year of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Phosphogypsum is the byproduct of the phosphoric acid industry, obtained by reacting phosphate rock with sulphuric acid. This waste is stockpiled in the surrounding environment of the facilities at a rate of 5.5 x 10{sup 6} tons per year. The level of radioactivity present in the phosphogypsum, among other impurities, prevents its reuse for a variety of purposes. All the countries that produce phosphate fertilizer by acid wet processing of phosphate rock are facing the same problem of finding solutions for the safe application of phosphogypsum, in order to minimize the impact caused by its disposal. This paper aims to present a review of the research carried out at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, Brazil, focusing in the radiological implications of using Brazilian phosphogypsum as building material: bricks and plaster. The results and conclusions achieved can contribute to the development or national standards and guidelines concerning the safe use and management or phosphogypsum as a building material. (author)

  20. Environmental radiological impact of a Brazilian deactivated Uranium Mine along the period 1999-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to assess the environmental radiological impact (ERI) from the release of wastewaters used by the Mining Industrial Complex at Poços de Caldas (CIPC), today called Ore Treatment Unit (UTM) in Caldas, MG, Brazil, during the period 1999-2009. The effluent waters were analyzed once a week at point 014 (associated with the mine and waste pile 8). Critical radionuclides are 238U, 226Ra, 210Pb, 232Th and 228Ra. The 238U and 232Th were analyzed by spectrophotometry. The 226Ra, 210Pb and 228Ra, in turn, were analyzed by radiochemical separation methods and subsequent radiometry. The dose estimates were based on the model proposed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for a hypothetical critical group associated with the point of effluents release into the river Ribeirao das Antas (point 014). The maximum dose rate allowed by CNEN for release is equal to 0.3 mSv·y-1for individuals of the critical group. Our calculations were performed using the average concentration along the ten years period study. The estimated dose value for the individual of the critical group was 0.12 mSv·y-1. It may be concluded that the reference levels established by CNEN were not reached. This indicates that the treatment of effluents generated by the CIPC/UTM was conducted efficiently, ensuring the safety of the population living in the surroundings of the Ore Processing Unit (UTM) at Caldas. (author)

  1. Environmental impact assessment of a radiological unit of ore processing, at Caldas, MG, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to estimate the radiological impact on the environment (RIE) from the release of water treated by the ore processing unit (UTM) at Caldas, MG, during the years 2005 and 2006. In 2005, the UMT operated 400 tons of monazite in a process to obtain rare earths; during the following year there was no industrial process. The effluent waters were tested once a week for points 014 and 025, and once a month for point 076. The critical radionuclides are U-238, Ra-226, Pb-210, Th-232 and Ra-228. U-238 and Th-232 were analyzed by spectrophotometry. Ra-226, Ra-228 and Pb-210, in turn, were analyzed by chemical separation and radiometric methods. The dose estimates were based on the model proposed by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) to three critical groups established according to the points of release. The calculations were performed using the annual average concentration of activity. The values of the maximum permitted dose rate allowed by CNEN is equal a 0.3 mSv y-1 onto the critical group. In conclusion, we observed that the maximum dose rates, allowed by CNEN, were not reached, being all below 50% of this limit. This indicates that the treatment of water effluents generated by UTM was conducted in an efficient way, ensuring the safety of the population surrounding the venture. (author)

  2. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Narcea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. a.; Corbacho, J. a.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Narcea coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  3. Experienced in Conducting Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) in Oil and Gas Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil and gas industry is a major contributor to the nation economy. Oil sludge and scales produced during production contain enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM).All the oil sludge and scales are temporarily stored at the crude oil terminal premise. Sludge and scales are under the jurisdiction of Department of Environment (DOE) and Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB).AELB has issued a guideline regarding the disposal of sludge and scales as in (LEM/TEK/30, 1996). In this guideline, Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) should be carried out on all proposed disposals and demonstrate that no member of public will be exposed to more than 1 mSv/y. Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) has the expertise and capability to conduct the RIA. Nuclear Malaysia has been conducting RIA for local and international oil and gas companies operated in Malaysia. Recently, AELB has issued code of practice on radiation protection for oil and gas industry (LEM/TEK/58, 2009). In this code of practice, RIA shall be conducted to assess the dose received by a critical group of public as a result of the disposal of oil sludge and scale higher than 3 Bq/g Total Activity Concentration (TAC). For exemption by AELB, the RIA calculated dose shall not exceed 0.3 mSv/y. (author)

  4. Assessment of Natural Radioactivity and its Radiological Impact in Ortum Region in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The earth contains natural background radiations originating from terrestrial and cosmic sources. This study aims at assessing the levels of background radiation in air, soil and water and its associated radiological impact and also determines the elemental concentration of the rocks and soils around Ortum hills and quarry. 100 points will be measured for radioactivity in the air and 40 soil and 10 water samples will be collected for laboratory analysis using both grid and purposive sampling methods. Radioactivity in the field will be determined using the hand held Red Eye and Radiagem radiation survey meters. The levels of naturally occurring radionuclide Uranium-238 (238U), Thorium-232 (232Th) and Potassium-40 (40K) in the soil and rocks will be determined using High Pure Germanium (HPGe) detector; the Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC) will be used for analysis of water samples while the Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (EDXRF) will be used to determine the elemental composition in the rocks and soil. The Residual Radioactivity (RESRAD) program will be used to analyze and assess the doses and risks associated with radiation exposure in Ortum region. (author)

  5. Politics, economics, and the law: Impact on and responses by radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent changes in government regulation and third-party reimbursement, and the rapid development of alternative health care delivery systems, are having large impact on the practice of radiology. In the first half of this course we examine the origins of these changes and evaluate the current and future strategies of the major instigators. Initiatives intended to reduce health care costs will be discussed in the context of their effect on radiologists' access to patients and equipment. Topics will include the regulation of expensive imaging technology and such alternative physician payment mechanisms as MD-DRGs, RAPs, relative value scales, and capitation. Government and third-party payors' efforts to instill market mechanisms to reduce physician costs will also be discussed. The second part of the program will focus on potential responses of radiologists to the changing milieu. Using a case method approach, the authors discuss the benefits and dangers associated with such possibilities as exclusive contracts and entrapreneurial ventures, and how such considerations as liability, fiscal, responsibility for technology, and antitrust legislation impinge on radiologists' decisions

  6. Radiology practice models: the 2008 ACR Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderman, Richard B; Weinreb, Jeffrey C; Van Moore, Arl; Hillman, Bruce J; Neiman, Harvey L; Thrall, James H

    2008-09-01

    The 2008 ACR Forum brought together a diverse group of participants from clinical radiology, radiology leadership and practice management, managed care, economics, law, and entrepreneurship in Washington, DC, in January 2008 to discuss current models of radiology practice and anticipate new ones. It addressed what forces shape the practice of radiology, how these forces are changing, and how radiology practices can most effectively respond to them in the future. PMID:18755435

  7. Socio-economic and other non-radiological impacts of the near surface disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to introduce, in a generic sense, the elements that could comprise a socio-economic and non-radiological environmental impact assessment. The various social, economic and environmental impacts that could be associated with surface and near surface disposal are discussed through factors that could apply at the local, regional or national level. Impact management is also discussed. The report also introduces concepts to help Member States develop their own approaches to undertaking impact assessment and management. The report is intended to complement IAEA documents on the technology and safety aspects of the near surface disposal of radioactive waste. The scope of this report includes a discussion of a range of social, economic and nonradiological environmental impacts relevant to surface and near surface disposal and illustrations of some impact management measures

  8. Radioactive characterization of the main materials involved in the titanium dioxide production process and their environmental radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study about the distribution of several radionuclides from the uranium and the thorium series radionuclides along the production process of a typical NORM industry devoted to the production of titanium dioxide has been performed. With this end the activity concentrations in raw materials, final product, co-products, and wastes of the production process have been determined by both gamma-ray and alpha-particle spectrometry. The main raw material used in the studied process (ilmenite) presents activity concentrations of around 300 Bq kg−1 for Th-series radionuclides and 100 Bq kg−1 for the U-series ones. These radionuclides in the industrial process are distributed in the different steps of the production process according mostly to the chemical behaviour of each radioelement, following different routes. As an example, most of the radium remains associated with the un-dissolved material waste, with activity concentrations around 3 kBq kg−1 of 228Ra and around 1 kBq kg−1 of 226Ra, while the final commercial products (TiO2 pigments and co-products) contain negligible amounts of radioactivity. The obtained results have allowed assessing the possible public radiological impact associated with the use of the products and co-products obtained in this type of industry, as well as the environmental radiological impact associated with the solid residues and liquid generated discharges. -- Highlights: ► The natural radionuclide distribution along the production process of a NORM industry is reported. ► The environmental radiological impact caused by this industry is evaluated. ► The occupational and public radiological impact of this industry can be inferred

  9. A preliminary assessment of the potential post-closure radiological impact of repositories for radioactive wastes located at Elstow, Bedfordshire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report a procedure for the assessment of the post-closure radiological impact of shallow land burial facilities has been illustrated by its application to a potential repository site at Elstow, Bedfordshire. This has involved: definition of a reference inventory; characterisation of the repository and site; assessment of the repository and site; assessment of groundwater pathways for radioactivity; consideration of other routes of exposure, including intrusion, gas evolution and biotic transport; and review of long-term geologic evolution. (author)

  10. A regulatory perspective on the radiological impact of NORM industries: the case of the Spanish phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive and chemical risks coexist in NORM industries although they are usually addressed separately by regulations. The European Union (EU) has developed extensive legislation concerning both matters, which has been diversely reflected in national policies. We consider the case of the Spanish phosphate industry and analyse to which extent regulatory mandates have reduced the historical and ongoing radiological impact on the environment of phosphate facilities. Although no specific radiological constraints on effluent monitoring and release or on waste disposal have yet been imposed on NORM industries in Spain, other environmental regulations have achieved a substantial reduction on the phosphate industry impact. Nevertheless, a more efficient control could be established by eliminating the current conceptual and practical separation of chemical and radioactive risks in NORM industries. We highlight research needs to accomplish so and propose shorter-term measures that require active cooperation among the regulatory bodies involved. - Research highlights: → The radiological impact of the Spanish phosphate industry has substantially decreased as a side result of environmental regulations on chemical pollution.→ A more efficient control of NORM industries could be established by eliminating the current conceptual and practical separation of chemical and radioactive risks.→ Further research is needed on how interactions between radiation and chemicals might affect regulatory limits and on a systematic way to input stakeholder preferences in MCDA.→ On shorter-term, administrative measures that require active cooperation among the regulatory bodies involved can be taken.

  11. Practical impact of the evolution and changes of ICRP recommendations on radiological protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has given recommendations concerning the radiological protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy, as well as of the worker in medicine and dentistry. In spite of these earlier recommendations, the situation in medicine is far from optimal showing a wide distribution of patient doses among various departments and hospitals without any similar variation in diagnostic information. There is a special need to emphasise such areas, which have the potential of high patient dose and/or high risk, e.g. interventional radiography, computed tomography, and paediatric radiology. For medical exposures, ICRP (Publication 60) still indicates that if the practice is justified and the protection optimised, dose limits should not be applied. However, it does recommend the development of reference levels as a quantitative guide to optimisation. Consideration should also be given to potential accidents and intervention. (Author)

  12. Impact of open access endoscopy on early diagnosis, treatment and gastrointestinal radiology service

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari Indrajit; Uddin Wasim; Mazhar Zia

    1997-01-01

    The objective is to compare the endoscopic findings before and after initiation of open access and its effect on gastrointestinal radiology services. The data of endoscopic findings before open access endoscopy (July, 1989-June, 1992) and after open access endoscopy (July, 1992-June, 1995) was collected from the records of the endoscopy unit. Similarly, data of barium meals for the same periods was collected from the radiology department. An X 2 test was used to compare the endoscopic findi...

  13. Radiological Impacts and Regulation of Rare Earth Elements in Non-Nuclear Energy Production

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy Ault; Steven Krahn; Allen Croff

    2015-01-01

    Energy industries account for a significant portion of total rare earth usage, both in the US and worldwide. Rare earth minerals are frequently collocated with naturally occurring radioactive material, imparting an occupational radiological dose during recovery. This paper explores the extent to which rare earths are used by various non-nuclear energy industries and estimates the radiological dose which can be attributed to these industries on absolute and normalized scales. It was determined...

  14. Environmental radiological impact of a Brazilian deactivated Uranium Mine along the period 1999-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S., E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (FCN/GMR/INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica de Combustivel Nuclear. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, A., E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Silva, A.X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Corrdenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to assess the environmental radiological impact (ERI) from the release of wastewaters used by the Mining Industrial Complex at Poços de Caldas (CIPC), today called Ore Treatment Unit (UTM) in Caldas, MG, Brazil, during the period 1999-2009. The effluent waters were analyzed once a week at point 014 (associated with the mine and waste pile 8). Critical radionuclides are {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Ra. The {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th were analyzed by spectrophotometry. The {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 228}Ra, in turn, were analyzed by radiochemical separation methods and subsequent radiometry. The dose estimates were based on the model proposed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for a hypothetical critical group associated with the point of effluents release into the river Ribeirao das Antas (point 014). The maximum dose rate allowed by CNEN for release is equal to 0.3 mSv·y{sup -1}for individuals of the critical group. Our calculations were performed using the average concentration along the ten years period study. The estimated dose value for the individual of the critical group was 0.12 mSv·y{sup -1}. It may be concluded that the reference levels established by CNEN were not reached. This indicates that the treatment of effluents generated by the CIPC/UTM was conducted efficiently, ensuring the safety of the population living in the surroundings of the Ore Processing Unit (UTM) at Caldas. (author)

  15. Radiological considerations regarding an alternate method for the placement of intermediate impact absorbers at the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents radiological considerations arising from the proposed implementation of an alternate method for intermediate impact absorber placement at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). These considerations include revising the dose rate estimate, at deck level over an open storage tube and outlining the administrative controls necessary for this implementation. Currently, the MCO Handling Machine (MHM) is used to install the intermediate impact absorbers. The proposed alternative would utilize a mobile crane, thus freeing up the MHM to handle the movement of MCOs within the CSB

  16. Palatable Meal Anticipation in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Patton, Danica; Mistlberger, Ralph; Hsu, Cynthia; Steele, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The ability to sense time and anticipate events is a critical skill in nature. Most efforts to understand the neural and molecular mechanisms of anticipatory behavior in rodents rely on daily restricted food access, which induces a robust increase of locomotor activity in anticipation of daily meal time. Interestingly, rats also show increased activity in anticipation of a daily palatable meal even when they have an ample food supply, suggesting a role for brain reward systems in anticipatory...

  17. Prediction of tritium behavior in the atmosphere and assessment of radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a computer program ATDC (Atmospheric Tritium Dispersion Code) to predict downwind tritium air concentrations in the environment around nuclear power plants on the basis of the Gaussian plume model. The tritium air concentrations by field measurement (measured tritium air concentrations in the areas adjacent to Wolsong Unit 1, a pressurized heavy water reactor ; PHWR) were compared with that by calculation to validate the program. The predicted and measured atmospheric tritium concentrations were quite consistent in trend and magnitude. This computer program will be useful in reviewing and evaluating environmental radiological impacts for PHWRs. Especially, it will be of great help to predict the behavior of tritium in the atmospheric environment around nuclear power plants. We also have studied the distribution of environmental tritium and the correlation coefficients between tritium concentrations in several environmental samples and the emissions of tritiated water vapor from Wolsong Unit 1. The annual mean concentration of atmospheric HTO were in the range of 1.31 ∼ 29.2 Bq/m3 and the long-term atmospheric dilution factors were in the range of 10-7 ∼ 10-6 s/m3. Annual mean concentrations of tritium in groundwater were in the range of 19.2 ∼ 27.9 Bq/liter at N-1 and 64.1 ∼ 189 Bq/liter at S-2, and were generally less than 0.2 % of MPCw (222 kBq/liter). The concentrations of tritium in precipitations exponentially decreased with the distance from Wolsong Unit 1, falling to current global levels at about 25 km off-site. The highest concentration of tritium in soil moisture was observed in May and June, when the relative humidity was high. The concentrations of tritium in soil moisture were higher than those in precipitations. The results obtained in this work can be used as valuable baseline data for tritium levels around Wolsong site, and would be eventually useful to assess any environmental impact of tritium released from Wolsong Unit 2

  18. An assessment of the radiological impact of sea-dumping at the North East Atlantic dump site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the models and methodology developed for the assessment of the radiological impact of disposal of low and intermediate level waste on the seabed. The development of the waste package model and the combined model of radionuclide dispersion and interactions with sediments in the world's ocean is outlined. This integrated set of models was used for the radiological assessment of sea dumping at the North-East Atlantic site, which formed part of the recent NEA review of the continued suitability of this site. The predicted radiation doses to man are presented, together with the results of the analysis of the sensitivity of the annual individual doses to critical groups to variations in model parameters. (author)

  19. Potential radiological impacts of recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid. Final report to the Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made to determine the radiological impacts associated with recovery of uranium from wet-process (WP) phosphoric acid in central Florida. Removal of U and other radionuclides from phosphoric acid prevents their distribution on farm lands and urban gardens and grasses via fertilizers; this results in a positive impact (decreased dose commitment) on the associated populations. This study considers the potential negative impacts of current and project recovery processes in a site-specific manner using detailed state-of-the-art methodologies. Positive impacts are treated in a generic sense using U.S. average values for important variables such as average and maximum fertilizer application rates and quantities of radionuclides in fertilizer. Three model plants to recover U from WP phosphoric acid were selected and source terms for release of radionuclides are developed for all three and for two treatment methods for airborne particulates. Costs for radwaste treatment were developed. Field measurements were conducted at the only commercial uranium recovery plant in operation. Radiological doses to the population surrounding release points during plant operation were estimated

  20. Criteria and actions facing a radiological environmental contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to improve the management of the radiological risk due to an environmental contamination is presented. The experience gained in emergency response has clearly demonstrated the importance to have an efficient emergency system including planning, procedures and operational internally consistent criteria. The lack of these components in the emergency system could lead to important radiological and non radiological consequences. The setting of internationally agreed criteria and guides is very important in the anticipated emergency response plan. The paper firstly reviews the approaches proposed by international recommendations and norms. From this review, a substantial coincidence on the basic principles is stated, in spite of small differences in its formulation. Also, a need for harmonization is endorsed. So, generic levels, in terms of imparted dose or avoided dose due to intervention, and, in some cases, derived levels, in terms of activity concentration, are proposed. Numerical values for emergency actions are also identified. The second part deals with the adaptation of the existing prediction and decision systems to the above radiological criteria. Relations among deposition, activity concentrations and annual doses for different scenarios, exposure pathways and age groups are established. Also, the sensibility of the radiological impact against different characteristics of the intervention scenarios is stated. This makes easy to assess the radiological significance of different contamination situations by comparison to the existing action generic levels. Furthermore, the radiological impact can be numerically incorporated in a decision system which includes non radiological aspects of the applicable intervention options. Agricultural, urban and mixed scenarios are presented and solved for a 137Cs contamination. The results can be further used to develop a methodology guide for setting action generic levels in post-accidental interventions and other

  1. Radiological impact associated to the use of phosphogypsum in crops cultivated at the Cerrado region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a by-product of the 'wet process', whereby sulfuric acid is reacted with phosphate rock to produce phosphoric acid. The Brazilian production of this material is around 12 million of tons per year which is stacked in piles at the same place where it is produced. Researches accomplished in several countries worldwide have demonstrated the potential use of PG in agriculture not only as a source for calcium and sulfur, but also as a conditioner for soils that contain high levels of aluminum. In Brazil, these studies are mainly focused on the application of phosphogypsum to the Cerrado region, the main agriculture region of the country. Taking into account the presence of natural radionuclides in this material and the fact that the mobility and bioaccumulation of these elements can vary significantly with changes in climate, a research project has been conducted in a partnership with the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the Soil Department of Vicosa Federal University in order to investigate the radiological impact of using phosphogypsum in crops cultivated in Cerrado soils. For this purpose a set of greenhouse experiments have been conducted in two types of soil (one clayey and other sandy loam textured) to determine the transfer factor of natural radionuclides (238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra and 210Pb) from soil to crops (lettuce, corn and soybean) and drainage waters. This paper aims to report preliminary results of the study, including the chemical, physical and mineralogical characterization of the soil samples, and radioactivity concentration in both the applied PG and soil samples. The measurement of 232Th concentration has been carried out by neutron activation analysis, 238U by delayed neutron counting technique, 226Ra, 228Ra and 210Pb by the method of radiochemical separation. The mean activity concentrations of 226Ra (240 Bq.kg-1) and 228Ra (224 Bq.kg-1) in PG were below the maximum level recommended by CNEN which is 1000 Bq

  2. Radiological impact assessment of the 226-Ra in phosphogypsum wastes used as amendment in agriculture soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphate fertilizer industry produces an important amount of Phosphogypsum (PG) as a residue of its activity. It is well known that such wastes contain significant amounts of natural radionuclides from the U, Th and K series. The raw material for the production (phosphate rock) has uranium activity concentrations of around 1 kBq kg-1 from which about 15% passes to the PG. At the Huelva industrial area (SW Spain) the wastes produced per year can reach some 3x106 Mg, but in spite of the recent scientific efforts its accumulation still being a problem of great concern for the area. In the other hand, reclamation of sodic soils for agricultural uses requires a Ca amendment to diminish Na saturation. Then, PG (with a high proportion of CaSO4·2H2O) is an effective amendment that has been widely used in the saline-sodic marsh soils from SW Spain. Using PG as an amendment dilutes the radionuclides down to background levels, becoming this practice a possible way to eliminate these wastes with a considerable additional value for the agricultural process. However, it is necessary to study the amount of radioisotopes that can move to water and plants to ensure the radiological safety of the amendment. PG has relatively high concentrations of 226Ra and other radionuclides, with an special concern due to the 222Rn emissions. These wastes could be used to improve the fertility of agriculture soils in a large former marsh area of the Guadalquivir river. Thus, it is interesting to study the levels and behaviour of natural radionuclides within this system to evaluate the radioactive impact of this amendment. An agronomical test is being conducted by one of the authors in an experimental farm in Lebrija (Seville). The soils are treated with 13 and 26 t ha-1 of PG, 30 t ha-1 of manure. Each treatment was repeated twice and continued for two years with beetroot and cotton plant production. We are measuring 226Ra (by alpha counting and gamma spectrometry) and U isotopes (by alpha

  3. Radionuclide activities and radiological impact from the intake of milk, wheat flour, tea and coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-text: The annual intake of four naturally occurring radionuclides 226Ra, 238U, 232Th and 40K from powdered milk, wheat flour, tea and coffee for Malaysian population were estimated using gamma spectrometry system. The radionuclides annual intake of 226Ra ranged from 6 to 35.7 Bq, 232Th ranged from 7.6 to 57.7 Bq, 238U ranged from 6.3 to 63.7 Bq and 40K ranged from 771.8 to 1707.5 Bq for adults. The means of these intakes were 28.8 Bq for 226Ra, 38.5 Bq for 232Th, 28.1 Bq for 238U and 2921.1 Bq for the 40K. The annual intake of radionuclide for infants were found to be 66.2 Bq for 226Ra, 71.6 Bq for 232Th, 23 Bq for 238U and 7774.8 Bq for 40K. the annual internal dose for infants from the intake of powdered milk were 63.5 μSv for 226Ra, 32.2 μSv for 232Th, 2.8 μSv for 238U and 326.5 μSv for 40K. The measured values also gives annual internal dose of 13.7 μSv 226Ra, 19 μSv for 232Th, 4 μSv for 238U and 24.2 μSv for 40K for adult population. The net radiological impact of these radionuclides is 425 μSv for infants and 60.9 μSv for adults. This value gives cancer risk factor of 1.8 x 10-3 for infants and 1.7 x 10-4 for adults. The probability of cancer risk increment is estimated as 0.18 % for infants (18 person in 10000) and 0.017 % for adults (1.7 person in 10000). Whereas ICRP cancer risk factor for general public is 2.5 x 10-3 nd the total risk involved from all natural radiation sources based on global average radiation dose of 2.4 mSv is of 6 x 10-3. The estimated cancer risk shows that probability of increase of cancer risk from intake of milk, wheat flour, tea and coffee is only a minor fraction of ICRP values. Therefore, the diet does not pose any significant health hazard and is considered safe for human consumption. (author)

  4. The application of an environmental radiological impact integrated evaluation system in emergency situations for the radiological exposure evaluation of urban areas population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated computational system for environmental radiological impact assessment in emergency situations has been developed at IRD/CNEN. This system has been used, in this paper, to assess the exposure to members of the public, in a urban area, after the release to the environment of radionuclides that may be relevant after a severe nuclear accident with a PWR reactor. Doses were calculated, for the short and long terms, for the radionuclides 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 129 I, 131 I, 133 I, 89 Sr, 90 Sr, 103 Ru and 106 Ru. The study also simulates the application of some protective measures aiming the estimate of dose reduction, taking into account the moment of their implementation. The starting point for the simulation is the activity deposited on the ground and on urban surfaces and includes the ingestion of home grown products, such as green vegetables, legumes and chicken. This paper is part of a program to derive tools for planning of emergency attendance, taking into account the present knowledge about the fate of radionuclides delivered to the environment, based on estimates of exposure, for the protection of population in tropical climate environments. (author)

  5. The impact of European research ethics legislation on UK radiology research activity: a bibliometric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, C.A. [Norwich Radiology Academy, Norwich (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Catherine.johnson@nnuh.nhs.uk; Toms, A.P. [Norwich Radiology Academy, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    Aim: To determine whether there is evidence of a reduction in radiology research activity in the UK following the implementation of the European research ethics legislation, which came in to force in 2001 and has been widely criticised as an impediment to research. Materials and methods: A bibliometric analysis was performed by searching PubMed for all first-author publications from UK departments of 'radiology' or 'medical imaging' between 1995 and 2007. Results were subcategorized into those papers published in the highest cited general radiology journals and by publication type: original research, reviews, and case reports. Results: From 1995 to 2007 the total number of publications rose by 6.5% from 137 to 146 with the increase occurring in non-general radiology journals. Original articles fell from 18 in 1995 to 12 in 2003, but then rose to 24 by 2007 (33% rise). This dip was paralleled by a fall and then recovery in case report publications. The most dramatic change has been in the number of review articles, which has increased more than eightfold from seven in 1995 to 65 in 2007 to become the most common form of publication. Conclusion: The overall number of original scientific articles, published by first-author UK radiologists, has increased slightly over the last 12 years despite a temporary fall associated with the introduction of new research ethics legislation.

  6. Assessing the impact of a radiology information management system in the emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Regina O.; Langlotz, Curtis P.; Lowe, Robert A.; Horii, Steven C.; Abbuhl, Stephanie B.; Kundel, Harold L.

    1998-07-01

    To evaluate a conventional radiology image management system, by investigating information accuracy, and information delivery. To discuss the customization of a picture archival and communication system (PACS), integrated radiology information system (RIS) and hospital information system (HIS) to a high volume emergency department (ED). Materials and Methods: Two data collection periods were completed. After the first data collection period, a change in work rules was implemented to improve the quality of data in the image headers. Data from the RIS, the ED information system, and the HIS as well as observed time motion data were collected for patients admitted to the ED. Data accuracy, patient waiting times, and radiology exam information delivery were compared. Results: The percentage of examinations scheduled in the RIS by the technologists increased from 0% (0 of 213) during the first period to 14% (44 of 317) during the second (p less than 0.001). The percentage of images missing identification numbers decreased from 36% (98 of 272) during the first data collection period to 10% (56 of 562) during the second period (p less than 0.001). Conclusions: Radiologic services in a high-volume ED, requiring rapid service, present important challenges to a PACS system. Strategies can be implemented to improve accuracy and completeness of the data in PACS image headers in such an environment.

  7. The impact of European research ethics legislation on UK radiology research activity: a bibliometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine whether there is evidence of a reduction in radiology research activity in the UK following the implementation of the European research ethics legislation, which came in to force in 2001 and has been widely criticised as an impediment to research. Materials and methods: A bibliometric analysis was performed by searching PubMed for all first-author publications from UK departments of 'radiology' or 'medical imaging' between 1995 and 2007. Results were subcategorized into those papers published in the highest cited general radiology journals and by publication type: original research, reviews, and case reports. Results: From 1995 to 2007 the total number of publications rose by 6.5% from 137 to 146 with the increase occurring in non-general radiology journals. Original articles fell from 18 in 1995 to 12 in 2003, but then rose to 24 by 2007 (33% rise). This dip was paralleled by a fall and then recovery in case report publications. The most dramatic change has been in the number of review articles, which has increased more than eightfold from seven in 1995 to 65 in 2007 to become the most common form of publication. Conclusion: The overall number of original scientific articles, published by first-author UK radiologists, has increased slightly over the last 12 years despite a temporary fall associated with the introduction of new research ethics legislation.

  8. Dose survey in Moroccan pediatric university hospitals: Impact of a preliminary work in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The quality control in radiology and standardization of radiological practices represent key factors for optimization of patient dose and radiation protection. In this context, work done by our team has shown that simple and achievable initiatives can be applied to optimize radiological procedures and subsequent dose reduction. Application of suggestions proposed in the light of this work and discussed with the concerned persons in the hospitals, is in progress. Preliminary results already show that it is possible to evolve, with the mutual efforts of research team members and professionals to establish a system of quality control in radiology departments in our Country. The preliminary study has been conducted in Moroccan university hospitals. Work consists on realisation of control quality procedures for evaluation of viewing boxes and developers. Evaluation of patient dose has been also considered which a part of results concerning children has been submitted to an International Journal and part concerning adults is being prepared for submission. Results show that: The major part of viewing boxes presents deficient box luminance and they are very inhomogeneous. Some simple and cheap actions can be introduced in the radiology departments such as bulbs replacement, cleaning and painting the inner surface of the viewing boxes with brilliant ink in order to help light diffusion inside the box. It should also be remembered that the fluorescent bulbs decrease their intensity at the rate of 20 % a year and should therefore be replaced annually to keep a good luminance performance. From the evaluation of processing speed study, it can be seen that 50 % of processors present under-development and 50 % are working within the limits. Under-development may cause an increase in the dose imparted to the patient since to obtain the proper optical density and film blackening, more radiations is needed. This is generally achieved by increasing the radiographic

  9. Qualitative evaluation of environmental radiological impact in a phosphate associated uranium conventional mine: Santa Quiteria Project, CE, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to identify and evaluate qualitatively the main potential sources of mineral and installation terms of Santa Quiteria, CE, Brazil, evaluating their possible impacts on the environment. The key terms sources in the production of phosphoric acid are usually: the dig of the mines, tailings dams and phospho plaster stack. Thus, this work intends to inform the academic community about this issue, as well as the population in general and also, acting proactively in order to warn about the possible environmental impacts, so that actions to compensate, minimize or avoid these radiological impacts on the environment, can be included in the planning of the industrial mineral project of Santa Quiteria (author)

  10. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 8. Cost and radiological impact associated with near-surface disposal of reactor waste (Spanish concept)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the determination of the cost and the radiological impact associated with a near-surface disposal site (Spanish concept) for low and medium-level radioactive waste generated during operation of a 20 GWe nuclear park composed of LWRs for 30 years. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  11. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 7. Cost and radiological impact associated with near-surface disposal of reactor waste (French concept)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the determination of the cost and the radiological impact associated with a near-surface disposal site (French concept) for low and medium-level radioactive waste generated during operation of a 20 GWe nuclear park composed of LWRs for 30 years. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management routes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  12. Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-mill tailings at an inactive site near Shiprock, New Mexico, contain an estimated 950 curies (Ci) of 226Ra together with its radioactive daughters. A radiological survey was conducted at this site in February 1976. Decontamination work and tailings stabilization performed at the site since that time have greatly changed conditions there and little effort was applied to quantification of potential health effects in comparison to the earlier consideration of the site at Salt Lake City. The present report delineates the radiological conditions that existed at the time of the survey including information on the surface and below-surface distribution of 226Ra. The data presented support the conclusion that diffusion of radon and inhalation of radon daughters is the principal mode of exposure of offsite population groups

  13. Impact of ICRP 117 recommendations in the operational protection of vascular radiology unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper lists and discusses the results obtained in the teams of the different specialties: traumatology, gastroenterology, hemodynamics, vascular radiology and neurosurgery at different care centres with various care portfolios and notable differences of technical resources. The results show a noticeable difference between the equipment used in gastroenterology, vascular radiology and hemodynamic reference services with other services and disciplines. Taking into account the recent 117 of ICRP publication it has been initiated a procedure for the estimation of dose of foot and ankle of the vascular radiologists and in crystalline. This paper shows the results obtained as well as the correlations between the mentioned area dose and values of dose of lapel, wrist, ankles and crystalline of the professionals

  14. Simulation supported training in oral radiology : methods and impact on interpretative skill

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Tore

    2007-01-01

    Simulation is an important tool when training is hazardous, time consuming, or expensive. Simulation can also be used to enhance reality by adding features normally not available in the real world. The aim with this work has been to develop and evaluate methods that could improve learning in oral radiology utilising a radiation-free simulator environment. Virtual reality software for radiographic examinations was developed. The virtual environment consisted of a model of a patient, an x-ray m...

