WorldWideScience

Sample records for anticancer therapeutics targeting

  1. Hypoxic state and glycolysis as a possible anticancer therapeutic target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Koblyakov

    2014-01-01

    dichloroacetate is very toxic for some forms of tumour. It is discussed the possibility to use the different inhibitors of the different glycolytic stages as anticancer compounds

  2. Targeting the Fanconi Anemia Pathway to Identify Tailored Anticancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Jenkins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi Anemia (FA pathway consists of proteins involved in repairing DNA damage, including interstrand cross-links (ICLs. The pathway contains an upstream multiprotein core complex that mediates the monoubiquitylation of the FANCD2 and FANCI heterodimer, and a downstream pathway that converges with a larger network of proteins with roles in homologous recombination and other DNA repair pathways. Selective killing of cancer cells with an intact FA pathway but deficient in certain other DNA repair pathways is an emerging approach to tailored cancer therapy. Inhibiting the FA pathway becomes selectively lethal when certain repair genes are defective, such as the checkpoint kinase ATM. Inhibiting the FA pathway in ATM deficient cells can be achieved with small molecule inhibitors, suggesting that new cancer therapeutics could be developed by identifying FA pathway inhibitors to treat cancers that contain defects that are synthetic lethal with FA.

  3. Targeted anti-cancer prodrug based on carbon nanotube with photodynamic therapeutic effect and pH-triggered drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jianquan; Zeng, Fang, E-mail: mcfzeng@scut.edu.cn; Xu, Jiangsheng; Wu, Shuizhu, E-mail: shzhwu@scut.edu.cn [South China University of Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices (China)

    2013-09-15

    Herein, we describe a multifunctional anti-cancer prodrug system based on water-dispersible carbon nanotube (CNT); this prodrug system features active targeting, pH-triggered drug release, and photodynamic therapeutic properties. For this prodrug system (with the size of {approx}100-300 nm), an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was incorporated onto CNT via a cleavable hydrazone bond; and a targeting ligand (folic acid) was also coupled onto CNT. This prodrug can preferably enter folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells and undergo intracellular release of the drug triggered by the reduced pH. The targeted CNT-based prodrug system can cause lower cell viability toward FR-positive cells compared to the non-targeted ones. Moreover, the CNT carrier exhibits photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) action; and the cell viability of FR-positive cancer cells can be further reduced upon light irradiation. The dual effects of pH-triggered drug release and PDT increase the therapeutic efficacy of the DOX-CNT prodrug. This study may offer some useful insights on designing and improving the applicability of CNT for other drug delivery systems.

  4. Enzyme inhibition as a key target for the development of novel metal-based anti-cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Darren; Parker, James P; Marmion, Celine J

    2010-06-01

    Historically, DNA has been the target for many metal-based anti-cancer drugs, but drawbacks of prevailing therapies have stimulated the search for new molecular targets which may present unique opportunities for therapeutic exploitation. Enzyme inhibition has recently been identified as an alternative and significant target. The pursuit of novel metallodrug candidates that selectively target enzymes is now the subject of intense investigation in medicinal bioinorganic chemistry and chemical biology. In the field of drug design, it is recognised by many that exploiting the structural and chemical diversity of metal ions for the identification of potential hit and lead candidates can dramatically increase the number of possible drug candidates that may be added to the already abundant armoury of chemotherapeutic agents. This review will focus on recent key advancements in enzyme inhibition as a key target for the development of novel metal-based anti-cancer therapeutics. The enormous clinical success of classical platinum drugs, amongst others, coupled with the wealth of knowledge accumulated in recent years on enzyme structure and function, has undoubtedly been the impetus behind the development of new metallodrug candidates with enzyme inhibitory properties. Recent trends in this field will be reviewed with a particular emphasis on metal complexes that inhibit protein and lipid kinases, matrix metalloproteases, telomerases, topoisomerases, glutathione-S-transferases, and histone deacetylases.

  5. Apoptosis as anticancer mechanism: function and dysfunction of its modulators and targeted therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistritto, Giuseppa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Ceci, Claudia; Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that results in the orderly and efficient removal of damaged cells, such as those resulting from DNA damage or during development. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Deregulation in apoptotic cell death machinery is an hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis alteration is responsible not only for tumor development and progression but also for tumor resistance to therapies. Most anticancer drugs currently used in clinical oncology exploit the intact apoptotic signaling pathways to trigger cancer cell death. Thus, defects in the death pathways may result in drug resistance so limiting the efficacy of therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the apoptotic cell death signaling pathways may improve the efficacy of cancer therapy and bypass resistance. This review will highlight the role of the fundamental regulators of apoptosis and how their deregulation, including activation of anti-apoptotic factors (i.e., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, etc) or inactivation of pro-apoptotic factors (i.e., p53 pathway) ends up in cancer cell resistance to therapies. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating apoptotic activity are briefly discussed.

  6. Therapeutic aptamers: developmental potential as anticancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Hyun Jung; Heo, Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, composed of single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that interact with target molecules through a specific three-dimensional structure, are selected from pools of combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries. With their high specificity and affinity for target proteins, ease of synthesis and modification, and low immunogenicity and toxicity, aptamers are considered to be attractive molecules for development as anticancer therapeutics. Two aptamers - one targeting nucleolin and a seco...

  7. Molecular interaction of a kinase inhibitor midostaurin with anticancer drug targets, S100A8 and EGFR: transcriptional profiling and molecular docking study for kidney cancer therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenat Mirza

    Full Text Available The S100A8 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR proteins are proto-oncogenes that are strongly expressed in a number of cancer types. EGFR promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by activating molecular pathways. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A8 in tumor cell differentiation and progression is largely unclear and not studied in kidney cancer (KC. S100A8 and EGFR are potential therapeutic biomarkers and anticancer drug targets for KC. In this study, we explored molecular mechanisms of interaction profiles of both molecules with potential anticancer drugs. We undertook transcriptional profiling in Saudi KCs using Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST arrays. We identified 1478 significantly expressed genes, including S100A8 and EGFR overexpression, using cut-off p value <0.05 and fold change ≥2. Additionally, we compared and confirmed our findings with expression data available at NCBI's GEO database. A significant number of genes associated with cancer showed involvement in cell cycle progression, DNA repair, tumor morphology, tissue development, and cell survival. Atherosclerosis signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, notch signaling, and IL-12 signaling were the most significantly disrupted signaling pathways. The present study provides an initial transcriptional profiling of Saudi KC patients. Our analysis suggests distinct transcriptomic signatures and pathways underlying molecular mechanisms of KC progression. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the kinase inhibitor "midostaurin" has amongst the selected drug targets, the best ligand properties to S100A8 and EGFR, with the implication that its binding inhibits downstream signaling in KC. This is the first structure-based docking study for the selected protein targets and anticancer drug, and the results indicate S100A8 and EGFR as attractive anticancer targets and midostaurin with effective drug properties for therapeutic intervention in KC.

  8. A novel nitric oxide-based anticancer therapeutics by macrophage-targeted poly(l-arginine)-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Shinpei; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-11-10

    In the immune system, macrophages in tumor tissue generate nitric oxide (NO), producing versatile effects including apoptosis of tumor cells, because inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the cytoplasm of a macrophage produces NO using l-arginine as a substrate. Here, we propose novel NO-triggered immune therapeutics based on our newly designed nanoparticle system. We designed a poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-arginine) (i.e., PEG-b-P(l-Arg)) block copolymer and prepared polyion complex micelles (PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m) composed of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) and chondroitin sulfate for systemic anticancer immunotherapy. iNOS treatment of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) did not generate NO, but NO molecules were detected after trypsin pretreatment, indicating that hydrolysis of P(l-Arg) to monomeric arginine was taking place in vitro. RAW264.7 macrophages abundantly generated NO from the PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m in comparison with control micelles; this finding is indicative of robustness of the proposed method. It is interesting to note that systemic administration of PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m had no noticeable adverse effects and suppressed the tumor growth rate in C26 tumor-bearing mice in a dose-dependent manner. Our newly designed nanoparticle-assisted arginine delivery system seems to hold promise as an NO-mediated anticancer immunotherapy.

  9. Targeted anticancer therapy: overexpressed receptors and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-09-25

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancer cells and tissues is a promising field due to its potential to spare unaffected cells and tissues, but it has been a major challenge to achieve success in these therapeutic approaches. Several innovative approaches to targeted drug delivery have been devised based on available knowledge in cancer biology and on technological advancements. To achieve the desired selectivity of drug delivery, nanotechnology has enabled researchers to design nanoparticles (NPs) to incorporate anticancer drugs and act as nanocarriers. Recently, many receptor molecules known to be overexpressed in cancer have been explored as docking sites for the targeting of anticancer drugs. In principle, anticancer drugs can be concentrated specifically in cancer cells and tissues by conjugating drug-containing nanocarriers with ligands against these receptors. Several mechanisms can be employed to induce triggered drug release in response to either endogenous trigger or exogenous trigger so that the anticancer drug is only released upon reaching and preferentially accumulating in the tumor tissue. This review focuses on overexpressed receptors exploited in targeting drugs to cancerous tissues and the tumor microenvironment. We briefly evaluate the structure and function of these receptor molecules, emphasizing the elegant mechanisms by which certain characteristics of cancer can be exploited in cancer treatment. After this discussion of receptors, we review their respective ligands and then the anticancer drugs delivered by nanotechnology in preclinical models of cancer. Ligand-functionalized nanocarriers have delivered significantly higher amounts of anticancer drugs in many in vitro and in vivo models of cancer compared to cancer models lacking such receptors or drug carrying nanocarriers devoid of ligand. This increased concentration of anticancer drug in the tumor site enabled by nanotechnology could have a major impact on the efficiency of cancer

  10. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic

  11. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danbo Yang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(L-g-glutamylglutamine-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX. PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic.

  12. Vimentin Is a Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutic Target; Insights from In Vitro and In Vivo Mice Xenograft Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Guy Lahat; Quan-Sheng Zhu; Kai-Lieh Huang; Suizhao Wang; Svetlana Bolshakov; Jeffery Liu; Keila Torres; Langley, Robert R; Lazar, Alexander J; Mien Chie Hung; Dina Lev

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vimentin is a ubiquitous mesenchymal intermediate filament supporting mechano-structural integrity of quiescent cells while participating in adhesion, migration, survival, and cell signaling processes via dynamic assembly/disassembly in activated cells. Soft tissue sarcomas and some epithelial cancers exhibiting "epithelial to mesenchymal transition" phenotypes express vimentin. Withaferin-A, a naturally derived bioactive compound, may molecularly target vimentin, so we sought to ...

  13. Anticancer Agents Targeted to Sirtuins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Kozako

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide+-dependent deacetylases of which there are seven isoforms (SIRT1–7. Sirtuin activity is linked to gene expression, lifespan extension, neurodegeneration, and age-related disorders. Numerous studies have suggested that sirtuins could be of great significance with regard to both antiaging and tumorigenesis, depending on its targets in specific signaling pathways or in specific cancers. Recent studies have identified small chemical compounds that modulate sirtuins, and these modulators have enabled a greater understanding of the biological function and molecular mechanisms of sirtuins. This review highlights the possibility of sirtuins, especially SIRT1 and SIRT2, for cancer therapy targets, and focuses on the therapeutic potential of sirtuin modulators both in cancer prevention and treatment.

  14. Folate-targeted pH-responsive calcium zoledronate nanoscale metal-organic frameworks: Turning a bone antiresorptive agent into an anticancer therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Kin Man; Satterlee, Andrew; Min, Yuanzeng; Tian, Xi; Kim, Young Seok; Caster, Joseph M; Zhang, Longzhen; Zhang, Tian; Huang, Leaf; Wang, Andrew Z

    2016-03-01

    Zoledronate (Zol) is a third-generation bisphosphonate that is widely used as an anti-resorptive agent for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis. While there is preclinical data indicating that bisphosphonates such as Zol have direct cytotoxic effects on cancer cells, such effect has not been firmly established in the clinical setting. This is likely due to the rapid absorption of bisphosphonates by the skeleton after intravenous (i.v.) administration. Herein, we report the reformulation of Zol using nanotechnology and evaluation of this novel nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (nMOFs) formulation of Zol as an anticancer agent. The nMOF formulation is comprised of a calcium zoledronate (CaZol) core and a polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface. To preferentially deliver CaZol nMOFs to tumors as well as facilitate cellular uptake of Zol, we incorporated folate (Fol)-targeted ligands on the nMOFs. The folate receptor (FR) is known to be overexpressed in several tumor types, including head-and-neck, prostate, and non-small cell lung cancers. We demonstrated that these targeted CaZol nMOFs possess excellent chemical and colloidal stability in physiological conditions. The release of encapsulated Zol from the nMOFs occurs in the mid-endosomes during nMOF endocytosis. In vitro toxicity studies demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are more efficient than small molecule Zol in inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in FR-overexpressing H460 non-small cell lung and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Our findings were further validated in vivo using mouse xenograft models of H460 and PC3. We demonstrated that Fol-targeted CaZol nMOFs are effective anticancer agents and increase the direct antitumor activity of Zol by 80-85% in vivo through inhibition of tumor neovasculature, and inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis.

  15. Autophagy modulation as a target for anticancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LI; Huai-long XU; Yong-xi LIU; Na AN; Si ZHAO; Jin-ku BAO

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involving the engulfment and degradation of non-essential or abnormal cellular organelles and proteins,is crucial for homeostatic maintenance in living cells.This highly regulated,multi-step process has been implicated in diverse diseases including cancer.Autophagy can function as either a promoter or a suppressor of cancer,which makes it a promising and challenging therapeutic target.Herein,we overview the regulatory mechanisms and dual roles of autophagy in cancer.We also describe some of the representative agents that exert their anticancer effects by regulating autophagy.Additionally,some emerging strategies aimed at modulating autophagy are discussed as having the potential for future anticancer drug discovery.In summary,these findings will provide valuable information to better utilize autophagy in the future development of anticancer therapeutics that meet clinical requirements.

  16. Anticancer Agents Targeted to Sirtuins

    OpenAIRE

    Tomohiro Kozako; Takayoshi Suzuki; Makoto Yoshimitsu; Naomichi Arima; Shin-ichiro Honda; Shinji Soeda

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuins are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide+-dependent deacetylases of which there are seven isoforms (SIRT1–7). Sirtuin activity is linked to gene expression, lifespan extension, neurodegeneration, and age-related disorders. Numerous studies have suggested that sirtuins could be of great significance with regard to both antiaging and tumorigenesis, depending on its targets in specific signaling pathways or in specific cancers. Recent studies have identified small chemical compounds that m...

  17. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-02-01

    The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings. PMID:22328057

  18. uPAR as anti-cancer target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Illemann, Martin; Thurison, Tine;

    2011-01-01

    , and a potential diagnostic and predictive impact of the different uPAR forms has been reported. Hence, pericellular proteolysis seems to be a suitable target for anti-cancer therapy and numerous approaches have been pursued. Targeting of this process may be achieved by preventing the binding of uPA to u...... using mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mouse uPA or uPAR. These reagents will target uPA and uPAR in both stromal cells and cancer cells, and their therapeutic potential can now be assessed in syngenic mouse cancer models.......Degradation of proteins in the extracellular matrix is crucial for the multistep process of cancer invasion and metastasis. Compelling evidence has demonstrated the urokinase receptor (uPAR) and its cognate ligand, the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), to play critical roles in the concerted...

  19. Understanding Resistance to Targeted Anticancer Therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, C.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapeutic regimens are gradually changing from using relatively unspecific cytotoxic agents to selective, pathway-centered approaches. The mechanistic rationale of targeted approaches is to destruct the tumor by blocking aberrant cell signaling, crucial for tumor maintenance and growth, but

  20. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  1. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JurIkova, A; Csach, K; Koneracka, M; Zavisova, V; Tomasovicova, N; Lancz, G; Kopcansky, P; Timko, M; Miskuf, J [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Muckova, M, E-mail: akasard@saske.s [Hameln rds a.s., 900 01 Modra (Slovakia)

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  2. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Jäger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT, which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination

  3. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  4. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  5. Transcription factors as targets of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniazdowski, M; Czyz, M

    1999-01-01

    Several general and gene- and cell-selective transcription factors are required for specific transcription to occur. Many of them exert their functions through specific contacts either in the promoter region or at distant sequences regulating the initiation. These contacts may be altered by anticancer drugs which form non-covalent complexes with DNA. Covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents may prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences or may constitute multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which attract the factors thus decreasing their availability in the cell. The anticancer drug-transcription factor interplay which is based on specific interactions with DNA may contribute to pharmacological properties of the former and provide a basis for the search for new drugs. PMID:10547027

  6. 靶向性抗癌治疗的纳米技术%Nanotechnology for targeted anticancer therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗育林

    2005-01-01

    Although many anticancer therapies are used in clinic, few are tolerable for their side effects from killing of normal cells. Seeking measures to target anticancer agents to tumors or at least tumor-located organs has been one of the major tasks for researchers. Nanotechnology is greatly helpful for fulfilling this task. There are several ways to direct therapeutic agents carried by nanoparticles to tumor sites. This article focuses on the mechanisms,advantages and disadvantages of different targeting manners, understanding of which may be benefitial to researchers to develop specific targeted anticancer therapy.

  7. Mitochondria and Mitochondrial ROS in Cancer: Novel Targets for Anticancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuhui; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Hartwig, Werner; D'Haese, Jan G; Philippov, Pavel P; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable for energy metabolism, apoptosis regulation, and cell signaling. Mitochondria in malignant cells differ structurally and functionally from those in normal cells and participate actively in metabolic reprogramming. Mitochondria in cancer cells are characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, which promotes cancer development by inducing genomic instability, modifying gene expression, and participating in signaling pathways. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA mutations caused by oxidative damage that impair the oxidative phosphorylation process will result in further mitochondrial ROS production, completing the "vicious cycle" between mitochondria, ROS, genomic instability, and cancer development. The multiple essential roles of mitochondria have been utilized for designing novel mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents. Selective drug delivery to mitochondria helps to increase specificity and reduce toxicity of these agents. In order to reduce mitochondrial ROS production, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants can specifically accumulate in mitochondria by affiliating to a lipophilic penetrating cation and prevent mitochondria from oxidative damage. In consistence with the oncogenic role of ROS, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants are found to be effective in cancer prevention and anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the role played by mitochondria in cancer development will help to reveal more therapeutic targets, and will help to increase the activity and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs. In this review we summarized the impact of mitochondria on cancer and gave summary about the possibilities to target mitochondria for anticancer therapies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2570-2581, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Annotating Cancer Variants and Anti-Cancer Therapeutics in Reactome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milacic, Marija; Haw, Robin, E-mail: robin.haw@oicr.on.ca; Rothfels, Karen; Wu, Guanming [Informatics and Bio-computing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON, M5G0A3 (Canada); Croft, David; Hermjakob, Henning [European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); D’Eustachio, Peter [Department of Biochemistry, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Stein, Lincoln [Informatics and Bio-computing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON, M5G0A3 (Canada)

    2012-11-08

    Reactome describes biological pathways as chemical reactions that closely mirror the actual physical interactions that occur in the cell. Recent extensions of our data model accommodate the annotation of cancer and other disease processes. First, we have extended our class of protein modifications to accommodate annotation of changes in amino acid sequence and the formation of fusion proteins to describe the proteins involved in disease processes. Second, we have added a disease attribute to reaction, pathway, and physical entity classes that uses disease ontology terms. To support the graphical representation of “cancer” pathways, we have adapted our Pathway Browser to display disease variants and events in a way that allows comparison with the wild type pathway, and shows connections between perturbations in cancer and other biological pathways. The curation of pathways associated with cancer, coupled with our efforts to create other disease-specific pathways, will interoperate with our existing pathway and network analysis tools. Using the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway as an example, we show how Reactome annotates and presents the altered biological behavior of EGFR variants due to their altered kinase and ligand-binding properties, and the mode of action and specificity of anti-cancer therapeutics.

  9. Sphingolipid metabolism enzymes as targets for anticancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, JW; Sietsma, H

    2004-01-01

    Treatment with anti-cancer agents in most cases ultimately results in apoptotic cell death of the target tumour cells. Unfortunately, tumour cells can develop multidrug resistance, e.g., by a reduced propensity to engage in apoptosis by which they become insensitive to multiple chemotherapeutics. Ce

  10. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  11. Anticancer Drug-Incorporated Layered Double Hydroxide Nanohybrids and Their Enhanced Anticancer Therapeutic Efficacy in Combination Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Layered double hydroxide (LDH nanoparticles have been studied as cellular delivery carriers for anionic anticancer agents. As MTX and 5-FU are clinically utilized anticancer drugs in combination therapy, we aimed to enhance the therapeutic performance with the help of LDH nanoparticles. Method. Anticancer drugs, MTX and 5-FU, and their combination, were incorporated into LDH by reconstruction method. Simply, LDHs were thermally pretreated at 400°C, and then reacted with drug solution to simultaneously form drug-incorporated LDH. Thus prepared MTX/LDH (ML, 5-FU/LDH (FL, and (MTX + 5-FU/LDH (MFL nanohybrids were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, zeta potential measurement, dynamic light scattering, and so forth. The nanohybrids were administrated to the human cervical adenocarcinoma, HeLa cells, in concentration-dependent manner, comparing with drug itself to verify the enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion. All the nanohybrids successfully accommodated intended drug molecules in their house-of-card-like structures during reconstruction reaction. It was found that the anticancer efficacy of MFL nanohybrid was higher than other nanohybrids, free drugs, or their mixtures, which means the multidrug-incorporated LDH nanohybrids could be potential drug delivery carriers for efficient cancer treatment via combination therapy.

  12. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Dharmendar; Jani, Dewal; Nagarkatti, Rana

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  13. Therapeutic targeting of bile acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gores, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The first objectives of this article are to review the structure, chemistry, and physiology of bile acids and the types of bile acid malabsorption observed in clinical practice. The second major theme addresses the classical or known properties of bile acids, such as the role of bile acid sequestration in the treatment of hyperlipidemia; the use of ursodeoxycholic acid in therapeutics, from traditional oriental medicine to being, until recently, the drug of choice in cholestatic liver diseases; and the potential for normalizing diverse bowel dysfunctions in irritable bowel syndrome, either by sequestering intraluminal bile acids for diarrhea or by delivering more bile acids to the colon to relieve constipation. The final objective addresses novel concepts and therapeutic opportunities such as the interaction of bile acids and the microbiome to control colonic infections, as in Clostridium difficile-associated colitis, and bile acid targeting of the farnesoid X receptor and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 with consequent effects on energy expenditure, fat metabolism, and glycemic control. PMID:26138466

  14. Therapeutic Strategies to Enhance the Anticancer Efficacy of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone acetylation is a posttranslational modification that plays a role in regulating gene expression. More recently, other nonhistone proteins have been identified to be acetylated which can regulate their function, stability, localization, or interaction with other molecules. Modulating acetylation with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi has been validated to have anticancer effects in preclinical and clinical cancer models. This has led to development and approval of the first HDACi, vorinostat, for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma. However, to date, targeting acetylation with HDACi as a monotherapy has shown modest activity against other cancers. To improve their efficacy, HDACi have been paired with other antitumor agents. Here, we discuss several combination therapies, highlighting various epigenetic drugs, ROS-generating agents, proteasome inhibitors, and DNA-damaging compounds that together may provide a therapeutic advantage over single-agent strategies.

  15. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L; Keith, W Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed "senescence," can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells' heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  16. Telomere and telomerase as targets for anti-cancer and regeneration therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-hsin HSU; Jing-jer LIN

    2005-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that directs the synthesis of telomeric sequence.It is detected in majority of malignant tumors, but not in most normal somatic cells.Because telomerase plays a critical role in cell immortality and tumor formation, it has been one of the targets for anti-cancer and regeneration drug development. In this review, we will discuss therapeutic approaches based mainly on small molecules that have been developed to inhibit telomerase activity, modulate telomerase expression, and telomerase directed gene therapy.

  17. The potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Priyanka Dwarampudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of invasive cervical carcinoma several molecular events were reported and these molecular events resulting in multiple genetic abnormalities. In order to control these tumors multiple molecular therapeutic targets are needed with different molecular mechanisms. Unfortunately, these molecular targets were in early stages of development. Because of less degree of success of conventional therapeutics for late stages of cervical cancer and lowering of prognosis of patients there is an increase in interest for the development of potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer. This review article emphasizes the current molecular targeted agents; with special attention to estrogen receptors for human papilloma virus infected cervical cancer.

  18. Lymphatic Targeting of Nanosystems for Anticancer Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellan-Pose, Raquel; Csaba, Noemi; Alonso, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system represents a major route of dissemination in metastatic cancer. Given the lack of selectivity of conventional chemotherapy to prevent lymphatic metastasis, in the last years there has been a growing interest in the development of nanocarriers showing lymphotropic characteristics. The goal of this lymphotargeting strategy is to facilitate the delivery of anticancer drugs to the lymph node-resident cancer cells, thereby enhancing the effectiveness of the anti-cancer therapies. This article focuses on the nanosystems described so far for the active or passive targeting of oncological drugs to the lymphatic circulation. To understand the design and performance of these nanosystems, we will discuss first the physiology of the lymphatic system and how physiopathological changes associated to tumor growth influence the biodistribution of nanocarriers. Second, we provide evidence on how the tailoring of the physicochemical characteristics of nanosystems, i.e. particle size, surface charge and hydrophilicity, allows the modulation of their access to the lymphatic circulation. Finally, we provide an overview of the relationship between the biodistribution and antimetastatic activity of the nanocarriers loaded with oncological drugs, and illustrate the most promising active targeting approaches investigated so far. PMID:26675222

  19. Pathogenesis and new therapeutic targets

    OpenAIRE

    Mertens, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury and its pronounced form, acute respiratory distress syndrome, are life-threatening diseases with 190,000 patients and 74,500 deaths per year in the United States. Until now there have been no therapeutic approaches to lower morbidity and mortality, except for ventilation with small tidal volumes. This partially results from a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanism of ventilator induced acute lung injury on the alveolar and alveolar capillary level. In addition, ph...

  20. Cisplatin encapsulated nanoparticle as a therapeutic agent for anticancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eka Putra, Gusti Ngurah Putu; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of manipulating size of biomaterials encapsulated drug into nano-scale particles has been researched and developed in treating cancer. Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, therefore it is critical to treat cancers challenging with therapeutic modality of various mechanisms. Our preliminary investigation has studied cisplatin encapsulated into lipid-based nanoparticle and examined the therapeutic effect on xenografted animal model. We used mice with tumor volume ranging from 195 to 214 mm3 and then few mice were grouped into three groups including: control (PBS), lipid platinum chloride (LPC) nanoparticles and CDDP (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) at dose of 3mg cisplatin /kg body weight. The effect of the treatment was observed for 12 days post-injection. It showed that LPC NPs demonstrated a better therapeutic effect compared to CDDP at same 3mg cisplatin/kg drug dose of tumor size reduction, 96.6% and 11.1% respectively. In addition, mouse body weight loss of LPC, CDDP and PBS treated group are 12.1%, 24.3% and 1.4%. It means that by compared to CDDP group, LPC group demonstrated less side effect as not much reduction of body weight have found. Our findings have shown to be a potential modality to further investigate as a feasible cancer therapy modality.

  1. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  2. The potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    L Priyanka Dwarampudi; Gowthamarajan, K.; Shanmugam, R; Madhuri, K.; Nilani, P.; M N Satish Kumar

    2013-01-01

    In case of invasive cervical carcinoma several molecular events were reported and these molecular events resulting in multiple genetic abnormalities. In order to control these tumors multiple molecular therapeutic targets are needed with different molecular mechanisms. Unfortunately, these molecular targets were in early stages of development. Because of less degree of success of conventional therapeutics for late stages of cervical cancer and lowering of prognosis of patients there is an inc...

  3. Therapeutic targeting of Janus kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Pesu, Marko; Laurence, Arian; Kishore, Nandini; Zwillich, Sam; Chan, Gary; O’Shea, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Cytokines play pivotal roles in immunity and inflammation, and targeting cytokines and their receptors is an effective means of treating such disorders. Type I and II cytokine receptors associate with Janus family kinases (JAKs) to effect intracellular signaling. These structurally unique protein kinases play essential and specific roles in immune cell development and function. One JAK, JAK3, has particularly selective functions. Mutations of this kinase underlie severe combined immunodeficie...

  4. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-08-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin’s self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics.

  5. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-08-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin's self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics.

  6. Heat-Shock Protein 90-Targeted Nano Anticancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochani, Ankit K; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Borah, Ankita; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal chemotherapy of anticancer drugs may be attributed to a variety of cellular mechanisms, which synergize to dodge the drug responses. Nearly 2 decades of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-targeted drug discovery has shown that the mono-therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors seems to be relatively ineffective compared with combination treatment due to several cellular dodging mechanisms. In this article, we have tried to analyze and review the Hsp90 and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR)-mediated drug resistance mechanisms. By using this information we have discussed about the rationale behind use of drug combinations that includes both or any one of these inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, biodegradable nano vector (NV)-loaded novel drug delivery systems have shown to resolve the problems of poor bioavailability. NVs of drugs such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and others have been successfully introduced for medicinal use. Hence, looking at the success of NVs, in this article we have also discussed the progress made in the delivery of biodegradable NV-loaded Hsp90 and m-TOR-targeted inhibitors in multiple drug combinations. We have also discussed the possible ways by which the market success of biodegradable NVs can positively impact the clinical trials of anti-Hsp90 and m-TOR combination strategy. PMID:26886301

  7. Conotoxins: Molecular and Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard J.

    Marine molluscs known as cone snails produce beautiful shells and a complex array of over 50,000 venom peptides evolved for prey capture and defence. Many of these peptides selectively modulate ion channels and transporters, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology. A number of conopeptides reduce pain in animal models, and several are now in pre-clinical and clinical development for the treatment of severe pain often associated with diseases such as cancer. Less than 1% of cone snail venom peptides are pharmacologically characterised.

  8. Targeted Anticancer Immunotoxins and Cytotoxic Agents with Direct Killing Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Kawakami

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the progress of the bioinformatics approach to characterize cell-surface antigens and receptors on tumor cells, it remains difficult to generate novel cancer vaccines or neutralizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics. Among targeted cancer therapeutics, biologicals with targetable antibodies or ligands conjugated or fused to toxins or chemicals for direct cell-killing ability have been developed over the last 2 decades. These conjugated or fused chimeric proteins are termed immunotoxins or cytotoxic agents. Two agents, DAB389IL-2 (ONTAKTM targeting the interleukin-2 receptor and CD33-calicheamicin (Mylotarg®, have been approved by the FDA for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML, respectively. Such targetable agents, including RFB4(dsFv-PE38 (BL22, IL13-PE38QQR, and Tf-CRM107, are being tested in clinical trials. Several agents using unique technology such as a cleavable adapter or immunoliposomes with antibodies are also in the preclinical stage. This review summarizes the generation, mechanism, and development of these agents. In addition, possible future directions of this therapeutic approach are discussed.

  9. Injectable nanomaterials for drug delivery: carriers, targeting moieties, and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, David M; Sundaram, Padma; Byrne, Mark E

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutics such as nucleic acids, proteins/peptides, vaccines, anti-cancer, and other drugs have disadvantages of low bio-availability, rapid clearance, and high toxicity. Thus, there is a significant need for the development of efficient delivery methods and carriers. Injectable nanocarriers have received much attention due to their vast range of structures and ability to contain multiple functional groups, both within the bulk material and on the surface of the particles. Nanocarriers may be tailored to control drug release and/or increase selective cell targeting, cellular uptake, drug solubility, and circulation time, all of which lead to a more efficacious delivery and action of therapeutics. The focus of this review is injectable, targeted nanoparticle drug delivery carriers highlighting the diversity of nanoparticle materials and structures as well as highlighting current therapeutics and targeting moieties. Structures and materials discussed include liposomes, polymersomes, dendrimers, cyclodextrin-containing polymers (CDPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and gold nanoparticles. Additionally, current clinical trial information and details such as trial phase, treatment, active drug, carrier sponsor, and clinical trial identifier for different materials and structures are presented and discussed.

  10. Polymeric micelles in anticancer therapy : targeting, imaging and triggered release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, Chris; Bult, Wouter; Bos, Mariska; Storm, Gert; Nijsen, J Frank W; Hennink, Wim E

    2010-01-01

    Micelles are colloidal particles with a size around 5-100 nm which are currently under investigation as carriers for hydrophobic drugs in anticancer therapy. Currently, five micellar formulations for anticancer therapy are under clinical evaluation, of which Genexol-PM has been FDA approved for use

  11. Logical design of an anti-cancer agent targeting the plant homeodomain in Pygopus2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ferdausi; Yamaguchi, Keiichi; Fukuoka, Mayuko; Elhelaly, Abdelazim Elsayed; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    Pygopus2 (Pygo2) is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway, which is required for β-catenin mediated transcription. Plant homeodomain (PHD) finger in Pygo2 intercalates the methylated histone 3 (H3K4me) tail and HD1 domain of BCL9 that binds to β-catenin. Thus, PHD finger may be a potential target for the logical design of an anti-cancer drug. Here, we found that Spiro[2H-naphthol[1,2-b]pyran-2,4'-piperidine]-1'ethanol,3,4-dihydro-4-hydroxy-α-(6-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)) termed JBC117 interacts with D339, A348, R356, V376 and A378 in PHD corresponding to the binding sites with H3K4me and/or HD1, and has strong anti-cancer effects. For colon (HCT116) and lung (A549) cancer cell lines, IC50 values were 2.6 ± 0.16 and 3.3 ± 0.14 μM, respectively, while 33.80 ± 0.15 μM for the normal human fibroblast cells. JBC117 potently antagonized the cellular effects of β-catenin-dependent activity and also inhibited the migration and invasion of cancer cells. In vivo studies showed that the survival time of mice was significantly prolonged by the subcutaneous injection of JBC117 (10 mg/kg/day). In conclusion, JBC117 is a novel anti-cancer lead compound targeting the PHD finger of Pygo2 and has a therapeutic effect against colon and lung cancer.

  12. Quercetin nanocomposite as novel anticancer therapeutic: improved efficiency and reduced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Giuseppe; Vittorio, Orazio; Hampel, Silke; Iemma, Francesca; Parchi, Paolo; Cecchini, Marco; Puoci, Francesco; Picci, Nevio

    2013-06-14

    A three-functional nanocomposite was prepared by radical polymerization of methacrylic acid around carbon nanotubes in the presence of Quercetin as biologically active molecule and proposed as new anticancer therapeutic. The so-obtained hybrid material was characterized by FT-IR, Raman, SEM, TEM analyses, while the functionalization degree of 2.33 mg of Quercetin per g of composite was assessed by Folin-Ciocalteu test. Antioxidant test (DPPH and ABTS) showed that the covalent coupling did not interfere with the antioxidant properties of the flavonoid, while the anticancer activity was greatly enhanced with a recorded IC50 value much lower than free Quercetin. Cell viability tests on healthy cells demonstrated no-toxicity of the conjugate. PMID:23602995

  13. Designed hybrid TPR peptide targeting Hsp90 as a novel anticancer agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohara Koji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite an ever-improving understanding of the molecular biology of cancer, the treatment of most cancers has not changed dramatically in the past three decades and drugs that do not discriminate between tumor cells and normal tissues remain the mainstays of anticancer therapy. Since Hsp90 is typically involved in cell proliferation and survival, this is thought to play a key role in cancer, and Hsp90 has attracted considerable interest in recent years as a potential therapeutic target. Methods We focused on the interaction of Hsp90 with its cofactor protein p60/Hop, and engineered a cell-permeable peptidomimetic, termed "hybrid Antp-TPR peptide", modeled on the binding interface between the molecular chaperone Hsp90 and the TPR2A domain of Hop. Results It was demonstrated that this designed hybrid Antp-TPR peptide inhibited the interaction of Hsp90 with the TPR2A domain, inducing cell death of breast, pancreatic, renal, lung, prostate, and gastric cancer cell lines in vitro. In contrast, Antp-TPR peptide did not affect the viability of normal cells. Moreover, analysis in vivo revealed that Antp-TPR peptide displayed a significant antitumor activity in a xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer in mice. Conclusion These results indicate that Antp-TPR peptide would provide a potent and selective anticancer therapy to cancer patients.

  14. Metformin and prostate cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M J; Klotz, L H; Venkateswaran, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Localized disease can be effectively treated with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, advanced prostate cancer is more difficult to treat and if metastatic, is incurable. There is a need for more effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer. One potential target is the cancer stem cell (CSC). CSCs have been described in several solid tumors, including prostate cancer, and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Metformin, a common oral biguanide used to treat type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to have anti-neoplastic effects. Specifically, metformin targets CSCs in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma and colon cancer. Metformin acts directly on the mitochondria to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and reduce mitochondrial ATP production. This forces tumor cells to compensate by increasing the rate of glycolysis. CSCs rely heavily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. The glycolytic switch results in an energy crisis in these cells. Metformin could be used to exploit this metabolic weakness in CSCs. This would increase CSC sensitivity to conventional cancer therapies, circumventing treatment resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy. This review will explore the characteristics of prostate CSCs, their role in tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance and the role of metformin as a potential prostate CSC sensitizer to current anticancer therapies. PMID:26215782

  15. Telomeres and telomerase: Pharmacological targets for new anticancer strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendino, F; Tarkanyi, I; Dudognon, C; Hillion, J; Lanotte, M; Aradi, J; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E

    2006-03-01

    Telomeres are located at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Human telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase, is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis and extension of telomeric DNA. It is composed of at least, a template RNA component (hTR; human Telomerase RNA) and a catalytic subunit, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The absence of telomerase is associated with telomere shortening and aging of somatic cells, while high telomerase activity is observed in over 85% of human cancer cells, strongly indicating its key role during tumorigenesis. Several details regarding telomere structure and telomerase regulation have already been elucidated, providing new targets for therapeutic exploitation. Further support for anti-telomerase approaches comes from recent studies indicating that telomerase is endowed of additional functions in the control of growth and survival of tumor cells that do not depend only on the ability of this enzyme to maintain telomere length. This observation suggests that inhibiting telomerase or its synthesis may have additional anti-proliferative and apoptosis inducing effect, independently of the reduction of telomere length during cell divisions. This article reviews the basic information about the biology of telomeres and telomerase and attempts to present various approaches that are currently under investigation to inhibit its expression and its activity. We summarize herein distinct anti-telomerase approaches like antisense strategies, reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and G-quadruplex interacting agents, and also review molecules targeting hTERT expression, such as retinoids and evaluate them for their therapeutic potential. "They conceive a certain theory, and everything has to fit into that theory. If one little fact will not fit it, they throw it aside. But it is always the facts that will not fit in that are significant". "Death on the Nile". Agatha Christie.

  16. Targeting of microRNAs for therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2008-01-01

    miRNAs (microRNAs) comprise a class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally repress gene expression by base-pairing with their target mRNAs. Recent evidence has shown that miRNAs play important roles in a wide variety of human diseases, such as viral infections, cancer...... and cardiovascular diseases, and thus miRNAs have rapidly emerged as potential targets for therapeutics. LNAs (locked nucleic acids) comprise a class of bicyclic conformational analogues of RNA, which exhibit high binding affinity to complementary RNA molecules and high stability in blood and tissues in vivo. Recent...

  17. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin’s self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics. PMID:27476814

  18. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  19. Hypoxic state and glycolysis as a possible anticancer therapeutic target

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Koblyakov

    2014-01-01

    In this review the role of hypoxia and glycolysis in tumor expansion is described. Experimental results demonstrate that glycolysis functions in tumor cells are not restrict only energy supply. Glycolysis stimulates the activity of transcription factor HIF-1α. Assemble of HIF1α and protein ARNT stimulates expression of numerous genes. Among others there are genes coding glycolysis proteins, telomerase, P-glycoproteins, antiapoptotic proteins belonging to Bcl-2 family, inhibitor of pyruvate de...

  20. ADAM10 as a target for anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marcia L; Stoeck, Alexander; Yan, Wenbo; Dempsey, Peter J

    2008-02-01

    There is a great unmet medical need in the area of cancer treatment. A potential therapeutic target for intervention in cancer is ADAM10. ADAM10 is a disintegrin-metalloproteinase that processes membrane bound proteins from the cell surface to yield soluble forms. Pharmaceutical companies are actively seeking out inhibitors of ADAM10 for treatments in cancer as the enzyme is known to release the ErbB receptor, HER2/ErbB2 from the cell membrane, an event that is necessary for HER2 positive tumor cells to proliferate. ADAM10 is also capable of processing betacellulin indicating that an inhibitor could be used against EGFR/ErbB1 and/or HER4/ErbB4 receptor positive tumor cells that are betacellulin-dependent. ADAM10 is the principle sheddase for several other molecules associated with cancer proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration such as Notch, E-cadherin, CD44 and L1 adhesion molecule indicating that targeting ADAM10 with specific inhibitors could be beneficial. PMID:18289051

  1. Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Cancer Cell Targeting, Imaging and Anticancer Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Pavel; Laronze-Cochard, Marie; Sapi, Janos; Sidorov, Lev N.; Nabiev, Igor

    The diagnosis and treatment of cancer have been greatly improved with recent developments in bio-nanotechnology, including engineering of multifunctional probes. One of the promising nanoscale tools for cancer imaging is fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), whose small size and unique optical properties allow them to penetrate into cells and ensure highly sensitive optical diagnosis of cancer at the cellular level. Furthermore, novel multi-functional probes have been developed in which QDs are conjugated with one or several functional molecules, including targeting moieties and therapeutic agents. Here, the strategy for engineering novel nanocarriers for controlled nucleus-targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time imaging by single- or two-photon microscopy is described. A triple multifunctional nanoprobe is being developed that consists of a nitrogen-based heterocyclic derivative, an anticancer agent interacting with a DNA in living cells; a recognized molecule serving as a vector responsible for targeted delivery of the probe into cancer cells; and photoluminescent QDs providing the imaging capability of the probe. Subsequent optimization of the multifunctional nanoprobe will offer new possibilities for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  2. EGFR as a therapeutic target in glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Siebert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The tyrosine kinase receptor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR can be activated by several ligands, thus triggering downstream pathways regulating cell growth and survival. Its dysregula­tion is particularly important for the development and progression of astrocytomas. After the description of its role in glioblastomas (WHO grade IV astrocytomas, an overview on the therapeutic strategies target­ing EGFR is provided. It analyzes the past and ongoing trials concerning the small molecule tyro­sine kinase inhibitors, i.e. gefitinib, erlotinib and the combination therapies, the EGFR vaccina­tion strategies, the antibodies directed against EGFR and finally the intracranially administered EGFR-targeted therapies. As our understanding of the underlying molecular aberrancies in glioblastoma grows, our ability to better target specific subtypes of glioblastoma should improve. Molecular biomarker enriched clinical trials may lead to improved patient outcomes.

  3. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies show that consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with lower risks of cancer. This evidence has kindled interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds is fisetin (3,7,3,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol that is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. Fisetin has been shown to inhibit or retard the growth of various cancer cells in culture and implanted tumors in vivo. Fisetin targets many components of intracellular signaling pathways including regulators of cell survival and apoptosis, tumor angiogenic and metastatic switches by modulating a distinct set of upstream kinases, transcription factors and their regulators. Current evidence supports the idea that fisetin is a promising agent for cancer treatment. This review summarizes reported anticancer effects of fisetin, and re-emphasizes its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of cancer. PMID:27377217

  4. Molecular Therapeutic Targets for Glioma Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Takano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent angiogenesis that occurs in malignant glioma, antiangiogenic therapy has been attempted. There have been several molecular targets that are specific to malignant gliomas, as well as more broadly in systemic cancers. In this review, I will focus on some topics related to molecular therapeutic targets for glioma angiogenesis. First, important angiogenic factors that could be considered molecular targets are VEGF, VEGF-induced proteins on endothelial cells, tissue factor, osteopontin, v3 integrin, and thymidine phosphorylase as well as endogenous inhibitors, soluble Flt1, and thrombospondin 1. Second, hypoxic areas are also decreased by metronomic CPT11 treatment as well as temozolomide. Third, glioma-derived endothelial cells that are genetically and functionally distinct from normal endothelial cells should be targeted, for example, with SDF-1 and CXCR7 chemokine. Fourth, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs likely contribute towards glioma angiogenesis in the brain and could be useful as a drug delivery tool. Finally, blockade of delta-like 4 (Dll4 results in a nonfunctioning vasculature and could be another important target distinct from VEGF.

  5. Natural product Celastrol destabilizes tubulin heterodimer and facilitates mitotic cell death triggered by microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakryul Jo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule drugs are effective anti-cancer agents, primarily due to their ability to induce mitotic arrest and subsequent cell death. However, some cancer cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire a resistance. Lack of apoptosis following mitotic arrest is thought to contribute to drug resistance that limits the efficacy of the microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs. Genetic or pharmacological agents that selectively facilitate the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells present opportunities to strengthen the therapeutic efficacy. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a natural product Celastrol targets tubulin and facilitates mitotic cell death caused by microtubule drugs. First, in a small molecule screening effort, we identify Celastrol as an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis. Subsequent time-lapse imaging analyses reveal that inhibition of microtubule-mediated cellular processes, including cell migration and mitotic chromosome alignment, is the earliest events affected by Celastrol. Disorganization, not depolymerization, of mitotic spindles appears responsible for mitotic defects. Celastrol directly affects the biochemical properties of tubulin heterodimer in vitro and reduces its protein level in vivo. At the cellular level, Celastrol induces a synergistic apoptosis when combined with conventional microtubule-targeting drugs and manifests an efficacy toward Taxol-resistant cancer cells. Finally, by time-lapse imaging and tracking of microtubule drug-treated cells, we show that Celastrol preferentially induces apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells in a caspase-dependent manner. This selective effect is not due to inhibition of general cell survival pathways or mitotic kinases that have been shown to enhance microtubule drug-induced cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We provide evidence for new cellular pathways that, when perturbed, selectively induce the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cancer cells, identifying a

  6. RasGRPs are targets of the anti-cancer agent ingenol-3-angelate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Song

    Full Text Available Ingenol-3-angelate (I3A is a non-tumor promoting phorbol ester-like compound identified in the sap of Euphoria peplus. Similar to tumor promoting phorbol esters, I3A is a diacylglycerol (DAG analogue that binds with high affinity to the C1 domains of PKCs, recruits PKCs to cellular membranes and promotes enzyme activation. Numerous anti-cancer activities have been attributed to I3A and ascribed to I3A's effects on PKCs. We show here that I3A also binds to and activates members of the RasGRP family of Ras activators leading to robust elevation of Ras-GTP and engagement of the Raf-Mek-Erk kinase cascade. In response to I3A, recombinant proteins consisting of GFP fused separately to full-length RasGRP1 and RasGRP3 were rapidly recruited to cell membranes, consistent with direct binding of the compound to RasGRP's C1 domain. In the case of RasGRP3, IA3 treatment led to positive regulatory phosphorylation on T133 and activation of the candidate regulatory kinase PKCδ. I3A treatment of select B non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines resulted in quantitative and qualitative changes in Bcl-2 family member proteins and induction of apoptosis, as previously demonstrated with the DAG analogue bryostatin 1 and its synthetic analogue pico. Our results offer further insights into the anticancer properties of I3A, support the idea that RasGRPs represent potential cancer therapeutic targets along with PKC, and expand the known range of ligands for RasGRP regulation.

  7. Gli as a novel therapeutic target in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is a highly aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. Current treatment is rarely curative, thus novel meaningful therapies are urgently needed. Inhibition of Hedgehog (Hh signaling at the cell membrane level in several cancers has shown anti-cancer activity in recent clinical studies. Evidence of Hh-independent Gli activation suggests Gli as a more potent therapeutic target. The current study is aimed to evaluate the potential of Gli as a therapeutic target to treat MPM. The expression profiles of Gli factors and other Hh signaling components were characterized in 46 MPM patient tissue samples by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Cultured cell lines were employed to investigate the requirement of Gli activation in tumor cell growth by inhibiting Gli through siRNA or a novel small molecule Gli inhibitor (Gli-I. A xenograft model was used to evaluate Gli-I in vivo. In addition, a side by side comparison between Gli and Smoothened (Smo inhibition was conducted in vitro using siRNA and small molecule inhibitors. Our study reported aberrant Gli1 and Gli2 activation in a large majority of tissues. Inhibition of Gli by siRNAs or Gli-I suppressed cell growth dramatically both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of Gli exhibited better cytotoxicity than that of Smo by siRNA and small molecule inhibitors vismodegib and cyclopamine. Combination of Gli-I and pemetrexed, as well as Gli-I and vismodegib demonstrated synergistic effects in suppression of MPM proliferation in vitro. In summary, Gli activation plays a critical role in MPM. Inhibition of Gli function holds strong potential to become a novel, clinically effective approach to treat MPM.

  8. Therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jeong Kim; Elizabeth L Siegler; Natnaree Siriwon; Pin Wang

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic limitations of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs present a challenge for cancer therapy; these shortcomings are largely attributed to the ability of cancer cells to repopulate and metastasize after initial therapies. Compelling evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) have a crucial impact in current shortcomings of cancer therapy because they are largely responsible for tumor initiation, relapse, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Thus, a better understanding of the properties and mechanisms underlying CSC resistance to treatments is necessary to improve patient outcomes and survival rates. In this review, the authors characterize and compare different CSC-speciifc biomarkers that are present in various types of tumors. We further discuss multiple targeting approaches currently in preclinical or clinical testing that show great potential for targeting CSCs. This review discusses numerous strategies to eliminate CSCs by targeting surface biomarkers, regulating CSC-associated oncogenes and signaling pathways, inhibiting drug-eflfux pumps involved in drug resistance, modulating the tumor microenvironment and immune system, and applying drug combination therapy using nanomedicine.

  9. Epigenetics and therapeutic targets mediating neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection.

  10. uPAR as anti-cancer target: evaluation of biomarker potential, histological localization, and antibody-based therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Illemann, Martin; Sørensen, Tine Thurison;

    2011-01-01

    , and a potential diagnostic and predictive impact of the different uPAR forms has been reported. Hence, pericellular proteolysis seems to be a suitable target for anti-cancer therapy and numerous approaches have been pursued. Targeting of this process may be achieved by preventing the binding of uPA to u...... using mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mouse uPA or uPAR. These reagents will target uPA and uPAR in both stromal cells and cancer cells, and their therapeutic potential can now be assessed in syngenic mouse cancer models.......Degradation of proteins in the extracellular matrix is crucial for the multistep process of cancer invasion and metastasis. Compelling evidence has demonstrated the urokinase receptor (uPAR) and its cognate ligand, the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), to play critical roles in the concerted...

  11. Copper and conquer: copper complexes of di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones as novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung Chan; Fouani, Leyla; Jansson, Patric J; Wooi, Danson; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Palanimuthu, Duraippandi; Lok, Hiu Chuen; Kovačević, Zaklina; Huang, Michael L H; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R

    2016-09-01

    Copper is an essential trace metal required by organisms to perform a number of important biological processes. Copper readily cycles between its reduced Cu(i) and oxidised Cu(ii) states, which makes it redox active in biological systems. This redox-cycling propensity is vital for copper to act as a catalytic co-factor in enzymes. While copper is essential for normal physiology, enhanced copper levels in tumours leads to cancer progression. In particular, the stimulatory effect of copper on angiogenesis has been established in the last several decades. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that copper affects tumour growth and promotes metastasis. Based on the effects of copper on cancer progression, chelators that bind copper have been developed as anti-cancer agents. In fact, a novel class of thiosemicarbazone compounds, namely the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones that bind copper, have shown great promise in terms of their anti-cancer activity. These agents have a unique mechanism of action, in which they form redox-active complexes with copper in the lysosomes of cancer cells. Furthermore, these agents are able to overcome P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR) and act as potent anti-oncogenic agents through their ability to up-regulate the metastasis suppressor protein, N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1). This review provides an overview of the metabolism and regulation of copper in normal physiology, followed by a discussion of the dysregulation of copper homeostasis in cancer and the effects of copper on cancer progression. Finally, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer agents targeting copper are discussed.

  12. Update on Aurora Kinase Targeted Therapeutics in Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Myke R.; Woolery, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mammalian cells contain three distinct serine/threonine protein kinases with highly conserved catalytic domains, including aurora A and B kinases that are essential regulators of mitotic entry and progression. Overexpression of aurora A and/or B kinase is associated with high proliferation rates and poor prognosis, making them ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy. Disruption of mitotic machinery is a proven anti-cancer strategy employed by multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous small molecule inhibitors of the aurora kinases have been discovered and tested in vivo and in vitro, with a few currently in phase II testing. Areas covered This review provides the reader with updated results from both preclinical and human studies for each of the aurora kinase inhibitors (AKI) that are currently being investigated. The paper also covers in detail the late breaking and phase I data presented for AKIs thereby allowing the reader to compare and contrast individual and classrelated effects of AKIs. Expert opinion While the successful development and approval of an AKI for anti-cancer therapy remains unresolved, pre-clinical identification of resistant mechanisms would help design better early phase clinical trials where relevant combinations may be evaluated prior to phase II testing. The authors believe that aurora kinases are important anti-cancer targets that operate in collaboration with other oncogenes intimately involved in uncontrolled tumor proliferation and by providing a unique, targeted and complimentary anti-cancer mechanism, expand the available armamentarium against cancer. PMID:21556291

  13. Ascaris lumbricoides: an overview of therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, Isabel; Giusti, Tatiana

    2010-10-01

    A. lumbricoides is the largest of the common nematode parasites of man and has been associated with intestinal pathology, respiratory symptoms and malnutrition in children from endemic areas. Current anthelmintic treatments have proven to be safe. However, a reduced efficacy of single dose drugs has been reported. In veterinary practice, anthelmintic drug resistance is an irreversible problem. Thus, research and development of sensitive tools for early detection of drug resistance as well as new anthelmintic approaches are urgently needed. In this review, we summarized data providing information about current drug therapy against A. lumbricoides and other intestinal helminths, new drugs in experimental trials, future drugs perspectives and the identification of immunogenic parasite molecules that may be suitable vaccine targets. In addition to the WHO recommended drugs (albendazole, mebendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel pamoate), new anthelmintic alternatives such as tribendimidine and Nitazoxanide have proved to be safe and effective against A. lumbricoides and other soil-transmitted helminthiases in human trials. Also, some new drugs for veterinary use, monepantel and cyclooctadepsipeptides (e.g., PF1022A), will probably expand future drug spectrum for human treatments. The development of genomic technology has provided a great amount of available nematode DNA sequences, coupled with new gene function data that may lead to the identification of new drug targets through efficient mining of nematode genomic databases. On the other hand, the identification of nematode antigens involved in different parasite vital functions as well as immunomodulatory molecules in animals and humans may contribute to future studies of new therapeutic approaches.

  14. Importins and exportins as therapeutic targets in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahipal, Amit; Malafa, Mokenge

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear transport proteins, importins and exportins (karyopherin-β proteins), may play an important role in cancer by transporting key mediators of oncogenesis across the nuclear membrane in cancer cells. During nucleocytoplasmic transport of tumor suppressor proteins and cell cycle regulators during the processing of these proteins, aberrant cellular growth signaling and inactivation of apoptosis can occur, both critical to growth and development of tumors. Karyopherin-β proteins bind to these cargo proteins and RanGTP for active transport across the nuclear membrane through the nuclear pore complex. Importins and exportins are overexpressed in multiple tumors including melanoma, pancreatic, breast, colon, gastric, prostate, esophageal, lung cancer, and lymphomas. Furthermore, some of the karyopherin-β proteins such as exportin-1 have been implicated in drug resistance in cancer. Importin and exportin inhibitors are being considered as therapeutic targets against cancer and have shown preclinical anticancer activity. Moreover, synergistic activity has been observed with various chemotherapeutic and targeted agents. However, clinical development of the exportin-1 inhibitor leptomycin B was stopped due to adverse events, including vomiting, anorexia, and dehydration. Selinexor, a selective nuclear export inhibitor, is being tested in multiple clinical trials both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy. Selinexor has demonstrated clinical activity in multiple cancers, especially acute myelogenous leukemia and multiple myeloma. The roles of other importin and exportin inhibitors still need to be investigated clinically. Targeting the key mediators of nucleocytoplasmic transport in cancer cells represents a novel strategy in cancer intervention with the potential to significantly affect outcomes. PMID:27113410

  15. Liquid biopsy and therapeutic response: Circulating tumor cell cultures for evaluation of anticancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Grenci, Gianluca; Jing, Tengyang; Lim, Ying Bena; Lee, Soo Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a robust anticancer drug screening system to monitor patients during treatment delays realization of personalized treatment. We demonstrate an efficient approach to evaluate drug response using patient-derived circulating tumor cell (CTC) cultures obtained from liquid biopsy. Custom microfabricated tapered microwells were integrated with microfluidics to allow robust formation of CTC clusters without pre-enrichment and subsequent drug screening in situ. Rapid feedback after 2 weeks promotes immediate intervention upon detection of drug resistance or tolerance. The procedure was clinically validated with blood samples (n = 73) from 55 patients with early-stage, newly diagnosed, locally advanced, or refractory metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four of these samples were used for drug evaluation. Cluster formation potential correlated inversely with increased drug concentration and therapeutic treatment. This new and robust liquid biopsy technique can potentially evaluate patient prognosis with CTC clusters during treatment and provide a noninvasive and inexpensive assessment that can guide drug discovery development or therapeutic choices for personalized treatment.

