WorldWideScience

Sample records for anticancer drug pump

  1. Proton pump inhibitors as anti vacuolar-ATPases drugs: a novel anticancer strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Fais Stefano; Citro Gennaro; Spugnini Enrico P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The vacuolar ATPases are ATP-dependent proton pumps whose functions include the acidification of intracellular compartments and the extrusion of protons through the cell cytoplasmic membrane. These pumps play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell pH in normal cells and, to a much greater extent, in tumor cells. In fact, the glucose metabolism in hypoxic conditions by the neoplasms leads to an intercellular pH drift towards acidity. The acid microenvironment is modulated through th...

  2. Proton pump inhibitors as anti vacuolar-ATPases drugs: a novel anticancer strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fais Stefano

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The vacuolar ATPases are ATP-dependent proton pumps whose functions include the acidification of intracellular compartments and the extrusion of protons through the cell cytoplasmic membrane. These pumps play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell pH in normal cells and, to a much greater extent, in tumor cells. In fact, the glucose metabolism in hypoxic conditions by the neoplasms leads to an intercellular pH drift towards acidity. The acid microenvironment is modulated through the over-expression of H+ transporters that are also involved in tumor progression, invasiveness, distant spread and chemoresistance. Several strategies to block/downmodulate the efficiency of these transporters are currently being investigated. Among them, proton pump inhibitors have shown to successfully block the H+ transporters in vitro and in vivo, leading to apoptotic death. Furthermore, their action seems to synergize with conventional chemotherapy protocols, leading to chemosensitization and reversal of chemoresistance. Aim of this article is to critically revise the current knowledge of this cellular machinery and to summarize the therapeutic strategies developed to counter this mechanism.

  3. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T;

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  4. Clinical pharmacology of novel anticancer drug formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuurman, F.E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies outlined in this thesis describe the impact of drug formulations on pharmacology of anticancer drugs. It consists of four parts and starts with a review describing the mechanisms of low oral bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs and strategies for improvement of the bioavailability. The major

  5. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JurIkova, A; Csach, K; Koneracka, M; Zavisova, V; Tomasovicova, N; Lancz, G; Kopcansky, P; Timko, M; Miskuf, J [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Muckova, M, E-mail: akasard@saske.s [Hameln rds a.s., 900 01 Modra (Slovakia)

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  6. Toxicities of anticancer drugs and its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambili Remesh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the characteristics that distinguish anticancer agents from other drugs is the frequency and severity of side effects at therapeutic doses. Most cytotoxic drugs target rapidly multiplying cells and the putative targets are the nucleic acids and their precursors, which are rapidly synthesised during cell division. Many solid tumours have a lower growth fraction than the normal bone marrow, gastro intestinal lining, reticuloendothelial system and gonads. Drugs affect these tissues in a dose dependant manner and there is individual susceptibility also. So toxicities are more frequently associated with these tissues. The side effects may be acute or chronic, self-limited, permanent, mild or potentially life threatening. Management of these side effects is of utmost importance because they affect the treatment, tolerability and overall quality of life. This paper gives an overview of different toxicities of anticancer drugs and its management. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2012; 1(1.000: 2-12

  7. Reactions and interactions in handling anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, P F

    1983-01-01

    The clinical toxicity of anticancer drugs has been well documented with regard to the adverse effects of treatment in patients. However, many of these drugs have a direct irritant effect on the skin, eyes, mucous membranes, and other tissues. Handled without due care, especially when being prepared for injection, most cytotoxic drugs can cause local toxic or allergic reactions; they also present hazards of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. This spectrum of potential risk should be kept in mind by personnel administering or handling these drugs, especially in oncology units where just a few individuals may routinely and frequently reconstitute many doses of cytotoxic agents. This is work in which the hospital pharmacist should and must be involved; indeed, many of the techniques and skills required are identical with those used in standard aseptic procedures for preparing pharmaceutical products. Pharmacy departments should take the initiative in making hospital staff aware of the potential risks of handling neoplastic agents, and they should spearhead a multidisciplinary assessment for producing local guidelines for working with these drugs. This article warns practitioners about the inherent dangers of these practitioner-drug interactions and suggests ways in which they may be reduced. Information is given in tabular form regarding recommended procedures for reconstituting 24 anticancer drugs and precautions to protect the personnel handling them, especially when there is spillage of powdered or liquid drugs. Also, guidelines are given about incompatibilities with admixtures of such drugs, and the literature is reviewed relative to recent developments in hospital pharmacy departments where reconstitution of anticancer drugs has been incorporated into existing intravenous fluid preparation/admixture units. Not only has this been shown to be safer and more effective in terms of time and labor, but also it has cut the cost of injectable cytotoxic drugs by an

  8. Transcription factors as targets of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniazdowski, M; Czyz, M

    1999-01-01

    Several general and gene- and cell-selective transcription factors are required for specific transcription to occur. Many of them exert their functions through specific contacts either in the promoter region or at distant sequences regulating the initiation. These contacts may be altered by anticancer drugs which form non-covalent complexes with DNA. Covalent modifications of DNA by alkylating agents may prevent transcription factors from recognizing their specific sequences or may constitute multiple "unnatural" binding sites in DNA which attract the factors thus decreasing their availability in the cell. The anticancer drug-transcription factor interplay which is based on specific interactions with DNA may contribute to pharmacological properties of the former and provide a basis for the search for new drugs. PMID:10547027

  9. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  10. Liposomal Drug Delivery of Anticancer Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Palle Jacob

    In the first part of the thesis the work towards a new generation of liposomal drug delivery systems for anticancer agents is described. The drug delivery system takes advantage of the elevated level of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) IIA in many tumors and the enhanced permeability......-trans retinoic acid, α-tocopheryl succinate and calcitriol were examined for their ability to be incorporated into the investigated drug delivery system and syntheses of the phospholipid prodrugs are described. The majority of the phospholipid prodrugs were able to form particles with diameters close to 100 nm...... that upon sPLA2 triggering the formulated phospholipid prodrugs displayed IC50 values in range from 3–36 μM and complete cell death was observed when higher drug concentrations were applied. Promising for the drug delivery system the majority of the phospholipid prodrugs remain non-toxic in the absence...

  11. PEGylated Silk Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wongpinyochit, Thidarat; Uhlmann, Petra; Urquhart, Andrew;

    2015-01-01

    .6 mV) using nanoprecipitation. We then surface grafted polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the fabricated silk nanoparticles and verified the aqueous stability and morphology of the resulting PEGylated silk nanoparticles. We assessed the drug loading and release behavior of these nanoparticles using......Silk has a robust clinical track record and is emerging as a promising biopolymer for drug delivery, including its use as nanomedicine. However, silk-based nanomedicines still require further refinements for full exploitation of their potential; the application of “stealth” design principals...... is especially necessary to support their evolution. The aim of this study was to develop and examine the potential of PEGylated silk nanoparticles as an anticancer drug delivery system. We first generated B. mori derived silk nanoparticles by driving β-sheet assembly (size 104 ± 1.7 nm, zeta potential −56 ± 5...

  12. Artemisinin–Second Career as Anticancer Drug?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin represents a showcase example not only for the activity of medicinal herbs deriving from traditional chinese medicine, but for phytotherapy in general. Its isolation from Sweet Wormwood (qinhao, Artemisia annua L. represents the starting point for an unprecedent success story in the treatment of malaria worldwide. Beyond the therapeutic value against Plasmodium parasites, it turned out in recent years that the bioactivity of artemisinin is not restricted to malaria. We and others found that this sesquiterpenoid also exerts profound anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. Artemisinin-type drugs exert multi-factorial cellular and molecular actions in cancer cells. Ferrous iron reacts with artemisinin, which leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species and ultimately to a plethora anticancer effects of artemisinins, e.g. expression of antioxidant response genes, cell cycle arrest (G1 as well as G2 phase arrests, DNA damage that is repaird by base excision repair, homogous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, as well as different modes of cell death (intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, necroptosis, oncosis, and ferroptosis. Furthermore, artemisinins inhibit neoangiogenesis in tumors. The signaling of major transcription factors (NF-κB, MYC/MAX, AP-1, CREBP, mTOR etc. and signaling pathways are affected by artemisinins (e.g. Wnt/β-catenin pathway, AMPK pathway, metastatic pathways, nitric oxide signaling, and others. Several case reports on the compassionate use of artemisinins as well as clinical Phase I/II pilot studies indicate the clinical activity of artemisinins in veterinary and human cancer patients. Larger scale of Phase II and III clinical studies are required now to further develop artemisinin-type compounds as novel anticancer drugs.

  13. Peptidomimetics and metalloprotease inhibitors as anticancer drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Peptidomimetics with three types, as the structural or functional mimetics of natural active peptides, can preserve the bioactivity and improve the bioavailability and the specificity towards the targets of the lead peptides. Peptidomimetics of high bioactivity can be designed through various ways including conformation restriction, modification and non-peptide design. Recently the concentration on the de-velopment of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs was transferred from cytotoxic drugs to target-based drugs, and many proteases and peptidases that play key roles in the process of tumor genesis and development was discovered, which means that peptidomimetics as potential cancer chemotherapeu-tic drugs should be paid close attention to. Our laboratory has focused on the development of small-molecule peptidomimetic inhibitors of APN, MMPs and HDACs as target-based anticancer agents. These three zinc-dependent metalloproteinases play very important roles in the process of tumor genesis, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis and matrix degradation, so small-molecule peptidomimetic inhibitors based on them would be quite potential in the development of chemotherapeutic drugs with high selectivity.

  14. Peptidomimetics and metalloprotease inhibitors as anticancer drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Li; XU WenFang

    2009-01-01

    Peptidomimetics with three types, as the structural or functional mimetica of natural active peptides, can preserve the bioactivity and improve the bioavailability and the specificity towards the targets of the lead peptides. Peptidomimetica of high bioectivity can be designed through various ways including conformation restriction, modification and non-peptide design. Recently the concentration on the de-velopment of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs was transferred from cytotoxic drugs to target-baeed drugs, and many proteasee and peptidases that play key roles in the process of tumor genesis and development was discovered, which means that peptidomimetice as potential cancer chemotherapeu-tic drugs should be paid close attention to. Our laboratory has focused on the development of small-molecule peplldomimetic inhibitora of APN, MMPs and HDACs as target-based anticancer agents. These three zinc-dependent metalloproteinaees play very important roles in the process of tumor genesis, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis and matrix degradation, so small-molecule peptidomimetic inhibitora based on them would be quite potential in the development of chemotherapeutic drugs with high selectivity.

  15. Anticancer properties of distinct antimalarial drug classes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Hooft van Huijsduijnen

    Full Text Available We have tested five distinct classes of established and experimental antimalarial drugs for their anticancer potential, using a panel of 91 human cancer lines. Three classes of drugs: artemisinins, synthetic peroxides and DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors effected potent inhibition of proliferation with IC50s in the nM- low µM range, whereas a DHODH (dihydroorotate dehydrogenase and a putative kinase inhibitor displayed no activity. Furthermore, significant synergies were identified with erlotinib, imatinib, cisplatin, dasatinib and vincristine. Cluster analysis of the antimalarials based on their differential inhibition of the various cancer lines clearly segregated the synthetic peroxides OZ277 and OZ439 from the artemisinin cluster that included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin and artemisone, and from the DHFR inhibitors pyrimethamine and P218 (a parasite DHFR inhibitor, emphasizing their shared mode of action. In order to further understand the basis of the selectivity of these compounds against different cancers, microarray-based gene expression data for 85 of the used cell lines were generated. For each compound, distinct sets of genes were identified whose expression significantly correlated with compound sensitivity. Several of the antimalarials tested in this study have well-established and excellent safety profiles with a plasma exposure, when conservatively used in malaria, that is well above the IC50s that we identified in this study. Given their unique mode of action and potential for unique synergies with established anticancer drugs, our results provide a strong basis to further explore the potential application of these compounds in cancer in pre-clinical or and clinical settings.

  16. Development of Combination Therapy with Anti-Cancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijen, S.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes early clinical trials with anti-cancer drugs in combination with commonly applied and registered chemotherapy and single agent studies with compounds that are intended for use in combination with registered or other targeted anti-cancer drugs. Gemcitabine is a prodrug that fi

  17. Assessing Specificity of Anticancer Drugs In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwe, Lan

    2016-01-01

    A procedure for assessing specificity of anticancer drugs in vitro using cultures containing both tumor and non-tumor cells is demonstrated. The key element is the quantitative determination of a tumor-specific genetic alteration in relation to a universal sequence using a dual-probe digital PCR assay and the subsequent calculation of the proportion of tumor cells. The assay is carried out on a culture containing tumor cells of an established line and spiked-in non-tumor cells. The mixed culture is treated with a test drug at various concentrations. After the treatment, DNA is prepared directly from the survived adhesive cells in wells of 96-well plates using a simple and inexpensive method, and subjected to a dual-probe digital PCR assay for measuring a tumor-specific genetic alteration and a reference universal sequence. In the present demonstration, a heterozygous deletion of the NF1 gene is used as the tumor-specific genetic alteration and a RPP30 gene as the reference gene. Using the ratio NF1/RPP30, the proportion of tumor cells was calculated. Since the dose-dependent change of the proportion of tumor cells provides an in vitro indication for specificity of the drug, this genetic and cell-based in vitro assay will likely have application potential in drug discovery. Furthermore, for personalized cancer-care, this genetic- and cell-based tool may contribute to optimizing adjuvant chemotherapy by means of testing efficacy and specificity of candidate drugs using primary cultures of individual tumors. PMID:27078035

  18. MECHANOMAGNETIC REACTOR FOR ACTIVATION OF ANTICANCER DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orel V. E.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanomagnetochemical activation can increase the concentration of paramagnetic centers (free radicals in the anticancer drug, for example, doxorubicin that enables to influence its magnetic properties under external electromagnetic field and improve its magnetic sensitivity and antitumor activity. The principles of design and operation of mechanomagnetic reactor for implementation of this technology which includes mechanomagnetochemical activation and electromagnetic radiation of the drug are described in the paper. The methods of vibration magnetometry, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography were used for studying of doxorubicin mechanomagnetic activation effects. The studies have shown that a generator of sinusoidal electromagnetic wave, working chambers from caprolactam, fluoroplastic or organic materials with metal inserts and working bodies made from steel or agate depending on the required doxorubicin magnetic properties are expedient to use in the designed mechanomagnic reactor. Under influence of mechanomagnetochemical activation doxorubicin, which is diamagnetic, acquires the properties of paramagnetic without changing g-factors in the spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance. Mechanomagnetochemical activation of doxorubicin satisfies pharmacopoeia condi tions according to the results of liquid chromatography that points on perspective of this method using in technology of tumor therapy with nanosized structures and external electromagnetic radiation.

  19. Anticancer drug-induced kidney disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintzel, P E

    2001-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is an inherent adverse effect of certain anticancer drugs. Renal dysfunction can be categorised as prerenal uraemia, intrinsic damage or postrenal uraemia according to the underlying pathophysiological process. Renal hypoperfusion promulgates prerenal uraemia. Intrinsic renal damage results from prolonged hypoperfusion, exposure to exogenous or endogenous nephrotoxins, renotubular precipitation of xenobiotics or endogenous compounds, renovascular obstruction, glomerular disease, renal microvascular damage or disease, and tubulointerstitial damage or disease. Postrenal uraemia is a consequence of clinically significant urinary tract obstruction. Clinical signs of nephrotoxicity and methods used to assess renal function are discussed. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced renal dysfunction generally include damage to vasculature or structures of the kidneys, haemolytic uraemic syndrome and prerenal perfusion deficits. Patients with cancer are frequently at risk of renal impairment secondary to disease-related and iatrogenic causes. This article reviews the incidence, presentation, prevention and management of anticancer drug-induced renal dysfunction. Dose-related nephrotoxicity subsequent to administration of certain chloroethylnitrosourea compounds (carmustine, semustine and streptozocin) is commonly heralded by increased serum creatinine levels, uraemia and proteinuria. Additional signs of streptozocin-induced nephrotoxicity include hypophosphataemia, hypokalaemia, hypouricaemia, renal tubular acidosis, glucosuria, aceturia and aminoaciduria. Cisplatin and carboplatin cause dose-related renal dysfunction. In addition to increased serum creatinine levels and uraemia, electrolyte abnormalities, such as hypomagnesaemia and hypokalaemia, are commonly reported adverse effects. Rarely, cisplatin has been implicated as the underlying cause of haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Pharmaceutical antidotes to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity include amifostine, sodium

  20. Preclinical pharmacodynamic evaluation of antibiotic nitroxoline for anticancer drug repurposing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Shanshan; Yang, Dexuan; PAN, KEVIN; Li, Linna; Yuan, Shoujun

    2016-01-01

    The established urinary antibiotic nitroxoline has recently regained considerable attention, due to its potent activities in inhibiting angiogenesis, inducing apoptosis and blocking cancer cell invasion. These features make nitroxoline an excellent candidate for anticancer drug repurposing. To rapidly advance nitroxoline repurposing into clinical trials, the present study performed systemic preclinical pharmacodynamic evaluation of its anticancer activity, including a methyl thiazolyl tetrazo...

  1. Drug delivery device including electrolytic pump

    KAUST Repository

    Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-03-31

    Systems and methods are provided for a drug delivery device and use of the device for drug delivery. In various aspects, the drug delivery device combines a “solid drug in reservoir” (SDR) system with an electrolytic pump. In various aspects an improved electrolytic pump is provided including, in particular, an improved electrolytic pump for use with a drug delivery device, for example an implantable drug delivery device. A catalytic reformer can be incorporated in a periodically pulsed electrolytic pump to provide stable pumping performance and reduced actuation cycle.

  2. Sensitization for Anticancer Drug-Induced Apoptosis by Betulinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fulda

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously described that betulinic acid (BetA, a naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenoid, induces apoptosis in tumor cells through the mitochondrial pathway. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence that BetA cooperated with anticancer drugs to induce apoptosis and to inhibit clonogenic survival of tumor cells. Combined treatment with BetA and anticancer drugs acted in concert to induce loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c and Smac from mitochondria, resulting in activation of caspases and apoptosis. Overexpression of Bcl-2, which blocked mitochondrial perturbations, also inhibited the cooperative effect of BetA and anticancer drugs, indicating that cooperative interaction involved the mitochondrial pathway. Notably, cooperation of BetA and anticancer drugs was found for various cytotoxic compounds with different modes of action (e.g., doxorubicin, cisplatin, Taxol, VP16, or actinomycin D. Importantly, BetA and anticancer drugs cooperated to induce apoptosis in different tumor cell lines, including p53 mutant cells, and also in primary tumor cells, but not in human fibroblasts indicating some tumor specificity. These findings indicate that using BetA as sensitizer in chemotherapy-based combination regimens may be a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of anticancer therapy, which warrants further investigation.

  3. Preclinical and clinical pharmacology of oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, more than 25% of all anticancer drugs are developed as oral formulations. Oral administration of drugs has several advantages over intravenous (i.v.) administration. It will on average be more convenient for patients, because they can take oral medication themselves, there is no need for f

  4. Electrolyte disorders associated with the use of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-04-15

    The use of anticancer drugs is beneficial for patients with malignancies but is frequently associated with the occurrence of electrolyte disorders, which can be hazardous and in many cases fatal. The review presents the electrolyte abnormalities that can occur with the use of anticancer drugs and provides the related mechanisms. Platinum-containing anticancer drugs induce hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia and hypocalcemia. Moreover, platinum-containing drugs are associated with hyponatremia, especially when combined with large volumes of hypotonic fluids aiming to prevent nephrotoxicity. Alkylating agents have been linked with the occurrence of hyponatremia [due to syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)] and Fanconi's syndrome (hypophosphatemia, aminoaciduria, hypouricemia and/or glucosuria). Vinca alkaloids are associated with hyponatremia due to SIADH. Epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody inhibitors induce hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia and hypocalcemia. Other, monoclonal antibodies, such as cixutumumab, cause hyponatremia due to SIADH. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are linked to hyponatremia and hypophosphatemia. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors induce hyponatremia (due to aldosterone resistance), hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia. Other drugs such as immunomodulators or methotrexate have been also associated with hyponatremia. The administration of estrogens at high doses, streptozocin, azacitidine and suramin may induce hypophosphatemia. Finally, the drug-related tumor lysis syndrome is associated with hyperphosphatemia, hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia. The prevention of electrolyte derangements may lead to reduction of adverse events during the administration of anticancer drugs.

  5. Electrolyte disorders associated with the use of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-04-15

    The use of anticancer drugs is beneficial for patients with malignancies but is frequently associated with the occurrence of electrolyte disorders, which can be hazardous and in many cases fatal. The review presents the electrolyte abnormalities that can occur with the use of anticancer drugs and provides the related mechanisms. Platinum-containing anticancer drugs induce hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia and hypocalcemia. Moreover, platinum-containing drugs are associated with hyponatremia, especially when combined with large volumes of hypotonic fluids aiming to prevent nephrotoxicity. Alkylating agents have been linked with the occurrence of hyponatremia [due to syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)] and Fanconi's syndrome (hypophosphatemia, aminoaciduria, hypouricemia and/or glucosuria). Vinca alkaloids are associated with hyponatremia due to SIADH. Epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody inhibitors induce hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia and hypocalcemia. Other, monoclonal antibodies, such as cixutumumab, cause hyponatremia due to SIADH. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are linked to hyponatremia and hypophosphatemia. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors induce hyponatremia (due to aldosterone resistance), hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia. Other drugs such as immunomodulators or methotrexate have been also associated with hyponatremia. The administration of estrogens at high doses, streptozocin, azacitidine and suramin may induce hypophosphatemia. Finally, the drug-related tumor lysis syndrome is associated with hyperphosphatemia, hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia. The prevention of electrolyte derangements may lead to reduction of adverse events during the administration of anticancer drugs. PMID:26939882

  6. Are isothiocyanates potential anti-cancer drugs?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang WU; Qing-hua ZHOU; Ke XU

    2009-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are naturally occurring small molecules that are formed from glucosinolate precursors of cruciferous vegetables. Many isothiocyanates, both natural and synthetic, display anticarcinogenic activity because they reduce activation of carcinogens and increase their detoxification. Recent studies show that they exhibit anti-tumor activity by affecting multiple pathways including apoptosis, MAPK signaling, oxidative stress, and cell cycle progression. This review summarizes the current knowledge on isothiocyanates and focuses on their role as potential anti-cancer agents.

  7. Therapeutic aptamers: developmental potential as anticancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Hyun Jung; Heo, Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, composed of single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that interact with target molecules through a specific three-dimensional structure, are selected from pools of combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries. With their high specificity and affinity for target proteins, ease of synthesis and modification, and low immunogenicity and toxicity, aptamers are considered to be attractive molecules for development as anticancer therapeutics. Two aptamers - one targeting nucleolin and a seco...

  8. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  9. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Smolarczyk

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  10. Autophagy modulation as a target for anticancer drug discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LI; Huai-long XU; Yong-xi LIU; Na AN; Si ZHAO; Jin-ku BAO

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy,an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process involving the engulfment and degradation of non-essential or abnormal cellular organelles and proteins,is crucial for homeostatic maintenance in living cells.This highly regulated,multi-step process has been implicated in diverse diseases including cancer.Autophagy can function as either a promoter or a suppressor of cancer,which makes it a promising and challenging therapeutic target.Herein,we overview the regulatory mechanisms and dual roles of autophagy in cancer.We also describe some of the representative agents that exert their anticancer effects by regulating autophagy.Additionally,some emerging strategies aimed at modulating autophagy are discussed as having the potential for future anticancer drug discovery.In summary,these findings will provide valuable information to better utilize autophagy in the future development of anticancer therapeutics that meet clinical requirements.

  11. Research progress in nanoparticles as anticancer drug carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying Sun; Huaqing Lin ; Chuqin Yu; Suna Lin

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles drug delivery system has sustained and controled release features as wel as targeted drug deliv-ery, which can change the characteristics of drug distributionin vivo. It can increase the stability of the drug and enhance drug bioavailability. The selective targeting of nanoparticles can be achieved through enhanced permeability and retention efect and a conjugated specific ligand or through the efects of physiological conditions, such as pH and temperature. Nanoparticles can be prepared by using a wide range of materials and can be used to encapsulate chemotherapeutic agents to reduce toxic-ity, which can be used for imaging, therapy, and diagnosis. In this research, recent progress on nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system wil be reviewed, including positive-targeting, negative-targeting, and physicochemical-targeting used as anticancer drug carriers.

  12. Reducing Both Pgp Overexpression and Drug Efflux with Anti-Cancer Gold-Paclitaxel Nanoconjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Zhou, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hongyu; Jia, Jianbo; Li, Liwen; Zhai, Shumei; Yan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Repeated administrations of anti-cancer drugs to patients often induce drug resistance. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) facilitates an efficient drug efflux, preventing cellular accumulation of drugs and causing multi-drug resistance (MDR). In this study, we developed a gold-paclitaxel nanoconjugate system to overcome MDR. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were conjugated with β-cyclodextrin enclosing paclitaxel (PTX) molecules and PEG molecules. GNP conjugates were effectively endocytosed by both drug-sensitive human lung cancer H460 cells and Pgp-overexpressed drug-resistant H460PTX cells. Compared with PTX, PGNPs did not induce the Pgp overexpression in drug-sensitive H460 cells after long-term treatment and also avoided being pumped out of cells by overexpressed Pgp molecules in H460PTX with a 17-fold lower EC50 compared to PTX. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry further confirmed that fluorescent labeled PGNPs (f-PGNPs) maintained a high cellular PTX level in both H460 and H460PTX cells. These results demonstrated that nano-drug conjugates were able to avoid the development of drug resistance in sensitive cells and evade Pgp-mediated drug resistance and to maintain a high cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cancer cells. These findings exemplify a powerful nanotechnological approach to the long-lasting issue of chemotherapy-induced drug resistance. PMID:27467397

  13. Reducing Both Pgp Overexpression and Drug Efflux with Anti-Cancer Gold-Paclitaxel Nanoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Zhou, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hongyu; Jia, Jianbo; Li, Liwen; Zhai, Shumei; Yan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Repeated administrations of anti-cancer drugs to patients often induce drug resistance. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) facilitates an efficient drug efflux, preventing cellular accumulation of drugs and causing multi-drug resistance (MDR). In this study, we developed a gold-paclitaxel nanoconjugate system to overcome MDR. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were conjugated with β-cyclodextrin enclosing paclitaxel (PTX) molecules and PEG molecules. GNP conjugates were effectively endocytosed by both drug-sensitive human lung cancer H460 cells and Pgp-overexpressed drug-resistant H460PTX cells. Compared with PTX, PGNPs did not induce the Pgp overexpression in drug-sensitive H460 cells after long-term treatment and also avoided being pumped out of cells by overexpressed Pgp molecules in H460PTX with a 17-fold lower EC50 compared to PTX. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry further confirmed that fluorescent labeled PGNPs (f-PGNPs) maintained a high cellular PTX level in both H460 and H460PTX cells. These results demonstrated that nano-drug conjugates were able to avoid the development of drug resistance in sensitive cells and evade Pgp-mediated drug resistance and to maintain a high cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cancer cells. These findings exemplify a powerful nanotechnological approach to the long-lasting issue of chemotherapy-induced drug resistance. PMID:27467397

  14. Anticancer drug: oxaliplatin, studied by density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Density functional calculations at the B3LYP level were performed to understanding into the structure of the third generation anticancer drug, oxaliplatin. The structure and frequency spectrum were calculated, and oxaliplatin monohydrates were studied. The calculated structure parameters were agreed with the experimental data. While there were some differences in frequency spectrum between the calculated data and the experimental data. The calculation also give out the most probably structure of oxaliplatin monohydrate. (author)

  15. A functional perspective of nitazoxanide as a potential anticancer drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Santo, Nicola, E-mail: nico.disanto@duke.edu; Ehrisman, Jessie, E-mail: jessie.ehrisman@duke.edu

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Combination anti-cancer therapies are associated with increased toxicity and cross-resistance. • Some antiparasitic compounds may have anti-cancer potential. • Nitazoxanide interferes with metabolic and pro-death signaling. • Preclinical studies are needed to confirm anticancer ability of nitazoxanide. - Abstract: Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell proliferation, evasion of cell death and the ability to invade and disrupt vital tissue function. The classic model of carcinogenesis describes successive clonal expansion driven by the accumulation of mutations that eliminate restraints on proliferation and cell survival. It has been proposed that during cancer's development, the loose-knit colonies of only partially differentiated cells display some unicellular/prokaryotic behavior reminiscent of robust ancient life forms. The seeming “regression” of cancer cells involves changes within metabolic machinery and survival strategies. This atavist change in physiology enables cancer cells to behave as selfish “neo-endo-parasites” that exploit the tumor stromal cells in order to extract nutrients from the surrounding microenvironment. In this framework, it is conceivable that anti-parasitic compounds might serve as promising anticancer drugs. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), a thiazolide compound, has shown antimicrobial properties against anaerobic bacteria, as well as against helminths and protozoa. NTZ has also been successfully used to promote Hepatitis C virus (HCV) elimination by improving interferon signaling and promoting autophagy. More compelling however are the potential anti-cancer properties that have been observed. NTZ seems to be able to interfere with crucial metabolic and pro-death signaling such as drug detoxification, unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy, anti-cytokine activities and c-Myc inhibition. In this article, we review the ability of NTZ to interfere with integrated survival mechanisms of

  16. Computational metallomics of the anticancer drug cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrini, Vania; Rossetti, Giulia; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Cisplatin, cis-diamminedichlorido-platinum(II), is an important therapeutic tool in the struggle against different tumors, yet it is plagued with the emergence of resistance mechanisms after repeated administrations. This hampers greatly its efficacy. Overcoming resistance problems requires first and foremost an integrated and systematic understanding of the structural determinants and molecular recognition processes involving the drug and its cellular targets. Here we review a strategy that we have followed for the last few years, based on the combination of modern tools from computational chemistry with experimental biophysical methods. Using hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) simulations, validated by spectroscopic experiments (including NMR, and CD), we have worked out for the first time at atomic level the structural determinants in solution of platinated cellular substrates. These include the copper homeostasis proteins Ctr1, Atox1, and ATP7A. All of these proteins have been suggested to influence the pre-target resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, coupling hybrid QM/MM simulations with classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations, based on force field parameters refined by the so-called "Force Matching" procedure, we have characterized the structural modifications and the free energy landscape associated with the recognition between platinated DNA and the protein HMGB1, belonging to the chromosomal high-mobility group proteins HMGB that inhibit the repair of platinated DNA. This may alleviate issues relative to on-target resistance process. The elucidation of the mechanisms by which tumors are sensitive or refractory to cisplatin may lead to the discovery of prognostic biomarkers. The approach reviewed here could be straightforwardly extended to other metal-based drugs.

  17. Effect of selected ABC-drug transporters and anticancer drug disposition in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, S

    2013-01-01

    Studies described in the thesis that is lying in front of you aim to address the possible implications of selected ABC-drug transporters on the disposition of a number of important anticancer drugs. Although variability in drug disposition has been known for as long as pharmacological studies supported drug development and clinical therapeutics general molecular pharmacological concepts explaining the given interpatient variation in drug disposition have been lacking for many decades. Firm ex...

  18. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Neng [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Yin, Huabing, E-mail: huabing.yin@glasgow.ac.uk [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Ji, Bozhi; Klauke, Norbert; Glidle, Andrew [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yongkui; Song, Hang [Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Cai, Lulu; Ma, Liang; Wang, Guangcheng [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chen, Lijuan, E-mail: lijuan17@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Wenwen [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  19. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: ► BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. ► Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. ► The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent ► In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  20. [Future directions of anticancer drug development in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Kawai, Koji; Tsuruo, Takashi; Tsukagoshi, Shigeru; Aiba, Keisuke; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Hideki; Ikeda, Tadashi; Nakamura, Seigo; Tamura, Tomohide; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Isonishi, Seiji; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hirose, Masaru; Katsura, Jun

    2008-02-01

    At the 13th Oncology Forum, future directions of anticancer drug development in Japan were discussed. Development of anticancer drugs in the 1990s was based on the concept of total cell kill, but now development of molecular targeted drugs becomes the mainstream. Unfortunately, molecular targeted drugs and antibody agents are mostly foreign products and translational research in Japan is poor as it stands now. As future directions of anticancer drug development, international collaborative development is considered essential, but there are various obstacles to the conduct of international collaborative studies. Companies, medical institutions and regulatory agencies must make collaborative efforts to overcome these obstacles. As future development of anticancer agents in individual cancer regions in Japan is considered, gastric cancer therapy is progressing considerably with the advent of S-1 and in the future, development of multi-agent combination therapy including molecular targeted agents is expected. Much progress in colon cancer therapy has been made owing to accumulation of evidence in recent years. Multi-agent chemotherapy combined with antibody agent, which is advancing overseas, is introduced to Japan. Clinical development of combination therapy with a high therapeutic index, including compounds discovered in Japan, is expected in the future. Although conventionally hormone therapy has been considered as first-line treatment of breast cancer and used in combination with chemotherapy, with the advent of antibody agents in recent years, HER2 sensitivity has greatly affected the algorithm of treatment. Future development of molecular targeted drugs and individualised diagnosis using cDNA array, etc. are likely to advance individualisation of treatment. On the other hand, large-scale clinical trials are required to prove a small difference in adjuvant therapy, etc. and accordingly international studies are becoming indispensable. For urological cancers

  1. Pumping of drugs by P-glycoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Skovsgaard, Torben; Stein, Wilfred D

    2003-01-01

    The apparent inhibition constant, Kapp, for the blockade of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by four drugs, verapamil, cyclosporin A, XR9576 (tariquidar), and vinblastine, was measured by studying their ability to inhibit daunorubicin and calcein-AM efflux from four strains of Ehrlich cells with different...... levels of drug resistance and P-gp content. For daunorubicin as a transport substrate, Kapp was independent of [P-gp] for verapamil but increased strictly linearly with [P-gp] for vinblastine, cyclosporin A, and XR9576. A theoretical analysis of the kinetics of drug pumping and its reversal shows...... but rather, in serial, i.e., a drug that is pumped from the cytoplasmic phase has to pass the preemptive route upon leaving the cell. Our results are consistent with the Sauna-Ambudkar two-step model for pumping by P-gp. We suggest that the vinblastine/cyclosporin A/XR9576-binding site accepts daunorubicin...

  2. Effects of anticancer drugs on transcription factor-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniazdowski, Marek; Denny, William A; Nelson, Stephanie M; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2005-06-01

    DNA-interacting anticancer drugs are able to affect the propensity of DNA to interact with proteins through either reversible binding or covalent bond formation. The effect of the drugs on transcription factor interactions with DNA is reviewed. These effects can be classified as (i) competition between a drug and regulatory protein for target sequences; (ii) weakening of this interaction; (iii) enhancement of this interaction by chemical modification of the DNA and the creation of non-natural binding sites; and (iv) a 'suicide' mechanism, which is observed when a transcription factor induces changes in DNA structure, allowing a drug to bind to a target sequence. Several new strategies -- the antigene approach with oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids or locked nucleic acids, and sequence-specific polyamides -- are also reviewed. PMID:15948668

  3. pH-dependent anticancer drug release from silk nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, F Philipp; Jones, Gregory T; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Lin, Yinan; Kaplan, David L

    2013-12-01

    Silk has traditionally been used as a suture material because of its excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility. These properties have led to the development of different silk-based material formats for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Although there have been a small number of studies about the use of silk particles for drug delivery, none of these studies have assessed the potential of silk to act as a stimulus-responsive anticancer nanomedicine. This report demonstrates that an acetone precipitation of silk allows the formation of uniform silk nanoparticles (98 nm diameter, polydispersity index 0.109), with an overall negative surface charge (-33.6 ± 5.8 mV), in a single step. Silk nanoparticles are readily loaded with doxorubicin (40 ng doxorubicin/μg silk) and show pH-dependent release (pH 4.5≫ 6.0 > 7.4). In vitro studies with human breast cancer cell lines demonstrates that the silk nanoparticles are not cytotoxic (IC50 > 120 μg mL(-1) ) and that doxorubicin-loaded silk nanoparticles are able to overcome drug resistance mechanisms. Live cell fluorescence microscopy studies show endocytic uptake and lysosomal accumulation of silk nanoparticles. In summary, the pH-dependent drug release and lysosomal accumulation of silk nanoparticles demonstrate the ability of drug-loaded silk nanoparticles to serve as a lysosomotropic anticancer nanomedicine.

  4. Lymphatic Targeting of Nanosystems for Anticancer Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellan-Pose, Raquel; Csaba, Noemi; Alonso, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system represents a major route of dissemination in metastatic cancer. Given the lack of selectivity of conventional chemotherapy to prevent lymphatic metastasis, in the last years there has been a growing interest in the development of nanocarriers showing lymphotropic characteristics. The goal of this lymphotargeting strategy is to facilitate the delivery of anticancer drugs to the lymph node-resident cancer cells, thereby enhancing the effectiveness of the anti-cancer therapies. This article focuses on the nanosystems described so far for the active or passive targeting of oncological drugs to the lymphatic circulation. To understand the design and performance of these nanosystems, we will discuss first the physiology of the lymphatic system and how physiopathological changes associated to tumor growth influence the biodistribution of nanocarriers. Second, we provide evidence on how the tailoring of the physicochemical characteristics of nanosystems, i.e. particle size, surface charge and hydrophilicity, allows the modulation of their access to the lymphatic circulation. Finally, we provide an overview of the relationship between the biodistribution and antimetastatic activity of the nanocarriers loaded with oncological drugs, and illustrate the most promising active targeting approaches investigated so far. PMID:26675222

  5. Deep sea as a source of novel-anticancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Patrizia; Del Bufalo, Alessandra; Fini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The deep-sea habitat is a source of very potent marine-derived agents that may inhibit the growth of human cancer cells “in vitro” and “in vivo”. Salinosporamide-A, Marizomib, by Salinispora species is a proteasome inhibitor with promising anticancer activity (Phase I/II trials). Different deep-sea-derived drugs are under preclinical evaluation. Cancer is a complex disease that may be represented by network medicine. A simple consequence is the change of the concept of target entity from a si...

  6. Digoxin is a selective modifier increasing platinum drug anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogush, T A; Chernov, V Yu; Dudko, E A; Shprakh, Z S; Bogush, E A; Polotsky, B E; Tjulandin, S A; Davydov, M I

    2016-05-01

    Using the model of breast cancer Ehrlich ascites tumor in mice, we showed that a sigle intraperitoneal injection of cardiac glycoside digoxin 1 h before the intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin increased the anticancer effect of the cytostatic drug more than twice when recalculated for the dose. It is assumed that the modifying effect of digoxin is determined by the direct inhibition of glycolysis in tumor cells. Taking into account the design of the study, we consider promising the clinical evaluation of the effectiveness of digoxin as a modifier of cisplatin efficiency in intracavitary therapy of ascites cancers with pleural and abdominal dissenmination. PMID:27417726

  7. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are inv...