  15. Methodology used by the spanish nuclear regulatory body in the radiological impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological risk assessment derived from the operation of a nuclear power plant is done in Spain with methods taken basically from the U.S.N.R.C. regulatory guides. This report presents the way followed by the Spanish Regulatory Body in order to arrive to an official decision on the acceptability of a nuclear plant in the different steps of the licensing. (author)

  16. Radiological impact of applying phosphogypsum to tilled land cropped to annual ryegrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of phosphoric acid by acidulation of rock phosphate with sulfuric acid produces phosphogypsum (PG) as a byproduct. Phosphogypsum is primarily CaSO4.2H2O and is a potential source of S and Ca for crops. Because of the presence of small amounts of 226Ra, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has imposed severe restrictions on the use of PG. The objective of the study was to evaluate the radiological impact of applying phosphogypsum to tilled land. The experimental land spanned over two soils (Myakka-sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Aeric Haplaquods and Pomona-sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Ultic Haplaquods) tilled and cropped to annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) for 3 crop-years. The PG with 792 226Ra, 836 210Pb, and 744 210Po Bq kg-1 was applied all at once at the start of the study at 2 and 4 Mg ha-1, with no PG as control, and harrowed into the top 15-cm layer of the soil. This layer initially contained 15.9, 28.1, and 14.1 Bq kg-1 of 226Ra, 210Pb, and 210Po, respectively. The 4 Mg PG ha-1 would have increased the initial soil 226Ra and 210Po by 9% each and 210Pb by 5%, assuming a soil bulk density of 1500 kg m-3. The results, averaged over crop-year and over the 3-crop-year period, showed no measurable increases in 226Ra, 210Pb, or 210Po in soil down to 90 cm sampled in layers of 15 cm, in groundwater sampled at 90 to 120 cm depth, in regrowth and mature forages, and in gamma radiation and airborne 222Rn both measured 1 m above the plots. However, 222Rn flux measured at the soil surface increased by 0.74 x 10-4 Bq m-2 s-1 per Mg PG ha-1. Thus, yearly application of 0.675 Mg ha-1 (upper level of annual application rates for gypsum as S or Ca source for crops) over a 100-year period of PG used in the study could increase 222Rn flux from the experimental land from 8.14 X 10-4 to 58.09 x 10-4 Bq m-2 s-1 at the end of said period, assuming no loss of 226Ra, the source of 222Rn in soil and PG. This 100-year-end value, however, would still

  17. Generic environmental impact statement in support of rulemaking on radiological criteria for license termination of NRC-licensed nuclear facilities. Final report, main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action being considered in this Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) is an amendment to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR Part 20 to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. Under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), all Federal agencies must consider the effect of their actions on the environment. To fulfill NRC's responsibilities under NEPA, the Commission is preparing this GEIS which analyzes alternative courses of action and the costs and impacts associated with those alternatives. In preparing the final GEIS, the following approach was taken: (1) a listing was developed of regulatory alternatives for establishing radiological criteria for decommissioning; (2) for each alternative, a detailed analysis and comparison of incremental impacts, both radiological and nonradiological, to workers, members of the public, and the environment, and costs, were performed; and (3) based on the analysis of impacts and costs, conclusions on radiological criteria for decommissioning were provided. Contained in the GEIS are results and conclusions related to achieving, as an objective of decommissioning ALARA, reduction to preexisting background, the radiological criterion for unrestricted use, decommissioning ALARA analysis for soils and structures containing contamination, restricted use and alternative analysis for special site specific situations, and groundwater cleanup. In its analyses, the final GEIS includes consideration of comments made on the draft GEIS during the public comment period

  18. The impact of education on occupational radiation exposure reduction in a diagnostic radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patient load, number of radiographic exams, complexity of some exams, and associated potential occupational radiation exposure of medical personnel have increased significantly in the past decade. Efforts to reduce exposure through employee education and awareness have resulted in significant reduction in occupational exposure for most diagnostic radiographic areas at Mayo Clinic. This paper reviews trends in occupational radiation exposure from diagnostic x- rays at Mayo Clinic over the past ten years. Changes in employee radiation dose equivalents are correlated with patient workload, complexity of exams, increased interventional radiology and cardiology, and efforts to reduce employee radiation exposure

  19. Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Grand Junction, Colorado, made in May and June 1976, are presented along with descriptions of techniques and equipment used to obtain the data and an assessment of increased risk of health effects attributable to radiation and radionuclides from the tailings. An estimate of potential health effects of exposure to gamma rays around a former mill building and to radon daughters produced by radon dispersed from the tailings has been made for occupants of the site

  20. Scenarios of radiological impacts in the long-term safety analysis of radioactive waste disposal at the Vector Site located in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Ukraine, at the Vector site in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, it is planned to dispose of large amounts of radioactive wastes, including those of Chernobyl origin, containing transuranium elements. The paper analyzes the main possible scenarios of radiological impacts of the Vector site for a long-term period after expiration of its active administrative control taking into account location of the Vector site in the exclusion zone. In the paper, assessment of total activities that can be disposed of on site is demonstrated, based on non-exceeding of admissible radiological impacts. (orig.)

  1. Scenarios of radiological impacts in the long-term safety analysis of radioactive waste disposal at the Vector Site located in the Chernobyl exclusion zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybalka, N.; Mykolaichuk, O. [State Nuclear Regulatory Inspectorate of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Alekseeva, Z.; Kondratiev, S.; Nikolaev, E. [State Scientific and Technical Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    In Ukraine, at the Vector site in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, it is planned to dispose of large amounts of radioactive wastes, including those of Chernobyl origin, containing transuranium elements. The paper analyzes the main possible scenarios of radiological impacts of the Vector site for a long-term period after expiration of its active administrative control taking into account location of the Vector site in the exclusion zone. In the paper, assessment of total activities that can be disposed of on site is demonstrated, based on non-exceeding of admissible radiological impacts. (orig.)

  2. Evidence for variation in human radiosensitivity and its potential impact on radiological protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffler, S D

    2016-06-01

    Radiological protection standards generally assume that all members of the population are equally sensitive to the adverse health effects associated with radiation exposure, recognising the age- and sex-related differences in sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer. It has become very clear over recent years that genetic and lifestyle factors can play important roles in the susceptibility of individuals to a range of diseases; as such, the same may apply to radiation-associated diseases. Evidence is accumulating from studies at many levels of biological organisation - cells, experimental organisms, and humans - that a range of radiosensitivity exists between individuals in the population. Consideration of improvements in radiological protection practices to take account of such differences will require the availability of robust and accurate ways to assess the sensitivity of an individual or population subgroup. In addition, there will need to be careful consideration of the ethical aspects relating to use of individual sensitivity information. These ethical considerations are very likely to be exposure context dependent, and require careful risk-benefit balance consideration before practical application. PMID:26956676

  3. The impact of extended radiology attending coverage in a children's hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. In order to achieve more 'timely' interpretation of radiologic examinations, a 3 to 11 p.m. attending radiologist slot was incorporated into the daily schedule utilizing existing staff. Our purpose was to assess the effectiveness of this practice by measuring report generation times. Material and methods. Using a radiology information system (DecRAD), the time between completion of the technical examination and dictation of the official report for general (plain film) studies was determined for a 2-month period and compared to similar periods 1 and 2 years prior to instituting extended hours. Emergency and portable (ICU) exams were similarly analyzed. Results. The number of examinations reported within 2 h of technical completion increased by 8.5% (mean); reporting within 4 h increased by 20%; reporting within 6 and 12 h of completion each increased by 24%. Over 80% of cases were dictated within 12 h after the change in practice occurred; whereas, it took up to 24 h in preceding years. Analysis of emergency and portable ICU exams showed similar trends, and the number of next day 'call-backs' to the emergency department was significantly reduced. (orig.)

  4. Does knowledge matter? The public's radiological knowledge and how this might affect their response in a radiological emergency event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public knowledge of radiological materials and the risks associated with them is often inaccurate and commonly distorted. With media on-hand there is always a supply of catastrophic images and reports of 'disasters' and 'cover-ups' from the past ready to be brought to bear on the current issue of interest. Against this backdrop misperceptions, distrust of authorities, and deep-rooted fears persist. Attempts to educate and inform the public are often met with apathy, disinterest, or even suspicion by some. With these external influences in play it is interesting to wonder what the public really does think, believe, or know about radiation, radioactivity, and its health impacts. Is it as bad as we might be led to believe? For those involved in issues of security, health, and public safety it is, perhaps, more a question of 'Does this actually matter (in the context of what I need to do)? or 'How will this affect what the public does in an emergency?' This presentation will draw on data from three research projects conducted from 2008-201]. All were undertaken to help inform those interested in the public's response to radiological emergency events; accidental or deliberate. The first research project, conducted as a pilot study (n=324) investigated Sydneysiders' knowledge of radiation and radiological materials; and included a 17-item knowledge test. This study also investigated anticipated responses to a radiological emergency event, risk perceptions, and attitudes. The second study (n=2800) was conducted earlier this year, in the context radiological terrorism, and also included information on likely responses of the general population but had a more modest knowledge component. The third study is currently underway and will involve focus groups with the Sydney public in June 2011 (n=64-80). The focus group study will include more in depth investigation of the public's anticipated response to a radiological terrorism event and factors that might influence their

  5. Radiological clerkships as a critical curriculum component in radiology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore the perceived value of clinical clerkships in the radiology curriculum as well as the impact of radiology clerkship on students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole and as a career. Methods: This study is a sequel to a previous survey in which student perceptions about radiology curriculum components were investigated. The present study focuses on a further analysis of a subsection in this study, based on 14 statements about radiology clerkship and two statements about radiology as a career. Results: Perceived usefulness of the aspects of radiology clerkship as 'radiology examination', 'skills development' and 'diagnosis focus' were awarded the highest scores. The predict value of the subscale 'radiology examination' on the level of performance was very high (adjusted R2 = 0.19, p < .001). Conclusion: Students expressed highly favorable evaluation of clerkship as a learning environment to learn to order and to interpret imaging studies as well as an unique possibility to attend various radiological examinations and to access to specific radiology software systems, as well as to get a better view on radiology and to improve image interpretation skills. This positive attitude towards clerkship is closely tied to students' beliefs about the profession of radiology as a whole. These aspects of dedicated radiology clerkship are crucial for effective and high-quality education as well as for the choice of radiology as a career.

  6. An assessment of the radiological impact of brachytherapy application in Metro Manila hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important uses of radioactive sources in medicine is the application of brachytherapy technology. Brachytherapy is a method of radiation therapy where an encapsulated radioactive source delivers gamma or beta radiation into a tumor site. The paper describes different categories of brachytherapy applications involving manual insertion or afterloading and remote afterloading techniques. A list of five hospitals in Metro Manila practicing different techniques of brachytherapy are enumerated. Because of the widespread uses of radioactive sources in brachytherapy technology in medicine, inadequate control in its use had led to a number of incidents resulting to unnecessary exposure of radiation workers, patients and general public. This study was initiated to determine the radilogical hazards involved in brachytherapy applications. It presents contingency scenarios and their projected radiological consequences. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs

  7. The impact of regulatory control on monitoring of pregnant hospital staff in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended the introduction of a supplementary dose limit for pregnant staff so that the foetus was adequately protected. This dose limit was framed in terms of an abdomen surface dose of 2 mSv for the duration of the pregnancy, once it had been declared. The philosophical basis underlying this supplementary dose limit was the desire to treat the foetus as a member of the public in respect of the occupational exposure of the mother. In the Basic Safety Standards, the International Atomic Energy Agency endorsed the need to limit the foetal dose, but in this document the dose limit refers to the foetus. The introduction of dose limits for foetal exposure to radiation has significant implications for hospitals as many workers are women of child bearing age. The practical implications of this dose limit will be discussed as well as suggested monitoring arrangements. (author)

  8. Assessment of the radiological impact of disposal of low and intermediate level wastes on the seabed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes progress in the development of models for use in a radiological assessment of the disposal of low and intermediate level waste on the ocean floor. In particular the report describes the waste package model, the ocean dispersion model and the sedimentation model. Five types of waste package have been identified and models have been developed for them. A flow pattern for the Atlantic Ocean has been derived from the existing distribution of temperature and salinity in the Atlantic Ocean. However a number of discrepancies between the calculated and predicted pattern were found; the model has been extended to include all the world's oceans to correct this. The sedimentation model describes two types of scavenging particles in the water column, a well mixed benthic boundary layer and the top two metres of the bed sediments. Good agreement with the GESAMP ocean model results has been found. (author)

  9. Radiological impact of low level solid radioactive waste disposed of with ordinary hospital refuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the measurement of radioactivity contained in cardboard boxes used to store hospital refuse was developed, testing its reliability with sources of known activity and geometry. The method was applied to a random sample of about 2000 boxes taken from those which are not considered to contain radioactive material and are disposed of without checks, in order to evaluate the amount of activity which is released into the environment. It was found that it is about 0.06% of the total activity administered to patients. Radiation protection quantities were calculated on this basis, showing that the radiological effect is small, not requiring routine analysis of all waste boxes produced in the hospital, but suggesting that measurements on a random sample are advisable to monitor the process. (Author)

  10. The radiological impact of agricultural activities in an area of high natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pocos de Caldas Plateau, Brazil, with 70 radioactive anomalies is used for cattle, pigs and poultry production and for raising crops like potatoes, corn, brown beans and carrots. Data on the radioactivity concentration of natural radionuclides in air, soil, animal products, vegetables, water, sediment, external dose rates, and outdoor and indoor radon were used together with socio-economical information to estimate the radiological exposure from these agricultural activities in this high natural radioactivity area for the local rural and remote populations. For the local population agricultural products from the plateau contribute only relatively little (ca. 0.14-0.24 mSv.y-1) to the high radiation exposure (ca. 6-16 mSv.y-1) from external exposure and inhalation of radon and thoron daughters. However, the agricultural products carry a significant annual collective dose (ca. 14 man.Sv.y-1) to remote populations. (author)

  11. Radiological and environmental impact of amang, a TENORM industry in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The processing of amang, a by-product of tin mining industry has been going on in Malaysia for a very long time. The process of extracting valuable minerals from amang has resulted in the production of Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Material (TENORM). Radiological studies conducted on amang workers have shown that they have a higher risk of being exposed to ionising radiation. Chromosomal aberration studies have shown that there is a significant increase of dicentrics among amang workers compared to the control. Processed and unprocessed amang also showed cytotoxic and cytogenetic properties on plants. Waters of ponds from neighbouring amang plants have been shown to be very acidic and together with other changes in the water quality of the pond have contributed to some cytotoxic and mutagenic changes in plant

  12. Estech General Chemicals Corporation, Duette Mine, Manatee County, Florida. Resource document: radiological environment. Draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The site is unaltered except for agricultural uses and the baseline radiological condition can be readily measured. The mining to the northeast in the west central Florida phosphate area has been extensively studied and can serve as a point of reference for the proposed site. The document describes the background condition of the natural radiation environment in the absence of the proposed mining facilities. The only radionuclides having potential for significant impact are those of the uranium-238 decay series. The relative importance of the thorium-232 series are addressed. The discussion centers upon the natural and disturbed condition of uranium-238 series radionuclides. Specific items to be covered include uranium associated with the phosphate, the uranium series including radium-226 and radon-222, radon progeny, terrestrial gamma radiation, airborne radioactivity, subsurface profiles of radioactivity, radium-226 in surface waters, and radium-226 in groundwaters

  13. Preliminary assessment of the radiological impact for individual waste management areas at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study estimates the radiological impact (i.e., the potential doses) for individual waste management areas at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ranks the areas for remedial action based on the off-site doses that result from these discharges to White Oak Creek. Dose estimates are given for the drinking water pathway based on known discharges from White Oak Dam. Estimates are also made of doses for eating fish caught in the Clinch River near the confluence with White Oak Creek. The results of a search for data concerning the discharges of 90Sr, 3H, 137Cs, and 60Co from individual waste management areas are presented. A qualitative assessment is presented, and areas are ranked for remedial investigation based on the available information. 29 refs., 8 figs., 45 tabs

  14. Nuclear and energies nr 57. Japan, another glance. The environmental and radiological impact. The international impact. The illusion of renewable energies in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contributions of this publication first address the Japanese local context (organization, mentality, cultural background, thinking and action modes), and secondly the environmental and radiological impact of the Fukushima accident, notably in comparison with Chernobyl (contamination is much more localized, sometimes higher; a larger concerned population but quicker and more efficient protection measures; more severe consequences due to population displacement). The third article discusses the international impact of the accident: known or foreseen consequences on nuclear programs, discussion on safety strengthening and on governance, evolution of public opinion, possible consequences on climate negotiations. The last article proposes an overview of the current situation of Japan which must mobilize all the available energy resources to face the difficulties in electricity supply

  15. Control of radiological impacts in deactivated uranium mine - the portuguese experience; Controlo dos impactes radiologicos em minas de uranio desactivadas - a experiencia portuguesa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Alcides; Neves, Luis, E-mail: apereira@dct.uc.p, E-mail: luis.neves@dct.uc.p [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Dept. de Ciencias da Terra. Instituto do Mar

    2011-10-26

    The exploration of radioactive ores occurred in Portugal during around 100 years, and on that period 4370 tons were produced of uranium concentrate, and an estimated total of 13 millions of tons of residues, of various type and variable dangerous grade. From the year 2000 that the government has been performed studies on environmental characterization at the mining areas and remediation project as well. The precise evaluation of the environmental impacts implies the the knowledge of prior work situation, nonexistent for the case of Portuguese mines. This work proposes a methodology for exceeding that limitation focused on selection of area sited at the same metallogenetic province, and considered representative of background. The radiological impacts are checked by the effective dose calculated for reference groups of the exposed population, at this region and in the principal mining area at Portugal (Urgeirica), at the end of exploration and after the finalization of some remediation works

  16. A preliminary assessment of the radiological impact of the Chernobyl reactor accident on the population of the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the Chernobyl accident the Commission of the European Communities asked the National Radiological Protection Board to carry out a preliminary assessment of the radiological consequences of the accident on the population of the European Community (EC). The aim of the study was to review information on the environmental contamination measured in member states of the EC; to make a preliminary assessment of individual and population doses for each country; to make an estimate of the resulting health impact and to indicate the effects of the various countermeasures taken by member states in terms of the reductions in both individual and population exposure which they produced. All of the main pathways by which people have been and will be exposed to radiation as a result of the accident were included in the assessment. The impact estimate is based on environmental measurements made during the month after the accident, and on calculations made using mathematical models of radionuclide transfer through the environment. The calculated effective doses to average individuals in EC countries from exposure over the next 50 years range from 0.3 μSv (in Portugal) to between about 300 and 500 μSv (in the FRG, Italy and Greece). The total collective effective dose to the population of EC countries, integrated over all time, is estimated to be about 80 000 man Sv. This may be compared to the collective effective dose from natural background radiation of about 500 000 man Sv every year. In some countries, the restrictions placed on consumption of some foods are estimated to have been effective in reducing doses to the most exposed individuals; the reduction being up to about a factor of 2. The results presented in this paper should therefore be regarded as preliminary

  17. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  18. Generic environmental impact statement in support of rulemaking on radiological criteria for decommissioning of NRC-licensed nuclear facilities. Main report; Draft report for comment: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action being considered in this draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) is an amendment to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR Part 20 to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. Under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), all Federal agencies must consider the effect of their actions on the environment. To fulfill NRC's responsibilities under NEPA, the Commission is preparing this GEIS which analyzes alternative courses of action and the costs and impacts associated with those alternatives. In preparing the GEIS, the following approach was taken: (1) a listing was developed of regulatory alternatives for establishing radiological criteria for decommissioning; (2) for each alternative, a detailed analysis and comparison of incremental impacts, both radiological and nonradiological, to workers, members of the public, and the environment, and costs, were performed; and (3) based on the analysis of impacts and costs, preliminary recommendations were provided. Contained in the GEIS are recommendations related to the definition of decommissioning, the scope of rulemaking, the radiological criteria, restrictions on use, citizen participation, use of the GEIS in site-specific cases, and minimization of contamination

  19. Generic environmental impact statement in support of rulemaking on radiological criteria for decommissioning of NRC-licensed nuclear facilities. Appendices; Draft report for comment -- Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action being considered in this draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) is an amendment to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR Part 20 to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. Under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), all Federal agencies must consider the effect of their actions on the environment. To fulfill NRC's responsibilities under NEPA, the Commission is preparing this GEIS which analyzes alternative courses of action and the costs and impacts associated with those alternatives. In preparing the GEIS, the following approach was taken: (1) a listing was developed of regulatory alternatives for establishing radiological criteria for decommissioning; (2) for each alternative, a detailed analysis and comparison of incremental impacts, both radiological and nonradiological, to workers, members of the public, and the environment, and costs, were performed; and (3) based on the analysis of impacts and costs, preliminary recommendations were provided. Contained in the GEIS are recommendations related to the definition of decommissioning, the scope of rulemaking, the radiological criteria, restrictions on use, citizen participation, use of the GEIS in site-specific cases, and minimization of contamination

  20. Optimisation of radioactive waste management systems using weighted measures of economic and radiological impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study reported here investigates the effects of different cost and environmental impact minimisation strategies on radioactive waste disposal strategies. The study examines the costs and environmental impacts from storage, transport and disposal of the low and intermediate level radioactive waste expected to arise over the next 45 years assuming a moderate growth in nuclear power. The environmental impact takes account of the occupational impact, the risk and impact to the public. The risk and impact to the public from disposal of waste includes the collective dose received by the public and the maximum annual individual risks to members of a hypothetical critical group. The base case waste management system considers the options of disposal to sea, shallow land burial, engineered trench and deep cavity facilities. Assessments have been performed which cover the range of views perceived to exist about the relative importance of the reduction of cost and environmental impacts in radioactive waste management. The study investigates the implications for the waste management system of the sea disposal option not being available, deferring development of the deep cavity facility and developing an off-shore borehole disposal facility. A set of sensitivity studies showed that the assessments are robust to the assumptions and impact parameters used. (author)

  1. Enhanced radiological work planning; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this standard is to provide Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) with guidance for ensuring radiological considerations are adequately addressed throughout the work planning process. Incorporating radiological controls in the planning process is a requirement of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-I), Chapter 3, Part 1. This standard is applicable to all PHMC contractors and subcontractors. The essential elements of this standard will be incorporated into the appropriate site level work control standard upon implementation of the anticipated revision of the PHMC Administration and Procedure System

  2. Optimisation of occupational radiological protection in image-guided interventions: potential impact of dose rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimisation of occupational radiological protection is challenging and a variety of factors have to be considered. Physicians performing image-guided interventions are working in an environment with one of the highest radiation risk levels in healthcare. Appropriate knowledge about the radiation environment is a prerequisite for conducting the optimisation process. Information about the dose rate variation during the interventions could provide valuable input to this process. The overall purpose of this study was to explore the prerequisite and feasibility to measure dose rate in scattered radiation and to assess the usefulness of such data in the optimisation process. Using an active dosimeter system, the dose rate in the unshielded scattered radiation field was measured in a fixed point close to the patient undergoing an image-guided intervention. The measurements were performed with a time resolution of one second and the dose rate data was continuously timed in a data log. In two treatment rooms, data was collected during a 6 month time period, resulting in data from 380 image-guided interventions and vascular treatments in the abdomen, arms and legs. These procedures were categorised into eight types according to the purpose of the treatment and the anatomical region involved. The dose rate varied substantially between treatment types, both regarding the levels and the distribution during the procedure. The maximum dose rate for different types of interventions varied typically between 5 and 100 mSv h−1, but substantially higher and lower dose rates were also registered. The average dose rate during a complete procedure was however substantially lower and varied typically between 0.05 and 1 mSv h−1. An analysis of the distribution disclosed that for a large part of the treatment types, the major amount of the total accumulated dose for a procedure was delivered in less than 10% of the exposure time and in less than 1% of the total procedure

  3. Information support for analysing the radiological impact of areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shershakov, V.M.; Baranov, A.Yu.; Borodin, R.V.; Golubenkov, A.V.; Godko, A.M.; Kosykh, V.S.; Korenev, A.I.; Meleshkin, M.A. [SPA `Typhoon`, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-09-01

    The organisation and management of data banks generated using data from monitoring the radiological situation after the Chernobyl accident is of key importance to health care and rehabilitation in the contaminated areas. Measures following the accident were based on large scale studies involving analysis and prediction of radioactive contamination. These studies included measurements of radioactivity in air, soil and water, modelling and prediction of radionuclides transport and transformation. This required the development of a computer system RECASS (RadioEcological Analysis Support System) which is currently being developed in SPA ``Typhoon``. The main tasks of RECASS are to integrate data on existing characteristics of the environment, and data on air, soil, water and biota-contamination with numerical models that account for radionuclide behaviour in all environmental media, and with radiation dose formations that are based on geographic information system (GIS) principles. The data bank of the system includes the following data bases: a data base with measurement of radioactive contamination levels in environmental media (soil, air, water); a meteorological data base; and a data base with administrative and demographic data. A set of models for radionuclide transfer in various environments incorporated in the chain permits short or long-term predictions to be made. The results of implementing RECASS to reconstruct the time and space picture of contamination in the first days after the Chernobyl accident are presented. (Author).

  4. Information support for analysing the radiological impact of areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organisation and management of data banks generated using data from monitoring the radiological situation after the Chernobyl accident is of key importance to health care and rehabilitation in the contaminated areas. Measures following the accident were based on large scale studies involving analysis and prediction of radioactive contamination. These studies included measurements of radioactivity in air, soil and water, modelling and prediction of radionuclides transport and transformation. This required the development of a computer system RECASS (RadioEcological Analysis Support System) which is currently being developed in SPA ''Typhoon''. The main tasks of RECASS are to integrate data on existing characteristics of the environment, and data on air, soil, water and biota-contamination with numerical models that account for radionuclide behaviour in all environmental media, and with radiation dose formations that are based on geographic information system (GIS) principles. The data bank of the system includes the following data bases: a data base with measurement of radioactive contamination levels in environmental media (soil, air, water); a meteorological data base; and a data base with administrative and demographic data. A set of models for radionuclide transfer in various environments incorporated in the chain permits short or long-term predictions to be made. The results of implementing RECASS to reconstruct the time and space picture of contamination in the first days after the Chernobyl accident are presented. (Author)

  5. Informatics support for analysing the radiological impact of areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organisation and management of data banks generated using data from monitoring the radiological situation after the Chernobyl accident is of key importance to health care and rehabilitation in the contaminated areas. Measures following the accident were based on large scale studies involving analysis and prediction of radioactive contamination. These studies included measurements of radioactivity in air, soil and water, modelling and prediction of radionuclides transport and transformation. This required the development of a computer system RECASS (RadioEcological Analysis Support System) which is currently being developed in SPA ''Typhoon''. The main tasks of RECASS are to integrate data on existing characteristics of the environment, and data on air, soil, water and biota-contamination with numerical models that account for radionuclide behaviour in all environmental media and with radiation dose formations that are based on geographic information system (GIS) principles. The data bank of the system includes the following databases: a data base with measurement of radioactive contamination levels in environmental media (soil, air, water); a meteorological data base; and a data base with administrative and demographic data. A set of models for radionuclide transfer in various environments incorporated in the chain permits short or long-term predictions to be made. The results of implementing RECASS to reconstruct the time and space picture of contamination in the first days after the Chernobyl accident are presented. (Author)

  6. Radon induced radiological impact of coal, fly ash and cement samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal and its by-product fly ash are technologically important materials being used for power generation and in the manufacture of bricks, sheets, cement, land-filling, etc., respectively. Increased interest in measuring radon concentration in coal, fly ash and cement is due to its health hazards and environmental pollution. As the presence of radon in the environment (indoor and outdoor), soil, ground water, oil and gas deposits contributes the largest fraction of the natural radiation dose to populations, tracking its concentration is thus of paramount importance for radiological protection. Samples of coal and fly ash were collected from different thermal power stations in northern India and cement samples from National Council for Cement and Building Materials, Ballabgarh (Haryana), India and were analysed for radon concentration. For the measurement, alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors were used. Based upon the available data, the annual effective dose and the lifetime fatality risk factors have been calculated. The radon concentration from coal samples varied from 433 ± 28 Bqm-3 to 2086 ± 28 Bqm-3. The radon concentration from fly ash samples varied from 748 ± 28 Bqm-3 to 1417 ± 111 Bqm-3 and from 158 Bqm-3 to 1810 Bqm-3 in cement samples, with an average of 624 ± 169 Bqm-3. (author)

  7. Radiological dose conversion factors for generic non-human biota used for screening potential ecological impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of non-human biota from radionuclides in the environment is an important aspect of many environmental assessments. Biosphere transport models can be used to estimate radionuclide concentrations in plants and animals, and the radiological dose is calculated as the product of concentration and a dose-rate conversion factor (DCF). Here, we calculate and present DCF values for 99 radionuclides that can be used in a generic sense to estimate the dose to a wide variety of plants and animals. DCF values for internally incorporated radionuclides are based on the absorption of all emitted radiations from within the body. DCF values for external exposures include immersion in air, water, soil/sediment and vegetation. We implicitly include the energy from the decay progeny if they have a half-life of less than 1 day, to be consistent with many biosphere transport models. The DCF values can be used for simple screening of potential doses in assessments where a specific target organism cannot be defined. (author)

  8. Environmental behavior of technetium in soil and vegetation: implications for radiological impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant radiological exposures have been estimated for hypothetical atmospheric releases of Tc-99 from gaseous diffusion facilities when vegetation-to-soil concentration ratios representative of laboratory experiments are substituted for generic default values assumed in current regulatory models. To test the relevancy of these laboratory ratios, field investigations were conducted to obtain measurements of the vegetation-to-soil concentration ratio for Tc-99 in samples collected near operating gaseous diffusion facilities and to observe the dynamic behavior of technetium in soil and vegetation following a single application of a sprayed solution of /sup 95m/TcO4- Comparison of observed field concentration ratios and calculated steady-state concentration ratios with ratios obtained from previous laboratory experiments indicates that concentration ratios obtained from field data are one to two orders of magnitude less than those obtained from the laboratory. Furthermore, a substantial accumulation of technetium in soil and vegetation may not occur over long periods of time, since concentrations of technetium in both environmental media were observed to decrease with time subsequent to initial application of /sup 95m/TcO4-

  9. Evaluation of the radiological impact in the aquatic system in the surrounding of IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to control the discharges of radioactive material in the aquatic system (Jaguare stream and Pinheiros river) in the vicinity of IPEN-CNEN/SP an effluent monitoring program was established on a routine basis. This control is carried out by measuring the activity of the radionuclides present in the liquid effluents (source term) using gamma spectrometry and/or spectrophotometry. The results obtained are then compared with the discharge limits adopted by CNEN when a decision is made upon the discharge of the effluent under consideration. In 1988 the total activity discharged by the nuclear installations available was 1997, 9x106Bq in a total volume of 2421,4 m3. The next step was to evaluate the effective equivalent dose in the general public by using the results of the source term and the information available concerning the environment. It was assumed that the only critical pathway is the external gamma irradiation of the people that work in the nearby of the discharge points in Pinheiros river. The effective equivalent dose obtained was 39,4η Sv and the most relevant radionuclides that should be considered 60Co, 137Cs, 131I and 226Ra. This result is less than 1/10 of the maximum admissible dose limit adopted by the Radiological Protection Standards which is 10-3 Sv/year. In order to measure the level of radioactivity in the environment, samples of ground water, water and sediments of Pinheiros river were collected and analyzed by using gamma spectrometry and fluorimetry. The radionuclides found were 226Ra, 22228Ra, UNat, 40K and 7Be with activities corresponding to the background levels. The analysis of these results and the evaluation of the equivalent dose show that the radiological impact in the aquatic systems considered is insignificant. (author)

  10. Development of an integrated system for evaluation of environmental radiologic impact during emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated system for performing environmental dose assessment after nuclear or radiological emergencies has been developed, as a tool for decision making process. The system includes databases such as those describing radionuclide decay, dose conversion factors for several environmental geometries and radionuclides with emitted radiation and energies. It includes several models for predicting environmental behaviour at the short,medium and long terms, for both rural and urban environments and is flexible enough for simulating the exposure of members of the public due to small accidents involving individual sources up to large scale nuclear accidents with complex source terms to the environment. The model has been built in a way that can perform assessment of actual exposures or make forecasts for future exposure based on dynamic simulation of the fate of radionuclides in environmental and potential exposure pathways to members of the public, taking into account he kind of contaminated environment and the age groups of exposed persons. Input data may come from a predicted source term or information on environmental concentration based on dispersion models or on environmental measurements, including on line monitoring systems, environmental surveys, direct measurements by in situ gamma spectrometry or analysis of environmental samples. Outputs of the model are dose estimates to members of the public as a function of the exposure pathway, time after the contamination and age group, for different groups of members of the public and kind of use of the environment. Time dependent kerma rates in air and concentrations in environmental compartments such as soil and foodstuff are also available, including the simulation of the effect of protective measures, to support the decision making process. (author)

  11. Randomized clinical trial on the use of antispasmodic drugs in barium enema: impact on radiological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the willingness of radiologists to change their practice when the results of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) on the use of antispasmodic drugs in barium enema are presented. Materials and Methods: During the years 1994 and 1995 two postal questionnaires were sent to 481 practicing radiologists who were all members of the Netherlands Society of Radiology. In the first questionnaire the respondents were asked to give the characteristics of their practices in performing daily barium enema. The data from this questionnaire was used as a reference. The second questionnaire was sent to the respondents together with an abstract on the randomized clinical trial supporting the use of antispasmodic drugs in barium enema. We also indicated a preference for Buscopan over Glucagon as the antispasmodic drug. The willingness to change prescription habits was measured by comparing the data of the two questionnaires. Results: Of 481 practicing radiologists, 312 responded to the first questionnaire and gave information of their prescription habits (response rate 64%). These 312 responders were sent an abstract of the RCT and were asked to fill out a second questionnaire to determine their willingness to change their practice. Two hundred and sixty-seven radiologists responded (response rate 86%). A significant number of 119 (51%) were willing to increase the use of antispasmodic drugs. A significant number of 128 (55%) chose to increase the use of Buscopan, while a significant number of 81 (32%) were willing to decrease the use of Glucagon. Conclusion: Direct exposure to the results of an RCT recommending the use of antispasmodic drugs in barium enema, especially Buscopan, is likely to increase its use by practicing radiologists

  12. The radiological impact of naturally-occurring radionuclides in foods from the wild

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habit surveys have been conducted to identify people who make use of foodstuffs collected from the wild (free foods) in two areas of the UK: in the area around Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire, where levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides in soil were expected to be typical of the UK, and in the vicinity of Okehampton in Devon, where levels were known to be elevated. Individuals who make regular use of these foodstuffs were specifically identified, so that an estimate of typical and higher than average consumption rates could be derived. The naturally-occurring radionuclides of interest were 210Po, 210Pb, 234U, 235U, 238U, 230Th, 232Th and 226Ra. Samples of important foodstuffs were collected and the radionuclides of interest determined. The consumption rates were combined with the measured activity concentrations and published dose coefficients to estimate doses to average and higher than average consumers. These doses were compared with estimated doses reported in the Food Standards Agency's ongoing monitoring programme and with average doses to the population of the UK reviewed by NRPB. In total, 400 people were identified and between them they collected 54 different types of free food. Blackberries were by far the most common species collected, although various types of mushroom and nuts were also popular. On average, each collector from around Chipping Norton collected 2.1 different foods, and each from around Okehampton collected 2.2. On the basis of the habit survey, therefore, it would be reasonable to expect that any site, nuclear or otherwise, chosen for habit surveys, whether for radiological purposes or for any other contaminant, could have substantial numbers of people collecting free foods. In addition, the pattern of foods collected was very similar to previous studies, indicating similarities across England and Wales. (author)

  13. Responsibility of the Federal States in the area of precautionary radiation protection against dangerous radiological events with impacts on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legal foundations of protective measures against radiological events are the Atomic Energy Act (AtG) and the Precautionary Radiation Protection Act (StrVG). Both acts are part of federal German law, and are implemented partly by the Federal States in the form of the carrying out of the so-called administrative duties' (Bundesauftragsverwaltung). In radiological situations involving very considerable impacts on the environment or a high risk with regard to radiation-related diseases among the population, the competent administrative body of the Federal State can declare the occurrence of a disaster for a defined region. Responsibility for the assessment of the radiological situation in Bavaria falls to the emergency management unit of the Bavarian State Ministry for State Development and Environmental Affairs. This unit advises both the central federal government and the Bavarian disaster control management. (orig.)