  16. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlullah Khan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods—including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements—and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed.

  17. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C.; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods—including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements—and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed. PMID:27589790

  18. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-08-29

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods-including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements-and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed.

  19. Urokinase-targeted recombinant bacterial protein toxins-a rationally designed and engineered anticancer agent for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yizhen LIU; Shi-Yan LI

    2009-01-01

    Urokinase-targeted recombinant bacterial protein toxins are a sort of rationally designed and engineered anticancer recombinant fusion proteins representing a novel class of agents for cancer therapy.Bacterial protein toxins have long been known as the primary virulence factor(s) for a variety of pathogenic bacteria and are the most powerful human poisons.On the other hand,it has been well documented that urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR),making up the uPA system,are overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and tumor cell lines.The expression of uPA system is highly correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis.To exploit these characteristics in the design of tumor cell-selective cytotoxins,two prominent bacterial protein toxins,i.e.,the diphtheria toxin and anthrax toxin are deliberately engineered through placing a sequence targeted specifically by the uPA system to form anticancer recombinant fusion proteins.These uPA system-targeted bacterial protein toxins are activated selectively on the surface of uPA systemexpressing tumor cells,thereby killing these cells.This article provides a review on the latest progress in the exploitation of these recombinant fusion proteins as potent tumoricidal agents.It is perceptible that the strategies for cancer therapy are being innovated by this novel therapeutic approach.

  20. Targeting HCV Entry For Development of Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey F. McKelvy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in defining the molecular mechanisms of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV entry affords the opportunity to exploit new viral and host targets for therapeutic intervention. Entry inhibitors would limit the expansion of the infected cell reservoir, and would complement the many replication inhibitors now under development. The current model for the pathway of entry involves the initial docking of the virus onto the cell surface through interactions of virion envelope and associated low density lipoproteins (LDL with cell surface glycosaminoglycans and lipoprotein receptors, followed by more specific utilization with other hepatocyte membrane proteins: Scavenger Receptor Class B type 1 (SR-BI, CD81, Claudin 1 (CLDN1 and Occludin (OCLN. The use of blockers of these interactions, e.g. specific antibodies, suggests that inhibition of any one step in the entry pathway can inhibit infection. Despite this knowledge base, the tools for compound screening, HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp and cell culture virus (HCVcc, and the ability to adapt them to industrial use are only recently available and as a result drug discovery initiatives are in their infancy. Several therapies aiming at modulating the virus envelope to prevent host cell binding are in early clinical testing. The first test case for blocking a cellular co-receptor is an SR-BI modulator. ITX 5061, an orally active small molecule, targets SR-BI and has shown potent antiviral activity against HCVpp and HCVcc. ITX 5061 has exhibited good safety in previous clinical studies, and is being evaluated in the clinic in chronic HCV patients and patients undergoing liver transplantation. Entry inhibitors promise to be valuable players in the future development of curative therapy against HCV.

  1. Molecular biology of cancer-associated fibroblasts: can these cells be targeted in anti-cancer therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Tamas A; Varro, Andrea; Wang, Timothy C; Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    It is increasingly recognized that the non-neoplastic stromal compartment in most solid cancers plays an active role in tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the most abundant cell types in the tumor stroma, and these cells are pro-tumorigenic. Evidence that CAFs are epigenetically and possibly also genetically distinct from normal fibroblasts is beginning to define these cells as potential targets of anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the cell-of-origin and molecular biology of CAFs, arguing that such knowledge provides a rational basis for designing therapeutic strategies to coordinately and synergistically target both the stromal and malignant epithelial component of human cancers.

  2. Targeting and Therapeutic Peptides in Nanomedicine for Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eun Ji

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality, and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis are provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as ...

  3. Targeting α-synuclein: Therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehay, Benjamin; Decressac, Mickael; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Guadagnino, Irene; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Tamburrino, Anna; Bassil, Fares; Meissner, Wassilios G; Bezard, Erwan

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of the central role of α-synuclein (αSyn) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has powered, in the last decade, the emergence of novel relevant models of this condition based on viral vector-mediated expression of the disease-causing protein or inoculation of toxic species of αSyn. Although the development of these powerful tools and models has provided considerable insights into the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in PD, it has also been translated into the expansion of the landscape of preclinical therapeutic strategies. Much attention is now brought to the proteotoxic mechanisms induced by αSyn and how to block them using strategies inspired by intrinsic cellular pathways such as the enhancement of cellular clearance by the lysosomal-autophagic system, through proteasome-mediated degradation or through immunization. The important effort undertaken by several laboratories and consortia to tackle these issues and identify novel targets warrants great promise for the discovery not only of neuroprotective approaches but also of restorative strategies for PD and other synucleinopathies. In this viewpoint, we summarize the latest advances in this new area of PD research and will discuss promising approaches and ongoing challenges. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26926119

  4. Phytochemical-mediated Protein Expression Profiling and the Potential Applications in Therapeutic Drug Target Identifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fai-Chu; Tan, Siok-Thing; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2016-07-29

    Many phytochemicals derived from edible medicinal plants have been investigated intensively for their various bioactivities. However, the detailed mechanism and their corresponding molecular targets frequently remain elusive. In this review, we present a summary of the research works done on phytochemical-mediated molecular targets, identified via proteomic approach. Concurrently, we also highlighted some pharmaceutical drugs which could be traced back to their origins in phytochemicals. For ease of presentation, these identified protein targets were categorized into two important healthcare-related fields, namely anti-bacterial and anti-cancer research. Through this review, we hope to highlight the usefulness of comparative proteomic as a powerful tool in phytochemical-mediated protein target identifications. Likewise, we wish to inspire further investigations on some of these protein targets identified over the last few years. With contributions from all researchers, the accumulative efforts could eventually lead to the discovery of some target-specific, low-toxicity therapeutic agents. PMID:26193174

  5. HER2-mediated anticancer drug delivery: strategies to prepare targeting ligands highly specific for the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calce, Enrica; Monfregola, Luca; Saviano, Michele; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    HER2 receptor, for its involvement in tumorigenesis, has been largely studied as topic in cancer research. In particular, the employment of trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized anti-HER2 antibody, showed several clinical benefits in the therapy against the breast cancer. Moreover, for its accessible extracellular domain, this receptor is considered an ideal target to deliver anticancer drugs for the receptormediated anticancer therapy. By now, monoclonal antibody and its fragments, affibody, and some peptides have been employed as targeting agents in order to deliver various drugs to HER2 positive tumor cells. In particular, the ability to perform a fast and reliable screening of a large number of peptide molecules would make possible the selection of highly specific compounds to the receptor target. In this regard, the availability of preparing a simplified synthetic model which is a good mimetic of the receptor target and can be used in a reliable screening method of ligands would be of a strategic importance for the development of selective HER2-targeting peptide molecules. Herein, we illustrate the importance of HER2-targeted anticancer therapies. We also report on a synthetic and effective mimetic of the receptor, which revealed to be a useful tool for the selection of specific HER2 ligands. PMID:25994863

  6. Histone lysine demethylases as targets for anticancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Agger, Karl; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    interesting drug targets. The successful introduction of DNA methylation and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for the treatment of specific subtypes of cancer has paved the way for the use of epigenetic therapy. Here, we highlight key biological findings demonstrating the roles of members of the histone...

  7. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene th...

  8. Targeted alpha anticancer therapies: update and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen BJ

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Barry J Allen,1,2 Chen-Yu Huang,3 Raymond A Clarke2 1Faculty of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Faculty of Medicine, Ingham Institute, University of Western Sydney, Liverpool, NSW, Australia; 3Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Targeted alpha therapy (TAT is an emerging option for local and systemic cancer treatment. Preclinical research and clinical trials show that alpha-emitting radionuclides can kill targeted cancer cells while sparing normal cells, thus reducing toxicity. 223RaCl2 (Xofigo® is the first alpha emitting radioisotope to gain registration in the US for palliative therapy of prostate cancer bone metastases by indirect physiological targeting. The alpha emitting radioisotopes 211At, 213Bi, 225Ac and 227Th are being used to label targeting vectors such as monoclonal antibodies for specific cancer therapy indications. In this review, safety and tolerance aspects are considered with respect to microdosimetry, specific energy, Monte Carlo model calculations, biodosimetry, equivalent dose and mutagenesis. The clinical efficacy of TAT for solid tumors may also be enhanced by its capacity for tumor anti-vascular (TAVAT effects. This review emphasizes key aspects of TAT research with respect to the PAI2-uPAR complex and the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, C595 and J591. Clinical trial outcomes are reviewed for neuroendocrine tumors, leukemia, glioma, melanoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and prostate bone metastases. Recommendations and future directions are proposed.Keywords: biodosimetry, microdosimetry, mutagenesis, PAI2, bevacizumab, C595, J591, tumors, cancer, metastases

  9. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  10. Tumor-targeted intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs through the mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakash, Jai; Beljaars, Leonie; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Zeinstra-Smith, Mieke; de Jager-Krikken, Alie; Hessing, Martin; Steen, Herman; Poelstra, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-targeting of anticancer drugs is an interesting approach for the treatment of cancer since chemotherapies possess several adverse effects. In the present study, we propose a novel strategy to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor cells through the mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor

  11. Application of CellDesigner to the Selection of Anticancer Drug Targets: Test Case using P53

    OpenAIRE

    Isea, Raul; Hoebeke, Johan; Mayo, Rafael; Alvarez, Fernando; Holmes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a disease involving many genes, consequently it has been difficult to design anticancer drugs that are efficacious over a broad range of cancers. The robustness of cellular responses to gene knockout and the need to reduce undesirable side effects also contribute to the problem of effective anti-cancer drug design. To promote the successful selection of drug targets, each potential target should be subjected to a systems biology scrutiny to locate effective and specific targets whil...

  12. Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure as an Early-Response Marker for Anticancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Ferretti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days or later (6 or 7 days lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P ≤ .005 correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development.

  13. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function.

  14. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  15. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  16. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  17. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Fierro Aurora

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials

  18. Neuropeptides as therapeutic targets in anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, En-Ju D

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the classical neurotransmitters, neuropeptides represent an important class of modulators for affective behaviors and associated disorders, such as anxiety disorders. Many neuropeptides are abundantly expressed in brain regions involved in emotional processing and anxiety behaviors. Moreover, risk factors for anxiety disorders such as stress modulate the expression of various neuropeptides in the brain. Due to the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and yet limited treatment options, there is a clear need for more effective therapeutics. In this regard, the various neuropeptides represent exciting candidates for new therapeutic designs. In this review, I will provide an up-to-date summary on the evidences for the involvement of seven neuropeptides in anxiety: corticotropin-releasing factor, urocortins, vasopressin, oxytocin, substance P, neuropeptide Y and galanin. This review will cover the behavioral effects of these neuropeptides in animal models of anxiety by both genetic and pharmacological manipulations. Human studies indicating a role for these neuropeptides in anxiety disorders will also be discussed.

  19. Therapeutic Approaches to Target Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Arlhee, E-mail: arlhee@cim.sld.cu; Leon, Kalet [Department of Systems Biology, Center of Molecular Immunology, 216 Street, PO Box 16040, Atabey, Havana 11600 (Cuba)

    2011-08-15

    The clinical relevance of cancer stem cells (CSC) remains a major challenge for current cancer therapies, but preliminary findings indicate that specific targeting may be possible. Recent studies have shown that these tumor subpopulations promote tumor angiogenesis through the increased production of VEGF, whereas the VEGF neutralizing antibody bevacizumab specifically inhibits CSC growth. Moreover, nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with a potent antiangiogenic activity, has been shown by our group to reduce the frequency of CSC-like subpopulations in mouse models of brain tumors when combined with ionizing radiation. These studies and subsequent reports from other groups support the relevance of approaches based on molecular-targeted therapies to selectively attack CSC. This review discusses the relevance of targeting both the EGFR and angiogenic pathways as valid approaches to this aim. We discuss the relevance of identifying better molecular markers to develop drug screening strategies that selectively target CSC.

  20. Development of multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and noninvasive imaging of therapeutic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajja, Hari Krishna; East, Michael P; Mao, Hui; Wang, Y Andrew; Nie, Shuming; Yang, Lily

    2009-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary scientific field undergoing explosive development. Nanometer-sized particles offer novel structural, optical and electronic properties that are not attainable with individual molecules or bulk solids. Advances in nanomedicine can be made by engineering biodegradable nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, polymers, dendrimers and liposomes that are capable of targeted delivery of both imaging agents and anticancer drugs. This leads toward the concept and possibility of personalized medicine for the potential of early detection of cancer lesions, determination of molecular signatures of the tumor by noninvasive imaging and, most importantly, molecular targeted cancer therapy. Increasing evidence suggests that the nanoparticles, whose surface contains a targeting molecule that binds to receptors highly expressed in tumor cells, can serve as cancer image contrast agents to increase sensitivity and specificity in tumor detection. In comparison with other small molecule contrast agents, the advantage of using nanoparticles is their large surface area and the possibility of surface modifications for further conjugation or encapsulation of large amounts of therapeutic agents. Targeted nanoparticles ferry large doses of therapeutic agents into malignant cells while sparing the normal healthy cells. Such multifunctional nanodevices hold the promise of significant improvement of current clinical management of cancer patients. This review explores the development of nanoparticles for enabling and improving the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, the potential of nanomedicine, and the development of novel and more effective diagnostic and screening techniques to extend the limits of molecular diagnostics providing point-of-care diagnosis and more personalized medicine.

  1. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition: a new target in anticancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Fabrizio; Stassi, Giorgio; De Maria, Ruggero

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of cells with an epithelial phenotype into cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, referred to as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a critical process for embryonic development that also occurs in adult life, particularly during tumour progression. Tumour cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition acquire the capacity to disarm the body's antitumour defences, resist apoptosis and anticancer drugs, disseminate throughout the organism, and act as a reservoir that replenishes and expands the tumour cell population. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is therefore becoming a target of prime interest for anticancer therapy. Here, we discuss the screening and classification of compounds that affect epithelial-mesenchymal transition, highlight some compounds of particular interest, and address issues related to their clinical application.

  2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor and its targeted therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jheri Dupart; Wei Zhang; Jonathan C. Trent

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, investigators of basic science, pathology, and clinical medicine have studied gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and made minor advances in patient care. Recent discoveries have led to an understanding of the biological rote of KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α in GIST and the development of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, formerly STI-571), one of the most exciting examples of targeted therapy to date. The success of targeted therapy in GIST has lead to new developments in our understanding of the medical and surgical management of the disease. Intense study of GIST may lead to new paradigms in the management of cancer.

  3. Antibody therapeutics targeting ion channels:are we there yet?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han SUN; Min LI

    2013-01-01

    The combination of technological advances,genomic sequences and market success is catalyzing rapid development of antibodybased therapeutics.Cell surface receptors and ion channel proteins are well known drug targets,but the latter has seen less success.The availability of crystal structures,better understanding of gating biophysics and validation of physiological roles now form an excellent foundation to pursue antibody-based therapeutics targeting ion channels to treat a variety of diseases.

  4. Antibody therapeutics targeting ion channels: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Han; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    The combination of technological advances, genomic sequences and market success is catalyzing rapid development of antibody-based therapeutics. Cell surface receptors and ion channel proteins are well known drug targets, but the latter has seen less success. The availability of crystal structures, better understanding of gating biophysics and validation of physiological roles now form an excellent foundation to pursue antibody-based therapeutics targeting ion channels to treat a variety of diseases. PMID:23381110

  5. Anticancer efficacy of the metabolic blocker 3-bromopyruvate: specific molecular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    The anticancer efficacy of the pyruvate analog 3-bromopyruvate has been demonstrated in multiple tumor models. The chief principle underlying the antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate is its ability to effectively target the energy metabolism of cancer cells. Biochemically, the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has been identified as the primary target of 3-bromopyruvate. Its inhibition results in the depletion of intracellular ATP, causing cell death. Several reports have also demonstrated that in addition to GAPDH inhibition, the induction of cellular stress also contributes to 3-bromopyruvate treatment-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that 3-bromopyruvate is taken up selectively by tumor cells via the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) that are frequently overexpressed in cancer cells (for the export of lactate produced during aerobic glycolysis). The preferential uptake of 3-bromopyruvate via MCTs facilitates selective targeting of tumor cells while leaving healthy and non-malignant tissue untouched. Taken together, the specificity of molecular (GAPDH) targeting and selective uptake by tumor cells, underscore the potential of 3-bromopyruvate as a potent and promising anticancer agent. In this review, we highlight the mechanistic characteristics of 3-bromopyruvate and discuss its potential for translation into the clinic. PMID:23267123

  6. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solé Ricard V

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since existent SL data is mainly restricted to yeast screenings, the road towards human SL candidates is limited to inference methods. Results In the present work, we use phylogenetic analysis and database manipulation (BioGRID for interactions, Ensembl and NCBI for homology, Gene Ontology for GO attributes in order to reconstruct the phylogenetically-inferred SL gene network for human. In addition, available data on cancer mutated genes (COSMIC and Cancer Gene Census databases as well as on existent approved drugs (DrugBank database supports our selection of cancer-therapy candidates. Conclusions Our work provides a complementary alternative to the current methods for drug discovering and gene target identification in anti-cancer research. Novel SL screening analysis and the use of highly curated databases would contribute to improve the results of this methodology.

  7. New Therapeutic Targets for Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Machado-Vieira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing pharmacological treatments for bipolar disorder (BPD and major depressive disorder (MDD are often insufficient for many patients. Here we describe a number of targets/compounds that clinical and preclinical studies suggest could result in putative novel treatments for mood disorders. These include: (1 glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 and protein kinase C (PKC, (2 the purinergic system, (3 histone deacetylases (HDACs, (4 the melatonergic system, (5 the tachykinin neuropeptides system, (6 the glutamatergic system, and (7 oxidative stress and bioenergetics. The paper reviews data on new compounds that have shown antimanic or antidepressant effects in subjects with mood disorders, or similar effects in preclinical animal models. Overall, an improved understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of mood disorders is critical in order to develop targeted treatments that are more effective, act more rapidly, and are better tolerated than currently available therapies.

  8. GPCRs as potential therapeutic targets in preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    McGuane, JT; Conrad, KP

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is an important obstetric complication that arises in 5% of women after the 20th week of gestation, for which there is no specific therapy and no cure. Although much of the recent investigation in this field has focused on soluble forms of the angiogenic membrane receptor tyrosine kinase Flt1 and the transforming growth factor β co-receptor Endoglin, there is significant clinical potential for several GPCR targets and their agonists or antagonists in preeclampsia. In this review,...

  9. New Therapeutic Targets for Mood Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Machado-Vieira; Giacomo Salvadore; Nancy DiazGranados; Lobna Ibrahim; David Latov; Cristina Wheeler-Castillo; Jacqueline Baumann; Henter, Ioline D.; Carlos A. Zarate

    2010-01-01

    Existing pharmacological treatments for bipolar disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are often insufficient for many patients. Here we describe a number of targets/compounds that clinical and preclinical studies suggest could result in putative novel treatments for mood disorders. These include: (1) glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) and protein kinase C (PKC), (2) the purinergic system, (3) histone deacetylases (HDACs), (4) the melatonergic system, (5) the tachykinin neuropepti...

  10. QSAR and docking studies on xanthone derivatives for anticancer activity targeting DNA topoisomerase IIα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarfaraz Alam, Feroz KhanMetabolic and Structural Biology Department, Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaAbstract: Due to the high mortality rate in India, the identification of novel molecules is important in the development of novel and potent anticancer drugs. Xanthones are natural constituents of plants in the families Bonnetiaceae and Clusiaceae, and comprise oxygenated heterocycles with a variety of biological activities along with an anticancer effect. To explore the anticancer compounds from xanthone derivatives, a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR model was developed by the multiple linear regression method. The structure–activity relationship represented by the QSAR model yielded a high activity–descriptors relationship accuracy (84% referred by regression coefficient (r2=0.84 and a high activity prediction accuracy (82%. Five molecular descriptors – dielectric energy, group count (hydroxyl, LogP (the logarithm of the partition coefficient between n-octanol and water, shape index basic (order 3, and the solvent-accessible surface area – were significantly correlated with anticancer activity. Using this QSAR model, a set of virtually designed xanthone derivatives was screened out. A molecular docking study was also carried out to predict the molecular interaction between proposed compounds and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA topoisomerase IIα. The pharmacokinetics parameters, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity, were also calculated, and later an appraisal of synthetic accessibility of organic compounds was carried out. The strategy used in this study may provide understanding in designing novel DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitors, as well as for other cancer targets.Keywords: drug likeness, ADMET, regression model, HeLa cell line

  11. Neutrophils: potential therapeutic targets in tularemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Ann H Allen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The central role of neutrophils in innate immunity and host defense has long been recognized, and the ability of these cells to efficiently engulf and kill invading bacteria has been extensively studied, as has the role of neutrophil apoptosis in resolution of the inflammatory response. In the past few years additional immunoregulatory properties of neutrophils were discovered, and it is now clear that these cells play a much greater role in control of the immune response than was previously appreciated. In this regard, it is noteworthy that Francisella tularensis is one of relatively few pathogens that can successfully parasitize neutrophils as well as macrophages, DC and epithelial cells. Herein we will review the mechanisms used by F. tularensis to evade elimination by neutrophils. We will also reprise effects of this pathogen on neutrophil migration and lifespan as compared with other infectious and inflammatory disease states. In addition, we will discuss the evidence which suggests that neutrophils contribute to disease progression rather than effective defense during tularemia, and consider whether manipulation of neutrophil migration or turnover may be suitable adjunctive therapeutic strategies.

  12. Targeting TRP channels for novel migraine therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussor, Gregory; Yan, J; Xie, Jennifer Y; Ossipov, Michael H; Dodick, David W; Porreca, Frank

    2014-11-19

    Migraine is increasingly understood to be a disorder of the brain. In susceptible individuals, a variety of "triggers" may influence altered central excitability, resulting in the activation and sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive afferents surrounding blood vessels (i.e., the trigeminovascular system), leading to migraine pain. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in a subset of dural afferents, including those containing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Activation of TRP channels promotes excitation of nociceptive afferent fibers and potentially lead to pain. In addition to pain, allodynia to mechanical and cold stimuli can result from sensitization of both peripheral afferents and of central pain pathways. TRP channels respond to a variety of endogenous conditions including chemical mediators and low pH. These channels can be activated by exogenous stimuli including a wide range of chemical and environmental irritants, some of which have been demonstrated to trigger migraine in humans. Activation of TRP channels can elicit CGRP release, and blocking the effects of CGRP through receptor antagonism or antibody strategies has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of migraine. Identification of approaches that can prevent activation of TRP channels provides an additional novel strategy for discovery of migraine therapeutics.

  13. Sphingolipid and Ceramide Homeostasis: Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A. Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells where they have been attributed a plethora of functions from the formation of structural domains to polarized cellular trafficking and signal transduction. Recent research has identified and characterised many of the key enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism and this has led to a heightened interest in the possibility of targeting these processes for therapies against cancers, Alzheimer's disease, and numerous important human pathogens. In this paper we outline the major pathways in eukaryotic sphingolipid metabolism and discuss these in relation to disease and therapy for both chronic and infectious conditions.

  14. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27695318

  15. Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Sandborn, W; Sands, B E;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE) program was initiated by the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IOIBD). It examined potential treatment targets for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to be used for a "treat-t...

  16. Molecular pathways: novel approaches for improved therapeutic targeting of Hedgehog signaling in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justilien, Verline; Fields, Alan P

    2015-02-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is critical for embryonic development. In adult tissues, Hh signaling is relatively quiescent with the exception of roles in tissue maintenance and repair. Aberrant activation of Hh signaling is implicated in multiple aspects of transformation, including the maintenance of the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype. Preclinical studies indicate that CSCs from many tumor types are sensitive to Hh pathway inhibition and that Hh-targeted therapeutics block many aspects of transformation attributed to CSCs, including drug resistance, relapse, and metastasis. However, to date, Hh inhibitors, specifically those targeting Smoothened [such as vismodegib, BMS-833923, saridegib (IPI-926), sonidegib/erismodegib (LDE225), PF-04449913, LY2940680, LEQ 506, and TAK-441], have demonstrated good efficacy as monotherapy in patients with basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma, but have shown limited activity in other tumor types. This lack of success is likely due to many factors, including a lack of patient stratification in early trials, cross-talk between Hh and other oncogenic signaling pathways that can modulate therapeutic response, and a limited knowledge of Hh pathway activation mechanisms in CSCs from most tumor types. Here, we discuss Hh signaling mechanisms in the context of human cancer, particularly in the maintenance of the CSC phenotype, and consider new therapeutic strategies that hold the potential to expand considerably the scope and therapeutic efficacy of Hh-directed anticancer therapy. PMID:25646180

  17. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites.

  18. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewundara, Samantha S; Wiggs, Janey L; Sullivan, David A; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a gene receptive to estrogen regulation, are associated with glaucoma. The study concluded that increasing evidence suggests that lifetime exposure to estrogen may alter the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Estrogen exposure may have a neuroprotective effect on the progression of POAG but further studies need to confirm this finding. The role of sex-specific preventive and therapeutic treatment may be on the horizon. PMID:26959139

  19. MicroRNAs: novel therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Reema; Ghosh, Tanay; Scaria, Vinod; Pillai, Beena

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders is rising steadily as human life expectancy increases. However, limited knowledge of the molecular basis of disease pathogenesis is a major hurdle in the identification of drug targets and development of therapeutic strategies for these largely incurable disorders. Recently, differential expression of endogenous regulatory small RNAs, known as 'microRNAs' (miRNAs), in patients of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and models of ataxia suggest that they might have key regulatory roles in neurodegeneration. miRNAs that can target known mediators of neurodegeneration offer potential therapeutic targets. Our bioinformatic analysis suggests novel miRNA-target interactions that could potentially influence neurodegeneration. The recent development of molecules that alter miRNA expression promises valuable tools that will enhance the therapeutic potential of miRNAs.

  20. Factor XI as a Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailani, David; Gruber, Andras

    2016-07-01

    Factor XIa is a plasma serine protease that contributes to thrombin generation primarily through proteolytic activation of factor IX. Traditionally considered part of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, several lines of evidence now suggest that factor XIa serves as an interface between the vitamin-K-dependent thrombin generation mechanism and the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system, allowing the 2 systems to influence each other. Work with animal models and results from epidemiological surveys of human populations support a role for factor XIa in thromboembolic disease. These data and the clinical observation that deficiency of factor XI, the zymogen of factor XIa, produces a relatively mild bleeding disorder suggest that drugs targeting factor XI or XIa could produce an antithrombotic effect while leaving hemostasis largely intact. Results of a recent trial comparing antisense-induced factor XI reduction to standard-dose low molecular-weight heparin as prophylaxis for venous thrombosis during knee replacement are encouraging in this regard. Here, we discuss recent findings on the biochemistry, physiology, and pathology of factor XI as they relate to thromboembolic disease. PMID:27174099

  1. Classical and Targeted Anticancer Drugs: An Appraisal of Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor cells resist the action of multiple anticancer drugs, often with widely different chemical structures, have been pursued for more than 30 years. The identification of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug efflux transporter protein with affinity for multiple therapeutic drugs, provided an important potential mechanism and further work, which identified other members of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family that act as drug transporters. Several observations, including results of clinical trials with pharmacological inhibitors of P-gp, have suggested that mechanisms other than efflux transporters should be considered as contributors to resistance, and in this review mechanisms of anticancer drug resistance are considered more broadly. Cells in human tumors exist is a state of continuous turnover, allowing ongoing selection and "survival of the fittest." Tumor cells die not only as a consequence of drug therapy but also by apoptosis induced by their microenvironment. Cell death can be mediated by host immune mechanisms and by nonimmune cells acting on so-called death receptors. The tumor cell proliferation rate is also important because it controls tumor regeneration. Resistance to therapy might therefore be considered to arise from a reduction of several distinct cell death mechanisms, as well as from an increased ability to regenerate. This review provides a perspective on these mechanisms, together with brief descriptions of some of the methods that can be used to investigate them in a clinical situation. PMID:26910066

  2. Design, synthesis and evaluation of N-acetyl glucosamine (NAG)-PEG-doxorubicin targeted conjugates for anticancer delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Smita K; Badhwar, Archana J; Kharas, Firuza; Khandare, Jayant J; Vavia, Pradeep R

    2012-10-15

    Efficacy of anticancer drug is limited by the severe adverse effects induced by drug; therefore the crux is in designing delivery systems targeted only to cancer cells. Toward this objectives, we propose, synthesis of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug conjugates consisting N-acetyl glucosamine (NAG) as a targeting moiety. Multicomponent system proposed here is characterized by (1)H NMR, UV spectroscopy, and HPLC. The multicomponent system is evaluated for in vitro cellular kinetics and anticancer activity using MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Molecular modeling study demonstrated sterically stabilized conformations of polymeric conjugates. Interestingly, PEG-DOX conjugate with NAG ligand showed significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to drug conjugate with DOX. In addition, the polymer drug conjugate with NAG and DOX showed enhanced internalization and retention effect in cancer cells, compared to free DOX. Thus, with enhanced internalization and targeting ability of PEG conjugate of NAG-DOX has implication in targeted anticancer therapy.

  3. Targeting Notch degradation system provides promise for breast cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Jia-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Fen; Guo, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role, not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. As a group of ligand-induced proteins, different subtypes of mammalian Notch (Notch1-4) are sensitive to subtle changes in protein levels. Thus, a clear understanding of mechanisms of Notch protein turnover is essential for understanding normal and pathological mechanisms of Notch functions. It has been suggested that there is a close relationship between the carcinogenesis and the dysregulation of Notch degradation. However, this relationship remains mostly undefined in the context of breast cancer, as protein degradation is mediated by numerous signaling pathways as well as certain molecule modulators (activators/inhibitors). In this review, we summarize the published data regarding the regulation of Notch family member degradation in breast cancer, while emphasizing areas that are likely to provide new therapeutic modalities for mechanism-based anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27263934

  4. The disulfide compound α-lipoic acid and its derivatives: A novel class of anticancer agents targeting mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörsam, Bastian; Fahrer, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    The endogenous disulfide α-lipoic acid (LA) is an essential mitochondrial co-factor. In addition, LA and its reduced counterpart dihydro lipoic acid form a potent redox couple with antioxidative functions, for which it is used as dietary supplement and therapeutic. Recently, it has gained attention due to its cytotoxic effects in cancer cells, which is the key aspect of this review. We initially recapitulate the dietary occurrence, gastrointestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics of LA, illustrating its diverse antioxidative mechanisms. We then focus on its mode of action in cancer cells, in which it triggers primarily the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, whereas non-transformed primary cells are hardly affected. Furthermore, LA impairs oncogenic signaling and displays anti-metastatic potential. Novel LA derivatives such as CPI-613, which target mitochondrial energy metabolism, are described and recent pre-clinical studies are presented, which demonstrate that LA and its derivatives exert antitumor activity in vivo. Finally, we highlight clinical studies currently performed with the LA analog CPI-613. In summary, LA and its derivatives are promising candidates to complement the arsenal of established anticancer drugs due to their mitochondria-targeted mode of action and non-genotoxic properties. PMID:26604131

  5. ENaCs and ASICs as therapeutic targets

    OpenAIRE

    Qadri, Yawar J.; Rooj, Arun K.; Fuller, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensitive ion channel (ASIC) branches of the ENaC/degenerin superfamily of cation channels have drawn increasing attention as potential therapeutic targets in a variety of diseases and conditions. Originally thought to be solely expressed in fluid absorptive epithelia and in neurons, it has become apparent that members of this family exhibit nearly ubiquitous expression. Therapeutic opportunities range from hypertension, due to the role of ENaC in ma...

  6. Critical questions in development of targeted nanoparticle therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Korsmeyer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    One of the fourteen Grand Challenges for Engineering articulated by the US National Academy of Engineering is ‘Engineer Better Medicines’. Although there are many ways that better medicines could be engineered, one of the most promising ideas is to improve our ability to deliver the therapeutic molecule more precisely to the desired target. Most conventional drug delivery methods (oral absorption, intravenous infusion etc.) result in systemic exposure to the therapeutic molecule, which places...

  7. Principles of separation: indications and therapeutic targets for plasma exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark E; Balogun, Rasheed A

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal "blood purification," mainly in the form of hemodialysis has been a major portion of the clinical activity of many nephrologists for the past 5 decades. A possibly older procedure, therapeutic plasma exchange, separates and then removes plasma as a method of removing pathogenic material from the patient. In contrast to hemodialysis, therapeutic plasma exchange preferentially removes biologic substances of high molecular weight such as autoantibodies or alloantibodies, antigen-antibody complexes, and Ig paraproteins. These molecular targets may be cleared through two alternative procedures: centrifugal separation and membrane separation. This review presents operational features of each procedure, with relevance to the nephrologist. Kinetics of removal of these plasma constituents are based on the principles of separation by the apheresis technique and by features specific to each molecular target, including their production and compartmentalization in the body. Molecular targets for common renal conditions requiring therapeutic plasma exchange are also discussed in detail.

  8. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shini Feng,1 Huijie Zhang,1 Ting Yan,1 Dandi Huang,1 Chunyi Zhi,2 Hideki Nakanishi,1 Xiao-Dong Gao1 1Key Laboratory of Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China Abstract: With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. Keywords: boron nitride nanospheres, folic acid, doxorubicin, targeted delivery, cancer therapy

  9. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S; Chen, D.-H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chendh@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2008-07-02

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g{sup -1}. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  10. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-07-01

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g-1. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  11. Particulate Systems for Targeting of Macrophages: Basic and Therapeutic Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moien; Parhamifar, Ladan; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2012-01-01

    and intracellular drug release processes can be optimized through modifications of the drug carrier physicochemical properties, which include hydrodynamic size, shape, composition and surface characteristics. Through such modifications together with understanding of macrophage cell biology, targeting may be aimed...... at a particular subset of macrophages. Advances in basic and therapeutic concepts of particulate targeting of macrophages and related nanotechnology approaches for immune cell modifications are discussed.Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel...

  12. Elements toward novel therapeutic targeting of the adrenergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Hu, Xintian

    2015-02-01

    Adrenergic receptors belong to the family of the G protein coupled receptors that represent important targets in the modern pharmacotherapies. Studies on different physiological and pathophysiological properties of the adrenergic system have led to novel evidences and theories that suggest novel possible targeting of such system in a variety of pathologies and disorders, even beyond the classical known therapeutic possibilities. Herein, those advances have been illustrated with selected concepts and different examples. Furthermore, we illustrated the applications and the therapeutic implications that such findings and advances might have in the contexts of experimental pharmacology, therapeutics and clinic. We hope that the content of this work will guide researches devoted to the adrenergic aspects that combine neurosciences with pharmacology. PMID:25481798

  13. A Current Review of Targeted Therapeutics for Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana M. Campos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Difficult to detect, ovarian cancer typically presents at an advanced stage. Significant progress has been achieved in the treatment of ovarian cancer with therapeutics focused on DNA replication or cell division. However, despite sensitivity to induction chemotherapy the majority of patients will develop recurrent disease. Conventional agents for recurrent disease offer little in terms of long-term responses. Various targeted therapeutics have been explored in the management of ovarian cancer. These include monoclonal antibodies to epidermal growth factor receptors, small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies directed at the vascular endothelial growth factor (bevacizumab, and the small tyrosine kinase inhibitors that target the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. Recently, several other agents have come forth as potential therapeutic agents in the management of ovarian cancer. These include monoclonal antibodies to the folate receptor, triple angiokinase inhibitors, PARP inhibitors, aurora kinase inhibitors, inhibitors of the Hedgehog pathway, folate receptor antagonists, and MTOR inhibitors.

  14. RAS GTPase AS THE DRUG TARGET FOR ANTI-CANCER DESIGNING OF DRUG FROM TEMPLATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Krishnapriya and P.K. Krishnan Namboori*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ras proteins in association with GTP and GDP act as a bio-molecular switch for signaling cell growth, cell survival and signal transduction. The presence of mutated Ras proteins is found to vary in different cancer types and the highest occurrence of about 90% is observed in pancreatic cancer. The Ras GTPase binding site is mainly involved in signal cell proliferation. Hence, this binding site has been considered as a major target. At the same time, targeting a specific protein and designing the drug molecule with respect to that is practically of no use as the target proteins are fast mutating. In this scenario, designing the template from the hot spot of proteins and fitting the template for all the target protein molecules seem to be a promising technique. The templates are initially screened on the basis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements. Six templates are found to be satisfying conditions like IC50, lipophilic efficiency, ligand efficiency etc. and their efficiencies are compared with standard reference molecules. The computed enrichment factors support these templates to be leads for effective anti-cancer drugs subject to further in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

  15. Quadruplex-targeting anticancer drug BRACO-19 voltammetric and AFM characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quadruplex-targeting anticancer drug BRACO-19 adsorption and redox behaviour were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface and by cyclic, differential pulse and square-wave voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. The AFM and voltammetric results demonstrated that the BRACO-19 orientation and strong adsorption, with the acridine aromatic core parallel or perpendicular to the carbon electrode surface depending on solution pH, directly influences the peak potentials and redox behaviour. BRACO-19 oxidation was a complex, pH-dependent, four-step electrode process. The first oxidation step was reversible, the second, third and fourth oxidation steps irreversible, and an electroactive irreversibly oxidized BRACO-19 oxidation product was formed. BRACO-19 reduction occurred in two irreversible, pH-independent steps. The proposed redox mechanisms are related to the pyrrolidine and acridine moieties

  16. Anticancer targets in the glycolytic metabolism of tumors: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo E Porporato

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a metabolic disease and the solution of two metabolic equations: to produce energy with limited resources and to fulfill the biosynthetic needs of proliferating cells. Both equations are solved when glycolysis is uncoupled from oxidative phosphorylation in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, a process known as the glycolytic switch. This review addresses in a comprehensive manner the main molecular events accounting for high-rate glycolysis in cancer. It starts from modulation of the Pasteur Effect allowing short-term adaptation to hypoxia, highlights the key role exerted by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF-1 in long-term adaptation to hypoxia, and summarizes the current knowledge concerning the necessary involvement of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg Effect in cancer cell proliferation. Based on the many observations positing glycolysis as a central player in malignancy, the most advanced anticancer treatments targeting tumor glycolysis are briefly reviewed.

  17. Toward discovering new anti-cancer agents targeting topoisomerase IIα: a facile screening strategy adaptable to high throughput platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shih Lin

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases are a family of vital enzymes capable of resolving topological problems in DNA during various genetic processes. Topoisomerase poisons, blocking reunion of cleaved DNA strands and stabilizing enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage complex, are clinically important antineoplastic and anti-microbial agents. However, the rapid rise of drug resistance that impedes the therapeutic efficacy of these life-saving drugs makes the discovering of new lead compounds ever more urgent. We report here a facile high throughput screening system for agents targeting human topoisomerase IIα (Top2α. The assay is based on the measurement of fluorescence anisotropy of a 29 bp fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide duplex. Since drug-stabilized Top2α-bound DNA has a higher anisotropy compared with free DNA, this assay can work if one can use a dissociating agent to specifically disrupt the enzyme/DNA binary complexes but not the drug-stabilized ternary complexes. Here we demonstrate that NaClO4, a chaotropic agent, serves a critical role in our screening method to differentiate the drug-stabilized enzyme/DNA complexes from those that are not. With this strategy we screened a chemical library of 100,000 compounds and obtained 54 positive hits. We characterized three of them on this list and demonstrated their effects on the Top2α-mediated reactions. Our results suggest that this new screening strategy can be useful in discovering additional candidates of anti-cancer agents.

  18. EGFR-Targeted Therapeutics: Focus on SCCHN and NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sattler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers of the head and neck and of the lung are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates that have remained relatively unchanged for more than 3 decades, despite advances in radiation therapies and chemotherapies over the same time. It is generally believed that the efficacy of standard therapy regimens has reached a plateau for these cancers. The discovery of specific aberrant molecular signaling pathways in solid tumors has afforded promising new directions for newer “targeted” cancer therapeutics. Among these, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR shows promise as a therapeutic target. Clinical studies have demonstrated that this targeted approach provides clinically meaningful benefit. This article reviews EGFR-targeted therapies in use and in development, with a focus on the role of EGFR in the pathophysiology of head and neck and lung cancer, and new concepts being investigated to improve outcomes with these agents.

  19. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan, E-mail: s.bhattacharya@jiit.ac.in

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  20. Integrin-targeted pH-responsive micelles for enhanced efficiency of anticancer treatment in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinjian; Deng, Hongzhang; Liu, Qiang; Chu, Liping; Zhang, Yumin; Yang, Cuihong; Zhao, Xuefei; Huang, Pingsheng; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-02-01

    The key to developing more nanocarriers for the delivery of drugs in clinical applications is to consider the route of the carrier from the administration site to the target tissue and to look for a simple design to complete this whole journey. We synthesized the amphiphilic copolymer cRGDfK-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidene-1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl) ethane methacrylate) (cRGD-PETM) to construct multifunctional micelles. These micelles combined enhanced drug-loading efficiency with tumor-targeting properties, visual detection and controllable intracellular drug release, resulting in an improved chemotherapeutic effect in vivo. Doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated within the cRGD-PETM micelles as a model drug (termed as cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms). The size and morphology of the micelles were characterized systematically. As a result of the hydrophobic interaction and the π-π conjugation between the DOX molecules and the PTTMA copolymers, the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms showed an excellent drug-loading capacity. The results of in vitro drug-release studies indicated that the cumulative release of DOX from cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms at pH 5.0 was twice that at pH 7.4. The results of fluorescent microscopic analysis showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms could be internalized by 4T1 and HepG2 cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis with rapid intracellular drug release, which resulted in increased cytotoxicity compared with free DOX. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms improved the accumulation and retention of the drug in tumor tissues. Studies of the in vivo anticancer effects showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms had a significantly higher therapeutic efficacy with lower side-effects than free DOX and PETM/DOX Ms. These results show that the multifunctional cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms have great potential as vehicles for the delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  1. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  2. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  3. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity of covalent conjugates of artemisinin and a transferrin-receptor targeting peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Steve; Kim, Byung Ju; Singh, Narendra P; Lai, Henry; Sasaki, Tomikazu

    2009-02-01

    Artemisinin, a natural product isolated from Artemisia annua L., shows a unique anti-cancer activity by an iron dependent mechanism. Artemisinin was covalently conjugated to a transferrin-receptor targeting peptide, HAIYPRH that binds to a cavity on the surface of transferrin receptor. This enables artemisinin to be co-internalized with receptor-bound transferrin. The iron released from transferrin can activate artemisinin to generate toxic radical species to kill cells. The artemisinin-peptide conjugates showed potent anti-cancer activity against Molt-4 leukemia cells with a significantly improved cancer/normal cells selectivity. PMID:18838215

  4. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammad Shafiq

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies.

  5. Therapeutic Targets of Triglyceride Metabolism as Informed by Human Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert C; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Hand, Nicholas J; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Human genetics has contributed to the development of multiple drugs to treat hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease (CAD), most recently including antibodies targeting PCSK9 to reduce LDL cholesterol. Despite these successes, a large burden of CAD remains. Genetic and epidemiological studies have suggested that circulating triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are a causal risk factor for CAD, presenting an opportunity for novel therapeutic strategies. We discuss recent unbiased human genetics testing, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and whole-genome or -exome sequencing, that have identified the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipogenesis pathways as important mechanisms in the regulation of circulating TRLs. Further strengthening the causal relationship between TRLs and CAD, findings such as these may provide novel targets for much-needed potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26988439

  6. Mitochondria as therapeutic targets for cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Sung Song; Jeong Yu Jeong; Seung Hun Jeong; Hyoung Kyu Kim; Kyung Soo Ko; Byoung Doo Rhee; Nari Kim; Jin Han

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are maintained by theirsomatic stem cells and are responsible for tumorinitiation, chemoresistance, and metastasis. Evidencefor the CSCs existence has been reported for a numberof human cancers. The CSC mitochondria have beenshown recently to be an important target for cancertreatment, but clinical significance of CSCs and theirmitochondria properties remain unclear. Mitochondriatargetedagents are considerably more effectivecompared to other agents in triggering apoptosis ofCSCs, as well as general cancer cells, via mitochondrialdysfunction. Mitochondrial metabolism is altered incancer cells because of their reliance on glycolyticintermediates, which are normally destined for oxidativephosphorylation. Therefore, inhibiting cancer-specificmodifications in mitochondrial metabolism, increasingreactive oxygen species production, or stimulatingmitochondrial permeabilization transition could bepromising new therapeutic strategies to activate celldeath in CSCs as well, as in general cancer cells. Thisreview analyzed mitochondrial function and its potentialas a therapeutic target to induce cell death in CSCs.Furthermore, combined treatment with mitochondriatargeteddrugs will be a promising strategy for thetreatment of relapsed and refractory cancer.

  7. Targeted polymeric therapeutic nanoparticles: design, development and clinical translation†

    OpenAIRE

    Kamaly, Nazila; Xiao, Zeyu; Valencia, Pedro M.; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    Polymeric materials have been used in a range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology products for more than 40 years. These materials have evolved from their earlier use as biodegradable products such as resorbable sutures, orthopaedic implants, macroscale and microscale drug delivery systems such as microparticles and wafers used as controlled drug release depots, to multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) capable of targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. These newe...

  8. Therapeutic Targeting of Hyaluronan in the Tumor Stroma

    OpenAIRE

    H. Michael Shepard; Frost, Gregory I.; Thompson, Curtis B.; Ping Jiang; Xiaoming Li; Anne Kultti

    2012-01-01

    The tumor stroma, consisting of non-malignant cells and the extracellular matrix, undergoes significant quantitative and qualitative changes throughout malignant transformation and tumor progression. With increasing recognition of the role of the tumor microenvironment in disease progression, stromal components of the tumor have become attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Stromal accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan occurs in many tumor types and is frequently associat...

  9. Functions of astrocytes and their potential as therapeutic targets

    OpenAIRE

    Kimelberg, Harold K.; NEDERGAARD, Maiken

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytes are often referred to, and historically have been regarded as, support cells of the mammalian CNS. Work over the last decade suggests otherwise, that astrocytes may in fact play a more active role in higher neural processing than previously recognized. Because astrocytes can potentially serve as novel therapeutic targets, it is critical to understand how astrocytes execute their diverse supportive tasks while maintaining neuronal health. To that end, this review will focus on the s...

  10. Targeting Mitochondria as Therapeutic Strategy for Metabolic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Sorriento; Antonietta Valeria Pascale; Rosa Finelli; Anna Lisa Carillo; Roberto Annunziata; Bruno Trimarco; Guido Iaccarino

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical regulator of cell metabolism; thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with many metabolic disorders. Defects in oxidative phosphorylation, ROS production, or mtDNA mutations are the main causes of mitochondrial dysfunction in many pathological conditions such as IR/diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Thus, targeting mitochondria has been proposed as therapeutic approach for these conditions, leading to the development of small mol...

  11. Autophagy as a new therapeutic target in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, C.; F. Morisi; Cheli, S; S. Pambianco; Cappello, V; Vezzoli, M; Rovere-Querini, P; Moggio, M; Ripolone, M.; Francolini, M; Sandri, M.; Clementi, E

    2012-01-01

    A resolutive therapy for Duchene muscular dystrophy, a severe degenerative disease of the skeletal muscle, is still lacking. Because autophagy has been shown to be crucial in clearing dysfunctional organelles and in preventing tissue damage, we investigated its pathogenic role and its suitability as a target for new therapeutic interventions in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here we demonstrate that autophagy is severely impaired in muscles from patients affected by DMD and mdx mice, a mo...

  12. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In th...

  13. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Taly

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted.

  14. Lactobionic acid and carboxymethyl chitosan functionalized graphene oxide nanocomposites as targeted anticancer drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qixia; Lv, Yao; Williams, Gareth R; Tao, Lei; Yang, Huihui; Li, Heyu; Zhu, Limin

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we report a targeted drug delivery system built by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), fluorescein isothiocyanate and lactobionic acid (LA). Analogous systems without LA were prepared as controls. Doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the composites through adsorption. The release behavior from both the LA-functionalized and the LA-free material is markedly pH sensitive. The modified GOs have high biocompatibility with the liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721, but can induce cell death after 24h incubation if loaded with DOX. Tests with shorter (2h) incubation times were undertaken to investigate the selectivity of the GO composites: under these conditions, neither DOX-loaded system was found to be toxic to the non-cancerous L929 cell line, but the LA-containing composite showed the ability to selectively induce cell death in cancerous (SMMC-7721) cells while the LA-free analogue was inactive here also. These findings show that the modified GO materials are strong potential candidates for targeted anticancer drug delivery systems. PMID:27474628

  15. Caleosin-based nanoscale oil bodies for targeted delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale artificial oil bodies (NOBs) could be assembled from plant oil, phospholipids (PLs), and oleosin (Ole) as previously reported. NOBs have a lipid-based structure that contains a central oil space enclosed by a monolayer of Ole-bound PLs. As an oil structural protein, Ole functions to maintain the integrity of NOBs. Like Ole, caleosin (Cal) is a plant oil-associated protein. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of NOBs assembled by Cal for targeted delivery of drugs. Cal was first fused with anti-HER2/neu affibody (ZH2), and the resulting fusion gene (Cal–ZH2) was then expressed in Escherichia coli. Consequently, NOBs assembled with the fusion protein were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-positive tumor cells. The internalization efficiency could reach as high as 90%. Furthermore, a hydrophobic anticancer drug, Camptothecin (CPT), was encapsulated into Cal-based NOBs. These CPT-loaded NOBs had a size around 200 nm and were resistant to hemolysis. Release of CPT from NOBs at the non-permissive condition followed a sustained and prolonged profile. After administration of the CPT formulation, Cal–ZH2-displayed NOBs exhibited a strong antitumor activity toward HER2/neu-positive cells both in vitro and in vivo. The result indicates the potential of Cal-based NOBs for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

  16. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alex Matter

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery&development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. hTe conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. hTe importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. hTe most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. hTe factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery&development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials.

  17. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Alex

    2015-12-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  18. [Gap junctions: A new therapeutic target in major depressive disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrouilhe, D; Dejean, C

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder is a multifactorial chronic and debilitating mood disease with high lifetime prevalence and is associated with excess mortality, especially from cardiovascular diseases and through suicide. The treatments of this disease with tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are poorly tolerated and those that selectively target serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake are not effective in all patients, showing the need to find new therapeutic targets. Post-mortem studies of brains from patients with major depressive disorders described a reduced expression of the gap junction-forming membrane proteins connexin 30 and connexin 43 in the prefrontal cortex and the locus coeruleus. The use of chronic unpredictable stress, a rodent model of depression, suggests that astrocytic gap junction dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. Chronic treatments of rats with fluoxetine and of rat cultured cortical astrocytes with amitriptyline support the hypothesis that the upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication between brain astrocytes could be a novel mechanism for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. In conclusion, astrocytic gap junctions are emerging as a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder.

  19. Magnetic antibody-linked nanomatchmakers for therapeutic cell targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Shen, Deliang; Hensley, M Taylor; Middleton, Ryan; Sun, Baiming; Liu, Weixin; De Couto, Geoffrey; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising strategy for therapeutic cardiac regeneration, but current therapies are limited by inefficient interaction between potentially beneficial cells (either exogenously transplanted or endogenously recruited) and the injured tissue. Here we apply targeted nanomedicine to achieve in vivo cell-mediated tissue repair, imaging and localized enrichment without cellular transplantation. Iron nanoparticles are conjugated with two types of antibodies (one against antigens on therapeutic cells and the other directed at injured cells) to produce magnetic bifunctional cell engager (MagBICE). The antibodies link the therapeutic cells to the injured cells, whereas the iron core of MagBICE enables physical enrichment and imaging. We treat acute myocardial infarction by targeting exogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells (expressing CD45) or endogenous CD34-positive cells to injured cardiomyocytes (expressing myosin light chain. Targeting can be further enhanced by magnetic attraction, leading to augmented functional benefits. MagBICE represents a generalizable platform technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:25205020

  20. Targeting DNA repair, DNA metabolism and replication stress as anti-cancer strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigvert, Jordi Carreras; Sanjiv, Kumar; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cancer therapies targeting and damaging the DNA have been extensively used in the last 50 years since the discovery of nitrogen mustards, antimetabolites and platin agents. The use of these drugs is often limited by dose-limiting side effects related to their poor specificity. In recent years, much effort has been put on the discovery and development of compounds that would exploit defects in DNA repair in cancer cells such as Wee1, Chk1 or PARP1 inhibitors. However, not all cancers respond to these inhibitors. Recently, new developments towards specifically targeting broader characteristics of cancer such as replication stress (RS) and lost redox homeostasis have emerged. Oncogenes induce proliferation signals, which also result in replication-associated DNA damage, i.e. RS. Our knowledge into overall causes of RS, lesions produced and how these are signalled in cells to activate cell cycle checkpoints is evolving. Inhibition of ATR, which would normally keep non-deleterious levels of RS, induces intolerable RS levels for cancer cells. Interestingly, links between replication and transcription appear to underlie RS along with a reduction of the dNTP pool. Remarkably, sanitization of the dNTP pool by MutT homologue 1, impeding incorporation of oxidized dNTPs into the DNA, seems to be crucial for cancer cell survival. In this minireview we present an overview of current and novel strategies to target DNA repair and exploit DNA damage to treat cancer. We present the current models for cancer-associated RS as well as cancer phenotypic lethality. Both strategies are poised to better target cancer cells and reduce side effects. PMID:26507796

  1. Critical questions in development of targeted nanoparticle therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsmeyer, Richard

    2016-06-01

    One of the fourteen Grand Challenges for Engineering articulated by the US National Academy of Engineering is 'Engineer Better Medicines'. Although there are many ways that better medicines could be engineered, one of the most promising ideas is to improve our ability to deliver the therapeutic molecule more precisely to the desired target. Most conventional drug delivery methods (oral absorption, intravenous infusion etc.) result in systemic exposure to the therapeutic molecule, which places severe constraints on the types of molecules that can be used. A molecule administered by systemic delivery must be effective at low concentrations in the target tissue, yet safe everywhere else in the body. If drug carriers could be developed to deliver therapeutic molecules selectively to the desired target, it should be possible to greatly improve safety and efficacy of therapy. Nanoparticles (and related nanostructures, such as liposomes, nanoemulsions, micelles and dendrimers) are an attractive drug carrier concept because they can be made from a variety of materials engineered to have properties that allow loading and precise delivery of bound therapeutic molecules. The field of targeted nanoparticles has been extraordinarily active in the academic realm, with thousands of articles published over the last few years. Many of these publications seem to demonstrate very promising results in in vitro studies and even in animal models. In addition, a handful of human clinical trials are in progress. Yet, the biopharmaceutical industry has been relatively slow to make major investments in targeted nanoparticle development programs, despite a clear desire to introduce innovative new therapies to the market. What is the reason for such caution? Some degree of caution is no doubt due to the use of novel materials and the unproven nature of targeted nanoparticle technology, but many other unproven technologies have generated intense interest at various times. We believe that the

  2. Critical questions in development of targeted nanoparticle therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsmeyer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    One of the fourteen Grand Challenges for Engineering articulated by the US National Academy of Engineering is ‘Engineer Better Medicines’. Although there are many ways that better medicines could be engineered, one of the most promising ideas is to improve our ability to deliver the therapeutic molecule more precisely to the desired target. Most conventional drug delivery methods (oral absorption, intravenous infusion etc.) result in systemic exposure to the therapeutic molecule, which places severe constraints on the types of molecules that can be used. A molecule administered by systemic delivery must be effective at low concentrations in the target tissue, yet safe everywhere else in the body. If drug carriers could be developed to deliver therapeutic molecules selectively to the desired target, it should be possible to greatly improve safety and efficacy of therapy. Nanoparticles (and related nanostructures, such as liposomes, nanoemulsions, micelles and dendrimers) are an attractive drug carrier concept because they can be made from a variety of materials engineered to have properties that allow loading and precise delivery of bound therapeutic molecules. The field of targeted nanoparticles has been extraordinarily active in the academic realm, with thousands of articles published over the last few years. Many of these publications seem to demonstrate very promising results in in vitro studies and even in animal models. In addition, a handful of human clinical trials are in progress. Yet, the biopharmaceutical industry has been relatively slow to make major investments in targeted nanoparticle development programs, despite a clear desire to introduce innovative new therapies to the market. What is the reason for such caution? Some degree of caution is no doubt due to the use of novel materials and the unproven nature of targeted nanoparticle technology, but many other unproven technologies have generated intense interest at various times. We believe that

  3. Novel therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oishi, Xin Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC hypothesis was first proposed over 40 years ago. Advances in CSC isolation were first achieved in hematological malignancies, with the first CSC demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. However, using similar strategies and technologies, and taking advantage of available surface markers, CSCs have been more recently demonstrated in a growing range of epithelial and other solid organ malignancies, suggesting that the majority of malignancies are dependent on such a compartment.Primary liver cancer consists predominantly of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. It is believed that hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs could be the origin of some HCCs and ICCs. Furthermore, stem cell activators such as Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Notch and Hedgehog signaling pathways also expedite tumorigenesis, and these pathways could serve as molecular targets to assist in designing cancer prevention strategies. Recent studies indicate that additional factors such as EpCAM, Lin28 or miR-181 may also contribute to HCC progression by targeting HCC CSCs. Various therapeutic drugs that directly modulate CSCs have been examined in vivo and in vitro. However, CSCs clearly have a complex pathogenesis, with a considerable crosstalk and redundancy in signaling pathways, and hence targeting single molecules or pathways may have a limited benefit for treatment. Many of the key signaling molecules are shared by both CSCs and normal stem cells, which add further challenges for designing molecularly targeted strategies specific to CSCs but sparing normal stem cells to avoid side effects. In addition to the direct control of CSCs, many other factors that are needed for the maintenance of CSCs, such as angiogenesis, vasculogenesis, invasion and migration, hypoxia, immune evasion, multiple drug resistance, and radioresistance, should be taken into consideration when designing therapeutic strategies for HCC.Here we provide a brief

  4. Curcumin: A review of anti-cancer properties and therapeutic activity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Marilene B

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Curcumin (diferuloylmethane is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries, as it is nontoxic and has a variety of therapeutic properties including anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer activities via its effect on a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, oncogene expression, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Curcumin has shown anti-proliferative effect in multiple cancers, and is an inhibitor of the transcription factor NF-κB and downstream gene products (including c-myc, Bcl-2, COX-2, NOS, Cyclin D1, TNF-α, interleukins and MMP-9. In addition, curcumin affects a variety of growth factor receptors and cell adhesion molecules involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and treatment protocols include disfiguring surgery, platinum-based chemotherapy and radiation, all of which may result in tremendous patient morbidity. As a result, there is significant interest in developing adjuvant chemotherapies to augment currently available treatment protocols, which may allow decreased side effects and toxicity without compromising therapeutic efficacy. Curcumin is one such potential candidate, and this review presents an overview of the current in vitro and in vivo data supporting its therapeutic activity in head and neck cancer as well as some of the challenges concerning its development as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent.