  8. Hurdles in anticancer drug development from a regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Bertil; Bergh, Jonas

    2012-04-01

    Between January 2001 and January 2012, 48 new medicinal products for cancer treatment were licensed within the EU, and 77 new indications were granted for products already licensed. In some cases, a major improvement to existing therapies was achieved, for example, trastuzumab in breast cancer. In other cases, new fields for effective drug therapy opened up, such as in chronic myeloid leukemia, and renal-cell carcinoma. In most cases, however, the benefit-risk balance was considered to be only borderline favorable. Based on our assessment of advice procedures for marketing authorization, 'need for speed' seems to be the guiding principle in anticancer drug development. Although, for drugs that make a difference, early licensure is of obvious importance to patients, this is less evident in the case of borderline drugs. Without proper incentives and with hurdles inside and outside companies, a change in drug development cannot be expected; drugs improving benefit-risk modestly over available therapies will be brought forward towards licensure. In this Perspectives article, we discuss some hurdles to biomarker-driven drug development and provide some suggestions to overcome them. PMID:22349015

  9. Injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel for delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, CuiXiang; Lin, XiaoXiao; Wang, Jun; Zheng, XiaoQun; Li, XingYi; Lin, ZhengFeng; Lin, GuangYong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel composed of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caplactone) (MPEG5000-PCL5000) micelles was developed by a simple method for hydrophobic anticancer drug delivery. By mixing α-CD aqueous solution and MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel could be formed under mild condition due to the inclusion complexation between α-CD and MPEG segment of MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles. The resultant supramolecular hydrogel was thereafter characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of α-CD amount on the gelation time, mechanical strength and thixotropic property was studied by a rheometer. Payload of hydrophobic paclitaxel (PTX) to supramolecular hydrogel was achieved by encapsulation of PTX into MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles prior mixing with α-CD aqueous solution. In vitro release study showed that the release behavior of PTX from hydrogel could be modulated by change the α-CD amount in hydrogel. Furthermore, such supramolecular hydrogel could enhance the biological activity of encapsulated PTX compared to free PTX, as indicated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay. All these results indicated that the developed micellar supramolecular hydrogel might be a promising injectable drug delivery system for anticancer therapy. PMID:26886821

  10. Anticancer Drug-Incorporated Layered Double Hydroxide Nanohybrids and Their Enhanced Anticancer Therapeutic Efficacy in Combination Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Layered double hydroxide (LDH nanoparticles have been studied as cellular delivery carriers for anionic anticancer agents. As MTX and 5-FU are clinically utilized anticancer drugs in combination therapy, we aimed to enhance the therapeutic performance with the help of LDH nanoparticles. Method. Anticancer drugs, MTX and 5-FU, and their combination, were incorporated into LDH by reconstruction method. Simply, LDHs were thermally pretreated at 400°C, and then reacted with drug solution to simultaneously form drug-incorporated LDH. Thus prepared MTX/LDH (ML, 5-FU/LDH (FL, and (MTX + 5-FU/LDH (MFL nanohybrids were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, zeta potential measurement, dynamic light scattering, and so forth. The nanohybrids were administrated to the human cervical adenocarcinoma, HeLa cells, in concentration-dependent manner, comparing with drug itself to verify the enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion. All the nanohybrids successfully accommodated intended drug molecules in their house-of-card-like structures during reconstruction reaction. It was found that the anticancer efficacy of MFL nanohybrid was higher than other nanohybrids, free drugs, or their mixtures, which means the multidrug-incorporated LDH nanohybrids could be potential drug delivery carriers for efficient cancer treatment via combination therapy.

  11. Anticancer Drug Delivery: An Update on Clinically Applied Nanotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Sophie; El Hor, Amélie; Millard, Marie; Gillon, Véronique; Bezdetnaya, Lina

    2015-09-01

    The development of chemotherapy using conventional anticancer drugs has been hindered due to several drawbacks related to their poor water solubility and poor pharmacokinetics, leading to severe adverse side effects and multidrug resistance in patients. Nanocarriers were developed to palliate these problems by improving drug delivery, opening the era of nanomedicine in oncology. Liposomes have been by far the most used nanovectors for drug delivery, with liposomal doxorubicin receiving US FDA approval as early as 1995. Antibody drug conjugates and promising drug delivery systems based on a natural polymer, such as albumin, or a synthetic polymer, are currently undergoing advanced clinical trials or have received approval for clinical applications. However, despite attractive results being obtained in preclinical studies, many well-designed nanodrugs fell short of expectations when tested in patients, evidencing the gap between nanoparticle design and their clinical translation. The aim of this review is to evaluate the extent of nanotherapeutics used in oncology by providing an insight into the most successful concepts. The reasons that prevent nanodrugs from expanding to clinic are discussed, and the efforts that must be taken to take full advantage of the great potential of nanomedicine are highlighted. PMID:26323338

  12. In vivo evaluation on the effects of HemoHIM in promoting anticancer activities and reducing the side-effects of anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, we aimed to obtain the preclinical in vivo evaluation data for the development of the herbal composition (HemoHIM) as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment that can reduce the side-effects of anticancer drugs and enhance their anticancer activities. Firstly, in vitro studies showed that HemoHIM did not show any effects on the tumor cell growth inhibition by 2 anticancer drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), which indicated that at least HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the activities of anticancer drugs. Next, the in vivo studies with mice implanted with tumor cells(B16F0, LLC1) showed that HemoHIM partially enhanced the anticancer activities of drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), and improved endogenous anticancer immune activities. Furthermore, in the same animal models, HemoHIM effectively reduced the side-effects of anticancer drugs (liver and renal toxicities by cisplatin, immune and hematopoietic disorders by 5-FU). These results collectively showed that HemoHIM can enhance the activities of anticancer drugs and reduce their side-effects in vitro and in vivo and HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The results of this project can be utilized as the basic preclinical data for the development and approval of HemoHIM as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment

  13. In vivo evaluation on the effects of HemoHIM in promoting anticancer activities and reducing the side-effects of anticancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran; Ju, Eun Jin; Cho, Eun Hee

    2009-07-15

    In this project, we aimed to obtain the preclinical in vivo evaluation data for the development of the herbal composition (HemoHIM) as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment that can reduce the side-effects of anticancer drugs and enhance their anticancer activities. Firstly, in vitro studies showed that HemoHIM did not show any effects on the tumor cell growth inhibition by 2 anticancer drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), which indicated that at least HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the activities of anticancer drugs. Next, the in vivo studies with mice implanted with tumor cells(B16F0, LLC1) showed that HemoHIM partially enhanced the anticancer activities of drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), and improved endogenous anticancer immune activities. Furthermore, in the same animal models, HemoHIM effectively reduced the side-effects of anticancer drugs (liver and renal toxicities by cisplatin, immune and hematopoietic disorders by 5-FU). These results collectively showed that HemoHIM can enhance the activities of anticancer drugs and reduce their side-effects in vitro and in vivo and HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The results of this project can be utilized as the basic preclinical data for the development and approval of HemoHIM as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment

  14. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors

  15. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingliang Fang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors.

  16. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Bingliang [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors.

  17. Crosslinked multilamellar liposomes for controlled delivery of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Kye-Il; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Shuanglong; Liu, Yarong; Lee, Chi-Lin; Conti, Peter S; Wong, Michael K; Li, Zibo; Wang, Pin

    2013-04-01

    Liposomes constitute one of the most popular nanocarriers for the delivery of cancer therapeutics. However, since their potency is limited by incomplete drug release and inherent instability in the presence of serum components, their poor delivery occurs in certain circumstances. In this study, we address these shortcomings and demonstrate an alternative liposomal formulation, termed crosslinked multilamellar liposome (CML). With its properties of improved sustainable drug release kinetics and enhanced vesicle stability, CML can achieve controlled delivery of cancer therapeutics. CML stably encapsulated the anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) in the vesicle and exhibited a remarkably controlled rate of release compared to that of the unilamellar liposome (UL) with the same lipid composition or Doxil-like liposome (DLL). Our imaging study demonstrated that the CMLs were mainly internalized through a caveolin-dependent pathway and were further trafficked through the endosome-lysosome compartments. Furthermore, in vivo experiments showed that the CML-Dox formulation reduced systemic toxicity and significantly improved therapeutic activity in inhibiting tumor growth compared to that of UL-Dox or DLL-Dox. This drug packaging technology may therefore provide a new treatment option to better manage cancer and other diseases. PMID:23375392

  18. Halloysite Nanotubes, a Multifunctional Nanovehicle for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭明义; 王艾菲; 费海姆; 齐文秀; 任浩; 郭颖杰; 朱广山

    2012-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems have attracted a great deal of interest by virtue of their potential use in chemotherapy. In this study, multicomponent halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) have been evaluated as a platform to assist and direct the delivery of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) into cancer cells. Folic acid (FA) and magnetite nanopar- ticles were successfully grafted onto HNTs via amide reaction whereas the drug has been introduced by capitalizing electrostatic interaction between cationic drug and anionic exterior of HNTs, which eventually leads to pH respon- sive release. The resultant DOX loaded FA-Fe304@HNTs were well characterized by transmission electron mi- croscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and XRD. The clinical efficacy of the system was validated by confocal microscopy and cell cytotoxicity assay (MTT assay). MTT assay results revealed a high biocompatibility up to a concentration of 200 μg/mL of HNTs, while, DOX loaded FA-Fe304@HNTs were markedly cytotoxic to HeLa cells. This multifunctional nanovehicle has a great po- tential for cancer diagnosis and therapy, and could further advance the clinical use of nanomedicine.

  19. Nanoformulation for anticancer drug delivery: Enhanced pharmacokinetics and circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Gaurav

    In this study, we have explored the application of the Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly technique for improving injectable drug delivery systems of low soluble anticancer drugs (e.g. Camptothecin (CPT), Paclitaxel (PTX) or Doxorubicin (DOX)). For this study, a polyelectrolyte shell encapsulates different types of drug nanocores (e.g. soft core, nanomicelle or solid lipid nanocores).The low soluble drugs tend to crystallize and precipitate in an aqueous medium. This is the reason they cannot be injected and may have low concentrations and low circulation time in the blood. Even though these drugs when present in the cancer microenvironment have high anti-tumor inhibition, the delivery to the tumor site after intravenous administration is a challenge. We have used FDA-approved biopolymers for the process and elaborated formation of 60-90 nm diameter initial cores, which was stabilized by multilayer LbL shells for controlled release and longer circulation. A washless LbL assembly process was applied as an essential advancement in nano-assembly technology using low density nanocore (lipids) and preventing aggregation. This advancement reduced the number of process steps, enhanced drug loading capacity, and prevented the loss of expensive polyelectrolytes. Finally, we elaborated a general nano-encapsulation process, which allowed these three important anticancer drug core-shell nanocapsules with diameters of ca. 100-130 nm (this small size is a record for LbL encapsulation technique) to be stable in the serum and the blood for at least one week, efficient for cancer cell culture studies, injectable to mice with circulation for 4 hrs, and effective in suppressing tumors. This work is divided into three studies. The first study (CHAPTER 4) explores the application of LbL assembly for encapsulating a soft core of albumin protein and CPT anticancer drug. In order to preserve the activity of drug in the core, a unique technique of pH reversal is employed where the first few

  20. Delivery of anticancer drugs and antibodies into cells using ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junru; Pepe, Jason; Rincon, Mercedes

    2005-04-01

    It has been shown experimentally in cell suspensions that pulsed ultrasound (2.0 MHz) could be used to deliver an anti-cancer drug (Adriamycin hydrochloride) into Jurkat lymphocytes and antibodies (goat anti rabbit IgG and anti mouse IgD) into human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMC) cells and Jurkat lymphocytes assisted by encapsulated microbubbles (Optison). When Adriamycin hydrochloride (ADR) was delivered, the delivery efficiency reached 4.80% and control baseline (no ultrasound and no ADR) was 0.17%. When anti-rabbit IgD was delivered, the efficiencies were 34.90% (control baseline was 1.33%) and 32.50% (control baseline was 1.66%) respectively for Jurkat cells and PBMC. When goat anti rabbit IgG was delivered, the efficiencies were 78.60% (control baseline was 1.60%) and 57.50% (control baseline was 11.30%) respectively for Jurkat cells and PBMC.

  1. Clinical practice guidelines for translating pharmacogenomic knowledge to bedside. Focus on anticancer drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Gara eEsguevillas; Gemma eAmo; Elena eGarcía-Martín

    2014-01-01

    The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of pharmacogenomics data is an essential issue for improving drug therapy, particularly for drugs with high toxicity and/or narrow therapeutic index such as anticancer drugs. Although pharmacogenomic-based recommendations have been formulated for over 40 anticancer drugs, the number of clinical practice guidelines available is very low. The guidelines already published indicate that pharmacogenomic testing...

  2. Clinical practice guidelines for translating pharmacogenomic knowledge to bedside. Focus on anticancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Agúndez, José A. G.; Esguevillas, Gara; Amo, Gemma; García-Martín, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of pharmacogenomics data is an essential issue for improving drug therapy, particularly for drugs with high toxicity and/or narrow therapeutic index such as anticancer drugs. Although pharmacogenomic-based recommendations have been formulated for over 40 anticancer drugs, the number of clinical practice guidelines available is very low. The guidelines already published indicate that pharmacogenomic testing...

  3. Using DNA devices to track anticancer drug activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahanda, Dimithree; Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Mcwilliams, Marc A; Boothman, David A; Slinker, Jason D

    2016-06-15

    It is beneficial to develop systems that reproduce complex reactions of biological systems while maintaining control over specific factors involved in such processes. We demonstrated a DNA device for following the repair of DNA damage produced by a redox-cycling anticancer drug, beta-lapachone (β-lap). These chips supported ß-lap-induced biological redox cycle and tracked subsequent DNA damage repair activity with redox-modified DNA monolayers on gold. We observed drug-specific changes in square wave voltammetry from these chips at therapeutic ß-lap concentrations of high statistical significance over drug-free control. We also demonstrated a high correlation of this change with the specific ß-lap-induced redox cycle using rational controls. The concentration dependence of ß-lap revealed significant signal changes at levels of high clinical significance as well as sensitivity to sub-lethal levels of ß-lap. Catalase, an enzyme decomposing peroxide, was found to suppress DNA damage at a NQO1/catalase ratio found in healthy cells, but was clearly overcome at a higher NQO1/catalase ratio consistent with cancer cells. We found that it was necessary to reproduce key features of the cellular environment to observe this activity. Thus, this chip-based platform enabled tracking of ß-lap-induced DNA damage repair when biological criteria were met, providing a unique synthetic platform for uncovering activity normally confined to inside cells. PMID:26901461

  4. Strategic development on generic anti-cancer drugs Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride for Harbin Pharmaceutical Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheung Fat Ping

    2011-01-01

    @@ With improved economy, changing life styles, aging population and health care reform, China had a very potential anti-cancer drug market.The patents of popular anti-cancer drugs Avastin and Tarceva would expire in few years.Generic versions of Avastin and Tarceva were Bevacizumab and Erlotinib Hydrochloride respectively.Harbin Pharmaceutical Group was proposed to develop strategically both generic medicines to enter the high-end anti-cancer drug market for targeted cancer therapies.The vital to success of developing the generic drugs were discussed.

  5. Fermented wheat germ extract - nutritional supplement or anticancer drug?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voigt Wieland

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermented wheat germ extract (FWGE is a multisubstance composition and, besides others, contains 2-methoxy benzoquinone and 2, 6-dimethoxy benzoquinone which are likely to exert some of its biological effects. FWGE interferes with anaerobic glycolysis, pentose cycle and ribonucleotide reductase. It has significant antiproliferative effects and kills tumor cells by the induction of apoptosis via the caspase-poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase-pathway. FWGE interacts synergistically with a variety of different anticancer drugs and exerted antimetastatic properties in mouse models. In addition, FWGE modulates immune response by downregulation of MHC-I complex and the induction of TNF-α and various interleukins. Data in the F-344 rat model provide evidence for a colon cancer preventing effect of FWGE. Clinical data from a randomized phase II trial in melanoma patients indicate a significant benefit for patients treated with dacarbazine in combination with FWGE in terms of progression free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS. Similarly, data from studies in colorectal cancer suggested a benefit of FWGE treatment. Besides extension of OS and PFS, FWGE improved the quality of life in several studies. Conclusion In conclusion, available data so far, justify the use of FWGE as a non-prescription medical nutriment for cancer patients. Further randomized, controlled and large scale clinical studies are mandatory, to further clarify the value of FWGE as a drug component of future chemotherapy regimens.

  6. Synergistic effect of pH-responsive folate-functionalized poloxamer 407-TPGS-mixed micelles on targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Butt AM; Mohd Amin MC; Katas H

    2015-01-01

    Adeel Masood Butt, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin, Haliza Katas Centre for Drug Delivery Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Doxorubicin (DOX), an anthracycline anticancer antibiotic, is used for treating various types of cancers. However, its use is associated with toxicity to normal cells and development of resistance due to overexpression of drug efflux pumps. Poloxamer 407 (P407) and vitamin E TPGS (d-α-tocopheryl poly...

  7. Human recombinant RNASET2: A potential anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Lewin, Iris; Shoseyov, Oded; Schwartz, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The roles of cell motility and angiogenetic processes in metastatic spread and tumor aggressiveness are well established and must be simultaneously targeted to maximize antitumor drug potency. This work evaluated the antitumorigenic capacities of human recombinant RNASET2 (hrRNASET2), a homologue of the Aspergillus niger T2RNase ACTIBIND, which has been shown to display both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities. hrRNASET2 disrupted intracellular actin filament and actin-rich extracellular extrusion organization in both CT29 colon cancer and A375SM melanoma cells and induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of A375SM cell migration. hrRNASET2 also induced full arrest of angiogenin-induced tube formation and brought to a three-fold lower relative HT29 colorectal and A375SM melanoma tumor volume, when compared to Avastin-treated animals. In parallel, mean blood vessel counts were 36.9% lower in hrRNASET2-vs. Avastin-treated mice and survival rates of hrRNASET2-treated mice were 50% at 73 days post-treatment, while the median survival time for untreated animals was 22 days. Moreover, a 60-day hrRNASET2 treatment period reduced mean A375SM lung metastasis foci counts by three-fold when compared to untreated animals. Taken together, the combined antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic capacities of hrRNASET2, seemingly arising from its direct interaction with intercellular and extracellular matrices, render it an attractive anticancer therapy candidate. PMID:27014725

  8. Tirapazamine: a bioreductive anticancer drug that exploits tumour hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, W A; Wilson, W R

    2000-12-01

    Tirapazamine is the second clinical anticancer drug (after porfiromycin) that functions primarily as a hypoxia-selective cytotoxin. Hypoxic cells in tumours are relatively resistant to radiotherapy and to some forms of chemotherapy and are also biologically aggressive, thus representing an important target population in oncology. Tirapazamine undergoes metabolism by reductases to form a transient oxidising radical that can be efficiently scavenged by molecular oxygen in normal tissues to re-form the parent compound. In the absence of oxygen, the oxidising radical abstracts a proton from DNA to form DNA radicals, largely at C4' on the ribose ring. Tirapazamine can also oxidise such DNA radicals to cytotoxic DNA strand breaks. It therefore shows substantial selective cytotoxicity for anoxic cells in culture (typically approximately 100-fold more potent than under oxic conditions) and for the hypoxic subfraction of cells in tumours. Preclinical studies showed enhanced activity of combinations of tirapazamine with radiation (to kill oxygenated cells) and with conventional cytotoxics, especially cisplatin (probably through inhibition of repair of cisplatin DNA cross-links in hypoxic cells). Phase II and III clinical studies of tirapazamine and cisplatin in malignant melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer suggest that the combination is more active than cisplatin alone and preliminary results with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck indicate that tirapazamine may enhance the activity of cisplatin with fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:11093359

  9. Targeting efflux pumps to overcome antifungal drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ann R; Cardno, Tony S; Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Keniya, Mikhail V; Lackovic, Kurt; Monk, Brian C; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antifungal drugs is an increasingly significant clinical problem. The most common antifungal resistance encountered is efflux pump-mediated resistance of Candida species to azole drugs. One approach to overcome this resistance is to inhibit the pumps and chemosensitize resistant strains to azole drugs. Drug discovery targeting fungal efflux pumps could thus result in the development of azole-enhancing combination therapy. Heterologous expression of fungal efflux pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a versatile system for screening for pump inhibitors. Fungal efflux pumps transport a range of xenobiotics including fluorescent compounds. This enables the use of fluorescence-based detection, as well as growth inhibition assays, in screens to discover compounds targeting efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance. A variety of medium- and high-throughput screens have been used to identify a number of chemical entities that inhibit fungal efflux pumps. PMID:27463566

  10. Piperin and piplartin as natural oral anticancer drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlian Bidarisugma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the last few decades, oral cancer as pathology has become an attention in medicine and dentistry. The majority cases of oral cancer are affecting people with smoking habit and alcohol consumption. Many herbs contain substances which can stop cancer cells proliferation, such as Piper retrofractum/Retrofracti fructus, an herb plant from Piperaceae family which contains piperin and piplartin. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanism of piperin and pilplartin as natural oral anticancer drug. Reviews: Piperin and piplartin has function as antioxidant that can protect body cell from damage caused by free radicals. Piperin works synergistically with another bioactive substance like capsaicin and curcumin. Piperin increase the number of serum and life time of serum from a few nutrition substance like co-enzyme Q10 and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene can catch reactive O2 and peroxil radicals. The activity of anticancer piplartin related with obstruction of proliferation cell rate, observe form Ki67 reduction as antigen in nucleus that associated with G1, S, G2, and M phase in cell cycle. Comparing with piplartin, piperin is more potential to inhibit proliferation rate of Ki67, but piplartin’s antiproliferation mechanism will increase if supported by piperin. Conclusion: Piperin and piplartin contained in Javanese chili are potential for natural oral anticancer, by directly or indirectly suppress tumor cell development by increasing the number of immunity cells (immunomodulator, and by inhibiting cell proliferation with reduction of Ki67, nucleus antigen that associated with G1,S,G2, dan M phase of cell cycle.Latar belakang: Sejak beberapa dekade terakhir, patologi kanker rongga mulut telah banyak menjadi perhatian di bidang kedokteran dan kedokteran gigi. Risiko paling tinggi ditemukan pada penderita perokok dan peminum alkohol. Banyak tanaman herbal yang memiliki kandungan untuk menghambat pertumbuhan sel kanker

  11. Nanodrug Formed by Coassembly of Dual Anticancer Drugs to Inhibit Cancer Cell Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Chen, Fei; Pan, Yuanming; Li, Zhipeng; Xue, Xiangdong; Okeke, Chukwunweike Ikechukwu; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Chan; Peng, Ling; Wang, Paul C; Ma, Xiaowei; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2015-09-01

    Carrier-free pure nanodrugs (PNDs) that are composed entirely of pharmaceutically active molecules are regarded as promising candidates to be the next generation of drug formulations and are mainly formulated from supramolecular self-assembly of drug molecules. It benefits from the efficient use of drug compounds with poor aqueous solubility and takes advantage of nanoscale drug delivery systems. Here, a type of all-in-one nanoparticle consisting of multiple drugs with enhanced synergistic antiproliferation efficiency against drug-resistant cancer cells has been created. To nanoparticulate the anticancer drugs, 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) were chosen as a typical model. The resulting HD nanoparticles (HD NPs) were formulated by a "green" and convenient self-assembling method, and the water-solubility of 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) was improved 50-fold after nanosizing by coassembly with DOX. The formation process was studied by observing the morphological changes at various reaction times and molar ratios of DOX to HCPT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that DOX molecules tend to assemble around HCPT molecules through intermolecular forces. With the advantage of nanosizing, HD NPs could improve the intracellular drug retention of DOX to as much as 2-fold in drug-resistant cancer cells (MCF-7R). As a dual-drug-loaded nanoformulation, HD NPs effectively enhanced drug cytotoxicity to drug-resistant cancer cells. The combination of HCPT and DOX exhibited a synergistic effect as the nanosized HD NPs improved drug retention in drug-resistant cancer cells against P-gp efflux in MCF-7R cells. Furthermore, colony forming assays were applied to evaluate long-term inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and these assays confirmed the greatly improved cytotoxicity of HD NPs in drug-resistant cells compared to free drugs. PMID:26270258

  12. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti...

  13. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery. PMID:27229857

  14. Antiplatelet drug interactions with proton pump inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stuart A; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-aspirin antiplatelet agents (e.g., clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) are commonly prescribed for the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events among patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In addition, combination therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is often recommended to attenuate gastrointestinal bleeding risk, particularly during dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with clopidogrel and aspirin. Importantly, a pharmacological interaction between clopidogrel and some PPIs has been proposed based on mutual CYP450-dependent metabolism, but available evidence is inconsistent. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the currently approved antiplatelet agents and PPIs, including their metabolic pathways. Additionally, the CYP450 isoenzyme at the center of the drug interaction, CYP2C19, is described in detail, and the available evidence on both the potential pharmacological interaction and influence on clinical outcomes are summarized and evaluated. Expert opinion Although concomitant DAPT and PPI use reduces clopidogrel active metabolite levels and ex vivo-measured platelet inhibition, the influence of the drug interaction on clinical outcomes has been conflicting and largely reported from non-randomized observational studies. Despite this inconsistency, a clinically important interaction cannot be definitively excluded, particularly among patient subgroups with higher overall cardiovascular risk and potentially among CYP2C19 loss-of-function allele carriers. PMID:24205916

  15. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  16. Quinoxaline Nucleus: A Promising Scaffold in Anti-cancer Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Alessandra C; Mendonça Nogueira, Thais C; de Souza, Marcus V N

    2016-01-01

    Heterocyclic compounds are a class of substances, which play a critical role in modern drug discovery being incorporated in the structure of a large variety of drugs used in many different types of diseases. Quinoxaline is an important heterocyclic nucleus with a wide spectrum of biological activities, and recently much attention has been found on anticancer drug discovery based on this class. Owing to the importance of this system, the aim of this review is to provide an update on the synthesis and anticancer activity of quinoxaline derivatives covering articles published between 2010 and 2015.

  17. Non conventional biological treatment based on Trametes versicolor for the elimination of recalcitrant anticancer drugs in hospital wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrando Climent, Laura; Cruz Morató, Carles; Marco Urrea, Ernest; Vicent, Teresa; Sarrà i Adroguer, Montserrat; Rodríguez Mozaz, Sara; Barceló i Cullerés, Damià

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a study about the elimination of anticancer drugs, a group of pollutants considered recalcitrant during conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment, using a biological treatment based on the fungus Trametes versicolor. A 10-L fluidized bed bioreactor inoculated with this fungus was set up in order to evaluate the removal of 10 selected anticancer drugs in real hospital wastewater. Almost all the tested anticancer drugs were completely removed from the wastewater at ...

  18. The absence of functional glucosylceramide synthase does not sensitize melanoma cells for anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, RJ; Mita, A; Cuvillier, O; Garcia, [No Value; Klappe, K; Medin, JA; Campbell, JD; Carpentier, S; Kok, JW; Levade, T

    2003-01-01

    Conversion of ceramide, a putative mediator of anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, into glucosylceramide, by the action of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS), has been implicated in drug resistance. Herein, we compared GM95 mouse melanoma cells deficient in GCS activity, with cells stably transfected wi

  19. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  20. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed. PMID:23170959

  1. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    V. K. Saini; Sewal, R. K.; Ahmad, Yusra; B Medhi

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and ...

  2. Hyperthermia enhances the anticancer-drug induced cytotoxicity in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yang; Baorui Liu; Xiaoping Qian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Hyperthermia is an attractive addition to multidisciplinary approaches to clinical cancer treatment.The efficiency of hyperthermia depends on the elevation of the temperature and the duration of treatment. It has been reported that in vitro and in vivo hyperthermia enhanced the cytotoxic effect of certain anticancer drugs. However, this enhancement varies,depending on the drug used and the scheduling of treatments. Thus, the combination effect of chemotherapy and hyperthermia remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether concurrent exposure of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells SMMC-7721 to chemotherapeutic agents andhypenhermia could increase anticancer effects. Methods: Two chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin and hydroxycamptothecin, were applied. The MTT assay was performed to evaluate the growth inhibition of SMMC-7721 induced by anticancer drugs with and without hyperthermia. Flow cytometric analysis was used for the assessment of apoptosis after treatments. Results: The percentages of growth inhibition of SMMC-7721 induced by cisplatin (10 μg/ml) alone,hydroxycamptothecin (1 μg/ml) alone, hyperthermia alone, cisplatin and hyperthermia, hydroxycamptothecin and hyperthermia,were 20.77%, 13.65%, 32.46%, 62.76%, 71.89%, respectively. The percentages of apoptosis of five treatments are 5.56%,3.96%, 10.16%, 24.32%, 20.42%, respectively. Conclusion: While both hyperthermia and anticancer drugs can individually induce apoptosis and anti-proliferation effect, the combination of the two treatments induce significantly higher apoptosis and cytotoxicity than hyperthermia or anticancer drugs treatment alone. These data suggest a synergistic benefit when hyperthermia and anticancer drugs used concurrently.

  3. Platination of the copper transporter ATP7A involved in anticancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrini, Vania; Arnesano, Fabio; Galliani, Angela; Nguyen, Trung Hai; Ippoliti, Emiliano; Carloni, Paolo; Natile, Giovanni

    2014-08-21

    The clinical efficacy of the widely used anticancer drug cisplatin is severely limited by the emergence of resistance. This is related to the drug binding to proteins such as the copper influx transporter Ctr1, the copper chaperone Atox1, and the copper pumps ATP7A and ATP7B. While the binding modes of cisplatin to the first two proteins are known, the structural determinants of platinated ATP7A/ATP7B are lacking. Here we investigate the interaction of cisplatin with the first soluble domain of ATP7A. First, we establish by ESI-MS and (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR that, in solution, the adduct is a monomer in which the sulfur atoms of residues Cys19 and Cys22 are cis-coordinated to the [Pt(NH3)2](2+) moiety. Then, we carry out hybrid Car-Parrinello QM/MM simulations and computational spectroscopy calculations on a model adduct based on the NMR structure of the apo protein and featuring the experimentally determined binding mode of the metal ion. These calculations show quantitative agreement with CD spectra and (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR chemical shifts, thus providing a quantitative molecular view of the 3D binding mode of cisplatin to ATP7A. Importantly, the same comparison rules out a variety of alternative models with different coordination modes, that we explored to test the robustness of the computational approach. Using this combined in silico-in vitro approach we provide here for the first time a quantitative 3D atomic view of the platinum binding to the first soluble domain of ATP7A. PMID:24983998

  4. Microprocessor in controlled transdermal drug delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, N S; Shobha Rani, R H

    2009-12-01

    Microprocessor controlled transdermal delivery of anticancer drugs 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) was developed and in vitro evaluation was done. Drugs were loaded based on the pharmacokinetics parameters. In vitro diffusion studies were carried at different current density (0.0, 0.1, 0.22, 0.50 mA/cm2). The patches were evaluated for the drug content, thickness, weight, folding endurance, flatness, thumb tack test and adhesive properties all were well with in the specification of transdermal patches with elegant and transparent in appearance. In vitro permeation studies through human cadaver skin showed, passive delivery (0.0 mA/cm2) of 6-MP was low. As the current density was progressively increased, the flux also increased. the flux also increased with 0.1 mA/cm2 for 15-20 min, but it was less than desired flux, 0.2 mA/cm2 for 30 min showed better flux than 0.1 mA/cm2 current, but lag time was more than 4 h, 0.5 mA/cm2 current for more than 1 h, flux was >159 microg/cm2 h which was desired flux for 6-MP. 5-FU flux reached the minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 54 microg/cm2 h with 0.5 mA/cm2 current for 30-45 min, drug concentration were within the therapeutic window in post-current phase. We concluded from Ohm's Law that as the resistance decreases, current increases. Skin resistance decrease with increase in time and current, increase in the drug permeation. Interestingly, for all investigated current densities, as soon as the current was switched off, 5-FU and 6-MP flux decreased fairly, but the controlled drug delivery can be achieved by switching the current for required period of time.

  5. Secondary metabolites as DNA topoisomerase inhibitors: A new era towards designing of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya Baikar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of secondary metabolites like alkaloids, terpenoids, polyphenols and quinones are produced by the plants. These metabolites can be utilized as natural medicines for the reason that they inhibit the activity of DNA topoisomerase which are the clinical targets for anticancer drugs. DNA topoisomerases are the cellular enzymes that change the topological state of DNA through the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands. Synthetic drugs as inhibitors of topoisomerases have been developed and used in the clinical trials but severe side effects are a serious problem for them therefore, there is a need for the development of novel plant-derived natural drugs and their analogs which may serve as appropriate inhibitors with respect to drug designing. The theme for this review is how secondary metabolites or natural products inactivate the action of DNA topoisomerases and open new avenues towards isolation and characterization of compounds for the development of novel drugs with anticancer potential.

  6. Tumor-targeted intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs through the mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakash, Jai; Beljaars, Leonie; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Zeinstra-Smith, Mieke; de Jager-Krikken, Alie; Hessing, Martin; Steen, Herman; Poelstra, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-targeting of anticancer drugs is an interesting approach for the treatment of cancer since chemotherapies possess several adverse effects. In the present study, we propose a novel strategy to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor cells through the mannose-6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor

  7. Classification of stimuli-responsive polymers as anticancer drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Bita; Taranejoo, Shahrouz; Monemian, Seyed Ali; Salehi Moghaddam, Zoha; Daliri, Karim; Derakhshankhah, Hossein; Derakhshani, Zaynab

    2015-02-01

    Although several anticancer drugs have been introduced as chemotherapeutic agents, the effective treatment of cancer remains a challenge. Major limitations in the application of anticancer drugs include their nonspecificity, wide biodistribution, short half-life, low concentration in tumor tissue and systemic toxicity. Drug delivery to the tumor site has become feasible in recent years, and recent advances in the development of new drug delivery systems for controlled drug release in tumor tissues with reduced side effects show great promise. In this field, the use of biodegradable polymers as drug carriers has attracted the most attention. However, drug release is still difficult to control even when a polymeric drug carrier is used. The design of pharmaceutical polymers that respond to external stimuli (known as stimuli-responsive polymers) such as temperature, pH, electric or magnetic field, enzymes, ultrasound waves, etc. appears to be a successful approach. In these systems, drug release is triggered by different stimuli. The purpose of this review is to summarize different types of polymeric drug carriers and stimuli, in addition to the combination use of stimuli in order to achieve a better controlled drug release, and it discusses their potential strengths and applications. A survey of the recent literature on various stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems is also provided and perspectives on possible future developments in controlled drug release at tumor site have been discussed.

  8. Unimolecular micelles of amphiphilic cyclodextrin-core star-like block copolymers for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhigang; Liu, Shiying; Liu, Hui; Yang, Cangjie; Kang, Yuejun; Wang, Mingfeng

    2015-11-11

    Well-defined star-like amphiphilic polymers composed of a β-cyclodextrin core, from which 21 hydrophobic poly(lactic acid) arms and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) arms are grafted sequentially, form robust and uniform unimolecular micelles that are biocompatible and efficient in the delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:26121632

  9. Development and characterization of metal oxide nanoparticles for the delivery of anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Harshita; Kumar, Krishan; Choudhary, Chetan; Mishra, Pawan K; Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare chemotherapeutic agent-loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles for the intracellular delivery of drug, for better therapeutic activity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have inherent anticancer properties, hence it was envisaged that by loading the anticancer drug into zinc oxide nanoparticles, enhanced anticancer activity might be observed. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were prepared using zinc nitrate and sodium hydroxide. Starch was used as the stabilizing agent. The nanoparticles prepared were characterized for size, shape, entrapment efficiency, and drug release. Further, cell line studies were performed to evaluate cellular uptake and cytotoxicity profile using MCF-7 cells. A hemolysis study was performed to check the acute toxicity of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were found to be 476.4 ± 2.51 nm in size, with low PDI (0.312 ± 0.02) and high entrapment efficiency (> 85%). The nanoparticles were stable, and did not form aggregates on storage in the dispersed form. A cytotoxicity study demonstrated that drug-loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles exhibited higher anticancer activity as compared to either blank zinc oxide nanoparticles and doxorubicin (DOX) alone, or their mixture. A hemolytic test revealed that the prepared zinc oxide nanoparticles caused negligible hemolysis. Thus, it can be concluded that zinc oxide nanoparticles loaded with DOX resulted in better uptake of the chemotherapeutic agent, and at the same time, showed low toxicity towards normal cells.

  10. Pharmaceutical development of selected novel anticancer agents : from drugs substance to dosage form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brok, M.W.J. (Monique Wilhelmina Johanna) den

    2004-01-01

    Despite the substantial progress made over the last decades in the treatment of cancer, there still is a great need for novel therapies. Especially for patients with advanced disease, chemotherapy is the best option. Nature is the primary source of anticancer drugs with compounds isolated from plant

  11. Targeting anti-cancer drug resistance in mouse models of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to anti-cancer drugs is one of the biggest challenges in clinical oncology. In contrast to the success of local therapy (e.g. surgery or radiotherapy), the treatment of disseminated cancers using classical DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents and novel specific inhibitors frequently fails

  12. Anticancer studies of drug encapsulated polyethylene terephthalate-Co-polylactic acid nanocapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sathish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer activity of anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil and 6-thioguanine in polymeric nanocapsules in the presence and in the absence of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles toward Hep2 cancer cells. Materials and Methods: MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used for quantitative measurements for the anticancer cell activity. Encapsulated drug in polyethylene terephthalate-polylactic acid copolymer (PET-co-PLA nanocapsules in the presence and absence of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared via the W/O/W emulsification solvent-evaporation method. Morphology of the nanoparticles was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Conclusion: The average size of the polymeric nanocapsules, gold nanoparticles, and iron oxide nanoparticles were found to be in range of 230-260, 18 -20 nm, 5-10 nm, respectively. The findings in this study inferred that incorporated drug in polymeric nanocapsules with gold nanoparticles and iron oxide nanoparticles show better anticancer activity when compared with encapsulated drug in polymeric nanocapsules.

  13. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-02-01

    The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings. PMID:22328057

  14. Gamma irradiation reduces the immunological toxicity of doxorubicin, anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Sung, Nak-Yun; Raghavendran, H. Balaji; Yoon, Yohan; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Yoo, Young-Choon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Hwang, Young-Jeong; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anticancer agent, but exhibits some immunological toxicity to patients during chemotherapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the immunological response and the inhibition activity on in vivo tumor mass of DOX. The results showed that DOX irradiated at 10 and 20 kGy reduce the inhibition of mouse peritoneal macrophage proliferation and induce the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) when compared with non-irradiated DOX. The cytotoxicity against human breast (MCF-7), murine colon adenocarcinoma (Colon 26) and human monocytic (THP-1) tumor cell were not significantly different between non-irradiated and irradiated DOX ( Pstatistically non-significant as compared with non-irradiated DOX. In conclusion, gamma irradiation could be regarded as a potential method for reducing the immunological toxicity of DOX. Further researches is needed to reveal the formation and activity of radiolysis products by gamma irradiation.

  15. Optimizing anticancer drug treatment in pregnant cancer patients : pharmacokinetic analysis of gestation-induced changes for doxorubicin, epirubicin, docetaxel and paclitaxel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hasselt, J G C; van Calsteren, K; Heyns, L; Han, S; Mhallem Gziri, M; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H; Huitema, A D R; Amant, F

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant patients with cancer are increasingly treated with anticancer drugs, although the specific impact of pregnancy-induced physiological changes on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anticancer drugs and associated implications for optimal dose regimens remains unclear. Our objectives wer

  16. RAS GTPase AS THE DRUG TARGET FOR ANTI-CANCER DESIGNING OF DRUG FROM TEMPLATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Krishnapriya and P.K. Krishnan Namboori*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ras proteins in association with GTP and GDP act as a bio-molecular switch for signaling cell growth, cell survival and signal transduction. The presence of mutated Ras proteins is found to vary in different cancer types and the highest occurrence of about 90% is observed in pancreatic cancer. The Ras GTPase binding site is mainly involved in signal cell proliferation. Hence, this binding site has been considered as a major target. At the same time, targeting a specific protein and designing the drug molecule with respect to that is practically of no use as the target proteins are fast mutating. In this scenario, designing the template from the hot spot of proteins and fitting the template for all the target protein molecules seem to be a promising technique. The templates are initially screened on the basis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements. Six templates are found to be satisfying conditions like IC50, lipophilic efficiency, ligand efficiency etc. and their efficiencies are compared with standard reference molecules. The computed enrichment factors support these templates to be leads for effective anti-cancer drugs subject to further in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

  17. Designing anti-cancer drugs and directing anti-cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Velasquez, Elinor; Soto-Andrade, Jorge; Bongalon, Ben

    2014-01-01

    A prototype for a web application was designed and implemented as a guide to be used by clinicians when designing the best drug therapy for a specific cancer patient, given biological data derived from the patients tumor tissue biopsy. A representation of the patients metabolic pathways is displayed as a graph in the application, with nodes as substrates and products and edges as enzymes. The top metabolically active sub- paths in the pathway, ranked using an algorithm based on both the patie...

  18. A Comprehensive Review on Cyclodextrin-Based Carriers for Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxic Anticancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Bina Gidwani; Amber Vyas

    2015-01-01

    Most of the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents have poor aqueous solubility. These molecules are associated with poor physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which makes the formulation difficult. An important approach in this regard is the use of combination of cyclodextrin and nanotechnology in delivery system. This paper provides an overview of limitations associated with anticancer drugs, their complexation with cyclodextrins, loading/encapsulating the complexed drugs into carrie...