  14. The radiological impact of naturally-occurring radionuclides in foods from the wild

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habit surveys have been conducted to identify people who make use of foodstuffs collected from the wild (free foods) in two areas of the UK: in the area around Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire, where levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides in soil were expected to be typical of the UK, and in the vicinity of Okehampton in Devon, where levels were known to be elevated. Individuals who make regular use of these foodstuffs were specifically identified, so that an estimate of typical and higher than average consumption rates could be derived. The naturally-occurring radionuclides of interest were 210Po, 210Pb, 234U, 235U, 238U, 230Th, 232Th and 226Ra. Samples of important foodstuffs were collected and the radionuclides of interest determined. The consumption rates were combined with the measured activity concentrations and published dose coefficients to estimate doses to average and higher than average consumers. These doses were compared with estimated doses reported in the Food Standards Agency's ongoing monitoring programme and with average doses to the population of the UK reviewed by NRPB. In total, 400 people were identified and between them they collected 54 different types of free food. Blackberries were by far the most common species collected, although various types of mushroom and nuts were also popular. On average, each collector from around Chipping Norton collected 2.1 different foods, and each from around Okehampton collected 2.2. On the basis of the habit survey, therefore, it would be reasonable to expect that any site, nuclear or otherwise, chosen for habit surveys, whether for radiological purposes or for any other contaminant, could have substantial numbers of people collecting free foods. In addition, the pattern of foods collected was very similar to previous studies, indicating similarities across England and Wales. Doses from the consumption of free foods were estimated. The annual doses estimated to have been received by a typical consumer of

  15. Long term cumulative radiological impact assessment to liquid effluent of american inland NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual radioactivity monitoring reports (2005-2011) for 38 typical inland nuclear power plants in US were investigated, and the artificial radioactivity levels in the sediments of receiving water of liquid effluent were analyzed. It was indicated that the long term operation of these NPPs had no obvious cumulative impacts on sediment, only at a few of which were found radioactivity originated from liquid effluents around discharge points, and much lower than the natural radioactivity concentrations. Only a very few NPPs had an effect with relatively higher concentration levels of radioactivity in sediment, which was due to the poor hydrological conditions of the receiving water for the dilution of radioactive liquid effluents. According to the dose assessments of artificial radioactivity in sediment to public individuals, all American typical inland NPPs had negligible impacts on public health compared to the natural public background and the personal dose constraint of liquid effluent regulated by NRC. (authors)

  16. Environmental impact of Pakistan Research Reactor-2 following a hypothetical radiological release accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental impact of Pakistan Research Reactor-2 (PARR-2) following a hypothetical accident is presented. It is shown that with 100% core meltdown and multiple failures, PARR-2 does not pose any catastrophic consequences. Conservative estimates show that radiation levels in the Low Population Zone (LPZ) adjacent to the PARR-2 building, which in this case is the PINSTECH building, remains below the established limits. (author)

  17. Radiological English

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  18. Radiological English

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribes, R. [Hospital Reina Sofia, Cordoba (Spain). Servicio de Radiologia; Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Div. of Radiology

    2007-07-01

    The book is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English level is indeterminate because their reading skills are much higher than their fluency. It is intended to help those health care professionals who need English for their work but do not speak English on a day-to-day basis. (orig.)

  19. Radiological impact of a national repository for radioactive waste: the italian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type of repository: It is assumed that the disposal structure is similar to the French one in l'Aube or to the Spanish one in El Cabril. The waste are assumed to comply with the ANPA Technical Guide (T.G.) n. 26 and are, therefore, conditioned in a concrete matrix with compression strength of at least 50 Kg/cm2. Reference impact: It is assumed that the reference impact produces a conical crater having an angle of 90o and a depth of 4 m. The cause of the impact is, moreover assumed to be undefined; it could be eventually identified, however, with a plane crash, with the launch of a projectile or with the blast of an internal or external explosive charge. The 4 m deep crater has been chosen as it can be related with an explosive projectile of medium size (discussion at the Hannover Congress on the nuclear underground sites). The volume of material expelled from the crater would then be of about 70 m3 corresponding to a weight of about 140 tons. These values can be compared with the effect of mining explosives and with the effect of a plane crash. The amount of rock (hard limestone rock) demolished in an open air mine is of the order of 7-10 tons of rock per Kg of explosive. The 140 tons of rock considered above would then correspond (in ideal conditions) to about 20 Kg of explosive, an amount to be considered modest. The effect of an aeroplane crash, then, may cause, according to usual assumptions, a load of about 10 000 tons on a surface area of 7 m2, corresponding to about 150 Kg/cm2

  20. Natural radionuclides in zircon and related radiological impacts in mineral separation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity concentration of uranium and thorium present in zircon obtained from mineral sand industries are presented. External gamma radiation levels and inhalation of airborne dust are found to be the significant routes of radiation exposure to occupational workers. The annual average dose attributed to zircon processing is estimated to be 2.3 mSv in the plants under study. This paper presents the results of external gamma measurements, estimation of airborne radioactivity in zircon process locations and radon and thoron in the occupational environment of two mineral separation plants in India. Analyses of the solid wastes and liquid effluent generated and resultant environmental impacts are indicated. (authors)

  1. Radiological impact assessment of radioactive minerals of amang and ilmenite on future landuse using RESRAD computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiological impact assessment (RIA) onto environment from radioactive minerals of amang and ilmenite was carried out in an amang processing plant at Dengkil, Selangor, Malaysia. The RIA was based on maximum total doses received by residents and industrial workers with the assumption that the area will be turned into a residential or industrial area once the plant is closed. RIA was based on a land area of 20,000 m2 with 0.2 m thick contamination zone. Result was obtained by comparing with the limits prescribed by Atomic Energy Licensing Board of Malaysia (AELB), which is 1 mSv y-1 for public. The parameter input was based on the study location specific value, existing value in RESRAD and suitable estimation values based on sensitivity analysis. Based on two scenarios, the predicted maximum total doses received by residents and industrial workers in extreme condition are 10.41, 1.94, 35.03 and 35.0 mSv y-1 each exceeding the dose limit for public. Nevertheless, with the use of soil cover with thickness between 0.1 and 1 m and ventilation rates between 1 and 10 h-1, these maximum total doses can be lowered to levels not exceeding the set dose limit and the area can be used safely for residential as well as industrial purpose

  2. Evaluation of the radiological impact of phosphogypsum waste from phosphate plants in the area of the Venice Lagoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements on dirt samples from dismissed quarries located in the Venice lagoon area and immediate surroundings yield evidence that the quarries have been used (probably near the end of the fifties) as dumps for phosphogypsum waste from the production of phosphoric acid and fertilisers. In the production of phosphoric acid, approx. 90% of the 226Ra present precipitates into a solid phase as insoluble radium sulphate, a slurry called phosphogypsum. 226Ra and its daughters, particularly 210Pb, 210Po and gaseous 222Rn, are extremely dangerous. Mean and peak concentrations of 226Ra of its daughters 214Bi and 214Pb were measured. To evaluate the solubility of the radionuclide, a chemical elution of the samples was obtained by addition of distilled water and acetic acid and gamma- and alfa- spectrometry measurements of the resulting liquid samples were performed. On the basis of the results obtained, the authors have performed an 'evaluation of radiological impact' for the area population, that showed that phosphogypsum waste is best left in site. (author)

  3. Assessment of radiological impact due to a hypothetical core disruptive accident for PFBR using an advanced atmospheric dispersion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological impact due to air borne effluent dispersion from a hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (CDA) scenario for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpakkam coastal site is estimated using an advanced system consisting of a 3-d meso-scale atmospheric model and a random walk particle dispersion model. A simulation of dispersion for CDA carried out for a typical summer day on 24th May 2003 predicted development of land-sea breeze circulation and Thermal Internal Boundary Layer (TIBL) at Kalpakkam site, which have been confirmed by observations. Analysis of dose distribution corresponding to predicted atmospheric conditions shows maximum dose from stack releases beyond the site boundary at about 4 km during TIBL fumigation and stable conditions respectively. A multi mode spatial concentration distribution has been noticed with diurnal meandering of wind under land sea breeze circulation. Over a meso-scale range of 25 km, turning of plume under sea breeze and maximum concentration along plume centerline at distances of 3 to 10 km have been noticed. The study has enabled to simulate the more complex meteorological situation that is actually present at the site. (author)

  4. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  5. Implementation of a competency check-off in diagnostic fluoroscopy for radiology trainees: impact on reducing radiation for three common fluoroscopic exams in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluoroscopy is an important tool for diagnosis in the pediatric population, but it carries the risk of radiation exposure. Because radiology resident education and experience in the use of fluoroscopy equipment in children vary, we implemented an intervention to standardize fluoroscopy training. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing a fluoroscopy competency check-off for radiology resident trainees aimed at decreasing radiation exposure in three common pediatric fluoroscopic studies. A fluoroscopy competency check-off form was developed for radiology resident trainees performing pediatric procedures. Techniques used to limit radiation exposure for common pediatric radiologic studies were reviewed as part of the check-off process. Pediatric radiologists supervised each trainee until they demonstrated competence to independently perform three specified procedures. Radiation dose was recorded for the three procedures, upper GI (UGI), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and oropharyngeal (OPM) exams, over 6 months preceding and 6 months following implementation of the competency check-off. The mean cumulative dose for each procedure was compared before and after implementation of competency check-off using a Kruskal-Wallis test. During the 12-month study period doses from 909 fluoroscopic procedures were recorded. In the 6 months preceding competency check-off implementation, procedures were performed by 24 radiology resident trainees including 171 UGI, 176 VCUG and 171 OPM exams. In the 6 months following competency check-off, 23 trainees performed 114 UGI, 145 VCUG and 132 OPM exams. After competency check-off implementation, a statistically significant reduction in average radiation dose was found for all three studies (P < 0.001). Median cumulative doses (mGy) were decreased by 33%, 36% and 13% for UGIs, VCUGs and OPMs, respectively. Implementation of a competency check-off for radiology resident trainees can reduce average radiation

  6. Implementation of a competency check-off in diagnostic fluoroscopy for radiology trainees: impact on reducing radiation for three common fluoroscopic exams in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Sweta [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Desouches, Stephane L. [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Lowe, Lisa H.; Kasraie, Nima; Reading, Brenton [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-07-24

    Fluoroscopy is an important tool for diagnosis in the pediatric population, but it carries the risk of radiation exposure. Because radiology resident education and experience in the use of fluoroscopy equipment in children vary, we implemented an intervention to standardize fluoroscopy training. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing a fluoroscopy competency check-off for radiology resident trainees aimed at decreasing radiation exposure in three common pediatric fluoroscopic studies. A fluoroscopy competency check-off form was developed for radiology resident trainees performing pediatric procedures. Techniques used to limit radiation exposure for common pediatric radiologic studies were reviewed as part of the check-off process. Pediatric radiologists supervised each trainee until they demonstrated competence to independently perform three specified procedures. Radiation dose was recorded for the three procedures, upper GI (UGI), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and oropharyngeal (OPM) exams, over 6 months preceding and 6 months following implementation of the competency check-off. The mean cumulative dose for each procedure was compared before and after implementation of competency check-off using a Kruskal-Wallis test. During the 12-month study period doses from 909 fluoroscopic procedures were recorded. In the 6 months preceding competency check-off implementation, procedures were performed by 24 radiology resident trainees including 171 UGI, 176 VCUG and 171 OPM exams. In the 6 months following competency check-off, 23 trainees performed 114 UGI, 145 VCUG and 132 OPM exams. After competency check-off implementation, a statistically significant reduction in average radiation dose was found for all three studies (P < 0.001). Median cumulative doses (mGy) were decreased by 33%, 36% and 13% for UGIs, VCUGs and OPMs, respectively. Implementation of a competency check-off for radiology resident trainees can reduce average radiation

  7. An assessment of the radiological impact of human intrusion at the UK Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) - 59356

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK Low Level Waste Repository Ltd submitted an Environmental Safety Case for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) to the Environment Agency on the 1 May 2011. The Environmental Safety Case (ESC) presents a complete case for the environmental safety of the Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) both during operations and in the long term (Cummings et al, in these proceedings). This includes an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of the facility, including an assessment of the potential consequences of human intrusion at the site. The human intrusion assessment is based on a cautiously realistic approach in defining intrusion cases and parameter values. A range of possible human intrusion events was considered based on present-day technologies and credible future uses of the site. This process resulted in the identification of geotechnical investigations, a housing development and a smallholding as requiring quantitative assessment. A particular feature of the site is that, because of its proximity to the coast and in view of expected global sea-level rise, it is vulnerable to coastal erosion. During such erosion, wastes and engineered barrier materials will be exposed, and could become targets for investigation or recovery. Therefore, human intrusion events have been included that are associated with such activities. A radiological assessment model has been developed to analyse the impacts of potential human intrusion at the site. A key feature of the model is the representation of the spatial layout of the disposal site, including the engineered cap design and the large-scale spatial heterogeneity of radionuclide concentrations within the repository. The model has been used to calculate the radiation dose to intruders and to others following intrusion at different times and at different locations across the site, for the each of the selected intrusion events, considering all relevant exposure modes. Potential doses due to radon and its daughters in

  8. Evaluation guideline for the study of the radiological impact of based nuclear installations (INB) presented in support of releases authorization demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the case of a license demand for the effluents release and water taking for a nuclear installation, the operating must realize a study of the nuclear effluents radiological impact on the environment and the public health. In this context, the study presents technical and methodological specifications which led the Direction of the Nuclear Installations Safety (DSIN) and the General Direction of the Health (DGS) to ask the IPSN the elaboration of a guideline to help these studies evaluation. The guideline presents the regulatory context, the description of the installations, the treatment and the control processes, the rules of management, the description of the environment, the estimation of the radiological impacts and the environment control system definition. (A.L.B.)

  9. Radiological impact assessment of arc welding supplies rutile; Evaluacion del impacto radiologico de la soldadura por arco con consumibles de rutilo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozas Guinea, S.; Herranz Soler, M.; Perez Marin, C.; Idoeta Hermandorena, R.; Alegria gutierrez, N.; Nunez-Lagos Rogla, R.; Legarda Ibanez, F.

    2013-07-01

    Consumables for welding containing rutile, the coating of the electrode or the filling of tubular thread, are the most widely used and also the most radioactive since the rutile is a mineral containing traces of natural radionuclides, and is therefore considered Normal Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). As these electrodes and wire are consumed, small particles, aerosols and gases are emitted to the atmosphere of work, and may be inhaled by the welder. Therefore, and also according to the current regulatory framework and work carried out previously by the author on the radiological impact of the process of manufacture and storage of coated rutile electrodes, the objectives are: 1Calcular the internal dose for inhalation during two types of welding, one with electrodes coated and the other with thread. 2 calculate the external dose due to the deposition of particles in the work environment, slag and the immersion of the soldering iron in the cloud of smoke. 3 to assess the radiological impact. (Author)

  10. Radiological impact of phosphogypsum surface application in a no-till system in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivea Maria Piccolomini Dias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the impact of phosphogypsum application on 226Ra and 228Ra activities in the soil and on their accumulation in soybean grains. A field experiment was carried out in Paraná state, Brazil, on a loamy Typic Hapludox, under no-till system, with increasing phosphogypsum rates: 4, 8, and 12 Mg ha-1. GammA ray spectrometry was carried out using HPGe detectors with 45 and 10% relative efficiencies, for soybean grains and soil, respectively. No increment of 226Ra and 228Ra activities was observed due to the increase in phosphogypsum rates in the soil, and a small reduction was noticed in the grains. Average values found for 226Ra and 228Ra activities were 37 and 57 Bq kg-1 in the soil and 1.44 and 3.19 Bq kg-1 in soybean grains. The application of phosphogypsum for no-till soybean production is a safe practice regarding the risks of radiation damage to human health

  11. A comparison of the radiological impact of energy production by fission and fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impacts of respectively a light water reactor and a planned fusion reactor, for which tritium-deuterium fusion reactions will act as energy source have been compared. The comparison is made on the basis of a generated capacity of 1 GWe.year, using the following criteria: fuel inventories, radioactive releases, collective effective dose equivalent commitments to the public and the volume of wastes. The accidental risk is not introduced. Fusion reactor parameters are still subject to uncertainties, which prevent accurate quantification of radionuclide releases (tritium apart) from the nuclear plant. Only orders of magnitude extrapolated from values for the NET tokamak are given. Despite these uncertainties, it would seem more interesting, from the dosimetric point of view, to use fusion reactors to produce electricity, although problems of radioactive releases, handling and long-term storage of radioactive waste would remain. Fusion reactors also generate generate high-level wastes with long-term exposure rates that are lower than those of light water reactors

  12. Computerized methodology for evaluating the long-range radiological impact of shallow-land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computerized methodology has been implemented to calculate the risk to local and intermediate-range (up to 80 km distant) populations resulting from water- and air-borne transport of radionuclides present in low-level wastes buried in shallow trenches such as those used at Oak Ridge. Our computer code, PRESTO (Prediction of Radiation Effects from Shallow Trench Operations), was developed under United States Environmental Protection Agency funding to evaluate possible health effects resulting from shallow burial operations. Sources of contamination include radionuclide releases from the trenches and from areas contaminated with operational spillage. The model is intended to predict radionuclide transport and the ensuing exposure and health impact to at-risk populations for a 1000-year period following cessation of burial ground operations. Several classes of submodels are used in PRESTO to represent scheduled event, unit system response, and risk evaluation processes. Examples of scheduled events are trench cap failure, stabilization of insoluble surface contaminant, the onset of farming or reclamation practices, and human intrusion. Unit system response submodels simulate processes such as infiltration of rainwater into the trench and erosion of soil overburden from the trench cover. System response submodels generate parameters used repeatedly in the 1000-year simulation loop

  13. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  14. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  15. Radiological impact of phosphogypsum discharged into the Venice lagoon: 222Rn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasson A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For about 20 years, between the 60 ’s and the 80 ’s of the last century, in the Passo a Campalto area (Lagoon of Venice - Italy about 400,000 m3 of phosphogypsum (PG were deposited at the border of the lagoon and next to urban areas without any environmental control. These materials are a by-product formed during the wet processing of phosphate rocks by sulphuric acid and have a significant environmental impact due to their abundance and their chemical-physical and radiochemical characteristics. The PG contains both chemical elements, which are considered dangerous for the ecosystems and natural radionuclides whose concentrations are much higher if compared to those typical for the Earth’s crust. These discarded materials caused for many years the dispersion of radionuclides in the environment due to the tidal erosion, the re-suspension of radioactive inhalable dusts, the uncontrolled radon exhalation and the bioaccumulation of some radionuclides in the lagoon environment. After a decision of the appointed authorities, the Venice Water Authority (Ministry of Infrastructure and Transport, planned a permanent safety control of the site resulting in the complete isolation of the entire volume of contaminated materials from the environmental system. The entire project was specific for the particular features of the site and it required the improvement of analytical, sampling and measurement techniques in order to verify the effectiveness of the safety action. The radon assessment, in particular the check of the effectiveness of the inhibition of radon exhalation, is part of a more complex study, covering many other aspects of the management of a permanent disposal; they will be the object of further notes. The ultimate results of this study prove the efficacy of the intervention: radon concentrations in air and exhalation values from the restored area, measured during surveys, have been proved to be well in agreement with those of non

  16. Evaluation of radiological impacts of tenorm in the Tunisian petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrichi, Hajer; Baccouche, Souad; Belgaied, Jamel-Eddine

    2013-01-01

    The health impacts associated with uncontrolled release of TENORM in products and wastes released in the petroleum industry are of great concern. In this study, evaluation of TENORM in the Tunisian petroleum products and wastes is presented. Fourteen products samples, twelve waste samples and three samples from the surrounding environment were collected from the Tunisian Refinery STIR site and from two onshore production oilfields. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K for all samples were determined using gamma-ray spectrometry with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of (224)Ra were calculated only for scale samples. The radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices, absorbed doses rates in air and annual effective dose were also estimated. It was noticed that maximum value of Ra(eq) activity was found to be 398 Bq/kg in scale (w8) collected from an onshore production oilfield which exceeds the maximum Ra(eq) value of 370 Bq/kg recommended for safe use. All hazard indices indicated that scale samples (w6, w7, w8 and w11) could be a significant waste problem especially sample (w8). In this study, the radium isotopic data were used to provide an estimate of scale samples ages by the use of the (224)Ra/(228)Ra activity ratio dating method. Ages of collected scales were found to be in the range 0.91-2.4 years. In this work, radioactivity (NORM contamination) in samples collected from the refinery STIR are showed to be insignificant if compared to those from onshore oilfield production sites. PMID:22902311

  17. Radiological impacts of natural radioactivity from phosphogypsum piles in Huelva (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a waste product of the phosphoric acid production process and contains, generally, high activity concentrations of uranium series radionuclides. It is stored in piles formed over the last 40 years close to the town of Huelva (Southwest of Spain). The very broad expanse of the PG piles (about 1200 ha) produces a local, but unambiguous radioactive impact to their surroundings. In 1992, the regional government of Andalucia restored an area of 400 ha by covering it with a 25-cm thick layer of natural soil and, currently, there is an additional zone of 400 ha in course of restoration (un-restored) and the same area of active PG stacks. Most studies have concluded that populations living close to PG stacks are not subjected to a significant health risk. However, it is still not clear whether employees who spend numerous hours on active PG stacks are subjected to a significant health risk. The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K have been measured by high detection efficiency gamma ray spectrometry from inactive PG stacks, restored and un-restored zones. The average activity concentrations of 226Ra (Bq kg-1) in the active PG stacks, un-restored and restored zone were 647, 573 and 83 respectively. The corresponding values for 232Th and 40K (Bq kg-1) were 8, 10 and 25 and 33, 47 and 225 respectively. As a measure of radiation hazard to the occupational workers and public, the Ra equivalent activities, the representative level index and dose rates due to natural radionuclides at 1 m above the ground surface were estimated. The average of absorbed dose rates due to 226Ra, 232Th and 40K (nGy/h) from inactive PG stacks, un-restored and restored zones are 284, 255 and 55.The calculated external γ-radiation average dose (mSv/y) received by the workers of the phosphogypsum piles are estimated to be 0.293, 0.263 and 0.057 respectively which is far below the international agreed dose limit of 20 mSv/y for workers. Also, we can conclude that the

  18. Comparative radiological and conventional pollution impact recording in the aquatic environment by use of a cytogenetic tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The effects of ionizing radiation can be viewed at all levels of biological organization, ranging from the molecular to ecosystem level. Effects on organisms can be traced to molecular and cellular responses, as radiation impact does not necessarily lead to observable effects on specimens, population or ecosystem. This is because the measurable attributes of the levels differ, despite the fact that all levels are interrelated. The cytogenetic effects of radioactive and conventional pollution as they are recorded in organisms of natural ecosystem and the apportionment of causes to each kind of pollutants is a relative new field in radioecological research. There is limited evidence on field observations in international literature; even there is a lot of evidence in concerning laboratory experiments. The study of in situ effects of ionizing radiation in the cytogenetic level is the key for determining the radiological status of the ecosystem considered, based on the relation: concentration of pollutant in abiotic components and/or bioaccumulation → dose rate → effect on organism at the cellular level. Several field studies on the comparative effects of ionizing radiation and chemical pollution in some selected areas in the Mediterranean, the Black Sea and in inland waters combined with laboratory experiments have shown a conceptual model of response of organisms, which is unique for ionizing radiation and chemical pollution. This model is based on the effects of different pollutants on aquatic biota (Crustacea, Polychaeta, Oligochatea, Fish embryos etc), as they have been recorded at the cellular level. The environmental assessment of an aquatic ecosystem with regards to ionizing radiation in comparison to effects of chemical pollutants is based on determining the distribution frequency of chromosomal aberrations induced in cells of natural populations. Cytogenetic methods are used in pollution research because of their high

  19. Social impact evaluation : Some implications of the specific decisional context approach for anticipatory project assessment with special reference to available alternatives and to techniques of evaluating the social impacts of the anticipated effects of such alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    The implications are explored of the specific decision context approach to anticipatory project assessment. More specifically, it is hypothesized that with respect to any given effect of a proposed project or action (mobility, job opportunities, air pollution, population distribution, etc.) such effect will likely differ in probability and/or magnitude from one decisional context to another; that the social desirability or undesirability of a given effect is a function (will differ with) each specific decisional context; that therefore the social impact of such effect will in all likelihood differ with each specific decisional context; and that the social significance of even the dame social impact of a given effect will vary from one decisional context to another when such social impact interacts with (competes with or reinforces) the social impacts of other effects. It also follows from this analysis that the respective roles of scientific method (demonstrable data) and adversarial system will not only differ with each specific decisional context but with each alternative course of action available to the decisional entity in each specific context.

  20. Radiological Impact Associated to Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) from Coal-Fired Power Plants Emissions - 13436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinis, Maria de Lurdes; Fiuza, Antonio; Soeiro de Carvalho, Jose; Gois, Joaquim [Geo-Environment and Resources Research Centre (CIGAR), Porto University, Faculty of Engineering - FEUP, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Meira Castro, Ana Cristina [School of Engineering Polytechnic of Porto - ISEP, Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 431, 4200-072, Porto (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    Certain materials used and produced in a wide range of non-nuclear industries contain enhanced activity concentrations of natural radionuclides. In particular, electricity production from coal is one of the major sources of increased human exposure to naturally occurring radioactive materials. A methodology was developed to assess the radiological impact due to natural radiation background. The developed research was applied to a specific case study, the Sines coal-fired power plant, located in the southwest coastline of Portugal. Gamma radiation measurements were carried out with two different instruments: a sodium iodide scintillation detector counter (SPP2 NF, Saphymo) and a gamma ray spectrometer with energy discrimination (Falcon 5000, Canberra). Two circular survey areas were defined within 20 km of the power plant. Forty relevant measurements points were established within the sampling area: 15 urban and 25 suburban locations. Additionally, ten more measurements points were defined, mostly at the 20-km area. The registered gamma radiation varies from 20 to 98.33 counts per seconds (c.p.s.) corresponding to an external gamma exposure rate variable between 87.70 and 431.19 nGy/h. The highest values were measured at locations near the power plant and those located in an area within the 6 and 20 km from the stacks. In situ gamma radiation measurements with energy discrimination identified natural emitting nuclides as well as their decay products (Pb-212, Pb-2142, Ra-226, Th-232, Ac-228, Th-234, Pa-234, U- 235, etc.). According to the results, an influence from the stacks emissions has been identified both qualitatively and quantitatively. The developed methodology accomplished the lack of data in what concerns to radiation rate in the vicinity of Sines coal-fired power plant and consequently the resulting exposure to the nearby population. (authors)

  1. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiology. Doctors who specialize in radiology are called radiologists. Information DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors ...