  5. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  6. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  7. Bioreductive prodrugs as cancer therapeutics: targeting tumor hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Christopher P; Mowday, Alexandra M; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Yuan, Ran; Lin, Wan-Hua; Wu, Dong-Hai; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V; Ding, Ke

    2014-02-01

    Hypoxia, a state of low oxygen, is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with disease progression as well as resistance to radiotherapy and certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Hypoxic regions in tumors, therefore, represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. To date, five distinct classes of bioreactive prodrugs have been developed to target hypoxic cells in solid tumors. These hypoxia-activated prodrugs, including nitro compounds, N-oxides, quinones, and metal complexes, generally share a common mechanism of activation whereby they are reduced by intracellular oxidoreductases in an oxygen-sensitive manner to form cytotoxins. Several examples including PR-104, TH-302, and EO9 are currently undergoing phase II and phase III clinical evaluation. In this review, we discuss the nature of tumor hypoxia as a therapeutic target, focusing on the development of bioreductive prodrugs. We also describe the current knowledge of how each prodrug class is activated and detail the clinical progress of leading examples.

  8. Bioreductive prodrugs as cancer therapeutics:targeting tumor hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher P. Guise; Alexandra M. Mowday; Amir Ashoorzadeh; Ran Yuan; Wan-Hua Lin; Dong-Hai Wu; Jeff B. Smaill; Adam V. Patterson; Ke Ding

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia, a state of low oxygen, is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with disease progression as well as resistance to radiotherapy and certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Hypoxic regions in tumors, therefore, represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. To date, five distinct classes of bioreactive prodrugs have been developed to target hypoxic cels in solid tumors. These hypoxia-activated prodrugs, including nitro compounds, N-oxides, quinones, and metal complexes, generally share a common mechanism of activation whereby they are reduced by intracelular oxidoreductases in an oxygen-sensitive manner to form cytotoxins. Several examples including PR-104, TH-302, and EO9 are currently undergoing phase II and phase III clinical evaluation. In this review, we discuss the nature of tumor hypoxia as a therapeutic target, focusing on the development of bioreductive prodrugs. We also describe the current knowledge of how each prodrug class is activated and detail the clinical progress of leading examples.

  9. Polysaccharide-Gold Nanocluster Supramolecular Conjugates as a Versatile Platform for the Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Su, Yue; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2014-02-01

    Through the high affinity of the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) cavity for adamantane moieties, novel polysaccharide-gold nanocluster supramolecular conjugates (HACD-AuNPs) were successfully constructed from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) bearing adamantane moieties and cyclodextrin-grafted hyaluronic acid (HACD). Due to their porous structure, the supramolecular conjugates could serve as a versatile and biocompatible platform for the loading and delivery of various anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), paclitaxel (PTX), camptothecin (CPT), irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11), and topotecan hydrochloride (TPT), by taking advantage of the controlled association/dissociation of drug molecules from the cavities formed by the HACD skeletons and AuNPs cores as well as by harnessing the efficient targeting of cancer cells by hyaluronic acid. Significantly, the release of anticancer drugs from the drug@HACD-AuNPs system was pH-responsive, with more efficient release occurring under a mildly acidic environment, such as that in a cancer cell. Taking the anticancer drug DOX as an example, cell viability experiments revealed that the DOX@HACD-AuNPs system exhibited similar tumor cell inhibition abilities but lower toxicity than free DOX due to the hyaluronic acid reporter-mediated endocytosis. Therefore, the HACD-AuNPs supramolecular conjugates may possess great potential for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  10. Cholesterol-Targeted Anticancer and Apoptotic Effects of Anionic and Polycationic Amphiphilic Cyclodextrin Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varan, Gamze; Öncül, Selin; Ercan, Ayşe; Benito, Juan M; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Bilensoy, Erem

    2016-10-01

    Amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs) are biocompatible derivatives of natural CDs and are able to form nanoparticles or polyplexes spontaneously. In this study, nanoparticles prepared from nonionic (6OCaproβCD) or cationic amphiphilic CD (PC βCDC6) were used comparatively to develop nanoparticles intended for breast cancer therapy. The characterization of these nanoparticles was performed both by in vitro and cell culture studies. Furthermore, the apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of blank amphiphilic CDs were demonstrated by various mechanistic methods including Caspase-8 activity, lipid peroxidation assay, TUNEL assay, Tali(®)-based image analysis, cholesterol assay, and gene expression studies. Blank nanoparticles exerted cytotoxicity against a variety of cancer cells (MCF-7, HeLa, HepG2, and MB49) but none to healthy cells (L929, G/G). Interestingly, blank 6OCaproβCD and blank PC βCDC6 derivatives were found to be intrinsically effective on cell number and membrane integrity of MCF-7 cells in apoptosis studies. Further in-depth studies were performed to elucidate the selective mechanism of anticancer action in MCF-7 cells caused by these amphiphilic CDs. In conclusion, blank amphiphilic CD nanoparticles induced apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway targeted to cholesterol microdomains in cancer cell membrane. PMID:27488900

  11. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  12. Toll-like receptors as therapeutic targets in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2008-12-01

    Background: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that act as a first-line of defence in the innate immune response by recognising and responding to conserved molecular patterns in microbial factors and endogenous danger signals. Cystic fibrosis (CF)-affected airways represent a milieu potentially rich in TLR agonists and the chronic inflammatory phenotype evident in CF airway epithelial cells is probably due in large part to activation of TLRs. Objective\\/methods: To examine the prospects of developing novel therapies for CF by targeting TLRs. We outline the expression and function of TLRs and explore the therapeutic potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic TLR inhibitors for CF. Results\\/conclusion: Modulation of TLRs has therapeutic potential for the inflammatory lung manifestations of CF.

  13. Neuropeptide Receptors: Novel Targets for HIV/AIDS Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Branch

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypepetide (VPAC receptors are important for many physiologic functions, including glucose homeostasis, neuroprotection, memory, gut function, modulation of the immune system and circadian function. In addition, VPAC receptors have been shown to function in vitro to modulate the infection of HIV by a signal transduction pathway that appears to regulate viral integration. In this article, the affects of VPAC stimulation on HIV infection will be reviewed and approaches for the development of HIV/AIDS therapeutics that target these receptors will be described. Novel HIV/AIDS therapeutics are urgently required to stem the continued spread of this disease, particularly in underdeveloped countries. Drug design to inhibit signaling through VPAC1 and stimulate signaling through VPAC2 could lead to alternative therapies for the treatment and/or prevention of HIV/AIDS.

  14. Human neutrophil elastase: mediator and therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Peter A; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is present within atherosclerotic plaques where it contributes to matrix degradation and weakening of the vessel wall associated with the complications of aneurysm formation and plaque rupture. It is joined by other extracellular proteases in these actions but the broad range of substrates and potency of HNE coupled with the potential for rapid increases in HNE activity associated with neutrophil degranulation in acute coronary syndromes single this disruptive protease out as therapeutic target in atherosclerotic disease. This review summarises the role of HNE in neutrophil-mediated endothelial injury and the evidence for HNE as a mediator of atherosclerotic plaque development. The therapeutic potential of HNE neutralising antiproteases, alpha-1-antitrypsin and elafin, in atherosclerosis, is discussed. PMID:18289916

  15. Targeted complement inhibition and microvasculature in transplants: a therapeutic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A; Hsu, J L; Assiri, A M; Broering, D C

    2016-02-01

    Active complement mediators play a key role in graft-versus-host diseases, but little attention has been given to the angiogenic balance and complement modulation during allograft acceptance. The complement cascade releases the powerful proinflammatory mediators C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins, C3b, C5b opsonins and terminal membrane attack complex into tissues, which are deleterious if unchecked. Blocking complement mediators has been considered to be a promising approach in the modern drug discovery plan, and a significant number of therapeutic alternatives have been developed to dampen complement activation and protect host cells. Numerous immune cells, especially macrophages, develop both anaphylatoxin and opsonin receptors on their cell surface and their binding affects the macrophage phenotype and their angiogenic properties. This review discusses the mechanism that complement contributes to angiogenic injury, and the development of future therapeutic targets by antagonizing activated complement mediators to preserve microvasculature in rejecting the transplanted organ.

  16. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  17. Endothelial FAK as a therapeutic target in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infusino, Giovanni A; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2012-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FA) are important mediators of endothelial cytoskeletal interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) via transmembrane receptors, integrins and integrin-associated intracellular proteins. This communication is essential for a variety of cell processes including EC barrier regulation and is mediated by the non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase, focal adhesion kinase (FAK). As FA mediate the basic response of EC to a variety of stimuli and FAK is essential to these responses, the idea of targeting EC FAK as a therapeutic strategy for an assortment of diseases is highly promising. In particular, inhibition of FAK could prove beneficial in a variety of cancers via effects on EC proliferation and angiogenesis, in acute lung injury (ALI) via the attenuation of lung vascular permeability, and in rheumatoid arthritis via reductions in synovial angiogenesis. In addition, there are potential therapeutic benefits of FAK inhibition in cardiovascular disease and diabetic nephropathy as well. Several drugs that target EC FAK are now in existence and include agents currently under investigation in preclinical models as well as drugs that are readily available such as the sphingolipid analog FTY720 and statins. As the role of EC FAK in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases continues to be explored and new insights are revealed, drug targeting of FAK will continue to be an important area of investigation and may ultimately lead to highly novel and effective strategies to treat these diseases.

  18. Targeted polymeric therapeutic nanoparticles: design, development and clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaly, Nazila; Xiao, Zeyu; Valencia, Pedro M; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2012-04-01

    Polymeric materials have been used in a range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology products for more than 40 years. These materials have evolved from their earlier use as biodegradable products such as resorbable sutures, orthopaedic implants, macroscale and microscale drug delivery systems such as microparticles and wafers used as controlled drug release depots, to multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) capable of targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. These newer generations of targeted and controlled release polymeric NPs are now engineered to navigate the complex in vivo environment, and incorporate functionalities for achieving target specificity, control of drug concentration and exposure kinetics at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. Indeed this optimization of drug pharmacology as aided by careful design of multifunctional NPs can lead to improved drug safety and efficacy, and may be complimentary to drug enhancements that are traditionally achieved by medicinal chemistry. In this regard, polymeric NPs have the potential to result in a highly differentiated new class of therapeutics, distinct from the original active drugs used in their composition, and distinct from first generation NPs that largely facilitated drug formulation. A greater flexibility in the design of drug molecules themselves may also be facilitated following their incorporation into NPs, as drug properties (solubility, metabolism, plasma binding, biodistribution, target tissue accumulation) will no longer be constrained to the same extent by drug chemical composition, but also become in-part the function of the physicochemical properties of the NP. The combination of optimally designed drugs with optimally engineered polymeric NPs opens up the possibility of improved clinical outcomes that may not be achievable with the administration of drugs in their conventional form. In this critical review, we aim to provide insights into the design and development

  19. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    OpenAIRE

    Arron Thind; Clive Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analy...

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease: exploring gut pathophysiology for novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vipul; Varum, Felipe; Bravo, Roberto; Furrer, Esther; Bojic, Daniela; Basit, Abdul W

    2016-10-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the 2 major phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which are influenced by a complex interplay of immunological and genetic elements, though the precise etiology still remains unknown. With IBD developing into a globally prevailing disease, there is a need to explore new targets and a thorough understanding of the pathophysiological differences between the healthy and diseased gut could unearth new therapeutic opportunities. In this review, we provide an overview of the major aspects of IBD pathogenesis and thereafter present a comprehensive analysis of the gut pathophysiology leading to a discussion on some of the most promising targets and biologic therapies currently being explored. These include various gut proteins (CXCL-10, GATA-3, NKG2D, CD98, microRNAs), immune cells recruited to the gut (mast cells, eosinophils, toll-like receptors 2, 4), dysregulated proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, -13, -18, -21), and commensal microbiota (probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation). We also evaluate some of the emerging nonconventional therapies being explored in IBD treatment focusing on the latest developments in stem cell research, oral targeting of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, novel anti-inflammatory signaling pathway targeting, adenosine deaminase inhibition, and the beneficial effects of antioxidant and nutraceutical therapies. In addition, we highlight the growth of biologics and their targets in IBD by providing information on the preclinical and clinical development of over 60 biopharmaceuticals representing the state of the art in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease drug development. PMID:27220087

  1. New Marine Derived Anticancer Therapeutics ─ A Journey from the Sea to Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jimeno

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Nature has been instrumental as a source for therapeutics. Despite the fact that we live in an oceanic planet, a number of technical factors have historically hampered the evolution of a marine-based chamanic medicine. With the implementation of scuba diving tools and the development of sophisticated instruments for the isolation and elucidation of structures of natural products from marine organisms, major advances have been made in the discovery of marine derived therapeutics. The availability of ARA-C, a nucleoside analog that is a basic component in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia, and its fluorinated analog Gemcitabine, an important therapeutic tool in the treatment of pancreatic cancer and in non small cell lung cancer, is a solid proof and validation of the potential of this approach. As a result of our discovery and developmental program, three innovative compounds with novel mechanisms of action: ET-743, AplidinR and Kahalalide F, have been shown to display a positive therapeutic index and activity in resistant solid tumors that supports the ongoing clinical phase III/II trials. ET-743 represents the first active agent against sarcomas developed in the past 25 years and has demonstrated a therapeutic potential in pretreated ovarian cancer. Several chemical entities are under advanced preclinical testing and additional candidates for clinical development are emerging, including compounds hitting a specific target. Moreover, the development of a given marine candidate implies the collaboration of an interdisciplinary team special focused on supply, formulation, pharmacogenetics and preclinical toxicology.

  2. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    OpenAIRE

    Solé Ricard V; Munteanu Andreea; Conde-Pueyo Nuria; Rodríguez-Caso Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL) if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since exi...

  3. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  4. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  5. Cancer Stem Cells: Biological Functions and Therapeutically Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Eugen Ciurea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Almost all tumors are composed of a heterogeneous cell population, making them difficult to treat. A small cancer stem cell population with a low proliferation rate and a high tumorigenic potential is thought to be responsible for cancer development, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Stem cells were reported to be involved in both normal development and carcinogenesis, some molecular mechanisms being common in both processes. No less controversial, stem cells are considered to be important in treatment of malignant diseases both as targets and drug carriers. The efforts to understand the role of different signalling in cancer stem cells requires in depth knowledge about the mechanisms that control their self-renewal, differentiation and malignant potential. The aim of this paper is to discuss insights into cancer stem cells historical background and to provide a brief review of the new therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells.

  6. In Search of New Therapeutic Targets in Obesity Treatment: Sirtuins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Kurylowicz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the available non-invasive medical therapies for obesity are non-efficient in a long-term evaluation; therefore there is a constant need for new methods of treatment. Research on calorie restriction has led to the discovery of sirtuins (silent information regulators, SIRTs, enzymes regulating different cellular pathways that may constitute potential targets in the treatment of obesity. This review paper presents the role of SIRTs in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as in the differentiation of adipocytes. How disturbances of SIRTs’ expression and activity may lead to the development of obesity and related complications is discussed. A special emphasis is placed on polymorphisms in genes encoding SIRTs and their possible association with susceptibility to obesity and metabolic complications, as well as on data regarding altered expression of SIRTs in human obesity. Finally, the therapeutic potential of SIRTs-targeted strategies in the treatment of obesity and related disorders is discussed.

  7. Therapeutic anticancer efficacy of a synthetic diazonamide analog in the absence of overt toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Noelle S; Burgett, Anthony W G; Atkins, Ashley S; Wang, Xiaodong; Harran, Patrick G; McKnight, Steven L

    2007-02-13

    Blocking cell division through the inhibition of mitosis is one of the most successful clinical strategies for the treatment of cancer. Taxanes and vinca alkaloids are in widespread use and have demonstrated substantive therapeutic efficacy. Both classes of compounds bind directly to tubulin, a structural component of the mitotic spindle. The ubiquitous utilization of tubulin in cell division in both cancerous and normal cells, however, tempers the broad spectrum of activity of currently used antimitotics by significant toxicities in normal dividing tissue. Moreover, peripheral nerve cells that rely on microtubules to shuttle cargo along axonal processes are also damaged by tubulin-binding drugs. Thus, neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy are the most frequently cited dose-limiting toxicities of this class of chemotherapeutics. Here we report the preclinical assessment of AB-5, a structural and functional analog of the natural product diazonamide A. AB-5, like taxanes and vinca alkaloids, blocks cell division during mitosis. However, AB-5 works not by binding tubulin but rather through inhibition of a newly discovered role for ornithine-delta-aminotransferase in mitosis. We hereby report that, unlike other antimitotics, AB-5 is extremely well tolerated by mice when administered under conditions where the drug cures xenografted tumors as effectively as taxanes and vinca alkaloids. AB-5-treated mice show no weight loss, no change in overall physical appearance, and no evidence of neutropenia. These observations raise the possibility that AB-5 may have clinical utility for cancer therapy under conditions largely devoid of chemotherapeutic toxicity and suggest that further preclinical evaluation of AB-5 is warranted. PMID:17287337

  8. Novel Microtubule-Targeting 7-Deazahypoxanthines Derived from Marine Alkaloid Rigidins with Potent in Vitro and in Vivo Anticancer Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellin, Derek C; Zhou, Qiong; Scott, Robert; Hill, R Matthew; Frail, Sarah K; Dasari, Ramesh; Ontiveros, Steven J; Pelly, Stephen C; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Betancourt, Tania; Shuster, Charles B; Hamel, Ernest; Bai, Ruoli; LaBarbera, Daniel V; Rogelj, Snezna; Frolova, Liliya V; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-01-14

    Docking studies of tubulin-targeting C2-substituted 7-deazahypoxanthine analogues of marine alkaloid rigidins led to the design and synthesis of compounds containing linear C2-substituents. The C2-alkynyl analogue was found to have double- to single-digit nanomolar antiproliferative IC50 values and showed statistically significant tumor size reduction in a colon cancer mouse model at nontoxic concentrations. These results provide impetus and further guidance for the development of these rigidin analogues as anticancer agents. PMID:26641132

  9. Targeting angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms using combined polymer therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Segal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an immense clinical need for novel therapeutics for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms such as osteosarcomas and bone metastases. We developed a new therapeutic strategy to target bone metastases and calcified neoplasms using combined polymer-bound angiogenesis inhibitors. Using an advanced "living polymerization" technique, the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT, we conjugated the aminobisphosphonate alendronate (ALN, and the potent anti-angiogenic agent TNP-470 with N-(2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMA copolymer through a Glycine-Glycine-Proline-Norleucine linker, cleaved by cathepsin K, a cysteine protease overexpressed at resorption sites in bone tissues. In this approach, dual targeting is achieved. Passive accumulation is possible due to the increase in molecular weight following polymer conjugation of the drugs, thus extravasating from the tumor leaky vessels and not from normal healthy vessels. Active targeting to the calcified tissues is achieved by ALN's affinity to bone mineral. METHODS AND FINDING: The anti-angiogenic and antitumor potency of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. We show that free and conjugated ALN-TNP-470 have synergistic anti-angiogenic and antitumor activity by inhibiting proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation of endothelial and human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Evaluation of anti-angiogenic, antitumor activity and body distribution of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was performed on severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID male mice inoculated with mCherry-labeled MG-63-Ras human osteosarcoma and by modified Miles permeability assay. Our targeted bi-specific conjugate reduced VEGF-induced vascular hyperpermeability by 92% and remarkably inhibited osteosarcoma growth in mice by 96%. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report to describe a new concept of a narrowly-dispersed combined

  10. Self-Targeted, Shape-Assisted, and Controlled-Release Self-Delivery Nanodrug for Synergistic Targeting/Anticancer Effect of Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Huang, Yu; Li, Yanxiu; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Hongjie; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Dai, Lizong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-11-25

    We constructed 10-hydroxycamptothecin (CPT) "nanodrugs" with functionalization of lipid-PEG-methotrexate (MTX) to prepare high-drug-loaded, and sustained/controlled-release MTX-PEG-CPT nanorods (NRs), in which MTX drug itself can serve as a specific "targeting ligand". The self-targeted nanodrug can codeliver both CPT and MTX drugs with distinct anticancer mechanisms. Furthermore, MTX-PEG-CPT NRs significantly reduced burst release, improved blood circulation and tumor accumulation, enhanced cellular uptake, and synergistically increased anticancer effect against tumor cells compared with MTX-PEG-CPT nanospheres (NSs) and either both free drugs or individual free drug. Therefore, the synergistic targeting/therapeuticy nano-multi-drug codelivery assisted by shape design may advantageously offer a promising new strategy for nanomedicine. PMID:26529185

  11. EphB4 as a therapeutic target in mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) often develops decades following exposure to asbestos. Current best therapy produces a response in only half of patients, and the median survival with this therapy remains under a year. A search for novel targets and therapeutics is underway, and recently identified targets include VEGF, Notch, and EphB4-Ephrin-B2. Each of these targets has dual activity, promoting tumor cell growth as well as tumor angiogenesis. We investigated EphB4 expression in 39 human mesothelioma tissues by immunohistochemistry. Xenograft tumors established with human mesothelioma cells were treated with an EphB4 inhibitor (monomeric soluble EphB4 fused to human serum albumin, or sEphB4-HSA). The combinatorial effect of sEphB4-HSA and biologic agent was also studied. EphB4 was overexpressed in 72% of mesothelioma tissues evaluated, with 85% of epithelioid and 38% of sarcomatoid subtypes demonstrating overexpression. The EphB4 inhibitor sEphB4-HSA was highly active as a single agent to inhibit tumor growth, accompanied by tumor cell apoptosis and inhibition of PI3K and Src signaling. Combination of sEphB4-HSA and the anti-VEGF antibody (Bevacizumab) was superior to each agent alone and led to complete tumor regression. EphB4 is a potential therapeutic target in mesothelioma. Clinical investigation of sEphB4-HSA as a single agent and in combination with VEGF inhibitors is warranted

  12. Stromal Fibroblast in Age-Related Cancer: Role in Tumorigenesis and Potential as Novel Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhattouti, Abdelouahid; Hassan, Mohamed; Gomez, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of most common cancers increases with age due to accumulation of damage to cells and tissues. Stroma, the structure close to the basement membrane, is gaining increased attention from clinicians and researchers due to its increasingly, yet incompletely understood role in the development of age-related cancer. With advanced age, stroma generates a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, exemplified by the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Components of the SASP, such as cytokines, chemokines, and high energy metabolites are main drivers of age-related cancer initiation and sustain its progression. Our purpose is to provide insight into the mechanistic role of the stroma, with particular emphasis on stromal fibroblasts, on the development of age-related tumors. We also present evidence of the potential of the stroma as target for tumor therapy. Likewise, a rationale for age-related antitumor therapy targeting the stroma is presented. We expect to foster debate on the underlining basis of age-related cancer pathobiology. We also would like to promote discussion on novel stroma-based anticancer therapeutic strategies tailored to treat the elderly. PMID:26284191

  13. Stromal Fibroblast in Age-related Cancer: Role in Tumorigenesis and Potential as Novel Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahid eElkhattouti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of most common cancers increases with age due to accumulation of damage to cells and tissues. Stroma, the structure close to the basement membrane, is gaining increased attention from clinicians and researchers due to its increasingly, yet incompletely understood role in the development of age-related cancer. With advanced age, stroma generates a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment, exemplified by the secretory-associated specific phenotype (SASP. Components of the SASP such as cytokines, chemokines, and high energy metabolites are main drivers of age-related cancer initiation and sustain its progression. Our purpose is to provide insight into the mechanistic role of the stroma, with particular emphasis on stromal fibroblasts, on the development of age-related tumors. We also present evidence of the potential of the stroma as target for tumor therapy. Likewise, a rationale for age-related antitumor therapy targeting the stroma is presented. We expect to foster debate on the underlining basis of age-related cancer pathobiology. We also would like to promote discussion on novel stroma-based anticancer therapeutic strategies tailored to treat the elderly.

  14. Chaperonopathies and chaperonotherapy. Hsp60 as therapeutic target in cancer: potential benefits and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Francesco; Angileri, Francesca; de Macario, Everly Conway; Macario, Alberto J L

    2013-01-01

    In this minireview we focus on Hsp60 as a target for anticancer therapy. We discuss the new concepts of chaperonopathies and chaperonotherapy and present information on Hsp60 localization in the cell membrane of human tumor cells. We describe novel mechanisms for Hsp60 reaching the extracellular environment that involve membrane-associated stages, as well as data on anti-Hsp60 antibodies found in human sera, both in normal subjects and patients affected by autoimmune diseases. Finally, we discuss possible therapeutic applications of anti-Hsp60 antibodies in cancer treatment, evaluating also side effects on non-tumor cells. In conclusion, the way for investigating Hsp60-targeted anti-tumor therapy is open, at least for those tumors that express Hsp60 on its surface and/or secrete it outside the cell, as is the search for the molecular mechanisms involved in Hsp60 translocation from cytosol to cell membrane: elucidation of this mechanism will greatly facilitate the optimization of chaperonotherapy centered on Hsp60 with anti-tumor efficacy and minimal side effects.

  15. Endocannabinoid System: A Multi-Facet Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rimplejeet; Ambwani, Sneha R; Singh, Surjit

    2016-01-01

    the therapeutic targets for both cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists. One challenge is to develop drugs that target only cannabinoid receptors in a particular tissue and another is to invent drugs that act selectively on cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood brain barrier. Besides this, development of the suitable dosage forms with maximum efficacy and minimum adverse effects is also warranted. Another angle to be introspected for therapeutic abilities of this group of drugs is non-CB1 and non-CB2 receptor targets for cannabinoids. In order to successfully exploit the therapeutic potential of endocannabinoid system, it is imperative to further characterize the endocannabinoid system in terms of identification of the exact cellular location of cannabinoid receptors and their role as "protective" and "disease inducing substance", time-dependent changes in the expression of cannabinoid receptors. PMID:27086601

  16. Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase: Potential Therapeutic Target and Putative Metabolic Oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl K. Zogg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exemplified by cancer cells’ preference for glycolysis, for example, the Warburg effect, altered metabolism in tumorigenesis has emerged as an important aspect of cancer in the past 10–20 years. Whether due to changes in regulatory tumor suppressors/oncogenes or by acting as metabolic oncogenes themselves, enzymes involved in the complex network of metabolic pathways are being studied to understand their role and assess their utility as therapeutic targets. Conversion of glycolytic intermediate 3-phosphoglycerate into phosphohydroxypyruvate by the enzyme phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH—a rate-limiting step in the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to serine—represents one such mechanism. Forgotten since classic animal studies in the 1980s, the role of PHGDH as a potential therapeutic target and putative metabolic oncogene has recently reemerged following publication of two prominent papers near-simultaneously in 2011. Since that time, numerous studies and a host of metabolic explanations have been put forward in an attempt to understand the results observed. In this paper, I review the historic progression of our understanding of the role of PHGDH in cancer from the early work by Snell through its reemergence and rise to prominence, culminating in an assessment of subsequent work and what it means for the future of PHGDH.

  17. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Are a Promising Therapeutic Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togo, Shinsaku, E-mail: shinsaku@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Polanska, Urszula M. [CR-UK Stromal-Tumour Interaction Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, The University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Horimoto, Yoshiya [Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Atopy Research Centre, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Department of Breast Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Orimo, Akira, E-mail: shinsaku@juntendo.ac.jp [CR-UK Stromal-Tumour Interaction Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, The University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan); Atopy Research Centre, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8412 (Japan)

    2013-01-31

    Human carcinomas frequently exhibit significant stromal reactions such as the so-called “desmoplastic stroma” or “reactive stroma”, which is characterised by the existence of large numbers of stromal cells and extracellular matrix proteins. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which are rich in activated fibroblast populations exemplified by myofibroblasts, are among the predominant cell types present within the tumour-associated stroma. Increased numbers of stromal myofibroblasts are often associated with high-grade malignancies with poor prognoses in humans. CAF myofibroblasts possess abilities to promote primary tumour development, growth and progression by stimulating the processes of neoangiogenesis as well as tumour cell proliferation, survival, migration and invasion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that CAFs serve as a niche supporting the metastatic colonisation of disseminated carcinoma cells in distant organs. Their contribution to primary and secondary malignancies makes these fibroblasts a potential therapeutic target and they also appear to be relevant to the development of drug resistance and tumour recurrence. This review summarises our current knowledge of tumour-promoting CAFs and discusses the therapeutic feasibility of targeting these cells as well as disrupting heterotypic interactions with other cell types in tumours that may improve the efficacy of current anti-tumour therapies.

  18. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  19. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  20. Modeling of hyaluronic acid containing anti-cancer drugs-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid bioconjugates for targeted delivery to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul-e-Saba, Adulphakdee, A.; Madthing, A.; Zafar, M. N.; Abdullah, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular modeling of hyaluronan (HA), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polyethylene glycol-bis-amine (PEG-bis-amine), Curcumin, Cisplatin and the conjugate HA-PEG-PLGA containing Curcumin/Cisplatin were performed using Discovery Studio 2.5 to better understand issues and constraints related to targeted delivery of potent anticancer drugs to cancer cells. HA, a versatile biopolymer is a ligand of cancer cell receptor, CD44 that can be particularly useful in a receptor-mediated cellular uptake of drug-incorporated nanoparticles. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers, PLGA and PEG, serve as polymeric micelles for controlled-release of drug. Curcumin as a natural anticancer agent has poor solubility that limits its use in drug therapeutics, while platinum-based Cisplatin exhibits systemic cytotoxicity. These can be overcome via drug delivery in polymeric biocompatible vehicles. The PLGA-PEG-HA conjugate shows the total measurement of 105 bond length with average bond length of 1.274163 Å. The conjugation between PEG and HA occurs at C8-O1 atoms and can be manipulated to improve properties.

  1. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  2. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  3. Aptamers as targeting delivery devices or anti-cancer drugs for fighting tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Dapas, Barbara; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Pozzato, Gabriele; Giansante, Carlo; Fiotti, Nicola; Tamai, Elisa; Tonon, Federica; Grassi, Gabriele

    2013-06-01

    Aptamer researches applied to the treatment of human cancers have increased since their discovery in 1990. This is due to different factors including: 1) the technical possibility to select, by SELEX-based procedures, specific aptamers targeting virtually any given molecule, 2) the aptamer favorable bio-activity in vivo, 3) the low production costs and 4) the ease synthesis and storage for the marketing. In the field of cancer treatments, aptamers have been studied as tumor-specific agents driving drugs into cancer cells; additionally they have been used as anti-neoplastic agents, able to inhibit tumor cell growth and dissemination when administered alone or in combination with conventional anti-neoplastic drugs. Aptamers are gaining an increased interest for pharmaceutical companies and some of them are under clinical evaluation trials. In this review we update the findings about the use of aptamers as "escort" molecules able to drive drugs into the cells and as antineoplastic drugs. Current anti-neoplastic treatments suffer from the intrinsic toxicity related to the un-specific targeting of both normal and tumorigenic proliferating cells. The aptamers could be useful to improve: 1) the selective targeting of molecules essential for the viability and expansion of tumor cells and/or the selective driving of chemotherapies into tumor cells, thus resulting in higher effectiveness and lower systemic side-effects compared to conventional anti-neoplastic drugs alone and 2) to improve the therapeutic index of currently used chemotherapies. Even if some problems related to the in vivo stability and pharmacokinetic/dynamics of aptamers remain to be improved, their potential use in the treatment of different human cancers is getting closer and closer to a practical therapeutic use. PMID:23687927

  4. BONE TUMOR ENVIRONMENT AS POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGET IN EWING SARCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise eREDINI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ewing sarcoma is the second most common pediatric bone tumor, with three cases per million worldwide. In clinical terms, ES is an aggressive, rapidly fatal malignancy that mainly develops in osseous sites (85%, but also in extraskeletal soft tissue. It spreads naturally to the lungs, bones and bone marrow with poor prognosis in the two latter cases. Bone lesions from primary or secondary (metastases tumors are characterized by extensive bone remodeling, more often due to osteolysis. Osteoclast activation and subsequent bone resorption is responsible for the clinical features of bone tumors including pain, vertebral collapse and spinal cord compression. Based on the vicious cycle concept of tumor cells and bone resorbing cells, drugs which target osteoclasts may be promising agents as adjuvant setting for treating bone tumors, including Ewing sarcoma. There is also increasing evidence that cellular and molecular protagonists present in the bone microenvironment play a part in establishing a favorable niche for tumor initiation and progression. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential therapeutic value of drugs targeting the bone tumor microenvironment in Ewing Sarcoma. The first part of the review will focus on targeting the bone resorbing function of osteoclasts by means of bisphosphonates (BPs or drugs blocking the pro-resorbing cytokine Receptor Activator of NF-kappa B Ligand (RANKL. Second, the role of this peculiar hypoxic microenvironment will be discussed in the context of resistance to chemotherapy, escape from the immune system, or neo-angiogenesis. Therapeutic interventions based on these specificities could be then proposed in the context of Ewing sarcoma.

  5. Frizzled-7 as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Ueno

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether one of the Wnt receptors, frizzled-7 (FZD7, functions in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway of colorectal cancer (CRC cells harboring an APC or CTNNB1 mutation and may be a potential therapeutic target for sporadic CRCs. The expression level of FZD gene family members in colon cancer cells and primary CRC tissues were determined by real-time PCR. Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway was evaluated by TOPflash assay. The expression level of Wnt target genes was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and/or Western blot analysis. Cell growth and cell invasion were assessed by MTS and matrigel assays, respectively. Among 10 FZD gene family members, FZD7 mRNA was predominantly expressed in six colon cancer cell lines with APC or CTNNB1 mutation. These six cell lines were transfected with FZD7 cDNA together with a TOPflash reporter plasmid, resulting in a 1.5- to 24.3-fold increase of Tcf transcriptional activity. The mRNA expression levels of seven known Wnt target genes were also increased by 1.5- to 3.4-fold after transfection of FZD7 cDNA into HCT-116 cells. The six cell lines were then cotransfected with FZD7-siRNA and a TOPflash reporter plasmid, which reduced Tcf transcriptional activity to 20% to 80%. FZD7-siRNA was shown to significantly decrease cell viability and in vitro invasion activity after transfection into HCT-116 cells. Our present data demonstrated that FZD7 activates the canonical Wnt pathway in colon cancer cells despite the presence of APC or CTNNB1 mutation and that FZD7-siRNA may be used as a therapeutic reagent for CRCs.

  6. RPS2: a novel therapeutic target in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stearns Mark E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have previously shown that the over expression of different ribosomal proteins might play an important role in cancer (i.e. S3a, L10, L16. We have previously reported that RPS2, a 33 Kda ribosomal protein was over expressed in malignant prostate cancer cell lines and in archived tumor specimens. Thus, RPS2 or other aberrantly over-expressed ribosomal proteins might promote cancer and be excellent therapeutic targets for treatment of the disease. Methods Western blotting and RT-PCR have been used to measure and compare the levels of expression of RPS2 in a variety of malignant prostate cancer cell lines, plus normal and benign cells lines. We have developed a 'ribozyme-like' DNAZYM-1P '10–23' motif oligonucleotide and examined whether it targets RPS2 in different cell lines by RT-PCR and Western blots. Growth and apoptosis assays were carried out to measure whether DNAZYM-1P 'knock-down' of RPS2 influenced cell proliferation or survival. We have also developed a SCID mouse tumor model with PC-3ML cells to determine whether DNAZYM-1P targeting of RPS2 compromised tumor growth and mouse survival rates in vivo. Results Western blots showed that PC-3ML, LNCaP, CPTX-1532, and pBABE-cmyc stably transfected IBC-10a cells all over-expressed RPS2, whereas IBC-10a parent, NPTX-1532, and BPH-1 cells or mouse NIH-3T3 cells expressed barely detectable levels of RPS2. RT-PCR assays showed that DNAZYM-1P, which targeted RPS2, 'knocked-down' RPS2 expression in the malignant cells (i.e. PC-3ML cells in vitro. The DNAZYM-1P also inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in the malignant prostate cells, but had little effect on the normal IBC-10a or NPTX-1532 cell lines. Finally, SCID mouse tumor modeling studies showed that DNAZYM-1P blocked tumor growth and metastasis by PC-3ML cells and eventually eradicated tumors following localized or systemic i.v. delivery. Mouse survival studies revealed that there was a dosage

  7. Targeting the Neddylation Pathway to Suppress the Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells: Therapeutic Implication for the Men’s Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neddylation pathway has been recognized as an attractive anticancer target in several malignancies, and its selective inhibitor, MLN4924, has recently advanced to clinical development. However, the anticancer effect of this compound against prostate cancer has not been well investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that the neddylation pathway was functional and targetable in prostate cancer cells. Specific inhibition of this pathway with MLN4924 suppressed the proliferation and clonogenic survival of prostate cancer cells. Mechanistically, MLN4924 treatment inhibited cullin neddylation, inactivated Cullin-RING E3 ligases (CRLs, and led to accumulation of tumor-suppressive CRLs substrates, including cell cycle inhibitors (p21, p27, and WEE1, NF-κB signaling inhibitor IκBα, and DNA replication licensing proteins (CDT1 and ORC1. As a result, MLN4924 triggered DNA damage, G2 phase cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of targeting the neddylation pathway with MLN4924 in suppressing the growth of prostate cancer cells, implicating a potentially new therapeutic approach for the men’s cancer.

  8. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  9. Neuroendothelial NMDA receptors as therapeutic targets in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrez, Richard; Ortega, Maria C; Bardou, Isabelle; Mehra, Anupriya; Fournier, Antoine; Van der Pol, Susanne M A; Haelewyn, Benoit; Maubert, Eric; Lesept, Flavie; Chevilley, Arnaud; de Castro, Fernando; De Vries, Helga E; Vivien, Denis; Clemente, Diego; Docagne, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is among the most common causes of neurological disability in young adults. Here we provide the preclinical proof of concept of the benefit of a novel strategy of treatment for multiple sclerosis targeting neuroendothelial N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. We designed a monoclonal antibody against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, which targets a regulatory site of the GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor sensitive to the protease tissue plasminogen activator. This antibody reverted the effect of tissue plasminogen activator on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function without affecting basal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity (n = 21, P mouse, at the vicinity of tight junctions of the blood-spinal cord barrier. Noteworthy, it reduced human leucocyte transmigration in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (n = 12, P multiple sclerosis, and highlights the therapeutic potential of strategies targeting the protease-regulated site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. PMID:27435092

  10. Targeting NF-κB in glioblastoma: A therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Narasimamurthy, Rajesh; Xia, Yifeng; Myskiw, Chad; Soda, Yasushi; Verma, Inder M

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal form of intracranial tumor. We have established a lentivirus-induced mouse model of malignant gliomas, which faithfully captures the pathophysiology and molecular signature of mesenchymal human GBM. RNA-Seq analysis of these tumors revealed high nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation showing enrichment of known NF-κB target genes. Inhibition of NF-κB by either depletion of IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), expression of a IκBαM super repressor, or using a NEMO (NF-κB essential modifier)-binding domain (NBD) peptide in tumor-derived cell lines attenuated tumor proliferation and prolonged mouse survival. Timp1, one of the NF-κB target genes significantly up-regulated in GBM, was identified to play a role in tumor proliferation and growth. Inhibition of NF-κB activity or silencing of Timp1 resulted in slower tumor growth in both mouse and human GBM models. Our results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB activity or targeting of inducible NF-κB genes is an attractive therapeutic approach for GBM. PMID:26824076

  11. Towards targeting anticancer drugs: ruthenium(ii)-arene complexes with biologically active naphthoquinone-derived ligand systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubanik, Mario; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Kim, Kunwoo; Anderson, Robert F; Klapproth, Erik; Jakupec, Michael A; Roller, Alexander; Söhnel, Tilo; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer active metal complexes with biologically active ligands have the potential to interact with more than one biological target, which could help to overcome acquired and/or intrinsic resistance of tumors to small molecule drugs. In this paper we present the preparation of 2-hydroxy-[1,4]-naphthoquinone-derived ligands and their coordination to a Ru(II)(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl moiety. The synthesis of oxime derivatives resulted in the surprising formation of nitroso-naphthalene complexes, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The compounds were shown to be stable in aqueous solution but reacted with glutathione and ascorbic acid rather than undergoing reduction. One-electron reduction with pulse radiolysis revealed different behavior for the naphthoquinone and nitroso-naphthalene complexes, which was also observed in in vitro anticancer assays. PMID:27214822

  12. MOLECULAR MODELING AND DRUG DISCOVERY OF POTENTIAL INHIBITORS FOR ANTICANCER TARGET GENE MELK (MATERNAL EMBRYONIC LEUCINE ZIPPER KINASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha. K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK, a member of the AMP serine/threonine kinase family, exhibits multiple features consistent with the potential utility of this gene as an anticancer target. Reports show that MELK functions as a cancer-specific protein kinase, and that down-regulation of MELK results in growth suppression of breast cancer cells. There are many inhibitors which bind to kinases and are in clinical trials too. In our study we have taken a library of different inhibitors and docked those using GLIDE Induced Fit. From docking result we can conclude that Syk inhibitor II, Rho kinase inhibitor IV, p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor III, HA 1004, Dihydrochloride and IKK -2 inhibitor VI have good binding affinity towards MELK and may have anticancer activity.

  13. Autophagy: A new therapeutic target for liver fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound-healing response to liverinjury and the result of imbalance of extracellular matrix(ECM) accumulation and degradation. The relentless production and progressive accumulation of ECM canlead to end-stage liver disease. Although significantprogress has been achieved in elucidating the mechanismsof fibrogenesis, effective anti-fibrotic strategiesare still lacking. Autophagy is an intracellular process ofself-digestion of defective organelles to provide materialrecycling or energy for cell survival. Autophagy hasbeen implicated in the pathophysiology of many humandisorders including hepatic fibrosis. However, the exactrelationships between autophagy and hepatic fibrosisare not totally clear and need further investigations.A new therapeutic target for liver fibrosis could bedeveloped with a better understanding of autophagy.

  14. Molecular markers as therapeutic targets in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsin-Hui Tseng; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for 29% of cancer deaths in the United States and has very low 5-year survival rates of approximately 11% in men and 15% in women.Although the early diagnosis of lung cancer may increase the survival rate with adequate treatment,advanced lung cancers are often metastasized and receive limited benefit from therapeutic regimens.As conventional treatments for lung cancer reach their limitations,researchers have attempted to discover novel drug therapies aimed at specific targets contributing to the progression of tumorigenesis.Recent advances in systems biology have enabled the molecular biology of lung carcinogenesis to be elucidated.Our understanding of the physiologic processes of tumor development provide a means to design more effective and specific drugs with less toxicity,thereby accelerating the delivery of new drug therapies to the patient's bedside.

  15. Hippocampal Area CA2: An Overlooked but Promising Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevaleyre, Vivien; Piskorowski, Rebecca A

    2016-08-01

    While the hippocampus has long been recognized as a brain structure specialized in mapping 'space' in rodents, human studies and now recent data from rodents have shown that its function extends well beyond spatial coding. Recently, an overlooked area of the hippocampus, CA2, has emerged as a critical region for social memory. This area is also uniquely altered during several pathologies such as schizophrenia and age-related dementia. Because of its singular connectivity, we propose that area CA2 resides at the interface between emotional brain activity and higher cognitive function. Furthermore, because of the unique expression of multiple neuromodulator receptors in area CA2, we posit that this region may represent a fruitful therapeutic target for diseases where social dysfunction occurs. PMID:27372610

  16. Featuring the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Isabel Torres Gomes; de Oliveira, Paulo Sergio Lopes; Santos, Guilherme Martins

    2015-05-01

    Chromatin is the major regulator of gene expression and genome maintenance. Proteins that bind the nucleosome, the repetitive unit of chromatin, and the histone H4 tail are critical to establishing chromatin architecture and phenotypic outcomes. Intriguingly, nucleosome-binding proteins (NBPs) and the H4 tail peptide compete for the same binding site at an acidic region on the nucleosome surface. Although the essential facts about the nucleosome were revealed 17 years ago, new insights into its atomic structure and molecular mechanisms are still emerging. Several complex nucleosome:NBP structures were recently revealed, characterizing the NBP-binding sites on the nucleosome surface. Here we discuss the potential of the nucleosome surface as a therapeutic target and the impact and development of exogenous nucleosome-binding molecules (eNBMs).

  17. Inflammation as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Ang, Lynn; Holmes, Crystal; Gallagher, Katherine; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) are one of the most prevalent chronic complications of diabetes and a major cause of disability, high mortality, and poor quality of life. Given the complex anatomy of the peripheral nervous system and types of fiber dysfunction, DNs have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The treatment of DNs continues to be challenging, likely due to the complex pathogenesis that involves an array of systemic and cellular imbalances in glucose and lipids metabolism. These lead to the activation of various biochemical pathways, including increased oxidative/nitrosative stress, activation of the polyol and protein kinase C pathways, activation of polyADP ribosylation, and activation of genes involved in neuronal damage, cyclooxygenase-2 activation, endothelial dysfunction, altered Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump function, impaired C-peptide-related signaling pathways, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and low-grade inflammation. This review summarizes current evidence regarding the role of low-grade inflammation as a potential therapeutic target for DNs. PMID:26897744

  18. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs. PMID:24827844

  19. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) as a therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Neves, Joana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and NPY receptors are widely expressed in the mammalian central nervous system. Studies in both humans and rodent models revealed that brain NPY levels are altered in some neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease. In this review, we will focus on the roles of NPY in the pathological mechanisms of these disorders, highlighting NPY as a neuroprotective agent, as a neural stem cell proliferative agent, as an agent that increases trophic support, as a stimulator of autophagy and as an inhibitor of excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation. Moreover, the effect of NPY in some clinical manifestations commonly observed in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Machado-Joseph disease, such as depressive symptoms and body weight loss, are also discussed. In conclusion, this review highlights NPY system as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Autophagy as a Therapeutic Target in Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchenko, Andriy; Chiong, Mario; Turer, Aslan; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    The epidemic of heart failure continues apace, and development of novel therapies with clinical efficacy has lagged. Now, important insights into the molecular circuitry of cardiovascular autophagy have raised the prospect that this cellular pathway of protein quality control may be a target of clinical relevance. Whereas basal levels of autophagy are required for cell survival, excessive levels – or perhaps distinct forms of autophagic flux – contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our challenge will be to distinguish mechanisms that drive adaptive versus maladaptive autophagy and to manipulate those pathways for therapeutic gain. Recent evidence suggests this may be possible. Here, we review the fundamental biology of autophagy and its role in a variety of forms of cardiovascular disease. We discuss ways in which this evolutionarily conserved catabolic mechanism can be manipulated, discuss studies presently underway in heart disease, and provide our perspective on where this exciting field may lead in the future. PMID:21723289

  1. Epigenetic modulators as therapeutic targets in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Inês; Pereira-Silva, Eva; Henrique, Rui; Packham, Graham; Crabb, Simon J; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common non-cutaneous malignancies among men worldwide. Epigenetic aberrations, including changes in DNA methylation patterns and/or histone modifications, are key drivers of prostate carcinogenesis. These epigenetic defects might be due to deregulated function and/or expression of the epigenetic machinery, affecting the expression of several important genes. Remarkably, epigenetic modifications are reversible and numerous compounds that target the epigenetic enzymes and regulatory proteins were reported to be effective in cancer growth control. In fact, some of these drugs are already being tested in clinical trials. This review discusses the most important epigenetic alterations in prostate cancer, highlighting the role of epigenetic modulating compounds in pre-clinical and clinical trials as potential therapeutic agents for prostate cancer management. PMID:27651838

  2. MicroRNA: an Emerging Therapeutic Target and Intervention Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decheng Yang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of short non-coding RNAs with posttranscriptional regulatory functions. To date, more than 600 human miRNAs have been experimentally identified, and estimated to regulate more than one third of cellular messenger RNAs. Accumulating evidence has linked the dysregulated expression patterns of miRNAs to a variety of diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases and viral infections. MiRNAs provide its particular layer of network for gene regulation, thus possessing the great potential both as a novel class of therapeutic targets and as a powerful intervention tool. In this regard, synthetic RNAs that contain the binding sites of miRNA have been shown to work as a “decoy” or “miRNA sponge” to inhibit the function of specific miRNAs. On the other hand, miRNA expression vectors have been used to restore or overexpress specific miRNAs to achieve a long-term effect. Further, double-stranded miRNA mimetics for transient replacement have been experimentally validated. Endogenous precursor miRNAs have also been used as scaffolds for the induction of RNA interference. This article reviews the recent progress on this emerging technology as a powerful tool for gene regulation studies and particularly as a rationale strategy for design of therapeutics.

  3. Pathogenic inflammation and its therapeutic targeting in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Andrew Gottschalk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, lupus is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues including skin, kidneys and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B and T lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as Belimumab which targets the B cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immuno-suppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and

  4. Targeting anti-cancer drug resistance in mouse models of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to anti-cancer drugs is one of the biggest challenges in clinical oncology. In contrast to the success of local therapy (e.g. surgery or radiotherapy), the treatment of disseminated cancers using classical DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents and novel specific inhibitors frequently fails

  5. pH-Sensitive stimulus-responsive nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mahdi; Eslami, Masoud; Sahandi-Zangabad, Parham; Mirab, Fereshteh; Farajisafiloo, Negar; Shafaei, Zahra; Ghosh, Deepanjan; Bozorgomid, Mahnaz; Dashkhaneh, Fariba; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    In recent years miscellaneous smart micro/nanosystems that respond to various exogenous/endogenous stimuli including temperature, magnetic/electric field, mechanical force, ultrasound/light irradiation, redox potentials, and biomolecule concentration have been developed for targeted delivery and release of encapsulated therapeutic agents such as drugs, genes, proteins, and metal ions specifically at their required site of action. Owing to physiological differences between malignant and normal cells, or between tumors and normal tissues, pH-sensitive nanosystems represent promising smart delivery vehicles for transport and delivery of anticancer agents. Furthermore, pH-sensitive systems possess applications in delivery of metal ions and biomolecules such as proteins, insulin, etc., as well as co-delivery of cargos, dual pH-sensitive nanocarriers, dual/multi stimuli-responsive nanosystems, and even in the search for new solutions for therapy of diseases such as Alzheimer's. In order to design an optimized system, it is necessary to understand the various pH-responsive micro/nanoparticles and the different mechanisms of pH-sensitive drug release. This should be accompanied by an assessment of the theoretical and practical challenges in the design and use of these carriers. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:696-716. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1389 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26762467

  6. Therapeutic Targeting of Hyaluronan in the Tumor Stroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kultti, Anne, E-mail: akultti@halozyme.com [Department of Research, Halozyme Therapeutics, 11388 Sorrento Valley Road, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Li, Xiaoming; Jiang, Ping; Thompson, Curtis B. [Department of Pharmacology and Safety Assessment, Halozyme Therapeutics, 11388 Sorrento Valley Road, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Frost, Gregory I. [Department of General and Administrative, Halozyme Therapeutics, 11388 Sorrento Valley Road, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Shepard, H. Michael [Department of Research, Halozyme Therapeutics, 11388 Sorrento Valley Road, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2012-09-06

    The tumor stroma, consisting of non-malignant cells and the extracellular matrix, undergoes significant quantitative and qualitative changes throughout malignant transformation and tumor progression. With increasing recognition of the role of the tumor microenvironment in disease progression, stromal components of the tumor have become attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Stromal accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan occurs in many tumor types and is frequently associated with a negative disease prognosis. Hyaluronan interacts with other extracellular molecules as well as cellular receptors to form a complex interaction network influencing physicochemical properties, signal transduction, and biological behavior of cancer cells. In preclinical animal models, enzymatic removal of hyaluronan is associated with remodeling of the tumor stroma, reduction of tumor interstitial fluid pressure, expansion of tumor blood vessels and facilitated delivery of chemotherapy. This leads to inhibition of tumor growth and increased survival. Current evidence shows that abnormal accumulation of hyaluronan may be an important stromal target for cancer therapy. In this review we highlight the role of hyaluronan and hyaluronan-mediated interactions in cancer, and discuss historical and recent data on hyaluronidase-based therapies and the effect of hyaluronan removal on tumor growth.