  19. A pH-Sensitive Injectable Nanoparticle Composite Hydrogel for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanfeng Ye; Xiaohong Hu

    2016-01-01

    According to previous reports, low pH-triggered nanoparticles were considered to be excellent carriers for anticancer drug delivery, for the reason that they could trigger encapsulated drug release at mild acid environment of tumor. Herein, an acid-sensitive β-cyclodextrin derivative, namely, acetalated-β-cyclodextrin (Ac-β-CD), was synthesized by acetonation and fabricated to nanoparticles through single oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion technique. At the same time, camptothecin (CPT), a hydrophob...

  20. Synthesis and characterization of polymeric nanospheres loaded with the anticancer drug paclitaxel and magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavisova, Vlasta [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)], E-mail: zavisova@saske.sk; Koneracka, Martina [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Muckova, Marta [Hameln rds a.s., Horna 36, Modra (Slovakia); Kopcansky, Peter; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Lancz, Gabor; Timko, Milan [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Paetoprsta, Bozena; Bartos, Peter [Hameln rds a.s., Horna 36, Modra (Slovakia); Fabian, Martin [Institute of Geotechnics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 45, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2009-05-15

    We describe the preparation (by nanoprecipitation) and characterization of nanospheres (NPs) for magnetic drug targeting made of a magnetic fluid with poly(ethylene glycol), poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and the anticancer drug paclitaxel (Taxol). Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the incorporation of the drug in the PLGA NPs, which were also characterized in terms of morphology, size (typical diameter 200-250 nm) and colloidal stability in aqueous solutions of NaCl. Drug release and in vivo toxicity experiments of the prepared samples were performed. Their stability, magnetic properties (superparamagnetism), and lethal dose were found to be acceptable for the proposed application in cancer therapy.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of polymeric nanospheres loaded with the anticancer drug paclitaxel and magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Závišová, Vlasta; Koneracká, Martina; Múčková, Marta; Kopčanský, Peter; Tomašovičová, Natália; Lancz, Gábor; Timko, Milan; Pätoprstá, Božena; Bartoš, Peter; Fabián, Martin

    2009-05-01

    We describe the preparation (by nanoprecipitation) and characterization of nanospheres (NPs) for magnetic drug targeting made of a magnetic fluid with poly(ethylene glycol), poly( D, L-lactic- co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and the anticancer drug paclitaxel (Taxol ®). Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the incorporation of the drug in the PLGA NPs, which were also characterized in terms of morphology, size (typical diameter 200-250 nm) and colloidal stability in aqueous solutions of NaCl. Drug release and in vivo toxicity experiments of the prepared samples were performed. Their stability, magnetic properties (superparamagnetism), and lethal dose were found to be acceptable for the proposed application in cancer therapy.

  2. Label-free detection of anticancer drug paclitaxel in living cells by confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Derely, L.; Vegh, A.-G.; Durand, J.-C.; Gergely, C.; Larroque, C.; Fauroux, M.-A.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label-free, and high spatial resolution imaging technique is employed to trace the anticancer drug paclitaxel in living Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. The Raman images were treated by K-mean cluster analysis to detect the drug in cells. Distribution of paclitaxel in cells is verified by calculating the correlation coefficient between the reference spectrum of the drug and the whole Raman image spectra. A time dependent gradual diffusion of paclitaxel all over the cell is observed suggesting a complementary picture of the pharmaceutical action of this drug based on rapid binding of free tubulin to crystallized paclitaxel.

  3. Topological Indices Study of Molecular Structure in Anticancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Gao; Weifan Wang; Mohammad Reza Farahani

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that there is strong inherent relationship between the chemical characteristics of chemical compounds and drugs (e.g., boiling point and melting point) and their molecular structures. Topological indices defined on these chemical molecular structures can help researchers better understand the physical features, chemical reactivity, and biological activity. Thus, the study of the topological indices on chemical structure of chemical materials and drugs can make up for...

  4. Nanoscale coordination polymers for platinum-based anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieter, William J; Pott, Kimberly M; Taylor, Kathryn M L; Lin, Wenbin

    2008-09-01

    Pt-containing nanoscale coordination polymer (NCP) particles with the formula of Tb2(DSCP)3(H2O)12 (where DSCP represents disuccinatocisplatin), NCP-1, were precipitated from an aqueous solution of Tb3+ ions and DSCP bridging ligands via the addition of a poor solvent. SEM and TEM images showed that as-synthesized NCP-1 exhibited a spherical morphology with a DLS diameter of 58.3 +/- 11.3 nm. NCP-1 particles were stabilized against rapid dissolution in water by encapsulation in shells of amorphous silica. The resulting silica-coated particles NCP-1' exhibited significantly longer half-lives for DSCP release from the particles (a t1/2 of 9 h for NCP-1' with 7 nm silica coating vs t1/2 of 1 h for as-synthesized NCP-1). In vitro cancer cell cytotoxicity assays with the human colon carcinoma cell line (HT-29) showed that internalized NCP-1' particles readily released the DSCP moieties which were presumably reduced to cytotoxic Pt(II) species to give the Pt-containing NCPs anticancer efficacy superior to the cisplatin standard. The generality of this degradable nanoparticle formulation should allow for the design of NCPs as effective delivery vehicles for a variety of biologically and medically important cargoes such as therapeutic and imaging agents.

  5. Gamma irradiation reduces the immunological toxicity of doxorubicin, anticancer drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anticancer agent, but exhibits some immunological toxicity to patients during chemotherapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the immunological response and the inhibition activity on in vivo tumor mass of DOX. The results showed that DOX irradiated at 10 and 20 kGy reduce the inhibition of mouse peritoneal macrophage proliferation and induce the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) when compared with non-irradiated DOX. The cytotoxicity against human breast (MCF-7), murine colon adenocarcinoma (Colon 26) and human monocytic (THP-1) tumor cell were not significantly different between non-irradiated and irradiated DOX (P<0.05). In vivo study on the tumor mass inhibition, gamma-irradiated DOX showed a considerable inhibition of tumor mass and this effect was statistically non-significant as compared with non-irradiated DOX. In conclusion, gamma irradiation could be regarded as a potential method for reducing the immunological toxicity of DOX. Further researches is needed to reveal the formation and activity of radiolysis products by gamma irradiation.

  6. Synthesis, Cytotoxicity and Mechanistic Evaluation of 4-Oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide Derivatives: Finding New Potential Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana da S. M. Forezi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As part of a continuing search for new potential anticancer candidates, we describe the synthesis, cytotoxicity and mechanistic evaluation of a series of 4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives as novel anticancer agents. The inhibitory activity of compounds 10–18 was determined against three cancer cell lines using the MTT colorimetric assay. The screening revealed that derivatives 16b and 17b exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against the gastric cancer cell line but was not active against a normal cell line, in contrast to doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapeutic drug in clinical use. Interestingly, no hemolytical activity was observed when the toxicity of 16b and 17b was tested against blood cells. The in silico and in vitro mechanistic evaluation indicated the potential of 16b as a lead for the development of novel anticancer agents against gastric cancer cells.

  7. Cell death mechanisms of plant-derived anticancer drugs: beyond apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali-Muhtasib, Hala; Hmadi, Raed; Kareh, Mike; Tohme, Rita; Darwiche, Nadine

    2015-12-01

    Despite remarkable progress in the discovery and development of novel cancer therapeutics, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the world. For many years, compounds derived from plants have been at the forefront as an important source of anticancer therapies and have played a vital role in the prevention and treatment of cancer because of their availability, and relatively low toxicity when compared with chemotherapy. More than 3000 plant species have been reported to treat cancer and about thirty plant-derived compounds have been isolated so far and have been tested in cancer clinical trials. The mechanisms of action of plant-derived anticancer drugs are numerous and most of them induce apoptotic cell death that may be intrinsic or extrinsic, and caspase and/or p53-dependent or independent mechanisms. Alternative modes of cell death by plant-derived anticancer drugs are emerging and include mainly autophagy, necrosis-like programmed cell death, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence leading to cell death. Considering that the non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms of plant-derived anticancer drugs are less reviewed than the apoptotic ones, this paper attempts to focus on such alternative cell death pathways for some representative anticancer plant natural compounds in clinical development. In particular, emphasis will be on some promising polyphenolics such as resveratrol, curcumin, and genistein; alkaloids namely berberine, noscapine, and colchicine; terpenoids such as parthenolide, triptolide, and betulinic acid; and the organosulfur compound sulforaphane. The understanding of non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms induced by these drugs would provide insights into the possibility of exploiting novel molecular pathways and targets of plant-derived compounds for future cancer therapeutics. PMID:26362468

  8. Clinical practice guidelines for translating pharmacogenomic knowledge to bedside. Focus on anticancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A G Agúndez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of clinical practice recommendations or guidelines for the clinical use of pharmacogenomics data is an essential issue for improving drug therapy, particularly for drugs with high toxicity and/or narrow therapeutic index such as anticancer drugs. Although pharmacogenomic-based recommendations have been formulated for over 40 anticancer drugs, the number of clinical practice guidelines available is very low. The guidelines already published indicate that pharmacogenomic testing is useful for patient selection, but final dosing adjustment should be carried out on the basis of clinical or analytical parameters rather than on pharmacogenomic information.Patient selection may seem a modest objective, but it constitutes a crucial improvement with regard to the pre-pharmacogenomics situation and it saves patients’ lives. However we should not overstate the current power of pharmacogenomics. At present the pharmacogenomics of anticancer drugs is not sufficiently developed for dose adjustments based on pharmacogenomics only, and no current guidelines recommend such adjustments without considering clinical and/or analytical parameters.

  9. Self-assembly Polyrotaxanes Nanoparticles as Carriers for Anticancer Drug Methotrexate Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longgui Zhang; Ting Su; Bin He; Zhongwei Gu∗

    2014-01-01

    α-Cyclodextrin/poly(ethylene glycol) (α-CD/PEG) polyrotaxane nanoparticles were prepared via a self-assembly method. Anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) was loaded in the nanoparticles. The interaction between MTX and polyrotaxane was investigated. The formation, morphology, drug release and in vitro anticancer activity of the MTX loaded polyrotaxane nanoparticles were studied. The results show that the MTX could be efficiently absorbed on the nanoparticles, and hydrogen bonds were formed between MTX andα-CDs. The typical channel-type stacking assembly style of polyrotaxane nanoparticles was changed after MTX was loaded. The mean diameter of drug loaded polyrotaxane nanoparticles were around 200 nm and the drug loading content was as high as about 20%. Drug release profiles show that most of the loaded MTX was released within 8 hours and the cumulated release rate was as high as 98%. The blank polyrotaxane nanoparticles were nontoxicity to cells. The in vitro anticancer activity of the MTX loaded polyrotaxane nanoparticles was higher than that of free MTX.

  10. Application of CellDesigner to the Selection of Anticancer Drug Targets: Test Case using P53

    OpenAIRE

    Isea, Raul; Hoebeke, Johan; Mayo, Rafael; Alvarez, Fernando; Holmes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a disease involving many genes, consequently it has been difficult to design anticancer drugs that are efficacious over a broad range of cancers. The robustness of cellular responses to gene knockout and the need to reduce undesirable side effects also contribute to the problem of effective anti-cancer drug design. To promote the successful selection of drug targets, each potential target should be subjected to a systems biology scrutiny to locate effective and specific targets whil...

  11. Controlled release of an anti-cancer drug from DNA structured nano-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younghyun; Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the generation of systemically releasable anti-cancer drugs from multilayer nanofilms. Nanofilms designed to drug release profiles in programmable fashion are promising new and alternative way for drug delivery. For the nanofilm structure, we synthesized various unique 3-dimensional anti cancer drug incorporated DNA origami structures (hairpin, Y, and X shaped) and assembled with peptide via layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method. The key to the successful application of these nanofilms requires a novel approach of the influence of DNA architecture for the drug release from functional nano-sized surface. Herein, we have taken first steps in building and controlling the drug incorporated DNA origami based multilayered nanostructure. Our finding highlights the novel and unique drug release character of LbL systems in serum condition taken full advantages of DNA origami structure. This multilayer thin film dramatically affects not only the release profiles but also the structure stability in protein rich serum condition.

  12. Clinical Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Herbal Supplements and Anticancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goey, A.K.L.

    2013-01-01

    In cancer treatment the response to chemotherapy is often characterized by a wide interpatient variability. The increasing popularity of herbal supplements among cancer patients may contribute to this phenomenon. Since these supplements may affect drug metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, pla

  13. Efflux Pump-mediated Drug Resistance in Burkholderia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L Podnecky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in B. cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance.

  14. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species - obligatory or not for induction of apoptosis by anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Donika; Zhelev, Zhivko; Aoki, Ichio; Bakalova, Rumiana; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2016-08-01

    Many studies demonstrate that conventional anticancer drugs elevate intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and alter redox-homeostasis of cancer cells. It is widely accepted that anticancer effect of these chemotherapeutics is due to induction of oxidative stress and ROS-mediated apoptosis in cancer. On the other hand, the harmful side effects of conventional anticancer chemotherapy are also due to increased production of ROS and disruption of redox-homeostasis of normal cells and tissues. This article describes the mechanisms for triggering and modulation of apoptosis through ROS-dependent and ROS-independent pathways. We try to answer the question: "Is it possible to induce highly specific apoptosis only in cancer cells, without overproduction of ROS, as well as without harmful effects on normal cells and tissues?" The review also suggests a new therapeutic strategy for selective killing of cancer cells, without significant impact on viability of normal cells and tissues, by combining anticancer drugs with redox-modulators, affecting specific signaling pathways and avoiding oxidative stress. PMID:27647966

  15. Thiazolidinone motif in anticancer drug discovery. Experience of DH LNMU medicinal chemistry scientific group

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    Subtel’na I. Yu.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim was analysis of 4-thiazolidinones and related heterocyclic systems anticancer activity data and formation of some rational design directions of potential anticancer agents. Synthetic research carried out in Danylo Halytsky Lviv National Medical University (DH LNMU allowed us to propose a whole number of new molecular design directions of biological active 4-thiazolidinones and related heterocyclic systems, as well as obtain directed library that numbers over 5000 of novel compounds. At the present time in vitro anticancer activity screening was carried out for more than 1000 compounds (US NCI protocol (Developmental Therapeutic Program, among them 167 compounds showed high antitumor activity level. For the purpose of optimization and rational design of highly active molecules with optimal «drug-like» characteristics and discovering of possible mechanism of action SAR, QSAR analysis and molecular docking were carried out. The ultimate aim of the project is creating of innovative synthetic drug with special mechanism of action and sufficient pharmacological and toxicological features. Some aspects of structure–activity relationships were determined and structure design directions were proposed. The series of active compounds with high anticancer activity and/or selectivity levels were selected.

  16. Shape regulated anticancer activities and systematic toxicities of drug nanocrystals in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Yu, Caitong; Nan, Xueyan; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, shape regulated anticancer activities as well as systematic toxicities of hydroxycamptothecin nanorods and nanoparticles (HCPT NRs and NPs) were systematically studied. In vitro and in vivo therapeutic efficacies were evaluated in cancer cells and tumor-bearing mice, indicating that NRs possessed superior antitumor efficacy over NPs at the equivalent dose, while systematic toxicity of the differently shaped nanodrugs assessed in healthy mice, including the maximum tolerated dose, blood analysis and histology examinations and so on, suggested that the NRs also caused higher toxicities than NPs, and also had a long-term toxicity. These results imply that the balance between anticancer efficiency and systematic toxicity of drug nanocrystals should be fully considered in practice, which will provide new concept in the future design of drug nanocrystals for cancer therapy. From the Clinical Editor: Advances in nanotechnology have enabled the design of novel nanosized drugs for the treatment of cancer. One of the interesting findings thus far is the different biological effects seen with different shaped nanoparticles. In this article, the authors investigated and compared the anticancer activities of hydroxycamptothecin nanorods and nanoparticles. The experimental data would provide a better understanding for future drug design. PMID:26427356

  17. Enhancing Activity of Anticancer Drugs in Multidrug Resistant Tumors by Modulating P-Glycoprotein through Dietary Nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad; Maryam, Amara; Mehmood, Tahir; Zhang, Yaofang; Ma, Tonghui

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a principal mechanism by which tumors become resistant to structurally and functionally unrelated anticancer drugs. Resistance to chemotherapy has been correlated with overexpression of p-glycoprotein (p-gp), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of membrane transporters. P-gp mediates resistance to a broad-spectrum of anticancer drugs including doxorubicin, taxol, and vinca alkaloids by actively expelling the drugs from cells. Use of specific inhibitors/blocker of p-gp in combination with clinically important anticancer drugs has emerged as a new paradigm for overcoming multidrug resistance. The aim of this paper is to review p-gp regulation by dietary nutraceuticals and to correlate this dietary nutraceutical induced-modulation of p-gp with activity of anticancer drugs. PMID:26514453

  18. Sequential-release of anticancer drugs microcapsulated with ethylcellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾耕华; 黄剑奇; 何虹

    2002-01-01

    Objective To approach the sequential release of antitumor drugs and promote the effect of chemotherapy.Methods Adriamycin (ADM) and carboplatin (CBP) were respectively microcapsulated with ethylcellulose by organic phase separation. The morphology and sizes of the microcapsules were observed and measured with light microscope and scanning electromicroscope. The contents and the release rates of ADM and CBP in microcapsules were measured with fluorescence spectrophotometer and high-efficiency phantom chromatic (HPC) spectrum respectively. The antitumor sensitivity test in vitro was devised with MTT assay.Results The microcapsules of ADM and CBP were spherical in shape with diameters of 196?4 μm and 214?8 μm respectively. The contents of one-layer and two-layer CBP and ADM microcapsules were 51.4%, 35.7% and 39.8% respectively, with the release rates in vitro of 62.4%/day, 54.8%/day and 48.2% /8h. The results of drug sensitivity test in vitro demonstrated that the current preparation has never affected the stability and antitumor activity of CBP and ADM.Conclusion Microcapsules with different drugs and different thickness of material have different release rate. Combined arterial chemoembolization with different microcapsules could approach the sequential release and promote the effect of chemotherapy.

  19. Systematic repurposing screening in xenograft models identifies approved drugs with novel anti-cancer activity.

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    Jeffrey J Roix

    Full Text Available Approved drugs target approximately 400 different mechanisms of action, of which as few as 60 are currently used as anti-cancer therapies. Given that on average it takes 10-15 years for a new cancer therapeutic to be approved, and the recent success of drug repurposing for agents such as thalidomide, we hypothesized that effective, safe cancer treatments may be found by testing approved drugs in new therapeutic settings. Here, we report in-vivo testing of a broad compound collection in cancer xenograft models. Using 182 compounds that target 125 unique target mechanisms, we identified 3 drugs that displayed reproducible activity in combination with the chemotherapeutic temozolomide. Candidate drugs appear effective at dose equivalents that exceed current prescription levels, suggesting that additional pre-clinical efforts will be needed before these drugs can be tested for efficacy in clinical trials. In total, we suggest drug repurposing is a relatively resource-intensive method that can identify approved medicines with a narrow margin of anti-cancer activity.

  20. Ginseng and Anticancer Drug Combination to Improve Cancer Chemotherapy: A Critical Review

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    Shihong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng, a well-known herb, is often used in combination with anticancer drugs to enhance chemotherapy. Its wide usage as well as many documentations are often cited to support its clinical benefit of such combination therapy. However the literature based on objective evidence to make such recommendation is still lacking. The present review critically evaluated relevant studies reported in English and Chinese literature on such combination. Based on our review, we found good evidence from in vitro and in vivo animal studies showing enhanced antitumor effect when ginseng is used in combination with some anticancer drugs. However, there is insufficient clinical evidence of such benefit as very few clinical studies are available. Future research should focus on clinically relevant studies of such combination to validate the utility of ginseng in cancer.

  1. In vivo nanotoxicology of hybrid systems based on copolymer/silica/anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, C. P.; Paula, A. J.; Apolinário, L. M.; Fávaro, W. J.; Durán, N.

    2015-05-01

    One of the major problems in cancer therapies is the high occurrence of side effects intrinsic of anticancer drugs. Doxorrubicin is a conventional anticancer molecule used to treat a wide range of cancer, such as breast, ovarian and prostate. However, its use is associated with a number of side effects like multidrug resistance and cardiotoxicity. The association with nanomaterials has been considered in the past decade to overcome the high toxicity of these drugs. In this context, mesoporous silica nanoparticles are great candidates to be used as carriers once they are very biocompatible. Taking into account the combination of nanoparticles and doxorrubicin, we treated rats with chemically induced prostate cancer with systems based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles and a thermoreversible block copolymer (Pluronic F-127) containing doxorrubicin. Preliminary results show a possible improvement in tumor conditions proportional to the concentration of the nanoparticles, opening a perspective to use mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carrier for doxorrubicin in prostate cancer treatment.

  2. Thermodynamical study of interaction of histone H1 chromosomal protein and mitoxantrone anticancer drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafargholizadeh, Naser [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zargar, Seyed Jalal, E-mail: Zargar@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safarian, Shahrokh; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-06-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time, our results show mitoxantrone anticancer drug binds to histone H1, via hydrophobic, hydrogen, van der Waals and electrostatic interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of mitoxantrone molecules to histone H1 is positive cooperative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histone H1 may be considered as a new target for mitoxantrone at the chromatin level. - Using ultraviolet spectroscopy technique, we have investigated the interaction of anticancer drug, mitoxantrone with calf thymus histone H1 chromosomal protein in 100 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, at temperatures 300 and 310 K. UV spectroscopy results show interactions between mitoxantrone and histone H1 with a positive cooperative binding process which was confirmed by Scatchard plot. According to the obtained results, it is concluded that histone H1 can be considered as a target for mitoxantrone binding at the chromatin level.

  3. Pharmaceutical development of selected novel anticancer agents : from drugs substance to dosage form

    OpenAIRE

    Brok, M.W.J. (Monique Wilhelmina Johanna) den

    2004-01-01

    Despite the substantial progress made over the last decades in the treatment of cancer, there still is a great need for novel therapies. Especially for patients with advanced disease, chemotherapy is the best option. Nature is the primary source of anticancer drugs with compounds isolated from plants or micro-organisms. Moreover, the marine ecosystem provides for a growing number of promising agents in clinical trials. Besides natural resources, the increasing knowledge of tumour pathology an...

  4. Astemizole: an old anti-histamine as a new promising anti-cancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Quiroz, Janice; Camacho, Javier

    2011-03-01

    Mortality-to-incidence ratio in cancer patients is extremely high, positioning cancer as a major cause of death worldwide. Despite hundreds of clinical trials for anti-cancer drugs that are currently in progress, most clinical trials for novel drug treatments fail to pass Phase I. However, previously developed drugs with novel anti-tumor properties offer a viable and cost-effective alternative to fight cancer. Histamine favors the proliferation of normal and malignant cells. Several anti-histamine drugs, including astemizole, can inhibit tumor cell proliferation. Astemizole has gained enormous interest since it also targets important proteins involved in cancer progression, namely, ether à-go-go 1 (Eag1) and Eag-related gene (Erg) potassium channels. Furthermore, Eag1 is thought to be an important marker and a therapeutic target for several different cancers. Astemizole inhibits Eag1 and Erg channel activity, and in cells expressing the Eag1 channel it decreases tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. It should be noted that some cardiovascular side effects have been reported for astemizole in a few rare cases. Nevertheless, astemizole stands as a very promising anti-cancer tool because it displays several anti-proliferative mechanisms, may serve as the basis to synthesize new anti-cancer agents, and has been previously administered clinically. In this review we will summarize the main findings relating to histamine and anti-histamines in cancer cell proliferation focusing on astemizole targets (Eag1 and Erg channels), and its anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. We will also describe the side effects of astemizole and discuss proposals to overcome such effects in cancer patients. Finally, we will remark on the relevance of developing novel astemizole-related compounds. PMID:21443504

  5. Chemotherapeutic properties of phospho-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, a new class of anticancer compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Liqun; Mackenzie, Gerardo G; Sun, Yu; Ouyang, Nengtai; Xie, Gang; Vrankova, Kvetoslava; Komninou, Despina; Rigas, Basil

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-Inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exhibit antineoplastic properties, but conventional NSAIDs do not fully meet safety and efficacy criteria for use as anti-cancer agents. In this study, we evaluated the chemotherapeutic efficacy of five novel phospho-NSAIDs, each of which includes in addition to the NSAID moiety a diethylphosphate linked through a butane moiety. All five compounds inhibited the growth of human breast, colon and pancreatic cancer cell lines with micromolar potency...

  6. Role of pharmacists in optimizing the use of anticancer drugs in the clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Ma CSJ

    2014-01-01

    Carolyn SJ Ma Department of Pharmacy Practice, Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Honolulu, HI, USA Abstract: Oncology pharmacists, also known as oncology pharmacy specialists (OPSs) have specialized knowledge of anticancer medications and their role in cancer. As essential member of the interdisciplinary team, OPSs optimize the benefits of drug therapy, help to minimize toxicities and work with patients on supportive care issues. The OPSs expanded role as ex...

  7. Effects of anticancer drugs on transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmańska, D; Czyz, M; Studzian, K; Piestrzeniewicz, M K; Gniazdowski, M

    2001-01-01

    The effects of DNA interacting drugs on: (1) total RNA synthesis catalyzed by E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase; (2) synthesis of the initiating dinucleotide (pppApU) by E. coli RNA polymerase ("abortive initiation"); (3) elongation of RNA chains synthesized by T7 RNA polymerase on pT7-7 plasmid DNA bearing T7 RNA polymerase promoter phi 10 with human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase coding sequence, (4) interaction of transcription factor Sp1 and its binding site were studied. Intercalating ligands which form quickly dissociating complexes with DNA (anthracyclines, proflavine, ethidium bromide) are compared with the slowly dissociating drug of d(G x C) specificity (actinomycin D), the non-intercalating, d(A x T) specific pyrrole antibiotics (netropsin and distamycin A) and covalently binding to DNA 1-nitroacridine derivative (nitracrine). The obtained results indicate that rapidly dissociating ligands, proflavine and ethidium bromide, inhibit total RNA synthesis in vitro and the abortive initiation to a similar extent while they do not induce discrete elongation stops of RNA polymerase. Actinomycin D and nitracrine exhibit a high inhibitory effect on total RNA synthesis and induce stops of RNA polymerase while not affecting abortive initiation. Pyrrole antibiotics primarily inhibit the initiation, while no elongation stops are induced. Actinomycin D inhibits complex formation between nuclear proteins and the Sp1 binding site. Netropsin, ethidium bromide, proflavine and other intercalating acridines do not affect Sp1 binding. The results indicate that the effects primarily depend on sequence specificity and secondarily on the dissociation rate of ligands from their complexes with DNA. PMID:11724400

  8. Potentiation of Anticancer Drugs: Effects of Pentoxifylline on Neoplastic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Barancik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The drug efflux activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, a product of the mdr1 gene, ABCB1 member of ABC transporter family represents a mechanism by which tumor cells escape death induced by chemotherapeutics. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms involved in the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX on P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR in mouse leukemia L1210/VCR cells. Parental sensitive mouse leukemia cells L1210, and multidrug-resistant cells, L1210/VCR, which are characterized by the overexpression of P-gp, were used as experimental models. The cells were exposed to 100 μmol/L PTX in the presence or absence of 1.2 μmol/L vincristine (VCR. Western blot analysis indicated a downregulation of P-gp protein expression when multidrug-resistant L1210/VCR cells were exposed to PTX. The effects of PTX on the sensitization of L1210/VCR cells to VCR correlate with the stimulation of apoptosis detected by Annexin V/propidium iodide apoptosis necrosis kit and proteolytic activation of both caspase-3 and caspase-9 monitored by Western blot analysis. Higher release of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, especially MMP-2, which could be attenuated by PTX, was found in L1210/VCR than in L1210 cells by gelatin zymography in electrophoretic gel. Exposure of resistant cells to PTX increased the content of phosphorylated Akt kinase. In contrast, the presence of VCR eliminated the effects of PTX on Akt kinase phosphorylation. Taken together, we conclude that PTX induces the sensitization of multidrug-resistant cells to VCR via downregulation of P-gp, stimulation of apoptosis and reduction of MMPs released from drug-resistant L1210/VCR cells. These facts bring new insights into the mechanisms of PTX action on cancer cells.

  9. Classical and Targeted Anticancer Drugs: An Appraisal of Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor cells resist the action of multiple anticancer drugs, often with widely different chemical structures, have been pursued for more than 30 years. The identification of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug efflux transporter protein with affinity for multiple therapeutic drugs, provided an important potential mechanism and further work, which identified other members of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family that act as drug transporters. Several observations, including results of clinical trials with pharmacological inhibitors of P-gp, have suggested that mechanisms other than efflux transporters should be considered as contributors to resistance, and in this review mechanisms of anticancer drug resistance are considered more broadly. Cells in human tumors exist is a state of continuous turnover, allowing ongoing selection and "survival of the fittest." Tumor cells die not only as a consequence of drug therapy but also by apoptosis induced by their microenvironment. Cell death can be mediated by host immune mechanisms and by nonimmune cells acting on so-called death receptors. The tumor cell proliferation rate is also important because it controls tumor regeneration. Resistance to therapy might therefore be considered to arise from a reduction of several distinct cell death mechanisms, as well as from an increased ability to regenerate. This review provides a perspective on these mechanisms, together with brief descriptions of some of the methods that can be used to investigate them in a clinical situation. PMID:26910066

  10. ACTIVITY OF LEAF EXTRACTS OF COIX LACHRYMA LINN. AND ASPARAGUS COCHINCHINENSISLINN. AS BREAST ANTICANCER DRUGS

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    RESMI MUSTARICHIE

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the current economic crisis, the use of plant medicine forcancer prevention should be investigated. Coix lachryma Linn and Asparagus cochinchinensis Linn are among eleven of species of medicinal plants that are noted as plant medicine for cancer in Indonesia, although their mechanism of action are still unknown. The eleven plants were screened using in vitro methods, Sulforhodamin B against breast cancer cells (MCF"7 and skin (KB. The research included a maceration process using ethanol as solvent and an anti"cancer testing process in vitro using Sulforhodamin B indicated by the value of percentage viability. Extracts were classed as being 'active anticancer' if they showed IC50 values below 100 ppm.. Coix lachryma Linn. and Asparagus cochinchinensis Linn. show breast and skin anticancer activity withIC50 values 6.51 ppm and 11.3 ppm of MCF"7 cells. The ethanol plant extracts were further extracted using various solvents with increasing polarity: n"hexane, methylene chloride, and ethyl acetate. The methylene chloride extract of Coix lachryma Linn. had IC50 = 2.75 ppm against MCF"7 cells. Against KB cells, methylene chloride extracts of Coix lachryma Linn. gave IC50 = 5.16 ppm. For Asparagus cochinchinensis Linn., an ethyl acetate extract had IC50 = 3.70 ppm against KB cancer cells and IC50 = 9.80 ppm against MCF"7 cancer cells. These data indicated that both plants can be used as anticancer drugs on breast and skin cancers.

  11. Curcumin: From Exotic Spice to Modern Anticancer Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurisankar Sa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of defined molecular steps of tumourigenesis by natural non-toxic compounds may be an efficient means to tackle the population cancer burden. Extensive research has addressed the chemotherapeutic potential of curcumin (diferuloylmethane, a relatively non-toxic plant derived polyphenol. Curcumin is used for centuries in cuisine and indigenous medicine against several major human diseases. Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Disruption of a proper regulation of cell proliferation can ultimately cause cancer. Most human malignancies are driven by chromosomal translocations or other genetic alterations that directly affect the function of critical cell cycle proteins such as cyclins as well as tumor suppressors, e.g., p53. In this regard, curcumin, the yellow pigment of the spice turmeric, has been reported to have immense potentialility for being used in cancer chemotherapy because of its control over the cell growth regulatory mechanisms and for its anti-inflammatory, anti-toxic and anti-oxidative properties. Increasingly reports are showing that curcumin can induce apoptosis in a wide variety of cancer cells. The mechanisms implicated in the inhibition of tumorigenesis by curcumin are diverse and seem to involve a combination of cell signalling pathways at multiple levels. When curcumin is combined with some cytotoxic drugs or certain other diet-derived polyphenols, synergistic effects have been demonstrated. Taken together, this review seeks to summarise the unique properties of curcumin that may be exploited for successful clinical cancer prevention.

  12. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  13. A 3D fibrous scaffold inducing tumoroids: a platform for anticancer drug development.

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    Yvonne K Girard

    Full Text Available The development of a suitable three dimensional (3D culture system for anticancer drug development remains an unmet need. Despite progress, a simple, rapid, scalable and inexpensive 3D-tumor model that recapitulates in vivo tumorigenesis is lacking. Herein, we report on the development and characterization of a 3D nanofibrous scaffold produced by electrospinning a mixture of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and a block copolymer of polylactic acid (PLA and mono-methoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG designated as 3P. Cancer cells cultured on the 3P scaffold formed tight irregular aggregates similar to in vivo tumors, referred to as tumoroids that depended on the topography and net charge of the scaffold. 3P scaffolds induced tumor cells to undergo the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT as demonstrated by up-regulation of vimentin and loss of E-cadherin expression. 3P tumoroids showed higher resistance to anticancer drugs than the same tumor cells grown as monolayers. Inhibition of ERK and PI3K signal pathways prevented EMT and reduced tumoroid formation, diameter and number. Fine needle aspirates, collected from tumor cells implanted in mice when cultured on 3P scaffolds formed tumoroids, but showed decreased sensitivity to anticancer drugs, compared to tumoroids formed by direct seeding. These results show that 3P scaffolds provide an excellent platform for producing tumoroids from tumor cell lines and from biopsies and that the platform can be used to culture patient biopsies, test for anticancer compounds and tailor a personalized cancer treatment.

  14. Alkaloids from Marine Invertebrates as Important Leads for Anticancer Drugs Discovery and Development

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    Concetta Imperatore

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes research on novel natural antitumor alkaloids isolated from marine invertebrates. The structure, origin, and confirmed cytotoxic activity of more than 130 novel alkaloids belonging to several structural families (indoles, pyrroles, pyrazines, quinolines, and pyridoacridines, together with some of their synthetic analogs, are illustrated. Recent discoveries concerning the current state of the potential and/or development of some of them as new drugs, as well as the current knowledge regarding their modes of action, are also summarized. A special emphasis is given to the role of marine invertebrate alkaloids as an important source of leads for anticancer drug discovery.

  15. Salt-bridge-supported bilayer lipid membrane biosensor for determination of anticancer drug cyclophosphamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Chunxu; Shen, Hanxi; Chao, Fuhuan

    2001-09-01

    A novel biosensor for assaying anticancer drug cyclophosphamide was constructed with salt-bridge supported bilayer lipid membrane modified with tetraphenylborate- cyclophosphamide complex. The modification was achieved by the introduction of the complex into the membrane forming solution. The biosensor show a linear response to the drug over the concentration range 8.96 X 10-6 mol L-1. The effects of coexistent substances and pH on assay were evaluated. The results show that the distinguish merits of this kind of biosensor is the excellently biological compatibility and no need of mediator for ions exchange. It also shows good selectivity and sensitivity for cyclophosphamide assay.

  16. The reduction of anti-cancer drug antagonism by the spatial protection of drugs with PLA-TPGS nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guang-Rong; Feng, Si-Shen; Leong, David T

    2014-03-01

    Docetaxel (DCL) and tamoxifen (TAM) individually are potent drugs in the fight against breast cancer. However when used in combination, they become antagonistic because of differential metabolism of both drugs. We reasoned that by spatially protecting them from metabolizing enzymes with poly (lactide)-D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA-TPGS) nanoparticles (NPs), we might reduce this drug antagonism. We now report that the drug antagonism between DCL and TAM in MCF7 cell line, was significantly reduced when co-delivered in PLA-TPGS NPs. In addition, this effect of NPs attenuated at high drug concentrations. To investigate the role of NPs in the reduction of drug antagonism, we quantified cellular uptake of the fluorescent model drug coumarin 6 (C6) encapsulated in a rigorous permutation of drugs-nanoparticles ratios. NPs carrying C6 exhibited enhanced cellular uptake over their free C6 counterparts at correspondingly low drug concentrations. This led us to conclude that the reduction of drug antagonism by NPs is correlated to cellular uptake and being in NPs therefore protects both drugs until they are released intracellular for therapeutic anti-cancer effect. PMID:24439415

  17. HER2-mediated anticancer drug delivery: strategies to prepare targeting ligands highly specific for the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calce, Enrica; Monfregola, Luca; Saviano, Michele; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    HER2 receptor, for its involvement in tumorigenesis, has been largely studied as topic in cancer research. In particular, the employment of trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized anti-HER2 antibody, showed several clinical benefits in the therapy against the breast cancer. Moreover, for its accessible extracellular domain, this receptor is considered an ideal target to deliver anticancer drugs for the receptormediated anticancer therapy. By now, monoclonal antibody and its fragments, affibody, and some peptides have been employed as targeting agents in order to deliver various drugs to HER2 positive tumor cells. In particular, the ability to perform a fast and reliable screening of a large number of peptide molecules would make possible the selection of highly specific compounds to the receptor target. In this regard, the availability of preparing a simplified synthetic model which is a good mimetic of the receptor target and can be used in a reliable screening method of ligands would be of a strategic importance for the development of selective HER2-targeting peptide molecules. Herein, we illustrate the importance of HER2-targeted anticancer therapies. We also report on a synthetic and effective mimetic of the receptor, which revealed to be a useful tool for the selection of specific HER2 ligands. PMID:25994863

  18. Anticancer efficacy and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity studies of Aspergiolide A in early drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuanyuan Wang, Xin Qi, Dehai Li, Tianjiao Zhu, Xiaomei Mo, Jing LiKey Laboratory of Marine Drugs, Ministry of Education, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Since the first anthracycline was discovered, many other related compounds have been studied in order to overcome its defects and improve efficacy. In the present paper, we investigated the anticancer effects of a new anthracycline, aspergiolide A (ASP-A, from a marine-derived fungus in vitro and in vivo, and we evaluated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity drug properties in early drug development. We found that ASP-A had activity against topoisomerase II that was comparable to adriamycin. ASP-A decreased the growth of various human cancer cells in vitro and induced apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells via a caspase-dependent pathway. The anticancer efficacy of ASP-A on the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts was further assessed in vivo. Results showed that, compared with the vehicle group, ASP-A exhibited significant anticancer activity with less loss of body weight. A pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution study revealed that ASP-A was rapidly cleared in a first order reaction kinetics manner, and was enriched in cancer tissue. The maximal tolerable dose (MTD of ASP-A was more than 400 mg/kg, and ASP-A was not considered to be potentially genotoxic or cardiotoxic, as no significant increase of micronucleus rates or inhibition of the hERG channel was seen. Finally, an uptake and transport assay of ASP-A was performed in monolayers of Caco-2 cells, and ASP-A was shown to be absorbed through the active transport pathway. Altogether, these results indicate that ASP-A has anticancer activity targeting topoisomerase II, with a similar structure and mechanism to adriamycin, but with much lower toxicity. Nonetheless, further molecular structure optimization is necessary.Keywords: aspergiolide A, anticancer

  19. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition: a new target in anticancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Fabrizio; Stassi, Giorgio; De Maria, Ruggero

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of cells with an epithelial phenotype into cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, referred to as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is a critical process for embryonic development that also occurs in adult life, particularly during tumour progression. Tumour cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition acquire the capacity to disarm the body's antitumour defences, resist apoptosis and anticancer drugs, disseminate throughout the organism, and act as a reservoir that replenishes and expands the tumour cell population. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is therefore becoming a target of prime interest for anticancer therapy. Here, we discuss the screening and classification of compounds that affect epithelial-mesenchymal transition, highlight some compounds of particular interest, and address issues related to their clinical application.

  20. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  1. Random laser in biological tissues impregnated with a fluorescent anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, F.; Martín, I. R.; Urgellés, M.; Marrero-Alonso, J.; Marín, R.; Saavedra, C. J.; Boto, A.; Díaz, M.