  2. Imaging and radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

  3. Evaluation of the atmospheric stability and it influence in the radiological environmental impact of the treatment plant and radioactive waste storage (PTDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well-known that the meteorological variables as the atmospheric stability, influence in the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants, for that as regards radiological safety, it constitutes a demand the evaluation of their impact in the process before mentioned. The present work exposes the results of the study of the radiological impact of our PTDR that it allowed to know the influence of this meteorological parameter in the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants in its location. To such effects they were processed by means of the methodology of Pasquill - Gifford, data of time zone observations of this meteorological variable obtained in the proximities of the installation, being modeled the worst conditions in atmospheric liberation of their radionuclides inventory, valuing stops the 2 critical considered population groups the doses received by inhalation of polluted air and ingestion of water and polluted products, as well as, for external irradiation from the radioactive cloud and the floor. The obtained annual effective doses due to the modeling situation reach until a mSv, except for the Ra-226 that are lightly superior, implying a risk radiological acceptable chord to the international standard. To the above-mentioned a reduced probability of occurrence of events initiators of the evaluated accidental sequence is added. (Author)

  4. Citation trend and suggestions for improvement of impact factor of Journal of Korean Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the recent citation trend and to find a way to improve impact factor (IF) of the Journal of Korean Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JKSTRO) by analysis of Korean Medical Citation index (KoMCI) citation data of JKSTRO and comparison with that of mean citation data of all journals enlisted on KoMCI (KoMCI journals) during 2000-2005. All citation data of entire journals enlisted on KoMCI and JKSTRO from 2000 to 2005 were obtained from KoMCI. The trend of total and annual number of published articles and reference citations, total citations and self-citations per paper, IF and impact factor excluding self-citations (ZIF) were described and compared on both KoMCI journals an JKSTRO. Annual number of published articles was decreased for 6 years on both KoMCI journals and JKSTRO (32% and 38% reduction rate). The number of Korean journal references per article is 1.6 papers of JKSTRO comparing to 2.0 papers on KoMCI journals. The percentage of Korean references/total references increased from 5.0% in 2000 to 7.7% in 2005 on JKSTRO and from 8.5% in 2000 to 10.1% on KoMCI journals. The number of total citations received/paper on JKSTRO (average 1.333) is smaller than that of KoMCI journals (average 1.694), there was an increased rate of 67% in 2005 comparing to 2000. The percentage of self-citations/total citations (average 72%) on JKSTRO is slightly higher than that of KoMCI journals (average 61%)/ IF of JKSTRO was gradually improved and 0.144, 0.125, 0.088, 0.107, 0.187 and 0.203 in 2000-2005 respectively. However, ZIF of JKSTRO is steadily decreased from 0.038 in 2000 to 0.013 in 2005 except 0.044 in 2004. IF of JKSTRO was slightly improved but had some innate problem of smaller number of citations received . To make JKSTRO as a highly cited journal, the awareness of academic status of JKSTRO and active participation of every member of JKSTRO including encouraging self-citations of papers published recent 2 years and submission of English written papers, and

  5. Citation trend and suggestions for improvement of impact factor of Journal of Korean Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Hwang, Seong Su; Ahn, Myeong Im [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, So Na [The Catholic University of Korea, Medical Library Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    To analyze the recent citation trend and to find a way to improve impact factor (IF) of the Journal of Korean Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JKSTRO) by analysis of Korean Medical Citation index (KoMCI) citation data of JKSTRO and comparison with that of mean citation data of all journals enlisted on KoMCI (KoMCI journals) during 2000-2005. All citation data of entire journals enlisted on KoMCI and JKSTRO from 2000 to 2005 were obtained from KoMCI. The trend of total and annual number of published articles and reference citations, total citations and self-citations per paper, IF and impact factor excluding self-citations (ZIF) were described and compared on both KoMCI journals an JKSTRO. Annual number of published articles was decreased for 6 years on both KoMCI journals and JKSTRO (32% and 38% reduction rate). The number of Korean journal references per article is 1.6 papers of JKSTRO comparing to 2.0 papers on KoMCI journals. The percentage of Korean references/total references increased from 5.0% in 2000 to 7.7% in 2005 on JKSTRO and from 8.5% in 2000 to 10.1% on KoMCI journals. The number of total citations received/paper on JKSTRO (average 1.333) is smaller than that of KoMCI journals (average 1.694), there was an increased rate of 67% in 2005 comparing to 2000. The percentage of self-citations/total citations (average 72%) on JKSTRO is slightly higher than that of KoMCI journals (average 61%)/ IF of JKSTRO was gradually improved and 0.144, 0.125, 0.088, 0.107, 0.187 and 0.203 in 2000-2005 respectively. However, ZIF of JKSTRO is steadily decreased from 0.038 in 2000 to 0.013 in 2005 except 0.044 in 2004. IF of JKSTRO was slightly improved but had some innate problem of smaller number of citations received . To make JKSTRO as a highly cited journal, the awareness of academic status of JKSTRO and active participation of every member of JKSTRO including encouraging self-citations of papers published recent 2 years and submission of English written papers, and

  6. Investigation of the radiological impact due to the dredging of sediments in the Minimes harbour of La Rochelle. Workers and population exposure to reinforced natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the city of La Rochelle is implementing a project of expansion of the Minimes yachting harbour which comprises the dredging of sediments (which may have been polluted by a rare earth production plant), this document reports the assessment of the radiological impact of this dredging activity on workers and on the population. A campaign of sediment coring has been performed in order to validate the reference coring station selection, to measure sand radiological activity and to measure the activity of the sediments to be dredged. The computed maximum efficient doses for the workers and for the population appear to be low, and very much less to the 1 mSv/year threshold

  7. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book presents the radiological manifestations of the maxillodental region in a suitable manner for fast detection and correct diagnosing of diseases of the teeth, soft tissue, and jaws. Classification therefore is made according to the radiological manifestations of the diseases and not according to etiology. (orig./MG)

  8. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  9. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V., E-mail: elena.kourdioukova@ugent.be [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Valcke, Martin [Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  10. Impact of a PACS/RIS-integrated speech recognition system on radiology reporting time and report availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Quantification of the impact of a PACS/RIS-integrated speech recognition system (SRS) on the time expenditure for radiology reporting and on hospital-wide report availability (RA) in a university institution. Material and Methods: In a prospective pilot study, the following parameters were assessed for 669 radiographic examinations (CR): 1. time requirement per report dictation (TED: dictation time (s)/number of images [examination] x number of words [report]) with either a combination of PACS/tape-based dictation (TD: analog dictation device/minicassette/transcription) or PACS/RIS/speech recognition system (RR: remote recognition/transcription and OR: online recognition/self-correction by radiologist), respectively, and 2. the Report Turnaround Time (RTT) as the time interval from the entry of the first image into the PACS to the available RIS/HIS report. Two equal time periods were chosen retrospectively from the RIS database: 11/2002-2/2003 (only TD) and 11/2003-2/2004 (only RR or OR with speech recognition system [SRS]). The midterm (≥24 h, 24 h intervals) and short-term (< 24 h, 1 h intervals), RA after examination completion were calculated for all modalities and for Cr, CT, MR and XA/DS separately. The relative increase in the mid-term RA (RIMRA: related to total number of examinations in each time period) and increase in the short-term RA (ISRA: ratio of available reports during the 1st to 24th hour) were calculated. Results: Prospectively, there was a significant difference between TD/RR/OR (n=151/257/261) regarding mean TED (0.44/0.54/0.62 s [per word and image]) and mean RTT (10.47/6.65/1.27 h), respectively. Retrospectively, 37 898/39 680 reports were computed from the RIS database for the time periods of 11/2002-2/2003 and 11/2003-2/2004. For CR/CT there was a shift of the short-term RA to the first 6 hours after examination completion (mean cumulative RA 20% higher) with a more than three-fold increase in the total number of available

  11. Radiological characterisation - Know your objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When developing a programme for mapping the radiological characteristics of a facility to be decommissioned it is important to take into account the objectives of the programme. Will the results be used to plan for radiological control and selection of appropriate decontamination and dismantling techniques? Will the radiological inventory be used for dimensioning of future waste repositories? These are two examples of the applications for such studies, which could require that a radiological characterisation programme be adapted to provide the data appropriate to the intended use. The level of detail and scope needed for a radiological characterisation will also vary depending on how the data will be used. An application to free-release a facility requires a comprehensive survey and well documented analysis in order to ensure that no radioactive contamination above prescribed levels is present. A bounding calculation to determine the maximum anticipated volumes and activity of radioactive waste requires a different approach. During the past few years, older decommissioning studies for the Swedish nuclear power plants have been updated (or are in the process of being updated). The decommissioning study's main purpose is to estimate the cost for decommissioning. The cost estimation is based on material and activity inventories, which in turn is based on previous and, in some cases, updated radiological characterisations of the facilities. The radiological inventory is an important part of the study as it affects the cost of decommissioning but also the uncertainties and accuracy of the cost estimation. The presentation will discuss the challenges in specifying a radiological characterisation programme with multiple objectives, together with insights on how data delivered can be applied to yield results suitable for the intended purpose, without introducing excessive conservatism. The intent of the presentation is to define issues that can be of use in various aspects

  12. The radiological impact associated with the options available for the transportation of Intermediate Level Wastes with respect to a Minimum Power Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological impact of the options available for the transportation of ILW has been assessed. The radiation exposure from normal transport operations was estimated assuming that all ILW transport containers emit the maximum radiation levels specified in the IAEA Transport Regulations. Regardless of whether road or rail will be used to convey the ILW, the radiation doses to the public are very low. The collective dose to transport personnel has also been found to be low. However, the cautious assumptions adopted in this study indicate that certain individuals could theoretically receive significant doses. The practical significance of these doses will be determined by actual work patterns and the actual levels of radiation penetrating the ILW transport containers. The radiological consequences that might result from a notional release of radioactive material from an ILW transport container conveying Magnox silo sludges through an urban area were evaluated. No consideration was given to the precursors of the release nor to the frequency with which this release might occur. The results suggest that for a 10-6 fractional release, the radiological consequences will be extremely small. In judging these results due account must be taken of the frequency with which such releases may be predicted to occur. (author)

  13. Interactive Radiological Anatomy eLearning Solution for First Year Medical Students: Development, Integration, and Impact on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alexandra Louise; Choi, Sunhea

    2014-01-01

    A technology enhanced learning and teaching (TELT) solution, radiological anatomy (RA) eLearning, composed of a range of identification-based and guided learning activities related to normal and pathological X-ray images, was devised for the Year 1 nervous and locomotor course at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton. Its…

  14. The development of biosphere codes for use in assessment of the radiological impact of geological repositories for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statement of radiological protection criteria and measures of dose, forms the preface to a review of extant biosphere codes. Consideration is given to the implementation of the codes FOODII and NEPTUN for use with SYVAC. The selection of nuclides for consideration in SYVAC is discussed. Detailed specifications are provided for biosphere model developments desirable in the longer term. (author)

  15. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge; Larsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anticipation (ie, an earlier age at onset in successive generations) is linked to repeat expansion in neurodegenerative syndromes, whereas its role in hereditary cancer is unclear. We assessed anticipation in Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer [HNPCC]), in which DN...

  16. Assessment of radiological impact in mineral industrial plants caused by deposition of wastes with U{sup 238} and/or Th{sup 232} associated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladeira, Paula C.; Alves, Rex Nazare, E-mail: rexnazare@ime.eb.b [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ruperti Junior, Nerbe J., E-mail: nruperti@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (DIREJ/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Rejeitos Radioativos

    2011-07-01

    The industrial-mining facilities constantly produce, in Brazil and in abroad, wastes from its production, many times containing uranium and/or thorium associated. Due to the large quantities generated, these wastes are usually deposited at the site of the facility, close to the place where they were produced. Since the chains of radioactive U{sup 238} and Th{sup 232} with alpha-emitting radionuclides have long half-life, waste deposits associated with these elements may cause radiological impact on the man and on the environment, even in the long term. Mathematical models are often used to represent the biosphere and the transport of radionuclides near to the surface. Thus, it was decided, through the software {sup M}athematica{sup ,} to present a methodology based on the solution of Bateman equations for the calculation of radiological impact on individuals from the public exposed to contamination. The radiological impact appraisal was carried out considering a scenario of intrusion into landfills containing U{sup 238} and / or Th{sup 232} in post-operational phase of an industrial-mining installation. The critical group examined was represented by farmers who used water from an artesian well for daily consumption and which feed themselves on vegetables locally grown in clay soil. As a result, there was the exposure in pathways evaluated, a minor contribution of dose for ingestion of contaminated water. The conclusion of this work, show us that calculated doses were within the accepted international limits for the intrusion scenario. Parameters associated with mathematical models defining the choice of project to build a landfill for the purpose of deposition, whereas rates of doses can be estimated in each of the scenarios proposed. (author)

  17. Anxiety, anticipation, and contextual information: A test of attentional control theory

    OpenAIRE

    Cocks, AJ; Jackson, RC; Bishop, DT; Williams, AM

    2015-01-01

    We tested Attentional Control Theory’s assumptions by examining the impact of anxiety on anticipation using a dynamic, time-constrained task. Moreover, we examined the involvement of high- and low-level cognitive processes in anticipation and how their importance may interact with anxiety. Skilled and less-skilled tennis players anticipated opponents’ shots under low- and high-anxiety conditions. Three different video stimuli were presented, each presenting various degrees of contextual infor...

  18. An assessment of the radiological impact of proposed future liquid discharges from Sellafield on the population of Northern Ireland through marine aerosol and beach-use pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inhabitants of coastal regions in Northern Ireland are exposed to radionuclides discharged into the Irish Sea from Sellafield through a variety of pathways. This study has considered exposures arising from beach-use and sea-spray transfer pathway only. A model of radionuclide dispersion through the Irish Sea has been used to assess the impact of historic discharges and the proposed discharges from EARP and THORP plants to the population of Northern Ireland. The assessment has evaluated the concentrations of radioactivity in seawater and the radiological dose which would result from a future discharge scenario based on proposed authorised limits and ± 50% variants on that central case. (author)

  19. Hospital Prepardness for a Radiological Terrorist Event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological incidents present uniquely challenging scenarios for hospital emergency planning and response. Radiological terrorism has been recognized as a probable scenario with high impact and hospitals are being educated to deal with this threat. The purpose of this paper is to present the hospital's experience preparing staff and infrastructure for response to a Radiological Dispersal Device(RDD) explosion

  20. Preliminary Scoping and Assessment Study of the Potential Impacts of Community-wide Radiological Events and Subsequent Decontamination Activities on Drinking Water and Wastewater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, there has been a great deal of concern about further attacks within the United States, particularly attacks using weapons of mass destruction (WMD) or other unconventional weapons, such as a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or 'dirty bomb', which is a type of RDD. During all phases of an RDD event, secondary impacts on drinking water and wastewater systems would be possible. Secondary impacts refer to those impacts that would occur when the water systems were not the direct or intended target of the specific event. Secondary impacts would include (1) fallout from an event occurring elsewhere on water supply reservoirs and (2) runoff into storm water and sewer systems during precipitation events or as a result of cleanup and decontamination activities. To help address potential secondary impacts, a scoping and assessment study was conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Homeland Security Research Center to support its water security program. The study addresses the potential impacts on water resources and infrastructure that could result from the use of an RDD, including potential impacts from the initial attack as well as from subsequent cleanup efforts. Eight radionuclides are considered in the assessment: Am-241, Cf-252, Cs-137, Co-60, Ir-192, Pu-238, Ra-226, and Sr-90. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of the environmental radiological impact of Brazilian phosphogypsum and leachability of Ra-226 and Pb-210

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphogypsum is a by-product produced by the phosphoric acid industry, it is formed by precipitation during wet sulphuric acid processing of phosphate rock. Although phosphogypsum is mainly calcium sulphate dihydrate, it contains elevated levels of impurities, which originate from the source phosphate rock used in the phosphoric acid production. Among these impurities, radionuclides from 238U and 232Th decay series, particularly 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and Th isotopes are of most concern due to their radiotoxicity. Elemental characterization of stockpiled phosphogypsum from the two main producers of phosphoric acid, Copebras Ltda and Ultrafertil S.A. named A and C respectively, located in Cubatao, was performed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Phosphogypsum samples are enriched in rare earths elements, specifically Ce, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb and the elements Ba and Th. Radiological characterization of stockpiled phosphogypsum was performed by gamma-ray spectrometry. Activity concentrations (2,3 +- 0,5) x 102 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, (8,5 +- 2,4) x 102 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra and (8,4 +- 2,4) x 102 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb were observed for industry A phosphogypsum. For industry C phosphogypsum, activity concentrations obtained were (1,6 +- 0,6) x 102 Bq kg-''1 for 226Ra, (3,6 +- 1,2) x 102 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra and (3,4 +- 1,2) x 102 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb. The radiochemical and elemental characterization of the phosphogypsum from industry A and C show that the stacks are quite homogeneous and mainly dependent upon the origin of the phosphatic rock used as raw material. The environmental radiological impact assessment of stockpiled phosphogypsum from industry C was evaluated by taking into account internal and external doses. The critical pathways considered were contamination of groundwater, emanation of radon and direct external exposure due to the radionuclides present in the phosphogypsum. The activity concentrations obtained in the monitor wells water were (1,5 +- 0

  2. Radiological impact on the UK population of industries which use or produce materials containing enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides. Part II: the steel production industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an assessment of the radiological impact on the UK population of the steel production industry within the UK. The radiological impact of the primary industry, the waste streams produced and the use of by-product slag have been considered. Individual doses from atmospheric releases from ail currently operating integrated steel plants in the UK are less than 10 μSv y-1 for all age groups. The per caput dose rate in the UK population from 500 years of continuous steel production at the current levels is estimated to be 0.1 μSv y-1. Estimated maximum doses to workers at the steel production plant, landfill workers, and workers manufacturing and using building materials containing slag were generally less than 20 μSv y-1. The estimated radon concentrations in buildings constructed from concrete containing slag depend upon the radon emanation fraction assumed for the material. Experimental data in this area is sparse, and thus a range was considered. The estimated radon concentrations in buildings constructed from concrete containing slag ranged between 7.0 and 10.8 Bq m-3, compared with 9.9 Bq m-3 when slag-free concrete is assumed. The estimated dose from radon exposure ranges between 363 μSv y-1 and 559 μSv y-1, compared with 510 μSv y-1 when slag-free concrete is used. The estimated external dose to an individual in a house constructed using concrete containing slag is 790 μSv y-1 compared with 758 μSv y-1 for slag-free concrete. The overall effect of the use of the slag in building materials therefore ranges between a reduction in dose of 115 μSv y-1 and an increase of 81 μSv y-1. Other scenarios involving exposure of members of the public to slag resulted in doses of less than 5 μSv y-1. The estimated peak individual risk from landfill disposal of steel industry waste is less than approximately 1 10-8 y-1. Currently, radiological controls on the operation of steel production sites are confined to the authorisation by the Environment

  3. The role and impact of reference doses on diagnostic radiology, how to use them at the national level?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of patient dose audits reported in this paper for several types of examinations and various technical units have shown the importance of applications of reference dose levels in radiological practice. On the basis of national surveys slightly lower or higher standard dose reference levels (DRL) values could be justified. Continuing revision of DRL values and their extension to other types of radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations is needed

  4. Evaluating the Impact of a Canadian National Anatomy and Radiology Contouring Boot Camp for Radiation Oncology Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaswal, Jasbir [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); D' Souza, Leah; Johnson, Marjorie [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Tay, KengYeow [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences, London, Ontario (Canada); Fung, Kevin; Nichols, Anthony [Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Victoria Hospital, London, Ontario (Canada); Landis, Mark [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London Health Sciences, London, Ontario (Canada); Leung, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Kassam, Zahra [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, St. Joseph' s Health Care London, London, Ontario (Canada); Willmore, Katherine [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); D' Souza, David; Sexton, Tracy [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@lhsc.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Background: Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course (“boot camp”) designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. Methods: The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Results: Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, P<.001). Across all contoured structures, there was a 0.20 median improvement in students' average Dice score (P<.001). For individual structures, significant Dice improvements occurred in 10 structures. Residents self-reported an improved ability to contour OARs and interpret radiographs in all anatomic sites, 92% of students found the MDT format effective for their learning, and 93% found the boot camp

  5. Evaluating the Impact of a Canadian National Anatomy and Radiology Contouring Boot Camp for Radiation Oncology Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radiation therapy treatment planning has advanced over the past 2 decades, with increased emphasis on 3-dimensional imaging for target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation. Recent studies suggest a need for improved resident instruction in this area. We developed and evaluated an intensive national educational course (“boot camp”) designed to provide dedicated instruction in site-specific anatomy, radiology, and contouring using a multidisciplinary (MDT) approach. Methods: The anatomy and radiology contouring (ARC) boot camp was modeled after prior single-institution pilot studies and a needs-assessment survey. The boot camp incorporated joint lectures from radiation oncologists, anatomists, radiologists, and surgeons, with hands-on contouring instruction and small group interactive seminars using cadaveric prosections and correlative axial radiographs. Outcomes were evaluated using pretesting and posttesting, including anatomy/radiology multiple-choice questions (MCQ), timed contouring sessions (evaluated relative to a gold standard using Dice similarity metrics), and qualitative questions on satisfaction and perceived effectiveness. Analyses of pretest versus posttest scores were performed using nonparametric paired testing. Results: Twenty-nine radiation oncology residents from 10 Canadian universities participated. As part of their current training, 29%, 75%, and 21% receive anatomy, radiology, and contouring instruction, respectively. On posttest scores, the MCQ knowledge scores improved significantly (pretest mean 60% vs posttest mean 80%, P<.001). Across all contoured structures, there was a 0.20 median improvement in students' average Dice score (P<.001). For individual structures, significant Dice improvements occurred in 10 structures. Residents self-reported an improved ability to contour OARs and interpret radiographs in all anatomic sites, 92% of students found the MDT format effective for their learning, and 93% found the boot camp

  6. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  7. Emergency radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is the German, translated version of the original published in 1984 in the U.S.A., entitled 'Emergency Radiology'. The publication for the most part is made up as an atlas of the radiological images presenting the findings required for assessment of the emergency cases and their first treatment. The test parts' function is to explain the images and give the necessary information. The material is arranged in seven sections dealing with the skull, the facial part of the skull, the spine, thorax, abdominal region, the pelvis and the hip, and the limbs. With 690 figs

  8. Using the model release ARTM associated with resources for simulation geoprocessing radiological environmental impact of atmospheric emissions from a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of the dispersion of radionuclides emissions into the atmosphere arising from a nuclear reactor, in normal operation, is an important step in the process of the nuclear and environmental assessment study. These processes require an assessment study of the radiological environmental impact. However, to estimate this impact a simulation of the transport mechanisms and deposition of pollutants released into the atmosphere is required. The present study aimed at the application of the dispersion model ARTM (Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model), together with the powerful tools of the GIS (Geographic Information System) for the environmental impact assessment of a radiological nuclear reactor under typically routine and conditions. Therefore some important information from the national project for a research reactor known as Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) was considered. The information of the atmospheric emissions of the reactor, needed for the simulation of this project, was based on data of the Open Pool Australian Light Water (OPAL).Other important data that had to be collected and analyzed were the source term, the topography, the meteorology and the environmental data. The radionuclides analyzed as pollutants were 41Ar; 140Ba; 51Cr; 137Cs; 131I; 133I; 85m Kr; 87Kr; 88Kr; 140La; 133Xe; 135Xe; 3H; 90Sr. The model was run for two chronological scenarios according to their meteorological data for the years 2009 and 2010, respectively. The adoption of GIS techniques was relevant in planning, data preprocessing and in the post-processing of results as well. After pre-processing, the input data were processed by the ARTM dispersion model. Maps, charts, and tables were then produced and evaluated. According to the simulated and evaluated scenarios it could be concluded that exposure pathways that mostly contributed to the dose for individual public were 41Ar, for immersion in the plume, and 133I, for inhalation. Nevertheless, even these pathways

  9. Protecting against natural hazards - Information seeking behaviour in anticipation of severe weather events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, Jelmer

    2011-01-01

    Protection against natural hazards - Information seeking behaviour in anticipation of severe weather events Severe weather events can have considerable impact on society, including tourism organisations and tourists. Providing accurate and timely information about possible risks due to environmental

  10. An assessment of the radiological impact of the operation of selected industrial gamma radiography facilities in Metro Manila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations and radiation monitoring were done during radiographic operations conducted by eleven (11) industrial radiography institutions in 8 installations and in 4 project sites in Metro Manila, Batangas, and Antipolo. Radiological hazards involved during routine normal operations were evaluated in terms of potential doses to radiography workers and members of the public. Based on radiation monitoring results, radiography workers involved in routine and normal operations got whole body dose exposures ranging from 0.03 to 27.96 mSv/year. These are doses lower than the 50 mSv annual limit for radiation workers. Radiological consequences to radiography workers during abnormal occurrences and accident conditions were projected to be from as low as 0.03 mSv to as high as 7,500 mSv or 150 times the annual limit. Dose exposures of members of the public involved or affected were estimated to be from 0.08 mSv to doses easily exceeding the annual limit of 5 mSv. The upper limit of these doses greatly exceeds the half-lethal dose value of 4.5 Gy. This study recommends some measures to ensure safety of operating personnel from undue exposure to radiation during routine normal operations as well as during abnormal occurrences and accident conditions. (Author)

  11. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P < 0.001), 9% for the brain (982 vs. 896 mGycm, P < 0.05), 24% for the chest (425 vs. 322 mGycm, P < 0.05) and 42% for the pulmonary arteries (352 vs. 203 mGycm, P < 0.001). No significant change in DLP was found for abdominal CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose. (orig.)

  12. An education and training programme for radiological institutes: impact on the reduction of the CT radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindera, Sebastian T.; Allmen, Gabriel von; Vock, Peter; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Treier, Reto; Trueb, Philipp R. [Federal Office of Public Health, Radiation Protection Division, Berne (Switzerland); Nauer, Claude [University of Berne, University Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University Hospital Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    To establish an education and training programme for the reduction of CT radiation doses and to assess this programme's efficacy. Ten radiological institutes were counselled. The optimisation programme included a small group workshop and a lecture on radiation dose reduction strategies. The radiation dose used for five CT protocols (paranasal sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary angiography and abdomen) was assessed using the dose-length product (DLP) before and after the optimisation programme. The mean DLP values were compared with national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). The average reduction of the DLP after optimisation was 37% for the sinuses (180 vs. 113 mGycm, P < 0.001), 9% for the brain (982 vs. 896 mGycm, P < 0.05), 24% for the chest (425 vs. 322 mGycm, P < 0.05) and 42% for the pulmonary arteries (352 vs. 203 mGycm, P < 0.001). No significant change in DLP was found for abdominal CT. The post-optimisation DLP values of the sinuses, brain, chest, pulmonary arteries and abdomen were 68%, 10%, 20%, 55% and 15% below the DRL, respectively. The education and training programme for radiological institutes is effective in achieving a substantial reduction in CT radiation dose. (orig.)

  13. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB)

  14. WSPEEDI (worldwide version of SPEEDI): A computer code system for the prediction of radiological impacts on Japanese due to a nuclear accident in foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code system has been developed for near real-time dose assessment during radiological emergencies. The system WSPEEDI, the worldwide version of SPEEDI (System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) aims at predicting the radiological impact on Japanese due to a nuclear accident in foreign countries. WSPEEDI consists of a mass-consistent wind model WSYNOP for large-scale wind fields and a particle random walk model GEARN for atmospheric dispersion and dry and wet deposition of radioactivity. The models are integrated into a computer code system together with a system control software, worldwide geographic database, meteorological data processor and graphic software. The performance of the models has been evaluated using the Chernobyl case with reliable source terms, well-established meteorological data and a comprehensive monitoring database. Furthermore, the response of the system has been examined by near real-time simulations of the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX), carried out over about 2,000 km area in Europe. (author)

  15. Demonstration of mobile radiation monitoring methodology for quick assessment of radiological impact of Mumbai City Using road, rail and sea routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of background radiation levels by suitable mobile monitoring methodology through different routes (road, rail and sea) with the help of state of the art monitoring systems has been initiated with an objective to demonstrate the effectiveness of monitoring methodologies for quick radiological impact assessment during any radiological emergency and to detect the presence of orphan source(s), if any. The other objective was to establish a reliable base line data on the background radiation levels. The study was carried out in Mumbai city through different available routes. Mumbai is a densely populated city and everyday millions of commuters are crossing across the city using rail and road routes. In case of any unwarned radiological emergency in public domain, a large section of people of the city may get concerned of radioactive contamination/ high radiation exposure. In such scenario, environmental radiation monitoring and quick assessment of contamination in public domain will be a challenging task for the civil authorities. The monitoring techniques used for quick radiological impact assessment and the established base line dose rate data of Mumbai city will be very useful for planning counter measures, if required. During mobile monitoring programme of this highly populated city, the monitoring routes, selection and placement of different monitoring instruments/system within the mobile platform, data acquisition time of the respective monitoring equipments, speed of mobile monitoring station etc were optimized. State-of-the-art systems like Portable Mobile Gamma Spectrometry System (PMGSS), Compact Radiation Monitoring System integrated with GPS, Gammatracers, Portable low/high range survey meters and hand held spectrometers were used. The average of the dose rates recorded during monitoring through road routes and railway routes of Mumbai city were 60±10 nGy.h-1 and 65±15 nGy.h-1 respectively, which are attributable to terrestrial and cosmic

  16. Demonstration of mobile radiation monitoring methodology for quick assessment of radiological impact of Mumbai City using road, rail and sea routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of background radiation levels by suitable mobile monitoring methodology through different routes (road, rail and sea) with the help of state of the art monitoring systems has been initiated with an objective to demonstrate the effectiveness of monitoring methodologies for quick radiological impact assessment during any radiological emergency and to detect the presence of orphan source(s), if any. The other objective was to establish a reliable base line data on the background radiation levels. The study was carried out in Mumbai city through different available routes. Mumbai is a densely populated city and everyday millions of commuters are crossing across the city using rail and road routes. In case of any unwarned radiological emergency in public domain, a large section of people of the city may get concerned of radioactive contamination/ high radiation exposure. In such scenario, environmental radiation monitoring and quick assessment of contamination in public domain will be a challenging task for the civil authorities. The monitoring techniques used for quick radiological impact assessment and the established base line dose rate data of Mumbai city will be very useful for planning counter measures, if required. During mobile monitoring programme of this highly populated city, the monitoring routes, selection and placement of different monitoring instruments/system within the mobile platform, data acquisition time of the respective monitoring equipments, speed of mobile monitoring station etc were optimized. State-of-the-art systems like Portable Mobile Gamma Spectrometry System (PMGSS), Compact Radiation Monitoring System integrated with GPS, Gammatracers, Portable low/high range survey meters and hand held spectrometers were used. The average of the dose rates recorded during monitoring through road routes and railway routes of Mumbai city were 60±10 nGy.h-1 and 65±15 nGy.h-1 respectively, which are attributable to terrestrial and cosmic

  17. Study of the Radiological Impact of NORM in Steel Industry Case Study Egyptain Iron and Steel Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiological survey on the Egyptian Iron and Steel Company raw materials, by-products and waste samples, stored in stacks along the Autostorade Road was carried out . U-238 ( Ra-226) series, Th-232 series and K-40 activity concentrations were determined using hyper pure germanium detector. Pb-210 was measured directly by its gamma line 46.5 keV . Self absorption correction due to sample composition was carried out . Effective dose rate and annual effective dose for workers due to direct exposure to gamma radiation , dust inhalation and material dumping were calculated. Ten samples of raw material and by-products from the factory were collected from the period April 2003- May 2004 , 24 samples from the waste stacks on the Autostorade Road represent very old , intermediate and very new in storage were also collected and analyzed

  18. The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents for the Sizewell PWR The impact of adopting revised frequencies of occurrence

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N

    1983-01-01

    The radiological consequences of degraded core accidents postulated for the Sizewell PWR were assessed in an earlier study and the results published in NRPB-R137. Further analyses have since been made by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) of degraded core accidents which have led to a revision of their predicted frequencies of occurrence. The implications of these revised frequencies, in terms of the risk to the public from degraded core accidents, are evaluated in this report. Increases, by factors typically within the range of about 1.5 to 7, are predicted in the consequences, compared with those estimated in the earlier study. However, the predicted risk from degraded core accidents, despite these increases, remains exceedingly small.

  19. Argonne Radiological Impact Program (ARIP). Part II. MONITOR: a program and data base for retrieval and utilizaton of pollutant monitoring data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argonne Radiological Impact Program (ARIP) is an ongoing project that aims at developing methodologies for assessing the carcinogenic hazards associated with nuclear power development. The current report (Part II) treats the storage and access of available data on radiation and radioactivity levels in the U.S. A computer code (the MONITOR program) is presented, which can serve as a ready-access data bank for all monitoring data acquired over the past two decades. The MONITOR program currently stores data on monitoring locations, types of monitoring efforts, and types of monitoring data reported in Radiation Data and Reports by the various state and federal networks; expansion of this data base to include nuclear power facilities in operation or on order is on-going. The MONITOR code retrieves information within a search radius, or rectangle, circumscribed by parameters of latitude and longitude, and lists or maps the data as requested. The code, with examples, is given in full in the report

  20. Outcome of residual mediastinal masses of thoracic lymphomas in children: impact on management and radiological follow-up strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisse, H.; Pacquement, H.; Burdairon, E.; Plancher, C.; Neuenschwander, S. [Service de Radiologie, Institut Curie, 26 rue d`Ulm, F-75 005 Paris (France)

    1998-06-01

    Background. Following treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, patients with thoracic lymphomas may demonstrate benign residual mediastinal masses, composed of inflammatory, fibrous or necrotic tissue. Because of the potential risk of viable tumour cells within the mass, histological verification of the nature of these masses may be requested. Objective. To study the outcome of thoracic lymphomas in children in order to optimise the radiological follow-up strategy of residual mediastinal masses (RMM). Materials and methods. A retrospective study of 39 children [24 with Hodgkin`s disease (HD), 10 with non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (NHL), and 5 with anaplastic lymphoma (AL)]. The results of chest X-rays (CXR) and thoracic CT performed at the time of re-assessment were compared with the histology of the residual masses (n = 11) or the clinical course (n = 28). Results. At the time of re-evaluation, 16/39 patients had residual mediastinal enlargement (RME) on CXR, and 18/39 patients had RMM on CT. Good concordance was observed between the two imaging modalities (K = 0.69). Two children with a RMM died from extra-mediastinal progression. Two children with NHL had active residual mediastinal lesions but neither had RMM. Sixteen cases of RMM were observed in the remaining 35 children and 9 of these masses were histologically verified as benign. A favourable course was observed in these 35 cases. Conclusions. RMM are frequent and generally benign. They are well shown on CXR and have a non-specific appearance on CT. Except when required by a treatment protocol, they could be submitted to further radiological follow-up before contemplating surgical verification. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 tabs., 12 refs.

  1. Outcome of residual mediastinal masses of thoracic lymphomas in children: impact on management and radiological follow-up strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Following treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, patients with thoracic lymphomas may demonstrate benign residual mediastinal masses, composed of inflammatory, fibrous or necrotic tissue. Because of the potential risk of viable tumour cells within the mass, histological verification of the nature of these masses may be requested. Objective. To study the outcome of thoracic lymphomas in children in order to optimise the radiological follow-up strategy of residual mediastinal masses (RMM). Materials and methods. A retrospective study of 39 children [24 with Hodgkin's disease (HD), 10 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and 5 with anaplastic lymphoma (AL)]. The results of chest X-rays (CXR) and thoracic CT performed at the time of re-assessment were compared with the histology of the residual masses (n = 11) or the clinical course (n = 28). Results. At the time of re-evaluation, 16/39 patients had residual mediastinal enlargement (RME) on CXR, and 18/39 patients had RMM on CT. Good concordance was observed between the two imaging modalities (K = 0.69). Two children with a RMM died from extra-mediastinal progression. Two children with NHL had active residual mediastinal lesions but neither had RMM. Sixteen cases of RMM were observed in the remaining 35 children and 9 of these masses were histologically verified as benign. A favourable course was observed in these 35 cases. Conclusions. RMM are frequent and generally benign. They are well shown on CXR and have a non-specific appearance on CT. Except when required by a treatment protocol, they could be submitted to further radiological follow-up before contemplating surgical verification. (orig.)