  7. Estrogen receptor beta is a novel therapeutic target for photoaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken C N; Wang, Yihe; Oh, Inn Gyung; Jenkins, Susan; Freedman, Leonard P; Thompson, Catherine C; Chung, Jin Ho; Nagpal, Sunil

    2010-05-01

    One of the many harmful factors faced by the skin is solar UV radiation, which damages skin by inducing chronic low-grade inflammation through increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines, metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Estrogen receptors (ERs) alpha and beta are ligand-dependent transcription factors that are expressed in skin, and an ERbeta agonist has previously shown efficacy in vivo in models of pain and inflammation. Because ERbeta does not carry the breast and uterine proliferation liabilities of ERalpha, we decided to explore the possibility of using ERbeta as a target for photoaging. We show that ERbeta-selective compounds suppressed the expression of cytokines and MMPs in activated keratinocytes and fibroblast-based in vitro models of photoaging. Furthermore, in activated dermal fibroblasts, ERbeta-selective compounds also inhibited COX-2. These activities of ERbeta ligands in skin cells correlated with the expression levels of ERbeta and showed reversal by treatment with a potent synthetic ER antagonist. Furthermore, the pharmacology of ERbeta-selective compound was observed in wild-type but not in skin cells obtained from ERbeta knockout mice. Finally, we demonstrate that a synthetic ERbeta agonist inhibited UV-induced photodamage and skin wrinkle formation in a murine model of photoaging. Therefore, the potential of an ERbeta ligand to regulate multiple pathways underlying the cause of photoaging suggests ERbeta to be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of photoaging. PMID:20110405

  8. Transcription Inhibition as a Therapeutic Target for Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During tumorigenesis the transformed cells lose their normal growth control mechanisms and become dependent on oncogenes' products and pathways for survival. Treatments tailored to block the expression or function of transforming genes have shown efficacy in eliminating neoplastic cells. The mRNAs of many oncogenes, as well as regulators of other key processes such as cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, typically have shorter half-lives. Agents that impede mRNA synthesis are expected to selectively hinder the expression of these genes and, therefore, be detrimental to neoplastic cells that are physiologically dependent on them. In addition to exploiting the tumor cells' dependency on short-lived transcripts, RNA-directed agents also take advantage of the differential sensitivity between transformed and non-transformed cells, as the cytotoxic effects of inhibiting RNA synthesis have not been seen in non-transformed cells. The abrogation of the formation of oncotranscripts provides a new concept in cancer therapeutics and numerous agents have been developed which are able to target transcription. The focus of this review is to give an overview of transcription and the different inhibitory strategies that target various aspects of the transcriptional process

  9. SKP2 is a direct transcriptional target of MYCN and a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Laura; Chen, Lindi; Milazzo, Giorgio; Gherardi, Samuele; Perini, Giovanni; Willmore, Elaine; Newell, David R; Tweddle, Deborah A

    2015-07-10

    SKP2 is the substrate recognition subunit of the ubiquitin ligase complex which targets p27(KIP1) for degradation. Induced at the G1/S transit of the cell cycle, SKP2 is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and contributes to malignancy. We previously identified SKP2 as a possible MYCN target gene and hence hypothesise that SKP2 is a potential therapeutic target in MYCN amplified disease. A positive correlation was identified between MYCN activity and SKP2 mRNA expression in Tet21N MYCN-regulatable cells and a panel of MYCN amplified and non-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines. In chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter gene assays, MYCN bound directly to E-boxes within the SKP2 promoter and induced transcriptional activity which was decreased by the removal of MYCN and E-box mutation. Although SKP2 knockdown inhibited cell growth in both MYCN amplified and non-amplified cells, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were induced only in non-MYCN amplified neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion these data identify SKP2 as a direct transcriptional target of MYCN and supports SKP2 as a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

  10. Molecular and Pharmacologic Properties of the Anticancer Quinolone Derivative Vosaroxin: A New Therapeutic Agent for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Gene C; Fox, Judith A; Poi, Ming; Strickland, Stephen A

    2016-09-01

    Vosaroxin is a first-in-class anticancer quinolone derivative that targets topoisomerase II and induces site-selective double-strand breaks in DNA, leading to tumor cell apoptosis. Vosaroxin has chemical and pharmacologic characteristics distinct from other topoisomerase II inhibitors due to its quinolone scaffold. The efficacy and safety of vosaroxin in combination with cytarabine were evaluated in patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a phase III, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (VALOR). In this study, the addition of vosaroxin produced a 1.4-month improvement in median overall survival (OS; 7.5 months with vosaroxin/cytarabine vs. 6.1 months with placebo/cytarabine; hazard ratio [HR] 0.87, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.73-1.02; unstratified log-rank p [Formula: see text] 0.061; stratified log-rank p [Formula: see text]0.024), with the greatest OS benefit observed in patients ≥60 years of age (7.1 vs. 5.0 months; HR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.62-0.92; p [Formula: see text]0.003) and patients with early relapse (6.7 vs. 5.2 months; HR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.59-1.00; p [Formula: see text] 0.039), two AML patient groups that typically have poor prognosis. Here we review the chemical and pharmacologic properties of vosaroxin, how these properties are distinct from those of currently available topoisomerase II inhibitors, how they may contribute to the efficacy and safety profile observed in the VALOR trial, and the status of clinical development of vosaroxin for treatment of AML. PMID:27484675

  11. Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles for Targeted Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Brian Tsengchi

    interactions between membranes and synthetic nanoparticles, and how the membrane coating technique faithfully translates the complexities of natural cellular membranes to the nanoscale. The following three sections explore potential therapeutic applications of membrane-coated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery, biodetoxification, and immunomodulation. Ultimately, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have the potential to significantly change the landscape of nanomedicine. The novel applications presented in this thesis are just a few of many examples currently being researched, with countless more avenues waiting to be explored.

  12. General Reagent Free Route to pH Responsive Polyacryloyl Hydrazide Capped Metal Nanogels for Synergistic Anticancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujjwal, Rewati Raman; Purohit, Mahaveer Prasad; Patnaik, Satyakam; Ojha, Umaprasana

    2015-06-01

    Herewith, we report a facile synthesis of pH responsive polyacryloyl hydrazide (PAH) capped silver (Ag) or gold (Au) nanogels for anticancer therapeutic applications. A cost-effective instant synthesis of PAH-Ag or PAH-Au nanoparticles (NPs) possessing controllable particle diameter and narrow size distribution was accomplished by adding AgNO3 or AuCl to the aqueous solution of PAH under ambient conditions without using any additional reagent. PAH possessing carbonyl hydrazide pendant functionality served as both reducing and capping agent to produce and stabilize the NPs. The stability analysis by UV-vis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy techniques suggested that these NPs may be stored in a refrigerator for at least up to 2 weeks with negligible change in conformation. The average hydrodynamic size of PAH-Ag NPs synthesized using 0.2 mmol/L AgNO3 changed from 122 to 226 nm on changing the pH of the medium from 5.4 to 7.4, which is a characteristic property of pH responsive nanogel. Camptothecin (CPT) with adequate loading efficiency (6.3%) was encapsulated in the PAH-Ag nanogels. Under pH 5.4 conditions, these nanogels released 78% of the originally loaded CPT over a period of 70 h. The antiproliferative potential of PAH-Ag-CPT nanogels (at [CPT]=0.6 μg/mL) against MCF-7 breast adeno-carcinoma cells were ∼350% higher compared to that of the free CPT as evidenced by high cellular internalization of these nanogels. Induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 breast adeno-carcinoma cells by PAH-Ag-CPT nanogels was evidenced by accumulation of late apoptotic cell population. Drug along with the PAH-Ag NPs were also encapsulated in a pH responsive hydrogel through in situ gelation at room temperature using acrylic acid as the cross-linker. The resulting hydrogel released quantitative amounts of both drug and PAH-Ag NPs over a period of 16 h. The simplicity of synthesis and ease of drug loading with efficient release render these NPs a viable

  13. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  14. RhoC a new target for therapeutic vaccination against metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenandy, L.; Sorensen, R.B.; Straten, P.T.;

    2008-01-01

    of cancer makes RhoC a very attractive target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Herein, we describe an HLA-A3 restricted epitope from RhoC, which is recognized by cytotoxic T cells. Moreover, RhoC-specific T cells show cytotoxic potential against HLA-matched cancer cells of different origin. Thus, RhoC may...

  15. Quinoxaline-Based Scaffolds Targeting Tyrosine Kinases and Their Potential Anticancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Newahie, Aliya M S; Ismail, Nasser S M; Abou El Ella, Dalal A; Abouzid, Khaled A M

    2016-05-01

    Quinoxaline derivatives, also called benzopyrazines, are an important class of heterocyclic compounds. Quinoxalines have drawn great attention due to their wide spectrum of biological activities. They are considered as an important basis for anticancer drugs due to their potential activity as protein kinase inhibitors. In this review, we focus on the chemistry of the quinoxaline derivatives, the strategies for their synthesis, their potential activities against various tyrosine kinases, and on the structure-activity relationship studies reported to date.

  16. Translational approaches targeting the p53 pathway for anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor blocks cancer development by triggering apoptosis or cellular senescence in response to oncogenic stress or DNA damage. Consequently, the p53 signalling pathway is virtually always inactivated in human cancer cells. This unifying feature has commenced tremendous efforts to develop p53-based anti-cancer therapies. Different strategies exist that are adapted to the mechanisms of p53 inactivation. In p53-mutated tumours, delivery of wild-type p53 by adenovirus-based gen...

  17. Could B7-H4 serve as a target to activate anti-cancer immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Heng, Xueyuan; Lu, Yong; Cai, Zhen; Yi, Qing; Che, Fengyuan

    2016-09-01

    It has been over 13years since the identification of B7-H4, the co-stimulatory molecule of B7 family members. While B7-H4 mRNA is widely distributed protein expression seems to be limited on tissues. Various cytokines and inflammatory mediators induce the expression of B7-H4. However, the specific regulatory mechanisms of B7-H4 remain to be defined. Recently, it has been shown that B7-H4 executes an inhibitory function in the T-cell response via reduced expansion, cell cycle arrest, decreased cytokine secretion and induced apoptosis of activated T-cells. Furthermore, B7-H4 suppresses the function of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and promotes the proliferation and development of regulatory T-cells (Treg). Moreover, a growing body of literature demonstrates that various cancers express B7-H4 and that the expression levels of B7-H4 correlate with cancer size, histological type, pathologic stage, grade, infiltration, lymph node metastasis, cancer progression, recurrence and death. The over-expression of B7-H4 in cancer may be related to an increased resistance to immune responses. The aim of this review is to supply an overview of the advances in the regulation and function of B7-H4. Additionally, many studies have suggested that B7-H4 is a molecular target for therapeutic intervention in cancer and that targeting B7-H4 may have promising potential for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy for cancer patients. PMID:27258187

  18. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinath eSutendra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Current drug development in oncology is non-selective as it typically focuses on pathways essential for the survival of all dividing cells. The unique metabolic profile of cancer, which is characterized by increased glycolysis and suppressed mitochondrial glucose oxidation provides cancer cells with a proliferative advantage, conducive with apoptosis resistance and even increased angiogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that targeting the cancer-specific metabolic and mitochondrial remodeling may offer selectivity in cancer treatment. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK is a mitochondrial enzyme that is activated in a variety of cancers and results in the selective inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH, a complex of enzymes that converts cytosolic pyruvate to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, the substrate for the Krebs’ cycle. Inhibition of PDK with either small interfering RNAs or the orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA shifts the metabolism of cancer cells from glycolysis to glucose oxidation and reverses the suppression of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. In addition, this therapeutic strategy increases the production of diffusible Krebs’ cycle intermediates and mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (mROS, activating p53 or inhibiting pro-proliferative and pro-angiogenic transcription factors like nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α. These effects result in decreased tumor growth and angiogenesis in a variety of cancers with high selectivity. In a small but mechanistic clinical trial in patients with glioblastoma, a highly aggressive and vascular form of brain cancer, DCA decreased tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth, suggesting that metabolic targeting therapies can be translated directly to patients. Therefore, reversing the mitochondrial suppression with metabolic-modulating drugs, like PDK inhibitors holds promise in the rapidly expanding field of metabolic oncology.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases as therapeutic targets for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Vanessa J; Zhang, Li; Hagood, James S; Owen, Caroline A

    2015-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a restrictive lung disease that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Current medical therapies are not fully effective at limiting mortality in patients with IPF, and new therapies are urgently needed. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteinases that, together, can degrade all components of the extracellular matrix and numerous nonmatrix proteins. MMPs and their inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IPF based upon the results of clinical studies reporting elevated levels of MMPs (including MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-8, and MMP-9) in IPF blood and/or lung samples. Surprisingly, studies of gene-targeted mice in murine models of pulmonary fibrosis (PF) have demonstrated that most MMPs promote (rather than inhibit) the development of PF and have identified diverse mechanisms involved. These mechanisms include MMPs: (1) promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMP-3 and MMP-7); (2) increasing lung levels or activity of profibrotic mediators or reducing lung levels of antifibrotic mediators (MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-8); (3) promoting abnormal epithelial cell migration and other aberrant repair processes (MMP-3 and MMP-9); (4) inducing the switching of lung macrophage phenotypes from M1 to M2 types (MMP-10 and MMP-28); and (5) promoting fibrocyte migration (MMP-8). Two MMPs, MMP-13 and MMP-19, have antifibrotic activities in murine models of PF, and two MMPs, MMP-1 and MMP-10, have the potential to limit fibrotic responses to injury. Herein, we review what is known about the contributions of MMPs and TIMPs to the pathogenesis of IPF and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for IPF.

  20. Influence of molecular design on biodistribution and targeting properties of an Affibody-fused HER2-recognising anticancer toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altai, Mohamed; Liu, Hao; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Gräslund, Torbjörn

    2016-09-01

    Targeted delivery of toxins is a promising way to treat disseminated cancer. The use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting moiety has provided proof-of-principle for this approach. However, extravasation and tissue penetration rates of antibody-based immunotoxins are limited due to antibody bulkiness. The use of a novel class of targeting probes, Affibody molecules, provides smaller toxin-conjugated constructs, which may improve targeting. Earlier, we have demonstrated that affitoxins containing a HER2-targeting Affibody moiety and a deimmunized and truncated exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PE38X8, provide highly selective toxicity to HER2-expressing cancer cells. To evaluate the influence of molecular design on targeting and biodistribution properties, a series of novel affitoxins were labelled with the residualizing radionuclide 111In. In this study, we have shown that the novel conjugates are more rapidly internalized compared with the parental affitoxin. The use of a (HE)3 purification tag instead of a hexahistidine tag enabled significant (pmolecular design of scaffold protein based anticancer targeted toxins can appreciably improve their biodistribution and targeting properties.

  1. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena, E-mail: meena_jhanwar@nymc.edu; Labagnara, Michael; Friedman, Marissa; Kwasnicki, Amanda; Murali, Raj [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States)

    2015-03-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM.

  2. Targeting CBLB as a potential therapeutic approach for disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun; Tang, Juan; Guo, Hui; Zhao, Yixia; Tang, Rong; Ouyang, Song; Zeng, Qiuming; Rappleye, Chad A; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Schlesinger, Larry S; Tao, Lijian; Brown, Gordon D; Langdon, Wallace Y; Li, Belinda T; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Disseminated candidiasis has become one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired blood stream infections with high mobility and mortality. However, the molecular basis of host defense against disseminated candidiasis remains elusive, and treatment options are limited. Here we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBLB directs polyubiquitination of dectin-1 and dectin-2, two key pattern-recognition receptors for sensing Candida albicans, and their downstream kinase SYK, thus inhibiting dectin-1- and dectin-2-mediated innate immune responses. CBLB deficiency or inactivation protects mice from systemic infection with a lethal dose of C. albicans, and deficiency of dectin-1, dectin-2, or both in Cblb(-/-) mice abrogates this protection. Notably, silencing the Cblb gene in vivo protects mice from lethal systemic C. albicans infection. Our data reveal that CBLB is crucial for homeostatic control of innate immune responses mediated by dectin-1 and dectin-2. Our data also indicate that CBLB represents a potential therapeutic target for protection from disseminated candidiasis. PMID:27428899

  3. [50 years of hepatology - from therapeutic nihilism to targeted therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manns, Michael P

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 50 years significant progress has been made in the whole field of hepatology. Part of this is translation of basic research (biochemistry, immunology, virology, molecular biology and others) into clinical hepatology. This enabled us to understand more about the pathogenesis of liver diseases and led to the discovery of the five major hepatotropic viruses, the identification of hepatocellular autoantigens, and to the development of specific therapies for chronic hepatitis B, C and D. In addition, the molecular basis of most genetic liver diseases has been identified. Significant progress was made in the development of medical therapies for various liver diseases with different underlying etiologies. Surgery significantly contributed to the progress in the management of liver diseases; examples are laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the development of liver transplantation. A multimodal therapeutic algorithm has been established for the therapy of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC); with Sorafenib "targeted therapy" has entered the area of HCC. The progress made over the last 50 years not only led to an aetiological differentiation of acute and chronic liver diseases but also to specific therapies based on the identification and understanding of the underlying etiology. PMID:23585265

  4. MPS1 kinase as a potential therapeutic target in medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, Irina; Ng, June; Harris, Peter; Birks, Diane; Donson, Andrew; Taylor, Michael D.; Foreman, Nicholas K.; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common type of malignant brain tumor that affects children. Although recent advances in chemotherapy and radiation have improved outcomes, high-risk patients perform poorly with significant morbidity. Gene expression profiling has revealed that monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1) (TTK1) is highly expressed in medulloblastoma patient samples compared to that noted in normal cerebellum. MPS1 is a key regulator of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a mitotic mechanism specifically required for proper chromosomal alignment and segregation. The SAC can be activated in aneuploid cancer cells and MPS1 is overexpressed in many types of cancers. A previous study has demonstrated the effectiveness of inhibiting MPS1 with small-molecule inhibitors, but the role of MPS1 in medulloblastoma is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that MPS1 inhibition by shRNA or with a small-molecule drug, NMS-P715, resulted in decreased cell growth, inhibition of clonogenic potential and induction of apoptosis in cells belonging to both the Shh and group 3 medulloblastoma genomic signature. These findings highlight MPS1 as a rational therapeutic target for medulloblastoma. PMID:27633003

  5. SOCS3: A novel therapeutic target for cardioprotection.

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    Yasukawa, Hideo; Nagata, Takanobu; Oba, Toyoharu; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2012-10-01

    The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of proteins are cytokine-inducible inhibitors of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of the transcription (STAT) signaling pathways. Among the family, SOCS1 and SOCS3 potently suppress cytokine actions by inhibiting JAK kinase activities. The generation of mice lacking individual SOCS genes has been instrumental in defining the role of individual SOCS proteins in specific cytokine pathways in vivo; SOCS1 is an essential negative regulator of interferon-γ (IFNγ) and SOCS3 is an essential negative regulator of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). JAK-STAT3 activating cytokines have exhibited cardioprotective roles in the heart. The cardiac-specific deletion of SOCS3 enhances the activation of cardioprotective signaling pathways, inhibits myocardial apoptosis and fibrosis and results in the inhibition of left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We propose that myocardial SOCS3 is a key determinant of left ventricular remodeling after MI, and SOCS3 may serve as a novel therapeutic target to prevent left ventricular remodeling after MI. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways mediated by JAK-STAT and SOCS proteins and their roles in the development of myocardial injury under stress (e.g., pressure overload, viral infection and ischemia). PMID:24058778

  6. Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target for human ovarian cancer

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    Feng Jingjing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is overexpressed in human cancer cells and plays an essential role in cancer cell growth. However, the significance of MR-1 in human ovarian cancer has not yet been explored. The aim of this study was to examine whether MR-1 is a predictor of ovarian cancer and its value as a therapeutic target in ovarian cancer patients. Methods Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to detect MR-1 mRNA levels in tissue samples from 26 ovarian cancer patients and 25 controls with benign ovarian disease. Anti-MR-1 polyclonal antibodies were prepared, tested by ELISA and western blotting, and then used for immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue samples. Adhesion and invasion of 292T cells was also examined after transfection of a pMX-MR-1 plasmid. Knockdown of MR-1 expression was achieved after stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a short hairpin DNA pGPU6/GFP/Neo plasmid against the MR-1 gene. In addition, SKOV3 cells were treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin, and a potential role for MR-1 as a therapeutic target was evaluated. Results MR-1 was overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissues and SKOV3 cells. 293T cells overexpressed MR-1, and cellular spread and invasion were enhanced after transfection of the pMX-MR-1 plasmid, suggesting that MR-1 is critical for ovarian cancer cell growth. Knockdown of MR-1 expression inhibited cell adhesion and invasion, and treatment with anti-cancer drugs decreased its expression in cancer cells. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which MR-1 might serve as a novel biological marker and potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. Conclusions MR-1 may be a biomarker for diagnosis of ovarian cancer. It may also be useful for monitoring of the effects of anti-cancer therapies. Further studies are needed to clarify whether MR-1 is an early

  7. Structure and Potential Cellular Targets of HAMLET-like Anti-Cancer Compounds made from Milk Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Emma M; Duff, Anthony P; Håkansson, Anders P; Vacher, Catherine S; Liu, Guo Jun; Knott, Robert B; Church, William Bret

    2015-01-01

    The HAMLET family of compounds (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumours) was discovered during studies on the properties of human milk, and is a class of protein-lipid complexes having broad spectrum anti-cancer, and some specific anti-bacterial properties. The structure of HAMLET-like compounds consists of an aggregation of partially unfolded protein making up the majority of the compound's mass, with fatty acid molecules bound in the hydrophobic core. This is a novel protein-lipid structure and has only recently been derived by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The structure is the basis of a novel cytotoxicity mechanism responsible for anti-cancer activity to all of the around 50 different cancer cell types for which the HAMLET family has been trialled. Multiple cytotoxic mechanisms have been hypothesised for the HAMLET-like compounds, but it is not yet clear which of those are the initiating cytotoxic mechanism(s) and which are subsequent activities triggered by the initiating mechanism(s). In addition to the studies into the structure of these compounds, this review presents the state of knowledge of the anti-cancer aspects of HAMLET-like compounds, the HAMLET-induced cytotoxic activities to cancer and non-cancer cells, and the several prospective cell membrane and intracellular targets of the HAMLET family. The emerging picture is that HAMLET-like compounds initiate their cytotoxic effects on what may be a cancer-specific target in the cell membrane that has yet to be identified. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page. PMID:26626257

  8. Structure and Potential Cellular Targets of HAMLET-like Anti-Cancer Compounds made from Milk Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Emma M; Duff, Anthony P; Håkansson, Anders P; Vacher, Catherine S; Liu, Guo Jun; Knott, Robert B; Church, William Bret

    2015-01-01

    The HAMLET family of compounds (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumours) was discovered during studies on the properties of human milk, and is a class of protein-lipid complexes having broad spectrum anti-cancer, and some specific anti-bacterial properties. The structure of HAMLET-like compounds consists of an aggregation of partially unfolded protein making up the majority of the compound's mass, with fatty acid molecules bound in the hydrophobic core. This is a novel protein-lipid structure and has only recently been derived by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The structure is the basis of a novel cytotoxicity mechanism responsible for anti-cancer activity to all of the around 50 different cancer cell types for which the HAMLET family has been trialled. Multiple cytotoxic mechanisms have been hypothesised for the HAMLET-like compounds, but it is not yet clear which of those are the initiating cytotoxic mechanism(s) and which are subsequent activities triggered by the initiating mechanism(s). In addition to the studies into the structure of these compounds, this review presents the state of knowledge of the anti-cancer aspects of HAMLET-like compounds, the HAMLET-induced cytotoxic activities to cancer and non-cancer cells, and the several prospective cell membrane and intracellular targets of the HAMLET family. The emerging picture is that HAMLET-like compounds initiate their cytotoxic effects on what may be a cancer-specific target in the cell membrane that has yet to be identified. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  9. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

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    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  10. "Siglec"ting the allergic response for therapeutic targeting.

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    Bochner, Bruce S

    2016-06-01

    As a physician-scientist, I have pursued research related to translational immunology with the goal of improving our ability to diagnose and treat allergic, immunologic and other diseases involving eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. We have tried to delineate novel mechanisms of human disease, working whenever possible with primary human cells and tissues, attempting to identify targets that might be amenable to the development of new therapies. As a general strategy, we have compared eosinophils, basophils, mast cells and neutrophils to look for pathways in inflammation that were unique to distinct subsets of these cells. In doing so, the concepts of glycobiology did not enter my mind until we began noticing some intriguing functional differences involving selectins and their ligands among these cell types. One simple observation, that neutrophils were coated with a glycan that allowed them to interact with an endothelial adhesion molecule while eosinophils lacked this structure, pried open the glyco-door for me. Fruitful collaborations with card-carrying glycobiologists soon followed that have forever positively influenced our science, and have enhanced our hypotheses, experimental design, research opportunities and discoveries. Within a few years, we helped to discover Siglec-8, an I-type lectin expressed only on human eosinophils, basophils, mast cells. This receptor, together with its closest mouse counterpart Siglec-F, has been the primary focus of our work now for over a decade. If not for those in the fields of glycobiology and glycoimmunology, my lab would not have made much progress toward the goal of leveraging Siglec-8 for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26911285

  11. GABAergic signaling as therapeutic target for Autism Spectrum Disorders

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    Giada eCellot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, early in postnatal life exerts a depolarizing and excitatory action. This depends on accumulation of chloride inside the cell via the cation-chloride importer NKCC1, being the expression of the chloride exporter KCC2 very low at birth. The developmentally regulated expression of KCC2 results in extrusion of chloride with age and a shift of GABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. The depolarizing action of GABA leads to intracellular calcium rise through voltage-dependent calcium channels and/or NMDA receptors. GABA-mediated calcium signals regulate a variety of developmental processes from cell proliferation migration, differentiation, synapse maturation and neuronal wiring. Therefore, it is not surprising that some forms of neuro-developmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs are associated with alterations of GABAergic signaling and impairment of the excitatory/inhibitory balance in selective neuronal circuits. In this review we will discuss how changes of GABAA-mediated neurotransmission affect several forms of ASDs including the Fragile X, the Angelman and Rett syndromes. Then, we will describe various animal models of ASDs with GABAergic dysfunctions, highlighting their behavioral deficits and the possibility to rescue them by targeting selective components of the GABAergic synapse. In particular, we will discuss how in some cases, reverting the polarity of GABA responses from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with the diuretic bumetanide, a selective blocker of NKCC1, may have beneficial effects on ASDs, thus opening new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of these devastating disorders.

  12. Targeting amyloid-degrading enzymes as therapeutic strategies in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anthony J; Fisk, Lilia; Nalivaeva, Natalia N

    2004-12-01

    The levels of amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) in the brain represent a dynamic equilibrium state as a result of their biosynthesis from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases, their degradation by a team of amyloid-degrading enzymes, their subsequent oligomerization, and deposition into senile plaques. While most therapeutic attention has focused on developing inhibitors of secretases to prevent Abeta formation, enhancing the rate of Abeta degradation represents an alternative and viable strategy. Current evidence both in vivo and in vitro suggests that there are three major players in amyloid turnover: neprilysin, endothelin converting enzyme(s), and insulin-degrading enzyme, all of which are zinc metallopeptidases. Other proteases have also been implicated in amyloid metabolism, including angiotensin-converting enzyme, and plasmin but for these the evidence is less compelling. Neprilysin and endothelin converting enzyme(s) are homologous membrane proteins of the M13 peptidase family, which normally play roles in the biosynthesis and/or metabolism of regulatory peptides. Insulin-degrading enzyme is structurally and mechanistically distinct. The regional, cellular, and subcellular localizations of these enzymes differ, providing an efficient and diverse mechanism for protecting the brain against the normal accumulation of toxic Abeta peptides. Reduction in expression levels of some of these proteases following insults (e.g., hypoxia and ischemia) or aging might predispose to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Conversely, enhancement of their levels by gene delivery or pharmacological means could be neuroprotective. Even a relatively small enhancement of Abeta metabolism could slow the inexorable progression of the disease. The relative merits of targeting these enzymes for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease will be reviewed and possible side-effects of enhancing their activity evaluated.

  13. MYC as therapeutic target in leukemia and lymphoma

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    Cortiguera MG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Maria G Cortiguera,1 Ana Batlle-López,1,2 Marta Albajar,1,2 M Dolores Delgado,1,3 Javier León1,3 1Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology of Cantabria (IBBTEC, CSIC-University of Cantabria, 2Department of Hemathology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, 3Department of Molecular Biology, University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain Abstract: MYC is a transcription factor that is involved in the expression of many genes. Deregulated MYC is found in about half of human tumors, being more prevalent in hematological neoplasms. Deregulation mechanisms include chromosomal translocation (particularly in lymphoma, amplification, and hyperactivation of MYC transcription. Here we review MYC involvement in the major types of leukemia and lymphoma. MYC rearrangements appear in all Burkitt lymphomas and are common in other lymphoma types, whereas in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, lymphoproliferative, and myeloproferative diseases, they are less frequent. However, MYC overexpression is present in all types of hematological malignancies and often correlates with a worse prognosis. Data in leukemia-derived cells and in animal models of lymphomagenesis and leukemogenesis suggest that MYC would be a good therapeutic target. Several MYC-directed therapies have been assayed in preclinical settings and even in clinical trials. First, peptides and small molecules that interrupt the MYC–MAX interaction impair MYC-mediated tumorogenesis in several mouse models of solid tumors, although not yet in lymphoma and leukemia models. Second, there are a number of small molecules inhibiting the interaction of MYC–MAX heterodimers with DNA, still in the preclinical research phase. Third, inhibitors of MYC expression via the inhibition of BRD4 (a reader of acetylated histones have been shown to control the growth of MYC-transformed leukemia and lymphoma cells and are being used in clinic trials. Finally, we review a number of promising MYC

  14. Hyaluronic acid-decorated graphene oxide nanohybrids as nanocarriers for targeted and pH-responsive anticancer drug delivery.

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    Song, Erqun; Han, Weiye; Li, Cheng; Cheng, Dan; Li, Lingrui; Liu, Lichao; Zhu, Guizhi; Song, Yang; Tan, Weihong

    2014-08-13

    A novel nanohybrid of hyaluronic acid (HA)-decorated graphene oxide (GO) was fabricated as a targeted and pH-responsive drug delivery system for controlling the release of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for tumor therapy. For the preparation, DOX was first loaded onto GO nanocarriers via π-π stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and then it was decorated with HA to produce HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids via H-bonding interactions. In this strategy, HA served as both a targeting moiety and a hydrophilic group, making the as-prepared nanohybrids targeting, stable, and disperse. A high loading efficiency (42.9%) of DOX on the nanohybrids was also obtained. Cumulative DOX release from HA-GO-DOX was faster in pH 5.3 phosphate-buffered saline solution than that in pH 7.4, providing the basis for pH-response DOX release in the slightly acidic environment of tumor cells, while the much-slower DOX release from HA-GO-DOX than DOX showed the sustained drug-release capability of the nanohybrids. Fluorescent images of cellular uptake and cell viability analysis studies illustrated that these HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids significantly enhanced DOX accumulation in HA-targeted HepG2 cancer cells compared to HA-nontargeted RBMEC cells and subsequently induced selective cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. In vivo antitumor efficiency of HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids showed obviously enhanced tumor inhibition rate for H22 hepatic cancer cell-bearing mice compared with free DOX and the GO-DOX formulation. These studies suggest that the HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids have potential clinical applications for anticancer drug delivery.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of single-wall carbon nanotube-paclitaxel-folic acid conjugate as an anti-cancer targeting agent.

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    Tavakolifard, Sara; Biazar, Esmaeil; Pourshamsian, Khalil; Moslemin, Mohammad H

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) represent a novel nanomaterial applied in various nanotechnology fields because of their surface chemistry properties and high drug cargo capacity. In this study, SWCNT are pre-functionalized covalently with paclitaxel (PTX) - an anticancer drug, and folic acid (FA), as a targeting agent for many tumors. The samples are investigated and evaluated by different analyses such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), absorption spectroscopic measurements (UV-Visible), elemental analysis, and cell analyses with cancer cell line cultures. The results show good conjugation of the targeting molecule and the anticancer drug on the surface of the carbon nanotubes (CNT). This work demonstrates that the SWCNT-PTX-FA system is a potentially useful system for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:25783856

  16. Localized sequence-specific release of a chemopreventive agent and an anticancer drug in a time-controllable manner to enhance therapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen-Yu; Lin, Kun-Ju; Huang, Chieh-Cheng; Chiang, Wei-Lun; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lin, Wei-Chih; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Chang, Yen; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2016-09-01

    Combination chemotherapy with multiple drugs commonly requires several injections on various schedules, and the probability that the drug molecules reach the diseased tissues at the proper time and effective therapeutic concentrations is very low. This work elucidates an injectable co-delivery system that is based on cationic liposomes that are adsorbed on anionic hollow microspheres (Lipos-HMs) via electrostatic interaction, from which the localized sequence-specific release of a chemopreventive agent (1,25(OH)2D3) and an anticancer drug (doxorubicin; DOX) can be thermally driven in a time-controllable manner by an externally applied high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF). Lipos-HMs can greatly promote the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in tumor cells by reducing their cytoplasmic expression of an antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase) by 1,25(OH)2D3, increasing the susceptibility of cancer cells to the cytotoxic action of DOX. In nude mice that bear xenograft tumors, treatment with Lipos-HMs under exposure to HFMF effectively inhibits tumor growth and is the most effective therapeutic intervention among all the investigated. These empirical results demonstrate that the synergistic anticancer effects of sequential release of 1,25(OH)2D3 and DOX from the Lipos-HMs may have potential for maximizing DOX cytotoxicity, supporting more effective cancer treatment. PMID:27294541

  17. Hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles enhance target drug delivery and anticancer effect

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    Li Su

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT has been shown to have activity against a broad spectrum of cancers. In order to enhance its tissue-specific delivery and anticancer activity, we prepared HCPT-loaded nanoparticles made from poly(ethylene glycol-poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PEG-PBLG, and then studied their release characteristics, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and anticancer effects. PEG-PBLG nanoparticles incorporating HCPT were prepared by a dialysis method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to observe the shape and diameter of the nanoparticles. The HCPT release characteristics in vitro were evaluated by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC detection method for determining HCPT in rabbit plasma was established. The pharmacokinetic parameters of HCPT/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles were compared with those of HCPT. Results The HCPT-loaded nanoparticles had a core-shell spherical structure, with a core diameter of 200 nm and a shell thickness of 30 nm. Drug-loading capacity and drug encapsulation were 7.5 and 56.8%, respectively. The HCPT release profile was biphasic, with an initial abrupt release, followed by sustained release. The terminal elimination half-lives (t 1/2 β of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 4.5 and 10.1 h, respectively. Peak concentrations (Cmax of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 2627.8 and 1513.5 μg/L, respectively. The apparent volumes of distribution of the HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 7.3 and 20.0 L, respectively. Compared with a blank control group, Lovo cell xenografts or Tca8113 cell xenografts in HCPT or HCPT-loaded nanoparticle treated groups grew more slowly and the tumor doubling times were increased. The tumor inhibition effect in the HCPT-loaded nanosphere-treated group was significantly higher than that of the HCPT-treated group (p 0.05. Conclusion Compared to the HCPT- and control-treated groups, the HCPT-loaded nanoparticle

  18. Recent advances in targeting the telomeric G-quadruplex DNA sequence with small molecules as a strategy for anticancer therapies.

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    Islam, Mohammad K; Jackson, Paul Jm; Rahman, Khondaker M; Thurston, David E

    2016-07-01

    Human telomeric DNA (hTelo), present at the ends of chromosomes to protect their integrity during cell division, comprises tandem repeats of the sequence d(TTAGGG) which is known to form a G-quadruplex secondary structure. This unique structural formation of DNA is distinct from the well-known helical structure that most genomic DNA is thought to adopt, and has recently gained prominence as a molecular target for new types of anticancer agents. In particular, compounds that can stabilize the intramolecular G-quadruplex formed within the human telomeric DNA sequence can inhibit the activity of the enzyme telomerase which is known to be upregulated in tumor cells and is a major contributor to their immortality. This provides the basis for the discovery and development of small molecules with the potential for selective toxicity toward tumor cells. This review summarizes the various families of small molecules reported in the literature that have telomeric quadruplex stabilizing properties, and assesses the potential for compounds of this type to be developed as novel anticancer therapies. A future perspective is also presented, emphasizing the need for researchers to adopt approaches that will allow the discovery of molecules with more drug-like properties in order to improve the chances of lead molecules reaching the clinic in the next decade. PMID:27442231

  19. Periostin: a promising target of therapeutical intervention for prostate cancer

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    Ding Weihong

    2011-06-01

    RNA-Periostin LNCap cells growed slowly in vitro and in vivo. The tissues of xenografts as PCa were verificated by HE staining. Additionally, the weak positive Periostin expressed tumor cells could be seen in the tissues of 6 xenografts from the group of down-regulated Periostin LNCap cells which had a significant decrease of the amount of Periostin compared to the other two group. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that sliencing Periostin could inhibit migration of LNCap cells in vitro. Conclusions Our data indicates that Periostin as an up-regulated protein in PCa may be a promising target of therapeutical intervention for PCa in future.

  20. Functionally-defined Therapeutic Targets in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Catherine S.; Tang, Yujie; Truffaux, Nathalene; Berlow, Noah E.; Liu, Lining; Debily, Marie-Anne; Quist, Michael J.; Davis, Lara E.; Huang, Elaine C.; Woo, Pamelyn J; Ponnuswami, Anitha; Chen, Spenser; Johung, Tessa B.; Sun, Wenchao; Kogiso, Mari; Du, Yuchen; Lin, Qi; Huang, Yulun; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Warren, Katherine E.; Dret, Ludivine Le; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mao, Hua; Quezado, Martha; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Abraham, Jinu; Fouladi, Maryam; Svalina, Matthew N.; Wang, Nicholas; Hawkins, Cynthia; Nazarian, Javad; Alonso, Marta M.; Raabe, Eric; Hulleman, Esther; Spellman, Paul T.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip; Grill, Jacques; Monje, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) is a fatal childhood cancer. We performed a chemical screen in patient-derived DIPG cultures along with RNAseq analyses and integrated computational modeling to identify potentially effective therapeutic strategies. The multi-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat demonstrated efficacy in vitro and in DIPG orthotopic xenograft models. Combination testing of panobinostat with histone demethylase inhibitor GSKJ4 revealed synergy. Together, these data suggest a promising therapeutic strategy for DIPG. PMID:25939062

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT for Monitoring the Response of Breast Cancer to miR-143-Based Therapeutics by Targeting Tumor Glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ying; Zhang, Ling-fei; Guo, Rui; Liang, Sheng; Zhang, Min; Shi, Shuo; Shang-Guan, Cheng-fang; Liu, Mo-fang; Li, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Increased glucose utilization is a hallmark of cancer, and tumor metabolism is emerging as anticancer target for therapeutic intervention. Triple-negative breast cancers TNBC are highly glycolytic and show poor clinical outcomes. We previously identified hexokinase 2, the major glycolytic enzyme, as a target gene of miR-143 in TNBC. Here, we developed a therapeutic formulation using cholesterol-modified miR-143 agomir encapsulated in a neutral lipid-based delivery agent that blocked tumor growth and glucose metabolism in TNBC tumor-bearing mice when administered systemically. The antioncogenic effects were accompanied by a reduction in the direct target hexokinase 2 and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake based on positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Treatment with miR-143 formulation has minimal toxic effects and mice tolerated it well. Thus, we demonstrated that miR-143 is a robust inhibitor of the Warburg effect and an effective therapeutic target for TNBC. In addition, 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be used to specifically monitor the response of TNBC to miR-143-based therapeutics by targeting tumor glycolysis. PMID:27574783

  2. Cell Survival and Apoptosis Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Cancer: Marine Bioactive Compounds

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    Kim Se-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of apoptosis leads to activation of cell survival factors (e.g., AKT causes continuous cell proliferation in cancer. Apoptosis, the major form of cellular suicide, is central to various physiological processes and the maintenance of homeostasis in multicellular organisms. A number of discoveries have clarified the molecular mechanism of apoptosis, thus clarifying the link between apoptosis and cell survival factors, which has a therapeutic outcome. Induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell survival by anticancer agents has been shown to correlate with tumor response. Cellular damage induces growth arrest and tumor suppression by inducing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence; the mechanism of cell death depends on the magnitude of DNA damage following exposure to various anticancer agents. Apoptosis is mainly regulated by cell survival and proliferating signaling molecules. As a new therapeutic strategy, alternative types of cell death might be exploited to control and eradicate cancer cells. This review discusses the signaling of apoptosis and cell survival, as well as the potential contribution of marine bioactive compounds, suggesting that new therapeutic strategies might follow.

  3. A novel anticancer therapy that simultaneously targets aberrant p53 and Notch activities in tumors.

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    Yuting Yao

    Full Text Available Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in tumorigenesis by maintaining the activity of self-renewal of cancer stem cells, and therefore, it is hypothesized that interference of Notch signaling may inhibit tumor formation and progression. H101 is a recombinant oncolytic adenovirus that is cytolytic in cells lacking intact p53, but it is unable to eradicate caner stem cells. In this study, we tested a new strategy of tumor gene therapy by combining a Notch1-siRNA with H101 oncolytic adenovirus. In HeLa-S3 tumor cells, the combined therapy blocked the Notch pathway and induced apoptosis in tumors that are p53-inactive. In nude mice bearing xenograft tumors derived from HeLa-S3 cells, the combination of H101/Notch1-siRNA therapies inhibited tumor growth. Moreover, Notch1-siRNA increased Hexon gene expression at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, and promoted H101 replication in tumors, thereby enhancing the oncolytic activity of H101. These data demonstrate the feasibility to combine H101 p53-targted oncolysis and anti-Notch siRNA activities as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  4. Anticancer compound plumbagin and its molecular targets: a structural insight into the inhibitory mechanisms using computational approaches.

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    Mohammad S Jamal

    Full Text Available Plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone is a naphthoquinone derivative from the roots of plant Plumbago zeylanica and belongs to one of the largest and diverse groups of plant metabolites. The anticancer and antiproliferative activities of plumbagin have been observed in animal models as well as in cell cultures. Plumbagin exerts inhibitory effects on multiple cancer-signaling proteins, however, the binding mode and the molecular interactions have not yet been elucidated for most of these protein targets. The present study is the first attempt to provide structural insights into the binding mode of plumbagin to five cancer signaling proteins viz. PI3Kγ, AKT1/PKBα, Bcl-2, NF-κB, and Stat3 using molecular docking and (unbinding simulation analysis. We validated plumbagin docking to these targets with previously known important residues. The study also identified and characterized various novel interacting residues of these targets which mediate the binding of plumbagin. Moreover, the exact modes of inhibition when multiple mode of inhibition existed was also shown. Results indicated that the engaging of these important interacting residues in plumbagin binding leads to inhibition of these cancer-signaling proteins which are key players in the pathogenesis of cancer and thereby ceases the progression of the disease.

  5. Nanoporous capsules of block co-polymers of [(MeO-PEG-NH)-b-(L-GluA)]-PCL for the controlled release of anticancer drugs for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amgoth, Chander; Dharmapuri, Gangappa; Kalle, Arunasree M.; Paik, Pradip

    2016-03-01

    Herein, new nanoporous capsules of the block co-polymers of MeO-PEG-NH-(L-GluA)10 and polycaprolactone (PCL) have been synthesized through a surfactant-free cost-effective self-assembled soft-templating approach for the controlled release of drugs and for therapeutic applications. The nanoporous polymer capsules are designed to be biocompatible and are capable of encapsulating anticancer drugs (e.g., doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and imatinib mesylate (ITM)) with a high extent (˜279 and ˜480 ng μg-1, respectively). We have developed a nanoformulation of porous MeO-PEG-NH-(L-GluA)10-PCL capsules with DOX and ITM. The porous polymer nanoformulations have been programmed in terms of the release of anticancer drugs with a desired dose to treat the leukemia (K562) and human carcinoma cells (HepG2) in vitro and show promising IC50 values with a very high mortality of cancer cells (up to ˜96.6%). Our nanoformulation arrests the cell divisions due to ‘cellular scenescence’ and kills the cancer cells specifically. The present findings could enrich the effectiveness of idiosyncratic nanoporous polymer capsules for use in various other nanomedicinal and biomedical applications, such as for killing cancer cells, immune therapy, and gene delivery.

  6. Aminoflavone-loaded EGFR-targeted unimolecular micelle nanoparticles exhibit anti-cancer effects in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Ashley M; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Yidan; Hedman, Curtis J; Sherer, Nathan M; Havighurst, Thomas C; Gong, Shaoqin; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer for which there is no available targeted therapy. TNBC cases contribute disproportionately to breast cancer-related mortality, thus the need for novel and effective therapeutic methods is urgent. We have previously shown that a National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigational drug aminoflavone (AF) exhibits strong growth inhibitory effects in TNBC cells. However, in vivo pulmonary toxicity resulted in withdrawal or termination of several human clinical trials for AF. Herein we report the in vivo efficacy of a nanoformulation of AF that enhances the therapeutic index of AF in TNBC. We engineered a unique unimolecular micelle nanoparticle (NP) loaded with AF and conjugated with GE11, a 12 amino acid peptide targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), since EGFR amplification is frequently observed in TNBC tumors. These unimolecular micelles possessed excellent stability and preferentially released drug payload at endosomal pH levels rather than blood pH levels. Use of the GE11 targeting peptide resulted in enhanced cellular uptake and strong growth inhibitory effects in TNBC cells. Further, AF-loaded, GE11-conjugated (targeted) unimolecular micelle NPs significantly inhibit orthotopic TNBC tumor growth in a xenograft model, compared to treatment with AF-loaded, GE11-lacking (non-targeted) unimolecular micelle NPs or free AF. Interestingly, the animals treated with AF-loaded, targeted NPs had the highest plasma and tumor level of AF among different treatment groups yet exhibited no increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity level or observable tissue damage at the time of sacrifice. Together, these results highlight AF-loaded, EGFR-targeted unimolecular micelle NPs as an effective therapeutic option for EGFR-overexpressing TNBC. PMID:27267625

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles targeting tumor stroma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Christensen, Rikke; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2011-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology continues to evolve by characterization of further types of stem cells and by exploring their therapeutic potential for experimental and clinical applications. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the most promising candidates simply because...... of their easiness of both ex vivo expansion in culture dishes and genetic manipulation. Despite many extensive isolation and expansion studies, relatively little has been done with regard to hMSCs' therapeutic potential. Although clinical trials using hMSCs are underway, their use in cancer therapy still needs...... better understanding and in vivo supporting data. The homing ability of hMSCs was investigated by creating a human xenograft model by transplanting an ovarian cancer cell line into immunocompromised mice. Then, genetically engineered hMSC-telo1 cells were injected through the tail vein...

  8. BMPs as Therapeutic Targets and Biomarkers in Astrocytic Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar González-Gómez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytic glioma is the most common brain tumor. The glioma initiating cell (GIC fraction of the tumor is considered as highly chemoresistant, suggesting that GICs are responsible for glioma relapse. A potential treatment for glioma is to induce differentiation of GICs to a more benign and/or druggable cell type. Given BMPs are among the most potent inducers of GIC differentiation, they have been considered as noncytotoxic therapeutic compounds that may be of use to prevent growth and recurrence of glioma. We herein summarize advances made in the understanding of the role of BMP signaling in astrocytic glioma, with a particular emphasis on the effects exerted on GICs. We discuss the prognostic value of BMP signaling components and the implications of BMPs in the differentiation of GICs and in their sensitization to alkylating drugs and oncolytic therapy/chemotherapy. This mechanistic insight may provide new opportunities for therapeutic intervention of brain cancer.

  9. Galectins as therapeutic targets for hematological malignancies: a hopeful sweetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Camilo; Mirandola, Leonardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Hosiriluck, Nattamol; Suvorava, Natallia; Trotter, Kayley; Reidy, Adair; Rakhshanda, Rahman; Payne, Drew; Jenkins, Marjorie; Grizzi, Fabio; Littlefield, Lauren; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-09-01

    Galectins are family of galactose-binding proteins known to play critical roles in inflammation and neoplastic progression. Galectins facilitate the growth and survival of neoplastic cells by regulating their cross-talk with the extracellular microenvironment and hampering anti-neoplastic immunity. Here, we review the role of galectins in the biology of hematological malignancies and their promise as potential therapeutic agents in these diseases. PMID:25405162

  10. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles as targeted probes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications†

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chenjie; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been attractive for medical diagnostics and therapeutics due to their unique magnetic properties and their ability to interact with various biomolecules of interest. The solution phase based chemical synthesis provides a near precise control on NP size, and monodisperse magnetic NPs with standard deviation in diameter of less than 10% are now routinely available. Upon controlled surface functionalization and coupling with fragments of DNA strands, pr...

  11. Beta-3 adrenoceptors as new therapeutic targets for cardiovascular pathologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Gauthier, Chantal; Rozec, Bertrand; Manoury, Boris; Balligand, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Catecholamines play a key role in the regulation of cardiovascular function, classically through ß(1/2)-adrenoreceptors (AR) activation. After ß(3)-AR cloning in the late 1980s, convincing evidence for ß(3)-AR expression and function in cardiovascular tissues recently initiated a reexamination of their involvement in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. Their upregulation in diseased cardiovascular tissues and resistance to desensitization suggest they may be attractive therapeutic...

  12. MicroRNA as therapeutic targets for treatment of depression

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen KF; Obrietan K

    2013-01-01

    Katelin F Hansen, Karl Obrietan Department of Neuroscience, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Depression is a potentially life-threatening mental disorder affecting approximately 300 million people worldwide. Despite much effort, the molecular underpinnings of clinical depression remain poorly defined, and current treatments carry limited therapeutic efficacy and potentially burdensome side effects. Recently, small noncoding RNA molecules known as microRNA (miRNA) have gaine...

  13. ROCK as a Therapeutic Target of Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Tatsuro Ishibashi; Yasuaki Hata; Ryoichi Arita

    2010-01-01

    The increasing global prevalence of diabetes is a critical problem for public health. In particular, diabetic retinopathy, a prevalent ocular complication of diabetes mellitus, causes severe vision loss in working population. A better understanding of the pathogenesis and the development of new pharmacologic treatments are needed. This paper describes the relevance between Rho/ROCK pathway and the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy from its early to late stages. Moreover, the therapeutic po...

  14. Selective anticancer copper(II)-mixed ligand complexes: targeting of ROS and proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chew Hee; Kong, Siew Ming; Tiong, Yee Lian; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Sukram, Nurhazwani; Ahmad, Munirah; Khoo, Alan Soo Beng

    2014-04-01

    Copper compounds can be alternatives to platinum-based anticancer drugs. This study investigated the effects of a series of ternary copper(II) complexes, [Cu(phen)(aa)(H2O)]NO3·xH2O 1-4 (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; aa = gly (1), DL-ala (2), sar (3), C-dmg (4)), on metastatic and cisplatin-resistant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and MCF10A non-cancerous breast cells, and some aspects of the mechanisms. These complexes were distinctively more antiproliferative towards and induced greater apoptotic cell death in MDA-MB-231 than in MCF10A cells. 2 and 4 could induce cell cycle arrest only in cancer cells. Further evidence from DCFH-DA assay showed higher induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in treated cancer cells but minimal ROS increase in normal cells. DNA double-strand breaks, via a γ-H2AX assay, were only detected in cancer cells treated with 5 μM of the complexes. These complexes poorly inhibited chymotrypsin-like activity in the 20S rabbit proteasome while they did not inhibit the three proteolytic sites of MDA-MB-231 cells at 10 μM. However, the complexes could inhibit degradation of ubiquinated proteins of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, compound 4 was found to be effective against cervical (Hela), ovarian (SKOV3), lung (A549, PC9), NPC (Hone1, HK1, C666-1), breast (MCF7, T47D), lymphoma and leukemia (Nalmawa, HL60) and colorectal (SW480, SW48, HCT118) cancer cell lines with IC50 values (24 h) in the 1.7-19.0 μM range. Single dose NCI60 screening of 4 showed the complex to be highly cytotoxic to most cancer cell types and more effective than cisplatin.

  15. Enhanced targeted anticancer effects and inhibition of tumor metastasis by the TMTP1 compound peptide TMTP1-TAT-NBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ronghua; Xi, Ling; Luo, Danfeng; Ma, Xiangyi; Yang, Wanhua; Xi, Yandong; Wang, Hongyan; Qian, Ming; Fan, Liangsheng; Xia, Xi; Li, Kezheng; Wang, Daowen; Zhou, Jianfeng; Meng, Li; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding

    2012-08-10

    Micromolecular agents that block tumor development and metastasis hold great promise as cancer-targeted therapies. Tumor molecular targeted peptide 1 (TMTP1) was previously shown to target primary tumors and metastatic foci specifically. In this study, a group of composite peptides were incorporated to TMPT1. The NF-κB essential modulator-binding domain (NBD), and the trans-activator of transcription (TAT) peptide, were synthesized to enhance the targeted anti-tumor effects of TMTP1. TMTP1-NBD did not exhibit strong affinity to tumor cells as we had expected. Conjugating TAT with TMTP1-NBD ameliorated the poor hydrophilicity and negative charge of TMTP1-NBD. Therefore TMTP1-TAT-NBD displayed strong affinity and anti-tumor effects as we expected in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation as well as apoptosis was observed in TMTP1-TAT-NBD treated PC-3M-1E8 cells. The downstream signaling pathways including AKT, GSK-3β, IκBα and NF-κB activity were verified to decrease by TMTP1-TAT-NBD. The pharmacokinetics and distribution of TMTP1-TAT-NBD in MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice model provided some evidence for safety of the composite peptide, which showed the fluorescence of the peptide peaked in the tumor 6h after injection, with little fluorescence detected in normal organs except for very weak fluorescence in kidney. In conclusion, TMTP1-TAT-NBD may be a promising targeted anti-tumor agent for primary tumor and metastatic foci, which enhances the anticancer effects through inhibiting the AKT/GSK-3β/NF-κB pathway comparing with TMTP1. PMID:22580115

  16. Landscape of Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Synergies in Melanoma Identifies a Novel BRAF-VEGFR/PDGFR Combination Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A Friedman

    Full Text Available A newer generation of anti-cancer drugs targeting underlying somatic genetic driver events have resulted in high single-agent or single-pathway response rates in selected patients, but few patients achieve complete responses and a sizeable fraction of patients relapse within a year. Thus, there is a pressing need for identification of combinations of targeted agents which induce more complete responses and prevent disease progression. We describe the results of a combination screen of an unprecedented scale in mammalian cells performed using a collection of targeted, clinically tractable agents across a large panel of melanoma cell lines. We find that even the most synergistic drug pairs are effective only in a discrete number of cell lines, underlying a strong context dependency for synergy, with strong, widespread synergies often corresponding to non-specific or off-target drug effects such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 transporter inhibition. We identified drugs sensitizing cell lines that are BRAFV600E mutant but intrinsically resistant to BRAF inhibitor PLX4720, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/kinase insert domain receptor (VEGFR/KDR and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR family inhibitor cediranib. The combination of cediranib and PLX4720 induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in animal models. This synergistic interaction is likely due to engagement of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, demonstrating the potential of drug- rather than gene-specific combination discovery approaches. Patients with elevated biopsy KDR expression showed decreased progression free survival in trials of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase pathway inhibitors. Thus, high-throughput unbiased screening of targeted drug combinations, with appropriate library selection and mechanistic follow-up, can yield clinically-actionable drug combinations.

  17. The therapeutic value of targeting inflammation in gastrointestinal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Beicheng; Karin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in the initiation and progression of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Inflammation also plays important roles in subverting immune tolerance, escape from immune surveillance, and conferring resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Targeting key regulators and mediators of inflammation represents an attractive strategy for GI cancer prevention and treatment. However, the targeting of inflammation in GI cancer is not straight-forward and sometimes inflammation may c...

  18. Is tau a suitable therapeutical target in tauopathies?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elena; Gomez; de; Barreda; Jesús; Avila

    2010-01-01

    Tau is an intracellular protein,found mainly in neurons,but it can also be found in the extracellular space in pathological situations.Here we discuss whether intracellular tau,in aggregated form or modified by phosphorylation,could be toxic inside a neuron.On the other hand,it has been proposed that extracellular tau could be toxic.In this review,we address the question if the elimination of tau would be a possible therapeutic method to avoid tauopathy disorder and we suggest ways to eliminate intracellular and extracellular tau as treatment.