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated that chemically modified anticancer drugs can provide random laser (RL) when infiltrated in a biological tissue. A fluorescent biomarker has been covalently bound to tamoxifen, which is one of the most frequently used drugs for breast cancer therapy. The light emitted by the drug-dye composite is scattered in tissue, which acts as a gain medium. Both non-coherent and coherent RL regimes have been observed. Moreover, the analysis of power Fourier transforms of coherent RL spectra indicates that the tissues show a dominant random laser cavity length of about 18 µm, similar to the average size of single cells. These results show that RL could be obtained from other drugs, if properly marked with a fluorescent tag, which could be appealing for new forms of combined opto-chemical therapies.

  2. Extracellular control of intracellular drug release for enhanced safety of anti-cancer chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian; Qi, Haixia; Long, Ziyan; Liu, Shang; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Junfeng; Wang, Chunming; Dong, Lei

    2016-06-01

    The difficulty of controlling drug release at an intracellular level remains a key challenge for maximising drug safety and efficacy. We demonstrate herein a new, efficient and convenient approach to extracellularly control the intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX), by designing a delivery system that harnesses the interactions between the system and a particular set of cellular machinery. By simply adding a small-molecule chemical into the cell medium, we could lower the release rate of DOX in the cytosol, and thereby increase its accumulation in the nuclei while decreasing its presence at mitochondria. Delivery of DOX with this system effectively prevented DOX-induced mitochondria damage that is the main mechanism of its toxicity, while exerting the maximum efficacy of this anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent. The present study sheds light on the design of drug delivery systems for extracellular control of intracellular drug delivery, with immediate therapeutic implications.

  3. Mucoadhesive nanoparticles from tamarind seed polysaccharides for sustained delivery of anticancer drug irinotecan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Saikia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed at development and optimization of mucoadhesive nanoparticles (NPs from natural mucoadhesive polysaccharides extracted from Tamarind seeds (Tamarindus indica for the sustained delivery of anticancer drug irinotecan. The drug loaded NPs were prepared by ion gelation method with the isolated polysaccharide by homogenization followed by lyophilization. The polysaccharides were cross-linked with sodium alginate in different ratios. The formulations were optimized using two level factorial design (Design Expert - 8.0.7.1 using the polysaccharide to alginate ratio, homogenization time and homogenization speed as independent variables and particle size (PS, drug entrapment efficiency and cumulative drug release as the dependent variables. The NPs were characterized in terms of PS, entrapment efficiency, drug loading (DL, in vitro drug release and cell viability studies in mice. Stable NPs were obtained with average PS of 405 ± 25.2 nm. The preparations were homogenous showing polydispersity index of 0.497 ± 0.02. The formulation showed up to 95.36 ± 3.1% (w/w yield showing DL of 1.0 ± 0.2% (w/w. The entrapment efficiency was found to be 46.56 ± 1.5% (w/w. In vitro drug release showed initial burst release followed by controlled release pattern showing up to 60% release in 12 h. The average cell viability was found to be 80% in case of the control group, which was reduced to 36% for NPs treated groups respectively. The Fourier transform infrared studies showed no incompatibility in the formulated NPs. It may be concluded from the study that tamarind seed polysaccharides may be suitable for formulation of mucoadhesive NPs for better efficacy and sustained delivery of anticancer drug irinotecan with reduced toxicity.

  4. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance.

  5. Synergistic effect of pH-responsive folate-functionalized poloxamer 407-TPGS-mixed micelles on targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt AM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Adeel Masood Butt, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin, Haliza Katas Centre for Drug Delivery Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Doxorubicin (DOX, an anthracycline anticancer antibiotic, is used for treating various types of cancers. However, its use is associated with toxicity to normal cells and development of resistance due to overexpression of drug efflux pumps. Poloxamer 407 (P407 and vitamin E TPGS (d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate, TPGS are widely used polymers as drug delivery carriers and excipients for enhancing the drug retention times and stability. TPGS reduces multidrug resistance, induces apoptosis, and shows selective anticancer activity against tumor cells. Keeping in view the problems, we designed a mixed micelle system encapsulating DOX comprising TPGS for its selective anticancer activity and P407 conjugated with folic acid (FA for folate-mediated receptor targeting to cancer cells. Methods: FA-functionalized P407 was prepared by carbodiimide crosslinker chemistry. P407-TPGS/FA-P407-TPGS-mixed micelles were prepared by thin-film hydration method. Cytotoxicity of blank micelles, DOX, and DOX-loaded micelles was determined by alamarBlue® assay. Results: The size of micelles was less than 200 nm with encapsulation efficiency of 85% and 73% for P407-TPGS and FA-P407-TPGS micelles, respectively. Intracellular trafficking study using nile red-loaded micelles indicated improved drug uptake and perinuclear drug localization. The micelles show minimal toxicity to normal human cell line WRL-68, enhanced cellular uptake of DOX, reduced drug efflux, increased DOX–DNA binding in SKOV3 and DOX-resistant SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, and enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity as compared to free DOX. Conclusion: FA-P407-TPGS-DOX micelles show potential as a targeted nano-drug delivery system for DOX due to their multiple synergistic factors of selective anticancer

  6. Tocopheryl pullulan-based self assembling nanomicelles for anti-cancer drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingyun, E-mail: wangjingyun67@dlut.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Cui, Shuang [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bao, Yongming, E-mail: biosci@dlut.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Xing, Jishuang [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Hao, Wenbo [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Heihe University, Heihe 164300 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Amphiphilic α-tocopherol pullulan polymers (PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3) with different degrees of substitution were synthesized as new carriers for anticancer drugs. The polymers easily self-assembled into nanomicelles through dialysis method. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) were 38.0, 8.0, and 4.3 mg/L for PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3, respectively. 10-Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) used as a model drug was successfully loaded into the PUTC nanomicelles. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that HCPT-loaded PUTC nanomicelles were almost spherical and had sizes ranging within 171.5–257.8 nm that increased with increased HCPT-loading content, as determined by dynamic laser scattering. The highest encapsulation efficiency of HCPT in PUTC nanomicelles reached 98.3%. The in vitro release of HCPT from PUTC micelles demonstrated sustained release for over 80 h. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assays showed that blank PUTC micelles were nontoxic to normal cells and that the HCPT-loaded PUTC2 nanomicelles showed higher cytotoxicity than the free drug, which was attributed to the enhanced cellular uptake of drug-loaded nanomicelles. Biodistribution experiments showed that PUTC micelles provided an excellent approach to rapid drug transport into cell nuclei. Moreover, the cellular uptake of micelles was found to be an energy-dependent and actin polymerization-associated endocytic process by endocytosis inhibition experiments. These results suggested that PUTC nanomicelles had considerable potential as a drug carrier for drug intracellular delivery in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Tocopheryl pullulan-based (PUTC) self-assembling nanomicelles were fabricated. • These micelles showed low CMC and dispersed uniformly with regular spherical shape. • High entrapment efficiency and in vitro sustained release of HCPT in PUTC micelles • HCPT–PUTC micelles accumulated in cell nuclei and showed higher anticancer activity.

  7. Transmembrane delivery of anticancer drugs through self-assembly of cyclic peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Bei; Xia, Fei; Xie, Yunchang; Jiang, Sifan; Su, Rui; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Breaking the natural barriers of cell membranes achieves fast entry of therapeutics, which leads to enhanced efficacy and helps overcome multiple drug resistance. Herein, transmembrane delivery of a series of small molecule anticancer drugs was achieved by the construction of artificial transmembrane nanochannels formed by self-assembly of cyclic peptide (cyclo[Gln-(d-Leu-Trp)4-d-Leu], CP) nanotubes (CPNTs) in the lipid bilayers. Our in vitro study in liposomes indicated that the transport of molecules with sizes smaller than 1.0 nm, which is the internal diameter of the CPNTs, could be significantly enhanced by CPNTs in a size-selective and dose-dependent manner. Facilitated uptake of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was also confirmed in the BEL7402 cell line. On the contrary, CPs could facilitate neither the transport across liposomal membranes nor the uptake by cell lines of cytarabine, a counterevidence drug with a size of 1.1 nm. CPs had a very weak anticancer efficacy, but could significantly reduce the IC50 of 5-FU in BEL7402, HeLa and S180 cell lines. Analysis by a q test revealed that a combination of 5-FU and CP had a synergistic effect in BEL7402 at all CP levels, in S180 at CP levels higher than 64 μg mL-1, but not in HeLa, where an additive effect was observed. Temporarily, intratumoral injection is believed to be the best way for CP administration. In vivo imaging using 125I radio-labelled CP confirmed that CPNPTs were completely localized in the tumor tissues, and translocation to other tissues was negligible. In vivo anticancer efficacy was studied in the grafted S180 solid tumor model in mice, and the results indicated that tumor growth was greatly inhibited by the combinatory use of 5-FU and CP, and a synergistic effect was observed at CP doses of 0.25 mg per kg bw. It is concluded that facilitated transmembrane delivery of anticancer drugs with sizes smaller than 1.0 nm was achieved, and the synergistic anticancer effect was confirmed both in cell lines

  8. Trypanocidal activity of the proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib was tested for in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei. The concentrations of bortezomib required to reduce the growth rate by 50% and to kill all trypanosomes were 3.3 nM and 10 nM, respectively. In addition, bortezomib was 10 times more toxic to trypanosomes than to human HL-60 cells. Moreover, exposure of trypanosomes to 10 nM bortezomib for 16 h was enough to kill 90% of the parasites following incubation in fresh medium. However, proteasomal peptidase activities of trypanosomes exposed to bortezomib were only inhibited by 10% and 30% indicating that the proteasome is not the main target of the drug. The results suggest that bortezomib may be useful as drug for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

  9. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27695318

  10. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia enables predictive modelling of anticancer drug sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretina, Jordi; Caponigro, Giordano; Stransky, Nicolas; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Margolin, Adam A; Kim, Sungjoon; Wilson, Christopher J; Lehár, Joseph; Kryukov, Gregory V; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Reddy, Anupama; Liu, Manway; Murray, Lauren; Berger, Michael F; Monahan, John E; Morais, Paula; Meltzer, Jodi; Korejwa, Adam; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Mapa, Felipa A; Thibault, Joseph; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Raman, Pichai; Shipway, Aaron; Engels, Ingo H; Cheng, Jill; Yu, Guoying K; Yu, Jianjun; Aspesi, Peter; de Silva, Melanie; Jagtap, Kalpana; Jones, Michael D; Wang, Li; Hatton, Charles; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Gupta, Supriya; Mahan, Scott; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C; Liefeld, Ted; MacConaill, Laura; Winckler, Wendy; Reich, Michael; Li, Nanxin; Mesirov, Jill P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Getz, Gad; Ardlie, Kristin; Chan, Vivien; Myer, Vic E; Weber, Barbara L; Porter, Jeff; Warmuth, Markus; Finan, Peter; Harris, Jennifer L; Meyerson, Matthew; Golub, Todd R; Morrissey, Michael P; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Garraway, Levi A

    2012-03-28

    The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumour biology and therapeutic possibilities remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacological annotation is available. Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 human cancer cell lines. When coupled with pharmacological profiles for 24 anticancer drugs across 479 of the cell lines, this collection allowed identification of genetic, lineage, and gene-expression-based predictors of drug sensitivity. In addition to known predictors, we found that plasma cell lineage correlated with sensitivity to IGF1 receptor inhibitors; AHR expression was associated with MEK inhibitor efficacy in NRAS-mutant lines; and SLFN11 expression predicted sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. Together, our results indicate that large, annotated cell-line collections may help to enable preclinical stratification schemata for anticancer agents. The generation of genetic predictions of drug response in the preclinical setting and their incorporation into cancer clinical trial design could speed the emergence of 'personalized' therapeutic regimens.

  11. SR 4233 (tirapazamine): a new anticancer drug exploiting hypoxia in solid tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    J. M. Brown

    1993-01-01

    SR 4233 (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide, WIN 59075, tirapazamine) is the lead compound in a new class of bioreductive anticancer drugs, the benzotriazine di-N-oxides. It is currently undergoing Phase I clinical testing. The preferential tumour cell killing of SR 4233 is a result of its high specific toxicity to cells at low oxygen tensions. Such hypoxic cells are a common feature of solid tumours, but not normal tissues, and are resistant to cancer therapies including radiation and s...

  12. Design of interior-functionalized fully acetylated dendrimers for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingjing; Su, Yunzhang; Zhang, Hongfeng; Xu, Tongwen; Cheng, Yiyun

    2011-12-01

    In this study, dendrimers was synthesized by introducing functional groups into the interior pockets of fully acetylated dendrimers. NMR techniques including COSY and 2D-NOESY revealed the molecular structures of the synthesized dendrimers and the encapsulation of guest molecule such as methotrexate within their interior pockets. The synthesized polymeric nanocarriers showed much lower cytotoxicity on two cell lines than cationic dendrimers, and exhibited better performance than fully acetylated dendrimers in the sustained release of methotrexate. The results provided a new strategy in the design of non-toxic dendrimers with high performance in the delivery of anti-cancer drugs for clinical applications.

  13. Layered double hydroxides as effective carrier for anticancer drugs and tailoring of release rate through interlayer anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Sudipta; Thakur, Ravi; Verma, Shiv Prakash; Duggal, Shivali; Mishra, Durga Prasad; Das, Parimal; Shripathi, T; Kumar, Mohan; Rana, Dipak; Maiti, Pralay

    2016-02-28

    Hydrophobic anticancer drug, raloxifene hydrochloride (RH) is intercalated into a series of magnesium aluminum layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with various charge density anions through ion exchange technique for controlled drug delivery. The particle nature of the LDH in presence of drug is determined through electron microscopy and surface morphology. The release of drug from the RH intercalated LDHs was made very fast or sustained by altering the exchangeable anions followed by the modified Freundlich and parabolic diffusion models. The drug release rate is explained from the interactions between the drug and LDHs along with order-disorder structure of drug intercalated LDHs. Nitrate bound LDH exhibits greater interaction with drug and sustained drug delivery against the loosely interacted phosphate bound LDH-drug, which shows fast release. Cell viability through MTT assay suggests drug intercalated LDHs as better drug delivery vehicle for cancer cell line against poor bioavailability of the pure drug. In vivo study with mice indicates the differential tumor healing which becomes fast for greater drug release system but the body weight index clearly hints at damaged organ in the case of fast release system. Histopathological experiment confirms the damaged liver of the mice treated either with pure drug or phosphate bound LDH-drug, fast release system, vis-à-vis normal liver cell morphology for sluggish drug release system with steady healing rate of tumor. These observations clearly demonstrate that nitrate bound LDH nanoparticle is a potential drug delivery vehicle for anticancer drugs without any side effect. PMID:26774219

  14. Unblocking Blockbusters: Using Boolean Text-Mining to Optimise Clinical Trial Design and Timeline for Novel Anticancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Richard J Epstein

    2009-01-01

    Two problems now threaten the future of anticancer drug development: (i) the information explosion has made research into new target-specific drugs more duplication-prone, and hence less cost-efficient; and (ii) high-throughput genomic technologies have failed to deliver the anticipated early windfall of novel first-in-class drugs. Here it is argued that the resulting crisis of blockbuster drug development may be remedied in part by innovative exploitation of informatic power. Using scenarios...

  15. Structural and stability investigation of the anticancer drug Cyclophosphamide via quantum chemical calculations :A nanotube drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Felegari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclophosphamide is a medicine used to interfere with the growth and spread of tumor cells and treat cancers and autoimmune disorders.This work reports the study of anticancer drugs with density functional theory (DFT and electronic structures.Its structure was optimized with B3LYP/6-311G* level in the gas phase and different solvents (SCRF calculation. NBO analysis,NMR parameter,thermodynamic properties,HOMO and LUMO,HOMO-LUMO band gap, and the electronic chemical potential (µ were calculated. The results indicated that the Cyclophosphamide in water solvent is more stable than the gas phase orother solvents.

  16. Drug accumulation in the presence of the multidrug resistance pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayesh, S; Litman, Thomas; Stein, W D

    1997-01-01

    We studied the interaction between the multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein, and two compounds that interact with it: vinblastine, a classical substrate of the pump, and verapamil, a classical reverser. Steady-state levels of accumulation of these two drugs were determined in a multidrug resistant...... P388 leukemia cell line, P388/ADR. The time course of accumulation of these drugs, and the effect of energy starvation and the presence of chloroquine on the level of their steady-state accumulation were quite disparate. Vinblastine inhibited the accumulation of verapamil whereas it enhanced...

  17. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MunJu eKim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  18. Magnetic Properties of Polyvinyl Alcohol and Doxorubicine Loaded Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Ahmad, Munir; Akhtar, Muhammad Saeed; Shaari, Amiruddin; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Masood, Misbah; Saeed, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study emphasizes the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and impact of hydrophilic polymer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) coating concentration as well as anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) loading on saturation magnetization for target drug delivery applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles particles were synthesized by a reformed version of the co-precipitation method. The coating of polyvinyl alcohol along with doxorubicin loading was carried out by the physical immobilization method. X-ray diffraction confirmed the magnetite (Fe3O4) structure of particles that remained unchanged before and after polyvinyl alcohol coating and drug loading. Microstructure and morphological analysis was carried out by transmission electron microscopy revealing the formation of nanoparticles with an average size of 10 nm with slight variation after coating and drug loading. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive, and Fourier transform infrared spectra further confirmed the conjugation of polymer and doxorubicin with iron oxide nanoparticles. The room temperature superparamagnetic behavior of polymer-coated and drug-loaded magnetite nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer. The variation in saturation magnetization after coating evaluated that a sufficient amount of polyvinyl alcohol would be 3 wt. % regarding the externally controlled movement of IONPs in blood under the influence of applied magnetic field for in-vivo target drug delivery. PMID:27348436

  19. In vitro anticancer drug test: A new method emerges from the model of glioma stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Riva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV astrocytoma and the most common malignant brain tumor. Current therapies provide a median survival of 12–15 months after diagnosis, due to the high recurrence rate. The failure of current therapies may be due to the presence, within the tumor, of cells characterized by enhanced self-renewal capacity, multilineage differentiation potential and elevated invasive behavior, called glioma stem cells (GSCs. To evaluate the pharmacological efficacy of selected drugs on six GSC lines, we set up a multiple drug responsivity assay based on the combined evaluation of cytomorphological and functional parameters, including the analysis of polymorphic nuclei, mitotic index and cell viability. In order to understand the real pharmacological efficacy of the tested drugs, we assigned a specific drug responsivity score to each GSC line, integrating the data produced by multiple assays. In this work we explored the antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel (PTX, an inhibitor of microtubule depolymerization, utilized as standard treatment in several cancers, and of valproic acid (VPA, an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs with multiple anticancer properties. We classified the six GSC lines as responsive or resistant to these drugs, on the basis of their responsivity scores. This method can also be useful to identify the best way to combine two or more drugs. In particular, we utilized the pro-differentiating effect of VPA to improve the PTX effectiveness and we observed a significant reduction of cell viability compared to single treatments.

  20. Magnetic Properties of Polyvinyl Alcohol and Doxorubicine Loaded Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nadeem

    Full Text Available The current study emphasizes the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs and impact of hydrophilic polymer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA coating concentration as well as anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX loading on saturation magnetization for target drug delivery applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles particles were synthesized by a reformed version of the co-precipitation method. The coating of polyvinyl alcohol along with doxorubicin loading was carried out by the physical immobilization method. X-ray diffraction confirmed the magnetite (Fe3O4 structure of particles that remained unchanged before and after polyvinyl alcohol coating and drug loading. Microstructure and morphological analysis was carried out by transmission electron microscopy revealing the formation of nanoparticles with an average size of 10 nm with slight variation after coating and drug loading. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive, and Fourier transform infrared spectra further confirmed the conjugation of polymer and doxorubicin with iron oxide nanoparticles. The room temperature superparamagnetic behavior of polymer-coated and drug-loaded magnetite nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer. The variation in saturation magnetization after coating evaluated that a sufficient amount of polyvinyl alcohol would be 3 wt. % regarding the externally controlled movement of IONPs in blood under the influence of applied magnetic field for in-vivo target drug delivery.

  1. CHIP buffers heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels to prevent augmentation of anticancer drug-resistant cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, M; Nakajima, Y; Waku, T; Hiyoshi, H; Morishita, T; Furumai, R; Hayashi, Y; Kishimoto, H; Kimura, K; Yanagisawa, J

    2015-08-27

    Many types of cancer display heterogeneity in various features, including gene expression and malignant potential. This heterogeneity is associated with drug resistance and cancer progression. Recent studies have shown that the expression of a major protein quality control ubiquitin ligase, carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), is negatively correlated with breast cancer clinicopathological stages and poor overall survival. Here we show that CHIP acts as a capacitor of heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels and prevents an increase in the anticancer drug-resistant population in breast cancer cells. CHIP knockdown in breast cancer cells increased variation in Bcl-2 expression levels, an antiapoptotic protein, among the cells. Our results also showed that CHIP knockdown increased the proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells. These findings suggest that CHIP buffers variation in gene expression levels, affecting resistance to anticancer drugs. In single-cell clones derived from breast cancer cell lines, CHIP knockdown did not alter the variation in Bcl-2 expression levels and the proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells. In contrast, when clonal cells were treated with a mutagen, the variation in Bcl-2 expression levels and proportion of anticancer drug-resistant cells were altered by CHIP knockdown. These results suggest that CHIP masks genetic variations to suppress heterogeneous Bcl-2 expression levels and prevents augmentation of the anticancer drug-resistant population of breast cancer cells. Because genetic variation is a major driver of heterogeneity, our results suggest that the degree of heterogeneity in expression levels is decided by a balance between genetic variation and the buffering capacity of CHIP.

  2. Encapsulation of anticancer drug and magnetic particles in biodegradable polymer nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koneracka, M; Zavisova, V; Tomasovicova, N; Kopcansky, P; Timko, M; JurIkova, A; Csach, K; Kavecansky, V; Lancz, G [Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, Kosice (Slovakia); Muckova, M [Hameln rds a.s., Horna 36, Modra (Slovakia)], E-mail: konerack@saske.sk

    2008-05-21

    In this study, we have prepared PLGA (poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanospheres loaded with biocompatible magnetic fluid and anticancer drug taxol by a modified nanoprecipitation technique and investigated their magnetic properties. A magnetic fluid, MF-PEG, with a biocompatible layer of polyethylene glycol (PEG), was chosen as a magnetic carrier. The PLGA, whose copolymer ratio of D,L-lactide to glycolide is 85:15, was utilized as a capsulation material. Taxol, as an important anticancer drug, was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. The morphology and particle size distributions of the prepared nanospheres were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and showed a spherical shape of prepared nanospheres with size 250 nm. Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA) analysis confirmed incorporation of magnetic particles and taxol into the PLGA polymer. The results showed good encapsulation with magnetite content 21.5 wt% and taxol 0.5 wt%. Magnetic properties of magnetic fluids and taxol within the PLGA polymer matrix were investigated by SQUID magnetometry from 4.2 to 300 K. The SQUID measurements showed superparamagnetism of prepared nanospheres with a blocking temperature of 160 K and saturation magnetization 1.4 mT.

  3. A novel candidate compound with urethane structure for anticancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Atsuko; Isama, Kazuo; Tanimura, Susumu; Kohno, Michiaki; Yamori, Takao

    2007-08-01

    Diethyl-4,4'-methylenebis(N-phenylcarbamate) (MDU) is a urethane compound that we originally synthesized, along with three other compounds, to investigate how polyurethane is hydrolysed. We tested the four compounds for cytotoxicity in two Chinese hamster cell lines (CHL and V79) and a human cancer cell line (HeLa S3). MDU showed the strongest cytotoxicity in all the cell lines with an IC50 of around 0.1 microg/ml. We further investigated MDU for its ability to induce chromosome aberrations (CAs) and micronuclei (MN) in CHL cells. MDU induced around 100% polyploid cells at 0.5 microg/ml after 24- and 48-h treatment in the CA test and a significantly increased frequency of micronuclei, polynuclear cells, and mitotic cells in the MN test, suggesting that it may induce numerical CAs. MDU's ability to cause mitotic arrest in CHL cells was greater than that of taxol and colchicine. Based on a COMPARE analysis using JFCR39, a panel of cancer cell lines, we predicted MDU to be a tubulin inhibitor. We confirmed this possibility in nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells as well as in HT1080 cells, in which MDU exhibited the activity to inhibit tubulin polymerization. MDU is simpler in structure than existing anticancer drugs taxol and vincristine and can be synthesized relatively easily. Here we offer MDU as a potential new type of anticancer drug, stable even at room temperature, and inexpensive. PMID:17691911

  4. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S; Chen, D.-H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chendh@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2008-07-02

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g{sup -1}. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  5. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-07-01

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g-1. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  6. Nanoparticulated docetaxel exerts enhanced anticancer efficacy and overcomes existing limitations of traditional drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jinhyang Choi,1,2 Eunjung Ko,1 Hye-Kyung Chung,3 Jae Hee Lee,1 Eun Jin Ju,1 Hyun Kyung Lim,4 Intae Park,1 Kab-Sig Kim,5 Joo-Hwan Lee,5 Woo-Chan Son,6 Jung Shin Lee,1,7 Joohee Jung,1,4 Seong-Yun Jeong,1,2 Si Yeol Song,1,8 Eun Kyung Choi1,3,8 1Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, 2Asan Institute for Life Sciences, 3Center for Development and Commercialization of Anti-cancer Therapeutics, 4College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women’s University, 5Bio-Synectics, 6Department of Pathology, 7Department of Internal Medicine, 8Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Nanoparticulation of insoluble drugs improves dissolution rate, resulting in increased bioavailability that leads to increased stability, better efficacy, and reduced toxicity of drugs. Docetaxel (DTX, under the trade name Taxotere™, is one of the representative anticancer chemotherapeutic agents of this era. However, this highly lipophilic and insoluble drug has many adverse effects. Our novel and widely applicable nanoparticulation using fat and supercritical fluid (NUFS™ technology enabled successful nanoscale particulation of DTX (Nufs-DTX. Nufs-DTX showed enhanced dissolution rate and increased aqueous stability in water. After confirming the preserved mechanism of action of DTX, which targets microtubules, we showed that Nufs-DTX exhibited similar effects in proliferation and clonogenic assays using A549 cells. Interestingly, we observed that Nufs-DTX had a greater in vivo tumor growth delay effect on an A549 xenograft model than Taxotere™, which was in agreement with the improved drug accumulation in tumors according to the biodistribution result, and was caused by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. Although both Nufs-DTX and Taxotere™ showed negative results for our administration dose in the hematologic toxicity test, Nufs-DTX showed much less toxicity than Taxotere™ in

  7. An in vivo C. elegans model system for screening EGFR-inhibiting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ki Bae

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a well-established target for cancer treatment. EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitors, such as gefinitib and erlotinib, have been developed as anti-cancer drugs. Although non-small cell lung carcinoma with an activating EGFR mutation, L858R, responds well to gefinitib and erlotinib, tumors with a doubly mutated EGFR, T790M-L858R, acquire resistance to these drugs. The C. elegans EGFR homolog LET-23 and its downstream signaling pathway have been studied extensively to provide insight into regulatory mechanisms conserved from C. elegans to humans. To develop an in vivo screening system for potential cancer drugs targeting specific EGFR mutants, we expressed three LET-23 chimeras in which the TK domain was replaced with either the human wild-type TK domain (LET-23::hEGFR-TK, a TK domain with the L858R mutation (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R], or a TK domain with the T790M-L858R mutations (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] in C. elegans vulval cells using the let-23 promoter. The wild-type hEGFR-TK chimeric protein rescued the let-23 mutant phenotype, and the activating mutant hEGFR-TK chimeras induced a multivulva (Muv phenotype in a wild-type C. elegans background. The anti-cancer drugs gefitinib and erlotinib suppressed the Muv phenotype in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R]-expressing transgenic animals, but not in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] transgenic animals. As a pilot screen, 8,960 small chemicals were tested for Muv suppression, and AG1478 (an EGFR-TK inhibitor and U0126 (a MEK inhibitor were identified as potential inhibitors of EGFR-mediated biological function. In conclusion, transgenic C. elegans expressing chimeric LET-23::hEGFR-TK proteins are a model system that can be used in mutation-specific screens for new anti-cancer drugs.

  8. Stability of amoxicillin in portable pumps is drug concentration dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlicot, N; Marie, A; Cade, C; Laffon, M; Antier, D

    2011-08-01

    Continuous amoxicillin infusion for deep infection's intravenous treatment is performed using elastomeric portable pumps carried under clothing and requires high doses of antibiotic. Therefore, we evaluated the stability of amoxicillin in those medical devices, with particular focus on both drug concentration and storage temperature. Stability of 20, 40, and 60g/L amoxicillin solutions in 300 mL portable pumps stored at 20 or 35 degrees C was studied by visual examination and drug concentration measurements at T0; T0 + 12 h; T0 + 24 h and; T0 + 48 h. Twenty and 40 g/L amoxicillin solutions were stable over 48 h, with a degradation rate that never exceeded 12% at T0 + 24 h, and 18% at T 0 + 48 h. However, the 60 g/L amoxicillin solution degradation rate was significant (p pump is guarantied over 48 h up to concentrations of 40 g/L. At 60 g/L major degradation of the antibiotic was observed. PMID:21901990

  9. Polysaccharide-Gold Nanocluster Supramolecular Conjugates as a Versatile Platform for the Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Su, Yue; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2014-02-01

    Through the high affinity of the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) cavity for adamantane moieties, novel polysaccharide-gold nanocluster supramolecular conjugates (HACD-AuNPs) were successfully constructed from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) bearing adamantane moieties and cyclodextrin-grafted hyaluronic acid (HACD). Due to their porous structure, the supramolecular conjugates could serve as a versatile and biocompatible platform for the loading and delivery of various anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), paclitaxel (PTX), camptothecin (CPT), irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11), and topotecan hydrochloride (TPT), by taking advantage of the controlled association/dissociation of drug molecules from the cavities formed by the HACD skeletons and AuNPs cores as well as by harnessing the efficient targeting of cancer cells by hyaluronic acid. Significantly, the release of anticancer drugs from the drug@HACD-AuNPs system was pH-responsive, with more efficient release occurring under a mildly acidic environment, such as that in a cancer cell. Taking the anticancer drug DOX as an example, cell viability experiments revealed that the DOX@HACD-AuNPs system exhibited similar tumor cell inhibition abilities but lower toxicity than free DOX due to the hyaluronic acid reporter-mediated endocytosis. Therefore, the HACD-AuNPs supramolecular conjugates may possess great potential for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  10. Anti-tumor activities of lipids and lipid analogues and their development as potential anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Michael; Hraiki, Adam; Bebawy, Mary; Pazderka, Curtis; Rawling, Tristan

    2015-06-01

    Lipids have the potential for development as anticancer agents. Endogenous membrane lipids, such as ceramides and certain saturated fatty acids, have been found to modulate the viability of tumor cells. In addition, many tumors over-express cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase or cytochrome P450 enzymes that mediate the biotransformation of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to potent eicosanoid regulators of tumor cell proliferation and cell death. In contrast, several analogous products from the biotransformation of ω-3 PUFAs impair particular tumorigenic pathways. For example, the ω-3 17,18-epoxide of eicosapentaenoic acid activates anti-proliferative and proapoptotic signaling cascades in tumor cells and the lipoxygenase-derived resolvins are effective inhibitors of inflammatory pathways that may drive tumor expansion. However, the development of potential anti-cancer drugs based on these molecules is complex, with in vivo stability a major issue. Nevertheless, recent successes with the antitumor alkyl phospholipids, which are synthetic analogues of naturally-occurring membrane phospholipid esters, have provided the impetus for development of further molecules. The alkyl phospholipids have been tested against a range of cancers and show considerable activity against skin cancers and certain leukemias. Very recently, it has been shown that combination strategies, in which alkyl phospholipids are used in conjunction with established anticancer agents, are promising new therapeutic approaches. In future, the evaluation of new lipid-based molecules in single-agent and combination treatments may also be assessed. This could provide a range of important treatment options in the management of advanced and metastatic cancer. PMID:25603423

  11. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shini Feng,1 Huijie Zhang,1 Ting Yan,1 Dandi Huang,1 Chunyi Zhi,2 Hideki Nakanishi,1 Xiao-Dong Gao1 1Key Laboratory of Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China Abstract: With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. Keywords: boron nitride nanospheres, folic acid, doxorubicin, targeted delivery, cancer therapy

  12. Anticancer activity of drug conjugates in head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Debatosh; Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Shin, Dong M

    2016-01-01

    Sexually transmitted oral cancer/head and neck cancer is increasing rapidly. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is playing a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN). Paclitaxel is a widely used anticancer drug for breast, ovarian, testicular, cervical, non-small cell lung, head and neck cancer. However, it is water insoluble and orally inactive. We report the synthesis of water soluble nanosize conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide by employing native chemical ligation. We performed a native chemical ligation between the N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) ester of paclitaxel succinate and cysteine at pH 6.5 to give the cysteine-conjugated paclitaxel derivative. The thiol functionality of cysteine was activated and subsequently conjugated to multiarm thiol-PEG to obtain the paclitaxel branched PEG conjugate. Finally, we conjugated an EGFR-targeting peptide to obtain conjugates of paclitaxel, branched PEG, and EGFR-targeting peptide. These conjugates show anticancer activity against squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck cells (SCCHN, Tu212). PMID:27100344

  13. Structural basis of DNA gyrase inhibition by antibacterial QPT-1, anticancer drug etoposide and moxifloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pan F; Srikannathasan, Velupillai; Huang, Jianzhong; Cui, Haifeng; Fosberry, Andrew P; Gu, Minghua; Hann, Michael M; Hibbs, Martin; Homes, Paul; Ingraham, Karen; Pizzollo, Jason; Shen, Carol; Shillings, Anthony J; Spitzfaden, Claus E; Tanner, Robert; Theobald, Andrew J; Stavenger, Robert A; Bax, Benjamin D; Gwynn, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    New antibacterials are needed to tackle antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Type IIA topoisomerases (topo2As), the targets of fluoroquinolones, regulate DNA topology by creating transient double-strand DNA breaks. Here we report the first co-crystal structures of the antibacterial QPT-1 and the anticancer drug etoposide with Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase, showing binding at the same sites in the cleaved DNA as the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin. Unlike moxifloxacin, QPT-1 and etoposide interact with conserved GyrB TOPRIM residues rationalizing why QPT-1 can overcome fluoroquinolone resistance. Our data show etoposide's antibacterial activity is due to DNA gyrase inhibition and suggests other anticancer agents act similarly. Analysis of multiple DNA gyrase co-crystal structures, including asymmetric cleavage complexes, led to a 'pair of swing-doors' hypothesis in which the movement of one DNA segment regulates cleavage and religation of the second DNA duplex. This mechanism can explain QPT-1's bacterial specificity. Structure-based strategies for developing topo2A antibacterials are suggested. PMID:26640131

  14. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  15. Poly(lactic acid)/chitosan hybrid nanoparticles for controlled release of anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenlong; Chen, Shu; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Xi; Wang, Jiexin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Le, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a kind of non-toxic biological materials with excellent absorbability, biocompatibility and biodegradability, which can be used for drug release, tissue engineering and surgical treatment applications. In this study, we prepared chitosan modified PLA nanoparticles as carriers for encapsulation of docetaxel by anti-solvent precipitation method. The morphology, particle size, zeta potential and composition of the PLA/chitosan were characterized by SEM, DLS, FTIR and XPS. As-prepared PLA/chitosan particles exhibited average size of 250 nm and showed very narrow distribution with polydispersity index of 0.098. Their large surface charge-ability was confirmed by zeta potential value of 53.9 mV. Docetaxel was released from PLA/chitosan nanoparticles with 40% initial burst release in 5 h and 70% cumulative release within 24 h, while from PLA nanoparticles 65% of docetaxel was released in 5h. In vitro drug release study demonstrated that PLA/chitosan nanoparticles prolonged drug release and decreased the burst release over the unmodified PLA nanoparticles. These results illustrated high potential of chitosan modified PLA nanoparticles for usage as anticancer drug carriers. PMID:25492016

  16. Poly(lactic acid)/chitosan hybrid nanoparticles for controlled release of anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenlong; Chen, Shu; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Xi; Wang, Jiexin; Chen, Jian-Feng; Le, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a kind of non-toxic biological materials with excellent absorbability, biocompatibility and biodegradability, which can be used for drug release, tissue engineering and surgical treatment applications. In this study, we prepared chitosan modified PLA nanoparticles as carriers for encapsulation of docetaxel by anti-solvent precipitation method. The morphology, particle size, zeta potential and composition of the PLA/chitosan were characterized by SEM, DLS, FTIR and XPS. As-prepared PLA/chitosan particles exhibited average size of 250 nm and showed very narrow distribution with polydispersity index of 0.098. Their large surface charge-ability was confirmed by zeta potential value of 53.9 mV. Docetaxel was released from PLA/chitosan nanoparticles with 40% initial burst release in 5 h and 70% cumulative release within 24 h, while from PLA nanoparticles 65% of docetaxel was released in 5h. In vitro drug release study demonstrated that PLA/chitosan nanoparticles prolonged drug release and decreased the burst release over the unmodified PLA nanoparticles. These results illustrated high potential of chitosan modified PLA nanoparticles for usage as anticancer drug carriers.

  17. Antitumor Activity of Artemisinin and Its Derivatives: From a Well-Known Antimalarial Agent to a Potential Anticancer Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Crespo-Ortiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of quality of life and survival of cancer patients will be greatly enhanced by the development of highly effective drugs to selectively kill malignant cells. Artemisinin and its analogs are naturally occurring antimalarials which have shown potent anticancer activity. In primary cancer cultures and cell lines, their antitumor actions were by inhibiting cancer proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis. In xenograft models, exposure to artemisinins substantially reduces tumor volume and progression. However, the rationale for the use of artemisinins in anticancer therapy must be addressed by a greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved in their cytotoxic effects. The primary targets for artemisinin and the chemical base for its preferential effects on heterologous tumor cells need yet to be elucidated. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent advances and new development of this class of drugs as potential anticancer agents.

  18. Steady Increase In Prices For Oral Anticancer Drugs After Market Launch Suggests A Lack Of Competitive Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennette, Caroline S; Richards, Catherine; Sullivan, Sean D; Ramsey, Scott D

    2016-05-01

    The cost of treating cancer has risen to unprecedented heights, putting tremendous financial pressure on patients, payers, and society. Previous studies have documented the rising prices of cancer drugs at launch, but less critical attention has been paid to the cost of these drugs after launch. We used pharmacy claims for commercially insured individuals to examine trends in postlaunch prices over time for orally administered anticancer drugs recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In the period 2007-13, inflation-adjusted per patient monthly drug prices increased 5 percent each year. Certain market changes also played a role, with prices rising an additional 10 percent with each supplemental indication approved by the FDA and declining 2 percent with the FDA's approval of a competitor drug. Our findings suggest that there is currently little competitive pressure in the oral anticancer drug market. Policy makers who wish to reduce the costs of anticancer drugs should consider implementing policies that affect prices not only at launch but also later. PMID:27140986

  19. Steady Increase In Prices For Oral Anticancer Drugs After Market Launch Suggests A Lack Of Competitive Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennette, Caroline S; Richards, Catherine; Sullivan, Sean D; Ramsey, Scott D

    2016-05-01

    The cost of treating cancer has risen to unprecedented heights, putting tremendous financial pressure on patients, payers, and society. Previous studies have documented the rising prices of cancer drugs at launch, but less critical attention has been paid to the cost of these drugs after launch. We used pharmacy claims for commercially insured individuals to examine trends in postlaunch prices over time for orally administered anticancer drugs recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In the period 2007-13, inflation-adjusted per patient monthly drug prices increased 5 percent each year. Certain market changes also played a role, with prices rising an additional 10 percent with each supplemental indication approved by the FDA and declining 2 percent with the FDA's approval of a competitor drug. Our findings suggest that there is currently little competitive pressure in the oral anticancer drug market. Policy makers who wish to reduce the costs of anticancer drugs should consider implementing policies that affect prices not only at launch but also later.