  2. Radiological impacts from nuclear industrial facilities on the public and the environment - Their current magnitude and the next 50 years forecast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since their inception, nuclear industrial facilities (front-end cycle, reactors, back-end cycle) have been designed and operated with such a high level of containment that under normal operations, only a minuscule fraction of the radioactive materials used by these facilities has been released into the environment. The best indicator of the radiological impacts from nuclear industrial facilities on the environment is 'radiation dose to the public'. This integrated indicator accounts for the radiation hazard (radiotoxicity) from each radionuclide, the transfer of each radionuclide into the environment, and the exposure scenarios for the group of individuals which are potentially the most exposed among the public. Potential radiation risk for humans is expressed in units of milliSievert (mSv). From the 'radiation dose to the public' indicator, regulatory authorities have set limits to strictly control air and liquid radioactive releases from nuclear industrial facilities into the environment. Until the last decade or so, regulatory limits for radioactive releases were derived from a public dose limit of 5 mSv per year. In practice though, it is emphasized that nuclear facilities were required to comply with much lower operational limits (often about a few hundred times smaller). Over the last decade or so, the nuclear industry brought forward further significant improvements in effluent controls that resulted in significantly lower radioactive releases. A corresponding reduction of the resulting public dose impacts by about a factor 10 is not unusual. In parallel with these improvements, the regulatory framework has been updated in most countries on the basis of a reduced public dose limit of 1 mSv per year. This means that currently, public dose impacts from nuclear facilities are for the most part about 100 times smaller (and sometimes even smaller) than either the public dose limit or background radiation, and about 10 times smaller than the local

  3. [Telecommunications, health and radiology: potential synergies for the new millennium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagalla, R

    2001-01-01

    Healthcare telematics, or telemedicine, is a new methodology that applies the potentialities of telecommunications technologies to the needs of medicine, thereby greatly contributing to improving the management of clinical data and medical information for the benefit of the individual patient and the community at large. The fields of application of Telemedicine are becoming increasingly vast, and this gives rise to technical problems (interconnections) as well as professional, ethical, medico-legal and legal problems. The dissemination of Telemedicine will require changes to be made to the organisation and delivery of the medical/administrative services connected to the management of patient data, the remote provision of care, and the impact of Telemedicine itself (e.g. need to standardise the nomenclature for telemedicine services). In addition, it will also call for a careful analysis of costs and benefits for both healthcare providers and patients. One of the most interesting experiences in terms of impact is Teleradiology. This is neither a new discipline nor a (sub)specialty: the practice of Teleradiology must comply with the rules regulating any radiological medical act, the primary aim of which is to contribute to establishing - rapidly and accurately - a diagnosis that will affect treatment strategies. It may be anticipated that in some situations Teleradiology will significantly change the working practices of Radiology Specialists and Radiology Technicians. Because it is better to anticipate problems rather than wait for them to arise, our Scientific Society, which is always sensitive to emerging issues, intends to propose the following recommendations/guidelines for the use of Teleradiology in the common interest of the community and healthcare workers. The invitation to take part in the initiative proposed by the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM), the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine (AIMN) and the Italian Association of Neuroradiology

  4. Thailand NR Supply Better than Anticipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erin Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Learned from the media, though suffering from the attack of the rainstorm and flood, the Thailand NR is in better supply than anticipation this year. In the situation of the demand anxiety resulted from the European debt crisis and the sufficient inventory in China, the in- creasing supply makes the price under further pressure.

  5. Why the Economic Crisis Was Not Anticipated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    An article in the October 11 "New York Times" attributed the almost universal failure to anticipate the current economic crisis to "insanity"--more precisely, to a psychological inability to give proper weight to past events, so that if there is prosperity today people assume that it will last forever, even though they know that in the past booms…

  6. Radiological impacts of the usability of clay and kaolin as raw material in manufacturing of structural building materials in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to measure the natural radioactivity due to the presence of radionuclides in clay and kaolin, used widely as raw materials in ceramics, bricks and cement industries, and to assess the possible radiological hazards associated with these raw materials. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in 50 samples collected from different quarries were measured by means of gamma-ray spectrometry with an HPGe detector. The mean values of the measured activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K for clay samples were found to be 39.3 ± 22.7 Bq kg-1, 49.6 ± 27.9 Bq kg-1 and 569.5 ± 181.0 Bq kg-1, and for kaolin samples 82.0 ± 37.3 Bq kg-1, 94.8 ± 49.2 Bq kg-1 and 463.6 ± 544.9 Bq kg-1, respectively. These levels are comparable to those appearing in clays of European countries. The radium equivalent activity and the external (gamma) and internal (alpha) hazard indices were calculated to assess the potential radiological hazard. The calculated gamma and alpha indices varied from 0.19 to 1.17 and from 0.04 to 0.47 for clay samples and from 0.36 to 1.75 and from 0.08 to 0.63, respectively. The mean value of the gamma index for the clay samples (0.57 ± 0.24) is slightly above the criterion of 0.5 corresponding to an annual effective dose of 0.3 mSv, while the mean value of the gamma index for the kaolin samples (0.90 ± 0.49) is below the criterion of unity corresponding to an annual effective dose of 1 mSv. The calculated alpha index values for all samples are below the recommended upper level.

  7. Impact of the application of criteria of internal monitoring in radiological protection programmes in nuclear medicine services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manipulation of open sources in Nuclear Medicine services involves risks of external exposure and internal contamination. The radiological protection plan of facilities licensed by CNEN - Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - must include the evaluation of such risks and propose a programme of individual monitoring to control exposure and ensure the maintenance of conditions of radiation safety. The IAEA - International Atomic Energy Agency - recommendations presented in the Safety Guide RS-G-1.2 suggest that an internal worker monitoring program be implemented where there is a possibility of internal contamination lead to effective dose committed annual values equal to or greater than 1 mSv. This paper presents the application of such criteria to the radionuclides most frequently used in the field of Nuclear Medicine, taking into account the normal conditions of handling and the ranges of activity authorized by CNEN. It is concluded that iodine 131 manipulation for therapeutic purposes is the practice that presented the greatest risk of internal exposure of workers, requiring the adoption of a programme of internal monitoring of Nuclear Medicine services

  8. Transportation radiological risk assessment for the programmatic environmental impact statement: An overview of methodologies, assumptions, and input parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy is considering a broad range of alternatives for the future configuration of radioactive waste management at its network of facilities. Because the transportation of radioactive waste is an integral component of the management alternatives being considered, the estimated human health risks associated with both routine and accident transportation conditions must be assessed to allow a complete appraisal of the alternatives. This paper provides an overview of the technical approach being used to assess the radiological risks from the transportation of radioactive wastes. The approach presented employs the RADTRAN 4 computer code to estimate the collective population risk during routine and accident transportation conditions. Supplemental analyses are conducted using the RISKIND computer code to address areas of specific concern to individuals or population subgroups. RISKIND is used for estimating routine doses to maximally exposed individuals and for assessing the consequences of the most severe credible transportation accidents. The transportation risk assessment is designed to ensure -- through uniform and judicious selection of models, data, and assumptions -- that relative comparisons of risk among the various alternatives are meaningful. This is accomplished by uniformly applying common input parameters and assumptions to each waste type for all alternatives. The approach presented can be applied to all radioactive waste types and provides a consistent and comprehensive evaluation of transportation-related risk

  9. Study of plutonium and americium contamination in agricultural area, radiological impact caused by consumption of vegetables of this area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transuranide concentration has been studied for 30 years in vegetable production, crops in wide extensions and in private-owned farms, all of them situated within the Pu-contaminated area of Palomares due to an air accident in 1966. Based on these studies, a preliminary estimation of the radiological risk caused by the consumption of these products by the inhabitants was possible. The results show that most of the fruits present a surface contamination, which disappears or is significantly reduced when they are washed. The contamination present in edible parts of the vegetables, as well as the contamination of other products included in the diet, has facilitated the estimation of the effective dose for ingestion and the committed effective dose for 50 years for the inhabitants. The main conclusions are: those plants, whose cultivation period is less than a year, present a low level of contamination; the green parts of the plants have a higher contamination than the fruits; the Pu soil to plant transfer factor is very low. In general, those plants that have remained in the contaminated land for several years present a high contamination level; the ingestion of products from Palomares does not represent an important risk for the population, even in the case that the products were totally consumed by a critical group.( author)

  10. Radiology education: a glimpse into the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The digital revolution in radiology continues to advance rapidly. There are a number of interesting developments within radiology informatics which may have a significant impact on education and training of radiologists in the near future. These include extended functionality of handheld computers, web-based skill and knowledge assessment, standardization of radiological procedural training using simulated or virtual patients, worldwide videoconferencing via high-quality health networks such as Internet2 and global collaboration of radiological educational resources via comprehensive, multi-national databases such as the medical imaging resource centre initiative of the Radiological Society of North America. This article will explore the role of e-learning in radiology, highlight a number of useful web-based applications in this area, and explain how the current and future technological advances might best be incorporated into radiological training

  11. Radiology education: a glimpse into the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarsbrook, A.F. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andyscarsbrook1@aol.com; Graham, R.N.J. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Perriss, R.W. [Department of Radiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The digital revolution in radiology continues to advance rapidly. There are a number of interesting developments within radiology informatics which may have a significant impact on education and training of radiologists in the near future. These include extended functionality of handheld computers, web-based skill and knowledge assessment, standardization of radiological procedural training using simulated or virtual patients, worldwide videoconferencing via high-quality health networks such as Internet2 and global collaboration of radiological educational resources via comprehensive, multi-national databases such as the medical imaging resource centre initiative of the Radiological Society of North America. This article will explore the role of e-learning in radiology, highlight a number of useful web-based applications in this area, and explain how the current and future technological advances might best be incorporated into radiological training.

  12. Radiological protection of patients in diagnostic and interventional radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An International Conference on the Radiological Protection of Patients in Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization was held in Malaga, Spain, from 26 to 30 March 2001. The Government of Spain hosted this Conference through the Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, the Junta de Andalucia, the Universidad de Malaga and the Grupo de Investigacion en Proteccion Radiologica de la Universidad de Malaga (PRUMA). The Conference was organized in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the following professional societies: International Organization of Medical Physicists (IOMP), International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA), International Society of Radiation Oncology (ISRO), International Society of Radiology (ISR), International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists (ISRRT) and World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB). This publication contains contributed papers submitted to the Conference Programme Committee. The papers are in one of the two working languages of this Conference, English and Spanish. The topics covered by the Conference are as follows: Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (radiography), Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology (fluoroscopy), Radiological protection issues in specific uses of diagnostic radiology, such as mammography and computed tomography (with special consideration of the impact of digital techniques), Radiological protection in interventional radiology, including fluoroscopy not carried out by radiologists, Radiological protection of patients in nuclear medicine, Developing and

  13. Risk management in radiology departments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Horea; Craciun; Kshitij; Mankad; Jeremy; Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as aresult of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients.

  14. Risk management in radiology departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Horea; Mankad, Kshitij; Lynch, Jeremy

    2015-06-28

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as a result of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients. PMID:26120383

  15. Radiological scenario modeling using the Hotspot code and potential financial impact of treatment of radiation induced cancer to the public; Modelagem de cenario radiologico utilizando o codigo Hotspot e potenciais impactos financeiros para tratamento de cancer radioinduzido ao publico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Gabriel Fidalgo Queiroz da; Andrade, Edson Ramos de; Rebello, Wilson Freitas; Araujo, Olga Maria Oliveira de, E-mail: profgabriel.fisica@gmail.com, E-mail: fisica.dna@gmail.com, E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: olgafisica2013@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The work aims to develop a methodology that is able to estimate the financial impact in a radiological emergency events, considering the radiation induced cancer, particularly leukemia. Considering a RDD - Radiological Dispersive Device, consisting of explosives and cesium-137 as radioactive material, a scenario building on the Rio de Janeiro was modeled. The convergence of a risk modeling platform (HotSpot 3.0), the analysis of excess relative risks for humans (BEIR V-Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V), considering scenarios composed of contaminated areas, are secondary goals.

  16. Estimation of the environmental or radiological impact in the event of accidental release of radionuclides in a DCLL fusion reactor; Estimacion del impacto radiologico ambiental en caso de liberacion accidental de radionucleidos en un reactor de fusion DCLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palermo, I.; Gomez Ros, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Mota, F.

    2013-07-01

    Tritium production and activation in the LiPb products can pose a radiological risk in the event of accidental release in a fusion reactor. Within the research programme Consolider TECNO{sub F}US (CSD2008-079) fusion technology has developed a design for a reactor with regenerative wrap with dual refrigeration (DCLL). The purpose of this communication is to present estimates of the radiological impact derived from an accidental release of radionuclides from the circuit of LiPb provinients. (Author)

  17. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton. (KRM)

  18. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  19. Cardiothoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wealth of cardiothoracic websites exist on the internet. What follows is a list of the higher quality resources currently available which should save you time searching them out for yourself. Many of the sites listed cater for undergraduates and trainee or non-specialist radiologists, nevertheless these may also be of interest to specialists in thoracic radiology, particularly for use in teaching. Hyperlinks are available in the electronic version of this article and were all active at the time of going to press (April 2005)

  20. Dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since dental radiology has become a subject of the final examinations in dental medicine, there is a demand for literature presenting the basic principles of this subject field. The textbook in hand is primarily intended as an introduction for students attending the roentgenography lessons, or for students preparing for their dental medicine examinations. The book discusses the following aspects: physical principles and fundamentals; technical fundamentals of X-ray generation; image formation; X-ray films and film processing; intraoral imaging techniques; extraoral imaging techniques; special methods; panoramic technique; biological radiation effects; basic principles of radiation protection; legal aspects (X-ray Ordinance). (orig.)

  1. Radiological health review of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0026-D) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, US Department of Energy. Report EEG-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review of radiological health considerations contains a number of concerns, questions and recommendations that should be addressed by the Department of Energy in the final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Using the assumptions contained in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS), the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) calculated a number of radiation doses and the results were found to be in general agreement with those presented in the DEIS. The doses resulting from the operational and long-range releases from WIPP to the general population are no more than a fraction of existing radiation doses to the public. However, there are a number of technical considerations in the assessment of radiation exposure that were not adequately evaluated in the DEIS. They are discussed in this review. A number of additional dosage estimates have been identified that need to be calculated by both DOE and EEG. As the DEIS did not contain estimates of the amounts of radioactivity to be permanently located in the repository, it was necessary to calculate these amounts. Health effects, transportation, waste acceptance criteria, site evaluation, site selection criteria, operational exposure, the experimental waste program, long term radiation releases, retrievability, and decommissioning are the categories of the DEIS which were evaluated

  2. Anticipation of physical causality guides eye movements

    OpenAIRE

    Wende, Kim; Theunissen, Laetitia; Missal, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Causality is a unique feature of human perception. We present here a behavioral investigation of the influence of physical causality during visual pursuit of object collisions. Pursuit and saccadic eye movements of human subjects were recorded during ocular pursuit of two concurrently launched targets, one that moved according to the laws of Newtonian mechanics (the causal target) and the other one that moved in a physically implausible direction (the non-causal target). We found that anticip...

  3. Intelligent Anticipated Exploration of Web Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Ianni, Giovambattista

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we describe a web search agent, called Global Search Agent (hereafter GSA for short). GSA integrates and enhances several search techniques in order to achieve significant improvements in the user-perceived quality of delivered information as compared to usual web search engines. GSA features intelligent merging of relevant documents from different search engines, anticipated selective exploration and evaluation of links from the current result set, automated derivation of refin...

  4. Impact of clinical audit on the quality of radiological practices - Experiences from a national audit programme supported by a national steering committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Clinical audit is a systematic examination or review of medical radiological procedures against standards of good practices, with the aim to improve the quality and outcome of patient care. It is a cross cutting, multidisciplinary issue which can have a broad impact on quality of radiological practices. Clinical audit, long applied in other fields of medicine, was introduced to medical radiological practices by an EC Directive (97/43/EURATOM). In Finland, the requirements on clinical audit were implemented by appropriate modifications of the radiation protection regulations. A special joint-stock company Qualisan Oy, supported by the major professional societies of Finland, has provided so far the necessary clinical audit services. About 150 auditors from volunteers among the major professional groups have been trained. By now, all radiological units in Finland, comprising about 450 health care units for diagnostic radiology, 30 units for nuclear medicine and 10 units for radiotherapy, have been audited by Qualisan for the first time. In 2004, a national Steering Committee for the coordination, development and follow-up of the clinical audits was established by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. This is a multidisciplinary group of clinical experts, independent of Qualisan or other auditing organizations. The first results of the national audit programme, with the actions by the Steering Committee, are the subject of this paper. Methods. At first, the national Steering Committee prepared guidelines on the detailed requirements of competence, experience and independence of the auditors. After about 25% of the units had been audited (excluding radiotherapy by that time), the committee carried out a comprehensive survey of the outcome of audits. Recently, the committee has organized meetings with other invited experts in order to supplement the audits by in-depth assessment of selected practices. Results. According to Finnish regulation, clinical

  5. Dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  6. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  7. Investigation of the radiological impact of naturally occurring radionuclides from the usage of phosphate and organic fertilizers on farmlands in the New Juaben Municipality of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological impact of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) from the usage of phosphate and organic fertilizers in the New Juaben Municipality of Ghana was investigated. The activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were measured in seven (7) widely used phosphate and organic fertilizers using gamma spectroscopy. The activity concentrations were found to be 32.10±2.60 Bq/kg, 12.20±1.60 Bq/kg and 3005.50±68.80 Bq/kg respectively. The radioactivity level index (Iγ ) which gives an estimate of the level of risk associated with natural radionuclides in specific material was found to be higher than the recommended limit of one (1) in some of the fertilizer samples collected from storage. The storage also recorded a relatively high dose rates (ranging from 96-624 μSv/a) compared to the surrounding background (ranging from 109-241 μSv/a) suggesting that the storage of large quantities of these fertilizers can lead to a possible increase in the dose rates. The mean activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in cultivated (fertilized) soils were found to be 12.50±3.30 Bq/kg, 10.60 ± 2.80 Bq/kg and 206.0 ± 30.2 Bq/kg respectively. These values were relatively higher than those found in their respective virgin (unfertilized) soils (226Ra- 9.0±1.7 Bq/kg; 232Th - 8.10±1.70 Bq/kg; and 40K-139.0±13.3 Bq/kg). This might be considered as an indication that the use of fertilizers to increase soil fertility enhances the level of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in agricultural soils. The averages of other risk indices such as radium equivalent, the absorbed dose rate in air at 1m above the ground, the mean outdoor annual effective dose and the external hazard index estimated for the cultivated soils were found to be higher than their corresponding virgin soils but generally lower than the world averages. Therefore, the radiological impact associated with NORMs in the cultivated lands as a result of the application of fertilizers is expected to be low

  8. Radiological protection for supervisor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is divided into two parts. One is for principle for radiological protection, and the other is for radiation safety management. It mentions background of radiological protection, principle for radiological protection, basic amount of radiological protection and conception, limit of radiological protection and practice for radiological protection. It also explains summary of radiation safety management, management on personal radiation, management on local radiation principle of accident on radiation and environment radiation and measurement equipment for radiation control.

  9. Integrated impact analysis of a nuclear power plant: evaluation of accident scenarios, radiological dose estimates and protective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential environmental impact associated to hypothetical accident scenarios in nuclear power plants can be better evaluated by using an integrated analysis approach. This approach would also help the planning of protective measures to protect public and the environment. The objective of this work identification of critical areas and groups of population, in terms of protective measures, by taking a geographical information system approach in the region of Angra dos Reis, where the Brazilian nuclear power plant is located

  10. Determination of Radionuclide Activity and Radiological Impact from the Intake of Milk, Wheat Flour, Tea and Coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consumption of food containing radionuclides may contribute to internal dose. Studies on radionuclide content in several types of food should be done to determine effects to human. The objectives of this research are to i) determine the activity concentration in milk powder, tea, flour and coffee samples, ii) to calculate the annual exposure dose in food products and iii) to determine the lifetime cancer risk amongst Malaysians. The concentrations of 226Ra, 238U, 232Th and 40K were determined using gamma ray spectrometry. The study found that the mean activity concentration in milk powder, tea, flour and coffee are 1.6±0.8, 3.3±0.4 , 1.2±0.2, 2.1±0.7 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 1.6±0.2, 10.7±3.3, 2.1±0.6 and 1.8±0.2 Bq kg-1 for 238U, 1.8±0.5, 9.5±2.2, 1.9±0.1, 2.2±0.3 Bq kg-1 for 232Th and 190.2±49.6, 395.4 ±11.9, 57.4±28.5, 429.4±305.5 Bq kg-1 for 40K, respectively. The annual internal exposure dose for children through consumption of milk powder are 63.5 μSv for 226Ra, 32.2 μSv for 232Th, 2.8 μSv for 238U and 326.5 μSv for the 40K, respectively. Whereas, the annual internal exposure dose for adults through consumption of wheat flour, tea and coffee are 13.7 μSv for 226Ra, 18.0 μSv for 232Th, 5.1 μSv year-1 for 238U and 24.2 μSv year-1 for 40K, respectively. All radionuclide exposure doses are 425 μSv year-1 for children and 61.0 μSv year-1 for adults. This value provides a risk factor of 1. x10-3 cancer for children and 1.7x10-4 for adults. It means that the probability of lifetime cancer risk increment of 0.18 % for children (18 people in 10 000) and 0.017 % for adults (1.7 people in 10 000). These values are lower than the ICRP cancer risk factors for the public of 2.5x10-3 and the total risk from all sources of radiation dose based on the global annual dose of 2.4 mSv year-1 which is 6x10-3. The study revealed that the intake of milk powder, flour, tea and coffee do not contribute a significant health hazard and is considered radiological safe

  11. Monitor displays in radiology: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitor displays play an important role in modern radiology practice. Practicing radiologists need to be familiar with the various performance parameters of medical-grade displays. A certain amount of technical knowledge is useful when making purchasing decisions since the right choice of equipment can have a great impact on the accuracy, efficiency, and speed in the radiology department

  12. Postmodern Anticipations with E. A. Poe

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian-Vasile SZABO

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to serve as an introduction to a postmodern reading of Edgar Allan Poe’s short prose. Adventurous approach, as the author manifested himself as a writer in the first part of the 19th century, when romanticism revived and modern paradigm was founded. Based on the assessments expressed on postmodernism and using the tools proposed by various field researchers, we discover in Poe’s work anticipations of the narrative structure method specific for our present t...

  13. Role for Genetic Anticipation in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Timshel, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge; Larsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    mismatch repair (MMR) defects cause early and accelerated tumor development with a broad tumor spectrum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the population-based Danish HNPCC registry, 407 MMR gene mutation carriers who had developed cancer associated with Lynch syndrome, were identified. These individuals formed 290...... remained when cancers diagnosed at surveillance were excluded, applied to maternal as well as paternal inheritance, and was independent of the MMR gene mutated. CONCLUSION: The effect from anticipation demonstrated in this large, population-based Lynch syndrome cohort underscores the need to initiate...

  14. Roentgenology, radiology, radiobiology. 7. national congress on roentgenology, radiology, radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    339 abstracts of papers read at the congress are presented. They deal with the application of the conventional and modern diagnostic techniques like biomedical radiography, computerized tomography, ultrasonography, NMR imaging, DSA; radiotherapy; radiation hygiene and radiology. Some investigations concerning Kozloduj-NPP environment and post-Chernobyl impact on Bulgarian population are included as well. (I.M.)

  15. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Anllares; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Anllares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Anllares coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  16. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of La Robla; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de La Robla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the La Robla coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  17. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Lada; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Lada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of 238{sup U}, 235{sup U}, 232{sup T}h and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Lada coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  18. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of La Robla; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de La Robla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Mora, J. C.; Trueba, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Baeza, A.; Corbacho, J. A.; Guillen, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of 238{sup U}, 235{sup U}, 232{sup T}h and also the 40{sup K}, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the non-combustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the La Robla coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  19. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Abono; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Abono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the {sup 4}0K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Abono coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  20. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Meirama; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Meirama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Baeza, A.; Mora, J. C.; Corbacho, J. A.; Trueba, C.; Guillen, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of {sup 2}38U, {sup 2}35U, {sup 2}32Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the noncombustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Meirama coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  1. Use of and Lessons Learned in Using a Surrogate Radionuclide Approach in the Remediation of Radiologically Impacted Soils and Sediments at the Middlesex Sampling Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the use of applying a radionuclide surrogate approach at the Middlesex Sampling Plant Site (MSP) and the lessons learned in doing so. The Draft Final Record of Decision for the MSP Soils Operable Unit includes use of a surrogate radionuclide approach to guide and verify that the radiological Remedial Action (RA) standards were met. Specifically, Radium-226 (Ra-226) was used as a surrogate for total uranium. The surrogate approach impacts the real time excavation and final status survey processes. Upon completion of excavation activities and prior to backfilling a final status survey of the twenty-two (22) on site and one (1) offsite survey units was performed in accordance with the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) protocol. Early on in this process it was determined that radium was not 100 percent effective as a surrogate and alternative means for guiding and confirming the effectiveness of the remediation had to be developed. This paper will explore the lessons learned in this action, and the key planning and execution decisions used to resolve this change in plan. Other projects with multiple radionuclide contaminants and those considering the use of a surrogate radionuclide approach may benefit from this paper and presentation. (authors)

  2. Radiological Impact Study of the Coal-Fired Power Plant of Velilla; Estudio del Impacto Radiologico de la Central Termica de Carbon de Velilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, B.; Mora, J. c.; Trueba, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Baeza, A.; Corbacho, J. a.; Guillen, J.; Miralles, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Coal, fuel used in thermal power plants for electricity production, contains variable concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides from natural disintegration series of 238U, 235U, 232Th and also the 40K, which are enhanced in the wastes and coproducts due to the industrial process. For this reason, natural radionuclides which are part of the non-combustible fraction of coal, except those volatiles which incorporate directly to the flue gases, concentrates and are partitioned between fly ashes and bottom ashes. This enhancement could cause, to the workers of the installation and to members of the public around the plant, an increase in the exposure which should be assessed under the radiation protection point of view. Present report collect the results obtained from a screening assessment of the radiological impact derived from the normal operation of the Velilla coal-fired power plant. The project where this assessment was performed is part of a bigger project which is jointly developed by the Unit of Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (UPRPYMA) of CIEMAT and the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory of the Extremadura University (LARUEX) in agreement with the Spanish Association of the Electrical Industry (ENUSA). (Author)

  3. Radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer: radiologic impact of out-patient treatment with 100 to 150 mCi Iodine-131 activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate exposure and dosimetry to family members and environment due to outpatient radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Methods: Twenty patients were treated with 100-150 mCi of iodine-131 on an out-patient basis. Family members dosimetry (n = 27) and potential doses inside the house were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters. Surface contamination and radioactive wastes were also monitored. Results: Less than 1.0 mSv doses were found in 26 co-habitants and 2.8 mSv in a single case (inferior to the acceptable value of 5.0 mSv/procedure). Potential doses in the houses were inferior to 0.25 mSv, excluding the patients bedroom (mean value = 0.69 mSv). Surface contamination (mean = 4.2 Bq.cm-2) were below clearance levels. Radioactive wastes generated had a volume of 2.5 liters and a total activity estimated in 90 μCi, with a calculated exposure close to the background radiation levels. Conclusions: No radiological impact was detected after iodine therapy with 100-150 mCi on an out-patient basis followed by experienced professionals. (author)

  4. Need to monitoring the particulate components and gaseous components of the I-131 in air, on Radiological monitoring networks. impact of the accident of Fukushima Dai-chi in Spain; Necesidad de monitorizar las componentes particulada y gaseosa del {sup 1}31I en aire, en redes de vigilancia radiologica. Impacto en Espana del accidente de Fukushima DAI-ICHI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza Espasa, A.; Caballero Andrada, M.; Corbacho Merino, J. A.; Ontalba Salamanca, M. A.; Rodriguez Perulero, A.; Valencia Corrales, D.; Vasco Vargas, J.

    2013-07-01

    Following a nuclear accident with significant overseas evacuations, it should be accurately determined concentration radio iodines into the atmosphere, given its important contribution to the radiological impact produced. Automatic networks radiation monitoring aim to provide as quickly as possible, reliable information on these radiological changes, to take necessary countermeasures. (Author)

  5. Radiologic protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With this work and employing the radioprotection criterion, the authors pretend to minimize the risks associated to this practice; without losing the quality of the radiologic image. Odontology should perform the following criterions: 1. Justification: all operation of practice that implies exposition to radiations, should be reweighed, through an analysis of risks versus benefits, with the purpose to assure, that the total detriment will be small, compared to resultant benefit of this activity. 2. Optimization: all of the exposures should be maintained as low as reasonable possible, considering the social and economic factors. 3. Dose limit: any dose limit system should be considered as a top condition, nota as an admissible level. (S. Grainger)

  6. A comparison of the radiologic impact of electricity production by means of pressurized water reactors or Tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impacts of respectively light water reactors and a planned fusion reactor, for which tritium-deuterium fusion reactions will act as energy source, have been compared. The comparison is based on a generated capacity of 1 GWe.y, using the following criteria: fuel inventories, radioactive releases, collective effective dose equivalent commitments to the public and the volume of waste. The accidental risk is not introduced. Fusion reactor parameters are still subject to uncertainties, which prevent accurate quantification of radionuclide releases (tritium apart) from the nuclear plant. Only orders of magnitude extrapolated from values for the NET Tokamak are given. Despite these uncertainties, it would seem more interesting, from the dosimetric point of view, to use fusion reactors to produce electricity, although problems of radioactive releases, handling and long-term storage of radioactive waste would remain. Fusion reactors also generate high-level wastes with long-term exposure rates that are lower than those of light water reactors

  7. Radiological impact of a municipal solid waste landfill on soil and groundwater using 2-D resistivity tomography and gamma ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological impacts of a municipal solid waste landfill on soil and groundwater in Port Harcourt municipality was investigated by integrating 2-D resistivity imaging and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The objective of the study is to determine the lateral and vertical limits of leachate contamination, and to estimate the radioactivity concentrations in soil and groundwater. Results show that the soil and ground water have been contaminated by landfill emissions and radioactive materials throughout the landfill area. The distribution of the contamination is uneven and spotty, both horizontally and vertically, and has penetrated to depths exceeding 31m into the ground water aquifer. The primary contaminants found in the site were leachate, landfill gases, and 40K, 226Ra, and 228Ra radionuclides. The mean absorbed dose rates of 31.98nGy/hr, 10.51nGy/hr and 6.98nGy/hr, and mean dose rate equivalents of 0.28mSv/yr, 0.09mSv/yr and 0.06mSv/yr were obtained for the soil, leachate and water samples, respectively. The mean absorbed and equivalent dose rates in the soil and water samples are greater than their controls, suggesting that the landfill area is contaminated. These results are comparable to those reported for other waste sites in the area and lower than the maximum permitted limits for the general public of 1mSv/yr and 0.1mSv/yr for soil and water, respectively. These therefore, have no immediate radiological health burden on the inhabitants who depend on the soil and groundwater for their crops and potable water supply, except for the effects of disease causing micro-organism and non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the leachate. However, with continuous consumption of crop products and intake of groundwater, increase in the activity concentration and dose rates of these radionuclides may occur over time, with adverse effects on humans.

  8. The Bionic Anticipation of Natural Disasters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helmut Tributsch

    2005-01-01

    After major natural disasters, such as the recent earthquake-tsunami event in South Asia, reports appear about the mysterious ability of animals to anticipate and to escape the impending danger. This is an opportunity to recall the long history of this phenomenon in the traditions of different civilizations, to evaluate Chinese efforts, 30 -40 years ago, to use this phenomenon for earthquake prediction, and to judge its state of acceptance in modern science. An effort is made to introduce this phenomenon as a research field of modern bionics. The timing is favorable since, increasingly, infrared thermal anomalies, monitored from satellite, suggesting litho-atmospheric processes, are found to precede earthquakes.They were unexpected by seismologists and are here suggested to essentially reflect the energy conversion patterns responsible for the signals monitored by animals. The aim is to learn from animals in the long term how natural disasters can better be anticipated, and how simple technical warning systems can be developed. Some challenges are analyzed. One is interpretation of the nature of energy release prior to the main earthquake disaster resulting in "macro-anomaly" precursors,another is better to understand the effect on animal senses. The role of non-linear cooperative phenomena including tsunamitype waves is emphasized.

  9. Postmodern Anticipations with E. A. Poe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian-Vasile SZABO

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to serve as an introduction to a postmodern reading of Edgar Allan Poe’s short prose. Adventurous approach, as the author manifested himself as a writer in the first part of the 19th century, when romanticism revived and modern paradigm was founded. Based on the assessments expressed on postmodernism and using the tools proposed by various field researchers, we discover in Poe’s work anticipations of the narrative structure method specific for our present times. His concern for the newspaper reader, the insertion of general press topics and articles in his prose, the use of the sensational side of events in his newspaper reports, the ironic approach of real and diegetic facts allow a fresh reading, revaluating this surprising writer. Remarkable are his projections which come close to the SF genre, his confidence in the progress of science and the permanent impairment of this confidence, generated by the fear of world destruction. The conclusion would be that Poe’s prose allows certain postmodern anticipative projections to be decoded and the research to be extended beyond the conventional boundaries of modernity.

  10. Anticipation learning from the past the Russian/Soviet contributions to the science of anticipation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the work of leading scientists from Russia, Georgia, Estonia, Lithuania, Israel, and the USA, revealing major insights long unknown to the scientific community. Without any doubt their work will provide a springboard for further research in anticipation. Until recently, Robert Rosen (Anticipatory Systems) and Mihai Nadin (MIND – Anticipation and Chaos) were deemed forerunners in this still new knowledge domain. The distinguished neurobiologist, Steven Rose, pointed to the fact that Soviet neuropsychological theories have not on the whole been well received by Western science. These earlier insights as presented in this volume make an important contribution to the foundation of the science of anticipation. It is shown that the daring hypotheses and rich experimental evidence produced by Bernstein, Beritashvili, Ukhtomsky, Anokhin, and Uznadze, among others—extend foundational work to aspects of neuroscience, physiology, motorics, education.