  19. The Natural Flavonoid Pinocembrin: Molecular Targets and Potential Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xi; Wang, Wenzhu; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Pinocembrin is a natural flavonoid compound extracted from honey, propolis, ginger roots, wild marjoram, and other plants. In preclinical studies, it has shown anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects as well as the ability to reduce reactive oxygen species, protect the blood-brain barrier, modulate mitochondrial function, and regulate apoptosis. Considering these pharmaceutical characteristics, pinocembrin has potential as a drug to treat ischemic stroke and other clinical conditions. In this review, we summarize its pharmacologic characteristics and discuss its mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic applications. PMID:25744566

  20. Tumor Progression Locus 2 (Tpl2 Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Target for Cancer: Double-Sided Effects of Tpl2 on Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Won Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2 is a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase kinase (MAP3K that conveys various intra- and extra-cellular stimuli to effector proteins of cells provoking adequate adoptive responses. Recent studies have elucidated that Tpl2 is an indispensable signal transducer as an MAP3K family member in diverse signaling pathways that regulate cell proliferation, survival, and death. Since tumorigenesis results from dysregulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, Tpl2 participates in many decisive molecular processes of tumor development and progression. Moreover, Tpl2 is closely associated with cytokine release of inflammatory cells, which has crucial effects on not only tumor cells but also tumor microenvironments. These critical roles of Tpl2 in human cancers make it an attractive anti-cancer therapeutic target. However, Tpl2 contradictorily works as a tumor suppressor in some cancers. The double-sided effects of Tpl2 originate from the specific upstream and downstream signaling environment of each tumor, since Tpl2 interacts with various signaling components. This review summarizes recent studies concerning the possible roles of Tpl2 in human cancers and considers its possibility as a therapeutic target, against which novel anti-cancer agents could be developed.

  1. Development of new estrogen receptor-targeting therapeutic agents for tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Quan; Zheng, Shilong; Wang, Guangdi

    2013-01-01

    Despite our deepening understanding of the mechanisms of resistance and intensive efforts to develop therapeutic solutions to combat resistance, de novo and acquired tamoxifen resistance remains a clinical challenge, and few effective regimens exist to treat tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer. The complexity of tamoxifen resistance calls for diverse therapeutic approaches. This review presents several therapeutic strategies and lead compounds targeting the estrogen receptor signaling pathways ...

  2. The development of molecularly targeted anticancer therapies: an Eli Lilly and Company perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, William L; Weitzman, Aaron

    2005-03-01

    The ability to identify activated pathways that drive the growth and progression of cancer and to develop specific and potent inhibitors of key proteins in these pathways promises to dramatically change the treatment of cancer: A patient's cancer could be characterized at the molecular level and the information used to select the best treatment options. The development of successful therapies not only requires extensive target validation, but also new approaches to evaluating drug efficacy in animal models and in the clinic compared to the development of traditional cytotoxic agents. This article highlights Eli Lilly and Company's approach to developing targeted therapies, from target identification and validation through evaluation in the clinic. A selection of drugs in the Lilly Oncology pipeline is also discussed.

  3. Therapeutic approaches targeting intestinal microflora in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Andoh; Yoshihide Fujiyama

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease, are chronic intestinal disorders of unknown etiology in which in genetically susceptible individuals, the mucosal immune system shows an aberrant response towards commensal bacteria.The gastrointestinal tract has developed ingenious mechanisms to coexist with its autologous microflora,but rapidly responds to invading pathogens and then returns to homeostasis with its commensal bacteria after the pathogenic infection is cleared. In case of disruption of this tightly-regulated homeostasis, chronic intestinal inflammation may be induced. Previous studies showed that some commensal bacteria are detrimental while others have either no influence or have a protective action. In addition, each host has a genetically determined response to detrimental and protective bacterial species. These suggest that therapeutic manipulation of imbalance of microflora can influence health and disease. This review focuses on new insights into the role of commensal bacteria in gut health and disease, and presents recent findings in innate and adaptive immune interactions. Therapeutic approaches to modulate balance of intestinal microflora and their potential mechanisms of action are also discussed.

  4. Recent Progress and Advances in HGF/MET-Targeted Therapeutic Agents for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilong Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF: MET axis is a ligand-mediated receptor tyrosine kinase pathway that is involved in multiple cellular functions, including proliferation, survival, motility, and morphogenesis. Aberrancy in the HGF/MET pathway has been reported in multiple tumor types and is associated with tumor stage and prognosis. Thus, targeting the HGF/MET pathway has become a potential therapeutic strategy in oncology development in the last two decades. A number of novel therapeutic agents—either as therapeutic proteins or small molecules that target the HGF/MET pathway—have been tested in patients with different tumor types in clinical studies. In this review, recent progress in HGF/MET pathway-targeted therapy for cancer treatment, the therapeutic potential of HGF/MET-targeted agents, and challenges in the development of such agents will be discussed.

  5. IGF-1R as an anti-cancer target-trials and tribulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helen X.Chen; Elad Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Type Ⅰ insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) has long been recognized for its role in tumorigenesis and growth,but only recently have the tools for targeting the IGF pathway become available.More than 10 IGF/IGF-1R inhibitors have entered clinical trials,and these belong to three main classes:(1)monoclonal antibodies against IGF-1R,(2) monoclonal antibodies against IGF-1R ligands (IGF-1 and IGF-2),and (3) IGF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitors.These IGF-1R-targeting agents share common effects on IGF-1R signaling but differ in mechanisms of action,spectrum of target inhibition,and pharmacological features.Clinical activity of IGF-1R inhibitors has been demonstrated with sustained responses in a small number of patients with select tumor types,such as Ewing sarcoma and thymoma.However,many large clinical trials involving patients with adult tumors,including non-small cell lung cancer,breast cancer,and pancreatic cancer,failed to show clinical benefit in the overall patient population.Possible reasons for failure include the complexity of the IGF-1R/insulin receptor system and parallel growth and survival pathways,as well as a lack of patient selection markers.While IGF-1R remains a valid target for selected tumor types,identification of predictive markers and rational combinations will be critical to success in future development.

  6. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease.

  7. 1st Joint European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry (TTMC 2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Borgne, Marc; Haidar, Samer; Duval, Olivier; Wünsch, Bernhard; Jose, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Conference on Therapeutic Targets and Medicinal Chemistry is a new two-day meeting on drug discovery that is focused on therapeutic targets and the use of tools to explore all fields of drug discovery and drug design such as molecular modelling, bioorganic chemistry, NMR studies, fragment screening, in vitro assays, in vivo assays, structure activity relationships, autodisplay. Abstracts of keynote lectures, plenary lectures, junior lectures, flash presentations, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:26712767

  8. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles as targeted probes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenjie; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-08-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been attractive for medical diagnostics and therapeutics due to their unique magnetic properties and their ability to interact with various biomolecules of interest. The solution phase based chemical synthesis provides a near precise control on NP size, and monodisperse magnetic NPs with standard deviation in diameter of less than 10% are now routinely available. Upon controlled surface functionalization and coupling with fragments of DNA strands, proteins, peptides or antibodies, these NPs can be well-dispersed in biological solutions and used for drug delivery, magnetic separation, magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. This Perspective reviews the common syntheses and controlled surface functionalization of monodisperse Fe(3)O(4)-based superparamagnetic NPs. It further outlines the exciting application potentials of these NPs in magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. PMID:20449070

  9. Overview of Nrf2 as Therapeutic Target in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Carmona-Aparicio

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a biochemical state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidant defenses. It is involved in the physiopathology of degenerative and chronic neuronal disorders, such as epilepsy. Experimental evidence in humans and animals support the involvement of oxidative stress before and after seizures. In the past few years, research has increasingly focused on the molecular pathways of this process, such as that involving transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, which plays a central role in the regulation of antioxidant response elements (ARE and modulates cellular redox status. The aim of this review is to present experimental evidence on the role of Nrf2 in this neurological disorder and to further determine the therapeutic impact of Nrf2 in epilepsy.

  10. Overview of Nrf2 as Therapeutic Target in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; Pérez-Cruz, Claudia; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Granados-Rojas, Leticia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Hernández-Damián, Jacqueline; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Sampieri, Aristides; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí

    2015-08-07

    Oxidative stress is a biochemical state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidant defenses. It is involved in the physiopathology of degenerative and chronic neuronal disorders, such as epilepsy. Experimental evidence in humans and animals support the involvement of oxidative stress before and after seizures. In the past few years, research has increasingly focused on the molecular pathways of this process, such as that involving transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which plays a central role in the regulation of antioxidant response elements (ARE) and modulates cellular redox status. The aim of this review is to present experimental evidence on the role of Nrf2 in this neurological disorder and to further determine the therapeutic impact of Nrf2 in epilepsy.

  11. Overview of Nrf2 as Therapeutic Target in Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; Pérez-Cruz, Claudia; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Granados-Rojas, Leticia; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Hernández-Damián, Jacqueline; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Sampieri, Aristides III; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a biochemical state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and antioxidant defenses. It is involved in the physiopathology of degenerative and chronic neuronal disorders, such as epilepsy. Experimental evidence in humans and animals support the involvement of oxidative stress before and after seizures. In the past few years, research has increasingly focused on the molecular pathways of this process, such as that involving transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which plays a central role in the regulation of antioxidant response elements (ARE) and modulates cellular redox status. The aim of this review is to present experimental evidence on the role of Nrf2 in this neurological disorder and to further determine the therapeutic impact of Nrf2 in epilepsy. PMID:26262608

  12. [The development of therapeutics targeting oxidative stress in prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Naito, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress is caused by increased reactive-oxygen species (ROS) due to augmented ROS production and impaired anti-oxidative capacity. Recently, oxidative stress has been revealed to promote castration resistance via androgen receptor(AR)-dependent pathway such as AR overexpression, AR cofactor, and AR post-translational modification as well as AR-independent pathway, leading to the emergence of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, antioxidants therapy using natural and chemical ROS scavengers and inhibitors of ROS production seems to be a promising therapy for CRPC as well as preventing castration resistance. However, at present, the application to therapeutics is limited. Therefore, further research on oxidative stress in prostate cancer, as well as on the development for clinical application would be needed.

  13. Design of antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes filled with radioactivable metals towards a targeted anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinato, Cinzia; Perez Ruiz de Garibay, Aritz; Kierkowicz, Magdalena; Pach, Elzbieta; Martincic, Markus; Klippstein, Rebecca; Bourgognon, Maxime; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.; Ballesteros, Belén; Tobias, Gerard; Bianco, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    In the present work we have devised the synthesis of a novel promising carbon nanotube carrier for the targeted delivery of radioactivity, through a combination of endohedral and exohedral functionalization. Steam-purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been initially filled with radioactive analogues (i.e. metal halides) and sealed by high temperature treatment, affording closed-ended CNTs with the filling material confined in the inner cavity. The external functionalization of these filled CNTs was then achieved by nitrene cycloaddition and followed by the derivatization with a monoclonal antibody (Cetuximab) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), overexpressed by several cancer cells. The targeting efficiency of the so-obtained conjugate was evaluated by immunostaining with a secondary antibody and by incubation of the CNTs with EGFR positive cells (U87-EGFR+), followed by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy or elemental analyses. We demonstrated that our filled and functionalized CNTs can internalize more efficiently in EGFR positive cancer cells.In the present work we have devised the synthesis of a novel promising carbon nanotube carrier for the targeted delivery of radioactivity, through a combination of endohedral and exohedral functionalization. Steam-purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been initially filled with radioactive analogues (i.e. metal halides) and sealed by high temperature treatment, affording closed-ended CNTs with the filling material confined in the inner cavity. The external functionalization of these filled CNTs was then achieved by nitrene cycloaddition and followed by the derivatization with a monoclonal antibody (Cetuximab) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), overexpressed by several cancer cells. The targeting efficiency of the so-obtained conjugate was evaluated by immunostaining with a secondary antibody and by incubation of the CNTs with EGFR positive cells (U87

  14. Alzheimer’s disease:Risk factors and therapeutic targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laxman Pokhrel

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder, has been determined as an outcome of genetic as well as behavioral conditions. The complete understanding of its generation and progress is yet to be understood. However, there has been a significant progress in the diagnosis and identification of the associated risk factors of AD. Several of the risk factors were found connected with cholesterol. Scientists are mainly focusing on the reduction of amyloid β and stabilization of tau protein towards the development of its drugs. To modulate amyloid β, the key components of cholesterol metabolism have been attractive targets and the enzymes involved in the phosphorylation of tau have been tried to stabilize tau protein. This review article briefly highlights the symptoms, risk factors, and drug targets of AD.

  15. Alzheimer’s disease: Risk factors and therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Pokhrel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, a neurodegenerative disorder, has been determined as an outcome of genetic as well as behavioral conditions. The complete understanding of its generation and progress is yet to be understood. However, there has been a significant progress in the diagnosis and identification of the associated risk factors of AD. Several of the risk factors were found connected with cholesterol. Scientists are mainly focusing on the reduction of amyloid β and stabilization of tau protein towards the development of its drugs. To modulate amyloid β, the key components of cholesterol metabolism have been attractive targets and the enzymes involved in the phosphorylation of tau have been tried to stabilize tau protein. This review article briefly highlights the symptoms, risk factors, and drug targets of AD.

  16. Mesenchymal Migration as a Therapeutic Target in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive infiltration of the surrounding healthy brain tissue is a cardinal feature of glioblastomas, highly lethal brain tumors. Deep infiltration by the glioblastoma cells renders complete surgical excision difficult and contemporary adjuvant therapies have had little impact on long-term survival. Thus, deep infiltration and resistance to irradiation and chemotherapy remain a major cause of patient mortality. Modern therapies specifically targeted to this unique aspect of glioblastoma cell biology hold significant promise to substantially improve survival rates for glioblastoma patients. In the present paper, we focus on the role of adhesion signaling molecules and the actin cytoskeleton in the mesenchymal mode of motility that characterizes invading glioblastoma cells. We then review current approaches to targeting these elements of the glioblastoma cell migration machinery and discuss other aspects of cell migration that may improve the treatment of infiltrating glioblastoma.

  17. Vocal Tremor: Novel Therapeutic Target for Deep Brain Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K. Ravikumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tremulous voice is characteristically associated with essential tremor, and is referred to as essential vocal tremor (EVT. Current estimates suggest that up to 40% of individuals diagnosed with essential tremor also present with EVT, which is associated with an impaired quality of life. Traditional EVT treatments have demonstrated limited success in long-term management of symptoms. However, voice tremor has been noted to decrease in patients receiving deep brain stimulation (DBS with the targeting of thalamic nuclei. In this study, we describe our multidisciplinary procedure for awake, frameless DBS with optimal stimulation targets as well as acoustic analysis and laryngoscopic assessment to quantify tremor reduction. Finally, we investigate the most recent clinical evidence regarding the procedure.

  18. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Target Validation and Therapeutic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pendergrast, P. Shannon; Marsh, H Nicholas; Grate, Dilara; Healy, Judith M.; Stanton, Martin

    2005-01-01

    In the simplest view, aptamers can be thought of as nucleic acid analogs to antibodies. They are able to bind specifically to proteins, and, in many cases, that binding leads to a modulation of protein activity. New aptamers are rapidly generated through the SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment) process and have a very high target affinity and specificity (picomoles to nanomoles). Furthermore, aptamers composed of modified nucleotides have a long in vivo half-life ...

  19. MicroRNAs as potential therapeutic targets in kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Ivan G.; Grafals, Monica; Portilla, Didier; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    One cornerstone of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is fibrosis, as kidneys are susceptible due to their high vascularity and predisposition to ischemia. Presently, only therapies targeting the angiotensin receptor are used in clinical practice to retard the progression of CKD. Thus, there is a pressing need for new therapies designed to treat the damaged kidney. Several independent laboratories have identified a number of microRNAs that are dysregulated in human and animal models of CKD. We will...

  20. Contemporary Therapeutic Approaches Targeting Bone Complications in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Richard J.; Saylor, Philip J.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal complications are major causes of morbidity in patients with prostate cancer. Despite the osteoblastic appearance of prostate cancer bone metastases, elevated serum and urinary markers of bone resorption are indicative of high osteoclast activity. Increased osteoclast activity is independently associated with subsequent skeletal complications, disease progression, and death. Osteoclast-targeted therapies aim to reduce the risk for disease-related skeletal complications, bone metastas...

  1. Emerging targets for addiction neuropharmacology: From mechanisms to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaldi, Massimo; Cannella, Nazzareno; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Drug abuse represents a considerable burden of disease and has enormous economic impacts on societies. Over the years, few medications have been developed for clinical use. Their utilization is endowed with several limitations, including partial efficacy or significant side effects. On the other hand, the successful advancement of these compounds provides an important proof of concept for the feasibility of drug development programs in addiction. In recent years, a wealth of information has been generated on the psychological mechanisms, genetic or epigenetic predisposing factors, and neurobiological adaptations induced by drug consumption that interact with each other to contribute to disease progression. It is now clear that addiction develops through phases, from initial recreational use to excessive consumption and compulsive drug seeking, with a shift from positive to negative reinforcement driving motivated behaviors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms has opened new vistas in drug development programs. Researchers' attention has been shifted from investigation of classical targets associated with reward to biological substrates responsible for negative reinforcement, impulse loss of control, and maladaptive mechanisms resulting from protracted drug use. From this research, several new biological targets for the development of innovative therapies have started to emerge. This chapter offers an overview of targets currently under scrutiny for the development of new medications for addiction. This work is not exhaustive but rather it provides a few examples of how this research has advanced in recent years by virtue of studies carried out in our laboratory. PMID:26822362

  2. MicroRNAs: a novel therapeutic target for schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bravo, Javier A

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most disabling psychiatric conditions. Current treatments target monoamine receptors but this approach does not address the full complexity of the disorder. Here we explore the possibility of developing new anti-psychotics by targeting microRNAs (miRNAs), single stranded RNA molecules, 21-23 nucleotides in length that are not translated into proteins and regulate gene expression. The present review reveals that research involving schizophrenia and miRNA is very recent (the earliest report from 2007) and miRNAs add a significant layer of complexity to the pathophysiology of the disorder. However, miRNAs offer an exciting potential not only to understand the underlying mechanisms of schizophrenia, but also for the future development of antipsychotics, as the human miRNA system provides a rich and diverse opportunity for pharmacological targeting. However, technology is still developing in order to produce effective strategies to modulate specific and localized changes in miRNA, particularly in relation to the central nervous system and schizophrenia.

  3. V-ATPase as an effective therapeutic target for sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant tumors show intense glycolysis and, as a consequence, high lactate production and proton efflux activity. We investigated proton dynamics in osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma, and evaluated the effects of esomeprazole as a therapeutic agent interfering with tumor acidic microenvironment. All sarcomas were able to survive in an acidic microenvironment (up to 5.9–6.0 pH) and abundant acidic lysosomes were found in all sarcoma subtypes. V-ATPase, a proton pump that acidifies intracellular compartments and transports protons across the plasma membrane, was detected in all cell types with a histotype-specific expression pattern. Esomeprazole administration interfered with proton compartmentalization in acidic organelles and induced a significant dose-dependent toxicity. Among the different histotypes, rhabdomyosarcoma, expressing the highest levels of V-ATPase and whose lysosomes are most acidic, was mostly susceptible to ESOM treatment. - Highlights: • Osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma survive in acidic microenvironment. • At acidic extracellular pH, sarcoma survival is dependent on V-ATPase expression. • Esomeprazole administration induce a significant dose-dependent toxicity

  4. V-ATPase as an effective therapeutic target for sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perut, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.perut@ior.it [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Avnet, Sofia; Fotia, Caterina; Baglìo, Serena Rubina; Salerno, Manuela [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Hosogi, Shigekuni [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki [Department of Molecular Cell Physiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Baldini, Nicola [Laboratory for Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2014-01-01

    Malignant tumors show intense glycolysis and, as a consequence, high lactate production and proton efflux activity. We investigated proton dynamics in osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma, and evaluated the effects of esomeprazole as a therapeutic agent interfering with tumor acidic microenvironment. All sarcomas were able to survive in an acidic microenvironment (up to 5.9–6.0 pH) and abundant acidic lysosomes were found in all sarcoma subtypes. V-ATPase, a proton pump that acidifies intracellular compartments and transports protons across the plasma membrane, was detected in all cell types with a histotype-specific expression pattern. Esomeprazole administration interfered with proton compartmentalization in acidic organelles and induced a significant dose-dependent toxicity. Among the different histotypes, rhabdomyosarcoma, expressing the highest levels of V-ATPase and whose lysosomes are most acidic, was mostly susceptible to ESOM treatment. - Highlights: • Osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma survive in acidic microenvironment. • At acidic extracellular pH, sarcoma survival is dependent on V-ATPase expression. • Esomeprazole administration induce a significant dose-dependent toxicity.

  5. PPARγ as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind T. Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death, with more than half the patients having advanced-stage disease at the time of initial diagnosis and thus facing a poor prognosis. This dire situation poses a need for new approaches in prevention and treatment. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ is a ligand-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Its involvement in adipocyte differentiation and glucose and lipid homeostasis is well-recognized, but accumulating evidence now suggests that PPARγ may also function as a tumor suppressor, inhibiting development of primary tumors and metastases in lung cancer and other malignancies. Besides having prodifferentiation, antiproliferative, and proapoptotic effects, PPARγ agonists have been shown to prevent cancer cells from acquiring the migratory and invasive capabilities essential for successful metastasis. Angiogenesis and secretion of certain matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular matrix proteins within the tumor microenvironment are also regulated by PPARγ. This review of the current literature highlights the potential of PPARγ agonists as novel therapeutic modalities in lung cancer, either as monotherapy or in combination with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy.

  6. Therapeutics targeting inflammation in the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, Lokesh; Hamill, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is characterized by improvement in a previously incompetent human immune system manifesting as worsening of clinical symptoms secondary to the ability of the immune system to now mount a vigorous inflammatory response. IRIS was first recognized in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus, and this clinical setting continues to be where it is most frequently encountered. Hallmarks of the pathogenesis of IRIS, independent of the clinical presentation and the underlying pathogen, include excessive activation of the immune system, with increased circulating effector memory T cells, and elevated levels of serum cytokines and inflammatory markers. Patients with undiagnosed opportunistic infections remain at risk for unmasking IRIS at the time of active antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Systematic screening for opportunistic infections before starting ART is a key element to prevent this phenomenon. Appropriate management of IRIS requires prompt recognition of the syndrome and exclusion of alternative diagnoses, particularly underlying infections and drug resistance. Controlled studies supporting the use of pharmacologic interventions in IRIS are scare, and recommendations are based on case series and expert opinions. The only controlled trial published to date, showed reduction in morbidity in patients with paradoxical tuberculosis-related IRIS with the use of oral corticosteroids. There are currently limited data to recommend other anti-inflammatory or immunomodulatory therapies that are discussed in this review, and further research is needed. Ongoing research regarding the immune pathogenesis of IRIS will likely direct future rational therapeutic approaches and clinical trials. PMID:26303886

  7. Therapeutic Targets in Sepsis: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Eric J; Bernard, Gordon R

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics and fluids have been standard treatment for sepsis since World War II. Many molecular mediators of septic shock have since been identified. In models of sepsis, blocking these mediators improved organ injury and decreased mortality. Clinical trials, however, have failed. The absence of new therapies has been vexing to clinicians, clinical researchers, basic scientists, and the pharmaceutical industry. This article examines the evolution of sepsis therapy and theorizes about why so many well-reasoned therapies have not worked in human trials. We review new molecular targets for sepsis and examine trial designs that might lead to successful treatments for sepsis. PMID:27229636

  8. MDSCs in cancer: Conceiving new prognostic and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Solito, Samantha; Ugel, Stefano; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo; Marigo, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    The incomplete clinical efficacy of anti-tumor immunotherapy can depend on the presence of an immunosuppressive environment in the host that supports tumor progression. Tumor-derived cytokines and growth factors induce an altered hematopoiesis that modifies the myeloid cell differentiation process, promoting proliferation and expansion of cells with immunosuppressive skills, namely myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). MDSCs promote tumor growth not only by shaping immune responses towards tumor tolerance, but also by supporting several processes necessary for the neoplastic progression such as tumor angiogenesis, cancer stemness, and metastasis dissemination. Thus, MDSC targeting represents a promising tool to eliminate host immune dysfunctions and increase the efficacy of immune-based cancer therapies.

  9. Therapeutic targeting of epidermal growth factor receptor in human cancer: successes and limitations%Therapeutic targeting of epidermal growth factor receptor in humancancer: successes and limitations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jill Wykosky; Tim Fenton; Frank Furnari; Webster K. Cavenee

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is one of the most commonly altered genes in human cancer by way of over-expression, amplification, and mutation. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity suppresses signal transduction pathways which control tumor cell growth, proliferation, and resistance to apoptosis. Small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies are among the most common EGFR-targeting agents and have been used clinically for treating various malignancies. This review discusses the successes and challenges of targeting EGFR in human cancer. The genetic alterations of EGFR tend to occur more often in some solid tumors than others, as do the mechanisms of resistance to targeted inhibition. The clinical and basic science experiences with these agents thus far have important implications for the future of therapeutic targeting of EGFR.

  10. Therapeutic targets in prostaglandin E2 signaling for neurologic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, P.J.; Keene, C. Dirk; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are potent autocrine and paracrine oxygenated lipid molecules that contribute appreciably to physiologic and pathophysiologic responses in almost all organs, including brain. Emerging data indicate that the PGs, and more specifically PGE2, play a central role in brain diseases including ischemic injury and several neurodegenerative diseases. Given concerns over the potential toxicity from protracted use of cyclooxygenase inhibitors in the elderly, attention is now focused on blocking PGE2 signaling that is mediated by interactions with four distinct G protein-coupled receptors, EP1-4, which are differentially expressed on neuronal and glial cells throughout the central nervous system. EP1 activation has been shown to mediate Ca2+-dependent neurotoxicity in ischemic injury. EP2 activation has been shown to mediate microglial-induced paracrine neurotoxicity as well as suppress microglia internalization of aggregated neurotoxic peptides. Animal models support the potential efficacy of targeting specific EP receptor subtypes in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and ischemic stroke. However promising these preclinical studies are, they have yet to be followed by clinical trials targeting any EP receptor in neurologic diseases. PMID:18691044

  11. Human sterol 14α-demethylase as a target for anticancer chemotherapy: towards structure-aided drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Tatiana Y; Friggeri, Laura; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Sivakumaran, Suneethi; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M; Hiebert, Scott W; Guengerich, F Peter; Waterman, Michael R; Lepesheva, Galina I

    2016-08-01

    Rapidly multiplying cancer cells synthesize greater amounts of cholesterol to build their membranes. Cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) are currently in clinical trials for anticancer chemotherapy. However, given at higher doses, statins cause serious side effects by inhibiting the formation of other biologically important molecules derived from mevalonate. Sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51), which acts 10 steps downstream, is potentially a more specific drug target because this portion of the pathway is fully committed to cholesterol production. However, screening a variety of commercial and experimental inhibitors of microbial CYP51 orthologs revealed that most of them (including all clinical antifungals) weakly inhibit human CYP51 activity, even if they display high apparent spectral binding affinity. Only one relatively potent compound, (R)-N-(1-(3,4'-difluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl)-4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)benzamide (VFV), was identified. VFV has been further tested in cellular experiments and found to decrease proliferation of different cancer cell types. The crystal structures of human CYP51-VFV complexes (2.0 and 2.5 Å) both display a 2:1 inhibitor/enzyme stoichiometry, provide molecular insights regarding a broader substrate profile, faster catalysis, and weaker susceptibility of human CYP51 to inhibition, and outline directions for the development of more potent inhibitors. PMID:27313059

  12. Mechanisms of a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy involving atmospheric pressure plasma-mediated apoptosis and DNA strand break formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been developed for a variety of biomedical applications due to its chemically reactive components. Recently, the plasma has emerged as a promising novel cancer therapy based on its ability to selectively ablate cancer cells while leaving normal cells essentially unaffected. The therapeutic effect of plasma is attributed to intracellular generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint signaling pathway via severe DNA strand break formation. However, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for appropriate activation of these physiological events and which pathway is more crucial for plasma-mediated cytotoxicity have not been clarified. Understanding the molecular link between ROS/RNS-mediated apoptosis and DNA damage-involved chromosome instability is critical for the development of more efficacious therapeutic strategies for selective killing of diverse cancer cells.

  13. Bio-synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. and its therapeutic evaluation as anticancer and antimicrobial agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Amit Kumar [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India); Tripathy, Debabrata [Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, 793002 Meghalaya (India); Choudhary, Alka [Department of Natural Products, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India); Aili, Pavan Kumar [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India); Chatterjee, Anupam [Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, 793002 Meghalaya (India); Singh, Inder Pal [Department of Natural Products, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India); Banerjee, Uttam Chand, E-mail: ucbanerjee@niper.ac.in [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India)

    2015-08-01

    The present study aims to develop an easy and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using extracts from the medicinal plant, Potentilla fulgens and evaluation of its anticancer and antimicrobial properties. The various parts of P. fulgens were screened and the root extract was found to have the highest potential for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The root extracts were able to quickly reduce Ag{sup +} to Ag{sup 0} and stabilized the nanoparticles. The synthesis of nanoparticles was confirmed by UV–Visible spectrophotometry and further characterized using Zeta sizer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electron microscopic study showed that the size of the nanoparticle was in the range of 10 to 15 nm and spherical in shape. The studies of phytochemical analysis of nanoparticles indicated that the adsorbed components on the surface of nanoparticles were mainly flavonoid in nature. Furthermore, nanoparticles were evaluated as cytotoxic against various cancer cell lines and 0.2 to 12 μg/mL nanoparticles showed good toxicity. The IC{sub 50} value of nanoparticles was found to be 4.91 and 8.23 μg/mL against MCF-7 and U-87 cell lines, respectively. Additionally, the apoptotic effect of synthesized nanoparticles on normal and cancer cells was studied using trypan blue assay and flow-cytometric analysis. The results indicate the synthesized nanoparticle ability to kill cancer cells compared to normal cells. The nanoparticles also exhibited comparable antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. - Highlights: • Bio-synthesis of AgNPs using a medicinal plant Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. • Optimization of NP synthesis and its characterization using various techniques • Determination of therapeutic potential in terms of anticancer and antimicrobial properties • To know the mechanistic

  14. Bio-synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. and its therapeutic evaluation as anticancer and antimicrobial agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aims to develop an easy and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using extracts from the medicinal plant, Potentilla fulgens and evaluation of its anticancer and antimicrobial properties. The various parts of P. fulgens were screened and the root extract was found to have the highest potential for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The root extracts were able to quickly reduce Ag+ to Ag0 and stabilized the nanoparticles. The synthesis of nanoparticles was confirmed by UV–Visible spectrophotometry and further characterized using Zeta sizer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electron microscopic study showed that the size of the nanoparticle was in the range of 10 to 15 nm and spherical in shape. The studies of phytochemical analysis of nanoparticles indicated that the adsorbed components on the surface of nanoparticles were mainly flavonoid in nature. Furthermore, nanoparticles were evaluated as cytotoxic against various cancer cell lines and 0.2 to 12 μg/mL nanoparticles showed good toxicity. The IC50 value of nanoparticles was found to be 4.91 and 8.23 μg/mL against MCF-7 and U-87 cell lines, respectively. Additionally, the apoptotic effect of synthesized nanoparticles on normal and cancer cells was studied using trypan blue assay and flow-cytometric analysis. The results indicate the synthesized nanoparticle ability to kill cancer cells compared to normal cells. The nanoparticles also exhibited comparable antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. - Highlights: • Bio-synthesis of AgNPs using a medicinal plant Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. • Optimization of NP synthesis and its characterization using various techniques • Determination of therapeutic potential in terms of anticancer and antimicrobial properties • To know the mechanistic apoptosis effect of AgNPs

  15. Cannabidiol in Humans—The Quest for Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Potvin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabidiol (CBD, a major phytocannabinoid constituent of cannabis, is attracting growing attention in medicine for its anxiolytic, antipsychotic, antiemetic and anti-inflammatory properties. However, up to this point, a comprehensive literature review of the effects of CBD in humans is lacking. The aim of the present systematic review is to examine the randomized and crossover studies that administered CBD to healthy controls and to clinical patients. A systematic search was performed in the electronic databases PubMed and EMBASE using the key word “cannabidiol”. Both monotherapy and combination studies (e.g., CBD + ∆9-THC were included. A total of 34 studies were identified: 16 of these were experimental studies, conducted in healthy subjects, and 18 were conducted in clinical populations, including multiple sclerosis (six studies, schizophrenia and bipolar mania (four studies, social anxiety disorder (two studies, neuropathic and cancer pain (two studies, cancer anorexia (one study, Huntington’s disease (one study, insomnia (one study, and epilepsy (one study. Experimental studies indicate that a high-dose of inhaled/intravenous CBD is required to inhibit the effects of a lower dose of ∆9-THC. Moreover, some experimental and clinical studies suggest that oral/oromucosal CBD may prolong and/or intensify ∆9-THC-induced effects, whereas others suggest that it may inhibit ∆9-THC-induced effects. Finally, preliminary clinical trials suggest that high-dose oral CBD (150–600 mg/d may exert a therapeutic effect for social anxiety disorder, insomnia and epilepsy, but also that it may cause mental sedation. Potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic explanations for these results are discussed.

  16. MOGAT2: A New Therapeutic Target for Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhua Yang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is an ever-increasing health problem among the world’s population. It is a group of intertwined maladies that includes obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, and diabetes mellitus type II (T2D. There is a direct correlation between high triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG level and severity of metabolic syndrome. Thus, controlling the synthesis of TAG will have a great impact on overall systemic lipid metabolism and thus metabolic syndrome progression. The Acyl-CoA: monoacylglycerolacyltransferase (MGAT family has three members (MGAT1, -2, and -3 that catalyze the first step in TAG production, conversion of monoacylglycerol (MAG to diacylglycerol (DAG. TAG is then directly synthesized from DAG by a Acyl-CoA: diacylglycerolacyltransferase (DGAT. The conversion of MAG → DAG → TAG is the major pathway for the production of TAG in the small intestine, and produces TAG to a lesser extent in the liver. Transgenic and pharmacological studies in mice have demonstrated the beneficial effects of MGAT inhibition as a therapy for treating several metabolic diseases, including obesity, insulin resistance, T2D, and NAFLD. In this review, the significance of several properties of MGAT physiology, including tissue expression pattern and its relationship to overall TAG metabolism, enzymatic biochemical properties and their effects on drug discovery, and finally what is the current knowledge about MGAT small molecule inhibitors and their efficacy will be discussed. Overall, this review highlights the therapeutic potential of inhibiting MGAT for lowering TAG synthesis and whether this avenue of drug discovery warrants further clinical investigation.

  17. Cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes as mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kai; Chen, Yu; Ouyang, Cheng; Guan, Rui-Lin; Ji, Liang-Nian; Chao, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Four cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes [Ir(dfppy)2(L)](+) (dfppy = 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine, L = 6-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, Ir1; 6-(isoquinolin-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, Ir2; 6-(quinolin-2-yl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, Ir3; 6-(isoquinolin-3-yl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine, Ir4) have been synthesized and characterized. Distinct from cisplatin, Ir1-Ir4 could specifically target mitochondria and induced apoptosis against various cancer cell lines, especially for cisplatin resistant cells. ICP-MS results indicated that Ir1-Ir4 were taken up via different mechanism for cancer cells and normal cells, which resulted in their high selectivity. The structure-activity relationship and signaling pathways were also discussed. PMID:27039888

  18. Human Leukocyte Antigen-Presented Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Is a Surface Biomarker and Potential Therapeutic Target for Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Andrea M; Kaabinejadian, Saghar; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Ken W; Zuna, Rosemary E; Husain, Sanam; Adams, Gregory P; MacDonald, Glen; Dillon, Rachelle L; Ames, Harold; Buchli, Rico; Hawkins, Oriana E; Weidanz, Jon A; Hildebrand, William H

    2016-02-01

    T cells recognize cancer cells via HLA/peptide complexes, and when disease overtakes these immune mechanisms, immunotherapy can exogenously target these same HLA/peptide surface markers. We previously identified an HLA-A2-presented peptide derived from macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and generated antibody RL21A against this HLA-A2/MIF complex. The objective of the current study was to assess the potential for targeting the HLA-A2/MIF complex in ovarian cancer. First, MIF peptide FLSELTQQL was eluted from the HLA-A2 of the human cancerous ovarian cell lines SKOV3, A2780, OV90, and FHIOSE118hi and detected by mass spectrometry. By flow cytometry, RL21A was shown to specifically stain these four cell lines in the context of HLA-A2. Next, partially matched HLA-A*02:01+ ovarian cancer (n = 27) and normal fallopian tube (n = 24) tissues were stained with RL21A by immunohistochemistry to assess differential HLA-A2/MIF complex expression. Ovarian tumor tissues revealed significantly increased RL21A staining compared with normal fallopian tube epithelium (P < 0.0001), with minimal staining of normal stroma and blood vessels (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001 compared with tumor cells) suggesting a therapeutic window. We then demonstrated the anticancer activity of toxin-bound RL21A via the dose-dependent killing of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, MIF-derived peptide FLSELTQQL is HLA-A2-presented and recognized by RL21A on ovarian cancer cell lines and patient tumor tissues, and targeting of this HLA-A2/MIF complex with toxin-bound RL21A can induce ovarian cancer cell death. These results suggest that the HLA-A2/MIF complex should be further explored as a cell-surface target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Emerging innovative therapeutic approaches targeting PCSK9 to lower lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantha, G P S; Robinson, J G

    2016-01-01

    Statins are established therapies for cardiovascular disease prevention and ezetimibe has recently been shown to modestly reduce cardiovascular events when added to background statin therapy. Yet here remains a clear unmet need for additional therapies aimed at lowering low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) to further reduce cardiovascular risk. Multiple strategies targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibition have emerged as effective modalities for LDL-C lowering. PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies are the farthest along in clinical development and alirocumab and evolocumab were approved for clinical use by regulatory agencies in 2015. In addition to robust LDL-C lowering (nearly 50-65% from baseline), they improve other lipid parameters as well. Adverse events associated with these medications are minimal. Importantly, they improve clinical cardiovascular disease outcomes, although long-term study results are awaited. Cost may be an important limiting factor in their use and we propose two possible solutions which can potentially curtail cost.

  20. Skp2 is a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei eWang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among American women, and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death for female in the United States. It has been known that several signaling pathways and various factors play critical roles in the development and progression of breast cancer, such as estrogen receptor, Notch, PTEN, Her2, PI3K/Akt, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Emerging evidence has shown that the F-box protein Skp2 (S-phase kinase associated protein 2 also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Therefore, in this brief review, we summarize the novel functions of Skp2 in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Moreover, we provide further evidence regarding the state of our knowledge toward the development of novel Skp2 inhibitors especially natural chemopreventive agents as targeted approach for the prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer.

  1. Autophagy as a target for therapeutic uses of multifunctional peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muciño, Gabriel; Castro-Obregón, Susana; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of complex diseases is promoting a change from one-target to multitarget drugs and peptides are ideal molecules to fulfill this polypharmacologic role. Here we review current status in the design of polypharmacological peptides aimed to treat complex diseases, focusing on tuberculosis. In this sense, combining multiple activities in single molecules is a two-sided sword, as both positive and negative side effects might arise. These polypharmacologic compounds may be directed to regulate autophagy, a catabolic process that enables cells to eliminate intracellular microbes (xenophagy), such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MBT). Here we review some strategies to control MBT infection and propose that a peptide combining both antimicrobial and pro-autophagic activities would have a greater potential to limit MBT infection. This endeavor may complement the knowledge gained in understanding the mechanism of action of antibiotics and may lead to the design of better polypharmacological peptides to treat complex diseases such as tuberculosis. PMID:26968336

  2. Targeting nicotine addiction: the possibility of a therapeutic vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escobar-Chávez JJ

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available José Juan Escobar-Chávez1, Clara Luisa Domínguez-Delgado2, Isabel Marlen Rodríguez-Cruz21Unidad de Investigación Multidisciplinaria, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlán-Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuautitlán Izcalli, Estado de México, México; 2División de Estudios de Posgrado (Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlán-Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuautitlán Izcalli, Estado de México, MéxicoAbstract: Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases, reproductive disorders, and delayed wound healing all over the world. The goals of smoking cessation are both to reduce health risks and to improve quality of life. The development of novel and more effective medications for smoking cessation is crucial in the treatment of nicotine dependence. Currently, first-line smoking cessation therapies include nicotine replacement products and bupropion. The partial nicotinic receptor agonist, varenicline, has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for smoking cessation. Clonidine and nortriptyline have demonstrated some efficacy, but side effects may limit their use to second-line treatment products. Other therapeutic drugs that are under development include rimonabant, mecamylamine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and dopamine D3 receptor antagonists. Nicotine vaccines are among newer products seeking approval from the FDA. Antidrug vaccines are irreversible, provide protection over years and need booster injections far beyond the critical phase of acute withdrawal symptoms. Interacting with the drug in the blood rather than with a receptor in the brain, the vaccines are free of side effects due to central interaction. For drugs like nicotine, which interacts with different types of receptors in many organs, this is a further advantage. Three anti-nicotine vaccines are today in an advanced stage of clinical evaluation. Results

  3. The zebrafish embryo as a tool for screening and characterizing pleurocidin host-defense peptides as anti-cancer agents

    OpenAIRE

    Morash, Michael G.; Douglas, Susan E.; Anna Robotham; Ridley, Christina M.; Gallant, Jeffrey W.; Soanes, Kelly H.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The emergence of multidrug-resistant cancers and the lack of targeted therapies for many cancers underscore an unmet need for new therapeutics with novel modes of action towards cancer cells. Host-defense peptides often exhibit selective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells and show potential as anti-cancer therapeutics. Here, we screen 26 naturally occurring variants of the peptide pleurocidin for cytotoxic and anti-cancer activities, and investigate the underlying mechanism of actio...

  4. The zebrafish embryo as a tool for screening and characterizing pleurocidin host-defense peptides as anti-cancer agents

    OpenAIRE

    Michael G. Morash; Douglas, Susan E.; Anna Robotham; Ridley, Christina M.; Gallant, Jeffrey W.; Soanes, Kelly H.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The emergence of multidrug-resistant cancers and the lack of targeted therapies for many cancers underscore an unmet need for new therapeutics with novel modes of action towards cancer cells. Host-defense peptides often exhibit selective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells and show potential as anti-cancer therapeutics. Here, we screen 26 naturally occurring variants of the peptide pleurocidin for cytotoxic and anti-cancer activities, and investigate the underlying mechanism of action. ...

  5. Ion Channels in Obesity: Pathophysiology and Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Luiz H C; Souza, Iara L L; Pinheiro, Lílian S; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease related to metabolic disorders and associated with genetic determinants. Currently, ion channels activity has been linked to many of these disorders, in addition to the central regulation of food intake, energetic balance, hormone release and response, as well as the adipocyte cell proliferation. Therefore, the objective of this work is to review the current knowledge about the influence of ion channels in obesity development. This review used different sources of literature (Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) to assess the role of ion channels in the pathophysiology of obesity. Ion channels present diverse key functions, such as the maintenance of physiological homeostasis and cell proliferation. Cell biology and pharmacological experimental evidences demonstrate that proliferating cells exhibit ion channel expression, conductance, and electrical properties different from the resting cells. Thereby, a large variety of ion channels has been identified in the pathogenesis of obesity such as potassium, sodium, calcium and chloride channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and transient receptor potential channels. The fundamental involvement of these channels on the generation of obesity leads to the progress in the knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for the obesity pathophysiology, consequently emerging as new targets for pharmacological modulation. PMID:27065858

  6. Ion Channels in Obesity: Pathophysiology and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIZ HENRIQUE CÉSAR VASCONCELOS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifactorial disease related to metabolic disorders and associated with genetic determinants. Currently, ion channels activity has been linked to many of these disorders, in addition to the central regulation of food intake, energetic balance, hormone release and response, as well as the adipocyte cell proliferation. Therefore, the objective of this work is to review the current knowledge about the influence of ion channels in obesity development. This review used different sources of literature (Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science to assess the role of ion channels in the pathophysiology of obesity. Ion channels present diverse key functions, such as the maintenance of physiological homeostasis and cell proliferation. Cell biology and pharmacological experimental evidences demonstrate that proliferating cells exhibit ion channel expression, conductance and electrical properties different from the resting cells. Thereby, a large variety of ion channels has been identified in the pathogenesis of obesity such as potassium, sodium, calcium and chloride channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and transient receptor potential channels. The fundamental involvement of these channels on the generation of obesity leads to the progress in the knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for the obesity pathophysiology, consequently emerging as new targets for pharmacological modulation.

  7. Clearing the fog of anticancer patents from 1993-2013: through an in-depth technology landscape & target analysis from pioneer research institutes and universities worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Dara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a search for an effective anticancer therapy the R&D units from leading universities and institutes reveal numerous technologies in the form of patent documents. The article addressed comparative anticancer patent landscape and technology assessment of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR: India's largest R&D organisation with top twenty international public funded universities and institutes from eight different countries. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The methodology include quantitative and qualitative assessment based on the bibliometric parameters and manual technology categorisation to understand the changing patent trends and recent novel technologies. The research finding analysed 25,254 patent documents from the year 1993 to 2013 and reported the insights of latest anticancer technologies and targets through categorisation studies at the level of drug discovery, development and treatment & diagnosis. The article has reported the technology correlation matrix of twelve secondary class technologies with 34 tertiary sub-class research area to identify the leading technologies and scope of future research through whitespaces analysis. In addition, the results have also addressed the target analysis, leading inventor, assignee, collaboration network, geographical distribution, patent trend analysis, citation maps and technology assessment with respect to international patent classification systems such as CPC, IPC and CPI codes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The result suggested peptide technology as the dominating research area next to gene therapy, vaccine and medical preparation containing organic compounds. The Indian CSIR has ranked itself at seventh position among the top 20 universities. Globally, the anticancer research was focused in the area of genetics and immunology, whereas Indian CSIR reported more patents related to plant extract and organic preparation. The article provided a glimpse of two decade

  8. Development of a new anti-cancer agent for targeted radionuclide therapy: β- radiolabeled RAFT-RGD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-emitters radiolabeled RAFT-RGD as new agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. The αvβ3 integrin is known to play an important role in tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor proliferation, survival and metastasis. Because of its overexpression on neo-endothelial cells such as those present in growing tumors, as well as on tumor cells of various origins, αvβ3 integrin is an attractive molecular target for diagnosis and therapy of the rapidly growing and metastatic tumors. A tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK])4 (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets integrin αvβ3 in vitro and in vivo. RAFT-RGD has been used for tumor imaging and drug targeting. This study is the first to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the β-emitters radiolabeled tetrameric RGD peptide RAFT-RGD in a Nude mouse model of αvβ3 -expressing tumors. An injection of 37 MBq of 90Y-RAFT-RGD or 177Lu-RAFT-RGD in mice with αvβ3 -positive tumors caused a significant growth delay as compared with mice treated with 37 MBq of 90Y-RAFT-RAD or 177Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In comparison, an injection of 30 MBq of 90Y-RAFT-RGD had no efficacy for the treatment of αvβ3 -negative tumors. 90Y-RAFT-RGD and 177Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent αvβ3 -expressing tumor targeting agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Development of three-dimensional lung multicellular spheroids in air- and liquid-interface culture for the evaluation of anticancer therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    MEENACH, SAMANTHA A.; TSORAS, ALEXANDRA N.; McGARRY, RONALD C.; MANSOUR, HEIDI M.; HILT, J. ZACH; ANDERSON, KIMBERLY W.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) lung multicellular spheroids (MCS) in liquid-covered culture (LCC) and air-interface culture (AIC) conditions have both been developed for the evaluation of aerosol anticancer therapeutics in solution and aerosols, respectively. The MCS were formed by seeding lung cancer cells on top of collagen where they formed spheroids due to the prevalence of cell-to-cell interactions. LCC MCS were exposed to paclitaxel (PTX) in media whereas AIC MCS were exposed to dry powder PEGylated phospholipid aerosol microparticles containing paclitaxel. The difference in viability for 2D versus 3D culture for both LCC and AIC was evaluated along with the effects of the particles on lung epithelium via transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements. For LCC and AIC conditions, the 3D spheroids were more resistant to treatment with higher IC50 values for A549 and H358 cell lines. TEER results initially indicated a decrease in resistance upon drug or particle exposure, however, these values increased over the course of several days indicating the ability of the cells to recover. Overall, these studies offer a comprehensive in vitro evaluation of aerosol particles used in the treatment of lung cancer while introducing a new method for culturing lung cancer MCS in both LCC and AIC conditions. PMID:26846376

  10. Molecular docking based screening of novel designed chalcone series of compounds for their anti-cancer activity targeting EGFR kinase domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chennu Maruthi Malya Prasada; Yejella, Rajendra Prasad; Rehman, Rehman Shaik Abdul; Basha, Syed Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are critical for the growth of many tumors and expressed at high levels in about one third of epithelial cancers. Hence, blockade of the binding sites for EGFR has been hypothesized as an effective anti-cancer therapy. Chalcone derivative compounds have been shown to be highly effective anti-cancer agents, however there are still so many novel derivatives possible, one of which might get us the best targeted EGFR inhibitor. In this effort directed towards the discovery of novel, potent anti-tumor agents for the treatment of cancer, in the present study a library of novel chalcone series of compounds has been designed and evaluated for their anti-cancer activity targeting EGFR kinase domain using various computational approaches. Among the twenty five novel designed chalcone series of compounds, all of them have found to be successfully docking inside the active binding domain of EGFR receptor target with a binding energy in a range of -6.10 to -9.25 Kcal/mol with predicted IC50 value range of 33.50 micor molar to 164.66 nano molar respectively. On the other hand, calculated 2DQSAR molecular descriptor properties of the compounds showed promising ADME parameters and found to be well in compliance with Lipinski׳s rule of five. Among all the twenty five compounds tested, compound 21 ((2E)-3-(anthracen-9-yl)-1-phenylprop-2-2n-1- one) was found to be the best lead like molecule with a binding energy of -9.25 kcal/mol with predicted IC50 value of 164.66 nano molar. Conclusively, novel designed compound 21 of the present study have shown promising anti-cancer potential worth considering for further evaluations. PMID:26339147

  11. Cerebral Edema in Traumatic Brain Injury: Pathophysiology and Prospective Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Minter, Daniel; Yue, John K; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a heterogeneous disorder resulting from an external force applied to the head. The development of cerebral edema plays a central role in the evolution of injury following brain trauma and is closely associated with neurologic outcomes. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular and cellular pathways contributing to the posttraumatic development of cerebral edema have led to the identification of multiple prospective therapeutic targets. The authors summarize the pathogenic mechanisms underlying cerebral edema and highlight the molecular pathways that may be therapeutically targeted to mitigate cerebral edema and associated sequelae following traumatic brain injury. PMID:27637397

  12. Toxicities of anticancer drugs and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambili Remesh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the characteristics that distinguish anticancer agents from other drugs is the frequency and severity of side effects at therapeutic doses. Most cytotoxic drugs target rapidly multiplying cells and the putative targets are the nucleic acids and their precursors, which are rapidly synthesised during cell division. Many solid tumours have a lower growth fraction than the normal bone marrow, gastro intestinal lining, reticuloendothelial system and gonads. Drugs affect these tissues in a dose dependant manner and there is individual susceptibility also. So toxicities are more frequently associated with these tissues. The side effects may be acute or chronic, self-limited, permanent, mild or potentially life threatening. Management of these side effects is of utmost importance because they affect the treatment, tolerability and overall quality of life. This paper gives an overview of different toxicities of anticancer drugs and its management. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2012; 1(1.000: 2-12

  13. Heat shock proteins 27, 40, and 70 as combinational and dual therapeutic cancer targets

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Jeanette R.; McAlpine, Shelli R.

    2013-01-01

    The heat shock proteins are essential players in the development of cancer and they are prime therapeutic targets. Targeting multiple hsps in dual therapies decreases the likelihood of drug resistance compared to utilizing mono-therapies. Further, employing an hsp inhibitor in combination with another therapy has proven clinically successful. Examples of efficacious strategies include the inhibition of hsp27, which prevents protein aggregation, controlling hsp40’s role as an ATPase modulator,...

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted antibody therapy - Mechanisms of action and modulators of therapeutic efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen Jilles

    2008-01-01

    Cancer is an increasing disease in the world population, and in recent years there has been substantial interest in the development of novel therapeutic agents specifically targeting growth factor receptors on tumor cells. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) represents a tyrosine kinase cell

  15. Small flexible structure for targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging moieties in precision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingjie; Qiu, Xiuchun; Zou, Chaoxia; Ran, Henry; Zhang, Fujun; Ke, Shi

    2016-01-01

    The goals of precision medicine are to link diagnostic and therapeutic agents, improve clinical outcomes, and minimize side effects. We present a simple, small, flexible three-armed core structure that can be conjugated to targeting, imaging, and therapeutic moieties. The targeting molecule can be a peptide, protein, or chemical compound. The diagnostic reporter can be optical and/or nuclear in nature, and can be replaced by chemo- and/or radiotherapeutic compounds for treatment using a single targeting molecule. Imaging components can be used to detect disease biomarkers, monitor treatment response, and guide surgery in real-time to create a tumor-free margin. Isotope impurity can be exploited to visualize whole-body distribution of therapeutic agents. The one-to-one ratio of targeting component to therapeutic agents facilitates dose calculation. The simple synthesis and flexible, modular nature of the agent facilitate high-purity, large-scale production. The core capacity to “seek, treat, and see” may advance precision medicine in the future. PMID:27027441

  16. Insights into orphan nuclear receptors as prognostic markers and novel therapeutic targets for breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Reidun eAesoy; Colin D Clyne; Ashwini eChand

    2015-01-01

    The roles of orphan nuclear receptors in breast cancer development and progression are not well understood. In this review, we correlate orphan nuclear receptor expression in breast cancer tumour subtypes with patient outcomes and provide an overview of functional evidence that identifies candidate orphan nuclear receptors as prognostic markers or as therapeutic targets in breast cancer.

  17. Promise and challenges on the horizon of MET-targeted cancer therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Wen; Zhang

    2015-01-01

    MET(MNNG HOS transforming gene) is one of the receptor tyrosine kinases whose activities are frequently altered in human cancers, and it is a promising therapeutic target. MET is normally activated by its lone ligand, hepatocyte growth factor(HGF), eliciting its diverse biological activities that are crucial for development and physiology. Alteration of the HGF-MET axis results in inappropriate activation of a cascade of intracellular signaling pathways that contributes to hallmark cancer events including deregulated cell proliferation and survival, angiogenesis, invasion, andmetastasis. Aberrant MET activation results from autocrine or paracrine mechanisms due to overexpression of HGF and/or MET or from a ligand-independent mechanism caused by activating mutations or amplification of MET. The literature provides compelling evidence for the role of MET signaling in cancer development and progression. The finding that cancer cells often use MET activation to escape therapies targeting other pathways strengthens the argument for MET-targeted therapeutics. Diverse strategies have been explored to deactivate MET signaling, and compounds and biologics targeting the MET pathway are in clinical development. Despite promising results from various clinical trials, we are still waiting for true MET-targeted therapeutics in the clinic. This review will explore recent progress and hurdles in the pursuit of METtargeted cancer drugs and discuss the challenges in such development.