  20. Multidrug resistance in oncology and beyond : from imaging of drug efflux pumps to cellular drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Dijkers, Eli; Hospers, Geesiena; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Schröder, Carolien P; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2010-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to several structurally unrelated classes of natural products, including anthracyclines, taxanes, and epipodophyllotoxines, is often referred as multidrug resistance (MDR). This is associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters, which function as drug efflux pumps such a

  1. Predicting Anticancer Drug Responses Using a Dual-Layer Integrated Cell Line-Drug Network Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiqian Zhang

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the response of a cancer patient to a therapeutic agent is a major goal in modern oncology that should ultimately lead to personalized treatment. Existing approaches to predicting drug sensitivity rely primarily on profiling of cancer cell line panels that have been treated with different drugs and selecting genomic or functional genomic features to regress or classify the drug response. Here, we propose a dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model, which uses both cell line similarity network (CSN data and drug similarity network (DSN data to predict the drug response of a given cell line using a weighted model. Using the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE and Cancer Genome Project (CGP studies as benchmark datasets, our single-layer model with CSN or DSN and only a single parameter achieved a prediction performance comparable to the previously generated elastic net model. When using the dual-layer model integrating both CSN and DSN, our predicted response reached a 0.6 Pearson correlation coefficient with observed responses for most drugs, which is significantly better than the previous results using the elastic net model. We have also applied the dual-layer cell line-drug integrated network model to fill in the missing drug response values in the CGP dataset. Even though the dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model does not specifically model mutation information, it correctly predicted that BRAF mutant cell lines would be more sensitive than BRAF wild-type cell lines to three MEK1/2 inhibitors tested.

  2. Quadruplex-targeting anticancer drug BRACO-19 voltammetric and AFM characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quadruplex-targeting anticancer drug BRACO-19 adsorption and redox behaviour were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface and by cyclic, differential pulse and square-wave voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. The AFM and voltammetric results demonstrated that the BRACO-19 orientation and strong adsorption, with the acridine aromatic core parallel or perpendicular to the carbon electrode surface depending on solution pH, directly influences the peak potentials and redox behaviour. BRACO-19 oxidation was a complex, pH-dependent, four-step electrode process. The first oxidation step was reversible, the second, third and fourth oxidation steps irreversible, and an electroactive irreversibly oxidized BRACO-19 oxidation product was formed. BRACO-19 reduction occurred in two irreversible, pH-independent steps. The proposed redox mechanisms are related to the pyrrolidine and acridine moieties

  3. Applying fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanabe, Satoshi; Araki, Yoshie; Uchimura, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was applied to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs. A decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in apoptotic cancer cells stained by SYTO 13 dye was detected after treatment with antitumor antibiotics such as doxorubicin or epirubicin. It was confirmed that the change in fluorescence lifetime occurred earlier than morphological changes in the cells. We found that the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in the cells treated with epirubicin decreased more rapidly than that of the cells treated with doxorubicin. This implies that epirubicin was more efficacious than doxorubicin in the treatment of cancer cells. The change in fluorescence lifetime was, however, not indicated when the cells were treated with cyclophosphamide. The decrease in fluorescence lifetime was associated with the processes involving caspase activation and chromatin condensation. Therefore, this technique would provide useful information about apoptotic cells, particularly in the early stages.

  4. Nano drug delivery Study of Anticancer Properties on Jackfruit using QM/MM Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Bonsakhteh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nano-biotechnology takes most of its fundamentals from nanotechnology which most of the equipment designed for nano-biotechnological are based on other existing nanotechnologies. Nano-biotechnology is often used to describe the overlapping multidisciplinary activities associated with chemistry, biology and nano-medicine. In this investigation, the ab initio calculations were implemented using Gaussian program package based on density functional level of theory (DFT to achieve the drug delivery technic for unraveling of linkage of Jackfruit to single walled carbon nanotubes . NMR investigation gives deeper physical insight into the impact of different structures . In this work NMR parameters were calculated at the Ethyl isovalerate, Propylisovalerate, Isobutyl isovalerate and 3-methyl butyl acetate extracted of Jack fruit with different functional groups in their active sites so, the anticancer properties of this compound have been clarified.

  5. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD) analogues chemosensitize multidrug-resistant cancer cells to clinical anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junhua; Wang, Xu; Liu, Peng; Deng, Rongxin; Lei, Min; Chen, Wantao; Hu, Lihong

    2013-07-15

    Novel 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD) analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for the chemosensitizing activity against a multidrug resistant (MDR) cell line (KBvcr) overexpressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that aromatic substituted aliphatic amine at the 24-positions (groups V) effectively and significantly sensitized P-gp overexpressing multidrug resistant (MDR) cells to anticancer drugs, such as docetaxel (DOC), vincristine (VCR), and adriamycin (ADM). PPD derivatives 12 and 18 showed 1.3-2.6 times more effective reversal ability than verapamil (VER) for DOC and VCR. Importantly, no cytotoxicity was observed by the active PPD analogues (5μM) against both non-MDR and MDR cells, suggesting that PPD analogues serve as novel lead compounds toward a potent and safe resistance modulator. Moreover, a preliminary mechanism study demonstrated that the chemosensitizing activity of PPD analogues results from inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpressed in MDR cancer cells. PMID:23683834

  6. Radiation effect studies on anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin for radiation sterilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, L. E-mail: lalitv@magnum.barc.ernet.in; Dodke, P.B

    2004-12-01

    Two anticancer drugs, cyclophosphamide (CPH) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOXO), in powder form were exposed to a range of doses of {sup 60}Co gamma and electron beam radiation to study the effects of ionizing radiation. Pharmacopoeia tests, discolouration, degradation products, effect of irradiation temperature and dose rate were investigated. CPH undergoes less than 2% degradation at 30 kGy. Chromatographic studies revealed formation of several trace level degradation products, discolouration and free radicals in the irradiated CPH. N,N-bis (2-chloroethyl) group in the molecule is particularly sensitive to radiation degradation. Irradiation to 5 kGy at low temperature (77 K) did not result in significant changes. DOXO was observed to be quite radiation resistant and did not undergo significant changes in its physico-chemical properties and degradation product profile. It can be radiation sterilized at normal sterilization dose of 25 kGy.

  7. Codelivery of anticancer drugs and siRNA by mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi-Bojd, Mohammad Yahya; Ansari, Legha; Malaekeh-Nikouei, Bizhan

    2016-09-01

    The most common method for cancer treatment is chemotherapy. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is one of the major obstacles in chemotherapeutic treatment of many human cancers. One strategy to overcome this challenge is the delivery of anticancer drugs and siRNA simultaneously using nanoparticles. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles are one of the most popular nanoparticles for cargo delivery because of their intrinsic porosity. This paper highlights recent advances in codelivery of chemotherapeutic and siRNA with mesoporous silica nanoparticles for cancer therapy. In addition, synthesis and functionalization approaches of these nanoparticles are summarized. This review presents insight into the utilization of nanoparticles and combination therapy to achieve more promising results in chemotherapy. PMID:27582236

  8. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  9. Hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles enhance target drug delivery and anticancer effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Su

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT has been shown to have activity against a broad spectrum of cancers. In order to enhance its tissue-specific delivery and anticancer activity, we prepared HCPT-loaded nanoparticles made from poly(ethylene glycol-poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PEG-PBLG, and then studied their release characteristics, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and anticancer effects. PEG-PBLG nanoparticles incorporating HCPT were prepared by a dialysis method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to observe the shape and diameter of the nanoparticles. The HCPT release characteristics in vitro were evaluated by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC detection method for determining HCPT in rabbit plasma was established. The pharmacokinetic parameters of HCPT/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles were compared with those of HCPT. Results The HCPT-loaded nanoparticles had a core-shell spherical structure, with a core diameter of 200 nm and a shell thickness of 30 nm. Drug-loading capacity and drug encapsulation were 7.5 and 56.8%, respectively. The HCPT release profile was biphasic, with an initial abrupt release, followed by sustained release. The terminal elimination half-lives (t 1/2 β of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 4.5 and 10.1 h, respectively. Peak concentrations (Cmax of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 2627.8 and 1513.5 μg/L, respectively. The apparent volumes of distribution of the HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 7.3 and 20.0 L, respectively. Compared with a blank control group, Lovo cell xenografts or Tca8113 cell xenografts in HCPT or HCPT-loaded nanoparticle treated groups grew more slowly and the tumor doubling times were increased. The tumor inhibition effect in the HCPT-loaded nanosphere-treated group was significantly higher than that of the HCPT-treated group (p 0.05. Conclusion Compared to the HCPT- and control-treated groups, the HCPT-loaded nanoparticle

  10. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)-diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper.

  11. Bio-modified carbon nanoparticles loaded with methotrexate Possible carrier for anticancer drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthukumar, Thangavelu [Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu (India); Prabhavathi, Sundaram [Department of Biotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai 603 203 (India); Chamundeeswari, Munusamy [St. Joseph' s College of Engineering, Sholinganallur, Chennai 600119 (India); Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara, E-mail: sastrytp@hotmail.com [Bio-Products Laboratory, Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-03-01

    The modification of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) using biological molecules is important in the field of chemical biology, as the CNPs have the potential to deliver the drugs directly to the targeted cells and tissues. We have modified the CNPs by coating bovine serum albumin (BSA) on their surfaces and loaded with methotrexate (Mtx). Infrared spectra have revealed the coating of BSA and Mtx on CNP (CBM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) pictures have exhibited the spherical nature of the composite and coating of the proteins on CNPs. The prepared CBM biocomposite has exhibited a sustained release of drug. MTT assay using A549 lung cancer cell lines has revealed 83% cell death at 150 μg/ml concentration of CBM. These results indicate that CNPs based biocomposites may be tried as therapeutic agents in treatment of cancer like diseases. - Highlights: • It's a cost effective method with maximum anticancer activity. • Maximum drug loading (methotrexate) and release have been achieved. • The prepared CBM was found to be biocompatible and hemocompatible. • About 83% of A549 lung cancer cell line apoptosis was observed with CBM.

  12. Caleosin-based nanoscale oil bodies for targeted delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale artificial oil bodies (NOBs) could be assembled from plant oil, phospholipids (PLs), and oleosin (Ole) as previously reported. NOBs have a lipid-based structure that contains a central oil space enclosed by a monolayer of Ole-bound PLs. As an oil structural protein, Ole functions to maintain the integrity of NOBs. Like Ole, caleosin (Cal) is a plant oil-associated protein. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of NOBs assembled by Cal for targeted delivery of drugs. Cal was first fused with anti-HER2/neu affibody (ZH2), and the resulting fusion gene (Cal–ZH2) was then expressed in Escherichia coli. Consequently, NOBs assembled with the fusion protein were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-positive tumor cells. The internalization efficiency could reach as high as 90%. Furthermore, a hydrophobic anticancer drug, Camptothecin (CPT), was encapsulated into Cal-based NOBs. These CPT-loaded NOBs had a size around 200 nm and were resistant to hemolysis. Release of CPT from NOBs at the non-permissive condition followed a sustained and prolonged profile. After administration of the CPT formulation, Cal–ZH2-displayed NOBs exhibited a strong antitumor activity toward HER2/neu-positive cells both in vitro and in vivo. The result indicates the potential of Cal-based NOBs for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

  13. Bio-modified carbon nanoparticles loaded with methotrexate Possible carrier for anticancer drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modification of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) using biological molecules is important in the field of chemical biology, as the CNPs have the potential to deliver the drugs directly to the targeted cells and tissues. We have modified the CNPs by coating bovine serum albumin (BSA) on their surfaces and loaded with methotrexate (Mtx). Infrared spectra have revealed the coating of BSA and Mtx on CNP (CBM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) pictures have exhibited the spherical nature of the composite and coating of the proteins on CNPs. The prepared CBM biocomposite has exhibited a sustained release of drug. MTT assay using A549 lung cancer cell lines has revealed 83% cell death at 150 μg/ml concentration of CBM. These results indicate that CNPs based biocomposites may be tried as therapeutic agents in treatment of cancer like diseases. - Highlights: • It's a cost effective method with maximum anticancer activity. • Maximum drug loading (methotrexate) and release have been achieved. • The prepared CBM was found to be biocompatible and hemocompatible. • About 83% of A549 lung cancer cell line apoptosis was observed with CBM

  14. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper. PMID:26823679

  15. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)-diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper. PMID:26823679

  16. Nanoparticles Containing High Loads of Paclitaxel-Silicate Prodrugs: Formulation, Drug Release, and Anticancer Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Michel, Andrew R; Lee, Han Seung; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Wohl, Adam; Hoye, Thomas R; McCormick, Alon V; Panyam, Jayanth; Macosko, Christopher W

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated particle size, interior structure, drug release kinetics, and anticancer efficacy of PEG-b-PLGA-based nanoparticles loaded with a series of paclitaxel (PTX)-silicate prodrugs [PTX-Si(OR)3]. Silicate derivatization enabled us to adjust the hydrophobicity and hydrolytic lability of the prodrugs by the choice of the alkyl group (R) in the silicate derivatives. The greater hydrophobicity of these prodrugs allows for the preparation of nanoparticles that are stable in aqueous dispersion even when loaded with up to ca. 75 wt % of the prodrug. The hydrolytic lability of silicates allows for facile conversion of prodrugs back to the parent drug, PTX. A suite of eight PTX-silicate prodrugs was investigated; nanoparticles were made by flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) using a confined impingement jet mixer with a dilution step (CIJ-D). The resulting nanoparticles were 80-150 nm in size with a loading level of 47-74 wt % (wt %) of a PTX-silicate, which corresponds to 36-59 effective wt % of free PTX. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy images show that particles are typically spherical with a core-shell structure. Prodrug/drug release profiles were measured. Release tended to be slower for prodrugs having greater hydrophobicity and slower hydrolysis rate. Nanoparticles loaded with PTX-silicate prodrugs that hydrolyze most rapidly showed in vitro cytotoxicity similar to that of the parent PTX. Nanoparticles loaded with more labile silicates also tended to show greater in vivo efficacy.

  17. A Comprehensive Review on Cyclodextrin-Based Carriers for Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxic Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Most of the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents have poor aqueous solubility. These molecules are associated with poor physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which makes the formulation difficult. An important approach in this regard is the use of combination of cyclodextrin and nanotechnology in delivery system. This paper provides an overview of limitations associated with anticancer drugs, their complexation with cyclodextrins, loading/encapsulating the complexed drugs into carriers, and various approaches used for the delivery. The present review article aims to assess the utility of cyclodextrin-based carriers like liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, millirods, and siRNA for delivery of antineoplastic agents. These systems based on cyclodextrin complexation and nanotechnology will camouflage the undesirable properties of drug and lead to synergistic or additive effect. Cyclodextrin-based nanotechnology seems to provide better therapeutic effect and sustain long life of healthy and recovered cells. Still, considerable study on delivery system and administration routes of cyclodextrin-based carriers is necessary with respect to their pharmacokinetics and toxicology to substantiate their safety and efficiency. In future, it would be possible to resolve the conventional and current issues associated with the development and commercialization of antineoplastic agents. PMID:26582104

  18. A Comprehensive Review on Cyclodextrin-Based Carriers for Delivery of Chemotherapeutic Cytotoxic Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina Gidwani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents have poor aqueous solubility. These molecules are associated with poor physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, which makes the formulation difficult. An important approach in this regard is the use of combination of cyclodextrin and nanotechnology in delivery system. This paper provides an overview of limitations associated with anticancer drugs, their complexation with cyclodextrins, loading/encapsulating the complexed drugs into carriers, and various approaches used for the delivery. The present review article aims to assess the utility of cyclodextrin-based carriers like liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, millirods, and siRNA for delivery of antineoplastic agents. These systems based on cyclodextrin complexation and nanotechnology will camouflage the undesirable properties of drug and lead to synergistic or additive effect. Cyclodextrin-based nanotechnology seems to provide better therapeutic effect and sustain long life of healthy and recovered cells. Still, considerable study on delivery system and administration routes of cyclodextrin-based carriers is necessary with respect to their pharmacokinetics and toxicology to substantiate their safety and efficiency. In future, it would be possible to resolve the conventional and current issues associated with the development and commercialization of antineoplastic agents.

  19. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-graphene oxide conjugates: Carriers for anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jingting; Meng, Na; Fan, Yunting; Su, Yutian; Zhang, Ming; Xiao, Yinghong; Zhou, Ninglin

    2016-04-01

    A novel drug carrier based on hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed to incorporate anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX). The formulated nanomedicines were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results showed that PTX can be incorporated into GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres successfully, with an average diameter of about 100 nm. The solubility and stability of PTX-loaded GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres in aqueous media were greatly enhanced compared with the untreated PTX. The results of hemolysis test demonstrated that the drug-loaded nanospheres were qualified with good blood compatibility for intravenous use. In vitro anti-tumor activity was measured and results demonstrated that the incorporation of PTX into the newly developed GO-COO-HP-β-CD carrier could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity to the nanosystem against tumor cells than single application of PTX. GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres may represent a promising formulation platform for a broad range of therapeutic agent, especially those with poor solubility. PMID:26838897

  20. Nanoparticulated docetaxel exerts enhanced anticancer efficacy and overcomes existing limitations of traditional drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinhyang; Ko, Eunjung; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jae Hee; Ju, Eun Jin; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Park, Intae; Kim, Kab-Sig; Lee, Joo-Hwan; Son, Woo-Chan; Lee, Jung Shin; Jung, Joohee; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticulation of insoluble drugs improves dissolution rate, resulting in increased bioavailability that leads to increased stability, better efficacy, and reduced toxicity of drugs. Docetaxel (DTX), under the trade name Taxotere™, is one of the representative anticancer chemotherapeutic agents of this era. However, this highly lipophilic and insoluble drug has many adverse effects. Our novel and widely applicable nanoparticulation using fat and supercritical fluid (NUFS™) technology enabled successful nanoscale particulation of DTX (Nufs-DTX). Nufs-DTX showed enhanced dissolution rate and increased aqueous stability in water. After confirming the preserved mechanism of action of DTX, which targets microtubules, we showed that Nufs-DTX exhibited similar effects in proliferation and clonogenic assays using A549 cells. Interestingly, we observed that Nufs-DTX had a greater in vivo tumor growth delay effect on an A549 xenograft model than Taxotere™, which was in agreement with the improved drug accumulation in tumors according to the biodistribution result, and was caused by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Although both Nufs-DTX and Taxotere™ showed negative results for our administration dose in the hematologic toxicity test, Nufs-DTX showed much less toxicity than Taxotere™ in edema, paralysis, and paw-withdrawal latency on a hot plate analysis that are regarded as indicators of fluid retention, peripheral neuropathy, and thermal threshold, respectively, for toxicological tests. In summary, compared with Taxotere™, Nufs-DTX, which was generated by our new platform technology using lipid, supercritical fluid, and carbon dioxide (CO2), maintained its biochemical properties as a cytotoxic agent and had better tumor targeting ability, better in vivo therapeutic effect, and less toxicity, thereby overcoming the current hurdles of traditional drugs. PMID:26457052

  1. A smart magnetic nanoplatform for synergistic anticancer therapy: manoeuvring mussel-inspired functional magnetic nanoparticles for pH responsive anticancer drug delivery and hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikala, Arathyram Ramachandra Kurup; Ghavaminejad, Amin; Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Thomas, Reju George; Moon, Myeongju; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2015-10-01

    We report the versatile design of a smart nanoplatform for thermo-chemotherapy treatment of cancer. For the first time in the literature, our design takes advantage of the outstanding properties of mussel-inspired multiple catecholic groups - presenting a unique copolymer poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-dopamine methacrylamide) p(HEMA-co-DMA) to surface functionalize the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as well as to conjugate borate containing anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) in a pH-dependent manner for the synergistic anticancer treatment. The unique multiple anchoring groups can be used to substantially improve the affinity of the ligands to the surfaces of the nanoparticles to form ultrastable iron oxide nanoparticles with control over their hydrodynamic diameter and interfacial chemistry. Thus the BTZ-incorporated-bio-inspired-smart magnetic nanoplatform will act as a hyperthermic agent that delivers heat when an alternating magnetic field is applied while the BTZ-bound catechol moieties act as chemotherapeutic agents in a cancer environment by providing pH-dependent drug release for the synergistic thermo-chemotherapy application. The anticancer efficacy of these bio-inspired multifunctional smart magnetic nanoparticles was tested both in vitro and in vivo and found that these unique magnetic nanoplatforms can be established to endow for the next generation of nanomedicine for efficient and safe cancer therapy.We report the versatile design of a smart nanoplatform for thermo-chemotherapy treatment of cancer. For the first time in the literature, our design takes advantage of the outstanding properties of mussel-inspired multiple catecholic groups - presenting a unique copolymer poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-dopamine methacrylamide) p(HEMA-co-DMA) to surface functionalize the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as well as to conjugate borate containing anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) in a pH-dependent manner for the synergistic

  2. Effective combination treatment of lung cancer cells by single vehicular delivery of siRNA and different anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinming; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xue, Shanshan; Sun, Jinghua; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Ping; Ji, Liangnian; Mao, Zongwan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, lung cancer has become one of the fastest growing cancers in the world. Thus, the development of efficient combination therapy to treat lung cancer has attracted significant attention in the cancer therapy field. In this article, we developed a single vehicle drug delivery system, based on quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, to deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA; target Bcl-2) and different anticancer drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin) simultaneously for treating A549 lung cancer cells efficiently by combination therapy. The QD nanoparticles were conjugated with l-arginine (l-Arg) and different kinds of hydroxypropyl-cyclodextrins (HP-α-CDs, HP-β-CDs, and HP-γ-CDs) on the surface to form the delivery nanocarriers (QD nanocarriers). They were able to not only bind and transport the siRNA through electrostatic interactions with l-Arg residues but also accommodate various disparate anticancer drugs using different HP-CD modifications. Compared with free drug treatments, the use of QD nanocarriers to deliver Bcl-2 siRNA and different anticancer drugs simultaneously exerted a threefold to fourfold increase in cytotoxicity in A549 cells, which greatly improved the treatment efficacy through combined action. Furthermore, the QD nanocarriers could be used as a probe for real-time imaging of the drug delivery and release because of their strong fluorescence properties. These findings indicate that multifunctional QD nanocarriers hold great promise as a powerful tool for combination therapy for lung cancer.

  3. Curcumin and its promise as an anticancer drug: An analysis of its anticancer and antifungal effects in cancer and associated complications from invasive fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; He, Zheng-Min; Wang, Feng-Ling; Zhang, Zheng-Sheng; Liu, Xiu-zhen; Zhai, Dan-Dan; Chen, Wei-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFI) are important complications of cancer, and they have become a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Effective anti-infection therapy is necessary to inhibit significant deterioration from these infections. However, they are difficult to treat, and increasing antifungal drug resistance often leads to a relapse. Curcumin, a natural component that is isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa plants, has attracted great interest among many scientists studying solid cancers over the last half century. Interestingly, curcumin provides an ideal alternative to current therapies because of its relatively safe profile, even at high doses. To date, curcumin's potent antifungal activity against different strains of Candida, Cryptococcus, Aspergillus, Trichosporon and Paracoccidioides have been reported, indicating that curcumin anticancer drugs may also possess an antifungal role, helping cancer patients to resist IFI complications. The aim of this review is to discuss curcumin's dual pharmacological activities regarding its applications as a natural anticancer and antifungal agent. These dual pharmacological activities are expected to lead to clinical trials and to improve infection survival among cancer patients. PMID:26723514

  4. Biomaterial-based regional chemotherapy: Local anticancer drug delivery to enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side-effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Zak, Jerzy K

    2016-05-01

    Since the majority of anticancer pharmacological agents affect not only cancer tissue but also normal cells, chemotherapy is usually accompanied with severe side effects. Regional chemotherapy, as the alternative version of conventional treatment, leads to the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs and, simultaneously, reduction of toxic effects to healthy tissues. This paper provides an insight into different approaches of local delivery of chemotherapeutics, such as the injection of anticancer agents directly into tumor tissue, the use of injectable in situ forming drug carriers or injectable platforms in a form of implants. The wide range of biomaterials used as reservoirs of anticancer drugs is described, i.e. poly(ethylene glycol) and its copolymers, polyurethanes, poly(lactic acid) and its copolymers, poly(ɛ-caprolactone), polyanhydrides, chitosan, cellulose, cyclodextrins, silk, conducting polymers, modified titanium surfaces, calcium phosphate based biomaterials, silicone and silica implants, as well as carbon nanotubes and graphene. To emphasize the applicability of regional chemotherapy in cancer treatment, the commercially available products approved by the relevant health agencies are presented. PMID:26952500

  5. Enzyme-responsive doxorubicin release from dendrimer nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sang Joon Lee,1,* Young-Il Jeong,2,* Hyung-Kyu Park,3 Dae Hwan Kang,2,4 Jong-Suk Oh,3 Sam-Gyu Lee,5 Hyun Chul Lee31Department of Biomedical Sciences, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, 2Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, 3Department of Microbiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, 4Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Gyeongnam, 5Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Since cancer cells are normally over-expressed cathepsin B, we synthesized dendrimer-methoxy poly(ethylene glycol (MPEG-doxorubicin (DOX conjugates using a cathepsin B-cleavable peptide for anticancer drug targeting.Methods: Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly peptide was conjugated with the carboxylic acid end groups of a dendrimer, which was then conjugated with MPEG amine and doxorubicin by aid of carbodiimide chemistry (abbreviated as DendGDP. Dendrimer-MPEG-DOX conjugates without Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly peptide linkage was also synthesized for comparison (DendDP. Nanoparticles were then prepared using a dialysis procedure.Results: The synthesized DendGDP was confirmed with 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The DendDP and DendGDP nanoparticles had a small particle size of less than 200 nm and had a spherical morphology. DendGDP had cathepsin B-sensitive drug release properties while DendDP did not show cathepsin B sensitivity. Further, DendGDP had improved anticancer activity when compared with doxorubicin or DendDP in an in vivo CT26 tumor xenograft model, ie, the volume of the CT26 tumor xenograft was significantly inhibited when compared with xenografts treated with doxorubicin or DendDP nanoparticles. The DendGDP nanoparticles were found to be relatively concentrated in the tumor tissue and

  6. Possibility as an anti-cancer drug of astemizole: Evaluation of arrhythmogenicity by the chronic atrioventricular block canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Nakamura, Yuji; Cao, Xin; Wada, Takeshi; Ando, Kentaro; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Since astemizole in an oral dose of 50 mg/kg/day was recently reported to exert anti-cancer effect in mice, we evaluated its proarrhythmic potential using the atrioventricular block dogs in order to clarify its cardiac safety profile. An oral dose of 3 mg/kg prolonged the QT interval without affecting the QTc (n = 4), whereas that of 30 mg/kg increased the short-term variability of repolarization and induced premature ventricular contractions in each animal, resulting in the onset of torsade de pointes in 1 animal (n = 4). Thus, proarrhythmic dose of astemizole would be lower than anti-cancer one, limiting its re-profiling as an anti-cancer drug. PMID:27262902

  7. Anticancer Property of Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Drug Complexes: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, S; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-specific targeting of chemotherapeutic drugs can increase the therapeutic efficacy of most anticancer drugs. On surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs), we complexed a hypoxic cell-targeting agent, sanazole (SAN), and a cytotoxic isoquinoline alkaloid, berberine (BBN). The major objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cytotoxicity in murine tumor cells (DLA) induced by NP-BBN-SAN complexes. The cytotoxicity of these complexes was determined using the dye exclusion method. The induction of apoptosis and cellular DNA damage in these cells was analyzed using dual staining and comet assay, respectively. The expression of genes in the treated cells elucidated the molecular mechanism underlying cytotoxicity. Cells treated with NP-BBN-SAN complexes showed significant increases in cytotoxicity and apoptosis, as well as extensive damage to cellular DNA compared to control cells. The cells treated with NP-BBN-SAN complexes showed greater DNA damage compared with other treatments. The increase in the expression of a pro-apoptotic gene suggested that apoptosis was the mechanism underlying cytotoxicity induced by NP-BBN-SAN complexes. Complexing with SAN increased the cytotoxic potential of NP-BBN complexes. Further in vivo studies are needed to evaluate the potential application of this method in controlling tumors. PMID:26349601

  8. Lactobionic acid and carboxymethyl chitosan functionalized graphene oxide nanocomposites as targeted anticancer drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qixia; Lv, Yao; Williams, Gareth R; Tao, Lei; Yang, Huihui; Li, Heyu; Zhu, Limin

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we report a targeted drug delivery system built by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), fluorescein isothiocyanate and lactobionic acid (LA). Analogous systems without LA were prepared as controls. Doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the composites through adsorption. The release behavior from both the LA-functionalized and the LA-free material is markedly pH sensitive. The modified GOs have high biocompatibility with the liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721, but can induce cell death after 24h incubation if loaded with DOX. Tests with shorter (2h) incubation times were undertaken to investigate the selectivity of the GO composites: under these conditions, neither DOX-loaded system was found to be toxic to the non-cancerous L929 cell line, but the LA-containing composite showed the ability to selectively induce cell death in cancerous (SMMC-7721) cells while the LA-free analogue was inactive here also. These findings show that the modified GO materials are strong potential candidates for targeted anticancer drug delivery systems. PMID:27474628

  9. Role of pharmacists in optimizing the use of anticancer drugs in the clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma CSJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carolyn SJ Ma Department of Pharmacy Practice, Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Honolulu, HI, USA Abstract: Oncology pharmacists, also known as oncology pharmacy specialists (OPSs have specialized knowledge of anticancer medications and their role in cancer. As essential member of the interdisciplinary team, OPSs optimize the benefits of drug therapy, help to minimize toxicities and work with patients on supportive care issues. The OPSs expanded role as experts in drug therapy extends to seven major key elements of medication management that include: selection, procurement, storage, preparation/dispensing, prescribing/dosing/transcribing, administration and monitoring/evaluation/education. As front line caregivers in hospital, ambulatory care, long-term care facilities, and community specialty pharmacies, the OPS also helps patients in areas of supportive care including nausea and vomiting, hematologic support, nutrition and infection control. This role helps the patient in the recovery phase between treatment cycles and adherence to chemotherapy treatment schedules essential for optimal treatment and outcome. Keywords: oncology pharmacist, oncology pharmacy specialist, medication management, chemotherapy

  10. Self-Assembled Polymeric Micellar Nanoparticles as Nanocarriers for Poorly Soluble Anticancer Drug Ethaselen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhuoli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A series of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol-poly(lactide (mPEG-PLA diblock copolymers were synthesized, and mPEG-PLA micelle was fabricated and used as a nanocarrier for solubilization and delivery of a promising anticancer drug ethaselen. Ethaselen was efficiently encapsulated into the micelles by the dialysis method, and the solubility of ethaselen in water was remarkably increased up to 82 μg/mL before freeze-drying. The mean diameter of ethaselen-loaded micelles ranged from 51 to 98 nm with a narrow size distribution and depended on the length of PLA block. In vitro hemolysis study indicated that mPEG-PLA copolymers and ethaselen-loaded polymeric micelles had no hemolytic effect on the erythrocyte. The enhanced antitumor efficacy and reduced toxic effect of ethaselen-loaded polymeric micelle when compared with ethaselen-HP-β-CD inclusion were observed at the same dose in H22human liver cancer cell bearing mouse models. These suggested that mPEG-PLA polymeric micelle nanoparticles had great potential as nanocarriers for effective solubilization of poorly soluble ethaselen and further reducing side effects and toxicities of the drug.

  11. Polylactide-based Magnetic Spheres as Efficient Carriers for Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlanga, Nikiwe; Sinha Ray, Suprakas; Lemmer, Yolandy; Wesley-Smith, James

    2015-10-14

    To improve traditional cancer therapies, we synthesized polylactide (PLA) spheres coencapsulating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, Fe3O4) and an anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX). The synthesis process involves the preparation of Fe3O4 NPs by a coprecipitation method and then PLA/DOX/Fe3O4 spheres using the solvent evaporation (oil-in-water) technique. The Fe3O4 NPs were coated with oleic acid to improve their hydrophobicity and biocompatibility for medical applications. The structure, morphology and properties of the MNPs and PLA/DOX/Fe3O4 spheres were studied using various techniques, such as FTIR, SEM, TEM, TGA, VSM, UV-vis spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. The in vitro DOX release from the spheres was prolonged, sustained, and pH-dependent and fit a zero-order kinetics model and an anomalous mechanism. Interestingly, the spheres did not show a DOX burst effect, ensuring the minimal exposure of the healthy cells and an increased drug payload at the tumor site. The pronounced biocompatibility of the PLA/DOX/Fe3O4 spheres with HeLa cells was proven by a WST assay. In summary, the synthesized PLA/DOX/Fe3O4 spheres have the potential for magnetic targeting of tumor cells to transform conventional methods. PMID:26390359

  12. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of biodegradable embolic microspheres with tunable anticancer drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lihui; Rostamzadeh, Parinaz; Nooryshokry, Navid; Le, Hung C; Golzarian, Jafar

    2013-06-01

    Natural polymer-derived materials have attracted increasing interest in the biomedical field. Polysaccharides have obvious advantages over other polymers employed for biomedical applications due to their exceptional biocompatibility and biodegradability. None of the spherical embolic agents used clinically is biodegradable. In the current study, microspheres prepared from chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were investigated as a biodegradable embolic agent for arterial embolization applications. Aside from the enzymatic degradability of chitosan units, the cross-linking bonds in the matrix, Schiff bases, are susceptible to hydrolytic cleavage in aqueous conditions, which would overcome the possible shortage of enzymes inside the arteries. The size distribution, morphology, water retention capacity and degradability of the microspheres were found to be affected by the modification degree of CMC. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was successfully incorporated into these microspheres for local release and thus for killing cancerous cells. These microspheres demonstrated controllable degradation time, variable swelling and tunable drug release profiles. Co-culture with human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed non-cytotoxic nature of these microspheres compared to monolayer control (P>0.95). In addition, a preliminary study on the in vivo degradation of the microspheres (100-300μm) was performed in a rabbit renal embolization model, which demonstrated that the microspheres were compatible with microcatheters for delivery, capable of occluding the arteries, and biodegradable inside arteries. These microspheres with biodegradability would be promising for embolization therapies. PMID:23419554

  13. Overcoming EMT-associated resistance to anti-cancer drugs via Src/FAK pathway inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Catherine; Nicholes, Katrina; Bustos, Daisy; Lin, Eva; Song, Qinghua; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Settleman, Jeff

    2014-09-15

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and has been associated with cancer metastasis and drug resistance. For example, in EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), EMT has been associated with acquired resistance to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Moreover, "EGFR-addicted" cancer cell lines induced to undergo EMT become erlotinib-resistant in vitro. To identify potential therapeutic vulnerabilities specifically within these mesenchymal, erlotinib-resistant cells, we performed a small molecule screen of ~200 established anti-cancer agents using the EGFR mutant NSCLC HCC827 cell line and a corresponding mesenchymal derivative line. The mesenchymal cells were more resistant to most tested agents; however, a small number of agents showed selective growth inhibitory activity against the mesenchymal cells, with the most potent being the Abl/Src inhibitor, dasatinib. Analysis of the tyrosine phospho-proteome revealed several Src/FAK pathway kinases that were differentially phosphorylated in the mesenchymal cells, and RNAi depletion of the core Src/FAK pathway components in these mesenchymal cells caused apoptosis. These findings reveal a novel role for Src/FAK pathway kinases in drug resistance and identify dasatinib as a potential therapeutic for treatment of erlotinib resistance associated with EMT. PMID:25193862

  14. A microfluidic digital single-cell assay for the evaluation of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Tang, Xiaolong; Feng, Xiaojun; Liu, Chao; Chen, Peng; Chen, Dongjuan; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2015-02-01

    Digital single-cell assays hold high potentials for the analysis of cell apoptosis and the evaluation of chemotherapeutic reagents for cancer therapy. In this paper, a microfluidic hydrodynamic trapping system was developed for digital single-cell assays with the capability of monitoring cellular dynamics over time. The microfluidic chip was designed with arrays of bypass structures for trapping individual cells without the need for surface modification, external electric force, or robotic equipment. After optimization of the bypass structure by both numerical simulations and experiments, a single-cell trapping efficiency of ∼90 % was achieved. We demonstrated the method as a digital single-cell assay for the evaluation of five clinically established chemotherapeutic reagents. As a result, the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of these compounds could be conveniently determined. We further modeled the gradual decrease of active drugs over time which was often observed in vivo after an injection to investigate cell apoptosis against chemotherapeutic reagents. The developed method provided a valuable means for cell apoptotic analysis and evaluation of anticancer drugs. PMID:25433683

  15. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  16. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profiles of proton pump inhibitors: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Ralph-Steven; Blume, Henning

    2014-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used extensively for the treatment of gastric acid-related disorders, often over the long term, which raises the potential for clinically significant drug interactions in patients receiving concomitant medications. These drug-drug interactions have been previously reviewed. However, the current knowledge is likely to have advanced, so a thorough review of the literature published since 2006 was conducted. This identified new studies of drug interactions that are modulated by gastric pH. These studies showed the effect of a PPI-induced increase in intragastric pH on mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetics, which were characterised by a decrease in the maximum exposure and availability of mycophenolic acid, at least at early time points. Post-2006 data were also available outlining the altered pharmacokinetics of protease inhibitors with concomitant PPI exposure. New data for the more recently marketed dexlansoprazole suggest it has no impact on the pharmacokinetics of diazepam, phenytoin, theophylline and warfarin. The CYP2C19-mediated interaction that seems to exist between clopidogrel and omeprazole or esomeprazole has been shown to be clinically important in research published since the 2006 review; this effect is not seen as a class effect of PPIs. Finally, data suggest that coadministration of PPIs with methotrexate may affect methotrexate pharmacokinetics, although the mechanism of interaction is not well understood. As was shown in the previous review, individual PPIs differ in their propensities to interact with other drugs and the extent to which their interaction profiles have been defined. The interaction profiles of omeprazole and pantoprazole sodium (pantoprazole-Na) have been studied most extensively. Several studies have shown that omeprazole carries a considerable potential for drug interactions because of its high affinity for CYP2C19 and moderate affinity for CYP3A4. In contrast, pantoprazole-Na appears to have

  17. ABC transporters in anticancer drug transport – Less ons for Therapy, Drug Development and Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh P.K

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The structural aspects as well as the classification of the ABC superfamily (the largest group of transmembrane proteins has been highlighted. Over-expression of one or more of these transporters, barring exceptions, can correlate with an increased drug resistance (the multidrug resistance phenotype. Hence, studying these proteins, using experimental and in silico approaches, has tremendous benefit for patient selection as well as stratification into “good” and “poor” drug responders. Further, the need to obtain a better insight into “intrinsic” and “extrinsic” mechanisms of resistance were reiterated upon, based on the relative recruitment of the different signal transduction molecules. The concept of the reversal of the MDR phenotype, has been discussed and extended in the context of combination therapy. This form of therapy involves the use of a cocktail of synthetic and biopharmaceutical drugs as well as nanotechnology-based approaches, for improvements in their pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD profile. Such strategies have targeted the heterogeneous cancer and cancer stem cells, signaling molecules, marker enzymes as well as the microenvironment for improved efficacy and safety as well as to minimize the chance of relapse

  18. Flagging Drugs That Inhibit the Bile Salt Export Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Floriane; Pinto, Marta; Khunweeraphong, Narakorn; Wlcek, Katrin; Sohail, M Imran; Noeske, Tobias; Boyer, Scott; Chiba, Peter; Stieger, Bruno; Kuchler, Karl; Ecker, Gerhard F

    2016-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP) is an ABC-transporter expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Its physiological role is to expel bile salts into the canaliculi from where they drain into the bile duct. Inhibition of this transporter may lead to intrahepatic cholestasis. Predictive computational models of BSEP inhibition may allow for fast identification of potentially harmful compounds in large databases. This article presents a predictive in silico model based on physicochemical descriptors that is able to flag compounds as potential BSEP inhibitors. This model was built using a training set of 670 compounds with available BSEP inhibition potencies. It successfully predicted BSEP inhibition for two independent test sets and was in a further step used for a virtual screening experiment. After in vitro testing of selected candidates, a marketed drug, bromocriptin, was identified for the first time as BSEP inhibitor. This demonstrates the usefulness of the model to identify new BSEP inhibitors and therefore potential cholestasis perpetrators. PMID:26642869

  19. Gellan gum nanohydrogel containing anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs: a multi-drug delivery system for a combination therapy in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, Giorgia; Navarro, Gemma; Di Meo, Chiara; Matricardi, Pietro; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    During the last decades, it has become evident that inflammation plays a critical role in tumorigenesis: tumor microenvironment is largely orchestrated by inflammatory cells. In the present work, a novel gellan gum nanohydrogel system (NH) able to carry and deliver simultaneously anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs was developed. Prednisolone was chemically linked to the carboxylic groups of gellan gum to serve as a hydrophobic moiety promoting nanohydrogel formation, whereas paclitaxel was then physically entrapped in it. NH improved drug performances, acting as paclitaxel and prednisolone solubility enhancer and favoring the drug uptake in the cells. Moreover, NH allowed an increased cytotoxic effect in vitro on several types of cancer cells due to the synergistic effect of the combination of anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs. Thus, NH can be useful in a combination therapy that attacks both, malignant cells and tumor inflammatory components. PMID:24215783

  20. Mixed PEG-PE/Vitamin E Tumor-Targeted Immunomicelles as Carriers for Poorly Soluble Anti-Cancer Drugs: Improved Drug Solubilization and Enhanced In Vitro Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Rupa R.; Sawant, Rishikesh M.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2008-01-01

    Two poorly soluble, potent anticancer drugs, paclitaxel and camptothecin, were successfully solubilized by mixed micelles of polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) and vitamin E. Drug containing micelles were additionally modified with anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5), which can specifically bring micelles to tumor cells in vitro. The optimized micelles had an average size of about 13-to-22 nm and the immuno-modification of micelles did not significantly chang...