  11. Radiological Control Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  12. Radiological Control Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records

  13. Application of fisheries management techniques to assessing impacts: task I report. [Assessment of chemical, radiological, and thermal impacts of nuclear power plants on fish populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Baker, K.S.; Fickeisen, D.H.; Metzger, R.M.; Skalski, J.R.

    1979-03-01

    Task I efforts examined the available fisheries management techniques and assessed their potential application in a confirmatory monitoring program. The objective of such monitoring programs is to confirm that the prediction of an insignificant impact (usually made in the FES) was correct. Fisheries resource managers have developed several tools for assessing the fish population response to stress (exploitation) and they were thought potentially useful for detecting nuclear power plant impacts. Techniques in three categories were examined; catch removal, population dynamics, and nondestructive censuses, and the report contains their description, examples of application, advantages, and disadvantages. The techniques applied at nuclear power plant sites were examined in detail to provide information on implementation and variability of specific approaches. The most suitable techniques to incorporate into a monitoring program confirming no impact appear to be those based on Catch Per Unity Effort (CPUE) and hydroacoustic data. In some specific cases, age and growth studies and indirect census techniques may be beneficial. Recommendations for task II efforts to incorporate these techniques into monitoring program designs are presented. These include development of guidelines for; (1) designing and implementing a data collection program; (2) interpreting these data and assessing the occurrence of impact, and (3) establishment of the monitoring program's ability to detect changes in the affected populations.

  14. Anticipated Activities in Maritime Work, Process Control, and Business Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2004-01-01

    Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory....

  15. Radiation Protection Research: Radiological Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaert, T

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological impact assessment are (1) to elaborate and to improve methods and guidelines for the evaluation of restoration options for contaminated sites; (2) to develop, test and improve biosphere models for the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal in near-surface or geological repositories; (3) to asses the impact of releases from nuclear or industrial installations. Main achievements in these areas for 2000 are summarised.

  16. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  17. Anthropolis, revue d’anticipation culturelle1

    OpenAIRE

    Abélès, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Le projet d’Anthropolis est issu d’une constatation simple. Nous vivons dans un univers où le futur est désormais partie inté­grante du présent. Notre discours et nos comportements sont faits d’anticipations permanentes. Le virtuel est l’une des modalités essentielles du contemporain. L’appropriation massive des techno­logies de l’information a contribué à cette situation. De même, il est devenu parfois difficile de déterminer ce qui relève de la science proprement dite ou de la science‑ficti...

  18. Anticipating flow assurance challenges through geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flannery, M. [Fluid Evaluation and Sampling Technologies (FEAST) Team, Shell International Exploration and Production (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The behaviour of reservoir fluids pose a challenge at all stages of petroleum production, from the reservoir to refinery. The challenges sometimes stem from sub-optimal operations or inappropriate system design, with assumptions of similar fluid properties across the field. Hydrocarbon fluid phase behaviour is the product of local PVT conditions and the geochemical identity of the fluids. An appropriate development scenario along with anticipation of production challenges, can benefit from early integration of engineering and geochemical understanding of hydrocarbon fluids. This paper presented field examples of how the kerogen type and maturity, and later post-generation alteration processes such as biodegradation, water washing, TSR can influence likely flow assurance challenges in the production stream. The confounding issues of multiple charges and overlaying signatures were also discussed.

  19. Needs of anticipation for transport operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COGEMA LOGISTICS (formerly Transnucleaire) has designed and manufactured several thousands of casks, and owns fleet of more than 4000 casks. Benefiting from more than 40 years of experience in cask shipment COGEMA LOGISTICS has demonstrated an outstanding performance in transportation and has integrated all feed back from past successful operations in current ones. Early anticipation of needs, i.e. at preliminary design step, is of major importance from a technical point of view (capacity, interface, handling means, licensing), and also in terms of political and public acceptance issues from the design step. This paper will highlight for each step required for the implementation of an optimal transport and storage system: Decision to proceed (including political aspects)-Design of casks to be used (including operational interface)-Licensing process-Manufacturing process-Transport plan, Public Acceptance-Loading Operations-Transport-Maintenance operations. (authors)

  20. EP1000 anticipated transient without scram analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper summarizes the main results of the Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) analysis activity, performed for the European Passive Plant Program (EPP). The behavior of the EP1000 plant following an ATWS has been analyzed by means of the RELAP5/Mod3.2 code. An ATWS is defined as an Anticipated Transient accompanied by a common mode failure in the reactor protection system, such that the control rods do not scram as required to mitigate the consequences of the transient. According to the experience gained in PWR design, the limiting ATWS events, in a PWR, have been found to be the heatup transients caused by a reduction of heat removal capability by the secondary side of the plant. For this reason, the Loss of Normal Feedwater initiating event, to which the failure of the reactor scram is associated, has been analyzed. The purpose of the study is to verify the performance requirements set for the core feedback characteristics (that is to evaluate the effect of the low boron core neutron kinetic parameters), the overpressure protection system, and boration systems to cope with the EUR Acceptance Criteria for ATWS. Another purpose of this analysis was to support development of revised PSA success criteria that would reduce the contribution of ATWS to the large release frequency (LRF). The low boron core improved the basic EP1000 response to an ATWS event. In particular, the peak pressure was significantly lower than that which would result from a standard core configuration. The improved ATWS analysis results also permitted improved ATWS PSA success criteria. For example, the reduced peak pressure allows the use of other plant features to mitigate the event, including manual initiation of feed-bleed cooling in the event of PRHR HX failure. As a result, the core melt frequency and especially the LRF are significantly reduced. (author)

  1. Time discounting and pain anticipation. Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brañas Garza, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with pain anticipation experienced before medical procedures. our experimental results show that individuals with lower time discount factors are more prone to suffer pain in advance. We provide a framework to rationalize the connection between pain anticipation and impatience. in this set up, more impatient subjects, who only value very near events, mainly take into account the present negative effects of medical procedures (the costs, whereas more patient individuals have a net positive valuation of medical events, given that they are able to value both the cost incurred now and all the benefits to be accrued in the future.

    Este artículo trata de la anticipación del dolor experimentada antes de los procedimientos médicos. nuestros resultados experimentales muestran que los individuos con factor de descuento temporal más bajo son más proclives a sufrir dolor por adelantado. el artículo proporciona un marco en el que racionalizar la relación existente entre impaciencia y anticipación del dolor. en este marco, los sujetos más impacientes, que evalúan sólo los eventos muy próximos en el tiempo, focalizan su atención principalmente en los efectos negativos de los procedimientos médicos (sólo los costes, mientras que los individuos más pacientes tienen una valoración neta positiva de los actos médicos puesto que valoran tanto el coste en el que se incurre en el presente como los beneficios que se obtendrán en el futuro.

  2. Preliminary evaluation of radiological impact over the population due to radioactive gases and aerosol releases during normal exploitation of Juragua's Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we made an estimation of radiological influences of gases and aerosoles releases over the population during the normal exploitation of Juragua's Nuclear Power Station. We determined the behaviour of the dilution factor and other factors that causes ground contamination. Also, it was calculated the quantities of equivalent doses by different exposition ways and it was done an evaluation of the individual and collective radiological risk

  3. Phosphategypsum wastes in Venice lagoon. Radiological impact; Le discariche di fosfogessi nella laguna di Venezia. Valutazioni preliminari dell'impatto radiologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, M; Blasi, M; Guogang, J.; Rosamilia, S.; Sansone, U. [Agenzia Nazionale per la Protezione dell' Ambiente, Rome (Italy); Biancotto, R.; Bidoli, P.; Sepulcri, D. [Agenzia Regionale di Prevenzione e Protezione del Veneto, Venice (Italy). Dipt. provinciale di Venezia; Cavolo, F. [Smilax, Mira, VE (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The phosphoric minerals utilized in phosphoric acid production, presents high concentrations of radioactive materials: U238, Th 232, K 40. The phosphogypsum is the waste material obtained in the phosphoric acid production in wet process. This type of production method is employed for many years in Venice lagoon (Porto Marghera chemical plants). In this paper are reported evaluations of radiological impact on aquatic environment of lagoon. [Italian] Con il termine di fosfogessi si intende comunemente il materiale di risulta che si ottiene nella produzione di acido fosforico attraverso la via umida (attacco acido). Questa tipologia di produzione che ha operato per diversi decenni a Porto Marghera, e' finalizzata allo scopo di ottenere acido fosforico principalmente per l'industria dei fertilizzanti e quindi come prodotto intermedio per la chimica e per le preparazioni alimentari. Il fosforo, elemento principale della reazione, era ricavato da rocce fosfatiche di origine sedimentaria marina provenienti per lo piu' dall'Africa settentrionale. Il sistema produttivo utilizzato negli impianti di Porto Marghera era basato su una reazione principale, che partendo dal minerale attraverso un attacco acido, produceva acido fosforico: Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} (Minerale Fosforico) + 3H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (Acido Solforico) + 3H{sub 2}O (Acqua) {yields} 2H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} (Acido fosforico) + 3CaSO{sub 4}H{sub 2}O (Solfato di calcio (gesso)). In particolare il minerale era preventivamente macinato e vagliato, quindi si procedeva alla sua miscelazione con l'acido fosforico ed alla successiva reazione del composto ottenuto.

  4. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs

  5. The rise of sea level. To understand and to anticipate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By proposing and briefly commenting graphs and drawings, this publication propose brief presentations of the main issues related to sea level rise: global warming and climate disturbance, description of the phenomenon of sea level rise (difference between sea ice and ground ice, melting of glaciers), increase of sea level rise during the twentieth century, territories at risk (examples of Greenland, Tuvalu, Shanghai), acceleration of ice melting during the twenty first century with many coastal areas at risk, already noticed and possible future impacts in France (glaciers runoff, threatened coasts, example of the Xynthia tempest), how to be united and to anticipate (a threat for millions of people, adaptation to sea level rise, limitation of global warming to limit sea level rise)

  6. Anticipated Impacts of GMO Introduction on Production Pattern In Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Maciejczak, Mariusz; Was, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The paper takes one significant element of the agriculture production – use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) – and considers it in relation to the production pattern in Polish farms. It asks if under the ceteris paribus conditions the use of GMO plants in Polish farms will have influence on the cropping structure. To answer this question only a scientific and theoretical assumption has been applied that GMO cultivation is permitted without restrictions in Poland. The approach combines ...

  7. Radiology applications of financial accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibenhaut, Mark H

    2005-03-01

    A basic knowledge of financial accounting can help radiologists analyze business opportunities and examine the potential impacts of new technology or predict the adverse consequences of new competitors entering their service area. The income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement are the three basic financial statements that document the current financial position of the radiology practice and allow managers to monitor the ongoing financial operations of the enterprise. Pro forma, or hypothetical, financial statements can be generated to predict the financial impact of specific business decisions or investments on the profitability of the practice. Sensitivity analysis, or what-if scenarios, can be performed to determine the potential impact of changing key revenue, investment, operating cost or financial assumptions. By viewing radiology as both a profession and a business, radiologists can optimize their use of scarce economic resources and maximize the return on their financial investments. PMID:17411807

  8. Modelling of the radiological impact of radioactive waste dumping in the Arctic Seas. Report of the Modelling and Assessment Working Group of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work is summarized carried out by the Modelling and Assessment Working Group in 1994-1996. The Modelling and Assessment Working Group was established within the framework of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) launched by the IAEA in 1993 with the objectives of modelling the environmental dispersal and transport of nuclides to be potentially released from the dumped objects and of assessing the associated radiological impact on man and biota. Models were developed to model the dispersal of the pollutants and for the assessment of the radiological consequences of the releases from the dumped wastes in the Arctic. The results of the model intercomparison exercise were used as a basis on which to evaluate the estimate of concentration fields when detailed source term scenarios were used and also to assess the uncertainties in ensuing dose calculations. The descriptions and modelling work was divided into three main phases: description of the area, collection of relevant and necessary information; extension to and development of predictive models including an extensive model inter-comparison and finally prediction of radiological impact, used in the evaluation of the need and options for remediation

  9. Anticipation as a Strategy: A Design Paradigm for Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mary-Anne; Gärdenfors, Peter; Johnston, Benjamin; Wightwick, Glenn

    Anticipation plays a crucial role during any action, particularly in agents operating in open, complex and dynamic environments. In this paper we consider the role of anticipation as a strategy from a design perspective. Anticipation is a crucial skill in sporting games like soccer, tennis and cricket. We explore the role of anticipation in robot soccer matches in the context of reaching the RoboCup vision to develop a robot soccer team capable of defeating the FIFA World Champions in 2050. Anticipation in soccer can be planned or emergent but whether planned or emergent, anticipation can be designed. Two key obstacles stand in the way of developing more anticipatory robot systems; an impoverished understanding of the "anticipation" process/capability and a lack of know-how in the design of anticipatory systems. Several teams at RoboCup have developed remarkable preemptive behaviors. The CMU Dive and UTS Dodge are two compelling examples. In this paper we take steps towards designing robots that can adopt anticipatory behaviors by proposing an innovative model of anticipation as a strategy that specifies the key characteristics of anticipation behaviors to be developed. The model can drive the design of autonomous systems by providing a means to explore and to represent anticipation requirements. Our approach is to analyze anticipation as a strategy and then to use the insights obtained to design a reference model that can be used to specify a set of anticipatory requirements for guiding an autonomous robot soccer system.

  10. Educational treasures in Radiology: The Radiology Olympics - striving for gold in Radiology education

    OpenAIRE

    Talanow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on Radiology Olympics (www.RadiologyOlympics.com) - a collaboration with the international Radiology community for Radiology education, Radiolopolis (www.Radiolopolis.com). The Radiology Olympics honour the movers and shakers in Radiology education and offer an easy to use platform for educating medical professionals based on Radiology cases.

  11. Eye lens dose estimation during interventional radiology and its impact on the existing radiation protection and safety program: in the context with new International Commission on Radiological Protection guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional radiology procedures are used for diagnosing certain medical conditions. The radiologists and medical professionals are exposed to ionizing radiation from X-rays of the equipments and also from scattered radiation during these procedures. The radiation exposure to the eye is more important to be assessed while performing such procedures. ICRP has revised the annual dose limit to the lens of the eye from 150 mSv to 20 mSv. In view of this revision, a study was carried out to evaluate the dose to the lens of the eye during interventional radiology. The paper gives the details of calibration of TLDs using a head phantom, predict annual equivalent dose and also highlight the dependence of dose on the position of TLD on the head. It is observed the predicted annual equivalent doses to the lens of eye are in the range of 25 mGy to 37 mGy. The selection of dosimeter placement may also result in an uncertainty of -14% to 20%. (author)

  12. Anticipated consumer reaction to irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction on first hearing of food irradiation is horror, revulsion, and disbelief that we could seriously anticipate such a thing. Ignorance coupled with fear of anything to do with the nuclear industry is the reason for such extreme reaction. Before anyone rushes into marketing irradiated foods, a lot of careful preparation must be done. A consumer education program is essential. The consumers must be told why it is proposed to irradiate food, what benefits it will bring to the public. Enough need will have to be demonstrated to overcome the supposed risk factor. Symbol on all irradiated foods must not be used to alert or alarm the consumer but rather as a piece of information. It will be necessary to be ever vigilant, to keep up the diligent training of food irradiators, food handlers and food inspectors. Irradiation is not a substitute for good manufacturing practice. So by using a different name or symbol, irradiated foods will soon be a part of our lives

  13. Radiological Dispersion Devices: are we prepared?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Already before the events of September 11th 2001 concern was raised about the spread of orphan sources and their potential use in Radiological Dispersion Devices by terrorist groups. Although most of the simulated scenarios foresee a rather limited direct health impact on the population, the affected region would suffer from the indirect consequences such as social disruption, cleanup requirements and economic costs. The nature of such a radiological attack would anyway be different compared to conventional radiological accidents, basically because it can happen anywhere at any time. Part of the response resides in a general preparedness scheme incorporating attacks with Radiological Dispersion Devices. Training of different potential intervention teams is essential. The response would consist of a prioritised list of actions adapted to the circumstances. As the psychosocial dimension of the crisis could be worse than the purely radiological one, an adapted communication strategy with the public aspect would be a key issue

  14. Will Marriage Matter? Effects of Marriage Anticipated by Same-Sex Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Julie L.; Gotta, Gabrielle; Green, Robert-Jay

    2012-01-01

    The current study used an online survey to explore the anticipated impact of legalized marriage on partners in same-sex couples living in California. These data were gathered prior to the California Supreme Court decision in May 2008 legalizing same-sex marriage, which held sway for 5 months before California Proposition 8 eliminating same-sex…

  15. Radiology trainer. Musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book enables students to simulate examinations. The Radiology Trainer series comprises the whole knowledge of radiology in the form of case studies for self-testing. It is based on the best-sorted German-language collection of radiological examinations of all organ regions. Step by step, radiological knowledge is trained in order to make diagnoses more efficient. The book series ensures optimal preparation for the final medical examinations and is also a valuable tool for practical training. (orig.)

  16. Mobile computing for radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications. PMID:24200475

  17. Making the link between radiological assessment, nuclear safety assessment and environmental impact assessment, as applied to unloading of the Lepse spent fuel storage vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planning and optimisation of radioactive waste management operations is a complicated task involving scientific, technical and social issues. There are many factors which have to be balanced, involving trade-offs such as those between safety now and long term safety; between protection of human health and protection of the environment as a whole; between protection of workers and protection of the public; and between mitigation of risks of major accidents and mitigation of routine low-level but certain to occur risks. Managing the spent fuel currently stored on the Lepse vessel in Murmansk offers as big a challenge as any other in this context. The Russian Federation state regulatory process imposes strict requirements on operators to demonstrate adequate safety, environmental and human health protection. Practically, however, there is little experience in Russia or elsewhere on how to combine all the issues referred to above within an overall assessment that leads to informed decision making. The paper will describe the components of assessment work being considered within the context of the regulatory planning of Lepse unloading operations. The scope will focus on radiation protection issues but also include non-radioactive pollution risks and other safety issues have to be taken into account if a truly optimal allocation and application of resources is to be made. Consideration will be given to radiation worker dose and other health risk assessments for routine operations, safety assessments of special operations such as spent fuel handling; and the radiological and other environmental and human health impacts of planned releases of effluents to the biosphere. The need to identify and collate particular relevant information will discussed and the links between the different components of the overall assessment will be identified with a view to improving the overall effectiveness of the assessment process. The problem of combining all the information coherently

  18. Anticipated and experienced emotions in environmental risk perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Bohm

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective forecasting with respect to two environmental risks (ozone depletion, air pollution was investigated by studying tourists who travelled to either Australia or Bangkok and were thus confronted with one of these risks. We measured anticipated outcome and anticipated emotions before the journey, actually experienced outcome and actually experienced emotions during the journey, and anticipated outcome and emotions concerning a future encounter with the same risk after the journey. Results indicate that tourists underestimate (air pollution or correctly predict (ozone depletion both the seriousness of the outcome and their emotional reactions. The relationship between actual outcome and actual emotions is stronger than that between anticipated outcome and anticipated emotions. Furthermore, tourists learn from their travel experience and adjust their anticipations concerning future encounters with the environmental risk. Findings suggest that the domain of environmental risks differs from personal outcomes with respect to the process of affective forecasting.

  19. Anticipated and experienced emotions in environmental risk perception

    OpenAIRE

    Gisela Bohm; Hans-Rudiger Pfister

    2008-01-01

    Affective forecasting with respect to two environmental risks (ozone depletion, air pollution) was investigated by studying tourists who travelled to either Australia or Bangkok and were thus confronted with one of these risks. We measured anticipated outcome and anticipated emotions before the journey, actually experienced outcome and actually experienced emotions during the journey, and anticipated outcome and emotions concerning a future encounter with the same risk after the journey. Resu...

  20. Current status of development of the HARP software tool serving to estimate radiological impacts of accidental atmospheric radioactivity releases on the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current state of development of the HARP (HAzardous Radioactivity Propagation) software tool serving to estimate radiological burden on the population arising from accidental radioactivity leaks into the air is described with focus on the deterministic HAVAR-DET approach. The deterministic root of the HARP system estimates atmospheric propagation of radioactivity and its subsequent infiltration into the human body. (orig.)

  1. Conventional dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently, conventional dental radiology was performed by dentists and orofacial surgeons. Due to the rapid development of radiological technique, the demand of radiological advice is increasing. The radiologists see more and more dental patients in their daily routine. The aim of this article is to give an overview on established dental radiology and a glimpse into the future. Conventional dental radiology and digital radiography are presently in use. Intraoral technique comprises dental films, bite-wing views and occlusal radiographs. Panoramic views and cephalometric radiographs are done with extraoral technique. Digital radiography lacks all processes in behalf of film development. It leads to dose reduction and enables image manipulation. (orig.)

  2. Qualitative evaluation of environmental radiological impact in a phosphate associated uranium conventional mine: Santa Quiteria Project, CE, Brazil; Avaliacao qualitativa do impacto radiologico ambiental em uma mineracao convencional de fosfato com uranio associado: o Projeto Santa Quiteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Rocio G. dos; Santo, Aline Sa E., E-mail: rocio@ird.gov.br, E-mail: alinesah@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and evaluate qualitatively the main potential sources of mineral and installation terms of Santa Quiteria, CE, Brazil, evaluating their possible impacts on the environment. The key terms sources in the production of phosphoric acid are usually: the dig of the mines, tailings dams and phospho plaster stack. Thus, this work intends to inform the academic community about this issue, as well as the population in general and also, acting proactively in order to warn about the possible environmental impacts, so that actions to compensate, minimize or avoid these radiological impacts on the environment, can be included in the planning of the industrial mineral project of Santa Quiteria (author)

  3. Jail Inmates' Perceived and Anticipated Stigma: Implications for Post-release Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelly; Stuewig, Jeffrey; Tangney, June

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that offenders perceive stigma, but the accuracy of these perceptions has not been assessed, nor their impact on successful reintegration. In a longitudinal study, jail inmates (N = 168) reported perceptions of stigma toward criminals and anticipated stigma just prior to release. A diverse college sample completed a parallel survey assessing stigmatizing attitudes toward criminals. Inmates' perceived stigma was significantly higher than students' stigmatizing attitudes. Perceived stigma positively predicted post-release employment for African-American inmates, but not for Caucasians. Anticipated stigma negatively predicted arrests for Caucasian inmates, but not for African Americans. Perceived and anticipated stigma may have different implications for reintegration, and these implications may vary across race. PMID:25045324

  4. The effect of current and anticipated body pride and shame on dietary restraint and caloric intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troop, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Studies have established a link between body shame and eating disorder symptoms and behaviours. However, few have differentiated current feelings of body shame from those anticipated with weight change and none has examined the effects of these on subsequent eating behaviour. In this paper, a measure of body pride and shame was developed (Study 1) for the purposes of using it in a subsequent longitudinal study (Study 2). Two hundred and forty two women were recruited from a university and the general population and participated in Study 1, completing the Body Pride and Shame (BPS) scale either online or offline, as well as a number of validating measures. In Study 2, 40 female students completed the BPS, as well as a measure of dietary restraint, and subsequently recorded their dietary intake everyday for the next seven days. Study 1 identified and validated subscales of current body pride/shame as well as pride/shame that is anticipated were the individual to gain weight or lose weight. In Study 2, over and above levels of dietary restraint, current feelings of body shame predicted eating more calories over the next 7 days while the anticipation of shame with weight gain predicted eating fewer calories. Although previous research has only measured current feelings of body shame, the present studies showed that anticipated shame also impacts on subsequent behaviour. Interventions that regulate anticipated as well as current emotions, and that do not merely challenge cognitions, may be important in changing eating behaviour. PMID:26456412

  5. Anticipated transients without scram for light water reactors. Appendices. Staff report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning scram failure probability, rod drive failure data, ATWS rule and ATWS requirements, treatment of steam generator tube failures in ATWS evaluation, radiological consequences assessments, ATWS study to include parameter variations and equipment reliability in probabilistic accident analysis, PWR MTC for ATWS, safety valve flows, ATWS contribution to risk, fuel integrity, value-impact analysis, and analytical methods

  6. Anticipating Public Acceptance: The Hydrogen Case

    OpenAIRE

    Di Ruggero, O.

    2014-01-01

    Current energy related issues, such as climate change or the oil depletion, demand technological and societal change towards new ways of producing and using energy. One of the challenges coming with the development of these new solutions relates to the impact that these technologies will have on society, and how people will react to these technologies. This phenomenon is often referred to as public acceptance. The relevance of considering public acceptance of emerging technologies is self-evi...

  7. Patient expectations for radiology in noninteractive encounters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred seven patients who underwent procedures not involving direct interaction with a radiologist were interviewed regarding their experience. The 545 responses divided clearly into items regarding the physical facility (parking, room temperature, etc) and items directly under control of radiology. The latter were twofold: waiting time and technologist behavior. Specific behaviors judged critical for technologists included ability to impart clear instructions, interpersonal behaviors, concern for physical comfort, and skill in procedure performance. A final question involved the role of the ''unseen'' radiologist. Patients desired a high level of skill in study interpretation and that the radiologist possess several positive personality traits even though they never anticipated direct contact

  8. Site identification: environmental and radiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiological and environmental considerations are recognized as being of utmost importance in planning, siting, licensing, operating, and decommissioning a high-level nuclear waste repository. In such a complex undertaking, it is important to identify the major concerns anticipated to arise in all of these phases in order to address them as early as possible in the program. Three representative activities/studies are summarized which will identify some of the important radiological and environmental considerations which must be addressed through this prolonged sequence of events and will indicate how these considerations are being addressed. It should be emphasized that these are only three of many which could have been chosen. The three key activities/studies are: (1) the NWTS Program criteria for identifying repository sites, (2) the generic guide for preparing environmental evaluations for deep drilling and (3) a preliminary environmental assessment for disposal of mined rock during excavation of a repository

  9. The non-anticipation of the asynchronous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad, Serban E.

    2008-01-01

    The asynchronous systems are the models of the asynchronous circuits from the digital electrical engineering and non-anticipation is one of the most important properties in systems theory. Our present purpose is to introduce several concepts of non-anticipation of the asynchronous systems.

  10. Age Differences in Risky Decisions: The Role of Anticipated Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiwei; Ma, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of anticipated emotions in risky decisions of young and older adults. Young and older adults were asked to make a choice between an alternative that may have either a very positive or a very negative consequence and an alternative that was relatively safe. Meanwhile, they rated their anticipated emotions if…

  11. Radiological protection and environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the beginning of its industrial activity twenty five years ago, the Juzbado Factory of Enusa Group has always upheld a strong commitment with Radiological Protection and environmental respect and protection. Consequently, the evolution of dose shows a downward trend over the years. Although production has been increased gradually, the average doses to workers have stayed below 1 mSv. In order to identify and prevent the potential environmental impacts of its industrial activity and minimize its impact on the surroundings, the facility develops and environmental management system according to UNE-EN-ISO 14001 since 1999. (Author)

  12. A new car-following model considering velocity anticipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full velocity difference model proposed by Jiang et al. [2001 Phys. Rev. E 64 017101] has been improved by introducing velocity anticipation. Velocity anticipation means the follower estimates the future velocity of the leader. The stability condition of the new model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. Theoretical results show that the stability region increases when we increase the anticipation time interval. The mKdV equation is derived to describe the kink–antikink soliton wave and obtain the coexisting stability line. The delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density are obtained in this model. Numerical simulations exhibit that when we increase the anticipation time interval enough, the new model could avoid accidents under urgent braking cases. Also, the traffic jam could be suppressed by considering the anticipation velocity. All results demonstrate that this model is an improvement on the full velocity difference model. (general)

  13. 210Pb and 210Po concentrations in the Venice lagoon ecosystem (Italy) and the potential radiological impact to the local public and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the possible radiological impact to the local public and environment from a phosphogypsum stockpile, 210Po and 210Pb concentrations in river water, lagoon water, suspended matter, superficial sediment, algae and bivalves samples collected in Venice lagoon area have been investigated. The results show that the mean 210Po and 210Pb concentrations in river water are 1.42 ± 0.36 mBq x l-1 and 1.46 ± 0.39 mBq x l-1 with a mean 210Po/210Pb ratio of 0.98 ± 0.17 and about 60% of them are associated with the particulate; 210Po and 210Pb contribution from the phosphogypsum stockpile to the river water is negligible. Higher 210Po (2.61-5.67 mBq x l-1) and 210Pb (1.31-3.62 mBq x l-1) concentrations in the lagoon waters have been observed if compared with the literature values. About 60% of 210Po and 210Pb are found in the soluble form with a mean 210Po/210Pb ratio of 1.79 ± 1.47. 210Po and 210Pb concentrations in 28 out 37 sediment samples ranged from 26 to 45 Bq x kg-1 (dry weight), only 9 sediments with 210Po and 210Pb concentrations greater than 45 Bq x kg-1 are found and most of them are located 1-4 km near the phosphogypsum stockpile. The elevated 210Po and 210Pb concentrations in the sediments may be due to the contamination from the phosphogypsum stockpile. The mean 210Po/210Pb ratio (0.986 ± 0.049) in the sediments shows that 210Po and 210Pb exist in nearly secular equilibrium. 210Po and 210Pb concentrations in algae vary with different species. The mean 210Po and 210Pb concentrations in Gracilaria compress and Ulva laetevirens which show a similar behavior, are 3.18 ± 1.23 Bq x kg-1 and 2.42 ± 1.26 Bq x kg-1 (fresh weight), respectively, with a mean 210Po/210Pb ratio of 1.45 ± 0.34. The mean concentration factors with respect to the filtered water are 1096 ± 424 for 210Po and 1299 ± 680 for 210Pb. The mean 210Po and 210Pb concentrations in the soft part of Mytilus edulis are 23.2 ± 9.7 Bq x kg-1 and 0.537 ± 0.203 Bq x kg-1 (fresh

  14. The impact of quality assurance in medical radiology in raising the quality of life and the role of medical physicist in this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal on establishing quality assurance programmes in diagnostic radiology at the European level is to provide explanations on regulations, which had been developed by International Organizations on the level of the existing knowledge on the use of ionizing radiation for medical diagnosis. Since it is well known that diagnostic radiological users often produce poor quality images and are applying to patients unnecessary high radiation exposure the criteria for performance characteristics related to good imaging quality and patient exposure had been established. The correct application of the principles of quality assurance and quality control in relation to patient exposure needs to be standardised on a general European level, since radiographs should be generally comparable. The implementation of quality assurance programmes and quality control methods could lead to more accurate diagnosis and better informed decisions regarding treatment. The role and responsibility of medical physicists in the process of image production, radiation exposure and quality assurance in diagnostic radiology is now implemented in this Directive. The tasks of the medical physicist in this process had been identified and explained. (author)

  15. INTRODUCTION: Anticipated changes in the global atmospheric water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Richard P.; Liepert, Beate G.

    2010-06-01

    intensification of precipitation (O'Gorman and Schneider 2009) and analysis of observed and simulated changes in extreme rainfall for Europe (Lenderink and van Mijgaard 2008) and over tropical oceans by Allan et al (2010) appear to corroborate this. Radiative absorption by water vapour (Previdi 2010, Stephens and Ellis 2008) also provides a thermodynamic feedback on the water cycle, and explains why climate model projections of global precipitation and evaporation of around 1-3% K-1 are muted with respect to the expected 7% K-1 increases in low-level moisture. Climate models achieve dynamical responses through reductions in strength of the Walker circulation (Vecchi et al 2006) and small yet systematic changes in the atmospheric boundary layer over the ocean that modify evaporation (Richter and Xie 2008). A further consequence is anticipated sub-tropical drying (Neelin et al 2006, Chou et al 2007); Allan et al (2010) confirm a decline in dry sub-tropical precipitation while the wet regions become wetter both in model simulations and satellite-based observations. Discrepancies between observed and climate model simulated hydrological response to warming (Wentz et al 2007, Yu and Weller 2007) are of immediate concern in understanding and predicting future responses. Over decadal time-scales it is important to establish whether such discrepancies relate to the observing system, climate modeling deficiencies, or are a statistical artifact of the brevity of the satellite records (Liepert and Previdi 2009). Techniques for extracting information on century-scale changes in precipitation are emerging (Smith et al 2009) but are also subject to severe limitations. Past decadal-scale changes in the water cycle may be further influenced by regionally and temporally varying forcings and resulting feedbacks which must be represented realistically by models (Andrews et al 2009). The radiative impact of aerosols and their indirect effects on clouds and precipitation (Liepert et al 2004) provide

  16. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board of...... Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology....