  18. Steroid hormone receptors and prostate cancer: role of structural dynamics in therapeutic targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors (SHRs) act in cell type- and gene-specific manner through interactions with coregulatory proteins to regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes at the level of gene regulation. Binding of steroid receptor modulator (SRM) ligand leads to allosteric changes in SHR to exert positive or negative effects on the expression of target genes. Due, in part, to the fact that current SRMs generally target ligand binding domain (LBD)/AF2 and neglect intrinsically disordered (ID) N-terminal domain (NTD)/AF1, clinically relevant SRMs lack selectivity and are also prone to the development of resistance over time. Therefore, to maximize the efficacy of SHR-based therapeutics, the possibility of developing unique modulators that act to control AF1 activity must be considered. Recent studies targeting androgen receptor's (AR's) ID AF1 domain for the castration-resistant prostate cancer has provided the possibility of therapeutically targeting ID NTD/AF1 surfaces by allosteric modulations to achieve desired effects. In this review article, we discuss how inter- and intra- molecular allosteric regulations controlled by AR's structural flexibility and dynamics particularly the ID NTD/AF1 is an emerging area of investigation, which could be exploited for drug development and therapeutic targeting of prostate cancer. PMID:27364545

  19. Complement therapeutics in inflammatory diseases: promising drug candidates for C3-targeted intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, D C; Ricklin, D; Hajishengallis, E; Hajishengallis, G; Lambris, J D

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing appreciation that complement dysregulation lies at the heart of numerous immune-mediated and inflammatory disorders. Complement inhibitors are therefore being evaluated as new therapeutic options in various clinical translation programs and the first clinically approved complement-targeted drugs have profoundly impacted the management of certain complement-mediated diseases. Among the many members of the intricate protein network of complement, the central component C3 represents a 'hot-spot' for complement-targeted therapeutic intervention. C3 modulates both innate and adaptive immune responses and is linked to diverse immunomodulatory systems and biological processes that affect human pathophysiology. Compelling evidence from preclinical disease models has shown that C3 interception may offer multiple benefits over existing therapies or even reveal novel therapeutic avenues in disorders that are not commonly regarded as complement-driven, such as periodontal disease. Using the clinically developed compstatin family of C3 inhibitors and periodontitis as illustrative examples, this review highlights emerging therapeutic concepts and developments in the design of C3-targeted drug candidates as novel immunotherapeutics for oral and systemic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26332138

  20. Annexin A9 (ANXA9) biomarker and therapeutic target in epithelial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.

    2012-06-12

    Amplification of the ANXA9 gene in human chromosomal region 1q21 in epithelial cancers indicates a likelihood of both in vivo drug resistance and metastasis, and serves as a biomarker indicating these aspects of the disease. ANXA9 can also serve as a therapeutic target. Interfering RNAs (iRNAs) (such as siRNA and miRNA) and shRNA adapted to inhibit ANXA9 expression, when formulated in a therapeutic composition, and delivered to cells of the tumor, function to treat the epithelial cancer.

  1. Combined analgesics in (headache pain therapy: shotgun approach or precise multi-target therapeutics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiebich Bernd L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain in general and headache in particular are characterized by a change in activity in brain areas involved in pain processing. The therapeutic challenge is to identify drugs with molecular targets that restore the healthy state, resulting in meaningful pain relief or even freedom from pain. Different aspects of pain perception, i.e. sensory and affective components, also explain why there is not just one single target structure for therapeutic approaches to pain. A network of brain areas ("pain matrix" are involved in pain perception and pain control. This diversification of the pain system explains why a wide range of molecularly different substances can be used in the treatment of different pain states and why in recent years more and more studies have described a superior efficacy of a precise multi-target combination therapy compared to therapy with monotherapeutics. Discussion In this article, we discuss the available literature on the effects of several fixed-dose combinations in the treatment of headaches and discuss the evidence in support of the role of combination therapy in the pharmacotherapy of pain, particularly of headaches. The scientific rationale behind multi-target combinations is the therapeutic benefit that could not be achieved by the individual constituents and that the single substances of the combinations act together additively or even multiplicatively and cooperate to achieve a completeness of the desired therapeutic effect. As an example the fixesd-dose combination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, paracetamol (acetaminophen and caffeine is reviewed in detail. The major advantage of using such a fixed combination is that the active ingredients act on different but distinct molecular targets and thus are able to act on more signalling cascades involved in pain than most single analgesics without adding more side effects to the therapy. Summary Multitarget therapeutics like combined analgesics broaden

  2. Advances in the proteomic discovery of novel therapeutic targets in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shanchun Guo,1 Jin Zou,2 Guangdi Wang3 1Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, 2Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Research Centers in Minority Institutions Cancer Research Program, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Proteomic approaches are continuing to make headways in cancer research by helping to elucidate complex signaling networks that underlie tumorigenesis and disease progression. This review describes recent advances made in the proteomic discovery of drug targets for therapeutic development. A variety of technical and methodological advances are overviewed with a critical assessment of challenges and potentials. A number of potential drug targets, such as baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat-containing protein 6, macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1, phosphoglycerate mutase 1, prohibitin 1, fascin, and pyruvate kinase isozyme 2 were identified in the proteomic analysis of drug-resistant cancer cells, drug action, and differential disease state tissues. Future directions for proteomics-based target identification and validation to be more translation efficient are also discussed. Keywords: proteomics, cancer, therapeutic target, signaling network, tumorigenesis

  3. Anticancer Compound Plumbagin and Its Molecular Targets: A Structural Insight into the Inhibitory Mechanisms Using Computational Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad S Jamal; Shadma Parveen; Mohd A Beg; Mohd Suhail; Chaudhary, Adeel G. A.; Damanhouri, Ghazi A.; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Mohd Rehan

    2014-01-01

    Plumbagin (5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a naphthoquinone derivative from the roots of plant Plumbago zeylanica and belongs to one of the largest and diverse groups of plant metabolites. The anticancer and antiproliferative activities of plumbagin have been observed in animal models as well as in cell cultures. Plumbagin exerts inhibitory effects on multiple cancer-signaling proteins, however, the binding mode and the molecular interactions have not yet been elucidated for most of...

  4. Gene Therapy for Advanced Melanoma: Selective Targeting and Therapeutic Nucleic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana R. Viola

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances, the treatment of malignant melanoma still results in the relapse of the disease, and second line treatment mostly fails due to the occurrence of resistance. A wide range of mutations are known to prevent effective treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. Hence, approaches with biopharmaceuticals including proteins, like antibodies or cytokines, are applied. As an alternative, regimens with therapeutically active nucleic acids offer the possibility for highly selective cancer treatment whilst avoiding unwanted and toxic side effects. This paper gives a brief introduction into the mechanism of this devastating disease, discusses the shortcoming of current therapy approaches, and pinpoints anchor points which could be harnessed for therapeutic intervention with nucleic acids. We bring the delivery of nucleic acid nanopharmaceutics into perspective as a novel antimelanoma therapeutic approach and discuss the possibilities for melanoma specific targeting. The latest reports on preclinical and already clinical application of nucleic acids in melanoma are discussed.

  5. Targeting the Raf kinase cascade in cancer therapy--novel molecular targets and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John T; McCubrey, James A

    2002-12-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a group of signal transducers with oncogenic potential in an assortment of cell types. Dysregulated signalling from any of the members of this family has been shown to result in development of human malignancies. Consequently, the collective goal of the scientific community is to inhibit aberrant signalling initiated from these molecules whilst minimising toxicity associated with such inhibition. This review covers events responsible for MAPK activation in detail, with an emphasis placed upon possible points of pharmacological intervention. A discussion addressing numerous chemotherapeutic approaches that have been developed over the previous decade for MAPK inhibition is also included. In addition, emphasis is placed upon the various arrays of kinase inhibitors, small molecule inhibitors, competitive inhibitors, nucleic acid aptamers and other molecules which have been proven effective in prevention of MAPK signalling. Finally, the potential therapeutic promise of many of these compounds is addressed in a manner that encompasses the complexities of MAPK signal transduction, in addition to concerns surrounding the development of drug resistance.

  6. Microtubule-binding agents: a dynamic field of cancer therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Dumontet, Charles; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    International audience Microtubules are dynamic filamentous cytoskeletal proteins composed of tubulin and are an important therapeutic target in tumour cells. Agents that bind to microtubules have been part of the pharmacopoeia of anticancer therapy for decades and until the advent of targeted therapy, microtubules were the only alternative to DNA as a therapeutic target in cancer. The screening of a range of botanical species and marine organisms has yielded promising new antitubulin agen...

  7. Gene Body Methylation can alter Gene Expression and is a Therapeutic Target in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Han, Han; De Carvalho, Daniel D.; Lay, Fides D.; Jones, Peter A.; Liang, Gangning

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA methylation in promoters is well known to silence genes and is the presumed therapeutic target of methylation inhibitors. Gene body methylation is positively correlated with expression yet its function is unknown. We show that 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment not only reactivates genes but decreases the over-expression of genes, many of which are involved in metabolic processes regulated by c-MYC. Down-regulation is caused by DNA demethylation of the gene bodies and restoration of high levels of expression requires remethylation by DNMT3B. Gene body methylation may therefore be an unexpected therapeutic target for DNA methylation inhibitors, resulting in the normalization of gene over-expression induced during carcinogenesis. Our results provide direct evidence for a causal relationship between gene body methylation and transcription. PMID:25263941

  8. Cell division cycle associated 1 as a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Phung Manh; Takano, Atsushi; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Masanori; Murakami, Yoshinori; Daigo, Yataro

    2016-10-01

    Oral cavity carcinoma (OCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide and has poor clinical outcome after standard therapies. Therefore, new prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for OCC are urgently needed. We selected cell division cycle associated 1 (CDCA1) as a candidate OCC biomarker. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that CDCA1 protein was expressed in 67 of 99 OCC tissues (67.7%), but not in healthy oral epithelia. CDCA1 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in OCC patients (P=0.0244). Knockdown of CDCA1 by siRNAs significantly increased apoptosis of tumor cells. These data suggest that CDCA1 represents a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for OCC. PMID:27499128

  9. Pattern recognition receptors as potential therapeutic targets in inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Lisa M; Chamberlain, Giselle; Sacre, Sandra

    2015-05-15

    The pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system are part of the first line of defence against pathogens. However, they also have the ability to respond to danger signals that are frequently elevated during tissue damage and at sites of inflammation. Inadvertent activation of pattern recognition receptors has been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of many conditions including inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Prolonged inflammation most often results in pain and damage to tissues. In particular, the Toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-like receptors that form inflammasomes have been postulated as key contributors to the inflammation observed in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, gout and systemic lupus erythematosus. As such, there is increasing interest in targeting these receptors for therapeutic treatment in the clinic. Here the role of pattern recognition receptors in the pathogenesis of these diseases is discussed, with an update on the development of interventions to modulate the activity of these potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Targeting reactive nitrogen species: a promising therapeutic strategy for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-miao CHEN; Han-sen CHEN; Ming-jing XU; Jian-gang SHEN

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke accounts for nearly 80% of stroke cases.Recanalization with thrombolysis is a currently crucial therapeutic strategy for re-building blood supply,but the thrombolytic therapy often companies with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury,which are mediated by free radicals.As an important component of free radicals,reactive nitrogen species (RNS),including nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONO0ˉ),play important roles in the process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.Ischemia-reperfusion results in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite (ONOOˉ) in ischemic brain,which trigger numerous molecular cascades and lead to disruption of the blood brain barrier and exacerbate brain damage.There are few therapeutic strategies available for saving ischemic brains and preventing the subsequent brain damage.Recent evidence suggests that RNS could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.Herein,we reviewed the recent progress regarding the roles of RNS in the process of cerebral ischemic-reperfusion injury and discussed the potentials of drug development that target NO and ONO0ˉ to treat ischemic stroke.We conclude that modulation for RNS level could be an important therapeutic strategy for preventing cerebral ischemiareperfusion injury.

  11. Cornering metastases: therapeutic targeting of circulating tumor cells and stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishoy eFaltas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an evolution of our understanding of the biology of the metastatic cascade. Recent insights into the metastatic process show that it is complex, dynamic and multi-directional. This process starts at a very early stage in the natural history of solid tumor growth leading to early development of metastases that grow in parallel with the primary tumor. The role of stem cells in perpetuating cancer metastases is increasingly becoming more evident. At the same time, there is a growing recognition of the crucial role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the development of metastases. These insights have laid the biological foundations for therapeutic targeting of CTCs, a promising area of research that aims to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by preventing the development of metastases at a very early stage. The hematogenous transport phase of the metastatic cascade provides critical access to CTCs for therapeutic targeting aiming to interrupt the metastatic process. Recent advances in the fields of nanotechnology and micro-fluidics have led to the development of several devices for in-vivo targeting of CTC during transit in the circulation. Selectin-coated tubes that target cell adhesion molecules, immuno-magnetic separators and in-vivo photoacoustic flow cytometers are currently being developed for this purpose. On the pharmacological front, several pharmacological and immunological agents targeting cancer stem cells are currently being developed. Such agents may ultimately prove to be effective against circulating tumor stem cells (CTSCs. Although still in its infancy, therapeutic targeting of CTCs and CTSCs offers an unprecedented opportunity to prevent the development of metastasis and potentially alter the natural history of cancer. By rendering cancer a local disease, these approaches could lead to major reductions in metastasis-related morbidity and mortality.

  12. Synergistic effect of pH-responsive folate-functionalized poloxamer 407-TPGS-mixed micelles on targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt AM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Adeel Masood Butt, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin, Haliza Katas Centre for Drug Delivery Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Doxorubicin (DOX, an anthracycline anticancer antibiotic, is used for treating various types of cancers. However, its use is associated with toxicity to normal cells and development of resistance due to overexpression of drug efflux pumps. Poloxamer 407 (P407 and vitamin E TPGS (d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate, TPGS are widely used polymers as drug delivery carriers and excipients for enhancing the drug retention times and stability. TPGS reduces multidrug resistance, induces apoptosis, and shows selective anticancer activity against tumor cells. Keeping in view the problems, we designed a mixed micelle system encapsulating DOX comprising TPGS for its selective anticancer activity and P407 conjugated with folic acid (FA for folate-mediated receptor targeting to cancer cells. Methods: FA-functionalized P407 was prepared by carbodiimide crosslinker chemistry. P407-TPGS/FA-P407-TPGS-mixed micelles were prepared by thin-film hydration method. Cytotoxicity of blank micelles, DOX, and DOX-loaded micelles was determined by alamarBlue® assay. Results: The size of micelles was less than 200 nm with encapsulation efficiency of 85% and 73% for P407-TPGS and FA-P407-TPGS micelles, respectively. Intracellular trafficking study using nile red-loaded micelles indicated improved drug uptake and perinuclear drug localization. The micelles show minimal toxicity to normal human cell line WRL-68, enhanced cellular uptake of DOX, reduced drug efflux, increased DOX–DNA binding in SKOV3 and DOX-resistant SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, and enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity as compared to free DOX. Conclusion: FA-P407-TPGS-DOX micelles show potential as a targeted nano-drug delivery system for DOX due to their multiple synergistic factors of selective anticancer

  13. MicroRNAs are potential therapeutic targets in fibrosing kidney disease: lessons from animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Grafals, Monica; Portilla, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Chronic disease of the kidneys has reached epidemic proportions in industrialized nations. New therapies are urgently sought. Using a combination of animal models of kidney disease and human biopsy samples, a pattern of dysregulated microRNA expression has emerged which is common to chronic diseases. A number of these dysregulated microRNA have recently been shown to have functional consequences for the disease process and therefore may be potential therapeutic targets. We highlight microRNA-...

  14. From DNA to Targeted Therapeutics: Bringing Synthetic Biology to the Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yvonne Y; Smolke, Christina D.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to make biological engineering more scalable and predictable, lowering the cost and facilitating the translation of synthetic biological systems to practical applications. Increasingly sophisticated, rationally designed synthetic systems that are capable of complex functions pave the way to translational applications, including disease diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Here, we provide an overview of recent developments in synthetic biology in the context of transl...

  15. Mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins: Novel therapeutic targets for combating cardiovascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, A.; Burke, N; Dongworth, R.; Hausenloy, D.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are no longer considered to be solely the static powerhouses of the cell. While they are undoubtedly essential to sustaining life and meeting the energy requirements of the cell through oxidative phosphorylation, they are now regarded as highly dynamic organelles with multiple funtions, playing key roles in cell survival and death. In this review, we discuss the emerging role of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, as novel therapeutic targets for treating a wide range of c...

  16. Targeting leukemic fusion proteins with small interfering RNAs: recent advances and therapeutic potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria THOMAS; Johann GREIL; Olaf HEIDENREICH

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference has become an indispensable research tool to study gene functions in a wide variety of organisms.Because of their high efficacy and specificity,RNA interference-based approaches may also translate into new therapeutic strategies to treat human diseases.In particular,oncogenes such as leukemic fusion proteins,which arise from chromosomal translocations,are promising targets for such gene silencing approaches,because they are exclusively expressed in precancerous and cancerous tissues,and because they are frequently indispensable for maintaining the malignant phenotype.This review summarizes recent developments in targeting leukemia-specific genes and discusses problems and approaches for possible clinical applications.

  17. Hypoxia-Inducible Factors: Mediators of Cancer Progression; Prognostic and Therapeutic Targets in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadri, Navid; Zhang, Paul J., E-mail: pjz@mail.med.upenn.edu [Anatomic Pathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, 6th Floor Founders Building, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-04-02

    Soft-tissue sarcomas remain aggressive tumors that result in death in greater than a third of patients due to either loco-regional recurrence or distant metastasis. Surgical resection remains the main choice of treatment for soft tissue sarcomas with pre- and/or post-operational radiation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy employed in more advanced stage disease. However, in recent decades, there has been little progress in the average five-year survival for the majority of patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas, highlighting the need for improved targeted therapeutic agents. Clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate that tumor hypoxia and up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) is associated with decreased survival, increased metastasis, and resistance to therapy in soft tissue sarcomas. HIF-mediated gene expression regulates many critical aspects of tumor biology, including cell survival, metabolic programming, angiogenesis, metastasis, and therapy resistance. In this review, we discuss HIFs and HIF-mediated genes as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in sarcomas. Many pharmacological agents targeting hypoxia-related pathways are in development that may hold therapeutic potential for treating both primary and metastatic sarcomas that demonstrate increased HIF expression.

  18. Engineering novel targeted nanoparticle formulations to increase the therapeutic efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutics against multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Jonathan D.

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy which results from the uncontrolled clonal expansion of plasma cells within the body. Despite recent medical advances, this disease remains largely incurable, with a median survival of ˜7 years, owing to the development of drug resistance. This dissertation will explore new advances in nanotechnology that will combine the cytotoxic effects of small molecule chemotherapeutics with the tumor targeting capabilities of nanoparticles to create novel nanoparticle formulations that exhibit enhanced therapeutic indices in the treatment of MM. First, doxorubicin was surfaced conjugated onto micellar nanoparticles via an acid labile hydrazone bond to increase the drug accumulation at the tumor. The cell surface receptor Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4; alpha4beta1) is expressed on cancers of hematopoietic origin and plays a vital role in the cell adhesion mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) in MM. Therefore, VLA-4 antagonist peptides were conjugated onto the nanoparticles via a multifaceted procedure to actively target MM cells and simultaneously inhibit CAM-DR. The micellar doxorubicin nanoparticles were able to overcome CAM-DR and demonstrated improved therapeutic index relative to free doxorubicin. In addition to doxorubicin, other classes of therapeutic agents, such as proteasome inhibitors, can be incorporated in nanoparticles for improved therapeutic outcomes. Utilizing boronic acid chemistry, bortezomib prodrugs were synthesized using a reversible boronic ester bond and then incorporated into liposomes. The different boronic ester bonds that could be potentially used in the synthesis of bortezomib prodrugs were screened based on stability using isobutylboronic acid. The liposomal bortezomib nanoparticles demonstrated significant proteasome inhibition and cytotoxicity in MM cells in vitro, and dramatically reduced the non-specific toxicities associated with free bortezomib while maintaining significant tumor growth

  19. Optimization of a cationic liposome-based gene delivery system for the application of miR-145 in anticancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jin; Ding, Wei-Feng; Che, Xiao-Hang; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chen, Fang; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Ye, Xiao-Lei; Xiong, Su-Bin

    2016-05-01

    further research into the use of miR‑145 in anticancer therapeutics. PMID:26986502

  20. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Dotan

    Full Text Available The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches.Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining.TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls.A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam radiation or chemotherapy, with

  1. Advances in Antisense Oligonucleotide Development for Target Identification, Validation, and as Novel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moizza Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (As-ODNs are single stranded, synthetically prepared strands of deoxynucleotide sequences, usually 18–21 nucleotides in length, complementary to the mRNA sequence of the target gene. As-ODNs are able to selectively bind cognate mRNA sequences by sequence-specific hybridization. This results in cleavage or disablement of the mRNA and, thus, inhibits the expression of the target gene. The specificity of the As approach is based on the probability that, in the human genome, any sequence longer than a minimal number of nucleotides (nt, 13 for RNA and 17 for DNA, normally occurs only once. The potential applications of As-ODNs are numerous because mRNA is ubiquitous and is more accessible to manipulation than DNA. With the publication of the human genome sequence, it has become theoretically possible to inhibit mRNA of almost any gene by As-ODNs, in order to get a better understanding of gene function, investigate its role in disease pathology and to study novel therapeutic targets for the diseases caused by dysregulated gene expression. The conceptual simplicity, the availability of gene sequence information from the human genome, the inexpensive availability of synthetic oligonucleotides and the possibility of rational drug design makes As-ODNs powerful tools for target identification, validation and therapeutic intervention. In this review we discuss the latest developments in antisense oligonucleotide design, delivery, pharmacokinetics and potential side effects, as well as its uses in target identification and validation, and finally focus on the current developments of antisense oligonucleotides in therapeutic intervention in various diseases.

  2. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  3. Evaluation of a Schiff base copper complex compound as potent anticancer molecule with multiple targets of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Ajanta; Kumar, Pramod; Ghosh, Kaushik; Roy, Partha

    2010-11-25

    Copper is a biologically relevant metal as it is associated with various biomolecules related to essential physiological activities. Anticancer compounds with copper as a metal center is hypothesized to be less toxic and more potent. In the present study we have tested the efficacy of a family of Schiff base copper complexes of which the best compound was [Cu(Pyimpy)Cl(2)] where Pyimpy is a tridentate ligand containing two pyridine and one imine nitrogen donor. [Cu(Pyimpy)Cl(2)], represented as CuP1, was checked for its anticancer potential. The IC(50) value of CuP1 was found to be 4.29±0.42, 6.34±0.58 and 5.32±0.38 μM in MCF-7, PC3 and HEK 293 cells respectively. It was found to cause in vitro DNA fragmentation in comet assays and acridine orange staining of MCF 7 cells. CuP1 was further tested on rat breast tumor models and was found to inhibit tumor growth. It caused apoptosis within the tumor by the up regulation of caspase pathway and inhibition of the Akt, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and α-methyl acyl CoA racemase. Antioxidant enzymes which in general results in drug resistant condition in tumor tissues were significantly inhibited by this copper compound (P<0.05). Further, CuP1 did not show any prominent systemic toxicity. These results indicate that CuP1 can be a potential anticancer agent and further investigation will reveal more about its mode of action. PMID:20797395

  4. Novel therapeutic approaches for pulmonary arterial hypertension: Unique molecular targets to site-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar; Gupta, Vivek

    2015-08-10

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a cardiopulmonary disorder characterized by increased blood pressure in the small arterioles supplying blood to lungs for oxygenation. Advances in understanding of molecular and cellular biology techniques have led to the findings that PAH is indeed a cascade of diseases exploiting multi-faceted complex pathophysiology, with cellular proliferation and vascular remodeling being the key pathogenic events along with several cellular pathways involved. While current therapies for PAH do provide for amelioration of disease symptoms and acute survival benefits, their full therapeutic potential is hindered by patient incompliance and off-target side effects. To overcome the issues related with current therapy and to devise a more selective therapy, various novel pathways are being investigated for PAH treatment. In addition, inability to deliver anti-PAH drugs to the disease site i.e., distal pulmonary arterioles has been one of the major challenges in achieving improved patient outcomes and improved therapeutic efficacy. Several novel carriers have been explored to increase the selectivity of currently approved anti-PAH drugs and to act as suitable carriers for the delivery of investigational drugs. In the present review, we have discussed potential of various novel molecular pathways/targets including RhoA/Rho kinase, tyrosine kinase, endothelial progenitor cells, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and miRNA in PAH therapeutics. We have also discussed various techniques for site-specific drug delivery of anti-PAH therapeutics so as to improve the efficacy of approved and investigational drugs. This review will provide gainful insights into current advances in PAH therapeutics with an emphasis on site-specific drug payload delivery.

  5. A single-dose toxicity study on non-radioactive iodinated hypericin for a targeted anticancer therapy in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-jie LI; Yi-cheng NI; Marlein Miranda CONA; Yuan-bo FENG; Feng CHEN; Guo-zhi ZHANG; Xue-bin FU; Uwe HIMMELREICH; Raymond OYEN; Alfons VERBRUGGEN

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Hypericin (Hyp) and its radio-derivatives have been investigated in animal models with ischemic heart diseases and malignancies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.Before radioiodinated Hyp (123I-Hyp or 131I-Hyp) can be considered as a clinically useful drug,vigorous evaluations on its chemotoxicity are necessary.In the present study,we examined the toxicity of a single dose of non-radioactive 127I-Hyp in normal mice for 24 h and 14 d.Methods: Studies were performed on 132 normal mice.127I-Hyp at a clinically relevant dose of 0.1 mg/kg body weight and a 100-times higher dose of 10 mg/kg was intravenously injected into 40 mice.The safety aspects of clinical manifestations,serological biochemistry,and histopathology were assessed.In another 72 mice,127I-Hyp was administered intravenously at assumed values to bracket the value of LD50.The rest 20 mice were used in the control groups.Results: At 24 h and 14 d following the injection of 127I-Hyp at either 0.1 or 10 mg/kg,all mice tolerated well without mortality or any observable treatment-related symptoms.No significant differences were found in blood biochemical parameters between the test and control groups.All organs presented normal appearances upon histopathological inspection.The value of LD50 of 127I-Hyp in mice through intravenous injection was 20.26 mg/kg,with the 95% confidence interval between 18.90 and 21.55 mg/kg.Conclusion: The current study reveals a broad safety range of 127I-Hyp,which not only supports the use of 123I-Hyp or 131I-Hyp in the necrosis targeting theragnostic strategy,but also serves as a valuable reference for exploring other possible applications for iodinated Hyp.

  6. Recent Advancements in Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Molecules in Neurodegenerative Disease - Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Prakash

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug discovery and its methodologies have been very effective in terms of treating cancers and immunological disorders but have not been able to stop genetic diseases as most of the drugs target at the protein level. They merely mitigate the symptoms of the disease. Spinocerebellar ataxia is a neurological genetic disorder that is caused by the formation of an abnormal protein. There have been several reports on ataxic drug development but actual clinical treatment is yet to be achieved. Oligonucleotide therapy called sequence specific siRNA mediated gene silencing has evolved with promising results. This approach emphasizes on suppressing the expression of the diseased gene at mRNA level. However, there is a limitation in delivery of siRNA to the target site. Several methods have been developed over the last decade to enhance the target specific delivery of DNA, siRNA, protein and small drug molecules for therapeutic purpose with less or no side effects. This review discusses the latest upcoming technologies in the field that focus on a number of nonviral nanocarriers for targeted delivery. In this review, we explore the promise and potential of novel therapeutics with interest on ataxia therapy.

  7. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  8. Recent Advances in Targetable Therapeutics in Metastatic Non-Squamous NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranshu eBansal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lung adenocarcinoma is the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. With the discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangements and effective targeted therapies, therapeutic options are expanding for patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Here, we review novel therapies in non-squamous NSCLC, which are directed against oncogenic targets, including EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF, MET, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, RET and NTRK. With the rapidly evolving molecular testing and development of new targeted agents, our ability to further personalize therapy in non-squamous NSCLC is rapidly expanding.

  9. CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics for hematologic malignancies: interpreting clinical outcomes to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae H; Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-06-30

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 has produced impressive results in treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Although these CAR-modified T cells target the same antigen, the designs of CARs vary as well as several key aspects of the clinical trials in which these CARs have been studied. It is unclear whether these differences have any impact on clinical outcome and treatment-related toxicities. Herein, we review clinical results reflecting the investigational use of CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics in patients with B-cell hematologic malignancies, in light of differences in CAR design and production, and outline the limitations inherent in comparing outcomes between studies. PMID:27207800

  10. Therapeutic targeting of CD19 in hematological malignancies: past, present, future and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ben-Zion; Herishanu, Yair

    2014-05-01

    Abstract During the past few decades, CD19 has been at the center of various scientific/translational endeavors to develop targeted therapeutics against B-cell malignancies. Due to the expression pattern of CD19 throughout the B-cell lineage, and on most B-cell malignancies, it became a preferred target for the development of experimental therapeutic agents during the first years of the monoclonal antibodies era. Successful preclinical experiments led to the first generation of clinical trials, based predominantly on toxin/anti-CD19 murine immunoconjugates. These, however, mostly failed due to poor biochemical design of the reagents, and the generation of human anti-murine antibodies. Modern anti-CD19 reagents are based on humanized anti-CD19 antibodies designed to attract components of the immune system, predominantly T-cells, to eliminate CD19+ target cells. These include, for example, modified anti-CD19 antibodies, and bispecific anti-CD19/CD3 antibodies. One of the most attractive approaches to target malignant B-cells is based on the introduction of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into patient derived T-cells. CARs are composed of extracellular recognition sequences derived from anti-CD19 antibodies, and intracellular signaling components that can foster T-cell activation. The novel anti-B-cell therapeutics have shown promising clinical effects against various B-cell malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), although expected side effects (e.g. significant immunosuppression) were also recorded. These novel successful anti-CD19 agents may have the potential to be used in other fields, such as autoimmunity.

  11. MicroRNAs are potential therapeutic targets in fibrosing kidney disease: lessons from animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Jeremy S; Grafals, Monica; Portilla, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Chronic disease of the kidneys has reached epidemic proportions in industrialized nations. New therapies are urgently sought. Using a combination of animal models of kidney disease and human biopsy samples, a pattern of dysregulated microRNA expression has emerged which is common to chronic diseases. A number of these dysregulated microRNA have recently been shown to have functional consequences for the disease process and therefore may be potential therapeutic targets. We highlight microRNA-21, the most comprehensively studied microRNA in the kidney so far. MicroRNA-21 is expressed widely in healthy kidney but studies from knockout mice indicate it is largely inert. Although microRNA-21 is upregulated in many cell compartments including leukocytes, epithelial cells and myofibroblasts, the inert microRNA-21 also appears to become activated, by unclear mechanisms. Mice lacking microRNA-21 are protected from kidney injury and fibrosis in several distinct models of kidney disease, and systemically administered oligonucleotides that specifically bind to the active site in microRNA-21, inhibiting its function, recapitulate the genetic deletion of microRNA-21, suggesting inhibitory oligonucleotides may have therapeutic potential. Recent studies of microRNA-21 targets in kidney indicate that it normally functions to silence metabolic pathways including fatty acid metabolism and pathways that prevent Reactive Oxygen Species generation in peroxisomes and mitochondria in epithelial cells and myofibroblasts. Targeting specific pathogenic microRNAs in a specific manner is feasible in vivo and may be a new therapeutic target in disease of the kidney PMID:25018773

  12. Pathophysiological significance and therapeutic targeting of germinal center kinase in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Julie Marie; Bhatt, Shruti; Patricelli, Matthew P; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon K; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Natkunam, Yasodha; Gentles, Andrew J; Martinez, Ezequiel; Zhu, Daxing; Chapman, Jennifer Rose; Cortizas, Elena; Shyam, Ragini; Chinichian, Shideh; Advani, Ranjana; Tan, Li; Zhang, Jianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Tibshirani, Robert; Buhrlage, Sara J; Gratzinger, Dita; Verdun, Ramiro; Gray, Nathanael S; Lossos, Izidore S

    2016-07-14

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, yet 40% to 50% of patients will eventually succumb to their disease, demonstrating a pressing need for novel therapeutic options. Gene expression profiling has identified messenger RNAs that lead to transformation, but critical events transforming cells are normally executed by kinases. Therefore, we hypothesized that previously unrecognized kinases may contribute to DLBCL pathogenesis. We performed the first comprehensive analysis of global kinase activity in DLBCL, to identify novel therapeutic targets, and discovered that germinal center kinase (GCK) was extensively activated. GCK RNA interference and small molecule inhibition induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in DLBCL cell lines and primary tumors in vitro and decreased the tumor growth rate in vivo, resulting in a significantly extended lifespan of mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. GCK expression was also linked to adverse clinical outcome in a cohort of 151 primary DLBCL patients. These studies demonstrate, for the first time, that GCK is a molecular therapeutic target in DLBCL tumors and that inhibiting GCK may significantly extend DLBCL patient survival. Because the majority of DLBCL tumors (∼80%) exhibit activation of GCK, this therapy may be applicable to most patients. PMID:27151888

  13. Sensitivity of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to small targeted therapeutic molecules: An in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvan, Sandra Eketorp; Skribek, Henriette; Norin, Stefan; Muhari, Orsolya; Österborg, Anders; Szekely, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    New drugs targeting important cellular signaling pathways are currently being developed for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). It is therefore of interest to analyze their in vitro killing capacity in manufacturer-independent, comparative experiments. We here report on the sensitivity of CLL cells to a panel of emerging targeted therapeutics using high-throughput screening based on an automated fluorescence digital scanning system. Fresh CLL cells from 42 patients with indolent or progressive CLL were cultured for 72 hours on microtiter plates in a unique primary cell culture medium. Antitumor effects of 31 small therapeutic molecules (and, as controls, 29 cytostatic agents) at equimolar concentration were compared in a fluorescence survival assay. In vitro sensitivity to each drug exhibited considerable interpatient variability. The highest mean direct killing was observed for one survivin inhibitor (YM-155), two bcl-2 inhibitors (ABT-199, ABT-737), and one selective CDK inhibitor (dinaciclib). Their killing capacity was, in contrast to most cytostatic agents, similarly high in refractory versus untreated CLL patients and was significantly higher on cells with the 17p deletion/TP53 mutation than on cells with other cytogenetic abnormalities (p = 0.02). Sensitivity of bone marrow and lymph node cells was highly correlated with that of blood cells. Even though direct killing may not be the only therapeutic effector function in vivo, results from this head-to-head comparison may help to identify drugs of particular interest for intensified clinical development. PMID:26325331

  14. The histone demethylase LSD1 is a novel oncogene and therapeutic target in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanling; Zhu, Yumin; Wang, Qiong; Hu, Huijun; Li, Zhongwu; Wang, Dongmiao; Zhang, Wei; Qi, Bin; Ye, Jinhai; Wu, Heming; Jiang, Hongbing; Liu, Laikui; Yang, Jianrong; Cheng, Jie

    2016-04-28

    The histone demethylase LSD1 functions as a key pro-oncogene and attractive therapeutic target in human cancer. Here we sought to interrogate the oncogenic roles of LSD1 in OSCC tumorigenesis and therapeutic intervention by integrating chemical-induced OSCC model, genetic and pharmacological loss-of-function approaches. Our data revealed that aberrant LSD1 overexpression in OSCC was significantly associated with tumor aggressiveness and shorter overall survival. Increased abundance of LSD1 was detected along with disease progression in DMBA- or 4NQO-induced OSCC animal models. LSD1 depletion via siRNA-mediated knockdown in OSCC cells resulted in impaired cell proliferation, migration/invasion, tumorsphere formation and reduced xenograft growth while inducing cell apoptosis and enhancing chemosensitivity to 5-FU. Moreover, treatments of LSD1 chemical inhibitors (pargyline and tranylcypromine) induced its protein reduction probably via enhanced protein degradation and produced similar phenotypic changes resembling LSD1 silencing in OSCC cells. Pharmacological inhibition of LSD1 by intraperitoneal delivery of these inhibitors resulted in impaired xenograft overgrowth. Taken together, our data reveal the tumorigenic roles of LSD1 and identified LSD1 as a novel biomarker with diagnostic and prognostic significance, and also establish that targeting LSD1 by chemical inhibitors is a viable therapeutic strategy against OSCC. PMID:26872725

  15. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'. PMID:23108552

  16. The Role of Chemokines in Breast Cancer Pathology and Its Possible Use as Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isabel Palacios-Arreola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small proteins that primarily regulate the traffic of leukocytes under homeostatic conditions and during specific immune responses. The chemokine-chemokine receptor system comprises almost 50 chemokines and approximately 20 chemokine receptors; thus, there is no unique ligand for each receptor and the binding of different chemokines to the same receptor might have disparate effects. Complicating the system further, these effects depend on the cellular milieu. In cancer, although chemokines are associated primarily with the generation of a protumoral microenvironment and organ-directed metastasis, they also mediate other phenomena related to disease progression, such as angiogenesis and even chemoresistance. Therefore, the chemokine system is becoming a target in cancer therapeutics. We review the emerging data and correlations between chemokines/chemokine receptors and breast cancer, their implications in cancer progression, and possible therapeutic strategies that exploit the chemokine system.

  17. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichai, Madharasi V A; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2012-06-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn's disease are highly debilitating. There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications, failures in adequate drug delivery, and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD. This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics. This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine, studied so far in animal and in vitro models, before comprehensive clinical testing in humans. The investigations carried out so far in IBD models have provided substantial evidence of the nanotherapeutic approach as having the potential to overcome some of the current drawbacks to conventional IBD therapy. We analyze the pros and cons of nanotechnology in IBD therapies studied in different models, aimed at different targets and mechanisms of IBD pathogenesis, in an attempt to predict its possible impact in humans. PMID:22736912

  18. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  19. Possible molecular targets for therapeutic applications of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in inflammation and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Murtaza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Of the various derivatives of caffeic acid, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE is a hydrophobic, bioactive polyphenolic ester obtained from propolis extract. The objective in writing this review article was to summarize all published studies on therapeutics of CAPE in inflammation and cancer to extract direction for future research. The possible molecular targets for the action of CAPE, include various transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB, tissue necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, Nrf2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor of activated T cells, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and signal transducers and activators of transcription. Based on the valuable data on its therapeutics in inflammation and cancer, clinical studies of CAPE should also be conducted to explore its toxicities, if any.

  20. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madharasi VA Pichai; Lynnette R Ferguson

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn's disease are highly debilitating.There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications,failures in adequate drug delivery,and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD.This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics.This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine,studied so far in animal andin vitro models,before comprehensive clinical testing in humans.The investigations carried out so far in IBD models have provided substantial evidence of the nanotherapeutic approach as having the potential to overcome some of the current drawbacks to conventional IBD therapy.We analyze the pros and cons of nanotechnology in IBD therapies studied in different models,aimed at different targets and mechanisms of IBD pathogenesis,in an attempt to predict its possible impact in humans.

  1. Integrin α5β1, the Fibronectin Receptor, as a Pertinent Therapeutic Target in Solid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffner, Florence; Ray, Anne Marie; Dontenwill, Monique, E-mail: monique.dontenwill@unistra.fr [UMR 7213 CNRS, Laboratoire de Biophotonique et Pharmacologie, Tumoral signaling and therapeutic targets, Université de Strasbourg, Faculté de Pharmacie, 67401 Illkirch (France)

    2013-01-15

    Integrins are transmembrane heterodimeric proteins sensing the cell microenvironment and modulating numerous signalling pathways. Changes in integrin expression between normal and tumoral cells support involvement of specific integrins in tumor progression and aggressiveness. This review highlights the current knowledge about α5β1 integrin, also called the fibronectin receptor, in solid tumors. We summarize data showing that α5β1 integrin is a pertinent therapeutic target expressed by tumoral neovessels and tumoral cells. Although mainly evaluated in preclinical models, α5β1 integrin merits interest in particular in colon, breast, ovarian, lung and brain tumors where its overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis for patients. Specific α5β1 integrin antagonists will be listed that may represent new potential therapeutic agents to fight defined subpopulations of particularly aggressive tumors.

  2. Network science for the identification of novel therapeutic targets in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Rod C.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of life of children with epilepsy is a function of seizures and associated cognitive and behavioral comorbidities. Current treatments are not successful at stopping seizures in approximately 30% of patients despite the introduction of multiple new antiepileptic drugs over the last decade. In addition, modification of seizures has only a modest impact on the comorbidities. Therefore, novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets that improve seizures and comorbidities are urgently required. The potential of network science as applied to genetic, local neural network, and global brain data is reviewed. Several examples of possible new therapeutic approaches defined using novel network tools are highlighted. Further study to translate the findings into clinical practice is now required. PMID:27239287

  3. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor: a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Woon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is originally identified in the culture medium of activated T lymphocytes as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages. MIF is now recognized as a multipotent cytokine involved in the regulation of immune and inf lammatory responses. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), MIF promotes inf lammatory responses by inducing proinflammatory cytokines and tissue-degrading molecules, promoting the proliferation and survival of synovial fibroblasts, stimulating neutrophil chemotaxis, and regulating angiogenesis and osteoclast differentiation. Expression of MIF in synovial tissue and synovial fluid levels of MIF are elevated in RA patients. Specifically, MIF levels correlate with RA disease activity and high levels are associated with bone erosion. In animal models of RA, the genetic and therapeutic inhibition of MIF has been shown to control inflammation and bone destruction. Based on the role of MIF in RA pathogenesis, small molecular inhibitors targeting it or its receptor pathways could provide a new therapeutic option for RA patients. PMID:27169879

  4. Regulatory T Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Progression: Role and Therapeutic Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Belal; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant efforts in understanding and modulating the immune response in cancer. In this context, immunosuppressive cells, including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), have come under intense investigation for their proposed roles in suppressing tumor-specific immune responses and establishing an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, thus enabling tumor immune evasion. Additionally, recent evidence indicates that Tregs comprise diverse and heterogeneous subsets; phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets of tumor-infiltrating Tregs could contribute differently to cancer prognosis and clinical outcomes. Understanding Treg biology in the setting of cancer, and specifically the tumor microenvironment, is important for designing effective cancer therapies. In this review, we critically examine the role of Tregs in the tumor microenvironment and in cancer progression focusing on human studies. We also discuss the impact of current therapeutic modalities on Treg biology and the therapeutic opportunities for targeting Tregs to enhance anti-tumor immune responses and clinical benefits. PMID:27509527

  5. Immune Pathways in Atopic Dermatitis, and Definition of Biomarkers through Broad and Targeted Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Yasaman; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2015-04-29

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease. Recent research findings have provided an insight into the complex pathogenic mechanisms involved in this disease. Despite a rising prevalence, effective and safe therapeutics for patients with moderate-to-severe AD are still lacking. Biomarkers of lesional, nonlesional skin, and blood have been developed for baseline as well as after treatment with broad and specific treatments (i.e., cyclosporine A and dupilumab). These biomarkers will help with the development of novel targeted therapeutics and assessment of disease reversal, with the promise of a more personalized treatment approach. Since AD involves more than one subtype (i.e., intrinsic/extrinsic, pediatric/adult, etc.), these molecular fingerprints needs to be validated in all subpopulations with AD.

  6. CC-chemokine receptors: a potential therapeutic target for Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A P M P; Silva, A A; Santos, P V A; Pinto, L M O; Gazinelli, R T; Teixeira, M M; Lannes-Vieira, J

    2005-03-01

    The comprehension of the pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis is crucial to delineate new therapeutic strategies aiming to ameliorate the inflammation that leads to heart dysfunction, without hampering parasite control. The augmented expression of CCL5/RANTES and CCL3/MIP-1alpha, and their receptor CCR5, in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice suggests a role for CC-chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis of T. cruzi-elicited myocarditis. Herein, we discuss our recent results using a CC-chemokine receptor inhibitor (Met-RANTES), showing the participation of CC-chemokines in T. cruzi infection and unraveling CC-chemokine receptors as an attractive therapeutic target for further evaluation in Chagas disease.

  7. CC-chemokine receptors: a potential therapeutic target for Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APMP Marino

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of the pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited myocarditis is crucial to delineate new therapeutic strategies aiming to ameliorate the inflammation that leads to heart dysfunction, without hampering parasite control. The augmented expression of CCL5/RANTES and CCL3/MIP-1alpha, and their receptor CCR5, in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice suggests a role for CC-chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis of T. cruzi-elicited myocarditis. Herein, we discuss our recent results using a CC-chemokine receptor inhibitor (Met-RANTES, showing the participation of CC-chemokines in T. cruzi infection and unraveling CC-chemokine receptors as an attractive therapeutic target for further evaluation in Chagas disease.

  8. Sjögren's syndrome: from pathogenesis to novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Francesca; Colafrancesco, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, characterised by a chronic infiltration of exocrine glands, mainly salivary glands, with the histological features of focal lymphocytic sialoadenitis. Disease spectrum is broad and the occurrence of several extra-glandular manifestations, and in rare cases lymphoma development, is well known. A specific approved treatment for pSS is still lacking and the detection of novel therapeutic biologic target is ongoing. The identification of biological fingerprints seems essential in order to stratify patients both in clinical trials and in real life. Discovery of new components of the inflammatory response will be the key in the future for the identification of novel additional therapeutic options. PMID:27586806

  9. Osteopontin as potential biomarker and therapeutic target in gastric and liver cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Xing Cao; Zhi-Jie Li; Xiao-Ou Jiang; Yick Liang Lum; Ester Khin; Nikki P Lee; Guo-Hao Wu; John M Luk

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer and liver cancer are among the most common malignancies and the leading causes of death worldwide,due to late detection and high recurrence rates.Today,these cancers have a heavy socioeconomic burden,for which a full understanding of their pathophysiological features is warranted to search for promising biomarkers and therapeutic targets.Osteopontin (OPN) is overexpressed in most patients with gastric and liver cancers.Over the past decade,emerging evidence has revealed a correlation of OPN level and clinicopathological features and prognosis in gastric and liver cancers,indicating its potential as an independent prognostic indicator in such patients.Functional studies have verified the potential of OPN knockdown as a therapeutic approach in vitro and in vivo.Furthermore,OPN mediates multifaceted roles in the interaction between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment,in which many details need further exploration.OPN signaling results in various functions,including prevention of apoptosis,modulation of angiogenesis,malfunction of tumor-associated macrophages,degradation of extracellular matrix,activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt and nuclear factor-κB pathways,which lead to tumor formation and progression,particularly in gastric and liver cancers.This editorial aims to review recent findings on alteration in OPN expression and its clinicopathological associations with tumor progression,its potential as a therapeutic target,and putative mechanisms in gastric and liver cancers.Better understanding of the implications of OPN in tumorigenesis might facilitate development of therapeutic regimens to benefit patients with these deadly malignancies.

  10. ErbB polymorphisms: insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; Morand, Grégoire B; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary) and to acquired (secondary) resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed. PMID:25699077

  11. Membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nibhriti; Biswas, Bintili; Khera, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    For the last two decades, there had been remarkable advancement in understanding the role of complement regulatory proteins in autoimmune disorders and importance of complement inhibitors as therapeutics. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a prototype of systemic autoimmune disorders. The disease, though rare, is potentially fatal and afflicts women at their reproductive age. It is a complex disease with multiorgan involvement, and each patient presents with a different set of symptoms. The diagnosis is often difficult and is based on the diagnostic criteria set by the American Rheumatology Association. Presence of antinuclear antibodies and more specifically antidouble-stranded DNA indicates SLE. Since the disease is multifactorial and its phenotypes are highly heterogeneous, there is a need to identify multiple noninvasive biomarkers for SLE. Lack of validated biomarkers for SLE disease activity or response to treatment is a barrier to the efficient management of the disease, drug discovery, as well as development of new therapeutics. Recent studies with gene knockout mice have suggested that membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) may critically determine the sensitivity of host tissues to complement injury in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Case-controlled and followup studies carried out in our laboratory suggest an intimate relation between the level of DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 transcripts and the disease activity in SLE. Based on comparative evaluation of our data on these four membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins, we envisaged CR1 and MCP transcripts as putative noninvasive disease activity markers and the respective proteins as therapeutic targets for SLE. Following is a brief appraisal on membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SLE. PMID:23402019

  12. The molecular phenotype of endocapillary proliferation: novel therapeutic targets for IgA nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B Hodgin

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy (IgAN is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous disease. Endocapillary proliferation is associated with higher risk of progressive disease, and clinical studies suggest that corticosteroids mitigate this risk. However, corticosteroids are associated with protean cellular effects and significant toxicity. Furthermore the precise mechanism by which they modulate kidney injury in IgAN is not well delineated. To better understand molecular pathways involved in the development of endocapillary proliferation and to identify novel specific therapeutic targets, we evaluated the glomerular transcriptome of microdissected kidney biopsies from 22 patients with IgAN. Endocapillary proliferation was defined according to the Oxford scoring system independently by 3 nephropathologists. We analyzed mRNA expression using microarrays and identified transcripts differentially expressed in patients with endocapillary proliferation compared to IgAN without endocapillary lesions. Next, we employed both transcription factor analysis and in silico drug screening and confirmed that the endocapillary proliferation transcriptome is significantly enriched with pathways that can be impacted by corticosteroids. With this approach we also identified novel therapeutic targets and bioactive small molecules that may be considered for therapeutic trials for the treatment of IgAN, including resveratrol and hydroquinine. In summary, we have defined the distinct molecular profile of a pathologic phenotype associated with progressive renal insufficiency in IgAN. Exploration of the pathways associated with endocapillary proliferation confirms a molecular basis for the clinical effectiveness of corticosteroids in this subgroup of IgAN, and elucidates new therapeutic strategies for IgAN.

  13. ErbB polymorphisms: Insights and implications for response to targeted cancer therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulay A Alaoui-Jamali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in high-throughput genomic-scanning have expanded the repertory of genetic variations in DNA sequences encoding ErbB tyrosine kinase receptors in humans, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, polymorphic repetitive elements, microsatellite variations, small-scale insertions and deletions. The ErbB family members: EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors are established as drivers of many aspects of tumor initiation and progression to metastasis. This knowledge has provided rationales for the development of an arsenal of anti-ErbB therapeutics, ranging from small molecule kinase inhibitors to monoclonal antibodies. Anti-ErbB agents are becoming the cornerstone therapeutics for the management of cancers that overexpress hyperactive variants of ErbB receptors, in particular ErbB2-positive breast cancer and non-small cell lung carcinomas. However, their clinical benefit has been limited to a subset of patients due to a wide heterogeneity in drug response despite the expression of the ErbB targets, attributed to intrinsic (primary and to acquired (secondary resistance. Somatic mutations in ErbB tyrosine kinase domains have been extensively investigated in preclinical and clinical setting as determinants for either high sensitivity or resistance to anti-ErbB therapeutics. In contrast, only scant information is available on the impact of SNPs, which are widespread in genes encoding ErbB receptors, on receptor structure and activity, and their predictive values for drug susceptibility. This review aims to briefly update polymorphic variations in genes encoding ErbB receptors based on recent advances in deep sequencing technologies, and to address challenging issues for a better understanding of the functional impact of single versus combined SNPs in ErbB genes to receptor topology, receptor-drug interaction, and drug susceptibility. The potential of exploiting SNPs in the era of stratified targeted therapeutics is discussed.

  14. Breast cancer phenotypes regulated by tissue factor-factor VII pathway: Possible therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2014-12-10

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women, worldwide. Fortunately, breast cancer is relatively chemosensitive, with recent advances leading to the development of effective therapeutic strategies, significantly increasing disease cure rate. However, disease recurrence and treatment of cases lacking therapeutic molecular targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and hormone receptors, referred to as triple-negative breast cancers, still pose major hurdles in the treatment of breast cancer. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches to treat aggressive breast cancers are essential. Blood coagulation factor VII (fVII) is produced in the liver and secreted into the blood stream. Tissue factor (TF), the cellular receptor for fVII, is an integral membrane protein that plays key roles in the extrinsic coagulation cascade. TF is overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. The TF-fVII complex may be formed in the absence of injury, because fVII potentially exists in the tissue fluid within cancer tissues. The active form of this complex (TF-fVIIa) may stimulate the expression of numerous malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells. Thus, the TF-fVII pathway is a potentially attractive target for breast cancer treatment. To date, a number of studies investigating the mechanisms by which TF-fVII signaling contributes to breast cancer progression, have been conducted. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms controlling TF and fVII synthesis and regulation in breast cancer cells. Our current understanding of the TF-fVII pathway as a mediator of breast cancer progression will be also described. Finally, we will discuss how this knowledge can be applied to the design of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25493229

  15. DISC1 pathway in brain development: exploring therapeutic targets for major psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKamiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic risk factors for major psychiatric disorders play key roles in neurodevelopment. Thus, exploring the molecular pathways of risk genes is important not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying brain development, but also to decipher how genetic disturbances affect brain maturation and functioning relevant to major mental illnesses. During the last decade, there has been significant progress in determining the mechanisms whereby risk genes impact brain development. Nonetheless, given that the majority of psychiatric disorders have etiological complexities encompassing multiple risk genes and environmental factors, the biological mechanisms of these diseases remain poorly understood. How can we move forward in our research for discovery of the biological markers and novel therapeutic targets for major mental disorders? Here we review recent progress in the neurobiology of Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1, a major risk gene for major mental disorders, with a particular focus on its roles in cerebral cortex development. Convergent findings implicate DISC1 as part of a large, multi-step pathway implicated in various cellular processes and signal transduction. We discuss links between the DISC1 pathway and environmental factors, such as immune/inflammatory responses, which may suggest novel therapeutic targets. Existing treatments for major mental disorders are hampered by a limited number of pharmacological targets. Consequently, elucidation of the DISC1 pathway, and its association with neuropsychiatric disorders, may offer hope for novel treatment interventions.

  16. Understanding and targeting cancer stem cells:therapeutic implications and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke CHEN; Ying-hui HUANG; Ji-long CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified as rare cell populations in many cancers,including leukemia and solid tumors.Accumulating evidence has suggested that CSCs are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into various types of cancer cells.Aberrant regulation of gene expression and some signaling pathways has been observed in CSCs compared to other tumor cells.CSCs are thought to be responsible for cancer initiation,progression,metastasis,recurrence and drug resistance.The CSC hypothesis has recently attracted much attention due to the potential for discovery and development of CSC-related therapies and the identification of key molecules involved in controlling the unique properties of CSC populations.Over the past several years,a tremendous amount of effort has been invested in the development of new drugs,such as nanomedicines,that can take advantage of the "Achilles'heel" of CSCs by targeting cell-surface molecular markers or various signaling pathways.Novel compounds and therapeutic strategies that selectively target CSCs have been identified,some of which have been evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies.In this article,we review new findings related to the investigation of the CSC hypothesis,and discuss the crucial pathways involved in regulating the development of CSC populations and the advances in studies of drug resistance.In addition,we review new CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aiming to eradicate malignancies.

  17. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD Associated Neural Defects: Complex Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Marrs

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD, caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, can result in craniofacial dysmorphism, cognitive impairment, sensory and motor disabilities among other defects. FASD incidences are as high as 2% to 5 % children born in the US, and prevalence is higher in low socioeconomic populations. Despite various mechanisms being proposed to explain the etiology of FASD, the molecular targets of ethanol toxicity during development are unknown. Proposed mechanisms include cell death, cell signaling defects and gene expression changes. More recently, the involvement of several other molecular pathways was explored, including non-coding RNA, epigenetic changes and specific vitamin deficiencies. These various pathways may interact, producing a wide spectrum of consequences. Detailed understanding of these various pathways and their interactions will facilitate the therapeutic target identification, leading to new clinical intervention, which may reduce the incidence and severity of these highly prevalent preventable birth defects. This review discusses manifestations of alcohol exposure on the developing central nervous system, including the neural crest cells and sensory neural placodes, focusing on molecular neurodevelopmental pathways as possible therapeutic targets for prevention or protection.

  18. Nrf2 as molecular target for polyphenols: A novel therapeutic strategy in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Barber, Alistair J; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Russo, Gian Luigi; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sobarzo-Sánchez, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a microvascular complication of diabetes that is considered one of the leading causes of blindness among adults. More than 4.4 million people suffer from this disorder throughout the world. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of diabetic retinopathy. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a redox sensitive transcription factor, plays an essential protective role in regulating the physiological response to oxidative and electrophilic stress via regulation of multiple genes encoding antioxidant proteins and phase II detoxifying enzymes. Many studies suggest that dozens of natural compounds, including polyphenols, can supress oxidative stress and inflammation through targeting Nrf2 and consequently activating the antioxidant response element-related cytoprotective genes. Therefore, Nrf2 may provide a new therapeutic target for treatment of diabetic retinopathy. In the present article, we will focus on the role of Nrf2 in diabetic retinopathy and the ability of polyphenols to target Nrf2 as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:26926494

  19. Neurosurgery for schizophrenia: an update on pathophysiology and a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikell, Charles B; Sinha, Saurabh; Sheth, Sameer A

    2016-04-01

    The main objectives of this review were to provide an update on the progress made in understanding specific circuit abnormalities leading to psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia and to propose rational targets for therapeutic deep brain stimulation (DBS). Refractory schizophrenia remains a major unsolved clinical problem, with 10%-30% of patients not responding to standard treatment options. Progress made over the last decade was analyzed through reviewing structural and functional neuroimaging studies in humans, along with studies of animal models of schizophrenia. The authors reviewed theories implicating dysfunction in dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling in the pathophysiology of the disorder, paying particular attention to neurosurgically relevant nodes in the circuit. In this context, the authors focused on an important pathological circuit involving the associative striatum, anterior hippocampus, and ventral striatum, and discuss the possibility of targeting these nodes for therapeutic neuromodulation with DBS. Finally, the authors examined ethical considerations in the treatment of these vulnerable patients. The functional anatomy of neural circuits relevant to schizophrenia remains of great interest to neurosurgeons and psychiatrists and lends itself to the development of specific targets for neuromodulation. Ongoing progress in the understanding of these structures will be critical to the development of potential neurosurgical treatments of schizophrenia.