  1. Biocompatible Zr-based nanoscale MOFs coated with modified poly(ε-caprolactone) as anticancer drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippousi, Maria; Turner, Stuart; Leus, Karen; Siafaka, Panoraia I; Tseligka, Eirini D; Vandichel, Matthias; Nanaki, Stavroula G; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2016-07-25

    Nanoscale Zr-based metal organic frameworks (MOFs) UiO-66 and UiO-67 were studied as potential anticancer drug delivery vehicles. Two model drugs were used, hydrophobic paclitaxel and hydrophilic cisplatin, and were adsorbed onto/into the nano MOFs (NMOFs). The drug loaded MOFs were further encapsulated inside a modified poly(ε-caprolactone) with d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate polymeric matrix, in the form of microparticles, in order to prepare sustained release formulations and to reduce the drug toxicity. The drugs physical state and release rate was studied at 37°C using Simulated Body Fluid. It was found that the drug release depends on the interaction between the MOFs and the drugs while the controlled release rates can be attributed to the microencapsulated formulations. The in vitro antitumor activity was assessed using HSC-3 (human oral squamous carcinoma; head and neck) and U-87 MG (human glioblastoma grade IV; astrocytoma) cancer cells. Cytotoxicity studies for both cell lines showed that the polymer coated, drug loaded MOFs exhibited better anticancer activity compared to free paclitaxel and cisplatin solutions at different concentrations. PMID:27235556

  2. Comparison of Two Approaches for the Attachment of a Drug to Gold Nanoparticles and Their Anticancer Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yingjie; Feng, Qishuai; Chen, Yifan; Shen, Yajing; Su, Qihang; Zhang, Yinglei; Zhou, Xiang; Cheng, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Drug attachment is important in drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy. The elucidation of the release mechanism and biological behavior of a drug is essential for the design of delivery systems. Here, we used a hydrazone bond or an amide bond to attach an anticancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox), to gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and compared the effects of the chemical bond on the anticancer activities of the resulting Dox-GNPs. The drug release efficiency, cytotoxicity, subcellular distribution, and cell apoptosis of hydrazone-linked HDox-GNPs and amide-linked SDox-GNPs were evaluated in several cancer cells. HDox-GNPs exhibited greater potency for drug delivery via triggered release comediated by acidic pH and glutathione (GSH) than SDox-GNPs triggered by GSH alone. Dox released from HDox-GNPs was released in lysosomes and exerted its drug activity by entering the nuclei. Dox from SDox-GNPs was mainly localized in lysosomes, significantly reducing its efficacy against cancer cells. In addition, in vivo studies in tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that HDox-GNPs and SDox-GNPs both accumulate in tumor tissue. However, only HDox-GNPs enhanced inhibition of subcutaneous tumor growth. This study demonstrates that HDox-GNPs display significant advantages in drug release and antitumor efficacy. PMID:27518201

  3. Natural product Celastrol destabilizes tubulin heterodimer and facilitates mitotic cell death triggered by microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakryul Jo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule drugs are effective anti-cancer agents, primarily due to their ability to induce mitotic arrest and subsequent cell death. However, some cancer cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire a resistance. Lack of apoptosis following mitotic arrest is thought to contribute to drug resistance that limits the efficacy of the microtubule-targeting anti-cancer drugs. Genetic or pharmacological agents that selectively facilitate the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells present opportunities to strengthen the therapeutic efficacy. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a natural product Celastrol targets tubulin and facilitates mitotic cell death caused by microtubule drugs. First, in a small molecule screening effort, we identify Celastrol as an inhibitor of neutrophil chemotaxis. Subsequent time-lapse imaging analyses reveal that inhibition of microtubule-mediated cellular processes, including cell migration and mitotic chromosome alignment, is the earliest events affected by Celastrol. Disorganization, not depolymerization, of mitotic spindles appears responsible for mitotic defects. Celastrol directly affects the biochemical properties of tubulin heterodimer in vitro and reduces its protein level in vivo. At the cellular level, Celastrol induces a synergistic apoptosis when combined with conventional microtubule-targeting drugs and manifests an efficacy toward Taxol-resistant cancer cells. Finally, by time-lapse imaging and tracking of microtubule drug-treated cells, we show that Celastrol preferentially induces apoptosis of mitotic arrested cells in a caspase-dependent manner. This selective effect is not due to inhibition of general cell survival pathways or mitotic kinases that have been shown to enhance microtubule drug-induced cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We provide evidence for new cellular pathways that, when perturbed, selectively induce the apoptosis of mitotic arrested cancer cells, identifying a

  4. Electrochemical and spectrophotometric characterisation of protein kinase inhibitor and anticancer drug danusertib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Chemical structure of danusertib and DP voltammograms recorded in 5 μM danusertib in pH = 4.5: (black curve) first and (dotted curve) second scan. - Highlights: • Clarify the redox mechanism of danusertib. • pH dependent process investigated at a glassy carbon electrode. • Number of electrons and protons determined. • Analytical determination of danusertib by voltammetry and spectrophotometry. • Different electroactive centres identified and redox mechanism proposed. - Abstract: The electrochemical oxidation mechanism of the anti-cancer drug and kinases inhibitor danusertib was studied by cyclic, differential pulse, square wave voltammetry and a glassy carbon electrode. Danusertib undergoes oxidation in a cascade mechanism and depending on the pH of the supporting electrolyte several oxidation peaks were observed. The number of electrons and protons involved in each oxidation step as well as the pKa ∼ 10.0 were determined. The analytical determination of danusertib was carried out in pH = 7.0 by square wave voltammetry with LOD = 27.4 nM and UV–VIS spectrophotometry with LOD = 0.5 μM. Different electroactive centres of danusertib were identified through comparative studies with similar compounds such as imatinib and piperazine, and an oxidation mechanism of danusertib proposed

  5. Preliminary neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase bound to the anticancer drug methotrexate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Brad C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Meilleur, Flora [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Howell, Elizabeth E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dealwis, Chris G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of H atoms in noncovalent interactions and enzymatic reactions underlies virtually all aspects of biology at the molecular level, yet their 'visualization' is quite difficult. To better understand the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR), a neutron diffraction study is under way to directly determine the accurate positions of H atoms within its active site. Despite exhaustive investigation of the catalytic mechanism of DHFR, controversy persists over the exact pathway associated with proton donation in reduction of the substrate, dihydrofolate. As the initial step in a proof-of-principle experiment which will identify ligand and residue protonation states as well as precise solvent structures, a neutron diffraction data set has been collected on a 0.3 mm{sup 3} D{sub 2}O-soaked crystal of ecDHFR bound to the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) using the LADI instrument at ILL. The completeness in individual resolution shells dropped to below 50% between 3.11 and 3.48 {angstrom} and the I/{sigma}(I) in individual shells dropped to below 2 at around 2.46 {angstrom}. However, reflections with I/{sigma}(I) greater than 2 were observed beyond these limits (as far out as 2.2 {angstrom}). To our knowledge, these crystals possess one of the largest primitive unit cells (P6{sub 1}, a = b = 92, c = 73 {angstrom}) and one of the smallest crystal volumes so far tested successfully with neutrons.

  6. Approaches to reducing toxicity of parenteral anticancer drug formulations using cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, R; Dorr, R T; Blanchard, J

    2000-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is a clinically useful anticancer drug which can cause severe dermatological problems upon injection. It can cause delayed erythema and/or ulceration occurring either at or distant from the injection site for weeks or even months after administration. In an attempt to reduce the skin necrosis, complexation of MMC with cyclodextrins was studied in order to help increase patient compliance and acceptance. The complexation of MMC with 2-Hydroxypropylbetacyclodextrin (HPBCD) in the presence and absence of mannitol was studied and it was found that the mannitol present in the commercial formulation caused an increase in the binding of MMC to HPBCD. Isotonicity adjustment of hypotonic MMC formulations by the addition of normal saline did not change the degree of complexation with MMC. The complexed formulations were then tested to determine their antitumor efficacy using the B-16 melanoma cell model. No difference in antitumor activity between the complexed and uncomplexed MMC formulations was observed. Different MMC formulations were tested for their potential to produce skin irritation and/or toxicity using intradermal injections in a BALB/c mouse model in order to find the most suitable formulation. The skin ulceration studies indicated that there were no significant differences between the isotonic MMC solution and isotonic formulations of MMC complexed with HPBCD. PMID:10927914

  7. Mesua beccariana (Clusiaceae, A Source of Potential Anti-cancer Lead Compounds in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soek Sin Teh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on biologically active secondary metabolites from the stem bark of Mesua beccariana was carried out. A new cyclodione, mesuadione (1, along with several known constituents which are beccamarin (2, 2,5-dihydroxy-1,3,4-trimethoxy anthraquinone (3, 4-methoxy-1,3,5-trihydroxyanthraquinone (4, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 were obtained from this ongoing research. Structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D-NMR, GC-MS, IR and UV techniques. Preliminary tests of the in vitro cytotoxic activities of all the isolated metabolites against a panel of human cancer cell lines Raji (lymphoma, SNU-1 (gastric carcinoma, K562 (erythroleukemia cells, LS-174T (colorectal adenocarcinoma, HeLa (cervical cells, SK-MEL-28 (malignant melanoma cells, NCI-H23 (lung adenocarcinoma, IMR-32 (neuroblastoma and Hep-G2 (hepatocellular liver carcinoma were carried out using an MTT assay. Mesuadione (1, beccamarin (2, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 displayed strong inhibition of Raji cell proliferation, while the proliferation rate of SK-MEL-28 and HeLa were strongly inhibited by stigmasterol (6 and beccamarin (2, indicating these secondary metabolites could be anti-cancer lead compounds in drug discovery.

  8. Targeting anticancer drug delivery to pancreatic cancer cells using a fucose-bound nanoparticle approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy.

  9. Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Cancer Cell Targeting, Imaging and Anticancer Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Pavel; Laronze-Cochard, Marie; Sapi, Janos; Sidorov, Lev N.; Nabiev, Igor

    The diagnosis and treatment of cancer have been greatly improved with recent developments in bio-nanotechnology, including engineering of multifunctional probes. One of the promising nanoscale tools for cancer imaging is fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), whose small size and unique optical properties allow them to penetrate into cells and ensure highly sensitive optical diagnosis of cancer at the cellular level. Furthermore, novel multi-functional probes have been developed in which QDs are conjugated with one or several functional molecules, including targeting moieties and therapeutic agents. Here, the strategy for engineering novel nanocarriers for controlled nucleus-targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time imaging by single- or two-photon microscopy is described. A triple multifunctional nanoprobe is being developed that consists of a nitrogen-based heterocyclic derivative, an anticancer agent interacting with a DNA in living cells; a recognized molecule serving as a vector responsible for targeted delivery of the probe into cancer cells; and photoluminescent QDs providing the imaging capability of the probe. Subsequent optimization of the multifunctional nanoprobe will offer new possibilities for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Spectral and structural studies of the anti-cancer drug Flutamide by density functional theoretical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive screening of the more recent DFT theoretical approach to structural analysis is presented in this section of theoretical structural analysis. The chemical name of 2-methyl-N-[4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-propanamide is usually called as Flutamide (In the present study it is abbreviated as FLT) and is an important and efficacious drug in the treatment of anti-cancer resistant. The molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, electronic and NMR spectral interpretation of Flutamide have been studied with the aid of density functional theory method (DFT). The vibrational assignments of the normal modes were performed on the basis of the PED calculations using the VEDA 4 program. Comparison of computational results with X-ray diffraction results of Flutamide allowed the evaluation of structure predictions and confirmed B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) as accurate for structure determination. Application of scaling factors for IR and Raman frequency predictions showed good agreement with experimental values. This is supported the assignment of the major contributors of the vibration modes of the title compound. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions leading to its bioactivity, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The comparison of measured FTIR, FT-Raman, and UV-Visible data to calculated values allowed assignment of major spectral features of the title molecule. Besides, Frontier molecular orbital analyze was also investigated using theoretical calculations.

  11. 1-[2-(2-Methoxyphenylaminoethylamino]-3-(naphthalene-1- yloxypropan-2-ol May Be a Promising Anticancer Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Nishizaki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have originally synthesized the naftopidil analogue 1-[2-(2-methoxyphenylaminoethylamino]-3-(naphthalene-1-yloxypropan-2-ol (HUHS 1015 as a new anticancer drug. HUHS1015 induces cell death in a wide variety of human cancer cell lines originated from malignant pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, hepatoma, gastric cancer, colorectal cancer, bladder cancer, prostate cancer, and renal cancer. HUHS1015-induced cell death includes necrosis (necroptosis and apoptosis, and the underlying mechanism differs depending upon cancer cell types. HUHS1015 effectively suppresses tumor growth in mice inoculated with NCI-H2052, MKN45, or CW2 cells, with a potential similar to or higher than that of currently used anticancer drugs. Here we show how HUHS1015 might offer brilliant hope for cancer therapy.

  12. Au/TiO2 nanobelt heterostructures for the detection of cancer cells and anticancer drug activity by potential sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jingjie; Chen, Jing; Chen, Shaowei; Gao, Li; Xu, Ping; Li, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Cancer is a cell dysfunction disease. The detection of cancer cells is extremely important for early diagnosis and clinical treatments. At present, the pretreatment for the detection of cancer cells is costly, complicated and time-consuming. As different species of the analytes may give rise to specific voltammetric signals at distinctly different potentials, simple potential sensing has the specificity to detect different cellular species. By taking advantage of the different electrochemical characteristics of normal cells, cancer cells and biointeractions between anticancer drugs and cancer cells, we develop a specific, sensitive, direct, cost-effective and rapid method for the detection of cancer cells by electrochemical potential sensing based on Au/TiO2 nanobelt heterostructure electrodes that will be of significance in early cancer diagnosis, in vitro screening of anticancer drugs and molecular biology research.

  13. Calorimetric and spectroscopic studies on the interaction of anticancer drug mitoxantrone with human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keswani, Neelam [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Kishore, Nand, E-mail: nandk@chem.iitb.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > Human serum albumin exhibits two binding sites for mitoxantrone. > Discrepancies in calorimetric and spectroscopic results clarify binding sites. > Effect of ionic strength on binding permitted detailed analysis of interactions. > Electrostatic interactions predominate in binding. > One binding site on protein does not have tryptophan in immediate vicinity. - Abstract: Binding of the anticancer drug mitoxantrone with the protein human serum albumin (HSA) has been studied by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), in combination with fluorescence, UV-visible, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The thermodynamic parameters of binding have been evaluated from ITC and spectroscopic results and compared. The ITC results demonstrate that the binding of mitoxantrone with HSA occurs according to two sets of binding sites on the protein as opposed to the fluorescence and UV-visible spectroscopic results. Blockage of one binding site on HSA for mitoxantrone in the presence of NaCl indicates strong involvement of electrostatic interactions in the binding of the drug with the protein. An insignificant temperature dependence of the association constant observed in fluorescence measurements suggests a very low enthalpy of binding which is in close agreement with the results obtained from ITC measurements. Fluorescence life time measurements suggest formation of a static complex between mitoxantrone and HSA. The discrepancies in the ITC and fluorescence results suggest that one of the binding sites on the protein for mitoxantrone does not contain tryptophan residue in its immediate vicinity. The calorimetric and spectroscopic results have provided quantitative information on the binding of mitoxantrone with HSA and suggest that the binding is dominated by electrostatic interactions.

  14. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  15. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  16. Characterization of the binding of an anticancer drug, lapatinib to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Md Zahirul; Mukarram, Abdul Kadir; Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Alias, Zazali; Tayyab, Saad

    2016-07-01

    Interaction of a promising anticancer drug, lapatinib (LAP) with the major transport protein in human blood circulation, human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy as well as molecular docking analysis. LAP-HSA complex formation was evident from the involvement of static quenching mechanism, as revealed by the fluorescence quenching data analysis. The binding constant, Ka value in the range of 1.49-1.01×10(5)M(-1), obtained at three different temperatures was suggestive of the intermediate binding affinity between LAP and HSA. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data (∆H=-9.75kJmol(-1) and ∆S=+65.21Jmol(-1)K(-1)) suggested involvement of both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding in LAP-HSA interaction, which were in line with the molecular docking results. LAP binding to HSA led to the secondary and the tertiary structural alterations in the protein as evident from the far-UV and the near-UV CD spectral analysis, respectively. Microenvironmental perturbation around Trp and Tyr residues in HSA upon LAP binding was confirmed from the three-dimensional fluorescence spectral results. LAP binding to HSA improved the thermal stability of the protein. LAP was found to bind preferentially to the site III in subdomain IB on HSA, as probed by the competitive drug displacement results and supported by the molecular docking results. The effect of metal ions on the binding constant between LAP and HSA was also investigated and the results showed a decrease in the binding constant in the presence of these metal ions. PMID:27128364

  17. Challenges in pre-clinical testing of anti-cancer drugs in cell culture and in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    HogenEsch, Harm; Yu Nikitin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Experiments with cultures of human tumor cell lines, xenografts of human tumors into immunodeficient mice, and mouse models of human cancer are important tools in the development and testing of anti-cancer drugs. Tumors are complex structures composed of genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous cancer cells that interact in a reciprocal manner with the stromal microenvironment and the immune system. Modeling the complexity of human cancers in cell culture and in mouse models for preclinic...

  18. Preclinical Predictors of Anticancer Drug Efficacy: Critical Assessment with Emphasis on Whether Nanomolar Potency Should Be Required of Candidate Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, C. C.; Cheng, Ka-Wing; Rigas, Basil

    2012-01-01

    In the current paradigm of anticancer drug development, candidate compounds are evaluated by testing their in vitro potency against molecular targets relevant to carcinogenesis, their effect on cultured cancer cells, and their ability to inhibit cancer growth in animal models. We discuss the key assumptions inherent in these approaches. In recent years, great emphasis has been placed on selecting for development compounds with nanomolar in vitro potency, expecting that they will be efficaciou...

  19. Multidrug PLA-PEG filomicelles for concurrent delivery of anticancer drugs-The influence of drug-drug and drug-polymer interactions on drug loading and release properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelonek, Katarzyna; Li, Suming; Kaczmarczyk, Bożena; Marcinkowski, Andrzej; Orchel, Arkadiusz; Musiał-Kulik, Monika; Kasperczyk, Janusz

    2016-08-20

    This study aimed to analyze the influence of drug-drug and drug-polymer interactions on drug loading and release properties of multidrug micelles. Three hydrophobic drugs-paclitaxel (Ptx), 17-AAG and rapamycin (Rap) were incorporated in poly(l-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) filomicelles. Double loaded micelles containing Ptx and 17-AAG were used for the sake of comparison. (1)H NMR confirmed the effective incorporation of the various drugs in micelles, and HPLC allowed to determine the drug loading contents. FTIR was used to evaluate interactions between particular drugs and between drugs and copolymer. Ptx and 17-AAG present similar loading efficiencies in double loaded micelles probably due to interactions of drugs with each other and also with the copolymer. In contrast, unequal drug loading properties are observed for triple loaded micelles. Rapamycin shows very weak interactions with the copolymer, and displays the lowest loading efficiency. In vitro release of drugs from micelles was realized in pH 7.4 phosphate buffered saline at 37°C, and monitored by HPLC. Similar release profiles are observed for the three drugs: a strong burst followed by slower release. Nevertheless, Ptx release from micelles is significantly slower as compared to 17-AAG and Rap, probably due to interactions of NH and OH groups of Ptx with the carbonyl group of PLA. In vitro cytotoxicity of Ptx/17-AAG/Rap loaded micelles and a mixture of free drugs was determined. Drug loaded micelles exhibit advantageous effect of prolonged drug release and cytotoxic activity against Caco-2 cells, which makes them a promising solution for simultaneous drug delivery to solid tumors. Therefore, understanding of interactions within multidrug micelles should be a valuable approach for the development of concurrent delivery systems of anticancer drugs with tailored properties. PMID:27346726

  20. Drug Delivery: Enabling Technology for Drug Discovery and Development. iPRECIO® Micro Infusion Pump: Programmable, Refillable, and Implantable

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Tsung; Watts, Stephanie W.; Davis, Robert Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Successful drug delivery using implantable pumps may be found in over 12,500 published articles. Their versatility in delivering continuous infusion, intermittent or complex infusion protocols acutely or chronically has made them ubiquitous in drug discovery and basic research. The recent availability of iPRECIO®, a programmable, refillable, and implantable infusion pump has made it possible to carry out quantitative pharmacology (PKPD) in single animals. When combined with specialized cathet...

  1. First inter-laboratory comparison exercise for the determination of anticancer drugs in aqueous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Ester; Česen, Marjeta; Negreira, Noelia; de Alda, Miren Lopez; Ferrando-Climent, Laura; Blahova, Lucie; Nguyen, Tung Viet; Adahchour, Mohamed; Ruebel, Achim; Llewellyn, Neville; Ščančar, Janez; Novaković, Srdjan; Mislej, Vesna; Stražar, Marjeta; Barceló, Damià; Kosjek, Tina

    2016-08-01

    The results of an inter-laboratory comparison exercise to determine cytostatic anticancer drug residues in surface water, hospital wastewater and wastewater treatment plant effluent are reported. To obtain a critical number of participants, an invitation was sent out to potential laboratories identified to have the necessary knowledge and instrumentation. Nine laboratories worldwide confirmed their participation in the exercise. The compounds selected (based on the extent of use and laboratories capabilities) included cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine, etoposide, methotrexate and cisplatinum. Samples of spiked waste (hospital and wastewater treatment plant effluent) and surface water, and additional non-spiked hospital wastewater, were prepared by the organising laboratory (Jožef Stefan Institute) and sent out to each participant partner for analysis. All analytical methods included solid phase extraction (SPE) and the use of surrogate/internal standards for quantification. Chemical analysis was performed using either liquid or gas chromatography mass (MS) or tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry. Cisplatinum was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A required minimum contribution of five laboratories meant that only cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, methotrexate and etoposide could be included in the statistical evaluation. z-score and Q test revealed 3 and 4 outliers using classical and robust approach, respectively. The smallest absolute differences between the spiked values and the measured values were observed in the surface water matrix. The highest within-laboratory repeatability was observed for methotrexate in all three matrices (CV ≤ 12 %). Overall, inter-laboratory reproducibility was poor for all compounds and matrices (CV 27-143 %) with the only exception being methotrexate measured in the spiked hospital wastewater (CV = 8 %). Random and total errors were identified by means of Youden

  2. A human telomeric G-quadruplex-based electronic nanoswitch for the detection of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheryan, Zahra; Raoof, Jahan-Bakhsh; Ojani, Reza; Rezaei, Parizad

    2015-06-21

    An electronic nanoswitch is described based on the conformational change of the DNA sequence in the presence of stabilizing ligands. The new electrochemical biosensor was prepared by modifying a screen-printed graphite electrode (SPE) with functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles [(SiO2-N-propylpiperazine-N-(2-mercaptopropane-1-one) (SiO2@NPPNSH)] and Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). These nanoparticles are able to immobilize thiolated G-quadruplex DNA structures (SH-G4DNA). The SH groups on the SiO2@NPPNSH nanoparticles provide a good platform for stabilizing AuNPs on the surface of the electrode. This is due to the fact that AuNPs are able to bind to the organic SH groups on the SiO2@NPPNSH. The SH-G4DNA binds to the modified electrode by a AuNPs-S bond. The structure of SiO2@NPPNSH was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The morphology of the modified electrode was characterized by SEM. The interaction between G4DNA and the anticancer drug, Tamoxifen (Tam), was studied in Tris-HCl buffer and [Fe(CN)6](3-) using cyclic (CV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV). The G-quadruplex formation and the interaction mechanism were identified by circular dichroism (CD) measurements. The CV current was seen to decrease with increasing concentration of Tam due to interaction between G4DNA and Tam. This biosensor is a simple and useful tool for selecting G-quadruplex-binding ligands. PMID:25884046

  3. Teriflunomide, an immunomodulatory drug, exerts anticancer activity in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ou; Zhang, Weili; Zhi, Qiaoming; Xue, Xiaofeng; Liu, Hongchun; Shen, Daoming; Geng, Meiyu; Xie, Zuoquan; Jiang, Min

    2015-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined as a group of primary breast cancers lacking expression of estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) receptors, characterized by higher relapse rate and lower survival compared with other subtypes. Due to lack of identified targets and molecular heterogeneity, conventional chemotherapy is the only available option for treatment of TNBC, but non-discordant positive therapeutic efficacy could not be achieved. Here, we demonstrated that these TNBC cells were sensitive to teriflunomide, which was a well-known immunomodulatory drug for treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Potent anti-cancer effects in TNBC in vitro, including proliferation inhibition, cell cycle delay, cell apoptosis, and suppression of cell motility and invasiveness, could be achieved with this agent. Of note, we showed that multiple signals involved in TNBC proliferation, survival, migratory, and invasive potential were under regulation by teriflunomide. Among them, we identified down-regulation of growth factor receptors to abolish growth maintenance, suppression of c-Myc, and cyclin D1 to contribute to its anti-proliferative effect, modulation of components of cell cycle to induce S-phase arrest, degradation of Bcl-xL, and up-regulation of BAX via activation of MAPK pathway to induce apoptosis, and inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) expression, and inactivation of Src/FAK to reduce TNBC migration and invasion. The results identified teriflunomide may be of therapeutic benefit for the more aggressive and difficult-to-treat breast cancer subtype, indicating the use of teriflunomide for clinical trials for treatment of TNBC patients. PMID:25304315

  4. Mammaglobin 1 promotes breast cancer malignancy and confers sensitivity to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Nadia; Guerrette, Roxann; Beauregard, Annie-Pier; Jean, Stéphanie; Michaud, Pascale; Harquail, Jason; Benzina, Sami; Robichaud, Gilles A

    2016-07-01

    Mammaglobin 1 (MGB1), a member of the secretoglobin family, is expressed in mammary epithelial tissues and is overexpressed in most mammary carcinomas. Despite the extensive research correlating MGB1 expression profiles to breast cancer pathogenesis and disease outcome, the biological significance of MGB1 in cancer processes is still unclear. We have thus set out to conduct a functional evaluation of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes leading to disease progression. Using a series of breast cancer cell models with conditional MGB1 expression, we demonstrate that MGB1 promotes cancer cell malignant features. More specifically, loss of MGB1 expression resulted in a decrease of cell proliferation, soft agar spheroid formation, migration, and invasion capacities of breast cancer cells. Concomitantly, we also observed that MGB1 expression activates signaling pathways mediated by MAPK members (p38, JNK, and ERK), the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and NFκB. Moreover, MGB1 regulates epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) features and modulates Snail, Twist and ZEB1 expression levels. Interestingly, we also observed that expression of MGB1 confers breast cancer cell sensitivity to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis. Together, our results support a role for MGB1 in tumor malignancy in exchange for chemosensitivity. These findings provide one of the first descriptive overview of the molecular and cellular roles of MGB1 in breast cancer processes and may offer new insight to the development of therapeutic and prognostic strategies in breast cancer patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26207726

  5. Targeted anti-cancer prodrug based on carbon nanotube with photodynamic therapeutic effect and pH-triggered drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jianquan; Zeng, Fang, E-mail: mcfzeng@scut.edu.cn; Xu, Jiangsheng; Wu, Shuizhu, E-mail: shzhwu@scut.edu.cn [South China University of Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices (China)

    2013-09-15

    Herein, we describe a multifunctional anti-cancer prodrug system based on water-dispersible carbon nanotube (CNT); this prodrug system features active targeting, pH-triggered drug release, and photodynamic therapeutic properties. For this prodrug system (with the size of {approx}100-300 nm), an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), was incorporated onto CNT via a cleavable hydrazone bond; and a targeting ligand (folic acid) was also coupled onto CNT. This prodrug can preferably enter folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells and undergo intracellular release of the drug triggered by the reduced pH. The targeted CNT-based prodrug system can cause lower cell viability toward FR-positive cells compared to the non-targeted ones. Moreover, the CNT carrier exhibits photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) action; and the cell viability of FR-positive cancer cells can be further reduced upon light irradiation. The dual effects of pH-triggered drug release and PDT increase the therapeutic efficacy of the DOX-CNT prodrug. This study may offer some useful insights on designing and improving the applicability of CNT for other drug delivery systems.

  6. Cardiac glycosides induce resistance to tubulin-dependent anticancer drugs in androgen-independent human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Ming; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Huang, Yao-Ting; Chueh, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Hui-Po; Teng, Che-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Due to high prevalence and mortality and the lack of effective therapies, prostate cancer is one of the most crucial health problems in men. Drug resistance aggravates the situation, not only in human prostate cancer but also in other cancers. In this study, we report for the first time that cardiac glycosides (e.g. ouabain and digitoxin) induced resistance of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) in vitro to tubulin-binding anticancer drugs, such as paclitaxel, colchicine, vincristine and vinblastine. Cardiac glycosides exhibited amazing ability to reverse the G2/M arrest of the cell cycle and cell apoptosis induced by tubulin-binding agents. However, neither ionomycin (a Ca(2+) ionophore) nor veratridine (a Na(+) ionophore) mimicked the preventive action of cardiac glycosides, indicating that elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and Na(+) accumulation were not involved in the cardiac glycoside action. Furthermore, cardiac glycosides showed little influence on the effects induced by actinomycin D, anisomycin and doxorubicin, suggesting selectivity for microtubule-targeted anticancer drugs. Using in situ immunofluorescent detection of mitotic spindles, our data showed that cardiac glycosides diminished paclitaxel-induced accumulation of microtubule spindles; however, in a non-cell assay system, cardiac glycosides had little influence on colchicine- and paclitaxel-induced microtubule dynamics. Using an isotope-labeled assay method, we found that ouabain modestly but significantly inhibited the transport of [(14)C]paclitaxel from the cytosol into the nucleus. It is suggested that cardiac glycosides inhibit the G2/M arrest induced by tubulin-binding anticancer drugs via an indirect blockade on microtubule function. The decline in transport of these drugs into the nucleus may partly explain the action of cardiac glycosides. PMID:12218360

  7. Mixed PEG-PE/Vitamin E Tumor-Targeted Immunomicelles as Carriers for Poorly Soluble Anti-Cancer Drugs: Improved Drug Solubilization and Enhanced In Vitro Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rupa R.; Sawant, Rishikesh M.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2008-01-01

    Two poorly soluble, potent anticancer drugs, paclitaxel and camptothecin, were successfully solubilized by mixed micelles of polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) and vitamin E. Drug containing micelles were additionally modified with anti-nucleosome monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5), which can specifically bring micelles to tumor cells in vitro. The optimized micelles had an average size of about 13-to-22 nm and the immuno-modification of micelles did not significantly change it. The solubilization of both drugs by the mixed micelles was more efficient than by micelles made of PEG-PE alone. Solubilization of camptothecin in micelles prevented also the hydrolysis of active lactone form of the drug to inactive carboxylate form. Drug loaded mixed micelles and mAb 2C5-immunomicelles demonstrated significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity than free drug against various cancer cell lines. PMID:18583114

  8. Towards targeting anticancer drugs: ruthenium(ii)-arene complexes with biologically active naphthoquinone-derived ligand systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubanik, Mario; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Kim, Kunwoo; Anderson, Robert F; Klapproth, Erik; Jakupec, Michael A; Roller, Alexander; Söhnel, Tilo; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer active metal complexes with biologically active ligands have the potential to interact with more than one biological target, which could help to overcome acquired and/or intrinsic resistance of tumors to small molecule drugs. In this paper we present the preparation of 2-hydroxy-[1,4]-naphthoquinone-derived ligands and their coordination to a Ru(II)(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl moiety. The synthesis of oxime derivatives resulted in the surprising formation of nitroso-naphthalene complexes, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The compounds were shown to be stable in aqueous solution but reacted with glutathione and ascorbic acid rather than undergoing reduction. One-electron reduction with pulse radiolysis revealed different behavior for the naphthoquinone and nitroso-naphthalene complexes, which was also observed in in vitro anticancer assays. PMID:27214822

  9. Evaluation of efflux pump gene expression among drug susceptible and drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardan Yamchi, Jalil; Haeili, Mehri; Gizaw Feyisa, Seifu; Kazemian, Hossein; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Zahednamazi, Fatemeh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Absence of mutations within the genes encoding drug targets in some phenotypically drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggests possible involvement of alternative mechanisms such as over-expression of efflux pumps. We investigated the expression level of Rv1410c, Rv2459, Rv1218c and Rv1273c efflux pumps gene by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) in 31 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Susceptibility to first-line drugs was performed using the proportion method. Twenty one isolates were characterized with drug resistance (DR), and among them 12 showed a significantly elevated level of expression (>4 fold) for at least one of the studied genes encoding for efflux pumps. Point mutations in the katG (codons 315 or 335) and rpoB (codons 456 and 441) genes were found in 42.85% and 66.6% of drug resistant isolates, respectively. Only one isolate showed mutation at position -15 of the inhA promoter region. Among the 7 isolates (33.33%) which had no mutation in the studied regions of drug target genes, 5 isolates showed over-expression for efflux pumps. Our results demonstrated that over-expression of efflux pumps can contribute to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  10. Electromagnetically powered electrolytic pump and thermo-responsive valve for drug delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2015-04-01

    A novel drug delivery device is presented, implementing an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve. The device is remotely operated by an AC electromagnetic field (40.5∼58.5 mT, 450 kHz) that provides the power for the pump and the valve. It is suitable for long-term therapy applications, which use a solid drug in reservoir (SDR) approach and avoids unwanted drug diffusion. When the electromagnetic field is on, the electrolytic pump drives the drug towards the valve. The valve is made of a magnetic composite consisting of a smart hydrogel: Poly (N-Isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) and iron powder. The heat generated in the iron powder via magnetic losses causes the PNIPAm to shrink, allowing the drug to flow past it. When the electromagnetic field is off, the PNIPAm swells, sealing the outlet. In the meantime, the bubbles generated by electrolysis recombine into water, causing a pressure reduction in the pumping chamber. This draws fresh fluid from outside the pump into the drug reservoir before the valve is fully sealed. The recombination can be accelerated by a platinum (Pt) coated catalytic reformer, allowing more fluid to flow back to the drug reservoir and dissolve the drug. By repeatedly turning on and off the magnetic field, the drug solution can be delivered cyclically. © 2015 IEEE.

  11. Host-guest interaction induced supramolecular amphiphilic star architecture and uniform nanovesicle formation for anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Ling; Liu, Kerh Li; Wen, Yuting; Song, Xia; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Polymer synthesis, characterization, preparation of drug-loaded nanovesicles, intracellular drug release and cytotoxicity assays, TEM and DLS measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06744h

  12. Stable polymer micelle systems as anti-cancer drug delivery carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yi

    2005-07-01

    Several temporarily stable polymer micelle systems that might be used as ultrasonic-activated drug delivery carriers were synthesized and investigated. These polymeric micelle systems were PlurogelRTM, Tetronic RTM, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-lactate n). In previous work in our lab, Pruitt et al. developed a stabilized drug carrier named PlurogelRTM [5, 6]. Unfortunately, the rate of the successful PlurogelRTM synthesis was only about 30% by simply following Pruitt's process. In this work, this rate was improved to 60% by combining the process of adding 0.15 M NaCl and/or 10 mul/ml n-butanol and by preheating the solution before polymerization. TetronicsRTM were proved not to be good candidates to form temporarily stable polymeric micelle system by polymerizing interpenetrating networks inside their micelle cores. Tetronic micelle systems treated by this process still were not stable at concentrations below their critical micelle concentration (CMC). Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine micelle-like nanoparticles were developed and characterized. When the N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine (BAC) was from 0.2 wt% to 0.75 wt% of the mass of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), diameters of the nanoparticles at 40°C were less than 150 nm. The cores of the nanoparticles were hydrophobic enough to sequester 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH) and the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Nanoparticles with 0.5 wt% BAC stored at room temperature in 0.002 mg/ml solutions were stable for up to two weeks. Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-lactate n) micelle systems were synthesized and characterized. The degree of polymerization of lactate side group, n, was 3 or 5. The copolymers with N-isopropylacrylamide:2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-lactate3: poly(ethylene oxide) (NIPAAm:HEMA-lactate 3:PEO) ratios of

  13. Hollow superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoshells as a hydrophobic anticancer drug carrier: intracelluar pH-dependent drug release and enhanced cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Yuan, Jing; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Lee, Siu-Fung; Sham, Kathy W. Y.; Cheng, Christopher H. K.; Au, Doris W. T.; Teng, Gao-Jun; Ahuja, Anil T.; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.