  17. Proposed Nuclear Power Plants in the UK-Potential Radiological Implications for Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK Government has identified up to eight locations for the construction of new nuclear power plants by 2025. Five of these locations are on the Irish Sea coast. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, RPII was requested by the Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government to undertake an assessment of the potential radiological impacts on Ireland from this New Build Programme. This report presents the findings of the potential impacts on Ireland of both the anticipated routine radioactive discharges and of a range of postulated nuclear accident scenarios. The following points are the principal findings of the report. Given the prevailing wind direction in Ireland, radioactive contamination in the air, either from routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants or accidental releases, will most often be transported away from Ireland. The routine operation of the proposed nuclear power plants will have no measurable radiological impact on Ireland or the Irish marine environment. The severe accident scenarios assessed ranged in their estimated frequency of occurrance from 1 in 50,000 to 1 in 33 million per year. The assessment used a weather pattern that maximised the transfer of radioactivity to Ireland. For the severe accident scenarios assessed, food controls or agriculture protective measures would generally be required in Ireland to reduce exposure of the population so as to mitigate potential long-term health effects. In the accident scenario with an estimated 1 in 33 million chance of occurring, short-term measures such as staying indoors would also be advised as a precautionary measure. In general, the accidents with higher potential impact on Ireland are the ones least likely to occur. Regardless of the radiological impact, any accident at the proposed nuclear power plants leading to an increase of radioactivity levels in Ireland would have a socio-economic impact on Ireland. A major accidental release of radioactivity to

  18. A Bayesian belief network of threat anticipation and terrorist motivations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Davenport, Kristen M.; Schryver, Jack C.

    2010-04-01

    Recent events highlight the need for efficient tools for anticipating the threat posed by terrorists, whether individual or groups. Antiterrorism includes fostering awareness of potential threats, deterring aggressors, developing security measures, planning for future events, halting an event in process, and ultimately mitigating and managing the consequences of an event. To analyze such components, one must understand various aspects of threat elements like physical assets and their economic and social impacts. To this aim, we developed a three-layer Bayesian belief network (BBN) model that takes into consideration the relative threat of an attack against a particular asset (physical layer) as well as the individual psychology and motivations that would induce a person to either act alone or join a terrorist group and commit terrorist acts (social and economic layers). After researching the many possible motivations to become a terrorist, the main factors are compiled and sorted into categories such as initial and personal indicators, exclusion factors, and predictive behaviors. Assessing such threats requires combining information from disparate data sources most of which involve uncertainties. BBN combines these data in a coherent, analytically defensible, and understandable manner. The developed BBN model takes into consideration the likelihood and consequence of a threat in order to draw inferences about the risk of a terrorist attack so that mitigation efforts can be optimally deployed. The model is constructed using a network engineering process that treats the probability distributions of all the BBN nodes within the broader context of the system development process.

  19. Socioeconomic trends in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For radiology the socioeconomic environment is a topic of increasing importance. In addition to the well-known important scientific developments in radiology such as interventional MRI, several other major trends can be recognized: (1) changes in the delivery of health care, in which all kinds of managed care are developing and will influence the practice of radiology, and (2) the process of computerization and digitization. The socioeconomic environment of radiology will be transformed by the developments in managed care, teleradiology and the integration of information systems. If radiologists want to manage future radiology departments they must have an understanding of the changes in the fields of economics and politics that are taking place and that will increasingly influence radiology. Some important and recognizable aspects of these changes will be described here. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation guideline for the study of the radiological impact of based nuclear installations (INB) presented in support of releases authorization demands; Guide d'examen pour l'etude de l'impact radiologique d'une installation nucleaire de base (INB) fournie a l'appui des demandes d'autorisation de rejets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, M.; Despres, A.; Supervil, S.; Conte, D.; Hubert, P.; Oudiz, A.; Champion, D

    2002-10-01

    In the case of a license demand for the effluents release and water taking for a nuclear installation, the operating must realize a study of the nuclear effluents radiological impact on the environment and the public health. In this context, the study presents technical and methodological specifications which led the Direction of the Nuclear Installations Safety (DSIN) and the General Direction of the Health (DGS) to ask the IPSN the elaboration of a guideline to help these studies evaluation. The guideline presents the regulatory context, the description of the installations, the treatment and the control processes, the rules of management, the description of the environment, the estimation of the radiological impacts and the environment control system definition. (A.L.B.)

  1. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A book has been written on the procedures used in diagnostic radiology covering the subject areas of the urinary tract, gastrointestinal and biliary tracts, vascular radiology, cerebral angiography and arthrography. The explanation of each procedure follows a common layout which includes indications, equipment, technique and complications. The book is intended to be a reference book for radiology trainees learning to do practical procedures for the first time and also for practising radiologists not habitually performing certain diagnostic procedures. (UK)

  2. Textbook of basic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book provides an excellent guide to the wide array of imaging techniques and technologies available today. The author, a highly respected educator in radiology, presents the available imaging choices in a succinct and forthright format. He includes imaging philosophies, the current imaging modalities, positioning, the relationship between common diseases and their imaging, and how to utilize the radiology specialist in consultation. Contents: Introduction; Imaging Modalities; Positioning; Bone Imaging; Chest Imaging; Gastrointestinal Imaging; Ultrasound; Neuroradiology; Interventional Radiology; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Teleradiology; Summary; Index

  3. The radiological protection adviser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New regulations governing the use of ionising radiations are expected to be introduced and come into force in 1984. The regulations will require the appointment of a qualified expert, a Radiological Protection Adviser, to advise employers whose activities involve the use of ionising radiations. To meet this requirement employers may be able to use the services of the National Radiological Protection Board or alternatively the services of local university radiological safety adviser, or some other suitably qualified consultant. This article describes the role of the Radiological Protection Adviser and outlines the contribution the NRPB can make. (author)

  4. Moral Disengagement, Anticipated Social Outcomes and Adolescents' Alcohol Use: Parallel Latent Growth Curve Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Catherine A; Bussey, Kay

    2015-10-01

    Moral disengagement is a social cognitive process that has been extensively applied to transgressive behaviors, including delinquency, aggression and illicit substance use. However, there has been limited research on moral disengagement as it relates to underage drinking. The current study aimed to examine moral disengagement contextualized to underage drinking and its longitudinal relationship to alcohol use. Moreover, the social context in which adolescent alcohol use typically occurs was also considered, with a specific emphasis on the social sanctions, or social outcomes, that adolescents anticipate receiving from friends for their alcohol use. Adolescents were assessed across three time-points, 8 months apart. The longitudinal sample consisted of 382 (46% female) underage drinkers (12-16 years at T1). Parallel latent growth curve analysis was used to examine the bi-directional influence of initial moral disengagement, anticipated social outcomes, and alcohol use on subsequent growth in moral disengagement, anticipated social outcomes and alcohol use. The interrelation of initial scores and growth curves was also assessed. The findings revealed that, in the binary parallel analyses, initial moral disengagement and anticipated social outcomes both significantly predicted changes in alcohol use across time. Moreover, initial anticipated social outcomes predicted changes in moral disengagement. These findings were not consistently found when all three process analyses were included in a single model. The results emphasize the impact of social context on moral disengagement and suggest that by targeting adolescents' propensity to justify or excuse their drinking, as well as the social outcomes adolescents anticipate for being drunk, it may be possible to reduce their underage drinking. PMID:26318080

  5. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses. PMID:26656575

  6. Improving strategies to prevent and prepare for radiological attack

    OpenAIRE

    Dubay, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    The threat of radiological attack against the United States is viewed as credible, imminent, and capable of inflicting lasting negative impacts on domestic society. The United States is pursuing detection/denial and public preparedness strategies in order to prevent and minimize the effects of a possible radiological terrorist attack. This thesis surveys the prevalence of radiological material in society, as well as major U.S. programs to secure international trade, U.S. borders, and radiolo...

  7. Anticipating the uncertain: economic modeling and climate change policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Svenn

    2012-11-01

    With this thesis I wish to contribute to the understanding of how uncertainty and the anticipation of future events by economic actors affect climate policies. The thesis consists of four papers. Two papers are analytical models which explicitly consider that emissions are caused by extracting scarce fossil fuels which in the future must be replaced by clean technologies. The other two are so called numerical integrated assessment models. Such models represent the world economy, the climate system and the interactions between those two quantitatively, complementing more abstract theoretical work. Should policy makers discriminate between subsidizing renewable energy sources such as wind or solar power, and technologies such as carbon capture and storage (CCS)? Focusing only on the dynamic supply of fossil fuels and hence Co{sub 2}, we find here that cheaper future renewables cause extraction to speed up, lower costs of CCS may delay it. CCS hence may dampen the dynamic inefficiency caused by the absence of comprehensive climate policies today. Does it matter whether uncertainty about future damage assessment is due to scientific complexities or stems from the political process? In paper two, I find that political and scientific uncertainties have opposing effects on the incentives to investment in renewables and the extraction of fossil fuels: The prospect of scientific learning about the climate system increases investment incentives and, ceteris paribus, slows extraction down; uncertainty about future political constellations does the opposite. The optimal carbon tax under scientific uncertainty equals expected marginal damages, whereas political uncertainty demands a tax below marginal damages that decreases over time. Does uncertainty about economic growth impact optimal climate policy today? Here we are the first to consistently analyze how uncertainty about future economic growth affects optimal emission reductions and the optimal social cost of carbon. We

  8. The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements Should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emissions' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon

  9. Trends in radiological examinations of the spine: frequencies of plain radiography, CT and MRI examinations and impact on collective effective dose in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerretzen, I.; Olerud, H. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Bakke, K. [Oslo University College, Oslo (Norway). Radiography Programme

    2005-09-15

    The present study aimed at examining possible shifts in modalities from plain radiography (CR) to Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the spine over the last decade and assessing the potential changes in the collective effective dose from spine examinations. Nationwide surveys have been carried out to assess the numbers of radiological examinations conducted in Norway in 2002 and 1993. The results show a considerable increase of MRI and CT examination frequencies and a modest decrease of the CR frequency implying an increase of 50 % in the collective effective dose from medical imaging of the spine. Some possible explanations and consequences of the observed results are discussed.

  10. Role of affective attitudes and anticipated affective reactions in predicting health behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Conner, M; McEachan, R.; Taylor, N; O'Hara, J.; Lawton, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Two measures of affect-affective attitude (AA) and anticipated affective reaction (AAR)- have frequently been used individually, but rarely simultaneously, in correlational studies predicting health behaviors. This research assessed their individual and combined impact in predicting intention and action for a range of health behaviors, controlling for theory of planned behavior (TPB) variables. Method: Self-reported intentions and performance of health behaviors were the main outco...

  11. Dynamic Analytical Capability to Better Understand and Anticipate Extremist Shifts Within Populations under Authoritarian Regimes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Michael Lewis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to create a generalizable data- and theory-supported capability to better understand and anticipate (with quantifiable uncertainty): 1) how the dynamics of allegiance formations between various groups and society are impacted by active conflict and by third-party interventions and 2) how/why extremist allegiances co-evolve over time due to changing geopolitical, sociocultural, and military conditions.

  12. Physics of Radiology

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Harold Elford

    1983-01-01

    Authority, comprehensivity and a consummate manner of presentation have been hallmarks of The Physics of Radiology since it first saw publication some three decades past. This Fourth Edition adheres to that tradition but again updates the context. It thoroughly integrates ideas recently advanced and practices lately effected. Students and professionals alike will continue to view it, in essence, as the bible of radiological physics.

  13. Medical Ethics in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the recent developments in radiological techniques, the role of radiology in the clinical management of patients is ever increasing and in turn, so is the importance of radiology in patient management. Thus far, there have been few open discussions about medical ethics related to radiology in Korea. Hence, concern about medical ethics as an essential field of radiology should be part of an improved resident training program and patient management. The categories of medical ethics related with radiology are ethics in the radiological management of patient, the relationship of radiologists with other medical professionals or companies, the hazard level of radiation for patients and radiologists, quality assurance of image products and modalities, research ethics, and other ethics issues related to teleradiology and fusion imaging. In order to achieve the goal of respectful progress in radiology as well as minimizing any adverse reaction from other medical professions or society, we should establish a strong basis of medical ethics through the continuous concern and self education

  14. Characterization of radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper identifies conditions that should be considered by the designers of mobile teleoperator equipment intended for service in radiological emergencies. We include a definition of radiological emergency and a taxonomy of emergencies. We will indicate the range of operating conditions that an equipment designer should consider and the type of operations that his machine might be expected to perform. 2 refs., 1 tab

  15. American College of Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American College of Radiology JOIN ACR Login About Us Media Center Contact Us Follow us Shopping Cart (0) ACR Catalog Donate My ACR ... Education Center eLearning Exams & Assessments MOC Marketplace AIRP™ Radiology Leadership Institute ® Quality & Safety Accreditation Appropriateness Criteria® Practice ...

  16. Gout. Radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we reviewed the clinical and radiological aspects of gout, showing the most frequent radiological findings that can guide to the correct diagnosis of the disease. The cases that we presented here have been analyzed for many years in our rheumatology service, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Bogota

  17. Participation anticipating in elections using data mining methods

    OpenAIRE

    Sangar, Amin Babazadeh; Khaze, Seyyed Reza; Ebrahimi, Laya

    2013-01-01

    Anticipating the political behavior of people will be considerable help for election candidates to assess the possibility of their success and to be acknowledged about the public motivations to select them. In this paper, we provide a general schematic of the architecture of participation anticipating system in presidential election by using KNN, Classification Tree and Na\\"ive Bayes and tools orange based on crisp which had hopeful output. To test and assess the proposed model, we begin to u...

  18. Anticipated Monetary Policy in a Cash-in-Advance Economy.

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit Carmichael

    1989-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of perfectly foreseen monetary policy within the framework of a standard cash-in-advance economy. Anticipated monetary policy is shown to have real effects by influencing inflationary expectations. In a cash-in-advance economy, an increase in the anticipated rate of inflation reduces the return to labor supply and induces a substitution away from time spent in the labor market. The paper analyzes the implication of this substitution for the time paths of output...

  19. Double-Sided Energy Auction Equilibrium Under Price Anticipation

    OpenAIRE

    Faqiry, M. Nazif; Das, Sanjoy

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the problem of proportionally fair double sided energy auction involving buying and selling agents. The grid is assumed to be operating under islanded mode. A distributed auction algorithm that can be implemented by an aggregator, as well as a possible approach by which the agents may approximate price anticipation is considered. Equilibrium conditions arising due to price anticipation is analyzed. A modified auction to mitigate the resulting loss in efficiency due to ...

  20. The radiological impact of 50 years of uranium mining in France. The necessity of a site satisfying restructuring by Cogema-Areva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a first text, the author briefly describes the radioprotection risks related to uranium mining, gives an overview of the characteristics of extraction residues in uranium extraction factories. Then, after having presented the case of the Limousin region in France, he outlines the high level of contamination of the environment of the mining sites, recalls the extraction process and discusses the careless use of the extracted radioactive rocks and materials. He outlines the insufficient management and processing of liquid effluents, the risk associated with the dispersal of contaminated scrap metals and of radioactive ores. He also discusses air contamination due to dusts and radioactive gases. He comments the issue of long term storage of uranium mining residues. He outlines the responsibility of the Administration and comments the trial against Cogema which took place in 2005. He outlines how restructuring of all the concerned sites is a challenging issue for our future. A second text in English describes radiological hazards from uranium mining (uranium by-products, radiological situation before and during extraction, long term contamination after mines closure, problems posed by tailing disposal)

  1. The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunnelling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching/In Situ Recovery (ISL/ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the late 1960s. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980s) which typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant (mill). Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or

  2. Medical student knowledge regarding radiology before and after a radiological anatomy module: implications for vertical integration and self-directed learning

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O’Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; O’Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Owen J. O’Connor; Cryan, John F; Maher, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the impact that anatomy-focused radiology teaching has on non-examined knowledge regarding radiation safety and radiology as a specialty. Methods First-year undergraduate medical students completed surveys prior to and after undertaking the first-year anatomy programme that incorporates radiological anatomy. Students were asked opinions on preferred learning methodology and tested on understanding of radiology as a specialty and radiation safety. Results Pre-module and p...

  3. Using technology assessment as the picture archiving and communication system spreads outside radiology to the enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Maliff, Robert P.; Launders, Jason

    2000-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) are being implemented within radiology departments, and many facilities are entering the next stage of PACS use by deploying PACS to departments outside of radiology and to other facilities located at a distance. Many PACS vendors and department administrators have based cost-justification analyses on the anticipated savings from expanding PACS to these areas. However, many of these cost-savings analyses can be highly suspect in their assumpt...

  4. Exercises in radiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As radiographic investigations become more numerous, and as more small centres develop their own radiology facilities, the value of a basic training in radiology is becoming more widely appreciated. The medical student, the general practitioner and the postgraduate student preparing for higher examinations will need to supplement the limited amount of formal teaching by reading on the subject. However, much of the radiological literature is designed for those wishing to specialize in radiology and is too detailed for the undergraduate or postgraduate in disciplines other than radiology. In addition to plain radiographs of all parts of the body, examples of CT scans and ultrasound have been included so that readers can familiarize themselves with diagnoses involving these newer modalities. A broad range of disorders encountered in everyday practice are covered. The second part of the book gives the answers together with the brief discussions which cover the salient points of radiographic appearances and differential diagnoses. Where appropriate, additional radiographs supplement the discussions. Careful study of Exercises in Radiological Diagnosis will provide a working knowledge of radiological interpretation that will be invaluable to the daily practice of clinical medicine

  5. Radiological protection report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The serious accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants once again highlighted the importance of planning and implementing measures for radiological and emergency protection. Of course, the accident happened a long way away and its impact in Switzerland was somewhat marginal but it was soon realised that action and improvements would be required in Switzerland as well. In May 2011, the Swiss Federal Council, in response to a report by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI), set up an interdepartmental working group to review emergency protection plans in the event of an extreme accident in Switzerland. The report identified 56 instances where modifications would be required to existing statutory and organisational measures for radiological and emergency protection. Of particular importance for the supervisory activities of ENSI were those relating to redundancy, the reliability of monitoring and forecasting systems and also telephony. In addition, ENSI has initiated a review of reference scenarios and emergency planning zones. However, the 8th Annual Report of ENSI deals solely with radiological protection in nuclear facilities in Switzerland: Section A covers both exposure rates for staff and individual job rates whereas Section B deals with releases from nuclear facilities and the monitoring of radioactivity in their immediate vicinity. Compared with previous years, there was little change in either collective or average individual doses. The average individual exposure rate for personnel in nuclear facilities of 0.6 mSv was significantly lower than both the maximum annual limit for persons exposed to radiation during their work (20 mSv) and the annual average rate of exposure for the population in Switzerland as a whole (5.5 mSv). The highest individual dose during the year under review was 11 mSv; this involved an individual employed by an external company working at the Leibstadt nuclear facility. At the Beznau, Goesgen and Muehleberg

  6. Radiological assessment of the impact on human populations and the environment of the 1949 to 1982 dumping of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in the deep North-East Atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thorough radiological assessment of the impact of the 1949 to 1982 dumping of low- and intermediate- level radioactive waste in the deep North-East Atlantic is performed with the numerical compartmental REJMAR model. The calculations include the assessment of the dose equivalent to the individuals of a theoretical critical group through a large set of pathways, and the collective dose to mankind through the ingestion pathways. The complete dumping performed in the deep North-East Atlantic is taken into account. The assumptions of biological short-circuit through marin food chains are tested. The order of magnitude of the dose delivered to marine organisms living near the dumping site is assessed

  7. Anticipation in turn-taking: mechanisms and information sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riest, Carina; Jorschick, Annett B; de Ruiter, Jan P

    2015-01-01

    During conversations participants alternate smoothly between speaker and hearer roles with only brief pauses and overlaps. There are two competing types of accounts about how conversationalists accomplish this: (a) the signaling approach and (b) the anticipatory ('projection') approach. We wanted to investigate, first, the relative merits of these two accounts, and second, the relative contribution of semantic and syntactic information to the timing of next turn initiation. We performed three button-press experiments using turn fragments taken from natural conversations to address the following questions: (a) Is turn-taking predominantly based on anticipation or on reaction, and (b) what is the relative contribution of semantic and syntactic information to accurate turn-taking. In our first experiment we gradually manipulated the information available for anticipation of the turn end (providing information about the turn end in advance to completely removing linguistic information). The results of our first experiment show that the distribution of the participants' estimation of turn-endings for natural turns is very similar to the distribution for pure anticipation. We conclude that listeners are indeed able to anticipate a turn-end and that this strategy is predominantly used in turn-taking. In Experiment 2 we collected purely reacted responses. We used the distributions from Experiments 1 and 2 together to estimate a new dependent variable called Reaction Anticipation Proportion. We used this variable in our third experiment where we manipulated the presence vs. absence of semantic and syntactic information by low-pass filtering open-class and closed class words in the turn. The results suggest that for turn-end anticipation, both semantic and syntactic information are needed, but that the semantic information is a more important anticipation cue than syntactic information. PMID:25699004

  8. Hazard control indices for radiological and non-radiological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document devises a method of comparing radiological and non-radiological hazard control levels. Such a comparison will be useful in determining the design control features for facilities that handle radioactive mixed waste. The design control features of interest are those that assure the protection of workers and the environment from unsafe airborne levels of radiological or non-radiological hazards

  9. Berlin radiology telecommunication project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is an evaluation of digital and analog image transfer and teleconferencing in radiology via a 140-Mbit forerunner broadband network (VBN). In the two locations of the Department of Radiology at our institution, 10 km apart, two Siemens picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) are installed. Image transfer from two MR and five CT units to PACS is organized in a Ethernet-based LAN. Communication between PACS is established via a 140-Mbit ISD network. A daily radiologic conference is performed with simultaneous telephone and video communication via an analog VBNet

  10. Laenderyggens degeneration og radiologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Gosvig, Kasper Kjaerulf; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common conditions, and at the same time one of the most complex nosological entities. The lifetime prevalence is approximately 80%, and radiological features of lumbar degeneration are almost universal in adults. The individual risk factors for LBP and...... significant relationships between radiological findings and subjective symptoms have both been notoriously difficult to identify. The lack of consensus on clinical criteria and radiological definitions has hampered the undertaking of properly executed epidemiological studies. The natural history of LBP is...

  11. Anxiety, anticipation and contextual information: A test of attentional control theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Adam J; Jackson, Robin C; Bishop, Daniel T; Williams, A Mark

    2016-09-01

    We tested the assumptions of Attentional Control Theory (ACT) by examining the impact of anxiety on anticipation using a dynamic, time-constrained task. Moreover, we examined the involvement of high- and low-level cognitive processes in anticipation and how their importance may interact with anxiety. Skilled and less-skilled tennis players anticipated the shots of opponents under low- and high-anxiety conditions. Participants viewed three types of video stimuli, each depicting different levels of contextual information. Performance effectiveness (response accuracy) and processing efficiency (response accuracy divided by corresponding mental effort) were measured. Skilled players recorded higher levels of response accuracy and processing efficiency compared to less-skilled counterparts. Processing efficiency significantly decreased under high- compared to low-anxiety conditions. No difference in response accuracy was observed. When reviewing directional errors, anxiety was most detrimental to performance in the condition conveying only contextual information, suggesting that anxiety may have a greater impact on high-level (top-down) cognitive processes, potentially due to a shift in attentional control. Our findings provide partial support for ACT; anxiety elicited greater decrements in processing efficiency than performance effectiveness, possibly due to predominance of the stimulus-driven attentional system. PMID:26211944

  12. Pediatric radiology for medical-technical radiology assistants/radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book on pediatric radiology includes the following chapter: differences between adults and children; psycho-social aspects concerning the patient child in radiology; relevant radiation doses in radiology; help for self-help: simple phantoms for image quality estimation in pediatric radiology; general information; immobilization of the patient; pediatric features for radiological settings; traumatology; contrast agents; biomedical radiography; computerized tomography; NMR imaging; diagnostic ultrasonography; handling of stress practical recommendations; medical displays.

  13. 3.3 Diagnostic Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Moores, B. M.; Stieve, F.-E.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.3 Diagnostic Radiology' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  14. Ergonomics in radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, N. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nimitgoyal@doctors.org.uk; Jain, N.; Rachapalli, V. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations.

  15. Society of Interventional Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how interventional radiology research improves patients’ lives at Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting; read ... comments to CMS on two MACRA coding issues; society is engaged with CMS as they develop codes ...

  16. Radiological assessment and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaert, T.; Sohier, A

    1998-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised.

  17. Radiological assessment and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's research in the field of radiological assessment and optimization are (1) to implement ALARA principles in activities with radiological consequences; (2) to develop methodologies for radiological optimization in decision-aiding; (3) to improve methods to assess in real time the radiological hazards in the environment in case of an accident; (4) to develop methods and programmes to assist decision-makers during a nuclear emergency; (5) to support the policy of radioactive waste management authorities in the field of radiation protection; (6) to investigate computer codes in the area of multi criteria analysis; (7) to organise courses on off-site emergency response to nuclear accidents. Main achievements in these areas for 1997 are summarised

  18. Ergonomics in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of computers is increasing in every field of medicine, especially radiology. Filmless radiology departments, speech recognition software, electronic request forms and teleradiology are some of the recent developments that have substantially increased the amount of time a radiologist spends in front of a computer monitor. Computers are also needed for searching literature on the internet, communicating via e-mails, and preparing for lectures and presentations. It is well known that regular computer users can suffer musculoskeletal injuries due to repetitive stress. The role of ergonomics in radiology is to ensure that working conditions are optimized in order to avoid injury and fatigue. Adequate workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity, efficiency, and job satisfaction. We review the current literature pertaining to the role of ergonomics in modern-day radiology especially with the development of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) workstations

  19. Anticipated transients without scram for light water reactors: implications for liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design of light water reactors (LWRs), protection against anticipated transients (e.g., loss of normal electric power and control rod withdrawal) is provided by a highly reliable scram, or shutdown system. If this system should become inoperable, however, the transient could lead to a core meltdown. The Nuclar Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed, in NUREG-0460 [1], new requirements (or acceptance criteria) for anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) events and the manner in which they could be considered in the design and safety evaluation of LWRs. This note assesses the potential impact of the proposed LWR-ATWS criteria on the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) safety program as represented by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

  20. Medical and Radiological Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Jalal Jalal Shokouhi

    2009-01-01

    Economy ride ahead of the world. "nAll human activities lead to financial problems. "nEconomy has two dimensions in usual daily commercial problems but medical and radiological economy is a tridimensional phenomenon. "nIn the two-dimensional economy, both sides, see their own benefits and fair "gains" but in the  medical and radiologic economy, the patient gives us money and gets health. We protect the patient’s benefits by controlling the complications and c...

  1. Data mining in radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Amit T Kharat; Amarjit Singh; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Digish Shah

    2014-01-01

    Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed dec...

  2. Hygiene in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is given of the hygienic management in radiological departments with special regard to the handling of injections and infusions. It includes prevention of bacterial as well as viral infections. In radiological departments disinfection of X-ray tables is necessary only in exceptional cases. A special proposal for disinfection is added. A safe method of sterilisation of flexible catheders is included, which proved to prevent bacterial infection. (orig.)

  3. Radiology and Heart Transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heart transplants is the only therapeutic alternative for patients with severe, irreversible heart disease refractory to conventional medical or surgical treatment. Radiology is used in the preoperative study of the recipient, in the asymptomatic patient's postoperative follow up and in the diagnosis, treatment and follow up of any complications. Our aim was to review the role of radiology in the preoperative study of heart transplant candidates, describe surgical transplant techniques and analyze normal postoperative findings and possible complications. (Author) 36 refs

  4. Interventional Radiology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With more than 3000 members, the Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology (CSIR) is one of the world's largest societies for interventional radiology (IR). Nevertheless, compared to other societies such as CIRSE and SIR, the CSIR is a relatively young society. In this article, the status of IR in China is described, which includes IR history, structure and patient management, personnel, fellowship, training, modalities, procedures, research, turf battle, and insightful visions for IR from Chinese interventional radiologists

  5. Radiological protection act, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Act provides for the establishment of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and dissolves An Bord Fuinnimh Nuicleigh (the Board), transferring its assets and liabilities to the Institute. It sets out a range of radiation protection measures to be taken by various Ministers in the event of a radiological emergency and gives effect at national level to the Assistance Convention, the Early Notification Convention and the Physical Protection Convention. The Institute is the competent Irish authority for the three Conventions. (NEA)

  6. Textbook of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is presented in two volumes, standard textbook of imaging, conclusive and totally up-to-date. This provides information organized by major topics covering the state-of-the-art for all imaging procedures. The volume 1 presents radiologic physics and technology by discussing roentgenography, ultrasound, CT, nuclear medicine, MRI, and positron emission tomography. The volume 2 studies pulmonary radiology, imaging of the skeletal and central nervous systems, uroradiology, abdominal and cardiac imaging, and imaging of the pelvis

  7. Computer assisted radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAR'89 is intended to serve as a forum for discussion between experts from the medical sciences e.g., radiology, radiotherapy, nuclear medicine, orthopaedia, cardiology, neurology and surgery and professionals from the computer and physical sciences. Computer assisted radiological diagnosis, orthopaedics, therapy, and planning are the main subjects of the symposium and the panel discussion. The state of the art and research results in the area of CAR are evaluated. (DG)

  8. Anticipating and Resisting the Temptation to Behave Unethically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Oliver J; Fishbach, Ayelet

    2015-07-01

    Ethical dilemmas pose a self-control conflict between pursuing immediate benefits through behaving dishonestly and pursuing long-term benefits through acts of honesty. Therefore, factors that facilitate self-control for other types of goals (e.g., health and financial) should also promote ethical behavior. Across four studies, we find support for this possibility. Specifically, we find that only under conditions that facilitate conflict identification--including the consideration of several decisions simultaneously (i.e., a broad decision frame) and perceived high connectedness to the future self--does anticipating a temptation to behave dishonestly in advance promote honesty. We demonstrate these interaction patterns between conflict identification and temptation anticipation in negotiation situations (Study 1), lab tasks (Study 2), and ethical dilemmas in the workplace (Studies 3-4). We conclude that identifying a self-control conflict and anticipating a temptation are two necessary preconditions for ethical decision making. PMID:26001580

  9. Study of the radiological impact of small-scale mining activities at Dunkwa-On-Offin in the Central Region, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-scale (and artisanal) mining has been defined differently around the world. However, in Ghana, small-scale (gold) mining is defined as mining (gold) by any method not involving substantial expenditure by an individual or group of persons not exceeding nine in number or by a co-operative society made up of ten or more persons. The activities in the mining sector have increased in recent times and as at 2008, a total of 212 mining companies were awarded mining leases and exploration rights. These mining operations consequently turn out large volumes of solid and liquid wastes in the form of waste dams; slime dams, tailings dams, which could contain elevated levels of NORM. Small-scale mining activities pollute rivers and streams nearby that serve as sources of drinking water for communities downstream. These activities are common in the study area. The general aim of the studies is to assess the radiological exposure to members of the general public living in Dunkwa community and its surrounding communities due to NORMS as a result of the small-scale mining activities. Direct gamma spectrometry and iMatic P-F Gas-less Automatic Gross Alpha/Beta counter was used to determine the concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, and gross alpha and gross beta activity concentration respectively in the soil and 0water samples. The mean values of the gross-α and gross-β activity concentrations in the water sources were 0.002±0.001 Bq/L and 0.029±0.0I6 Bq/L respectively which are also below the WHO recommended guideline values for drinking water. The gross-α and gross-β activity concentrations of most soil samples in the study area are below the activity concentration of the control sample. The mean activity concentrations measured for 226Ra (238U) 232Th and 40K in the soil sample were 25.4±11.1, 29.4±15.6 and 225.9±93.8 Bq/kg respectively. For the water samples the mean activity concentrations were 4.7±1.5, 2.7 ±0.4, 53.9±11.6 Bq

  10. Diagnostic and interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J. [Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Reith, Wolfgang [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie; Rummeny, Ernst J. (ed.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2016-08-01

    This exceptional book covers all aspects of diagnostic and interventional radiology within one volume, at a level appropriate for the specialist. From the basics through diagnosis to intervention: the reader will find a complete overview of all areas of radiology. The clear, uniform structure, with chapters organized according to organ system, facilitates the rapid retrieval of information. Features include: Presentation of the normal radiological anatomy Classification of the different imaging procedures according to their diagnostic relevance Imaging diagnosis with many reference images Precise description of the interventional options The inclusion of many instructive aids will be of particular value to novices in decision making: Important take home messages and summaries of key radiological findings smooth the path through the jungle of facts Numerous tables on differential diagnosis and typical findings in the most common diseases offer a rapid overview and orientation Diagnostic flow charts outline the sequence of diagnostic evaluation All standard procedures within the field of interventional radiology are presented in a clinically relevant and readily understandable way, with an abundance of illustrations. This is a textbook, atlas, and reference in one: with more than 2500 images for comparison with the reader's own findings. This comprehensive and totally up-to-date book provides a superb overview of everything that the radiology specialist of today needs to know.

  11. [Instruction in dental radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, W J M; Kreulen, C M; Berkhout, W E R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive intensive theoretical and practical training in practical and theoretical radiology, with the aim of obtaining the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor Tandartsen en Orthodontisten'-certificate, which is required for legal permission to use oral radiology in dental practice. It is recommended that the curriculum be expanded to include the areas of knowledge required to qualify for the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor het gebruik van CBCT-toestellen door tandartsen' (the certificate for the use of conebeam radiology by dentists). The general dental practitioner is faced with changing laws and regulations in all areas of practice. One of the most significant legal changes in the field of dental radiology was the introduction of the new radiation protection and safety rules in 2014. Moreover, a large group of dentists is also being confronted with the transition from conventional to digital images, with all its challenges and changes in everyday practice. PMID:27073811

  12. Adaptive and Rational Anticipations in Risk Management Systems and Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Daniel M.; Holmberg, Stig C.