  20. Organometallic Iridium(III) anticancer complexes with new mechanisms of action: NCI-60 screening, mitochondrial targeting, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Jessica M; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Qamar, Bushra; Liu, Zhe; Hands-Portman, Ian; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Platinum complexes related to cisplatin, cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], are successful anticancer drugs; however, other transition metal complexes offer potential for combating cisplatin resistance, decreasing side effects, and widening the spectrum of activity. Organometallic half-sandwich iridium (Ir(III)) complexes [Ir(Cp(x))(XY)Cl](+/0) (Cp(x) = biphenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), or phenylpyridine (3)) all hydrolyze rapidly, forming monofunctional G adducts on DNA with additional intercalation of the phenyl substituents on the Cp(x) ring. In comparison, highly potent complex 4 (Cp(x) = phenyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl and XY = N,N-dimethylphenylazopyridine) does not hydrolyze. All show higher potency toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells compared to cisplatin, with 1, 3, and 4 also demonstrating higher potency in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) NCI-60 cell-line screen. Use of the NCI COMPARE algorithm (which predicts mechanisms of action (MoAs) for emerging anticancer compounds by correlating NCI-60 patterns of sensitivity) shows that the MoA of these Ir(III) complexes has no correlation to cisplatin (or oxaliplatin), with 3 and 4 emerging as particularly novel compounds. Those findings by COMPARE were experimentally probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of A2780 cells exposed to 1, showing mitochondrial swelling and activation of apoptosis after 24 h. Significant changes in mitochondrial membrane polarization were detected by flow cytometry, and the potency of the complexes was enhanced ca. 5× by co-administration with a low concentration (5 μM) of the γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO). These studies reveal potential polypharmacology of organometallic Ir(III) complexes, with MoA and cell selectivity governed by structural changes in the chelating ligands. PMID:23618382

  1. Liposome Delivery Systems for Inhalation: A Critical Review Highlighting Formulation Issues and Anticancer Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudokas, Mindaugas; Najlah, Mohammad; Alhnan, Mohamed Albed; Elhissi, Abdelbary

    2016-01-01

    This is a critical review on research conducted in the field of pulmonary delivery of liposomes. Issues relating to the mechanism of nebulisation and liposome composition were appraised and correlated with literature reports of liposome formulations used in clinical trials to understand the role of liposome size and composition on therapeutic outcome. A major highlight was liposome inhalation for the treatment of lung cancers. Many in vivo studies that explored the potential of liposomes as anticancer carrier systems were evaluated, including animal studies and clinical trials. Liposomes can entrap anticancer drugs and localise their action in the lung following pulmonary delivery. The safety of inhaled liposomes incorporating anticancer drugs depends on the anticancer agent used and the amount of drug delivered to the target cancer in the lung. The difficulty of efficient targeting of liposomal anticancer aerosols to the cancerous tissues within the lung may result in low doses reaching the target site. Overall, following the success of liposomes as inhalable carriers in the treatment of lung infections, it is expected that more focus from research and development will be given to designing inhalable liposome carriers for the treatment of other lung diseases, including pulmonary cancers. The successful development of anticancer liposomes for inhalation may depend on the future development of effective aerosolisation devices and better targeted liposomes to maximise the benefit of therapy and reduce the potential for local and systemic adverse effects.

  2. Musashi1 as a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker for lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Yang; Yu, Huina; Linnoila, R. Ilona; Li, Laodong; Li, Dangyu; Mo, Biwen; Okano, Hideyuki; Luiz O. F. Penalva; Glazer, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide with a 5-year survival rate of less than 20%. One approach to improving survival is the identification of biomarkers to detect early stage disease. In this study, we investigated the potential of the stem cell and progenitor cell marker, Musashi1 (Msi1), as a diagnostic marker and potential therapeutic target for lung cancer. Functional studies in A549 bronchioalveolar carcinoma and NCI-H520 squamous cell carcino...

  3. Therapeutic Targets for Neurodevelopmental Disorders Emerging from Animal Models with Perinatal Immune Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ibi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing epidemiological evidence indicates that perinatal infection with various viral pathogens enhances the risk for several psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiological significance of astrocyte interactions with neurons and/or gut microbiomes has been reported in neurodevelopmental disorders triggered by pre- and postnatal immune insults. Recent studies with the maternal immune activation or neonatal polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid models of neurodevelopmental disorders have identified various candidate molecules that could be responsible for brain dysfunction. Here, we review the functions of several candidate molecules in neurodevelopment and brain function and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for psychiatric disorders.

  4. The ER mitochondria calcium cycle and ER stress response as therapeutic targets in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedrana eTadic

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Although the etiology remains unclear, disturbances in calcium homoeostasis and protein folding are essential features of neurodegeneration in this disorder. Here, we review recent research findings on the interaction between endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria, and its effect on calcium signaling and oxidative stress. We further provide insights into studies, providing evidence that structures of the ER mitochondria calcium cycle (ERMCC serve as a promising targets for therapeutic approaches for treatment of ALS.

  5. Progress in the development of therapeutic antibodies targeting prion proteins and β-amyloid peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by protein misfolding, and can lead to dementia. However, prion diseases are infectious and transmissible, while AD is not. The similarities and differences between these diseases have led researchers to perform comparative studies. In the last 2 decades, progress has been made in immunotherapy using anti-prion protein and anti-β-amyloid antibodies. In this study, we review new ideas and strategies for therapeutic antibodies targeting prion diseases and AD through conformation dependence.

  6. Visceral hypersensitivity and electromechanical dysfunction as therapeutic targets in pediatric functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; M; Rosen; Jose; T; Cocjin; Jennifer; V; Schurman; Jennifer; M; Colombo; Craig; A; Friesen

    2014-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders(FGID) are common clinical syndromes diagnosed in the absence of biochemical,structural,or metabolic abnormalities. They account for significant morbidity and health care expenditures and are identifiable across variable age,geography,and culture. Etiology of abdominal pain associated FGIDs,including functional dyspepsia(FD),remains incompletely understood,but growing evidence implicates the importance of visceral hypersensitivity and electromechanical dysfunction. This manuscript explores data supporting the role of visceral hypersensitivity and electromechanical dysfunction in FD,with focus on pediatric data when available,and provides a summary of potential therapeutic targets.

  7. Toll-like receptors are potential therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siamak; Sandoghchian; Shotorbani

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are found on the membranes of pattern recognition receptors and not only play important roles in activating immune responses but are also involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disease, injury and cancer. Furthermore, TLRs are also able to recognize endogenous alarmins released by damaged tissue and necrosis and/or apoptotic cells and are present in numerous autoimmune diseases. Therefore, the release of endogenous TLR ligands plays an important role in initiating and driving inflammatory diseases. Increasing data suggest a role for TLR signaling in rheumatoid arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease. Although their involvement is not comprehensively understood, the TLRs signaling transducers may provide potential therapeutic targets.

  8. Targeted anti-inflammatory therapeutics in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Andrew L; Caramori, Gaetano; Chung, Kian F; Adcock, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway, although the drivers and site of the inflammation differ between diseases. Asthmatics with a neutrophilic airway inflammation are associated with a poor response to corticosteroids, whereas asthmatics with eosinophilic inflammation respond better to corticosteroids. Biologicals targeting the Th2-eosinophil nexus such as anti-interleukin (IL)-4, anti-IL-5, and anti-IL-13 are ineffective in asthma as a whole but are more effective if patients are selected using cellular (eg, eosinophils) or molecular (eg, periostin) biomarkers. This highlights the key role of individual inflammatory mediators in driving the inflammatory response and for accurate disease phenotyping to allow greater understanding of disease and development of patient-oriented antiasthma therapies. In contrast to asthmatic patients, corticosteroids are relatively ineffective in COPD patients. Despite stratification of COPD patients, the results of targeted therapy have proved disappointing with the exception of recent studies using CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonists. Currently, several other novel mediator-targeted drugs are undergoing clinical trials. As with asthma specifically targeted treatments may be of most benefit in specific COPD patient endotypes. The use of novel inflammatory mediator-targeted therapeutic agents in selected patients with asthma or COPD and the detection of markers of responsiveness or nonresponsiveness will allow a link between clinical phenotypes and pathophysiological mechanisms to be delineated reaching the goal of endotyping patients. PMID:26334389

  9. Integrated nanotechnology platform for tumor-targeted multimodal imaging and therapeutic cargo release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Hitomi; Dobroff, Andrey S; Driessen, Wouter H P; Cristini, Vittorio; Brinker, Lina M; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; D'Angelo, Sara; Ferrara, Fortunato; Proneth, Bettina; Lin, Yu-Shen; Dunphy, Darren R; Dogra, Prashant; Melancon, Marites P; Stafford, R Jason; Miyazono, Kohei; Gelovani, Juri G; Kataoka, Kazunori; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-02-16

    A major challenge of targeted molecular imaging and drug delivery in cancer is establishing a functional combination of ligand-directed cargo with a triggered release system. Here we develop a hydrogel-based nanotechnology platform that integrates tumor targeting, photon-to-heat conversion, and triggered drug delivery within a single nanostructure to enable multimodal imaging and controlled release of therapeutic cargo. In proof-of-concept experiments, we show a broad range of ligand peptide-based applications with phage particles, heat-sensitive liposomes, or mesoporous silica nanoparticles that self-assemble into a hydrogel for tumor-targeted drug delivery. Because nanoparticles pack densely within the nanocarrier, their surface plasmon resonance shifts to near-infrared, thereby enabling a laser-mediated photothermal mechanism of cargo release. We demonstrate both noninvasive imaging and targeted drug delivery in preclinical mouse models of breast and prostate cancer. Finally, we applied mathematical modeling to predict and confirm tumor targeting and drug delivery. These results are meaningful steps toward the design and initial translation of an enabling nanotechnology platform with potential for broad clinical applications.

  10. Targeted anti-inflammatory therapeutics in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Andrew L.; Caramori, Gaetano; Chung, Kian F.; Adcock, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway, although the drivers and site of the inflammation differ between diseases. Asthmatics with a neutrophilic airway inflammation are associated with a poor response to corticosteroids, whereas asthmatics with eosinophilic inflammation respond better to corticosteroids. Biologicals targeting the Th2-eosinophil nexus such as anti–interleukin (IL)-4, anti–IL-5, and anti–IL-13 are ineffective in asthma as a whole but are more effective if patients are selected using cellular (eg, eosinophils) or molecular (eg, periostin) biomarkers. This highlights the key role of individual inflammatory mediators in driving the inflammatory response and for accurate disease phenotyping to allow greater understanding of disease and development of patient-oriented antiasthma therapies. In contrast to asthmatic patients, corticosteroids are relatively ineffective in COPD patients. Despite stratification of COPD patients, the results of targeted therapy have proved disappointing with the exception of recent studies using CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonists. Currently, several other novel mediator-targeted drugs are undergoing clinical trials. As with asthma specifically targeted treatments may be of most benefit in specific COPD patient endotypes. The use of novel inflammatory mediator-targeted therapeutic agents in selected patients with asthma or COPD and the detection of markers of responsiveness or nonresponsiveness will allow a link between clinical phenotypes and pathophysiological mechanisms to be delineated reaching the goal of endotyping patients. PMID:26334389

  11. Targeted anti-inflammatory therapeutics in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Andrew L; Caramori, Gaetano; Chung, Kian F; Adcock, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway, although the drivers and site of the inflammation differ between diseases. Asthmatics with a neutrophilic airway inflammation are associated with a poor response to corticosteroids, whereas asthmatics with eosinophilic inflammation respond better to corticosteroids. Biologicals targeting the Th2-eosinophil nexus such as anti-interleukin (IL)-4, anti-IL-5, and anti-IL-13 are ineffective in asthma as a whole but are more effective if patients are selected using cellular (eg, eosinophils) or molecular (eg, periostin) biomarkers. This highlights the key role of individual inflammatory mediators in driving the inflammatory response and for accurate disease phenotyping to allow greater understanding of disease and development of patient-oriented antiasthma therapies. In contrast to asthmatic patients, corticosteroids are relatively ineffective in COPD patients. Despite stratification of COPD patients, the results of targeted therapy have proved disappointing with the exception of recent studies using CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonists. Currently, several other novel mediator-targeted drugs are undergoing clinical trials. As with asthma specifically targeted treatments may be of most benefit in specific COPD patient endotypes. The use of novel inflammatory mediator-targeted therapeutic agents in selected patients with asthma or COPD and the detection of markers of responsiveness or nonresponsiveness will allow a link between clinical phenotypes and pathophysiological mechanisms to be delineated reaching the goal of endotyping patients.

  12. Integrated nanotechnology platform for tumor-targeted multimodal imaging and therapeutic cargo release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Hitomi; Dobroff, Andrey S; Driessen, Wouter H P; Cristini, Vittorio; Brinker, Lina M; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; D'Angelo, Sara; Ferrara, Fortunato; Proneth, Bettina; Lin, Yu-Shen; Dunphy, Darren R; Dogra, Prashant; Melancon, Marites P; Stafford, R Jason; Miyazono, Kohei; Gelovani, Juri G; Kataoka, Kazunori; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-02-16

    A major challenge of targeted molecular imaging and drug delivery in cancer is establishing a functional combination of ligand-directed cargo with a triggered release system. Here we develop a hydrogel-based nanotechnology platform that integrates tumor targeting, photon-to-heat conversion, and triggered drug delivery within a single nanostructure to enable multimodal imaging and controlled release of therapeutic cargo. In proof-of-concept experiments, we show a broad range of ligand peptide-based applications with phage particles, heat-sensitive liposomes, or mesoporous silica nanoparticles that self-assemble into a hydrogel for tumor-targeted drug delivery. Because nanoparticles pack densely within the nanocarrier, their surface plasmon resonance shifts to near-infrared, thereby enabling a laser-mediated photothermal mechanism of cargo release. We demonstrate both noninvasive imaging and targeted drug delivery in preclinical mouse models of breast and prostate cancer. Finally, we applied mathematical modeling to predict and confirm tumor targeting and drug delivery. These results are meaningful steps toward the design and initial translation of an enabling nanotechnology platform with potential for broad clinical applications. PMID:26839407

  13. Critical analysis of the potential for therapeutic targeting of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inokuchi M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mikito Inokuchi,1 Keiji Kato,1 Kazuyuki Kojima,2 Kenichi Sugihara1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, 2Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Multidisciplinary treatment including chemotherapy has become the global standard of care for patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC; nonetheless, survival remains poor. Although many molecular-targeted therapies have been developed for various cancers, only anti-HER2 treatment has produced promising results in patients with mGC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR plays a key role in cell proliferation, antiapoptosis, and metastasis in signaling pathways from the tyrosine kinase receptor, and its activation has been demonstrated in gastric cancer (GC cells. This review discusses the clinical relevance of mTOR in GC and examines its potential as a therapeutic target in patients with mGC. Preclinical studies in animal models suggest that suppression of the mTOR pathway inhibits the proliferation of GC cells and delays tumor progression. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been evaluated as second- or third-line treatment in clinical trials. Adverse events were well tolerated although the effectiveness of everolimus alone was limited. Everolimus is now being evaluated in combination with chemotherapy in Phase III clinical studies in this subgroup of patients. Two Phase III studies include exploratory biomarker research designed to evaluate the predictive value of the expression or mutation of molecules related to the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These biomarker studies may lead to the realization of targeted therapy for selected patients with mGC in the future. Keywords: gastric cancer, mTOR, everolimus

  14. Integrated Genomic Characterization Reveals Novel, Therapeutically Relevant Drug Targets in FGFR and EGFR Pathways in Sporadic Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Borad, Mitesh J.; Champion, Mia D.; Egan, Jan B.; Liang, Winnie S.; Rafael Fonseca; Bryce, Alan H.; Ann E McCullough; Barrett, Michael T.; Katherine Hunt; Maitray D Patel; Young, Scott W.; Collins, Joseph M.; Silva, Alvin C; Condjella, Rachel M.; Matthew Block

    2014-01-01

    Advanced cholangiocarcinoma continues to harbor a difficult prognosis and therapeutic options have been limited. During the course of a clinical trial of whole genomic sequencing seeking druggable targets, we examined six patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma. Integrated genome-wide and whole transcriptome sequence analyses were performed on tumors from six patients with advanced, sporadic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (SIC) to identify potential therapeutically actionable events. Among...

  15. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  16. Insulin Resistance and Endothelial Dysfunction Constitute a Common Therapeutic Target in Cardiometabolic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance and other risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as hypertension and hypercholesterolemia, promote endothelial dysfunction and lead to development of metabolic syndrome which constitutes an introduction to cardiovascular disease. The insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction cross talk between each other by numerous metabolic pathways. Hence, targeting one of these pathologies with pleiotropic treatment exerts beneficial effect on another one. Combined and expletive treatment of hypertension, lipid disorders, and insulin resistance with nonpharmacological interventions and conventional pharmacotherapy may inhibit the transformation of metabolic disturbances to fully developed cardiovascular disease. This paper summarises the common therapeutic targets for insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammatory reaction at molecular level and analyses the potential pleiotropic effects of drugs used currently in management of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes.

  17. Characterization of FGFR signaling pathway as therapeutic targets for sarcoma patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Ya Zhou; Hong Zheng; Xiao-Ling Du; Ji-Long Yang

    2016-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family plays important roles in regulating cell growth, proliferation, survival, differentiation and angiogenesis. Deregulation of the FGF/FGFR signaling pathway has been associated with multiple development syndromes and cancers, and thus therapeutic strategies targeting FGFs and FGFR in human cancer are currently being explored. However, few studies on the FGF/FGFR pathway have been conducted in sarcoma, which has a poor outcome with traditional treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Hence, in the present review, we provide an overview of the role of the FGF/FGFR pathway signal in sarcoma and FGFR inhibitors, which might be new targets for the treatment of sarcomas according to recent research.

  18. Targeting FGF19/FGFR4 Pathway: A Novel Therapeutic Strategy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Repana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a lethal cancer with limited systemic therapeutic options. Liver carcinogenesis is a complex procedure and various pathways have been found to be deregulated which are potential targets for novel treatments. Aberrant signalling through FGF19 and its receptor FGFR4 seems to be the oncogenic driver for a subset of HCCs and is associated with poor prognosis. Inhibition of the pathway in preclinical models has shown antitumour activity and has triggered further evaluation of this strategy to in vivo models. This review aims to describe the role of the FGF19/FGFR4 pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma and its role as a potential predictive biomarker for novel targeted agents against FGF19/FGFR4 signalling.

  19. Exploring apposite therapeutic target for apoptosis in filarial parasite: a plausible hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hande, Sneha; Goswami, Kalyan; Jena, Lingaraj; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2014-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis is a parasitic disease with profound socioeconomic encumbrance owing to its associated disability, affecting predominantly but not limited to the developing nations of tropics and subtropics. There are several technical issues like poor therapeutic and preventive repertoire as well as administrative and infrastructural limitations which jeopardize the salvage measures and further complicate the plight. Therefore, considering the gravity of the problem, WHO has mandated (under tropical disease research scheme) for placing emphasis on validation of novel therapeutic targets against this disease with the unfortunate tag of 'neglected tropical disease'. However, dearth of knowledge of parasite biology viciously coupled with difficulty of access to parasitic material from suitable animal model along with growing cost burden of high end research poses formidable challenge. Based on the recent research evidences, here we propose a premise with targeted apoptotic impact as a novel rationale to be exploited towards anti-parasitic drug development. The new era of bioinformatics ushers in new optimism with a wide range of genomic and proteomic database in public domain. Such platform might offer wonders for drug research, but needs highly selective criterion specificity. In order to test our hypothesis presumptively, we deployed a scheme for identification of target proteins from filarial parasitic origin through wide database search with precise criteria of non-homology against the host along with functional essentiality for the parasite. Further screening for proteins with growth potential from such list of essential non-homologous proteins was undertaken to mine out suitable representative target for ensuing apoptotic impact though effective inhibitors. A unique protein enzyme, RNA dependent RNA polymerase, which besides its vital role in RNA virus is believed to have regulatory role in gene expression, emerged as a plausible target. This protein

  20. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Wee1 Kinase as a Therapeutic Target in a Model of Proneural Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescarbeau, Rebecca S; Lei, Liang; Bakken, Katrina K; Sims, Peter A; Sarkaria, Jann N; Canoll, Peter; White, Forest M

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain cancer. With a median survival of about a year, new approaches to treating this disease are necessary. To identify signaling molecules regulating GBM progression in a genetically engineered murine model of proneural GBM, we quantified phosphotyrosine-mediated signaling using mass spectrometry. Oncogenic signals, including phosphorylated ERK MAPK, PI3K, and PDGFR, were found to be increased in the murine tumors relative to brain. Phosphorylation of CDK1 pY15, associated with the G2 arrest checkpoint, was identified as the most differentially phosphorylated site, with a 14-fold increase in phosphorylation in the tumors. To assess the role of this checkpoint as a potential therapeutic target, syngeneic primary cell lines derived from these tumors were treated with MK-1775, an inhibitor of Wee1, the kinase responsible for CDK1 Y15 phosphorylation. MK-1775 treatment led to mitotic catastrophe, as defined by increased DNA damage and cell death by apoptosis. To assess the extensibility of targeting Wee1/CDK1 in GBM, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) cell lines were also treated with MK-1775. Although the response was more heterogeneous, on-target Wee1 inhibition led to decreased CDK1 Y15 phosphorylation and increased DNA damage and apoptosis in each line. These results were also validated in vivo, where single-agent MK-1775 demonstrated an antitumor effect on a flank PDX tumor model, increasing mouse survival by 1.74-fold. This study highlights the ability of unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomics to reveal therapeutic targets in tumor models, and the potential for Wee1 inhibition as a treatment approach in preclinical models of GBM. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1332-43. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196784

  1. Glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB: A metastatic mediator and emerging therapeutic target in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maric G

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Gordana Maric,1,2 April AN Rose,3 Matthew G Annis,1,2 Peter M Siegel1,2,4,5 1Goodman Cancer Research Centre, 2Department of Medicine, 3Faculty of Medicine, 4Department of Biochemistry, 5Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada Abstract: Molecularly targeted therapies are rapidly growing with respect to their clinical development and impact on cancer treatment due to their highly selective anti-tumor action. However, many aggressive cancers such as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC currently lack well-defined therapeutic targets against which such agents can be developed. The identification of tumor-associated antigens and the generation of antibody drug-conjugates represent an emerging area of intense interest and growth in the field of cancer therapeutics. Glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB has recently been identified as a gene that is over-expressed in numerous cancers, including TNBC, and often correlates with the metastatic phenotype. In breast cancer, GPNMB expression in the tumor epithelium is associated with a reduction in disease-free and overall survival. Based on these findings, glembatumumab vedotin (CDX-011, an antibody-drug conjugate that selectively targets GPNMB, is currently being investigated in clinical trials for patients with metastatic breast cancer and unresectable melanoma. This review discusses the physiological and potential pathological roles of GPNMB in normal and cancer tissues, respectively, and details the clinical advances and challenges in targeting GPNMB-expressing malignancies. Keywords: GPNMB, osteoactivin, breast cancer, antibody-drug conjugates, CDX-011

  2. Expression and therapeutic targeting of dopamine receptor-1 (D1R) in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherding, D C; Tong, W; Hugo, E R; Barnard, D F; Fox, S; LaSance, K; Shaughnessy, E; Ben-Jonathan, N

    2016-06-16

    Patients with advanced breast cancer often fail to respond to treatment, creating a need to develop novel biomarkers and effective therapeutics. Dopamine (DA) is a catecholamine that binds to five G protein-coupled receptors. We discovered expression of DA type-1 receptors (D1Rs) in breast cancer, thereby identifying these receptors as novel therapeutic targets in this disease. Strong to moderate immunoreactive D1R expression was found in 30% of 751 primary breast carcinomas, and was associated with larger tumors, higher tumor grades, node metastasis and shorter patient survival. DA and D1R agonists, signaling through the cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) pathway, suppressed cell viability, inhibited invasion and induced apoptosis in multiple breast cancer cell lines. Fenoldopam, a peripheral D1R agonist that does not penetrate the brain, dramatically suppressed tumor growth in two mouse models with D1R-expressing xenografts by increasing both necrosis and apoptosis. D1R-expressing primary tumors and metastases in mice were detected by fluorescence imaging. In conclusion, D1R overexpression is associated with advanced breast cancer and poor prognosis. Activation of the D1R/cGMP/PKG pathway induces apoptosis in vitro and causes tumor shrinkage in vivo. Fenoldopam, which is FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved to treat renal hypertension, could be repurposed as a novel therapeutic agent for patients with D1R-expressing tumors.

  3. Cell to cell spreading of misfolded proteins as a therapeutic target in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Livia; Lenzi, Paola; Biagioni, Francesca; Siciliano, Gabriele; Fornai, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Despite a number of genetic mutations and molecular mechanisms are recognized to participate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), such a devastating neurological disorder still lacks a substantial cure. The present manuscript rather than a general overview of potential therapeutic approaches focuses on novel research findings detailing novel molecular mechanisms which appear to be promising for developing future ALS therapeutics. A special emphasis is given to the abnormal autophagy status and to those autophagy substrates which aggregate in the form of misfolded proteins. In fact, as reviewed in the first part of the manuscript, altered autophagy pathway is present in most genetic mutations responsible for familial ALS. These mutations impair clearance of autophagy substrates, which determines accumulation of giant altered mitochondria and misfolded proteins. Therefore, a considerable piece of the review is dedicated to unconventional processing of misfolded proteins leading to unconventional protein secretions which may underlie a prionoid cellto- cell spreading of ALS neuropathology. The intimate mechanisms regulating these steps are analyzed in order to comprehend which potential therapeutic targets might be considered in future studies. At the same time, negative findings concerning recent trials are explained in light of novel disease mechanisms. In the final part of the review the replacement therapy with focal stem cells implantation is discussed in relationship with toxic mechanisms operating in the intercellular space of the spinal cord and motor-related areas. PMID:24934358

  4. PEG-PE-based micelles co-loaded with paclitaxel and cyclosporine A or loaded with paclitaxel and targeted by anticancer antibody overcome drug resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarisozen, Can; Vural, Imran; Levchenko, Tatyana; Hincal, A Atilla; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-05-01

    The over-expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of the acquired Multidrug Resistance (MDR). Combined treatment of MDR cancer cells with P-gp inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents could result in reversal of resistance in P-gp-expressing cells. In this study, paclitaxel (PTX) was co-encapsulated in actively targeted (anticancer mAb 2C5-modified) polymeric lipid-core PEG-PE-based micelles with Cyclosporine A (CycA), which is one of the most effective first generation P-gp inhibitors. Cell culture studies performed using MDCKII (parental and MDR1) cell lines to investigate the potential MDR reversal effect of the formulations. The average size of both empty and loaded PEG₂₀₀₀-PE/Vitamin E mixed micelles was found between 10 and 25 nm. Zeta potentials of the formulations were found between -7 and -35 mV. The percentage of PTX in the micelles was found higher than 3% for both formulations and cumulative PTX release of about 70% was demonstrated. P-gp inhibition with CycA caused an increase in the cytotoxicity of PTX. Dual-loaded micelles demonstrated significantly higher cytotoxicity in the resistant MDCKII-MDR1 cells than micelles loaded with PTX alone. Micelle modification with mAb 2C5 results in the highest cytotoxicity against resistant cells, with or without P-gp modulator, probably because of better internalization bypassing the P-gp mechanism. Our results suggest that micelles delivering a combination of P-gp modulator and anticancer drug or micelles loaded with only PTX, but targeted with mAb 2C5 represent a promising approach to overcome drug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:22506922

  5. Nuclear Export as a Novel Therapeutic Target: The CRM1 Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chuanwen; Figueroa, Jose A; Liu, Zhongwei; Konala, Venu; Aulakh, Amardeep; Verma, Rashmi; Cobos, Everardo; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Gao, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of eukaryotic cellular function depends on molecular and biochemical compartmentalization. The transport of macromolecules between compartments requires specific and energydriven mechanisms. It occurs through a class of transport proteins known as karyopherins, which are divided in three different groups (exportins, importins, and transportins). The ubiquitous exportin Chromosome Region Maintenance 1 (CRM1) is involved in the transport of many proteins and RNA molecules from nucleus to cytoplasm. We have reviewed the available evidence supporting the relevance of CRM1 in the biology of several human neoplasms, its potential role in drug resistance, and its promise as a therapeutic target. Here we discuss different cancer related proteins (tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and enzymatic therapeutic targets), their function, and their association with CRM1, as well as agents that specifically inhibit CRM1, their mechanism of action, and their clinical relevance in certain human neoplasms. The directionality of nuclear transport and the specific molecular cargo in question are of paramount importance when examining the effects that CRM1 inhibition may have on cellular pathophysiology. The available data point out the potential role of CRM1-dependent nuclear export of regulatory proteins in the biology of certain human malignancies. Further studies should expand and clarify the importance of this mechanism in the pathobiology of human neoplasia. PMID:26324128

  6. The Role of Tau in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Its Potential as a Therapeutic Target

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    Michael S. Wolfe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal deposition of proteins in and around neurons is a common pathological feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. Among these pathological proteins, the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intraneuronal filaments in a spectrum of neurological disorders. The discovery that dominant mutations in the MAPT gene encoding tau are associated with familial frontotemporal dementia strongly supports abnormal tau protein as directly involved in disease pathogenesis. This and other evidence suggest that tau is a worthwhile target for the prevention or treatment of tau-associated neurodegenerative diseases, collectively called tauopathies. However, it is critical to understand the normal biological roles of tau, the specific molecular events that induce tau to become neurotoxic, the biochemical nature of pathogenic tau, the means by which pathogenic tau exerts neurotoxicity, and how tau pathology propagates. Based on known differences between normal and abnormal tau, a number of approaches have been taken toward the discovery of potential therapeutics. Key questions still remain open, such as the nature of the connection between the amyloid-β protein of Alzheimer’s disease and tau pathology. Answers to these questions should help better understand the nature of tauopathies and may also reveal new therapeutic targets and strategies.

  7. Immune system of the inner ear as a novel therapeutic target for sensorineural hearing loss

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    Takayuki eOkano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL is a common clinical condition resulting from dysfunction in one or more parts in the auditory pathway between the inner ear and auditory cortex. Despite the prevalence of SNHL, little is known about its etiopathology, although several mechanisms have been postulated including ischemia, viral infection or reactivation, and microtrauma. Immune-mediated inner ear disease has been introduced and accepted as one SNHL pathophysiology; it responds to immunosuppressive therapy and is one of the few reversible forms of bilateral SNHL. The concept of immune-mediated inner ear disease is straightforward and comprehensible, but criteria for clinical diagnosis and the precise mechanism of hearing loss have not been determined. Moreover, the therapeutic mechanisms of corticosteroids are unclear, leading to several misconceptions by both clinicians and investigators concerning corticosteroid therapy. This review addresses our current understanding of the immune system in the inner ear and its involvement in the pathophysiology in SNHL. Treatment of SNHL, including immune-mediated inner ear disorder, will be discussed with a focus on the immune mechanism and immunocompetent cells as therapeutic targets. Finally, possible interventions modulating the immune system in the inner ear to repair the tissue organization and improve hearing in patients with SNHL will be discussed. Tissue macrophages in the inner ear appear to be a potential target for modulating the immune response in the inner ear in the pathophysiology of SNHL.

  8. CDKN3 mRNA as a Biomarker for Survival and Therapeutic Target in Cervical Cancer.

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    Eira Valeria Barrón

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3 gene, involved in mitosis, is upregulated in cervical cancer (CC. We investigated CDKN3 mRNA as a survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target for CC. CDKN3 mRNA was measured in 134 CC and 25 controls by quantitative PCR. A 5-year survival study was conducted in 121 of these CC patients. Furthermore, CDKN3-specific siRNAs were used to investigate whether CDKN3 is involved in proliferation, migration, and invasion in CC-derived cell lines (SiHa, CaSki, HeLa. CDKN3 mRNA was on average 6.4-fold higher in tumors than in controls (p = 8 x 10-6, Mann-Whitney. A total of 68.2% of CC patients over expressing CDKN3 gene (fold change ≥ 17 died within two years of diagnosis, independent of the clinical stage and HPV type (Hazard Ratio = 5.0, 95% CI: 2.5-10, p = 3.3 x 10-6, Cox proportional-hazards regression. In contrast, only 19.2% of the patients with lower CDKN3 expression died in the same period. In vitro inactivation of CDKN3 decreased cell proliferation on average 67%, although it had no effect on cell migration and invasion. CDKN3 mRNA may be a good survival biomarker and potential therapeutic target in CC.

  9. Translating discovery in zebrafish pancreatic development to human pancreatic cancer: biomarkers, targets, pathogenesis, and therapeutics.

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    Yee, Nelson S; Kazi, Abid A; Yee, Rosemary K

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Experimental studies in the zebrafish have greatly facilitated understanding of genetic regulation of the early developmental events in the pancreas. Various approaches using forward and reverse genetics, chemical genetics, and transgenesis in zebrafish have demonstrated generally conserved regulatory roles of mammalian genes and discovered novel genetic pathways in exocrine pancreatic development. Accumulating evidence has supported the use of zebrafish as a model of human malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the genetic regulators of exocrine pancreatic development in zebrafish can be translated into potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transgenic zebrafish expressing oncogenic K-ras and zebrafish tumor xenograft model have emerged as valuable tools for dissecting the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and for drug discovery and toxicology. Future analysis of the pancreas in zebrafish will continue to advance understanding of the genetic regulation and biological mechanisms during organogenesis. Results of those studies are expected to provide new insights into how aberrant developmental pathways contribute to formation and growth of pancreatic neoplasia, and hopefully generate valid biomarkers and targets as well as effective and safe therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

  10. Medicinal plants growing in the Judea region: network approach for searching potential therapeutic targets

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    Arie Budovsky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants growing in the Judea region are widely used in traditional medicine of the Levant region. Nevertheless, they have not so far been sufficiently analyzed and their medicinal potential has not been evaluated. This study is the first attempt to fill the gap in the knowledge of the plants growing in the region. Comprehensive data mining of online botanical databases and peer-reviewed scientific literature including ethno-pharmacological surveys from the Levant region was applied to compile a full list of plants growing in the Judea region, with the focus on their medicinal applications. Around 1300 plants growing in the Judea region were identified. Of them, 25% have medicinal applications which were analyzed in this study. Screening for chemical-protein interactions, together with the network-based analysis of potential targets, will facilitate discovery and therapeutic applications of the Judea region plants. Such an approach could also be applied as an integrative platform for further searching the potential therapeutic targets of plants growing in other regions of the world.

  11. Neurological disorders and therapeutics targeted to surmount the blood–brain barrier

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    Kanwar JR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jagat R Kanwar, Bhasker Sriramoju, Rupinder K KanwarNanomedicine Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research, Centre for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Biosciences, Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: We are now in an aging population, so neurological disorders, particularly the neurodegenerative diseases, are becoming more prevalent in society. As per the epidemiological studies, Europe alone suffers 35% of the burden, indicating an alarming rate of disease progression. Further, treatment for these disorders is a challenging area due to the presence of the tightly regulated blood–brain barrier and its unique ability to protect the brain from xenobiotics. Conventional therapeutics, although effective, remain critically below levels of optimum therapeutic efficacy. Hence, methods to overcome the blood–brain barrier are currently a focus of research. Nanotechnological applications are gaining paramount importance in addressing this question, and yielding some promising results. This review addresses the pathophysiology of the more common neurological disorders and novel drug candidates, along with targeted nanoparticle applications for brain delivery.Keywords: blood–brain barrier, neurological diseases, brain delivery, targeted nanoparticles

  12. The Paramyxovirus Polymerase Complex as a Target for Next-Generation Anti-Paramyxovirus Therapeutics

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    Richard K Plemper

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paramyxovirus family includes major human and animal pathogens, including measles virus, mumps virus, and human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, as well as the emerging zoonotic Hendra and Nipah viruses. In the United States, RSV is the leading cause of infant hospitalizations due to viral infectious disease. Despite their clinical significance, effective drugs for the improved management of paramyxovirus disease are lacking. The development of novel anti-paramyxovirus therapeutics is therefore urgently needed. Paramyxoviruses contain RNA genomes of negative polarity, necessitating a virus-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp complex for replication and transcription. Since an equivalent enzymatic activity is absent in host cells, the RdRp complex represents an attractive druggable target, although structure-guided drug development campaigns are hampered by the lack of high-resolution RdRp crystal structures. Here, we review the current structural and functional insight into the paramyxovirus polymerase complex in conjunction with an evaluation of the mechanism of activity and developmental status of available experimental RdRp inhibitors. Our assessment spotlights the importance of the RdRp complex as a premier target for therapeutic intervention and examines how high-resolution insight into the organization of the complex will pave the path towards the structure-guided design and optimization of much-needed next-generation paramyxovirus RdRp blockers.

  13. Evidence for the endothelin system as an emerging therapeutic target for the treatment of chronic pain

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    Smith TP

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Terika P Smith,1 Tami Haymond,1 Sherika N Smith,1 Sarah M Sweitzer1,2 1Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Neuroscience, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical and Administrative Sciences, Presbyterian College School of Pharmacy, Clinton, SC, USA Abstract: Many people worldwide suffer from pain and a portion of these sufferers are diagnosed with a chronic pain condition. The management of chronic pain continues to be a challenge, and despite taking prescribed medication for pain, patients continue to have pain of moderate severity. Current pain therapies are often inadequate, with side effects that limit medication adherence. There is a need to identify novel therapeutic targets for the management of chronic pain. One potential candidate for the treatment of chronic pain is therapies aimed at modulating the vasoactive peptide endothelin-1. In addition to vasoactive properties, endothelin-1 has been implicated in pain transmission in both humans and animal models of nociception. Endothelin-1 directly activates nociceptors and potentiates the effect of other algogens, including capsaicin, formalin, and arachidonic acid. In addition, endothelin-1 has been shown to be involved in inflammatory pain, cancer pain, neuropathic pain, diabetic neuropathy, and pain associated with sickle cell disease. Therefore, endothelin-1 may prove a novel therapeutic target for the relief of many types of chronic pain. Keywords: endothelin-1, acute pain, chronic pain, endothelin receptor antagonists

  14. The significance of dynamin 2 expression for prostate cancer progression, prognostication, and therapeutic targeting.

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    Xu, Bin; Teng, Liang Hong; Silva, Sabrina Daniela da; Bijian, Krikor; Al Bashir, Samir; Jie, Su; Dolph, Michael; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; Bismar, Tarek A

    2014-02-01

    Dynamin 2 (Dyn2) is essential for intracellular vesicle formation and trafficking, cytokinesis, and receptor endocytosis. In this study, we investigated the implication of Dyn2 as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target for progressive prostate cancer (PCA). We evaluated Dyn2 protein expression by immunohistochemistry in two cohorts: men with localized PCA treated by retropubic radical prostatectomy (n = 226), and men with advanced/castrate-resistant PCA (CRPC) treated by transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) (n = 253). The role of Dyn2 in cell invasiveness was assessed by in vitro and in vivo experiments using androgen-responsive and refractory PCA preclinical models. Dyn2 expression was significantly increased across advanced stages of PCA compared to benign prostate tissue (P size and lymph node metastases in vivo. In isolated PCA cells, Dyn2 was found to regulate focal adhesion turnover, which is critical for cell migration; this mechanism requires full Dyn2 compared to mutants deficient in GTPase activity. In conclusion, Dyn2 overexpression is associated with neoplastic prostate epithelium and is associated with poor prognosis. Inhibition of Dyn2 prevents cell invasiveness in androgen-responsive and -refractory PCA models, supporting the potential benefit of Dyn2 to serve as a therapeutic target for advanced PCA.

  15. Targeting Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Restore Adult Neurogenesis.

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    Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Li, Wen-Lin; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Adult neurogenesis is the process of generating new neurons throughout life in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus of most mammalian species, which is closely related to aging and disease. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also an adipokine known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) salvage synthesis by generating nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide. Recent findings from our laboratory and other laboratories have provided much evidence that NAMPT might serve as a therapeutic target to restore adult neurogenesis. NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis in neural stem/progenitor cells is important for their proliferation, self-renewal, and formation of oligodendrocytes in vivo and in vitro. Therapeutic interventions by the administration of NMN, NAD, or recombinant NAMPT are effective for restoring adult neurogenesis in several neurological diseases. We summarize adult neurogenesis in aging, ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disease and review the advances of targeting NAMPT in restoring neurogenesis. Specifically, we provide emphasis on the P7C3 family, a class of proneurogenic compounds that are potential NAMPT activators, which might shed light on future drug development in neurogenesis restoration. PMID:27018006

  16. Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases

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    Maurizio Forte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the family of endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO is the smallest gaseous intercellular messenger involved in the modulation of several processes, such as blood flow and platelet aggregation control, essential to maintain vascular homeostasis. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS and its effects are mediated by cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests a crosstalk between the NO signaling and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the onset and progression of vascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia, and stroke. For these reasons, NO is considered as an emerging molecular target for developing therapeutic strategies for cardio- and cerebrovascular pathologies. Several natural derived compounds, such as polyphenols, are now proposed as modulators of NO-mediated pathways. The aim of this review is to highlight the experimental evidence on the involvement of nitric oxide in vascular homeostasis focusing on the therapeutic potential of targeting NO with some natural compounds in patients with vascular diseases.

  17. Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Maurizio; Damato, Antonio; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Puca, Annibale A.; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Vecchione, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Within the family of endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO) is the smallest gaseous intercellular messenger involved in the modulation of several processes, such as blood flow and platelet aggregation control, essential to maintain vascular homeostasis. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its effects are mediated by cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests a crosstalk between the NO signaling and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the onset and progression of vascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia, and stroke. For these reasons, NO is considered as an emerging molecular target for developing therapeutic strategies for cardio- and cerebrovascular pathologies. Several natural derived compounds, such as polyphenols, are now proposed as modulators of NO-mediated pathways. The aim of this review is to highlight the experimental evidence on the involvement of nitric oxide in vascular homeostasis focusing on the therapeutic potential of targeting NO with some natural compounds in patients with vascular diseases. PMID:27651855

  18. Identification of unique expression signatures and therapeutic targets in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

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    Yan Wusheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC, the predominant histological subtype of esophageal cancer, is characterized by high mortality. Previous work identified important mRNA expression differences between normal and tumor cells; however, to date there are limited ex vivo studies examining expression changes occurring during normal esophageal squamous cell differentiation versus those associated with tumorigenesis. In this study, we used a unique tissue microdissection strategy and microarrays to measure gene expression profiles associated with cell differentiation versus tumorigenesis in twelve cases of patient-matched normal basal squamous epithelial cells (NB, normal differentiated squamous epithelium (ND, and squamous cell cancer. Class comparison and pathway analysis were used to compare NB versus tumor in a search for unique therapeutic targets. Results As a first step towards this goal, gene expression profiles and pathways were evaluated. Overall, ND expression patterns were markedly different from NB and tumor; whereas, tumor and NB were more closely related. Tumor showed a general decrease in differentially expressed genes relative to NB as opposed to ND that exhibited the opposite trend. FSH and IgG networks were most highly dysregulated in normal differentiation and tumorigenesis, respectively. DNA repair pathways were generally elevated in NB and tumor relative to ND indicating involvement in both normal and pathological growth. PDGF signaling pathway and 12 individual genes unique to the tumor/NB comparison were identified as therapeutic targets, and 10 associated ESCC gene-drug pairs were identified. We further examined the protein expression level and the distribution patterns of four genes: ODC1, POSTN, ASPA and IGF2BP3. Ultimately, three genes (ODC1, POSTN, ASPA were verified to be dysregulated in the same pattern at both the mRNA and protein levels. Conclusions These data reveal insight into genes and

  19. Potential Diagnostic, Prognostic and Therapeutic Targets of MicroRNAs in Human Gastric Cancer

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    Ming-Ming Tsai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human gastric cancer (GC is characterized by a high incidence and mortality rate, largely because it is normally not identified until a relatively advanced stage owing to a lack of early diagnostic biomarkers. Gastroscopy with biopsy is the routine method for screening, and gastrectomy is the major therapeutic strategy for GC. However, in more than 30% of GC surgical patients, cancer has progressed too far for effective medical resection. Thus, useful biomarkers for early screening or detection of GC are essential for improving patients’ survival rate. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in tumorigenesis. They contribute to gastric carcinogenesis by altering the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Because of their stability in tissues, serum/plasma and other body fluids, miRNAs have been suggested as novel tumor biomarkers with suitable clinical potential. Recently, aberrantly expressed miRNAs have been identified and tested for clinical application in the management of GC. Aberrant miRNA expression profiles determined with miRNA microarrays, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and next-generation sequencing approaches could be used to establish sample specificity and to identify tumor type. Here, we provide an up-to-date summary of tissue-based GC-associated miRNAs, describing their involvement and that of their downstream targets in tumorigenic and biological processes. We examine correlations among significant clinical parameters and prognostic indicators, and discuss recurrence monitoring and therapeutic options in GC. We also review plasma/serum-based, GC-associated, circulating miRNAs and their clinical applications, focusing especially on early diagnosis. By providing insights into the mechanisms of miRNA-related tumor progression, this review will hopefully aid in the identification of novel potential therapeutic targets.

  20. HIV capsid is a tractable target for small molecule therapeutic intervention.

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    Wade S Blair

    Full Text Available Despite a high current standard of care in antiretroviral therapy for HIV, multidrug-resistant strains continue to emerge, underscoring the need for additional novel mechanism inhibitors that will offer expanded therapeutic options in the clinic. We report a new class of small molecule antiretroviral compounds that directly target HIV-1 capsid (CA via a novel mechanism of action. The compounds exhibit potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and HIV-2, and inhibit both early and late events in the viral replication cycle. We present mechanistic studies indicating that these early and late activities result from the compound affecting viral uncoating and assembly, respectively. We show that amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 CA are sufficient to confer resistance to this class of compounds, identifying CA as the target in infected cells. A high-resolution co-crystal structure of the compound bound to HIV-1 CA reveals a novel binding pocket in the N-terminal domain of the protein. Our data demonstrate that broad-spectrum antiviral activity can be achieved by targeting this new binding site and reveal HIV CA as a tractable drug target for HIV therapy.

  1. Targeted therapeutic delivery using engineered exosomes and its applications in cardiovascular diseases.

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    Xitong, Dang; Xiaorong, Zeng

    2016-01-10

    Exosomes are 30-120 nm membrane bound vesicles secreted naturally by almost all cells and exist in all body fluids. Accumulating evidence has shown that exosomes contain proteins, lipids, DNA, mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA that can be transferred from producer cells to recipient cells, facilitating cell-cell communication. As the natural carrier of these signal molecules, exosomes possess many other properties such as stability, biocompatibility, biological barrier permeability, low toxicity, and low immunogenicity, which make them an attractive vehicle for therapeutic delivery. How exosomes target recipient cells in vivo remains largely unknown, however, exosomes are selectively enriched in some transmembrane proteins that can be genetically engineered to display ligands/homing peptides on their surface, which confers exosome targeting capability to cells bearing cognate receptors. With the discovery of many peptides homing to diseased tissues or organs through phage display and in vivo biopanning technologies, there is ample opportunity to explore the potential use of exosome for targeted gene therapy. Here, we briefly review exosome biogenesis, mechanisms of exosome-mediated cell–cell communication, and exosome isolation and purification methods, and specifically focus on the emerging exosome targeting technologies.

  2. Kinesin family members KIF11 and KIF23 as potential therapeutic targets in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tatsuya; Lee, Daiyoon; Wu, Licun; Patel, Priya; Young, Ahn Jin; Wada, Hironobu; Hu, Hsin-Pei; Ujiie, Hideki; Kaji, Mitsuhito; Kano, Satoshi; Matsuge, Shinichi; Domen, Hiromitsu; Kaga, Kichizo; Matsui, Yoshiro; Kanno, Hiromi; Hatanaka, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Kanako C; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; de Perrot, Marc; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive form of cancer commonly associated with asbestos exposure that stems from the thoracic mesothelium with high mortality rate. Currently, treatment options for MPM are limited, and new molecular targets for treatments are urgently needed. Using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and an RNA interference-based screening, we screened two kinesin family members as potential therapeutic targets for MPM. Following in vitro investigation of the target silencing effects on MPM cells, a total of 53 MPMs were analyzed immunohistochemically with tissue microarray. KIF11 and KIF23 transcripts were found to be overexpressed in the majority of clinical MPM samples as well as human MPM cell lines as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Gene knockdown in MPM cell lines identified growth inhibition following knockdown of KIF11 and KIF23. High expression of KIF11 (KIF11-H) and KIF23 (KIF23-H) were found in 43.4 and 50.9% of all the MPM cases, respectively. Patients who received curative resection with tumors displaying KIF23-H showed shorter overall survival (P=0.0194). These results provide that inhibition of KIF11 and KIF23 may hold promise for treatment of MPMs, raising the possibility that kinesin-based drug targets may be developed in the future. PMID:27279560

  3. Identification of CD90 as Putative Cancer Stem Cell Marker and Therapeutic Target in Insulinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buishand, Floryne O; Arkesteijn, Ger J A; Feenstra, Laurien R; Oorsprong, Claire W D; Mestemaker, Margiet; Starke, Achim; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Mol, Jan A

    2016-06-01

    The long-term prognosis after surgical resection of malignant insulinoma (INS) is poor. Novel adjuvant therapies, specifically targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs), are warranted. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize and target putative INS CSCs. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, human INS cell line CM and pancreatic carcinoid cell line BON1 were screened for the presence of stem cell-associated markers. CD90, CD166, and GD2 were identified as potential CSC markers. Only CD90(+) INS cells had an increased tumor-initiating potential in athymic nude mice. Anti-CD90 monoclonal antibodies decreased the viability and metastatic potential of injected cells in a zebrafish embryo INS xenograft model. Primary INS stained positive for CD90 by immunohistochemistry, however also intratumoral fibroblasts and vascular endothelium showed positive staining. The results of this study suggest that anti-CD90 monoclonals form a potential novel adjuvant therapeutic modality by targeting either INS cells directly, or by targeting the INS microenvironment. PMID:27049037

  4. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T;

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  5. Evaluation of LMP1 of Epstein-Barr virus as a therapeutic target by its inhibition

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    Wilson Joanna B

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1 encoded by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is an oncoprotein which acts by constitutive activation of various signalling pathways, including NF-κB. In so doing it leads to deregulated cell growth intrinsic to the cancer cell as well as having extrinsic affects upon the tumour microenvironment. These properties and that it is a foreign antigen, lead to the proposition that LMP1 may be a good therapeutic target in the treatment of EBV associated disease. LMP1 is expressed in several EBV-associated malignancies, notably in Hodgkin's lymphoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. However, the viral protein is only detected in approximately 30%-50% of NPC samples, as such its role in carcinogenesis and tumour maintenance can be questioned and thus its relevance as a therapeutic target. Results In order to explore if LMP1 has a continuous function in established tumours, its activity was inhibited through expression of a dominant negative LMP1 mutant in tumour cell lines derived from transgenic mice. LMP1 is the tumour predisposing oncogene in two different series of transgenic mice which separately give rise to either B-cell lymphomas or carcinomas. Inhibition of LMP1 activity in the carcinoma cell lines lead to a reduction in clonagenicity and clone viability in all of the cell lines tested, even those with low or below detection levels of LMP1. Inhibition of LMP1 activity in the transgenic B-cell lines was incompatible with growth and survival of the cells and no clones expressing the dominant negative LMP1 mutant could be established. Conclusions LMP1 continues to provide a tumour cell growth function in cell lines established from LMP1 transgenic mouse tumours, of both B-cell and epithelial cell origin. LMP1 can perform this function, even when expressed at such low levels as to be undetectable, whereby evidence of its expression can only be inferred by its inhibition being detrimental to the growth

  6. Molecular pathogenesis and targeted therapeutics in Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumours

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    Kelleher Fergal C

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ewing sarcoma/PNET is managed with treatment paradigms involving combinations of chemotherapy, surgery, and sometimes radiation. Although the 5-year survival rate of non-metastatic disease approaches 70%, those cases that are metastatic and those that recur have 5-year survival rates of less than 20%. Molecularly targeted treatments offer the potential to further improve treatment outcomes. Methods A PUBMED search was performed from 1997 to 2011. Published literature that included the topic of the Ewing sarcoma/PNET was also referenced. Results Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R antagonists have demonstrated modest single agent efficacy in phase I/II clinical trials in Ewing sarcoma/PNET, but have a strong preclinical rationale. Based on in vitro and animal data, treatment using antisense RNA and cDNA oligonucleotides directed at silencing the EWS-FLI chimera that occurs in most Ewing sarcoma/PNET may have potential therapeutic importance. However drug delivery and degradation problems may limit this therapeutic approach. Protein-protein interactions can be targeted by inhibition of RNA helicase A, which binds to EWS/FLI as part of the transcriptional complex. Tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand induction using interferon has been used in preclinical models. Interferons may be incorporated into future chemotherapeutic treatment paradigms. Histone deacetylase inhibitors can restore TGF-β receptor II allowing TFF-β signalling, which appears to inhibit growth of Ewing sarcoma/PNET cell lines in vitro. Immunotherapy using allogeneic natural killer cells has activity in Ewing sarcoma/PNET cell lines and xenograft models. Finally, cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors such as flavopiridol may be clinically efficacious in relapsed Ewing sarcoma/PNET. Conclusion Preclinical evidence exists that targeted therapeutics may be efficacious in the ESFT. IGF-1R antagonists have demonstrated efficacy in phase I

  7. Targeting hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus induced carcinogenesis: novel patented therapeutics.