    2012-08-01

    With curcumin and doxorubicin (DOX) base as model drugs, intracellular delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs by hollow structured superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoshells (hydrodynamic diameter: 191.9 +/- 2.6 nm) was studied in glioblastoma U-87 MG cells. SPIO nanoshell-based encapsulation provided a stable aqueous dispersion of the curcumin. After the SPIO nanoshells were internalized by U-87 MG cells, they localized at the acidic compartments of endosomes and lysosomes. In endosome/lysosome-mimicking buffers with a pH of 4.5-5.5, pH-dependent drug release was observed from curcumin or DOX loaded SPIO nanoshells (curcumin/SPIO or DOX/SPIO). Compared with the free drug, the intracellular curcumin content delivered via curcumin/SPIO was 30 fold higher. Increased intracellular drug content for DOX base delivered via DOX/SPIO was also confirmed, along with a fast intracellular DOX release that was attributed to its protonation in the acidic environment. DOX/SPIO enhanced caspase-3 activity by twofold compared with free DOX base. The concentration that induced 50% cytotoxic effect (CC50) was 0.05 +/- 0.03 μg ml-1 for DOX/SPIO, while it was 0.13 +/- 0.02 μg ml-1 for free DOX base. These results suggested SPIO nanoshells might be a promising intracellular carrier for hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  14. PLGA-based microparticles loaded with bacterial-synthesized prodigiosin for anticancer drug release: Effects of particle size on drug release kinetics and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayemi, J D; Danyuo, Y; Dozie-Nwachukwu, S; Odusanya, O S; Anuku, N; Malatesta, K; Yu, W; Uhrich, K E; Soboyejo, W O

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and physicochemical characterization of biodegradable poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based microparticles that are loaded with bacterial-synthesized prodigiosin drug obtained from Serratia marcescens subsp. Marcescens bacteria for controlled anticancer drug delivery. The micron-sized particles were loaded with anticancer drugs [prodigiosin (PG) and paclitaxel (PTX) control] using a single-emulsion solvent evaporation technique. The encapsulation was done in the presence of PLGA (as a polymer matrix) and poly-(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (as an emulsifier). The effects of processing conditions (on the particle size and morphology) are investigated along with the drug release kinetics and drug-loaded microparticle degradation kinetics. The localization and apoptosis induction by prodigiosin in breast cancer cells is also elucidated along with the reduction in cell viability due to prodigiosin release. The implication of this study is for the potential application of prodigiosin PLGA-loaded microparticles for controlled delivery of cancer drug and treatment to prevent the regrowth or locoregional recurrence, following surgical resection of triple negative breast tumor. PMID:27207038

  15. An amphiphilic graft copolymer-based nanoparticle platform for reduction-responsive anticancer and antimalarial drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Nussbaumer, Martin G.; Schwertz, Geoffrey; Schwab, Anatol; Witschel, Matthias C.; Schäfer, Anja; Diederich, François; Rottmann, Matthias; Palivan, Cornelia G.; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous solubility, high systemic toxicity, and metabolic instability. Smart nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems provide means of solving these problems at once. Herein, we present such a smart nanoparticle platform based on self-assembled, reduction-responsive amphiphilic graft copolymers, which were successfully synthesized through thiol-disulfide exchange reaction between thiolated hydrophilic block and pyridyl disulfide functionalized hydrophobic block. These amphiphilic graft copolymers self-assembled into nanoparticles with mean diameters of about 30-50 nm and readily incorporated hydrophobic guest molecules. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to study nanoparticle stability and triggered release of a model compound in detail. Long-term colloidal stability and model compound retention within the nanoparticles was found when analyzed in cell media at body temperature. In contrast, rapid, complete reduction-triggered disassembly and model compound release was achieved within a physiological reducing environment. The synthesized copolymers revealed no intrinsic cellular toxicity up to 1 mg mL-1. Drug-loaded reduction-sensitive nanoparticles delivered a hydrophobic model anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX) to cancer cells (HeLa cells) and an experimental, metabolically unstable antimalarial drug (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) inhibitor (+/-)-1) to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), with higher efficacy compared to similar, non-sensitive drug-loaded nanoparticles. These responsive copolymer-based nanoparticles represent a promising candidate as smart nanocarrier platform for various drugs to be applied to different diseases, due to the biocompatibility and biodegradability of the hydrophobic block, and the protein-repellent hydrophilic block.Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous

  16. Polymer grafted magnetic nanoparticles for delivery of anticancer drug at lower pH and elevated temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sujan; Parida, Sheetal; Maiti, Chiranjit; Banerjee, Rakesh; Mandal, Mahitosh; Dhara, Dibakar

    2016-04-01

    Efficient and controlled delivery of therapeutics to tumor cells is one of the important issues in cancer therapy. In the present work, a series of pH- and temperature-responsive polymer grafted iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by simple coupling of aminated iron oxide nanoparticle with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-ran-poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (P(NIPA-r-PEGMEA)-b-PAA). For this, three water soluble block polymers were prepared via reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization technique. At first, three different block copolymers were prepared by polymerizing mixture of NIPA and PEGMEA (with varying mole ratio) in presence of poly(tert-butyl acrylate) (PtBA) macro chain transfer agent. Subsequently, P(NIPA-r-PEGMEA)-b-PAA copolymers were synthesized by hydrolyzing tert-butyl acrylate groups of the P(NIPA-r-PEGMEA)-b-PtBA copolymers. The resulting polymers were then grafted to iron oxide nanoparticles, and these functionalized nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Doxorubicin (DOX), an anti-cancer drug, was loaded into the polymer coated nanoparticles and its release behavior was subsequently studied at different pH and temperatures. The drug release pattern revealed a sustained release of DOX preferentially at the desired lysosomal pH of cancer cells (pH 5.0) and slightly above the physiological temperature depending upon the composition of the copolymers. The potential anticancer activity of the polymer grafted DOX loaded nanoparticles were established by MTT assay and apoptosis study of cervical cancer ME 180cells in presence of the nanoparticles. Thus, these particles can be utilized for controlled delivery of anticancer

  17. ATP-Responsive and Near-Infrared-Emissive Nanocarriers for Anticancer Drug Delivery and Real-Time Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chenggen; Chen, Yulei; Zhu, Sha; Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Peijian; Tang, Xin; Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Lu, Yue; Xiao, Xuanzhong; Shen, Qun-Dong; Gu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive and imaging-guided drug delivery systems hold vast promise for enhancement of therapeutic efficacy. Here we report an adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-responsive and near-infrared (NIR)-emissive conjugated polymer-based nanocarrier for the controlled release of anticancer drugs and real-time imaging. We demonstrate that the conjugated polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with phenylboronic acid tags on surface as binding sites for ATP could be converted to the water-soluble conjugated polyelectrolytes in an ATP-rich environment, which promotes the disassembly of the drug carrier and subsequent release of the cargo. In vivo studies validate that this formulation exhibits promising capability for inhibition of tumor growth. We also evaluate the metabolism process by monitoring the fluorescence signal of the conjugated polymer through the in vivo NIR imaging. PMID:27217838

  18. ATP-Responsive and Near-Infrared-Emissive Nanocarriers for Anticancer Drug Delivery and Real-Time Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chenggen; Chen, Yulei; Zhu, Sha; Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Peijian; Tang, Xin; Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Lu, Yue; Xiao, Xuanzhong; Shen, Qun-Dong; Gu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive and imaging-guided drug delivery systems hold vast promise for enhancement of therapeutic efficacy. Here we report an adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-responsive and near-infrared (NIR)-emissive conjugated polymer-based nanocarrier for the controlled release of anticancer drugs and real-time imaging. We demonstrate that the conjugated polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with phenylboronic acid tags on surface as binding sites for ATP could be converted to the water-soluble conjugated polyelectrolytes in an ATP-rich environment, which promotes the disassembly of the drug carrier and subsequent release of the cargo. In vivo studies validate that this formulation exhibits promising capability for inhibition of tumor growth. We also evaluate the metabolism process by monitoring the fluorescence signal of the conjugated polymer through the in vivo NIR imaging. PMID:27217838

  19. Long-term cultivation of colorectal carcinoma cells with anti-cancer drugs induces drug resistance and telomere elongation: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochizuki Hidetaka

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of telomerase activation in the expression and/or maintenance of drug resistance is not clearly understood. Therefore, we investigated the relationships, among the telomerase activity, telomere length and the expression of multidrug resistance genes in colorectal cancer cell lines cultivated with anti-cancer drugs. Methods LoVo and DLD-1 cells were continuously grown in the presence of both CDDP and 5-FU for up to 100 days. Cell proliferation, telomerase activity, telomere length and the expression of multidrug resistance genes were serially monitored as the PDL increased. Results The expression of multidrug resistance genes tended to increase as the PDL increased. However, an abnormal aneuploid clone was not detected as far as the cells were monitored by a DNA histogram analysis. Tumor cells showing resistance to anti-cancer drugs revealed a higher cell proliferation rate. The telomere length gradually increased with a progressive PDL. The telomerase activity reached a maximum level at 15 PDL in LoVo cells and at 27 PDL in DLD-1 cells. An increase in the mRNA expression of the telomerase components, especially in hTERT and in hTR, was observed at the same PDLs. Conclusions These results suggest that a high telomerase activity and an elongation of telomeres both appear to help maintain and/or increase drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells. Cancer cells with long telomeres and a high proliferative activity may thus be able to better survive exposure to anti-cancer drugs. This is presumably due to an increased chromosome stability and a strong expression of both mdr-1 and MRP genes.

  20. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran

    2013-01-15

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017.

  1. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017

  2. Gold Nanorods Conjugated with Doxorubicin and cRGD for Combined Anticancer Drug Delivery and PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling Xiao, Hao Hong, Vyara Z. Matson, Alireza Javadi, Wenjin Xu, Yunan Yang, Yin Zhang, Jonathan W. Engle, Robert J. Nickles, Weibo Cai, Douglas A. Steeber, Shaoqin Gong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A multifunctional gold nanorod (GNR-based nanoplatform for targeted anticancer drug delivery and positron emission tomography (PET imaging of tumors was developed and characterized. An anti-cancer drug (i.e., doxorubicin (DOX was covalently conjugated onto PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol GNR nanocarriers via a hydrazone bond to achieve pH-sensitive controlled drug release. Tumor-targeting ligands (i.e., the cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys peptides, cRGD and 64Cu-chelators (i.e., 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N, N', N''-triacetic acid (NOTA were conjugated onto the distal ends of the PEG arms to achieve active tumor-targeting and PET imaging, respectively. Based on flow cytometry analysis, cRGD-conjugated nanocarriers (i.e., GNR-DOX-cRGD exhibited a higher cellular uptake and cytotoxicity than non-targeted ones (i.e., GNR-DOX in vitro. However, GNR-DOX-cRGD and GNR-DOX nanocarriers had similar in vivo biodistribution according to in vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies. Due to the unique optical properties of GNRs, this multifunctional GNR-based nanoplatform can potentially be optimized for combined cancer therapies (chemotherapy and photothermal therapy and multimodality imaging (PET, optical, X-ray computed tomography (CT, etc..

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel thalidomide analogues as potential anticancer drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Yi Hua Zhang; Shan Yu; Hui Ji; Yi Sheng Lai; Si Xun Peng

    2008-01-01

    In search of novel anticancer agents, a series of thalidomide analogs (6a-j) were designed and synthesized. Cytotoxicity of these compounds against human hepatoma cells (HepG2) was evaluated by MTT method. Compounds 6d, 6h and 6i showed significant cytotoxic activities comparable to or stronger than control 5-fluorouracil.

  4. Unblocking Blockbusters: Using Boolean Text-Mining to Optimise Clinical Trial Design and Timeline for Novel Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Epstein

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two problems now threaten the future of anticancer drug development: (i the information explosion has made research into new target-specific drugs more duplication-prone, and hence less cost-efficient; and (ii high-throughput genomic technologies have failed to deliver the anticipated early windfall of novel first-in-class drugs. Here it is argued that the resulting crisis of blockbuster drug development may be remedied in part by innovative exploitation of informatic power. Using scenarios relating to oncology, it is shown that rapid data-mining of the scientific literature can refine therapeutic hypotheses and thus reduce empirical reliance on preclinical model development and early-phase clinical trials. Moreover, as personalised medicine evolves, this approach may inform biomarker-guided phase III trial strategies for noncytotoxic (antimetastatic drugs that prolong patient survival without necessarily inducing tumor shrinkage. Though not replacing conventional gold standards, these findings suggest that this computational research approach could reduce costly ‘blue skies’ R&D investment and time to market for new biological drugs, thereby helping to reverse unsustainable drug price inflation.

  5. Unblocking Blockbusters: Using Boolean Text-Mining to Optimise Clinical Trial Design and Timeline for Novel Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Epstein

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Two problems now threaten the future of anticancer drug development: (i the information explosion has made research into new target-specific drugs more duplication-prone, and hence less cost-efficient; and (ii high-throughput genomic technologies have failed to deliver the anticipated early windfall of novel first-in-class drugs. Here it is argued that the resulting crisis of blockbuster drug development may be remedied in part by innovative exploitation of informatic power. Using scenarios relating to oncology, it is shown that rapid data-mining of the scientific literature can refine therapeutic hypotheses and thus reduce empirical reliance on preclinical model development and early-phase clinical trials. Moreover, as personalised medicine evolves, this approach may inform biomarker-guided phase III trial strategies for noncytotoxic (antimetastatic drugs that prolong patient survival without necessarily inducing tumor shrinkage. Though not replacing conventional gold standards, these findings suggest that this computational research approach could reduce costly ‘blue skies’ R&D investment and time to market for new biological drugs, thereby helping to reverse unsustainable drug price inflation.

  6. pH-responsive glycol chitosan-cross-linked carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles for controlled release of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwen; Qin, Fei; Tan, Haina; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Mei; Yao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CMβ-CD)-modified glycol chitosan (GCS) nanoparticles (GCS-CMβ-CD NPs) were synthesized, and their pH-sensitive drug-release properties were investigated. GCS-CMβ-CD NPs could encapsulate doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), and the encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity increased with the amount of CMβ-CD. Drug-release studies indicate that DOX released was greater in acidic medium (pH 5.0) than in weakly basic medium (pH 7.4). The mechanism underlying the pH-sensitive properties of the carrier was analyzed. Finally, the MCF-7 (human breast cancer) and SW480 cell lines (human colon cancer) were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the NPs. The drug-loaded carriers show good inhibition of the growth of cancer cells compared with free DOX, and the carriers have good biocompatibility. In addition, the drug-loaded NPs have sustained drug-release properties. All these properties of the newly synthesized GCS-CMβ-CD NPs suggest a promising potential as an effective anticancer drug-delivery system for controlled drug release. PMID:26677325

  7. pH-responsive glycol chitosan-cross-linked carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin nanoparticles for controlled release of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Yiwen Wang,* Fei Qin,* Haina Tan, Yan Zhang, Miao Jiang, Mei Lu, Xin Yao School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CMβ-CD-modified glycol chitosan (GCS nanoparticles (GCS-CMβ-CD NPs were synthesized, and their pH-sensitive drug-release properties were investigated. GCS-CMβ-CD NPs could encapsulate doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, and the encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity increased with the amount of CMβ-CD. Drug-release studies indicate that DOX released was greater in acidic medium (pH 5.0 than in weakly basic medium (pH 7.4. The mechanism underlying the pH-sensitive properties of the carrier was analyzed. Finally, the MCF-7 (human breast cancer and SW480 cell lines (human colon cancer were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of the NPs. The drug-loaded carriers show good inhibition of the growth of cancer cells compared with free DOX, and the carriers have good biocompatibility. In addition, the drug-loaded NPs have sustained drug-release properties. All these properties of the newly synthesized GCS-CMβ-CD NPs suggest a promising potential as an effective anticancer drug-delivery system for controlled drug release. Keywords: MCF-7, SW480, surface plasmon resonance, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, cell viability

  8. Polymer-drug compatibility: a guide to the development of delivery systems for the anticancer agent, ellipticine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jubo; Xiao, Yuehua; Allen, Christine

    2004-01-01

    To establish a method for predicting polymer-drug compatibility as a means to guide formulation development, we carried out physicochemical analyses of polymer-drug pairs and compared the difference in total and partial solubility parameters of polymer and drug. For these studies, we employed a range of biodegradable polymers and the anticancer agent Ellipticine as the model drug. The partial and total solubility parameters for the polymer and drug were calculated using the group contribution method. Drug-polymer pairs with different enthalpy of mixing values were analyzed by physicochemical techniques including X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared. Polymers identified to be compatible [i.e., polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly-beta-benzyl-L-aspartate (PBLA)] and incompatible [i.e., poly (d,l-lactide (PLA)], by the above mentioned methods, were used to formulate Ellipticine. Specifically, Ellipticine was loaded into PBLA, PCL, and PLA films using a solvent casting method to produce a local drug formulation; while, polyethylene oxide (PEO)-b-polycaprolactone (PCL) and PEO-b-poly (d,l-lactide) (PLA) copolymer micelles were prepared by both dialysis and dry down methods resulting in a formulation for systemic administration. The drug release profiles for all formulations and the drug loading efficiency for the micelle formulations were also measured. In this way, we compared formulation characteristics with predictions from physicochemical analyses and comparison of total and partial solubility parameters. Overall, a good correlation was obtained between drug formulation characteristics and findings from our polymer-drug compatibility studies. Further optimization of the PEO-b-PCL micelle formulation for Ellipticine was also performed. PMID:14648643

  9. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  10. In vitro bioassays for anticancer drug screening: effects of cell concentration and other assay parameters on growth inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, M M; Patterson, G M; Moore, R E

    2001-11-01

    In vitro growth inhibition assays were performed using human cancer cell lines at various concentrations with experimental anticancer drugs such as the cryptophycins and other cytotoxins. The effect of variations in assay parameters on the observed growth inhibition of these anticancer therapeutic agents was determined. The results demonstrated that the observed inhibitory activity of these compounds varied inversely with the cell concentrations used. The observed differences in activity between different cytotoxins were not necessarily proportionate. Thus, the relative activities of two toxins also varied with cell concentration. Furthermore, the sensitivity of these cell lines to the cytostatic purine analog, 6-mercaptopurine (used as a control), varied with cell concentration as well. The activity of this compound was dependent on the medium used for cell growth, yielding good activity in Eagle's minimum essential medium, but not in Ham's F-12 (Kaigin) medium. Moreover, growth inhibition by cryptophycin as well as 6-mercaptopurine was also dependent on the serum concentration in the medium. Finally, the sensitivity of the cancer cell lines to various organic solvents commonly used as drug vehicles for in vitro testing, such as ethanol, dimethylformamide, and dimethylsulfoxide, was likewise found to vary inversely with cell concentration. PMID:11578805

  11. Nano-mechanical Phenotype as a Promising Biomarker to Evaluate Cancer Development, Progression, and Anti-cancer Drug Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyeun

    2016-06-01

    Since various bio-mechanical assays have been introduced for studying mechanical properties of biological samples, much progress has been made in cancer biology. It has been noted that enhanced mechanical deformability can be used as a marker for cancer diagnosis. The relation between mechanical compliances and the metastatic potential of cancer cells has been suggested to be a promising prognostic marker. Although it is yet to be conclusive about its clinical application due to the complexity in the tissue integrity, the nano-mechanical compliance of human cell samples has been evaluated by several groups as a promising marker in diagnosing cancer development and anticipating its progression. In this review, we address the mechanical properties of diverse cancer cells obtained by atomic force microscopy-based indentation experiments and reiterate prognostic relations between the nano-mechanical compliance and cancer progression. We also review the nano-mechanical responses of cancer cells to the anti-cancer drug treatment in order to interrogate a possible use of nano-mechanical compliance as a means to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs.

  12. Human Tumor Xenograft Models for Preclinical Assessment of Anticancer Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Joohee

    2014-01-01

    Xenograft models of human cancer play an important role in the screening and evaluation of candidates for new anticancer agents. The models, which are derived from human tumor cell lines and are classified according to the transplant site, such as ectopic xenograft and orthotopic xenograft, are still utilized to evaluate therapeutic efficacy and toxicity. The metastasis model is modified for the evaluation and prediction of cancer progression. Recently, animal models are made from patient-der...

  13. Hyaluronic acid-decorated graphene oxide nanohybrids as nanocarriers for targeted and pH-responsive anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Erqun; Han, Weiye; Li, Cheng; Cheng, Dan; Li, Lingrui; Liu, Lichao; Zhu, Guizhi; Song, Yang; Tan, Weihong

    2014-08-13

    A novel nanohybrid of hyaluronic acid (HA)-decorated graphene oxide (GO) was fabricated as a targeted and pH-responsive drug delivery system for controlling the release of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for tumor therapy. For the preparation, DOX was first loaded onto GO nanocarriers via π-π stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and then it was decorated with HA to produce HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids via H-bonding interactions. In this strategy, HA served as both a targeting moiety and a hydrophilic group, making the as-prepared nanohybrids targeting, stable, and disperse. A high loading efficiency (42.9%) of DOX on the nanohybrids was also obtained. Cumulative DOX release from HA-GO-DOX was faster in pH 5.3 phosphate-buffered saline solution than that in pH 7.4, providing the basis for pH-response DOX release in the slightly acidic environment of tumor cells, while the much-slower DOX release from HA-GO-DOX than DOX showed the sustained drug-release capability of the nanohybrids. Fluorescent images of cellular uptake and cell viability analysis studies illustrated that these HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids significantly enhanced DOX accumulation in HA-targeted HepG2 cancer cells compared to HA-nontargeted RBMEC cells and subsequently induced selective cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. In vivo antitumor efficiency of HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids showed obviously enhanced tumor inhibition rate for H22 hepatic cancer cell-bearing mice compared with free DOX and the GO-DOX formulation. These studies suggest that the HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids have potential clinical applications for anticancer drug delivery.

  14. EFFECTS OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AS BACTERIAL EFFLUX PUMP INHIBITORS ON QUORUM SENSING REGULATED BEHAVIORS

    OpenAIRE

    Aynur Aybey; Alev Usta; Elif Demirkan

    2014-01-01

    Psychotropic drugs are known to have antimicrobial activity against several groups of microorganisms. The antidepressant agents such as duloxetine, paroxetine, hydroxyzine and venlafaxine are shown to act as efflux pump inhibitors in bacterial cells. In order to the investigation of the effects of psychotropic drugs were determined for clinically significant pathogens by using standart broth microdillusion method. The anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) activity of psychotropic drugs was tested aga...

  15. In situ synthesized BSA capped gold nanoparticles: Effective carrier of anticancer drug Methotrexate to MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawala, Priyanka [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Tirmale, Amruta [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS, Pune 411007 (India); Shiras, Anjali, E-mail: anjalishiras@nccs.res.in [National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS, Pune 411007 (India); Prasad, B.L.V., E-mail: pl.bhagavatula@ncl.res.in [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India)

    2014-01-01

    The proficiency of MTX loaded BSA capped gold nanoparticles (Au-BSA-MTX) in inhibiting the proliferation of breast cancer cells MCF-7 as compared to the free drug Methotrexate (MTX) is demonstrated based on MTT and Ki-67 proliferation assays. In addition, DNA ladder gel electrophoresis studies, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay confirmed the induction of apoptosis by MTX and Au-BSA-MTX in MCF-7 cells. Notably, Au-BSA-MTX was found to have higher cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells compared with an equivalent dose of free MTX. The enhanced activity is attributed to the preferential uptake of Au-BSA-MTX particles by MCF-7 cells due to the presence of BSA that acts as a source of nutrient and energy to the rapidly proliferating MCF-7 cells. Moreover, the targeting ability of the drug MTX to the over expressed folate receptors on MCF-7 cells also contributes to the enhanced uptake and activity. Taken together, these results unveil that Au-BSA-MTX could be more effective than free drug for cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles prepared using bovine serum albumin as a reducing and capping agent. • These gold nanoparticles are extremely stable under strong electrolyte and pH conditions. • The anticancer drug methotrexate has been loaded on the Au-BSA nanoparticles. • Due to BSA loading these are taken up by cancerous cells preferentially. • Better proficiency in inhibiting MCF-7 cells as compared to the free drug Methotrexate is demonstrated.

  16. In situ synthesized BSA capped gold nanoparticles: Effective carrier of anticancer drug Methotrexate to MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proficiency of MTX loaded BSA capped gold nanoparticles (Au-BSA-MTX) in inhibiting the proliferation of breast cancer cells MCF-7 as compared to the free drug Methotrexate (MTX) is demonstrated based on MTT and Ki-67 proliferation assays. In addition, DNA ladder gel electrophoresis studies, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay confirmed the induction of apoptosis by MTX and Au-BSA-MTX in MCF-7 cells. Notably, Au-BSA-MTX was found to have higher cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells compared with an equivalent dose of free MTX. The enhanced activity is attributed to the preferential uptake of Au-BSA-MTX particles by MCF-7 cells due to the presence of BSA that acts as a source of nutrient and energy to the rapidly proliferating MCF-7 cells. Moreover, the targeting ability of the drug MTX to the over expressed folate receptors on MCF-7 cells also contributes to the enhanced uptake and activity. Taken together, these results unveil that Au-BSA-MTX could be more effective than free drug for cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles prepared using bovine serum albumin as a reducing and capping agent. • These gold nanoparticles are extremely stable under strong electrolyte and pH conditions. • The anticancer drug methotrexate has been loaded on the Au-BSA nanoparticles. • Due to BSA loading these are taken up by cancerous cells preferentially. • Better proficiency in inhibiting MCF-7 cells as compared to the free drug Methotrexate is demonstrated

  17. 金属类抗癌药物的研究进展%Metal-based anticancer drug research progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 张国刚; 王林; 杨勤玲; 张毓萍

    2012-01-01

    在新型抗癌药物中,金属类抗癌药物已成为重要的一类.金属类抗癌药物有许多其它药物无法比拟的独特性质,近年,新的高效、低毒、具有抗癌活性的金属化合物不断被合成出来.其中有铂类抗癌药物,有机锡及其配合物、有机锗化合物、钯配合物、钌配合物、铜配位化合物、钛类化合物等,本文综述了这些化合物在抗癌领域的研究与应用新进展.%In recent years, metal - based anti - cancer drugs have become one important type among the new developing anti - cancer drugs. Metal - based anti - cancer drugs have many unique properties that are superior to those of other drugs. With the further understanding of the pharmacological action of the metal complexes, the new metal compounds with high efficiency, low toxicity, and anticancer activity were continuously synthesized. Those compounds included platinum anti - cancer drugs, organic tin complexes, organic germanium compound, palladium complexes, ruthenium complexes, copper coordination compounds, titanium compounds, etc. This article reviews research and application progress of these compounds in the anti ?cancer field.

  18. Spectral characterization of the binding and conformational changes of serum albumins upon interaction with an anticancer drug, anastrozole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punith, Reeta; Seetharamappa, J.

    2012-06-01

    The present study employed different optical spectroscopic techniques viz., fluorescence, FTIR, circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy to investigate the mechanism of interaction of an anticancer drug, anastrozole (AZ) with transport proteins viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA). The drug, AZ quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of protein and the analysis of results revealed the presence of dynamic quenching mechanism. The binding characteristics of drug-protein were computed. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°) were calculated to be +92.99 kJ/mol and +159.18 J/mol/K for AZ-BSA and, +99.43 kJ/mol and +159.19 J/mol/K for AZ-HSA, respectively. These results indicated that the hydrophobic forces stabilized the interaction between the drug and protein. CD, FTIR, absorption, synchronous and 3D fluorescence results indicated that the binding of AZ to protein induced structural perturbation in both serum albumins. The distance, r between the drug and protein was calculated based on the theory of Förster's resonance energy transfer and found to be 5.9 and 6.24 nm, respectively for AZ-BSA and AZ-HSA.

  19. Programmable Infusion Pumps in ICUs: An Analysis of Corresponding Adverse Drug Events

    OpenAIRE

    Nuckols, Teryl K; Bower, Anthony G.; Paddock, Susan M.; Hilborne, Lee H.; Wallace, Peggy; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Griffin, Anne; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Carlson, Beverly; Panzer, Robert J.; Brook, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) frequently experience adverse drug events involving intravenous medications (IV-ADEs), which are often preventable. Objectives To determine how frequently preventable IV-ADEs in ICUs match the safety features of a programmable infusion pump with safety software (“smart pump”) and to suggest potential improvements in smart-pump design. Design Using retrospective medical-record review, we examined preventable IV-ADEs in ICUs before and after 2 ...

  20. Metallomics for drug development: serum protein binding and analysis of an anticancer tris(8-quinolinolato)gallium(III) drug using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossipov, Konstantin; Foteeva, Lidia S; Seregina, Irina F; Perevalov, Sergei A; Timerbaev, Andrei R; Bolshov, Mikhail A

    2013-06-27

    The application of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) assay for quantifying in vitro binding of a gallium-based anticancer drug, tris(8-quinolinolato)gallium(III), to serum albumin and transferrin and in human serum is described. The distribution of the drug between the protein-rich and protein-free fractions was assessed via ICP-MS measurement of total gallium in ultrafiltrates. Comparative kinetic studies revealed that the drug exhibits a different reactivity toward individual proteins. While the maximum possible binding to albumin (~10%) occurs practically immediately, interaction with transferrin has a step-like character and the equilibrium state (with more than 50% binding) is reached for about 48 h. Drug transformation into the bound form in serum, also very fast, results in almost quantitative binding (~95%). The relative affinity of protein-drug binding was characterized in terms of the association constants ranging from 10(3) to 10(4)M(-1). In order to further promote clinical testing of the gallium drug, the ICP-MS method was applied for direct quantification of gallium in human serum spiked with the drug. The detection limit for gallium was found to be as low as 20 ng L(-1). The repeatability was better than 8% (as RSD) and the achieved recoveries were in the range 99-103%.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro cytotoxicity analysis of a novel cellulose based drug carrier for the controlled delivery of 5-fluorouracil, an anticancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anirudhan, Thayyath S.; Nima, Jayachandran; Divya, Peethambaran L.

    2015-11-01

    The present investigation concerns the development and evaluation of a novel drug delivery system, aminated-glycidylmethacrylate grafted cellulose-grafted polymethacrylic acid-succinyl cyclodextrin (Cell-g-(GMA/en)-PMA-SCD) for the controlled release of 5-Fluorouracil, an anticancer drug. The prepared drug carrier was characterized by FT-IR, XRD and SEM techniques. Binding kinetics and isotherm studies of 5-FU onto Cell-g-(GMA/en)-PMA-SCD were found to follow pseudo-second-order and Langmuir model respectively. Maximum binding capacity of drug carrier was found to be 149.09 mg g-1 at 37 °C. Swelling studies, in vitro release kinetics, drug loading efficiency and encapsulation efficiency of Cell-g-(GMA/en)-PMA-SCD were studied. The release kinetics was analyzed using Ritger-Peppas equation at pH 7.4. Cytotoxicity analysis on MCF-7 (human breast carcinoma) cells indicated that the drug carrier shows sustained and controlled release of drug to the target site. Hence, it is evident from this investigation that Cell-g-(GMA/en)-PMA-SCD could be a promising carrier for 5-FU.

  2. Anticancer chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Despite troubled beginnings, anticancer chemotherapy has made significant contribution to the control of cancer in man, particularly within the last two decades. Early conceptual observations awakened the scientific community to the potentials of cancer chemotherapy. There are now more than 50 agents that are active in causing regression of clinical cancer. Chemotherapy's major conceptual contributions are two-fold. First, there is now proof that patients with overt metastatic disease can be cured, and second, to provide a strategy for control of occult metastases. In man, chemotherapy has resulted in normal life expectancy for some patients who have several types of metastatic cancers, including choriocarcinoma, Burkitt's lymphomas, Wilm's tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkins disease, diffuse histiocytic lymphoma and others. Anticancer chemotherapy in Veterinary medicine has evolved from the use of single agents, which produce only limited remissions, to the concept of combination chemotherapy. Three basic principles underline the design of combination chemotherapy protocols; the fraction of tumor cell killed by one drug is independent of the fraction killed by another drug; drugs with different mechanisms of action should be chosen so that the antitumor effects will be additive; and since different classes of drugs have different toxicities the toxic effects will not be additive.

  3. Approaches to improve the oral bioavailability and effects of novel anticancer drugs berberine and betulinic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandraiah Godugu

    Full Text Available The poor bioavailability of Berberine (BBR and Betulinic acid (BA limits the development of these promising anticancer agents for clinical use. In the current study, BBR and BA in spray dried (SD mucoadhesive microparticle formulations were prepared.A patented dual channel spray gun technology established in our laboratory was used for both formulations. Gastrointestinal (GI permeability studies were carried out using Caco-2 cell monolayer grown in in-vitro system. The oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic profile of SD formulations were studied in Sprague Dawley rats. A549 orthotopic and H1650 metastatic NSCLC models were utilized for the anticancer evaluations.Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that BBR and BA SD formulations resulted in 3.46 and 3.90 fold respectively, significant increase in plasma Cmax concentrations. AUC levels were increased by 6.98 and 7.41 fold in BBR and BA SD formulations, respectively. Compared to untreated controls groups, 49.8 & 53.4% decrease in the tumor volumes was observed in SD formulation groups of BBR and BA, respectively. Molecular studies done on excised tumor (A549 tissue suggested that BBR in SD form resulted in a significant decrease in the survivin, Bcl-2, cyclin D1, MMP-9, HIF-1α, VEGF and CD31 expressions. Cleaved caspase 3, p53 and TUNEL expressions were increased in SD formulations. The RT-PCR analysis on H1650 tumor tissue suggested that p38, Phospho-JNK, Bax, BAD, cleaved caspase 3&8 mRNA expressions were significantly increased in BA SD formulations. Chronic administration of BBR and BA SD formulations did not show any toxicity.Due to significant increase in oral bioavailability and superior anticancer effects, our results suggest that spray drying is a superior alternative formulation approach for oral delivery of BBR and BA.

  4. Landscape of Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Synergies in Melanoma Identifies a Novel BRAF-VEGFR/PDGFR Combination Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A Friedman

    Full Text Available A newer generation of anti-cancer drugs targeting underlying somatic genetic driver events have resulted in high single-agent or single-pathway response rates in selected patients, but few patients achieve complete responses and a sizeable fraction of patients relapse within a year. Thus, there is a pressing need for identification of combinations of targeted agents which induce more complete responses and prevent disease progression. We describe the results of a combination screen of an unprecedented scale in mammalian cells performed using a collection of targeted, clinically tractable agents across a large panel of melanoma cell lines. We find that even the most synergistic drug pairs are effective only in a discrete number of cell lines, underlying a strong context dependency for synergy, with strong, widespread synergies often corresponding to non-specific or off-target drug effects such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 transporter inhibition. We identified drugs sensitizing cell lines that are BRAFV600E mutant but intrinsically resistant to BRAF inhibitor PLX4720, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/kinase insert domain receptor (VEGFR/KDR and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR family inhibitor cediranib. The combination of cediranib and PLX4720 induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in animal models. This synergistic interaction is likely due to engagement of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, demonstrating the potential of drug- rather than gene-specific combination discovery approaches. Patients with elevated biopsy KDR expression showed decreased progression free survival in trials of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase pathway inhibitors. Thus, high-throughput unbiased screening of targeted drug combinations, with appropriate library selection and mechanistic follow-up, can yield clinically-actionable drug combinations.

  5. Quantitation of anticancer drugs – Cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in urine and water sewage samples by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeravan Lekskulchai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cyclophosphamide (CP and ifosfamide (IF are effective anti-cancer drugs but their genotoxicity can harm everyone contacting them occupationally or environmentally. Therefore, a sensitive method for monitoring their amounts in biological and environmental samples is needed. This has aimed to develop a method for analyzing these drugs in urine and water sewage samples. Material and Methods: The drug spiked samples were extracted, derivatized, and analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and the analytical parameters were validated. Results: The method gave linear calibration curves at the concentrations of 0–190 nmol/l. It had the quantitation limit of 3.8 nmol/l and showed acceptable specificity, accuracy, recovery and precision. Conclusions: The developed method can be used reliably for monitoring CP and IF concentrations in urine and water sewage. The method will be applied for preventing health risk from occupational and environmental exposures to these drugs. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5:815–822

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the anti-cancer drug irinotecan in presence of human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, A; Sergo, V; Toffoli, G; Bonifacio, A

    2015-03-01

    The development of nanotechnological devices and their clinical application in medicine has become increasingly important, especially in the context of targeted and personalized therapy. This is particularly important in cancer therapy, where antitumor drugs are highly cytotoxic and often exert their therapeutic effect at concentrations close to systemic toxicity. In the last years a growing number of studies has started to report the use of plasmonic nanoprobes in the field of theranostics, broadening the application of vibrational spectroscopies like Raman scattering and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in biomedicine. The present work aims to identify and characterize the vibrational profiles of a widely used anticancer drug, irinotecan (CPT-11). With a rational approach, SERS experiments have been performed on this analyte employing both Au and Ag colloids, starting from simple aqueous solutions up to albumin mixtures. A major step forward for drug detection in albumin solutions has been taken with the adoption of a simple deproteinization strategy, and a two-in-one-step separation and identification by coupling thin layer chromatography, TLC, with SERS (TLC-SERS). The latter has revealed to be a valid system for protein separation and simultaneous analyte detection, showing a potential to become an innovative, sensitive and low cost method for antineoplastic drug profiling in patients' body fluids. PMID:25645751

  7. Anticancer drug sensitivity prediction in cell lines from baseline gene expression through recursive feature selection

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zuoli; Zhang, Naiqian; Li, Chun; Wang, Haiyun; Fang, Yun; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Background An enduring challenge in personalized medicine is to select right drug for individual patients. Testing drugs on patients in large clinical trials is one way to assess their efficacy and toxicity, but it is impractical to test hundreds of drugs currently under development. Therefore the preclinical prediction model is highly expected as it enables prediction of drug response to hundreds of cell lines in parallel. Methods Recently, two large-scale pharmacogenomic studies screened mu...

  8. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of labile intercalative ruthenium(ii) complexes for anticancer drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Chen, Yu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-08-16

    DNA binding and DNA transcription inhibition is regarded as a promising strategy for cancer chemotherapy. Herein, chloro terpyridyl Ru(ii) complexes, [Ru(tpy)(N^N)Cl](+) (Ru1, N^N = 2,2'-bipyridine; Ru2, N^N = 3-(pyrazin-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]acenaphthylene; Ru3, N^N = 3-(pyrazin-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]phenanthrene; Ru4, N^N = 3-(pyrazin-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]pyrene) were prepared as DNA intercalative and covalent binding anticancer agents. The chloro ligand hydrolysis slowly and the octanol and water partition coefficient of Ru2-Ru4 were between 0.6 and 1.2. MALDI-TOF mass, DNA gel electrophoresis confirmed covalent and intercalative DNA binding modes of Ru2-Ru4, while Ru1 can only bind DNA covalently. As a result, Ru2-Ru4 exhibited stronger DNA transcription inhibition activity, higher cell uptake efficiency and better anticancer activity than Ru1. Ru4 was the most toxic complex toward all cancer cells which inhibited DNA replication and transcription. AO/EB, Annexin V/PI, nuclear staining, JC-1 assays further confirmed that Ru2-Ru4 induced cancer cell death by an apoptosis mechanism. PMID:27294337

  9. Enhanced anticancer potency using an acid-responsive ZnO-incorporated liposomal drug-delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Nirmalya; Ahmad, Rafiq; Ko, Hyun Ah; Khang, Gilson; Hahn, Yoon-Bong

    2015-02-01

    The development of stimuli-responsive nanocarriers is becoming important in chemotherapy. Liposomes, with an appropriate triggering mechanism, can efficiently deliver their encapsulated cargo in a controlled manner. We explored the use of acid-sensitive zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZNPs) as modulators of the responsive properties of liposomes. Nanocomplexes formed by the incorporation of ZNPs in liposomes (ZNP-liposomes) were designed to demonstrate the pH-responsive release of a drug (daunorubicin) without premature drug leakage and with the maintenance of the relevant therapeutic concentrations. The nanocomplexes were spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution and showed a high drug-encapsulating efficiency. Under acidic conditions, the ZNP-liposome nanocomplexes released the loaded drug more rapidly than bare liposomes. Using flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and an MTT assay, we demonstrated that these nanocomplexes were readily taken up by cancer cells, resulting in significantly enhanced cytotoxicity. On exposure to the acidic conditions inside cancer cells, the ZNPs rapidly decomposed, releasing the entrapped drug molecules from the ZNP-liposome nanocomplexes, producing widespread cytotoxic effects. The incorporated ZNPs were multimodal in that they not only resulted in a pH-responsive drug-delivery system, but they also had a synergistic chemo-photodynamic anticancer action. This design provides a significant step towards the development of multimodal liposome structures.The development of stimuli-responsive nanocarriers is becoming important in chemotherapy. Liposomes, with an appropriate triggering mechanism, can efficiently deliver their encapsulated cargo in a controlled manner. We explored the use of acid-sensitive zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZNPs) as modulators of the responsive properties of liposomes. Nanocomplexes formed by the incorporation of ZNPs in liposomes (ZNP-liposomes) were designed to demonstrate the pH-responsive release of a drug

  10. Role of p53 in Anticancer Drug Treatment- and Radiation-Induced Injury in Normal Small Intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the human gastrointestinal tract, the functional mucosa of the small intestine has the highest capacity for absorption of nutrients and rapid proliferation rates, making it vulnerable to chemoradiotherapy. Recent understanding of the protective role of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest in the small intestinal mucosa has led researchers to explore new avenues to mitigate mucosal injury during cancer treatment. A traditional p53 inhibitor and two other molecules that exhibit strong protective effects on normal small intestinal epithelium during anticancer drug treatment and radiation therapy are introduced in this work. The objective of this review was to update current knowledge regarding potential mechanisms and targets that inhibit the side effects induced by chemoradiotherapy

  11. 4D Tumorigenesis Model for Quantitating Coalescence, Directed Cell Motility and Chemotaxis, Identifying Unique Cell Behaviors, and Testing Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Spencer; Voss, Edward; Scherer, Amanda; Lusche, Daniel F; Wessels, Deborah; Soll, David R

    2016-01-01

    A 4D high-resolution computer-assisted reconstruction and motion analysis system has been developed and applied to the long-term (14-30 days) analysis of cancer cells migrating and aggregating within a 3D matrix. 4D tumorigenesis models more closely approximate the tumor microenvironment than 2D substrates and, therefore, are improved tools for elucidating the interactions within the tumor microenvironment that promote growth and metastasis. The model we describe here can be used to analyze the growth of tumor cells, aggregate coalescence, directed cell motility and chemotaxis, matrix degradation, the effects of anticancer drugs, and the behavior of immune and endothelial cells mixed with cancer cells. The information given in this chapter is also intended to acquaint the reader with computer-assisted methods and algorithms that can be used for high-resolution 3D reconstruction and quantitative motion analysis. PMID:27271907

  12. Gossypol-cross-linked boronic acid-modified hydrogels: a functional matrix for the controlled release of an anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heleg-Shabtai, Vered; Aizen, Ruth; Orbach, Ron; Aleman-Garcia, Miguel Angel; Willner, Itamar

    2015-02-24

    Anticancer drug gossypol cross-links phenylboronic acid-modified acrylamide copolymer chains to form a hydrogel matrix. The hydrogel is dissociated in an acidic environment (pH 4.5), and its dissociation is enhanced in the presence of lactic acid (an α-hydroxy carboxylic acid) as compared to formic acid. The enhanced dissociation of the hydrogel by lactic acid is attributed to the effective separation of the boronate ester bridging groups through the formation of a stabilized complex between the boronic acid substituent and the lactic acid. Because lactic acid exists in cancer cells in elevated amounts and the cancer cells' environment is acidic, the cross-linked hydrogel represents a stimuli-responsive matrix for the controlled release of gossypol. The functionality is demonstrated and characterized by rheology and other spectroscopic means. PMID:25664656

  13. Highly efficient nuclear delivery of anti-cancer drugs using a bio-functionalized reduced graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xin Ting; Ma, Xiao Qing; Li, Chang Ming

    2016-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery has become important, attractive and challenging in biomedical science and applications. Anti-HER2 antibody-conjugated poly-l-lysine functionalized reduced graphene oxide (anti-HER2-rGO-PLL) nanocarriers were prepared to efficiently deliver doxorubicin targeting at the nucleus of HER2 over-expressing cancer cells. The polycationic PLL was first covalently grafted to graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets followed by reduction to obtain rGO-PLL with high drug loading and good colloidal stability. The anti-HER2 antibodies were subsequently conjugated to the amino groups of PLL to achieve excellent cell uptake capability. Cellular uptake of anti-HER2-rGO-PLL into MCF7/HER2 cells is significantly higher than that of rGO-PLL due to the specific targeting of anti-HER2 to HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cells. Additionally the anti-HER2-rGO-PLL enables a fast accumulation of DOX inside the nucleus, its subcellular site of action. In vitro cytotoxicity measurements clearly reveal a seven fold improvement in the anticancer efficacy for anti-HER2-rGO-PLL/DOX in comparison to rGO-PLL/DOX. The enhanced anticancer efficacy could be ascribed to the different intracellular DOX distributions resulted from the different internalization routes that are energy-dependent macropinocytosis and energy-independent direct penetration by anti-HER2-rGO-PLL and rGO-PLL, respectively. The results demonstrate that anti-HER2 conjugated rGO-PLL developed is a promising vehicle for efficient nuclear delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to HER2 over-expressing tumours. PMID:26773607

  14. Identification of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase responsible for biosynthesis of the potential anti-cancer drug sansalvamide in Fusarium solani

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romans-Fuertes, Patricia; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Sandmann, Manuela Ilse Helga;

    2016-01-01

    Sansalvamide is a cyclic pentadepsipeptide produced by Fusarium solani and has shown promising results as potential anti-cancer drug. The biosynthetic pathway has until now remained unidentified, but here we used an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) approach to generate kno...... and Trichoderma virens, which suggests that the ability to produce compounds related to destruxin and sansalvamide is widespread....