    2010-11-01

    The global financial crisis of year 2009 is explained as a result of uncoordinated risk management decisions in business firms and economic organisations. The underlying reason for this can be found in the current financial system. As the financial market has lost much of its direct coupling to the concrete economy it provides misleading information to economic decision makers at all levels. Hence, the financial system has moved from a state of moderate and slow cyclical fluctuations into a state of fast and chaotic ones. Those misleading decisions can further be described, but not explained, by help of adaptive and rational expectations from macroeconomic theory. In this context, AE, the Adaptive Expectations are related to weak passive Exo-anticipation, and RE, the Rational expectations can be related to a strong, active and design oriented anticipation. The shortcomings of conventional cures, which builds on a reactive paradigm, have already been demonstrated in economic literature and are here further underlined by help of Ashby's "Law of Requisite Variety", Weaver's distinction between systems of "Disorganized Complexity" and those of "Organized Complexity", and Klir's "Reconstructability Analysis". Anticipatory decision-making is hence here proposed as a replacement to current expectation based and passive risk management. An anticipatory model of the business cycle is presented for supporting that proposition. The model, which is an extension of the Kaldor-Kalecki model, includes both retardation and anticipation. While cybernetics with the feedback process in control system deals with an explicit goal or purpose given to a system, the anticipatory system discussed here deals with a behaviour for which the future state of the system is built by the system itself, without explicit goal. A system with weak anticipation is based on a predictive model of the system, while a system with strong anticipation builds its own future by itself. Numerical simulations on

  13. Ultrasonic vocalizations in rats anticipating circadian feeding schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opiol, Hanna; Pavlovski, Ilya; Michalik, Mateusz; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2015-05-01

    Rats readily learn to anticipate a reward signaled by an external stimulus. Anticipatory behaviors evoked by conditioned stimuli include 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), a proposed behavioral correlate of positive affect and activation of midbrain dopamine pathways. Rats can also anticipate a reward, such as food, provided once daily, without external cueing. Anticipation of a daily reward exhibits formal properties of a circadian rhythm. The neural circuits that regulate the timing and amplitude of these rhythms remain an open question, but evidence suggests a role for dopamine. To gain further insight into the neural and affective correlates of circadian food anticipatory rhythms, we made 2h and 24h USV recordings in rats fed 2h/day in the light period, a procedure that induces robust anticipation 2-3h before mealtime. Potential interactions between internal and external time cues in USV production were evaluated by inclusion of a 3 kHz tone 15 min before mealtime. Prior to scheduled feeding, spontaneous 50 kHz USVs were rare during the light period. During scheduled feeding, flat and frequency modulated (FM) 50kHz USVs occurred prior to and during mealtime. FM USVs were more closely related to anticipation, while flat USVs were more dependent on food access. USVs also occurred during spontaneous waking at other times of day. The tone did not evoke USVs but did modulate activity. Behavioral anticipation of a daily meal is accompanied by USVs consistent with a positive affective state and elevated dopamine transmission. PMID:25677650

  14. Source term research for ship reactor anticipated operational events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the basic hypothesis of anticipated operational events, grounding on the special characters of a ship reactor, the equilibrium vapor specific activity and the cabin activity were calculated using NSRC code for the main loop and the secondary loop. The calculation results show that the computational mode of NSRC code is correct, and the NSRC code can be used to calculate radioactive effect of a ship reactor in anticipated operational events of design basis accidents. The calculation results can provide support to the safe operation of a ship nuclear power device. (authors)

  15. Factors affecting anticipated emotions in association with aggressive behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína VASKOVÁ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Conflict situations and situations of guile are not rare in our everyday life. In context of broadly conceived study, inspired by Richetins and Richardson’s (2011 extension of Theory of Planned Behavior, the character of anticipated emotions in relation to situation of aggressive and non aggressive reaction is analyzed. Influence of behavioral desire and perceived behavioral control is examined. Results show anticipating different emotions in relation to situation and acknowledge significant role of behavioral desire. Unimportant role of perceived behavioral control is ascer tained. Closer explanations in relation to self-control and self-regulation is discussed.

  16. Dosimetric model for assessment of radiologic impact due to the liquid waste release containing radionuclides arising from medical installations to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gradual growth of the use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, since the decade of 70, and the consequent increase of liquid radioactive discharges for the urban sewer network, brought the necessity of revise the current maximum values for release of radioactive material in sewage systems, and to develop regulation to ensure the protection of man and the environment. According to the IAEA- International Atomic Energy Agency guidelines, the definition of new limits for authorization of practices must meet the radiological protection and safety requirements established in the Basic Safety Standard (BSS), issued in 1996. This work aims to assess clearance limits for liquid waste releases arising from medical installations using radionuclides for medical diagnosis purposes in the town of Rio de Janeiro. The results will be used to verify the need to revise the current clearance values specified in Brazilian Regulation CNEN-NE-6.05 - Radioactive Waste Management in Radioactive Facilities. The proposed methodology is based on the mathematical model recommended by the IAEA, adapted to the observed releases conditions in the study area. Two scenarios are simulated: (i) direct releases to surface water bodies; and, (ii) releases to the sewer system, with the exposure of workers at the sewer treatment stations. Preliminary results indicate the need of revising current Brazilian guidelines in order to consider both the properties of radionuclides and of the type of environment receiving the releases. (author)

  17. An assessment of the external radiological impact in granites and pegmatite in central eastern desert in Egypt with elevated natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of natural radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) were measured in investigated samples (granite Gabal Ras Barud, Eastern Desert in Egypt) by using gamma spectrometry (NaI (Tl) 3''x3''). The activities of 226Ra, 232Th series and 40K are between (3.8±0.5 and 172.8±1135.1±56.8 8.6), (2.3±0.3 and 103.8±5.2) and (53.1±2.7 and 1135.1±56.8) Bq kg-1, respectively. With average total annual dose being only 67.2 μSv y-1, this value is about 6.72 % of the 1.0 mSv y-1 recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-60, 1990) as the maximum annual dose to members of the public. Geochemical studies revealed that Gabal Ras Barud is formed from a highly fractionated biotite granite, with SiO2 > 75 % and generally enriched in alkali with K/Na > 8 %. (authors)

  18. An assessment of the external radiological impact in granites and pegmatite in central Eastern Desert in Egypt with elevated natural radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uosif, M A M; Abdel-Salam, L M

    2011-11-01

    The contents of natural radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) were measured in investigated samples (granite Gabal Ras Barud, Eastern Desert in Egypt) by using gamma spectrometry (NaI (Tl) 3″×3″). The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th series and (40)K are between (3.8±0.5 and 172.8±1135.1±56.8 8.6), (2.3±0.3 and 103.8±5.2) and (53.1±2.7 and 1135.1±56.8) Bq kg(-1), respectively. With average total annual dose being only 67.2 μSv y(-1), this value is about 6.72 % of the 1.0 mSv y(-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-60, 1990) as the maximum annual dose to members of the public. Geochemical studies revealed that Gabal Ras Barud is formed from a highly fractionated biotite granite, with SiO(2) >75 % and generally enriched in alkali with K/Na >8 %. PMID:21131664

  19. The American College of Radiology white paper on radiation dose in medicine:deep impact on the practice of cardiovascular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semelka Richard

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In April 2007, the American College of Radiology released the "White Paper on Radiation Dose in Medicine". The Blue Ribbon panel members included private practice and academic diagnostic radiologists, medical physicists, representatives of industry and regulatory groups, and a patient advocate. The panel concluded that the expanding use of imaging modalities using ionizing radiations such as CT and nuclear medicine may result in an increased incidence of radiation-related cancer in the exposed population in the not-too-distant future, and this problem can likely be minimized by preventing the inappropriate use of such imaging and by optimizing studies that are performed to obtain the best image quality with the lowest radiation dose. The White Paper set forth practical suggestions to minimize radiation risk, including education for all stakeholders in the principles of radiation safety and preferential use of alternative (non-ionizing imaging techniques, such as MRI and ultrasound. These recommendations are especially relevant for cardiologists, who prescribe and/or practice medical imaging examinations accounting for at least 50% of the total effective dose by radiation medicine, which amounts to an equivalent of about 160 chest x-rays per head per year in US. Were they be enacted, these simple recommendations would determine a revolution in the contemporary way of teaching, learning and practising cardiology.

  20. ICRP PUBLICATION 121: Radiological Protection in Paediatric Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , use of protective shielding, optimisation of exposure factors, use of pulsed fluoroscopy, limiting fluoroscopy time, etc. Major paediatric interventional procedures should be performed by experienced paediatric interventional operators, and a second, specific level of training in radiological protection is desirable (in some countries, this is mandatory). For computed tomography, dose reduction should be optimised by the adjustment of scan parameters (such as mA, kVp, and pitch) according to patient weight or age, region scanned, and study indication (e.g. images with greater noise should be accepted if they are of sufficient diagnostic quality). Other strategies include restricting multiphase examination protocols, avoiding overlapping of scan regions, and only scanning the area in question. Up-to-date dose reduction technology such as tube current modulation, organ-based dose modulation, auto kV technology, and iterative reconstruction should be utilised when appropriate. It is anticipated that this publication will assist institutions in encouraging the standardisation of procedures, and that it may help increase awareness and ultimately improve practices for the benefit of patients.

  1. Uranium mining sites of Somair and Cominak (Niger). Situation of mission on site in may 2004, application of radiological impact and advice on the network of environmental surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents successively the context of the two mining sites, the situation of the I.R.S.N. mission on site of may 2004, an appreciation by I.R.S.N. of sites impact on the populations, the evaluation by I.R.S.N. of associated impact to generic scenario of scrap recovery from sites by the population around. (N.C.)

  2. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  3. Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaccarino, Vittorio, E-mail: vittorio.iaccarino@unina.it; Venetucci, Pietro [University of Naples ' Federico II' , Diagnostic Imaging Department-Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

  4. Radiological impact to the population of the three major accidents happened in the civil nuclear industry; Impacto radiologico a la poblacion de los tres mayores accidentes ocurridos en la industria nuclear civil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz M, J. R., E-mail: Acamb33@hotmail.com [Sociedad Nuclear Mexicana, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The greatest fear of the population before a nuclear accident, is the radiological impact to the health of people, due to the exposure to the liberated radioactive material during the accident, this fear is generally exaggerated or not well managed by the media. The best estimate in the received doses and their possible effects is carried out based on the information obtained during a certain time after the accident event. This work contains a summary of the information in the topic that at the present time has presented institutions as: the World Health Organization (Who), the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the World Nuclear Association, among others. The considered accidents are: first, the Unit-2 of the nuclear power plant of the Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, USA occurred 28 March of 1979, in the Reactor TMI-2, type PWR of 900 M We; the second accident was 26 April of 1986, in the Unit-4 of the nuclear power plant of Chernobyl, in Ukraine, the involved reactor was type BRMK, of 1000 M We moderated by graphite and cooled with light water, the power plant is located to 100 Km to the northwest of Kiev; 25 years later occurred the third accident in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Dai-ichi, in Japan, affecting at four of the six reactors of the power plant. A brief description of the accident is presented in each case, including the magnitude of the provoked liberations of radioactive material, the estimate doses of the population and the affected workers are presented, as well as the possible consequences of these doses on the health. The objective of this diffusion work is to give knowledge to the nuclear and radiological community of the available information on the topic, in order to be located in the appropriate professional context. (author)

  5. Linear stochastic differential equations with anticipating initial conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalifa, Narjess; Kuo, Hui-Hsiung; Ouerdiane, Habib;

    In this paper we use the new stochastic integral introduced by Ayed and Kuo (2008) and the results obtained by Kuo et al. (2012b) to find a solution to a drift-free linear stochastic differential equation with anticipating initial condition. Our solution is based on well-known results from...

  6. Person x Context Effects on Anticipated Moral Emotions Following Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Sanna; Salmivalli, Christina; Hodges, Ernest V. E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated person (sex, aggression level), context (witness type, victim reactions), and person x context effects on children's anticipated moral emotions following hypothetical acts of aggression against a peer. Children (N = 378, mean age = 11.3 years) were presented a series of hypothetical vignettes in which the presence of witnesses (no…

  7. Radiological environmental monitoring programs at nuclear power plants: A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses the content and conduct of radiological environmental monitoring programs (REMPs) conducted at nuclear power plants. Such programs have, since their inception, played a key role in assessing the open-quotes bottom lineclose quotes of a plant's impact on its environment. They are the principal means by which the actual impact of monitored and unmonitored effluent pathways can be integrated in the form of a bounding dose to the human population in the plant's environs. NRC regulations generally prescribe only that effluent and environmental monitoring programs appropriate to the licensed activity be established and conducted. Detailed guidance for such programs is contained in Regulatory Guides, Branch Technical Positions, and staff reports (NUREGs). Agency guidance, which is summarized in the paper, has continued to focus on principal radiation exposure pathways to the general public associated with effluents arising from normal operation, as well as anticipated operational occurrences. Through the Technical Specifications Improvement Program, licensees are now allowed some flexibility with respect to modification of certain program details, provided that certain regulatory constraints continue to be met, Sample results for six environmental media for 15 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants for the period 1986-94 are summarized in the paper. Based on a comparison of indicator and control locations, no significant impacts were noted in the form of radionuclide concentrations of plant origin

  8. Impact on Patient Safety and Satisfaction of Implementation of an Outpatient Clinic in Interventional Radiology (IPSIPOLI-Study): A Quasi-Experimental Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutjeboer, Jacob, E-mail: j.lutjeboer@lumc.nl; Burgmans, Mark Christiaan, E-mail: m.c.burgmans@lumc.nl, E-mail: mburgmans@hotmail.com; Chung, Kaman, E-mail: kaman.chung10@gmail.com; Erkel, Arian Robert van, E-mail: a.r.van-erkel@lumc.nl [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeInterventional radiology (IR) procedures are associated with high rates of preparation and planning errors. In many centers, pre-procedural consultation and screening of patients is performed by referring physicians. Interventional radiologists have better knowledge about procedure details and risks, but often only get acquainted with the patient in the procedure room. We hypothesized that patient safety (PS) and patient satisfaction (PSAT) in elective IR procedures would improve by implementation of a pre-procedural visit to an outpatient IR clinic.Material and MethodsIRB approval was obtained and informed consent was waived. PS and PSAT were measured in patients undergoing elective IR procedures before (control group; n = 110) and after (experimental group; n = 110) implementation of an outpatient IR clinic. PS was measured as the number of process deviations. PSAT was assessed using a questionnaire measuring Likert scores of three dimensions: interpersonal care aspects, information/communication, and patient participation. Differences in PS and PSAT between the two groups were compared using an independent t test.ResultsThe average number of process deviations per patient was 0.39 in the control group compared to 0.06 in the experimental group (p < 0.001). In 9.1 % patients in the control group, no legal informed consent was obtained compared to 0 % in the experimental group. The mean overall Likert score was significantly higher in the experimental group compared to the control group: 2.68 (SD 0.314) versus 2.48 (SD 0.381) (p < 0.001).ConclusionPS and PSAT improve significantly if patients receive consultation and screening in an IR outpatient clinic prior to elective IR procedures.

  9. Impact on Patient Safety and Satisfaction of Implementation of an Outpatient Clinic in Interventional Radiology (IPSIPOLI-Study): A Quasi-Experimental Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeInterventional radiology (IR) procedures are associated with high rates of preparation and planning errors. In many centers, pre-procedural consultation and screening of patients is performed by referring physicians. Interventional radiologists have better knowledge about procedure details and risks, but often only get acquainted with the patient in the procedure room. We hypothesized that patient safety (PS) and patient satisfaction (PSAT) in elective IR procedures would improve by implementation of a pre-procedural visit to an outpatient IR clinic.Material and MethodsIRB approval was obtained and informed consent was waived. PS and PSAT were measured in patients undergoing elective IR procedures before (control group; n = 110) and after (experimental group; n = 110) implementation of an outpatient IR clinic. PS was measured as the number of process deviations. PSAT was assessed using a questionnaire measuring Likert scores of three dimensions: interpersonal care aspects, information/communication, and patient participation. Differences in PS and PSAT between the two groups were compared using an independent t test.ResultsThe average number of process deviations per patient was 0.39 in the control group compared to 0.06 in the experimental group (p < 0.001). In 9.1 % patients in the control group, no legal informed consent was obtained compared to 0 % in the experimental group. The mean overall Likert score was significantly higher in the experimental group compared to the control group: 2.68 (SD 0.314) versus 2.48 (SD 0.381) (p < 0.001).ConclusionPS and PSAT improve significantly if patients receive consultation and screening in an IR outpatient clinic prior to elective IR procedures

  10. Radiological presentation of neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stjepanović Mihailo I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In diagnostics of neurosarcoidosis, radiological diagnostic procedures are available, non-invasive and they contribute significantly to the diagnosis of this disease. The aim of this paper is to present a brief overview of the radiological diagnostic methods, their application, and their importance in daily clinical work with these patients. Radiological Presentation of Neurosarcoidosis. Magnetic resonance is the method of choice in diagnostics of this disease. Computed tomography can also be helpful in patients with contraindications for magnetic resonance, although it is less precise in assessing the involvement of the periventricular white matter, hypothalamus, and cranial nerves. The number of lesions and the degree of involvement of the parenchyma and leptomeninges are better seen by magnetic resonance than by computed tomography scan. It is important to note that the magnetic resonance imaging may be normal in patients with neurosarcoidosis, especially in patients with cranial neuropathy, or in patients treated with corticosteroids. There is a number of variability in the occurrence of neurosarcoidosis on radiological images. Conclusion. Radiological procedures are on the very top of diagnostic pyramid of this disease due to their availability, non-invasiveness, and precision.

  11. The Future of Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Margulis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been my good fortune to live and practice radiology during a long period of momentous change – to see the transformation of the discipline from a supportive service into a mainstream, essential branch of clinical medicine. I remember wearing red goggles to adapt my vision before performing fluoroscopy; observing the horrible, now thankfully obsolete, practice of ventriculography, which was considered advanced neuroradiology; and performing other, now rarely prescribed procedures, such as double-contrast barium enemas and intravenous pyelography. Witnessing the beginnings of interventional radiology, I suggested its name in an editorial. I also had the good fortune to see the introduction of computed tomography (CT and a technology first known as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Together with fellow members of a committee of the American College of Radiology and editors of prestigious radiological journals, I took part in changing the name of the latter modality to MRI, freeing it from threatening implications. Looking back on these experiences, one lesson stands out above all: Innovation and transformation never cease. Looking forward, it is clear that radiology, along with the rest of medicine, is now undergoing further momentous changes that will affect the future of all those already practicing as well as those yet to start their careers.

  12. Human performance in radiological survey scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probability of detecting residual contamination in the field using portable radiological survey instruments depends not only on the sensitivity of the instrumentation used in scanning, but also on the surveyor's performance. This report provides a basis for taking human performance into account in determining the minimum level of activity detectable by scanning. A theoretical framework was developed (based on signal detection theory) which allows influences on surveyors to be anticipated and understood, and supports a quantitative assessment of performance. The performance of surveyors under controlled yet realistic field conditions was examined to gain insight into the task and to develop means of quantifying performance. Then, their performance was assessed under laboratory conditions to quantify more precisely their ability to make the required discriminations. The information was used to characterize surveyors' performance in the scanning task and to provide a basis for predicting levels of radioactivity that are likely to be detectable under various conditions by surveyors using portable survey instruments

  13. Dictionary of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dictionary of radiology is based on practical experience in diagnostic radiology. Following a brief clinical introduction, radiological methods including nuclear medicine and the increasingly important field of sonography are presented in alphabetic order, each term with a short definition. The most favourable order of application is determined by the diagnostic value, technical requirements and discomfort of the various methods. Preparative measures, the duration of the examinations, and problems of radiation hygiene are discussed. Illustrative drawings supplement the text. The fields of application given for the various methods are based on the latest state of knowledge. Other methods, e.g. endoscopy in all its variants and thermography, are mentioned whereever they are of diagnostic value. The book has a brief appendix in which the fundamental physical and technical context are explained, also in alphabetic order. Detailed cross-references establish a connection between diseases and diagnostic methods, thus facilitating access to the desired information. (orig./MG)

  14. Radiology's value chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a

  15. Radiology illustrated. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. A wealth of carefully selected and categorized illustrations. Highlighted key points to facilitate rapid review. Aid to differential diagnosis. Radiology Illustrated: Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Radiology is the first of two volumes that will serve as a clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. This volume, devoted to diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen, covers congenital disorders, vascular diseases, benign and malignant tumors, and infectious conditions. Liver transplantation, evaluation of the therapeutic response of hepatocellular carcinoma, trauma, and post-treatment complications are also addressed. The book presents approximately 560 cases with more than 2100 carefully selected and categorized illustrations, along with key text messages and tables, that will allow the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis. At the end of each text message, key points are summarized to facilitate rapid review and learning. In addition, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by both common and uncommon case studies that illustrate the role of different imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, radiography, CT, and MRI.

  16. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  17. Radiology illustrated. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ihn (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. Hospital (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen. A wealth of carefully selected and categorized illustrations. Highlighted key points to facilitate rapid review. Aid to differential diagnosis. Radiology Illustrated: Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Radiology is the first of two volumes that will serve as a clear, practical guide to the diagnostic imaging of abdominal diseases. This volume, devoted to diseases of the liver, biliary tree, gallbladder, pancreas, and spleen, covers congenital disorders, vascular diseases, benign and malignant tumors, and infectious conditions. Liver transplantation, evaluation of the therapeutic response of hepatocellular carcinoma, trauma, and post-treatment complications are also addressed. The book presents approximately 560 cases with more than 2100 carefully selected and categorized illustrations, along with key text messages and tables, that will allow the reader easily to recall the relevant images as an aid to differential diagnosis. At the end of each text message, key points are summarized to facilitate rapid review and learning. In addition, brief descriptions of each clinical problem are provided, followed by both common and uncommon case studies that illustrate the role of different imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, radiography, CT, and MRI.

  18. Radiologic protection in pediatric radiology: ICRP recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Ramon [University of Michigan Hospital, Department of Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Khong, Pek-Lan [The University of Hong Kong, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Ringertz, Hans [Linkoeping University Hospital, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    ICRP has provided an updated overview of radiation protection principles in pediatric radiology. The authors recommend that staff, radiologists, medical physicists and vendors involved in pediatric radiology read this document. For conventional radiography, the report gives advice on patient positioning, immobilization, shielding and appropriate exposure conditions. It describes extensively the use of pulsed fluoroscopy, the importance of limiting fluoroscopy time, and how shielding and geometry must be used to avoid unnecessary radiation to the patient and operator. Furthermore, the use of fluoroscopy in interventional procedures with emphasis on dose reduction to patients and staff is discussed in light of the increasing frequency, complexity and length ofthe procedures. CT is the main reason that medical imaging in several developed countries is the highest annual per capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources. The ICRP report gives extensive descriptions of how CT protocols can be optimized to minimize radiation exposure in pediatric patients. The importance of balancing image quality with acceptable noise in pediatric imaging and the controversies regarding the use of protective shielding in CT are also discussed.

  19. Radiological impact on the workers, members of the public, and environment from the partial decommissioning of Pakistan Research Reactor-I and its associated radioactive residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A; Orfi, S D; Manzur, H; Aslam, M

    2001-05-01

    The Pakistan Research Reactor-I (PARR-I) is a swimming pool type research reactor originally designed and built for a thermal power of 5 MW using High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In 1990-1991 the reactor was redesigned, partially decommissioned and recommissioned to operate with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel at a thermal power of 10 MW. An essential requirement, construction and commissioning of a wet spent fuel storage bay and fabrication of an irradiated fuel transfer cask were completed before actual dismantling of the reactor core. During the partial decommissioning operations, radioactive waste generated included 600 m3 low-level liquid radioactive waste and 14 m3 of solid radioactive waste with an average specific activity of 4.52 Bq ml(-1) and 2.22 kBq g(-1), respectively. External radiation doses of the workers were determined using TLD (NG 6,7) and direct reading dosimeters. The maximum individual external radiation dose received by any worker during this practice was 5 mSv, which was 25% of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Detection and measurement of internal contamination was carried out using bioassay techniques. During the whole operation, not a single case of internal contamination was detected. The ambient radiation levels around waste seepage pits are periodically monitored using TLD (G-2 cards) and G. M. radiation survey meters. Underground migration of radioactivity is checked by analyzing seepage water samples taken from boreholes that have been dug at different locations in the vicinity of the radioactive residues. The monitoring around disposal sites containing radioactive residues has been continued during the last 9 y and will be continued in the future. So far, no rise in the environmental gamma radiation dose level and migration of underground radionuclides has been found in the vicinity of these disposal sites. Working personal during the decommissioning of PARR-I have been found to be radiologically safe. Adherence to the ALARA

  20. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  1. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste

  2. Radiological diagnosis of osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Having at their disposal a wide range of imaging techniques, radiologists play a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with osteoporosis. The radiological tests range from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is the only reference method accepted by the WHO, to conventional radiographs for fracture characterization, to more recent techniques for analyzing trabecular structure, and the findings are decisive in initiating correct management of osteoporosis patients. This review provides an overview of established radiological techniques and an outline of new diagnostic approaches. (orig.)

  3. Radiological worker training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance

  4. Dosimetry in Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steady growth in the use of ionizing radiation in diagnostic imaging requires to maintain a proper management of patient’s dose. Dosimetry in Radiology is a difficult topic to address, but vital for proper estimation of the dose the patient is receiving. The awareness that every day is perceived in our country on these issues is the appropriate response to this problem. This article describes the main dosimetric units used and easily exemplifies doses in radiology through internationally known reference values. (authors)

  5. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, S.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilcox, D.P. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  6. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  7. Radiological sciences dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Dowsett, David

    2009-01-01

    The Radiological Sciences Dictionary is a rapid reference guide for all hospital staff employed in diagnostic imaging, providing definitions of over 3000 keywords as applied to the technology of diagnostic radiology.Written in a concise and easy to digest form, the dictionary covers a wide variety of subject matter, including:· radiation legislation and measurement · computing and digital imaging terminology· nuclear medicine radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals· radiographic contrast agents (x-ray, MRI and ultrasound)· definitions used in ultrasound and MRI technology· statistical exp

  8. Dental Radiology: The Forgotten Problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiology is an essential part of dental practice. Traditionally, this has relied upon a small number of simple radiographic techniques with a low level of associated radiation risk. High numbers of dental X ray examinations, the frequently young age of patients and the relatively low health benefits of dentistry mean that justification of examinations remains an important consideration. Most dentists work in independent practice and self-referral for imaging is normal. Non-clinical pressures, such as financial factors and defensive practice, may influence the use of X ray examinations. Referral criteria are available at national and international levels, but their evidence basis is variable and there is a lack of data for their impact on behaviour. Particular challenges in justification include frequency of X ray examinations, the use of routine panoramic radiography and cone beam CT. Improving the practice of justification in dental radiology will rely on the availability of high quality referral criteria, improved education of dentists and greater attention to audit of practice. (author)

  9. Radiology physics - where to now...?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth in the complexity and sophistication of medical imaging systems, coincident with a substantial escalation in the expectation of accountability for the safe application of these technologies, places imaging physicists in a position that is charged with possibilities. The challenge is how imaging physicists can take advantage of this situation given the dearth of available manpower resources. The development and consequent complexity of each imaging modality is unprecedented and continues on an exponential trajectory. The growth in the specialisation of the literature also compounds the issue. The expectation by our radiology colleagues is that a radiology medical physicist (RMP) should be an 'expert' on all imaging platforms. The more likely outcome is that an RMP will have detailed specialisation in one or two technologies and a comprehensive working knowledge of the dosimetry impact and imaging standards of the others. As the complexity of the technology increases, expectations placed on RMPs by radiologists, technologists and administrators increases significantly. One important aspect of the service is to be the bridge between the technological system, the user and the patient. There is little doubt of the increasing need for the specific skill set of RMPs. The time taken to acquire multi-modality expertise, both theoretical and practical, is of the order of 5-10 years. Clearly to gain this expertise trainees should be in an environment where they are exposed to multiple imaging systems and platforms and also have close supervision from an experienced and/or accredited RMP

  10. Application of geographic information system for radiologic emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive and timely radiological, cultural, and environmental data are required in order to make informed decisions during a radiological emergency. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. The most recent addition to this essential function has been the development of the Field Analysis System for Emergency Response (FASER). It is an integrated system with compatible digital image processing and Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities. FASER is configured with commercially available off-the-shelf hardware and software components. To demonstrate the potential of the FASER system for radiological emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. (R.P.)

  11. Radiological health review of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volumes 1 and 2. DOE/EIS-0026

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the potential radiation exposure to people from the proposed Federal radioactive Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, in order to protect the public health and safety and ensure that there is minimal environmental degradation. Analyses are conducted of reports issued by the US DOE and its contractors, other Federal agencies and other organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP

  12. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  13. Guidelines for a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual presents guidelines for hospitals on a radiology quality assurance and dose measurement audit program and a system of planned actions that monitor and record the performance and effectiveness of the radiological service

  14. Radiological Society of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workshop Clinical Trials Methodology Workshop Introduction to Academic Radiology Faculty Skills Update CORE Advanced Course in Grant ... Journals RSNA/AAPM Physics Modules RadioGraphics ABR Diagnostic Radiology Core Exam Study Guide Meetings & Workshops Track My ...

  15. Program of environmental radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Regulation refers to the requirement of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01, 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', as expressed in the section 5.14, related to the Program of Environmental Radiological Monitoring (PMRA)

  16. Neural bases for anticipation skill in soccer: an FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Daniel T; Wright, Michael J; Jackson, Robin C; Abernethy, Bruce

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the neural bases for perceptual-cognitive superiority in a soccer anticipation task using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty-nine participants lay in an MRI scanner while performing a video-based task in which they predicted an oncoming opponent's movements. Video clips were occluded at four time points, and participants were grouped according to in-task performance. Early occlusion reduced prediction accuracy significantly for all participants, as did the opponent's execution of a deceptive maneuver; however, high-skill participants were significantly more accurate than their low-skill counterparts under deceptive conditions. This perceptual-cognitive superiority was associated with greater activation of cortical and subcortical structures involved in executive function and oculomotor control. The contributions of the present findings to an existing neural model of anticipation in sport are highlighted. PMID:23404883

  17. Neural basis of reward anticipation and its genetic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tianye; Macare, Christine; Desrivières, Sylvane; Gonzalez, Dante A; Tao, Chenyang; Ji, Xiaoxi; Ruggeri, Barbara; Nees, Frauke; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J; Dove, Rachel; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny A; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lemaitre, Hervé; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor; Smolka, Michael N; Müller, Christian P; Feng, Jianfeng; Rothenfluh, Adrian; Flor, Herta; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunctional reward processing is implicated in various mental disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and addictions. Such impairments might involve different components of the reward process, including brain activity during reward anticipation. We examined brain nodes engaged by reward anticipation in 1,544 adolescents and identified a network containing a core striatal node and cortical nodes facilitating outcome prediction and response preparation. Distinct nodes and functional connections were preferentially associated with either adolescent hyperactivity or alcohol consumption, thus conveying specificity of reward processing to clinically relevant behavior. We observed associations between the striatal node, hyperactivity, and the vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4A (VPS4A) gene in humans, and the causal role of Vps4 for hyperactivity was validated in Drosophila Our data provide a neurobehavioral model explaining the heterogeneity of reward-related behaviors and generate a hypothesis accounting for their enduring nature. PMID:27001827

  18. Acting on intentions: the role of anticipated regret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Charles; Sheeran, Paschal

    2003-12-01

    Three studies tested the hypothesis that anticipated regret (AR) increases consistency between exercise intentions and behaviour. Study 1 employed a longitudinal survey design (N = 384). Measures specified by the theory of planned behaviour, past behaviour, and AR were used to predict self-reported exercise behaviour 2 weeks later. AR moderated the intention-behaviour relationship such that participants were most likely to exercise if they both intended to exercise and anticipated regret if they failed to exercise. Study 2 used an experimental design to examine the effect of focusing on AR prior to reporting intentions (N = 229). Exercise was measured 2 weeks later and the AR-focus manipulation was found to moderate the intention-behaviour relationship in a similar manner to that observed in Study 1. In Study 3 (N = 97), moderation was replicated and was shown to be mediated by the temporal stability of intention. PMID:14715114

  19. From insufficiency to anticipation, an introduction to 'Lichaamskaart'

    OpenAIRE

    De Grave, Dieter; Van Den Eede, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we take up the point of symbolic-imaginary anticipation and we combine it with the mirror stage, worked out by Jacques Lacan in numerous publications. We place the mirror stage within its complex temporal framework and explain how the three topological categories (RSI) follow from this most intimate of subjective experiences in the double mirror set up. All kinds of psychopathological mechanisms are traceable to this period in subjective development. Until recently it was imposs...

  20. Anticipated Tax Amnesties and Tax Compliance: An Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Christian; Müller, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Many countries grant exemption from legal prosecution under certain conditions, allowing for voluntary disclosures regarding tax evasion. It has been claimed that tax amnesties are most successful when they are accompanied by an increase in compliance efforts because amnesties then help tax evaders to adjust to the new circumstances. At the same time, time-limited amnesties are often repeated or in some countries even permanent amnesty laws exist. When tax amnesties are, however, anticipated,...