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    Kanwar, Rupinder K; Singh, Neha; Gurudevan, Sneha; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2011-05-01

    Viral infections leading to carcinogenesis tops the risk factors list for the development of human cancer. The decades of research has provided ample scientific evidence that directly links 10-15% of the worldwide incidence of human cancers to the infections with seven human viruses. Moreover, the insights gained into the molecular pathogenetic and immune mechanisms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) viral transmission to tumour progression, and the identification of their viral surface antigens as well as oncoproteins have provided the scientific community with opportunities to target these virus infections through the development of prophylactic vaccines and antiviral therapeutics. The preventive vaccination programmes targeting HBV and high risk HPV infections, linked to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cervical cancer respectively have been recently reported to alter age-old cancer patterns on an international scale. In this review, with an emphasis on HBV and HPV mediated carcinogenesis because of the similarities and differences in their global incidence patterns, viral transmission, mortality, molecular pathogenesis and prevention, we focus on the development of recently identified HBV and HPV targeting innovative strategies resulting in several patents and patent applications. PMID:21517743

  8. Neuromuscular therapeutics by RNA-targeted suppression of ACHE gene expression.

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    Dori, Amir; Soreq, Hermona

    2006-10-01

    RNA-targeted therapeutics offers inherent advantages over small molecule drugs wherever one out of several splice variant enzymes should be inhibited. Here, we report the use of Monarsen, a 20-mer acetylcholinesterase-targeted antisense agent with three 3'-2'o-methyl-protected nucleotides, for selectively attenuating the stress-induced accumulation of the normally rare, soluble "readthrough" acetylcholinesterase variant AChE-R. Acetylcholine hydrolysis by AChE-R may cause muscle fatigue and moreover, limit the cholinergic anti-inflammatory blockade, yielding inflammation-associated pathology. Specific AChE-R targeting by Monarsen was achieved in cultured cells, experimental animals, and patient volunteers. In rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, oral delivery of Monarsen improved muscle action potential in a lower dose regimen (nanomolar versus micromolar), rapid and prolonged manner (up to 72 h versus 2-4 h) as compared with the currently used small molecule anticholinesterases. In central nervous system neurons of both rats and cynomolgus monkeys, systematic Monarsen treatment further suppressed the levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6. Toxicology testing and ongoing clinical trials support the notion that Monarsen treatment would offer considerable advantages over conventional cholinesterase inhibitors with respect to dosing, specificity, side effects profile, and duration of efficacy, while raising some open questions regarding its detailed mechanism of action. PMID:17145929

  9. Barriers to the Preclinical Development of Therapeutics that Target Aging Mechanisms

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    Burd, Christin E.; Gill, Matthew S.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Robbins, Paul D.; Austad, Steven N.; Barzilai, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Through the progress of basic science research, fundamental mechanisms that contribute to age-related decline are being described with increasing depth and detail. Although these efforts have identified new drug targets and compounds that extend life span in model organisms, clinical trials of therapeutics that target aging processes remain scarce. Progress in aging research is hindered by barriers associated with the translation of basic science discoveries into the clinic. This report summarizes discussions held at a 2014 Geroscience Network retreat focused on identifying hurdles that currently impede the preclinical development of drugs targeting fundamental aging processes. From these discussions, it was evident that aging researchers have varied perceptions of the ideal preclinical pipeline. To forge a clear and cohesive path forward, several areas of controversy must first be resolved and new tools developed. Here, we focus on five key issues in preclinical drug development (drug discovery, lead compound development, translational preclinical biomarkers, funding, and integration between researchers and clinicians), expanding upon discussions held at the Geroscience Retreat and suggesting areas for further research. By bringing these findings to the attention of the aging research community, we hope to lay the foundation for a concerted preclinical drug development pipeline. PMID:27535964

  10. NADPH Oxidase as a Therapeutic Target for Neuroprotection against Ischaemic Stroke: Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carli L. Roulston

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS is known to contribute to stroke injury, particularly during reperfusion, and antioxidants targeting this process have resulted in improved outcomes experimentally. Unfortunately these improvements have not been successfully translated to the clinical setting. Targeting the source of oxidative stress may provide a superior therapeutic approach. The NADPH oxidases are a family of enzymes dedicated solely to ROS production and pre-clinical animal studies targeting NADPH oxidases have shown promising results. However there are multiple factors that need to be considered for future drug development: There are several homologues of the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase. All have differing physiological roles and may contribute differentially to oxidative damage after stroke. Additionally, the role of ROS in brain repair is largely unexplored, which should be taken into consideration when developing drugs that inhibit specific NADPH oxidases after injury. This article focuses on the current knowledge regarding NADPH oxidase after stroke including in vivo genetic and inhibitor studies. The caution required when interpreting reports of positive outcomes after NADPH oxidase inhibition is also discussed, as effects on long term recovery are yet to be investigated and are likely to affect successful clinical translation.

  11. NADPH Oxidase as a Therapeutic Target for Neuroprotection against Ischaemic Stroke: Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Sarah K; Roulston, Carli L

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to contribute to stroke injury, particularly during reperfusion, and antioxidants targeting this process have resulted in improved outcomes experimentally. Unfortunately these improvements have not been successfully translated to the clinical setting. Targeting the source of oxidative stress may provide a superior therapeutic approach. The NADPH oxidases are a family of enzymes dedicated solely to ROS production and pre-clinical animal studies targeting NADPH oxidases have shown promising results. However there are multiple factors that need to be considered for future drug development: There are several homologues of the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase. All have differing physiological roles and may contribute differentially to oxidative damage after stroke. Additionally, the role of ROS in brain repair is largely unexplored, which should be taken into consideration when developing drugs that inhibit specific NADPH oxidases after injury. This article focuses on the current knowledge regarding NADPH oxidase after stroke including in vivo genetic and inhibitor studies. The caution required when interpreting reports of positive outcomes after NADPH oxidase inhibition is also discussed, as effects on long term recovery are yet to be investigated and are likely to affect successful clinical translation. PMID:24961415

  12. Protein kinase Calpha and epsilon small-molecule targeted therapeutics: a new roadmap to two Holy Grails in drug discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brian, Catherine A; Chu, Feng; Bornmann, William G; Maxwell, David S

    2006-02-01

    Protein kinase (PK)Calpha and epsilon are rational targets for cancer therapy. However, targeted experimental therapeutics that inhibit PKCalpha or epsilon are unavailable. The authors established recently that covalent modification of an active-site cysteine in human PKCepsilon, Cys452, by small molecules, for example 2-mercaptoethanolamine, is necessary and sufficient to render PKCepsilon kinase-dead. Cys452 is conserved in only eleven human protein kinase genes, including PKCalpha. Therefore, the design of small molecules that bind PKC active sites with an electrophile substituent positioned proximal to the Cys452 side chain may lead to targeted therapeutics that selectively inhibit PKCepsilon, PKCalpha or other PKC isozymes.

  13. Targeting Specific HATs for Neurodegenerative Disease Treatment: Translating Basic Biology to Therapeutic Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila K. Pirooznia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic epigenetic regulation of neurons is emerging as a fundamental mechanism by which neurons adapt their transcriptional responses to specific developmental and environmental cues. While defects within the neural epigenome have traditionally been studied in the context of early developmental and heritable cognitive disorders, recent studies point to aberrant histone acetylation status as a key mechanism underlying acquired inappropriate alterations of genome structure and function in post-mitotic neurons during the aging process. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly evident that chromatin acetylation status can be impaired during the lifetime of neurons through mechanisms related to loss of function of histone acetyltransferase (HATs activity. Several HATs have been shown to participate in vital neuronal functions such as regulation of neuronal plasticity and memory formation. As such, dysregulation of such HATs has been implicated in the pathogenesis associated with age-associated neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive decline. In order to counteract the loss of HAT function in neurodegenerative diseases, the current therapeutic strategies involve the use of small molecules called histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors that antagonize HDAC activity and thus enhance acetylation levels. Although this strategy has displayed promising therapeutic effects, currently used HDAC inhibitors lack target specificity, raising concerns about their applicability. With rapidly evolving literature on HATs and their respective functions in mediating neuronal survival and higher order brain function such as learning and memory, modulating the function of specific HATs holds new promises as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the recent progress in research regarding epigenetic histone acetylation mechanisms underlying neuronal activity and cognitive function. We discuss the current understanding of specific HDACs and

  14. Dysfunction of two lysosome degradation pathways of α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease: potential therapeutic targets?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Fang Jiang; Sheng-Di Chen

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is pathologically characterized by the presence of α-synuclein (α-syn)-positive intracytoplasmic inclusions named Lewy bodies in the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra.A series of morbid consequences are caused by pathologically high amounts or mutant forms of α-syn,such as defects of membrane trafficking and lipid metabolism.In this review,we consider evidence that both point mutation and overexpression of α-syn result in aberrant degradation in neurons and microglia,and this is associated with the autophagy-lysosome pathway and endosomelysosome system,leading directly to pathological intracellular aggregation,abnormal externalization and re-internalization cycling (and,in turn,internalization and re-externalization),and exocytosis.Based on these pathological changes,an increasing number of researchers have focused on these new therapeutic targets,aiming at alleviating the pathological accumulation of α-syn and re-establishing normal degradation.

  15. Female resistance to pneumonia identifies lung macrophage nitric oxide synthase-3 as a therapeutic target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiping; Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Koziel, Henry;

    2014-01-01

    To identify new approaches to enhance innate immunity to bacterial pneumonia, we investigated the natural experiment of gender differences in resistance to infections. Female and estrogen-treated male mice show greater resistance to pneumococcal pneumonia, seen as greater bacterial clearance......). Epidemiologic data show decreased hospitalization for pneumonia in women receiving estrogen or statins (known to activate NOS3). Pharmacologic targeting of NOS3 with statins or another small-molecule compound (AVE3085) enhanced macrophage bacterial killing, improved bacterial clearance, and increased host...... survival in both primary and secondary (post-influenza) pneumonia. The data identify a novel mechanism for host defense via NOS3 and suggest a potential therapeutic strategy to reduce secondary bacterial pneumonia after influenza....

  16. Therapeutic potential of mGluR5 targeting in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil eKumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decades of research dedicated towards Alzheimer's disease (AD has culminated in much of the current understanding of the neurodegeneration associated with disease. However, delineating the pathophysiology and finding a possible cure for the disease is still wanting. This is in part due to the lack of knowledge pertaining to the connecting link between neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory pathways. Consequently, the inefficacy and ill-effects of the drugs currently available for AD encourage the need for alternative and safe therapeutic intervention. In this review we highlight the potential of mGluR5, a metabotropic glutamatergic receptor, in understanding the mechanism underlying the neuronal death and neuroinflammation in AD. We also discuss the role of mGlu5 receptor in mediating the neuron-glia interaction in the disease. Finally, we discuss the potential of mGluR5 as target for treating AD.

  17. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New therapeutic targets in major diseases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Balasundaram Padmanabhan; Shruti Mathur; Manjula Ramu; Shailesh Tripathi

    2016-06-01

    The bromodomains and extra-terminal domain (BET) family proteins recognize acetylated chromatin through their bromodomains (BDs) and helps in regulating gene expression. BDs are chromatin ‘readers’; by interacting with acetylated lysines on the histone tails, they recruit chromatin-regulating proteins on the promoter region to regulate gene expression and repression. Extensive efforts have been employed by the scientific communities worldwide, to identify and develop potential inhibitors of BET family BDs to regulate protein expression by inhibiting acetylated histone (H3/H4) interactions. Several small molecule inhibitors have been reported, which not only have high affinity, but also have high specificity to BET BDs. These developments make BET family proteins to be an important therapeutic targets, for major diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, obesity and inflammation. Here, we review and discuss the structural biology of BET family BDs and their applications in major diseases.

  18. β1 integrins as therapeutic targets to disrupt hallmarks of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Florence eBlandin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrins belong to a large family of αβ heterodimeric transmembrane proteins first recognized as adhesion molecules that bind to dedicated elements of the extracellular matrix and also to other surrounding cells. As important sensors of the cell microenvironment, they regulate numerous signaling pathways in response to structural variations of the extracellular matrix. Biochemical and biomechanical cues provided by this matrix and transmitted to cells via integrins are critically modified in tumoral settings. Integrins repertoire are subjected to expression level modifications, in tumor cells and in surrounding cancer-associated cells, implicated in tumor initiation and progression as well. As critical players in numerous cancer hallmarks, defined by Hanahan and Weinberg in 2011, integrins represent pertinent therapeutic targets. We will briefly summarize here our current knowledge about integrin implications in those different hallmarks focusing primarily on β1 integrins.

  19. Apelin and APJ, a novel critical factor and therapeutic target for atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deguan Lv; Hening Li; Linxi Chen

    2013-01-01

    Apelin is a bioactive peptide discovered recently that has been proved to be an endogenous ligand of the APJ receptor.Apelin and APJ are widely distributed in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues.Researches have confirmed that apelin/APJ involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological functions in the cardiovascular system.Investigations indicated that apelin is a novel critical factor in the development of atherosclerosis (AS).In this review,we discuss the roles of apelin in the vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation,monocytes-endothelial cell adhesion,and angiogenesis that potentially reveals a new cellular mechanism of AS.Considering these roles,apelin and APJ may be novel therapeutic targets of AS.

  20. Telomere components as potential therapeutic targets for treating microbial pathogen infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibo eLi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In a number of microbial pathogens that undergoes antigenic variation to evade the host’s immune attack, genes encoding surface antigens are located at subtelomeric loci, and recent studies have revealed that telomere components play important roles in regulation of surface antigen expression in several of these pathogens, indicating that telomeres play critical roles in microbial pathogen virulence regulation. Importantly, although telomere protein components and their functions are largely conserved from protozoa to mammals, telomere protein homologues in microbial pathogens and humans have low sequence homology. Therefore, pathogen telomere components are potential drug targets for therapeutic approaches because first, most telomere proteins are essential for pathogens’ survival, and second, disruption of pathogens’ antigenic variation mechanism would facilitate host’s immune system to clear the infection.

  1. Demyelination as a rational therapeutic target for ischemic or traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hong; Hu, Xiaoming; Leak, Rehana K; Shi, Yejie; An, Chengrui; Suenaga, Jun; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2015-10-01

    Previous research on stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) heavily emphasized pathological alterations in neuronal cells within gray matter. However, recent studies have highlighted the equal importance of white matter integrity in long-term recovery from these conditions. Demyelination is a major component of white matter injury and is characterized by loss of the myelin sheath and oligodendrocyte cell death. Demyelination contributes significantly to long-term sensorimotor and cognitive deficits because the adult brain only has limited capacity for oligodendrocyte regeneration and axonal remyelination. In the current review, we will provide an overview of the major causes of demyelination and oligodendrocyte cell death following acute brain injuries, and discuss the crosstalk between myelin, axons, microglia, and astrocytes during the process of demyelination. Recent discoveries of molecules that regulate the processes of remyelination may provide novel therapeutic targets to restore white matter integrity and improve long-term neurological recovery in stroke or TBI patients. PMID:25819104

  2. Innate immune receptors in heart failure: Side effect or potential therapeutic target?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katharina; B; Wagner; Stephan; B; Felix; Alexander; Riad

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure(HF) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in western countries and occasions major expenses for public health systems. Although optimal medical treatment is widely available according to current guidelines, the prognosis of patients with HF is still poor. Despite the etiology of the disease, increased systemic or cardiac activation of the innate immune system is well documented in several types of HF. In some cases there is evidence of an association between innate immune activation and clinical outcome of patients with this disease. However, the few large trials conducted with the use of anti-inflammatory medication in HF have not revealed its benefits. Thus, greater understanding of the relationship between alteration in the immune system and development and progression of HF is urgently necessary: prior to designing therapeutic interventions that target pathological inflammatory processes in preventing harmful cardiac effects of immune modulatory therapy. In this regard, relatively recently discovered receptors of the innate immune system, i.e., namely toll-like receptors(TLRs) and nodlike receptors(NLRs)-are the focus of intense cardiovascular research. These receptors are main up-stream regulators of cytokine activation. This review will focus on current knowledge of the role of TLRs and NLRs, as well as on downstream cytokine activation, and will discuss potential therapeutic implications.

  3. Circulating microRNAs as Biomarkers, Therapeutic Targets, and Signaling Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seena K. Ajit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs are important regulators of post-transcriptional gene regulation and have altered the prevailing view of a linear relationship between gene and protein expression. Aberrant miRNA expression is an emerging theme for a wide variety of diseases, highlighting the fundamental role played by miRNAs in both physiological and pathological states. The identification of stable miRNAs in bodily fluids paved the way for their use as novel biomarkers amenable to clinical diagnosis in translational medicine. Identification of miRNAs in exosomes that are functional upon delivery to the recipient cells has highlighted a novel method of intercellular communication. Delivery of miRNAs to recipient cells via blood, with functional gene regulatory consequences, opens up novel avenues for target intervention. Exosomes thus offer a novel strategy for delivering drugs or RNA therapeutic agents. Though much work lies ahead, circulating miRNAs are unequivocally ushering in a new era of novel biomarker discovery, intercellular communication mechanisms, and therapeutic intervention strategies.

  4. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2: a novel marker of cardiovascular risk and potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macphee, Colin; Benson, G Martin; Shi, Yi; Zalewski, Andrew

    2005-06-01

    Although the clinical benefit of statins is well established, these agents reduce the risk of cardiovascular events by only 20 - 40%, and the residual risk for high-risk patients is considerable. The recognition of atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disease has opened the door to numerous complementary therapeutic approaches to further reduce risk and the overall burden of cardiovascular disease. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) is a novel inflammatory marker of cardiovascular risk that is being evaluated as a potential therapeutic target. The biological function of this enzyme in atherosclerosis has been controversial but recent evidence supports its pro-atherogenic role. The enzyme is predominantly bound to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol particles in humans, and its activity produces bioactive lipid mediators that promote inflammatory processes present at every stage of atherogenesis, from atheroma initiation to plaque destabilisation and rupture. Initial clinical studies suggest that the inhibitors of Lp-PLA(2) can block enzyme activity in plasma and within atherosclerotic plaques. However, more studies are needed to determine the potential clinical benefits of inhibiting Lp-PLA(2). PMID:16004595

  5. Organization, Function, and Therapeutic Targeting of the Morbillivirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourimant, Julien; Plemper, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    The morbillivirus genus comprises major human and animal pathogens, including the highly contagious measles virus. Morbilliviruses feature single stranded negative sense RNA genomes that are wrapped by a plasma membrane-derived lipid envelope. Genomes are encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein forming ribonucleoprotein complexes, and only the encapsidated RNA is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs towards the structural and functional understanding of the morbillivirus polymerase complex. Considering the clinical burden imposed by members of the morbillivirus genus, the development of novel antiviral therapeutics is urgently needed. The viral polymerase complex presents unique structural and enzymatic properties that can serve as attractive candidates for druggable targets. We evaluate distinct strategies for therapeutic intervention and examine how high-resolution insight into the organization of the polymerase complex may pave the path towards the structure-based design and optimization of next-generation RdRp inhibitors. PMID:27626440

  6. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekanova M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Cekanova, Kusum Rathore Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA Abstract: Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients. Keywords: mouse cancer model, companion animal cancer model, dogs, cats, molecular targets

  7. Development of therapeutic Au-methylene blue nanoparticles for targeted photodynamic therapy of cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiashing; Hsu, Che-Hao; Huang, Chih-Chia; Chang, Po-Yang

    2015-01-14

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the cellular uptake of a photosensitizer (PS) combined with oxygen molecules and light at a specific wavelength to be able to trigger cancer cell death via the apoptosis pathway, which is less harmful and has less inflammatory side effect than necrosis. However, the traditional PDT treatment has two main deficiencies: the dark toxicity of the PS and the poor selectivity of the cellular uptake of PS between the target cells and normal tissues. In this work, methylene blue (MB), a known effective PS, combined with Au nanoparticles (NPs) was prepared using an intermolecular interaction between a polystyrene-alt-maleic acid (PSMA) layer on the Au NPs and MB. The Au@polymer/MB NPs produced a high quantum yield of singlet oxygen molecules, over 50% as much as that of free MB, when they were excited by a dark red light source at 660 nm, but without significant dark toxicity. Furthermore, transferrin (Tf) was conjugated on the Au@polymer/MB NPs via an EDC/NHS reaction to enhance the selectivity to HeLa cells compared to 3T3 fibroblasts. With a hand-held single laser treatment (32 mW/cm) for 4 min, the new Au@polymer/MB-Tf NPs showed a 2-fold enhancement of PDT efficiency toward HeLa cells over the use of free MB at 4 times dosage. Cellular staining examinations showed that the HeLa cells reacted with Au@polymer/MB-Tf NPs and the 660 nm light excitation triggered PDT, which caused the cells to undergo apoptosis ("programmed" cell death). We propose that applying this therapeutic Au@polymer/MB-Tf nanoagent is facile and safe for delivery and cancer cell targeting to simultaneously minimize side effects and accomplish a significant enhancement in photodynamic therapeutic efficiency toward next-generation nanomedicine development.

  8. ATP synthase ecto-α-subunit: a novel therapeutic target for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Jian

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment failure for breast cancer is frequently due to lymph node metastasis and invasion to neighboring organs. The aim of the present study was to investigate invasion- and metastasis-related genes in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Identification of new targets will facilitate the developmental pace of new techniques in screening and early diagnosis. Improved abilities to predict progression and metastasis, therapeutic response and toxicity will help to increase survival of breast cancer patients. Methods Differential protein expression in two breast cancer cell lines, one with high and the other with low metastatic potential, was analyzed using two-dimensional liquid phase chromatographic fractionation (Proteome Lab PF 2D system followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS. Results Up regulation of α-subunit of ATP synthase was identified in high metastatic cells compared with low metastatic cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of 168 human breast cancer specimens on tissue microarrays revealed a high frequency of ATP synthase α-subunit expression in breast cancer (94.6% compared to normal (21.2% and atypical hyperplasia (23% breast tissues. Levels of ATP synthase expression levels strongly correlated with large tumor size, poor tumor differentiation and advanced tumor stages (P Conclusions Over-expression of ATP synthase α-subunit may be involved in the progression and metastasis of breast cancer, perhaps representing a potential biomarker for diagnosis, prognosis and a therapeutic target for breast cancer. This finding of this study will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism of tumor metastasis and to improve the screening, diagnosis, as well as prognosis and/or prediction of responses to therapy for breast cancer.

  9. Functional amyloid signaling via the inflammasome, necrosome, and signalosome: New therapeutic targets in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traci L Parry

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available As the most common cause of death and disability globally, heart disease remains an incompletely understood enigma. A growing number of cardiac diseases are being characterized by the presence of misfolded proteins underlying their pathophysiology, including cardiac amyloidosis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. At least nine precursor proteins have been implicated in the development of cardiac amyloidosis, most commonly caused by multiple myeloma (MM light chain disease and disease-causing mutant or wildtype transthyretin (TTR. Similarly aggregates with PSEN1 and COFILIN-2 have been identified in up to 1/3 of idiopathic DCM cases studied indicating the potential predominance of misfolded proteins in heart failure. In this review, we present recent evidence linking misfolded proteins mechanistically with heart failure and present multiple lines of new therapeutic approaches that target the prevention of misfolded proteins in cardiac TTR amyloid disease. These include multiple small molecule pharmacological chaperones now in clinical trials designed specifically to support TTR folding by rational design, such as tafamidis, and chaperones previously developed for other purposes, such as doxycycline and tauroursodeoxycholic acid. Lastly, we present newly discovered non-pathological functional amyloid structures, such as the inflammasome and necrosome signaling complexes, which can be activated directly by amyloid. These may represent future targets to successfully attenuate amyloid-induced proteotoxicity in heart failure as the inflammasome, for example, is being therapeutically inhibited experimentally in autoimmune disease. Together, these studies demonstrate multiple novel points in which new therapies may be used to primarily prevent misfolded proteins or to inhibit their downstream amyloid-mediated effectors, such as the inflammasome, to prevent proteotoxicity in heart failure.

  10. Functional Amyloid Signaling via the Inflammasome, Necrosome, and Signalosome: New Therapeutic Targets in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Traci L; Melehani, Jason H; Ranek, Mark J; Willis, Monte S

    2015-01-01

    As the most common cause of death and disability, globally, heart disease remains an incompletely understood enigma. A growing number of cardiac diseases are being characterized by the presence of misfolded proteins underlying their pathophysiology, including cardiac amyloidosis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). At least nine precursor proteins have been implicated in the development of cardiac amyloidosis, most commonly caused by multiple myeloma light chain disease and disease-causing mutant or wildtype transthyretin (TTR). Similarly, aggregates with PSEN1 and COFILIN-2 have been identified in up to one-third of idiopathic DCM cases studied, indicating the potential predominance of misfolded proteins in heart failure. In this review, we present recent evidence linking misfolded proteins mechanistically with heart failure and present multiple lines of new therapeutic approaches that target the prevention of misfolded proteins in cardiac TTR amyloid disease. These include multiple small molecule pharmacological chaperones now in clinical trials designed specifically to support TTR folding by rational design, such as tafamidis, and chaperones previously developed for other purposes, such as doxycycline and tauroursodeoxycholic acid. Last, we present newly discovered non-pathological "functional" amyloid structures, such as the inflammasome and necrosome signaling complexes, which can be activated directly by amyloid. These may represent future targets to successfully attenuate amyloid-induced proteotoxicity in heart failure, as the inflammasome, for example, is being therapeutically inhibited experimentally in autoimmune disease. Together, these studies demonstrate multiple novel points in which new therapies may be used to primarily prevent misfolded proteins or to inhibit their downstream amyloid-mediated effectors, such as the inflammasome, to prevent proteotoxicity in heart failure. PMID:26664897

  11. Vancomycin Therapeutic Targets and Nephrotoxicity in Critically Ill Children With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, Glaucia T F; Araujo, Orlei R; Silva, Dafne C B; Arduini, Rodrigo G; Petrilli, Antonio S

    2016-03-01

    To obtain pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data for vancomycin in a cohort of critically ill pediatric oncology patients, we analyzed 256 measurements of vancomycin concentrations in 94 patients. Variables were tested as possible risk factors for vancomycin-related nephrotoxicity or death for 28 days. We found the following: mean vancomycin trough serum concentration, 15.6 ± 12.4 μg/mL; mean vancomycin clearance, 0.16 ± 0.098 L/h/kg; and mean vancomycin distribution volume, 1.04 ± 0.11 L/kg. Only 13.6% of serum trough level measurements were between 15 and 20 μg/mL. The trough levels showed a strong correlation with the AUC (area under the curve of serum concentrations vs. time over 24 h to the minimum inhibitory concentration ratio), with a 94% positive predictive value for AUC/MIC ≥ 400, but only for MIC=1. The doses that are currently used (60 mg/kg/d) attained the therapeutic target (AUC/MIC ≥ 400) in only 56% of measurements, considering MIC=1. A serum trough level of ≥ 20 μg/mL was an independent risk for nephrotoxicity (P = 0.0008; odds ratio = 17.83). Vancomycin-related nephrotoxicity was a predictor of death for up to 28 days (P = 0.003, odds ratio = 7.68). Currently administered doses of vancomycin do not reach the therapeutic target for critical cancer patients, particularly if staphylococci isolates have a MIC>1.

  12. Titanium(IV) targets phosphoesters on nucleotides: implications for the mechanism of action of the anticancer drug titanocene dichloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M; Guo, Z; Sadler, P J

    2001-09-01

    Abstract Reactions between the anticancer drug titanocene dichloride (Cp2TiCl2) and various nucleotides and their constituents in aqueous solution or N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) have been investigated by 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy and in the solid state by IR spectroscopy. In aqueous solution over the pH* (pH meter reading in D2O) range 2.3-6.5, CMP forms one new species with Ti(IV) bound only to the phosphate group. In acidic media at pH*TMP approximately AMP > CMP. At pH* > 7.0, hydrolysis of Cp2TiCl2 predominated and little reaction with the nucleotides was observed. Binding of deoxyribose 5'-phosphate and 4-nitrophenyl phosphate to Cp2TiCl2(aq) via their phosphate groups was detected by 31P NMR spectroscopy, but no reaction between Cp2TiCl2(aq) and deoxyguanosine, 9-ethylguanine or deoxy-D-ribose was observed in aqueous solution. The nucleoside phosphodiesters 3',5'-cyclic GMP and 2',3'-cyclic CMP did not react with Cp2TiCl2(aq) in aqueous solution; however, in the less polar solvent DMF, 3',5'-cyclic GMP coordination to [Cp2Ti]2+ via its phosphodiester group was readily observed. Binding of titanocene to the phosphodiester group of the dinucleotide GpC was also observed in DMF by 31P NMR. The nucleoside triphosphates ATP and GTP reacted more extensively with Cp2TiCl2(aq) than their monophosphates; complexes with bound phosphate groups were formed in acidic media and to a lesser extent at neutral pH. Cleavage of phosphate bonds in ATP (and GTP) by Cp2TiCl2(aq) to form inorganic phosphate, AMP (or GMP) and ADP (or GDP) was observed in aqueous solutions. In addition, titanocene binding to ATP was not inhibited by Mg(II), but the ternary complex titanocene-ATP-Mg appeared to form. These reactions contrast markedly with those of the drug cisplatin, which binds predominantly to the base nitrogen atoms of nucleotides and only weakly to the phosphate groups. The high affinity of Ti(IV) for phosphate groups may be important for its biological activity. PMID:11681703

  13. Keap1-Nrf2 pathway: A promising target towards lung cancer prevention and therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Hui Tong; Bo Zhang; Yun Fan; Neng-Ming Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Drugs for targeted therapy have become a new strategy of adjuvant therapy for treatment of lung cancer.The Keapl (kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1)-Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) pathway is recognized to be critical in regulating genes related to the cellular protective response and protecting cells from oxidative damages and toxic insult.Methods: Pubmed, Embase, OVID, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched from the beginning of each database without any limitations to the date of publication.Search terms were "Nrf2" or "Keap1" and "Lung cancer".Results: The upregulation of Nrf2 had been closely related to tumor protection and drug resistance.The aberrant state of Keap 1 or Nrf2 that were frequently found in lung cancer conferred a poor prognosis.Nrf2 could prevent cells from undergoing oncogenesis as a tumor suppressor, while it could also promote cancer progression and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs as an oncogene,depending on the different stages of tumor progression.Target Nrf2 signaling by specific chemicals showed it could prevent tumor growth or combat chemoresistance.Conclusions: Increasing evidence has demonstrated the dual roles of the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway in tumor initiation and progression.In this paper, we provide a comprehensive overview of the potency of the Keap 1-Nrf2 pathway as an antitumor target, and the current status of Nrf2 activators or inhibitors for therapeutic approaches.Further studies are required to clarify the role of Nrf2 in lung cancer at different tumor stages, in order to maximize the efficacy of Keap1-Nrf2 targeting agents.Copyright 2015, Chinese Medical Association Production.Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.on behalf of KeAi Communications Co., Ltd.This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  14. Amino Acid transporters in cancer and their relevance to "glutamine addiction": novel targets for the design of a new class of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cells have an increased demand for amino acids because of their rapid proliferation rate. In addition to their need in protein synthesis, several amino acids have other roles in supporting cancer growth. There are approximately two-dozen amino acid transporters in humans, and tumor cells must upregulate one or more of these transporters to satisfy their demand for amino acids. If the transporters that specifically serve this purpose in tumor cells are identified, they can be targeted for the development of a brand new class of anticancer drugs; the logical basis of such a strategy would be to starve the tumor cells of an important class of nutrients. To date, four amino acid transporters have been found to be expressed at high levels in cancer: SLC1A5, SLC7A5, SLC7A11, and SLC6A14. Their induction occurs in a cancer type-specific manner with a direct or indirect involvement of the oncogene c-Myc. Further, these transporters are functionally coupled, thus maximizing their ability to promote cancer growth and chemoresistance. Progress has been made in preclinical studies, exploiting these transporters as drug targets in cancer therapy. These transporters also show promise in development of new tumor-imaging probes and in tumor-specific delivery of appropriately designed chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25855379

  15. Novel 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-ones as potential anticancer agents targeting Hsp90.

    OpenAIRE

    Montoir, David; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Tonnerre, Alain; Juin, Philippe; Duflos, Muriel; Bazin, Marc-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    International audience Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent chaperone known to be overexpressed in many cancers. This way, Hsp90 is an important target for drug discovery. Novobiocin, an aminocoumarin antibiotic, was reported to inhibit Hsp90 targeting C-terminal domain, and showed anti-proliferative properties, leading to the development of new and more active compounds. Consequently, a new set of novobiocin analogs derived from 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one scaffold was designed, synthesized and evalu...

  16. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Smolarczyk

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  17. Glyco-nanoparticles with sheddable saccharide shells: A unique and potent platform for hepatoma-targeting delivery of anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Zou, Yan; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Reduction-sensitive shell-sheddable glyco-nanoparticles were designed and developed based on poly(ε-caprolactone)-graft-SS-lactobionic acid (PCL-g-SS-LBA) copolymer for efficient hepatoma-targeting delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). PCL-g-SS-LBA was prepared by ring-opening copolymerization of ε-caprola

  18. Targeted localized use of therapeutic antibodies: a review of non-systemic, topical and oral applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russell G A; Martino, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies provide important tools in the "medicine chest" of today's clinician for the treatment of a range of disorders. Typically monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies are administered in large doses, either directly or indirectly into the circulation, via a systemic route which is well suited for disseminated ailments. Diseases confined within a specific localized tissue, however, may be treated more effectively and at reduced cost by a delivery system which targets directly the affected area. To explore the advantages of the local administration of antibodies, we reviewed current alternative, non-systemic delivery approaches which are in clinical use, being trialed or developed. These less conventional approaches comprise: (a) local injections, (b) topical and (c) peroral administration routes. Local delivery includes intra-ocular injections into the vitreal humor (i.e. Ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration), subconjunctival injections (e.g. Bevacizumab for corneal neovascularization), intra-articular joint injections (i.e. anti-TNF alpha antibody for persistent inflammatory monoarthritis) and intratumoral or peritumoral injections (e.g. Ipilimumab for cancer). A range of other strategies, such as the local use of antibacterial antibodies, are also presented. Local injections of antibodies utilize doses which range from 1/10th to 1/100th of the required systemic dose therefore reducing both side-effects and treatment costs. In addition, any therapeutic antibody escaping from the local site of disease into the systemic circulation is immediately diluted within the large blood volume, further lowering the potential for unwanted effects. Needle-free topical application routes become an option when the condition is restricted locally to an external surface. The topical route may potentially be utilized in the form of eye drops for infections or corneal neovascularization or be applied to diseased skin for psoriasis, dermatitis, pyoderma

  19. Validation of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 as a therapeutic target for various types of human cancer and as a prognostic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takawa, Masashi; Masuda, Ken; Kunizaki, Masaki; Daigo, Yataro; Takagi, Katsunori; Iwai, Yukiko; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Toyokawa, Gouji; Yamane, Yuka; Maejima, Kazuhiro; Field, Helen I; Kobayashi, Takaaki; Akasu, Takayuki; Sugiyama, Masanori; Tsuchiya, Eijyu; Atomi, Yutaka; Ponder, Bruce A J; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2011-07-01

    The emphasis in anticancer drug discovery has always been on finding a drug with great antitumor potential but few side-effects. This can be achieved if the drug is specific for a molecular site found only in tumor cells. Here, we find the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) to be highly overexpressed in lung and other cancers, and show that EZH2 is integral to proliferation in cancer cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed higher expression of EZH2 in clinical bladder cancer tissues than in corresponding non-neoplastic tissues (P CCD-18Co, which has undetectable EZH2. Because EZH2 expression was scarcely detectable in all normal tissues we examined, EZH2 shows promise as a tumor-specific therapeutic target. Furthermore, as elevated levels of EZH2 are associated with poor prognosis of patients with NSCLC, its overexpression in resected specimens could prove a useful molecular marker, indicating the necessity for a more extensive follow-up in some lung cancer patients after surgical treatment. PMID:21539681

  20. From Molecular Classification to Targeted Therapeutics: The Changing Face of Systemic Therapy in Metastatic Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1 or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician’s therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  1. MicroRNAs as newer therapeutic targets: A big hope from a tiny player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik S Ghelani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a novel group of universally present small noncoding endogenous RNAs that regulate gene expression and protein coding by base pairing with the 3′ untranslated region (UTR of target mRNAs. So they have been associated with several physiological processes and play an important role in the manifestation of diverse diseases. miRNAs expression is associated with the normal and diverse pathophysiological state including cardiac hypertrophy, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes and its complication, and cancer because individual miRNAs are associated with the regulation of the expression of multiple target genes. Modulating the expression of a single miRNA can influence an entire gene network and thereby modify complex disease phenotypes. From recent studies, it has been confirmed that miRNA has a potential physiological role in various body systems. But in some specialized condition over expression of miRNA within the cytoplasm also leads to some pathological condition in the body. Here, we summarize the roles of miRNAs in various pathological conditions and consider the advantages and potential challenges of miRNA-based therapeutic approaches compared to conventional drug-based therapies.

  2. NADPH oxidase enzymes in skin fibrosis: molecular targets and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, Olubukola; Mamalis, Andrew; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Jagdeo, Jared

    2014-05-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components eventually resulting in organ dysfunction and failure. In dermatology, fibrosis is the hallmark component of many skin diseases, including systemic sclerosis, graft-versus-host disease, hypertrophic scars, keloids, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, restrictive dermopathy and other conditions. Fibrotic skin disorders may be debilitating and impair quality of life. There are few FDA-approved anti-fibrotic drugs; thus, research in this area is crucial in addressing this deficiency. Recent investigations elucidating the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis have implicated endogenous reactive oxygen species produced by the multicomponent nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzyme complex. In this review, we discuss Nox enzymes and their role in skin fibrosis. An overview of the Nox enzyme family is presented and their role in the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis is discussed. The mechanisms by which Nox enzymes influence specific fibrotic skin disorders are also reviewed. Finally, we describe the therapeutic approaches to ameliorate skin fibrosis by directly targeting Nox enzymes with the use of statins, p47phox subunit modulators, or GKT137831, a competitive inhibitor of Nox enzymes. Nox enzymes can also be targeted indirectly via scavenging ROS with antioxidants. We believe that Nox modulators are worthy of further investigation and have the potential to transform the management of skin fibrosis by dermatologists.

  3. Therapeutic efficacy by targeting correction of Notch1-induced aberrants in uveal tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Huang

    Full Text Available There is a need for more effective treatments for uveal melanoma. The recombinant oncolytic adenovirus H101 replicates specifically in p53-depleted tumor cells, and has been approved for use by the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration. However, this treatment is associated with subsequent remission. Transfection of uveal melanoma cells with a small interfering RNA against Notch1 (siNotch1 effectively suppressed Notch1 expression, resulting in significant cell growth inhibition when combined with H101 treatment. Combined treatment with siNotch1 and H101 (H101-Notch1-siRNA greatly enhanced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in vitro as compared to treatment with H101 or siNotch1 alone. For in vivo treatments, the combined treatment of siNotch1 and H101 showed remarkable tumor growth inhibition and prolonged mouse survival in the OCM1 xenograft model. We predict that Notch pathway deregulation could be a feature of uveal melanoma, and could be a therapeutic target, especially if p53 is concurrently targeted.

  4. From molecular classification to targeted therapeutics: the changing face of systemic therapy in metastatic gastroesophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrian; Kelly, Ronan J

    2015-01-01

    Histological classification of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma for esophageal cancer or using the Lauren classification for intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancer has limited clinical utility in the management of advanced disease. Germline mutations in E-cadherin (CDH1) or mismatch repair genes (Lynch syndrome) were identified many years ago but given their rarity, the identification of these molecular alterations does not substantially impact treatment in the advanced setting. Recent molecular profiling studies of upper GI tumors have added to our knowledge of the underlying biology but have not led to an alternative classification system which can guide clinician's therapeutic decisions. Recently the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has proposed four subtypes of gastric cancer dividing tumors into those positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Unfortunately to date, many phase III clinical trials involving molecularly targeted agents have failed to meet their survival endpoints due to their use in unselected populations. Future clinical trials should utilize molecular profiling of individual tumors in order to determine the optimal use of targeted therapies in preselected patients.

  5. Potential Molecular Targeted Therapeutics: Role of PI3-K/Akt/mTOR Inhibition in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Kevin M; Koprowski, Steven; Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Balamurugan, Mariappan; Gamblin, T Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2016-01-01

    Primary liver cancer is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the majority of primary liver cancer and is the 3rd most common cause of cancer-related deaths globally. Survival rates of patients with HCC are dependent upon early detection as concomitant liver dysfunction and advanced disease limits traditional therapeutic options such as resection or ablation. Unfortunately, at the time of diagnosis, most patients are not eligible for curative surgery and have a five-year relative survival rate less than 20%, leading to systemic therapy as the only option. Currently, sorafenib is the only approved systemic therapy; however, it has a limited survival advantage and low efficacy prompting alternative strategies. The inception of sorafenib for HCC systemic therapy and the understanding involved of cancer therapy have led to an enhanced focus of the PI3-k/Akt/mTOR pathway as a potential area of targeting including pan and isoform-specific PI3-K inhibitors, Akt blockade, and mTOR suppression. The multitude, expanding roles, and varying clinical trials of these inhibitors have led to an increase in knowledge and availability for current and future studies. In this review, we provide a review of the literature with the aim to focus on potential targets for HCC therapies as well as an in depth focus on Akt inhibition.

  6. NADPH oxidase enzymes in skin fibrosis: molecular targets and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babalola, Olubukola; Mamalis, Andrew; Lev-Tov, Hadar; Jagdeo, Jared

    2014-05-01

    Fibrosis is characterized by the excessive deposition of extracellular matrix components eventually resulting in organ dysfunction and failure. In dermatology, fibrosis is the hallmark component of many skin diseases, including systemic sclerosis, graft-versus-host disease, hypertrophic scars, keloids, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, porphyria cutanea tarda, restrictive dermopathy and other conditions. Fibrotic skin disorders may be debilitating and impair quality of life. There are few FDA-approved anti-fibrotic drugs; thus, research in this area is crucial in addressing this deficiency. Recent investigations elucidating the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis have implicated endogenous reactive oxygen species produced by the multicomponent nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzyme complex. In this review, we discuss Nox enzymes and their role in skin fibrosis. An overview of the Nox enzyme family is presented and their role in the pathogenesis of skin fibrosis is discussed. The mechanisms by which Nox enzymes influence specific fibrotic skin disorders are also reviewed. Finally, we describe the therapeutic approaches to ameliorate skin fibrosis by directly targeting Nox enzymes with the use of statins, p47phox subunit modulators, or GKT137831, a competitive inhibitor of Nox enzymes. Nox enzymes can also be targeted indirectly via scavenging ROS with antioxidants. We believe that Nox modulators are worthy of further investigation and have the potential to transform the management of skin fibrosis by dermatologists. PMID:24155025

  7. Apelin/APJ system as a therapeutic target in diabetes and its complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haoliang; He, Lu; Li, Lanfang; Chen, Linxi

    2016-09-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor APJ and its endogenous ligand apelin are widely expressed in many peripheral tissues and central nervous system, including adipose tissue, skeletal muscles and hypothalamus. Apelin/APJ system, involved in numerous physiological functions like angiogenesis, fluid homeostasis and energy metabolism regulation, is notably implicated in the development of different pathologies such as diabetes and its complications. Increasing evidence suggests that apelin regulates insulin sensitivity, stimulates glucose utilization and enhances brown adipogenesis in different tissues associated with diabetes. Moreover, apelin is also involved in the regulation of diabetic complications via binding to APJ receptor. Apelin improves diabetes-induced kidney hypertrophia, normalizes obesity-associated cardiac hypertrophy and negatively promotes retinal angiogenesis in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview about the role of apelin/APJ system in different tissues related with diabetes. Furthermore, we describe the pathogenesis of diabetic complications associated with apelin/APJ system. Finally, agonists and antagonists targeted to APJ receptor are described in the literature. Thus, we highlight apelin/APJ system as a novel therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in treating diabetes and its complications. PMID:27650065

  8. Dynamic Regulation of APE1/Ref-1 as a Therapeutic Target Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunga; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-05-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein that plays a central role in the cellular response to DNA damage and redox regulation against oxidative stress. APE1/Ref-1 functions in the DNA base excision repair pathway, the redox regulation of several transcription factors, and the control of intracellular redox status through the inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. APE1/Ref-1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus; however, its subcellular localization is dynamically regulated and it may be found in the mitochondria or elsewhere in the cytoplasm. Studies have identified a nuclear localization signal and a mitochondrial target sequence in APE1/Ref-1, as well as the involvement of the nuclear export system, as determinants of APE1/Ref-1 subcellular distribution. Recently, it was shown that APE1/Ref-1 is secreted in response to hyperacetylation at specific lysine residues. Additionally, post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, S-nitrosation, and ubiquitination appear to play a role in fine-tuning the activities and subcellular localization of APE1/Ref-1. In this review, we will introduce the multifunctional role of APE1/Ref-1 and its potential usefulness as a therapeutic target in cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  9. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 as a Therapeutic Target in Endometrial Cancer Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. S. Seeber

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Western world, endometrial cancer (EC is the most common malignant tumor of the female genital tract. Solid tumors like EC outgrow their vasculature resulting in hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia is important because it renders an aggressive phenotype and leads to radio- and chemo-therapy resistance. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 plays an essential role in the adaptive cellular response to hypoxia and is associated with poor clinical outcome in EC. Therefore, HIF-1 could be an attractive therapeutic target. Selective HIF-1 inhibitors have not been identified. A number of nonselective inhibitors which target signaling pathways upstream or downstream HIF-1 are known to decrease HIF-1 protein levels. In clinical trials for the treatment of advanced and/or recurrent EC are the topoisomerase I inhibitor Topotecan, mTOR-inhibitor Rapamycin, and angiogenesis inhibitor Bevacizumab. Preliminary data shows encouraging results for these agents. Further work is needed to identify selective HIF-1 inhibitors and to translate these into clinical trials.

  10. Targeting estrogen receptor β as preventive therapeutic strategy for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Annalinda; Preziuso, Carmela; Iommarini, Luisa; Perli, Elena; Grazioli, Paola; Campese, Antonio F; Maresca, Alessandra; Montopoli, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio; Ghelli, Anna; Giordano, Carla

    2015-12-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited blinding disease characterized by degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and consequent optic nerve atrophy. Peculiar features of LHON are incomplete penetrance and gender bias, with a marked male prevalence. Based on the different hormonal metabolism between genders, we proposed that estrogens play a protective role in females and showed that these hormones ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in LHON through the estrogen receptors (ERs). We also showed that ERβ localize to the mitochondria of RGCs. Thus, targeting ERβ may become a therapeutic strategy for LHON specifically aimed at avoiding or delaying the onset of disease in mutation carriers. Here, we tested the effects of ERβ targeting on LHON mitochondrial defective metabolism by treating LHON cybrid cells carrying the m.11778G>A mutation with a combination of natural estrogen-like compounds that bind ERβ with high selectivity. We demonstrated that these molecules improve cell viability by reducing apoptosis, inducing mitochondrial biogenesis and strongly reducing the levels of reactive oxygen species in LHON cells. These effects were abolished in cells with ERβ knockdown by silencing receptor expression or by using specific receptor antagonists. Our observations support the hypothesis that estrogen-like molecules may be useful in LHON prophylactic therapy. This is particularly important for lifelong disease prevention in unaffected LHON mutation carriers. Current strategies attempting to combat degeneration of RGCs during the acute phase of LHON have not been very effective. Implementing a different and preemptive approach with a low risk profile may be very helpful.

  11. Current understanding of BRAF alterations in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic targeting in paediatric low grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Louise Penman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway is known to play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of many tumours as well as normal development. This often occurs through mutation of the genes encoding RAS and RAF proteins which are involved in signal transduction in this pathway. BRAF is one of three RAF kinases which act as downstream effectors of growth factor signalling leading to cell cycle progression, proliferation and survival. Initially reported as a point mutation (V600E in the majority of metastatic melanomas, other alterations in the BRAF gene have now been reported in a variety of human cancers including papillary thyroid cancer, colon carcinomas, hairy cell leukaemia and more recently in gliomas. The identification of oncogenic mutations in the BRAF gene have led to a revolution in the treatment of metastatic melanoma using targeted molecular therapies that affect the MAPK pathway either directly through BRAF inhibition or downstream through inhibition of MEK. This review describes the molecular biology of BRAF in the context of paediatric low grade gliomas, the role of BRAF as a diagnostic marker, the prognostic implications of BRAF and evidence for therapeutic targeting of BRAF.

  12. Therapeutic Modulation of Apoptosis: Targeting the BCL-2 Family at the Interface of the Mitochondrial Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Kathleen N.

    2008-01-01

    A vast portion of human disease results when the process of apoptosis is defective. Disorders resulting from inappropriate cell death range from autoimmune and neurodegenerative conditions to heart disease. Conversely, prevention of apoptosis is the hallmark of cancer and confounds the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. In the search for optimal targets that would enable the control of apoptosis, members of the BCL-2 family of anti- and pro-apoptotic factors have figured prominently. Development of BCL-2 antisense approaches, small molecules, and BH3 peptidomimetics has met with both success and failure. Success-because BCL-2 proteins play essential roles in apoptosis. Failure-because single targets for drug development have limited scope. By examining the activity of the BCL-2 proteins in relation to the mitochondrial landscape and drawing attention to the significant mitochondrial membrane alterations that ensue during apoptosis, we demonstrate the need for a broader based multi-disciplinary approach for the design of novel apoptosis-modulating compounds in the treatment of human disease. PMID:18972587

  13. Therapeutic opportunities in Ewing sarcoma: EWS-FLI inhibition via LSD1 targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Emily R; Pishas, Kathleen I; Saund, Ranajeet S; Lessnick, Stephen L

    2016-04-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive primary pediatric bone tumor, often diagnosed in adolescents and young adults. A pathognomonic reciprocal chromosomal translocation results in a fusion gene coding for a protein which derives its N-terminus from a FUS/EWS/TAF15 (FET) protein family member, commonly EWS, and C-terminus containing the DNA-binding domain of an ETS transcription factor, commonly FLI1. Nearly 85% of cases express the EWS-FLI protein which functions as a transcription factor and drives oncogenesis. As the primary genomic lesion and a protein which is not expressed in normal cells, disrupting EWS-FLI function is an attractive therapeutic strategy for Ewing sarcoma. However, transcription factors are notoriously difficult targets for the development of small molecules. Improved understanding of the oncogenic mechanisms employed by EWS-FLI to hijack normal cellular programming has uncovered potential novel approaches to pharmacologically block EWS-FLI function. In this review we examine targeting the chromatin regulatory enzymes recruited to conspire in oncogenesis with a focus on the histone lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1). LSD1 inhibitors are being aggressively investigated in acute myeloid leukemia and the results of early clinical trials will help inform the future use of LSD1 inhibitors in sarcoma. High LSD1 expression is observed in Ewing sarcoma patient samples and mechanistic and preclinical data suggest LSD1 inhibition globally disrupts the function of EWS-ETS proteins. PMID:26848860

  14. Nanocarriers for spleen targeting: anatomo-physiological considerations, formulation strategies and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Anil B

    2016-10-01

    There are several clinical advantages of spleen targeting of nanocarriers. For example, enhanced splenic concentration of active agents could provide therapeutic benefits in spleen resident infections and hematological disorders including malaria, hairy cell leukemia, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Furthermore, spleen delivery of immunosuppressant agents using splenotropic carriers may reduce the chances of allograft rejection in organ transplantation. Enhanced concentration of radiopharmaceuticals in the spleen may improve visualization of the organ, which could provide benefit in the diagnosis of splenic disorders. Unique anatomical features of the spleen including specialized microvasculature environment and slow blood circulation rate enable it an ideal drug delivery site. Because there is a difference in blood flow between spleen and liver, splenic delivery is inversely proportional to the hepatic uptake. It is therefore desirable engineering of nanocarriers, which, upon intravenous administration, can avoid uptake by hepatic Kupffer cells to enhance splenic localization. Stealth and non-spherical nanocarriers have shown enhanced splenic delivery of active agents by avoiding hepatic uptake. The present review details the research in the field of splenotropy. Formulation strategies to design splenotropic drug delivery systems are discussed. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of spleen targeting of nanocarriers and application in diagnostics. PMID:27334277

  15. Emerging Lung Cancer Therapeutic Targets Based on the Pathogenesis of Bone Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses O. Oyewumi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer related mortality in both men and women. Each year, more people die of lung cancer than of colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined. It is widely accepted that tumor metastasis is a formidable barrier to effective treatment of lung cancer. The bone is one of the frequent metastatic sites for lung cancer occurring in a large number of patients. Bone metastases can cause a wide range of symptoms that could impair quality of life of lung cancer patients and shorten their survival. We strongly believe that molecular targets (tumor-related and bone microenvironment based that have been implicated in lung cancer bone metastases hold great promise in lung cancer therapeutics. Thus, this paper discusses some of the emerging molecular targets that have provided insights into the cascade of metastases in lung cancer with the focus on bone invasion. It is anticipated that the information gathered might be useful in future efforts of optimizing lung cancer treatment strategies.

  16. Type I IL-1 Receptor (IL-1RI as Potential New Therapeutic Target for Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Hong Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The IL-1R/TLR family has been receiving considerable attention as potential regulators of inflammation through their ability to act as either activators or suppressors of inflammation. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, allergic inflammation, elevated serum total, allergen-specific IgE levels, and increased Th2 cytokine production. The discovery that the IL-1RI–IL-1 and ST2–IL-33 pathways are crucial for allergic inflammation has raised interest in these receptors as potential targets for developing new therapeutic strategies for bronchial asthma. This paper discusses the current use of neutralizing mAb or soluble receptor constructs to deplete cytokines, the use of neutralizing mAb or recombinant receptor antagonists to block cytokine receptors, and gene therapy from experimental studies in asthma. Targeting IL-1RI–IL-1 as well as ST2–IL-33 pathways may promise a disease-modifying approach in the future.

  17. Magnetic resonance monitoring of focused ultrasound/magnetic nanoparticle targeting delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chu, Po-Chun; Wu, Jia-Shin; Tseng, I-Chou; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2010-01-01

    The superparamagnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) allow them to be guided by an externally positioned magnet and also provide contrast for MRI. However, their therapeutic use in treating CNS pathologies in vivo is limited by insufficient local accumulation and retention resulting from their inability to traverse biological barriers. The combined use of focused ultrasound and magnetic targeting synergistically delivers therapeutic MNPs across the blood–brain barrier to enter th...

  18. Novel 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-ones as potential anticancer agents targeting Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoir, David; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Tonnerre, Alain; Juin, Philippe; Duflos, Muriel; Bazin, Marc-Antoine

    2016-08-25

    Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent chaperone known to be overexpressed in many cancers. This way, Hsp90 is an important target for drug discovery. Novobiocin, an aminocoumarin antibiotic, was reported to inhibit Hsp90 targeting C-terminal domain, and showed anti-proliferative properties, leading to the development of new and more active compounds. Consequently, a new set of novobiocin analogs derived from 1,6-naphthyridin-2(1H)-one scaffold was designed, synthesized and evaluated against two breast cancer cell lines. Subsequently, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were conducted on best candidates, finally Western Blot analysis was performed to measure their ability to induce degradation of Hsp90 client proteins. PMID:27153346

  19. RGS6 as a Novel Therapeutic Target in CNS Diseases and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, Katelin E; Chakravarti, Bandana; Fisher, Rory A

    2016-05-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are gatekeepers regulating the cellular responses induced by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated activation of heterotrimeric G proteins. Specifically, RGS proteins determine the magnitude and duration of GPCR signaling by acting as a GTPase-activating protein for Gα subunits, an activity facilitated by their semiconserved RGS domain. The R7 subfamily of RGS proteins is distinguished by two unique domains, DEP/DHEX and GGL, which mediate membrane targeting and stability of these proteins. RGS6, a member of the R7 subfamily, has been shown to specifically modulate Gαi/o protein activity which is critically important in the central nervous system (CNS) for neuronal responses to a wide array of neurotransmitters. As such, RGS6 has been implicated in several CNS pathologies associated with altered neurotransmission, including the following: alcoholism, anxiety/depression, and Parkinson's disease. In addition, unlike other members of the R7 subfamily, RGS6 has been shown to regulate G protein-independent signaling mechanisms which appear to promote both apoptotic and growth-suppressive pathways that are important in its tumor suppressor function in breast and possibly other tissues. Further highlighting the importance of RGS6 as a target in cancer, RGS6 mediates the chemotherapeutic actions of doxorubicin and blocks reticular activating system (Ras)-induced cellular transformation by promoting degradation of DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) to prevent its silencing of pro-apoptotic and tumor suppressor genes. Together, these findings demonstrate the critical role of RGS6 in regulating both G protein-dependent CNS pathology and G protein-independent cancer pathology implicating RGS6 as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27002730

  20. Asthma phenotyping: a necessity for improved therapeutic precision and new targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a common heterogeneous disease with a complex pathophysiology that carries a significant mortality rate and high morbidity. Current therapies based on inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists remain effective in a large proportion of patients with asthma, but ~10% (considered to have 'severe asthma') do not respond to these treatments even at high doses or with the use of oral corticosteroids. Analytical clustering methods have revealed phenotypes that include dependence on high-dose corticosteroid treatment, severe airflow obstruction and recurrent exacerbations associated with an allergic background and late onset of disease. One severe phenotype is eosinophilic inflammation-predominant asthma, with late-onset disease, rhinosinusitis, aspirin sensitivity and exacerbations. Blood and sputum eosinophilia have been used to distinguish patients with high Th2 inflammation and to predict therapeutic response to treatments targeted towards Th2-associated cytokines. New therapies in the form of humanized antibodies against Th2 targets, such as anti-IgE, anti-IL4Rα, anti-IL-5 and anti-IL-13 antibodies, have shown encouraging results in terms of reduction in exacerbations and improvement in airflow in patients with a 'Th2-high' expression profile and blood eosinophilia. Research efforts are now focusing on elucidating the phenotypes underlying the non-Th2-high (or Th2-low) group, which constitutes ~50% of severe asthma cases. There is an increasing need to use biomarkers to indicate the group of patients who will respond to a specifically targeted treatment. The use of improved tools to measure activity of disease, a better definition of severe asthma and the delineation of inflammatory pathways with omics analyses using computational tools, will lead to better-defined phenotypes for specific therapies. PMID:26076339