  15. Nanoparticulated docetaxel exerts enhanced anticancer efficacy and overcomes existing limitations of traditional drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Choi J; Ko E; Chung HK; Ju EJ; Lim HK; Park I; Kim KS; Lee JH; Son WC; Lee JS; Jung J; Jeong SY; Song SY; Choi EK

    2015-01-01

    Jinhyang Choi,1,2 Eunjung Ko,1 Hye-Kyung Chung,3 Jae Hee Lee,1 Eun Jin Ju,1 Hyun Kyung Lim,4 Intae Park,1 Kab-Sig Kim,5 Joo-Hwan Lee,5 Woo-Chan Son,6 Jung Shin Lee,1,7 Joohee Jung,1,4 Seong-Yun Jeong,1,2 Si Yeol Song,1,8 Eun Kyung Choi1,3,8 1Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, 2Asan Institute for Life Sciences, 3Center for Development and Commercialization of Anti-cancer Therapeutics, 4College of Pharmacy, Duksung Women’s University, 5Bio-Synectics, 6Department of Pathology, ...

  16. Anticancer drug-loaded multifunctional nanoparticles to enhance the chemotherapeutic efficacy in lung cancer metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    LONG, JIAN-TING; Cheang, Tuck-yun; Zhuo, Shu-Yu; Zeng, Rui-Fang; Dai, Qiang-sheng; Li, He-Ping; Fang, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhalation of chemotherapeutic drugs directly into the lungs augments the drug exposure to lung cancers. The inhalation of free drugs however results in over exposure and causes severe adverse effect to normal cells. In the present study, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-modified gelatin nanoparticles (EGNP) was developed to administer doxorubicin (DOX) to lung cancers. Results The EGNP released DOX in a sustained manner and effectively internalized in EGFR overexpressing A549 and H22...

  17. Combinatorial effects of geopropolis produced by Melipona fasciculata Smith with anticancer drugs against human laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma (HEp-2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomeu, Ariane Rocha; Frión-Herrera, Yahima; da Silva, Livia Matsumoto; Romagnoli, Graziela Gorete; de Oliveira, Deilson Elgui; Sforcin, José Maurício

    2016-07-01

    The identification of natural products exerting a combined effect with therapeutic agents could be an alternative for cancer treatment, reducing the concentration of the drugs and side effects. Geopropolis (Geo) is produced by some stingless bees from a mixture of vegetable resins, gland secretions of the bees and soil. It has been used popularly as an antiseptic agent and to treat respiratory diseases and dermatosis. To determine whether Geo enhances the anticancer effect of carboplatin, methotrexate and doxorubicin (DOX), human laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma (HEp-2) cells were treated with Geo alone or in combination with each drug. Cell growth, cytotoxicity and apoptosis were evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and flow cytometry. Scratch assay was used to analyze cell migration and transmission electron microscopy to observe morphologic alterations. The influence of Geo on drug resistance was also investigated assessing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) action. Geo inhibited cell proliferation and migration. The combination Geo+DOX led to the highest cytotoxic activity and induced apoptosis, leading to loss of membrane integrity. Geo had no effect on P-gp-mediated efflux of DOX. Data indicate that Geo combined with DOX could be a potential clinical chemotherapeutic approach for laryngeal cancer treatment. PMID:27261576

  18. Structural Characterization of Anticancer Drug Paclitaxel and Its Metabolites Using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Hee; Hong, Areum; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Won Jong; Kim, Hugh I.

    2016-02-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a popular anticancer drug used in the treatment of various types of cancers. PTX is metabolized in the human liver by cytochrome P450 to two structural isomers, 3'- p-hydroxypaclitaxel (3 p-OHP) and 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel (6α-OHP). Analyzing PTX and its two metabolites, 3 p-OHP and 6α-OHP, is crucial for understanding general pharmacokinetics, drug activity, and drug resistance. In this study, electrospray ionization ion mobility mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) and collision induced dissociation (CID) are utilized for the identification and characterization of PTX and its metabolites. Ion mobility distributions of 3 p-OHP and 6α-OHP indicate that hydroxylation of PTX at different sites yields distinct gas phase structures. Addition of monovalent alkali metal and silver metal cations enhances the distinct dissociation patterns of these structural isomers. The differences observed in the CID patterns of metalated PTX and its two metabolites are investigated further by evaluating their gas-phase structures. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the observed structural changes and dissociation pathways are the result of the interactions between the metal cation and the hydroxyl substituents in PTX metabolites.

  19. Clinical Accuracy and Safety Using the SynchroMed II Intrathecal Drug Infusion Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Wesemann, Kelly; Coffey, Robert J; Wallace, Mark S.; Tan, Ye; Broste, Steven; Buvanendran, Asokumar

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives We evaluated the infusion accuracy and device-related safety of implantable drug infusion pumps in subjects with chronic pain or severe spasticity. Methods Nine centers in the United States enrolled patients receiving intrathecal drug delivery systems to manage chronic pain and/or severe spasticity. Infusion accuracy was assessed at 6 and 12 months by comparing syringe-measured delivered volumes to programmer-predicted volumes. Safety was evaluated through analysis o...

  20. The Role of Bile Salt Export Pump Gene Repression in Drug-Induced Cholestatic Liver Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Garzel, Brandy; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E.; Wang, Hongbing

    2014-01-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) is predominantly responsible for the efflux of bile salts, and disruption of BSEP function is often associated with altered hepatic homeostasis of bile acids and cholestatic liver injury. Accumulating evidence suggests that many drugs can cause cholestasis through interaction with hepatic transporters. To date, a relatively strong association between drug-induced cholestasis and attenuated BSEP activity has been proposed. However, whether repression of...

  1. Impact of the healthcare payment system on patient access to oral anticancer drugs: an illustration from the French and United States contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin, Laure; Buthion, Valérie; Vidal-Trécan, Gwenaëlle; Briot, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral anticancer drugs (OADs) allow treating a growing range of cancers. Despite their convenience, their acceptance by healthcare professionals and patients may be affected by medical, economical and organizational factors. The way the healthcare payment system (HPS) reimburses OADs or finances hospital activities may impact patients’ access to such drugs. We discuss how the HPS in France and USA may generate disincentives to the use of OADs in certain circumstances. Discussion Fre...

  2. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Swatantra Kumar Singh Kushwaha; Saurav Ghoshal; Awani Kumar Rai; Satyawan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affec...

  3. Photochemical properties of a new kind of anti-cancer drug: N-glycoside compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ping; WANG Mei; ZHANG ShuPing; SHAO SiChang; SUN XiaoYu; YAO SiDe; WANG ShiLong

    2008-01-01

    Due to the nontoxicity and efficient anti-cancer activity, more and more attention has been paid to N-glycoside compounds. Laser photolysis of N-(α-D-glucopyranoside) salicyloyl hydrazine (NGSH) has been performed for the first time. The research results show that NGSH has high photosensitivity and is vulnerable to be photo-ionized via a monophotonic process with a quantum yield of 0.02, generating NGSH+ and hydrated electrons. Under the aerobic condition of cells, the hydrated electrons are very easy to combine with oxygen to generate 1O2 and O2-, both of which are powerful oxidants that can kill the cancer cells. In addition, NGSH+ can be changed into neutral radicals by deprotonation with a pKa value of 4.02 and its decay constant was determined to be 2.55×109dm3·mol-1·s-1. NGSH also can be oxidized by SO4- with a rate constant of 1.76×109 dm3·mol-1·s-1, which further confirms the results of photoionization. All of these results suggest that this new N-glycoside compound might be useful for cancer treatment.

  4. Photochemical properties of a new kind of anti-cancer drug: N-glycoside compound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Due to the nontoxicity and efficient anti-cancer activity, more and more attention has been paid to N-glycoside compounds. Laser photolysis of N-(α-D-glucopyranoside) salicyloyl hydrazine (NGSH) has been performed for the first time. The research results show that NGSH has high photosensitivity and is vulnerable to be photo-ionized via a monophotonic process with a quantum yield of 0.02, generating NGSH+· and hydrated electrons. Under the aerobic condition of cells, the hydrated electrons are very easy to combine with oxygen to generate 1O2 and O2-, both of which are powerful oxidants that can kill the cancer cells. In addition, NGSH+· can be changed into neutral radicals by deprotonation with a pKa value of 4.02 and its decay constant was determined to be 2.55×109dm3·mol-1·s-1. NGSH also can be oxidized by SO4-. with a rate constant of 1.76×109 dm3·mol-1.s-1, which further confirms the results of photoionization. All of these results suggest that this new N-glycoside compound might be useful for cancer treatment.

  5. DNA compaction by mononuclear platinum cancer drug cisplatin and the trisplatinum anticancer agent BBR3464: Differences and similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, T; Dubey, P; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2012-02-01

    Cisplatin, a mononuclear platinum compound, which is known as a cancer drug for long time, can exhibit considerable side effects and is also not effective in many types of cancer. Therefore, the alternative platinum anticancer agents that can act at a much lower dose limit compared to the dose relevant for cisplatin treatment have been searched for. BBR3464, a trinuclear platinum compound, is found to exhibit cytotoxic effects at 10 to 1000 times lower dose limit, even in cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. The primary cellular target for cisplatin and BBR3464 is thought to be DNA. Herein, we report the nature of DNA structural changes that are induced by cisplatin and BBR3464, considering the same DNA sequence and similar sample deposition methods for comparison purpose. We have applied high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to obtain an idea about the molecular basis of BBR3464's effectiveness at the lower dose limit. We show from the molecularly resolved AFM images that both the compounds can compact the whole dsDNA molecules, though the degree of compaction in case of BBR3464 treatment is significantly higher. Furthermore, local compaction in terms of loop structure formation could be induced by both BBR3464 and cisplatin, though BBR3464 generated microloops and macroloops both, whereas cisplatin could generate primarily the microloops. It is a significant observation that BBR3464 could induce relatively drastic DNA structural changes in terms of loop formation as well as overall DNA compaction at a molar ratio, which is 50 times less than that applied for cisplatin treatment. Implications of such structural changes in cytotoxic effects of the platinum anticancer agents will be mentioned.

  6. The infection risk of intrathecal drug infusion pumps after multiple refill procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, Alessandro; Scamoni, Carlo; Picano, Marco; Fortini, Gianpaolo; Cuffari, Salvatore; Tomei, Giustino

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term infection risk from refilling intrathecal drug delivery devices. We studied 25 patients (14 females and 11 males) with intrathecal infusion pumps placed for spasticity (23 patients) and chronic pain (two patients). In this study group there were 890 refill procedures (mean 35.6 ± 20.5; range 8-72 times) performed on an outpatient basis by four different physicians. All refill procedures were performed in a sterile and standardized fashion as suggested by the manufacturer, using manufacturer's approved kits for the refills. During the study period, five patients had recurrent infection of the urinary tract and three patients had recurrent infections of the respiratory tract. At the last pump refill of each patient, residual drug, extracted from the pump reservoir, was sent to a laboratory for aerobic and anaerobic cultures. All cultures, in all pumps, were negative for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. We conclude that periodic refills of intrathecal implanted pumps do not seem to be a risk factor for infection if standard sterile refill procedures are performed. In this study, it was clear that comorbid infections from other parts of the body do not present as a risk for device contamination. PMID:22151381

  7. Targeted conjugation of breast anticancer drug tamoxifen and its metabolites with synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyakamdhorn, S; Agudelo, D; Bekale, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-09-01

    Conjugation of antitumor drug tamoxifen and its metabolites, 4-hydroxytamxifen and ednoxifen with synthetic polymers poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), methoxypoly (ethylene glycol) polyamidoamine (mPEG-PAMAM-G3) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM-G4) dendrimers was studied in aqueous solution at pH 7.4. Multiple spectroscopic methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular modeling were used to characterize the drug binding process to synthetic polymers. Structural analysis showed that drug-polymer binding occurs via both H-bonding and hydrophobic contacts. The order of binding is PAMAM-G4>mPEG-PAMAM-G3>PEG-6000 with 4-hydroxttamoxifen forming more stable conjugate than tamoxifen and endoxifen. Transmission electron microscopy showed significant changes in carrier morphology with major changes in the shape of the polymer aggregate as drug encapsulation occurred. Modeling also showed that drug is located in the surface and in the internal cavities of PAMAM with the free binding energy of -3.79 for tamoxifen, -3.70 for 4-hydroxytamoxifen and -3.69kcal/mol for endoxifen, indicating of spontaneous drug-polymer interaction at room temperature. PMID:27137803

  8. Targeted and controlled anticancer drug delivery and release with magnetoelectric nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodzinski, Alexandra; Guduru, Rakesh; Liang, Ping; Hadjikhani, Ali; Stewart, Tiffanie; Stimphil, Emmanuel; Runowicz, Carolyn; Cote, Richard; Altman, Norman; Datar, Ram; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2016-02-01

    It is a challenge to eradicate tumor cells while sparing normal cells. We used magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) to control drug delivery and release. The physics is due to electric-field interactions (i) between MENs and a drug and (ii) between drug-loaded MENs and cells. MENs distinguish cancer cells from normal cells through the membrane’s electric properties; cancer cells have a significantly smaller threshold field to induce electroporation. In vitro and in vivo studies (nude mice with SKOV-3 xenografts) showed that (i) drug (paclitaxel (PTX)) could be attached to MENs (30-nm CoFe2O4@BaTiO3 nanostructures) through surface functionalization to avoid its premature release, (ii) drug-loaded MENs could be delivered into cancer cells via application of a d.c. field (~100 Oe), and (iii) the drug could be released off MENs on demand via application of an a.c. field (~50 Oe, 100 Hz). The cell lysate content was measured with scanning probe microscopy and spectrophotometry. MENs and control ferromagnetic and polymer nanoparticles conjugated with HER2-neu antibodies, all loaded with PTX were weekly administrated intravenously. Only the mice treated with PTX-loaded MENs (15/200 μg) in a field for three months were completely cured, as confirmed through infrared imaging and post-euthanasia histology studies via energy-dispersive spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry.

  9. Regulatory approval pathways for anticancer drugs in Japan, the EU and the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Sumimasa; Ozawa, Keiya

    2016-07-01

    The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency and the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan and the US Food and Drug Administration are responsible for reviewing applications and approving drugs, medical devices, and regenerative medicines. In the EU, the European Medicines Agency is responsible for the centralized authorization procedure of medicines including oncologic drugs. In this review, we discuss general pathways for the marketing authorization of oncologic drugs and other drugs in Japan, the EU, and the US. There are still unmet medical needs in oncology, whereas scientific innovation and clinical development in oncology are rapid and active, suggesting a reasonable scope for new regulatory schemes for expedited review. Because regulatory schemes are also evolving rapidly, clinicians and academic researchers may have difficulty following the updated regulations in other regions as well as those in their own countries. However, keeping current with new regulations is important for the conduct of translational research and clinical development of new therapeutic products efficiently. This review is intended to help an international audience better understand the essence of the regulatory frameworks for the marketing authorization of oncologic drugs in Japan, the EU, and the US. PMID:27084259

  10. Regulatory approval pathways for anticancer drugs in Japan, the EU and the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Sumimasa; Ozawa, Keiya

    2016-07-01

    The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency and the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan and the US Food and Drug Administration are responsible for reviewing applications and approving drugs, medical devices, and regenerative medicines. In the EU, the European Medicines Agency is responsible for the centralized authorization procedure of medicines including oncologic drugs. In this review, we discuss general pathways for the marketing authorization of oncologic drugs and other drugs in Japan, the EU, and the US. There are still unmet medical needs in oncology, whereas scientific innovation and clinical development in oncology are rapid and active, suggesting a reasonable scope for new regulatory schemes for expedited review. Because regulatory schemes are also evolving rapidly, clinicians and academic researchers may have difficulty following the updated regulations in other regions as well as those in their own countries. However, keeping current with new regulations is important for the conduct of translational research and clinical development of new therapeutic products efficiently. This review is intended to help an international audience better understand the essence of the regulatory frameworks for the marketing authorization of oncologic drugs in Japan, the EU, and the US.

  11. One-step bulk preparation of calcium carbonate nanotubes and its application in anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Sun, Dong-Mei; Qian, Wen-Yu; Zhu, Rong-Rong; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Wen-Rui; Li, Kun; Wang, Shi-Long

    2012-06-01

    Bulk fabrication of ordered hollow structural particles (HSPs) with large surface area and high biocompatibility simultaneously is critical for the practical application of HSPs in biosensing and drug delivery. In this article, we describe a smart approach for batch synthesis of calcium carbonate nanotubes (CCNTs) based on supported liquid membrane (SLM) with large surface area, excellent structural stability, prominent biocompatibility, and acid degradability. The products were characterized by transmission electron micrograph, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-vis spectroscopy, zeta potential, and particle size distribution. The results showed that the tube-like structure facilitated podophyllotoxin (PPT) diffusion into the cavity of hollow structure, and the drug loading and encapsulation efficiency of CCNTs for PPT are as high as 38.5 and 64.4 wt.%, respectively. In vitro drug release study showed that PPT was released from the CCNTs in a pH-controlled and time-dependent manner. The treatment of HEK 293T and SGC 7901 cells demonstrated that PPT-loaded CCNTs were less toxic to normal cells and more effective in antitumor potency compared with free drugs. In addition, PPT-loaded CCNTs also enhanced the apoptotic process on tumor cells compared with the free drugs. This study not only provides a new kind of biocompatible and pH-sensitive nanomaterial as the feasible drug container and carrier but more importantly establishes a facile approach to synthesize novel hollow structural particles on a large scale based on SLM technology. PMID:22351100

  12. Influence of Five Potential Anticancer Drugs on Wnt Pathway and Cell Survival in Human Biliary Tract Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia WACHTER, Daniel NEUREITER, Beate ALINGER, Martin PICHLER, Julia FUEREDER, Christian OBERDANNER, Pietro Di FAZIO, Matthias OCKER, Frieder BERR, Tobias KIESSLICH

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of Wnt signalling in carcinogenesis suggests compounds targeting this pathway as potential anti-cancer drugs. Several studies report activation of Wnt signalling in biliary tract cancer (BTC thus rendering Wnt inhibitory drugs as potential candidates for targeted therapy of this highly chemoresistant disease.Methods: In this study we analysed five compounds with suggested inhibitory effects on Wnt signalling (DMAT, FH535, myricetin, quercetin, and TBB for their cytotoxic efficiency, mode of cell death, time- and cell line-dependent characteristics as well as their effects on Wnt pathway activity in nine different BTC cell lines.Results: Exposure of cancer cells to different concentrations of the compounds results in a clear dose-dependent reduction of viability for all drugs in the order FH535 > DMAT > TBB > myricetin > quercetin. The first three substances show high cytotoxicity in all tested cell lines, cause a direct cytotoxic effect by induction of apoptosis and inhibit pathway-specific signal transduction in a Wnt transcription factor reporter activity assay. Selected target genes such as growth-promoting cyclin D1 and the cell cycle progression inhibitor p27 are down- and up-regulated after treatment, respectively.Conclusions: Taken together, these data demonstrate that the small molecular weight inhibitors DMAT, F535 and TBB have a considerable cytotoxic and possibly Wnt-specific effect on BTC cell lines in vitro. Further in vivo investigation of these drugs as well as of new Wnt inhibitors may provide a promising approach for targeted therapy of this difficult-to-treat tumour.

  13. Structural and dynamical effects induced by the anticancer drug topotecan on the human topoisomerase I - DNA complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Mancini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human topoisomerase I catalyzes the relaxation of DNA supercoils in fundamental cell processes like transcription, replication and chromosomal segregation. It is the only target of the camptothecin family of anticancer drugs. Among these, topotecan has been used to treat lung and ovarian carcinoma for several years. Camptothecins reversibly binds to the covalent intermediate DNA-enzyme, stabilizing the cleavable complex and reducing the religation rate. The stalled complex then collides with the progression of the replication fork, producing lethal double strand DNA breaks and eventually cell death. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Long lasting molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA-topoisomerase I binary complex and of the DNA-topoisomerase-topotecan ternary complex have been performed and compared. The conformational space sampled by the binary complex is reduced by the presence of the drug, as observed by principal component and cluster analyses. This conformational restraint is mainly due to the reduced flexibility of residues 633-643 (the region connecting the linker to the core domain that causes an overall mobility loss in the ternary complex linker domain. During the simulation, DNA/drug stacking interactions are fully maintained, and hydrogen bonds are maintained with the enzyme. Topotecan keeps the catalytic residue Lys532 far from the DNA, making it unable to participate to the religation reaction. Arg364 is observed to interact with both the B and E rings of topotecan with two stable direct hydrogen bonds. An interesting constrain exerted by the protein on the geometrical arrangement of topotecan is also observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Atomistic-scale understanding of topotecan interactions with the DNA-enzyme complex is fundamental to the explaining of its poisonous effect and of the drug resistance observed in several single residue topoisomerase mutants. We observed significant alterations due to topotecan in

  14. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinh NQ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nguyen Quoc Vinh,1 Shigeyuki Naka,1 Horacio Cabral,2 Hiroyuki Murayama,1 Sachiko Kaida,1 Kazunori Kataoka,2 Shigehiro Morikawa,3 Tohru Tani4 1Department of Surgery, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan; 2Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Nursing, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan; 4Biomedical Innovation Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexaneplatinum(II (DACHPt] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or

  15. Yolk-shell hybrid nanoparticles with magnetic and pH-sensitive properties for controlled anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunxing; Zheng, Jianzhong; Chen, Dejian; Wu, Yijin; Zhang, Wuxiang; Zheng, Fengying; Cao, Jing; Ma, Heran; Liu, Yaling

    2013-11-01

    A facile and effective way for the preparation of nano-sized Fe3O4@graphene yolk-shell nanoparticles via a hydrothermal method is developed. Moreover, the targeting properties of the materials for anticancer drug (doxorubicin hydrochloride) delivery are investigated. Excitingly, these hybrid materials possess favorable dispersibility, good superparamagnetism (the magnetic saturation value is 45.740 emu g-1), high saturated loading capacity (2.65 mg mg-1), and effective loading (88.3%). More importantly, the composites exhibit strong pH-triggered drug release response (at the pH value of 5.6 and 7.4, the release rate was 24.86% and 10.28%, respectively) and good biocompatibility over a broad concentration range of 0.25-100 μg mL-1 (the cell viability was 98.52% even at a high concentration of 100 μg mL-1) which sheds light on their potentially bright future for bio-related applications.

  16. Effects of natural nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitors on anticancer drug efflux transporter human P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabekura, Tomohiro; Hiroi, Takashi; Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Uwai, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein plays an important role in cancer chemotherapy. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factors play critical roles in development and progression of cancer. In this study, the effects of natural compounds that can inhibit NF-κB activation on the function of P-glycoprotein were investigated using human MDR1 gene-transfected KB/MDR1 cells. The accumulation of daunorubicin or rhodamine 123, fluorescent substrates of P-glycoprotein, in KB/MDR1 cells increased in the presence of caffeic acid phenetyl ester (CAPE), licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, lupeol, zerumbone, thymoquinone, emodin, and anethol had no effects. The ATPase activities of P-glycoprotein were stimulated by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, celastrol, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulated NF-κB activation was inhibited by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, and xanthohumol. KB/MDR1 cells were sensitized to vinblastine cytotoxicity by CAPE, licochalcone A, anacardic acid, xanthohumol, magnolol, and honokiol, showing that these natural NF-κB inhibitors reverse multidrug resistance. These results suggest that natural compounds, such as CAPE, licochalcone A, and anacardic acid, have dual inhibitory effects on the anticancer drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein and NF-κB activation, and may become useful to enhance the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  17. Human sterol 14α-demethylase as a target for anticancer chemotherapy: towards structure-aided drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Tatiana Y; Friggeri, Laura; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Sivakumaran, Suneethi; Yazlovitskaya, Eugenia M; Hiebert, Scott W; Guengerich, F Peter; Waterman, Michael R; Lepesheva, Galina I

    2016-08-01

    Rapidly multiplying cancer cells synthesize greater amounts of cholesterol to build their membranes. Cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) are currently in clinical trials for anticancer chemotherapy. However, given at higher doses, statins cause serious side effects by inhibiting the formation of other biologically important molecules derived from mevalonate. Sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51), which acts 10 steps downstream, is potentially a more specific drug target because this portion of the pathway is fully committed to cholesterol production. However, screening a variety of commercial and experimental inhibitors of microbial CYP51 orthologs revealed that most of them (including all clinical antifungals) weakly inhibit human CYP51 activity, even if they display high apparent spectral binding affinity. Only one relatively potent compound, (R)-N-(1-(3,4'-difluorobiphenyl-4-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)ethyl)-4-(5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)benzamide (VFV), was identified. VFV has been further tested in cellular experiments and found to decrease proliferation of different cancer cell types. The crystal structures of human CYP51-VFV complexes (2.0 and 2.5 Å) both display a 2:1 inhibitor/enzyme stoichiometry, provide molecular insights regarding a broader substrate profile, faster catalysis, and weaker susceptibility of human CYP51 to inhibition, and outline directions for the development of more potent inhibitors. PMID:27313059

  18. Conformational Selection and Induced Fit Mechanisms in the Binding of an Anticancer Drug to the c-Src Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morando, Maria Agnese; Saladino, Giorgio; D’Amelio, Nicola; Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; Lovera, Silvia; Lelli, Moreno; López-Méndez, Blanca; Marenchino, Marco; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the conformational changes associated with the binding of small ligands to their biological targets is a fascinating and meaningful question in chemistry, biology and drug discovery. One of the most studied and important is the so-called “DFG-flip” of tyrosine kinases. The conserved three amino-acid DFG motif undergoes an “in to out” movement resulting in a particular inactive conformation to which “type II” kinase inhibitors, such as the anti-cancer drug Imatinib, bind. Despite many studies, the details of this prototypical conformational change are still debated. Here we combine various NMR experiments and surface plasmon resonance with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to shed light into the conformational dynamics associated with the binding of Imatinib to the proto-oncogene c-Src. We find that both conformational selection and induced fit play a role in the binding mechanism, reconciling opposing views held in the literature. Moreover, an external binding pose and local unfolding (cracking) of the aG helix are observed.

  19. The substance P/NK-1 receptor system: NK-1 receptor antagonists as anti-cancer drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Miguel Muñoz; Rafael Coveñas; Francisco Esteban; Maximino Redondo

    2015-06-01

    The substance P (SP)/neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor system plays an important role in cancer. SP promotes the proliferation of tumour cells, angiogenesis and the migration of tumour cells. We review the involvement of SP, the NK-1 receptor and NK-1 receptor antagonists in cancer. Tumour cells overexpress NK-1 receptors, which are involved in their viability. This overexpression suggests the possibility of specific treatment against tumour cells using NK-1 receptor antagonists, thus promoting a considerable decrease in the side effects of the treatment. This strategy opens up new approaches for cancer treatment, since these antagonists, after binding to their molecular target, induce the death of tumour cells by apoptosis, exert an antiangiogenic action and inhibit the migration of tumour cells. The use of NK-1 receptor antagonists such as aprepitant (used in clinical practice) as antitumour agents could be a promising innovation. The value of aprepitant as an antitumour agent could be determined faster than for less well-known compounds because many studies addressing its safety and characterization have already been completed. The NK-1 receptor may be a promising target in the treatment of cancer; NK-1 receptor antagonists could act as specific drugs against tumour cells; and these antagonists could be new candidate anti-cancer drugs.

  20. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushwaha, Swatantra Kumar Singh; Ghoshal, SauravI; Rai, Awani Kumar, E-mail: swatantrakushwaha@yahoo.co.in [Pranveer Singh Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Singh, Satyawan [Saroj Institute of Technology and Management, Lucknow (India)

    2013-10-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field. (author)

  1. Carbon nanotubes as a novel drug delivery system for anticancer therapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swatantra Kumar Singh Kushwaha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were discovered in 1991 and shown to have certain unique physicochemical properties, attracting considerable interest in their application in various fields including drug delivery. The unique properties of CNTs such as ease of cellular uptake, high drug loading, thermal ablation, among others, render them useful for cancer therapy. Cancer is one of the most challenging diseases of modern times because its therapy involves distinguishing normal healthy cells from affected cells. Here, CNTs play a major role because phenomena such as EPR, allow CNTs to distinguish normal cells from affected ones, the Holy Grail in cancer therapy. Considerable work has been done on CNTs as drug delivery systems over the last two decades. However, concerns over certain issues such as biocompatibility and toxicity have been raised and warrant extensive research in this field.

  2. Screening Anti-Cancer Drugs against Tubulin using Catch-and-Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Darestani, Reza; Winter, Philip; Kitova, Elena N.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Tubulin, which is the building block of microtubules, plays an important role in cell division. This critical role makes tubulin an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat cancer. Currently, there is no general binding assay for tubulin-drug interactions. The present work describes the application of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay to investigate the binding of colchicinoid drugs to αβ-tubulin dimers extracted from porcine brain. Proof-of-concept experiments using positive (ligands with known affinities) and negative (non-binders) controls were performed to establish the reliability of the assay. The assay was then used to screen a library of seven colchicinoid analogues to test their binding to tubulin and to rank their affinities.

  3. Drug delivery: enabling technology for drug discovery and development.iPRECIO® Micro Infusion Pump: Programmable, refillable and implantable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung eTan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Successful drug delivery using implantable pumps may be found in over 12,500 published articles. Their versatility in delivering continuous infusion, intermittent or complex infusion protocols acutely or chronically has made them ubiquitous in drug discovery and basic research. The recent availability of iPRECIO®, a programmable, refillable and implantable infusion pump has made it possible to carry out quantitative pharmacology (PKPD in single animals. When combined with specialized catheters, specific administration sites have been selected. When combined with radiotelemetry, the physiologic gold standard, more sensitive and powerful means of detecting drug induced therapeutic and/or adverse effects has been possible. Numerous application examples are cited from iPRECIO® use in Japan, United States and Europe with iPRECIO® as an enabling drug delivery device where the refillable and programmability functionality were key benefits. The ability to start/stop drug delivery and to have control periods prior dosing made it possible to have equivalent effects at a much lower dose than previously studied. Five different iPRECIO® applications are described in detail with references to the original work where the implantable, refillable and programmable benefits are demonstrated with their different end-points.

  4. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen;

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti...... with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier...

  5. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent

    OpenAIRE

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P.

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and ra...

  6. TGI-Simulator: a visual tool to support the preclinical phase of the drug discovery process by assessing in silico the effect of an anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, Nadia; Magni, Paolo

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents TGI-Simulator, a software tool designed to show, through a 2-D graphical animation, the simulated time effect of an anticancer drug on a tumor mass by exploiting the well-known Tumor Growth Inhibition (TGI) model published by Simeoni et al. [1]. Simeoni TGI model is a mathematical model routinely used by pharma companies and researchers during the drug development process. The application is based on a Java graphical user interface (GUI) including a self installing differential equation solver implemented in Matlab together with an optimization algorithm that performs model identification via Weighted Least Squares (WLS). However, it can graphically show also the simulation results obtained within other scientific software tools, if they are preventively stored into a suitable ASCII file. The tool would be a valid support also for researchers with no specific skills in scientific calculations and in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling but daily involved in pharma companies drug development processes at different levels. The availability of a movie with a temporal varying 2-D iconographic representation is an original instrument to communicate results and learn Simeoni TGI model and its potential application in preclinical studies. PMID:22005012

  7. Catabolism of pyrimidines in yeast: A tool to understand degradation of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Merico, A.; Bjornberg, O.;

    2006-01-01

    The pyrimidine catabolic pathway is of crucial importance in cancer patients because it is involved in degradation of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil; it also is important in plants, unicellular eukaryotes, and bacteria for the degradation of pyrimidine-based biocides...

  8. Catabolism of pyrimidines in yeast: a tool to understand degradation of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, G; Merico, A; Björnberg, O;

    2006-01-01

    The pyrimidine catabolic pathway is of crucial importance in cancer patients because it is involved in degradation of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as 5-fluorouracil; it also is important in plants, unicellular eukaryotes, and bacteria for the degradation of pyrimidine-based biocides...

  9. Electronic structure of an anticancer drug DC81 and its interaction with DNA base pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Gargi; Sharma, Dipendra; Dwivedi, K. K.; Dwivedi, M. K.

    2016-05-01

    The drug, 8-Hydroxy-7-methoxy-pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine-5-one, commonly christened as DC81 belongs to the pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBDs) family. It is a member of the group of naturally occurring antitumour antibiotics produced by various Streptomyces species. The antitumour activity of DC81 is attributed to its sequence specific interaction with G-C rich DNA region in particular, for Pu-G-Pu motifs. In the present paper, physico-chemical properties DC81 have been carried out using an ab-initio method, HF/6-31G(d,p) with GAMESS program. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the drug have been calculated. Further, drug-DNA interactions have been examined using modified second order perturbation theory along with multicentred-multipole expansion technique. Results have been discussed in the light of other theoretical and experimental observations. Efforts have been made to elucidate the binding patterns and thereby biological properties of the drug.

  10. Impedimetric toxicity assay in microfluidics using free and liposome-encapsulated anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zor, Kinga; Montini, Lucia;

    2015-01-01

    -dependent cytotoxic response of fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) to free OX and OX-loaded liposomes was observed and attributed to incomplete degradation of the liposomes, which results in lower drug availability. The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-dependent release of OX from OX-loaded liposomes was also confirmed using...

  11. Formation of multicellular tumor spheroids induced by cyclic RGD-peptides and use for anticancer drug testing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasov, Roman; Zaytseva-Zotova, Daria; Burov, Sergey; Leko, Maria; Dontenwill, Monique; Chiper, Manuela; Vandamme, Thierry; Markvicheva, Elena

    2016-06-15

    Development of novel anticancer formulations is a priority challenge in biomedicine. However, in vitro models based on monolayer cultures (2D) which are currently used for cytotoxicity tests leave much to be desired. More and more attention is focusing on 3D in vitro systems which can better mimic solid tumors. The aim of the study was to develop a novel one-step highly reproducible technique for multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) formation using synthetic cyclic RGD-peptides, and to demonstrate availability of the spheroids as 3D in vitro model for antitumor drug testing. Cell self-assembly effect induced by addition of both linear and cyclic RGD-peptides directly to monolayer cultures was studied for 12 cell lines of various origins, including tumor cells (e.i. U-87 MG, MCF-7, M-3, HCT-116) and normal cells, in particular L-929, BNL.CL2, HepG2. Cyclo-RGDfK and its modification with triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP), namely cyclo-RGDfK(TPP) in a range of 10-100μM were found to induce spheroid formation. The obtained spheroids were unimodal with mean sizes in a range of 60-120μm depending on cell line and serum content in culture medium. The spheroids were used as 3D in vitro model, in order to evaluate cytotoxicity effects of antitumor drugs (doxorubicin, curcumin, temozolomide). The developed technique could be proposed as a promising tool for in vitro test of novel antitumor drugs. PMID:27107900

  12. Aptamers as targeting delivery devices or anti-cancer drugs for fighting tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Dapas, Barbara; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Pozzato, Gabriele; Giansante, Carlo; Fiotti, Nicola; Tamai, Elisa; Tonon, Federica; Grassi, Gabriele

    2013-06-01

    Aptamer researches applied to the treatment of human cancers have increased since their discovery in 1990. This is due to different factors including: 1) the technical possibility to select, by SELEX-based procedures, specific aptamers targeting virtually any given molecule, 2) the aptamer favorable bio-activity in vivo, 3) the low production costs and 4) the ease synthesis and storage for the marketing. In the field of cancer treatments, aptamers have been studied as tumor-specific agents driving drugs into cancer cells; additionally they have been used as anti-neoplastic agents, able to inhibit tumor cell growth and dissemination when administered alone or in combination with conventional anti-neoplastic drugs. Aptamers are gaining an increased interest for pharmaceutical companies and some of them are under clinical evaluation trials. In this review we update the findings about the use of aptamers as "escort" molecules able to drive drugs into the cells and as antineoplastic drugs. Current anti-neoplastic treatments suffer from the intrinsic toxicity related to the un-specific targeting of both normal and tumorigenic proliferating cells. The aptamers could be useful to improve: 1) the selective targeting of molecules essential for the viability and expansion of tumor cells and/or the selective driving of chemotherapies into tumor cells, thus resulting in higher effectiveness and lower systemic side-effects compared to conventional anti-neoplastic drugs alone and 2) to improve the therapeutic index of currently used chemotherapies. Even if some problems related to the in vivo stability and pharmacokinetic/dynamics of aptamers remain to be improved, their potential use in the treatment of different human cancers is getting closer and closer to a practical therapeutic use. PMID:23687927

  13. Human Lipocalin-Type Prostaglandin D Synthase-Based Drug Delivery System for Poorly Water-Soluble Anti-Cancer Drug SN-38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuji, Masatoshi; Inoue, Haruka; Kohno, Masaki; Saito, Mayu; Tsuge, Syogo; Shimizu, Shota; Ishida, Atsuko; Ishibashi, Osamu; Inui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily, which is composed of secretory transporter proteins, and binds a wide variety of small hydrophobic molecules. Using this function, we have reported the feasibility of using L-PGDS as a novel drug delivery vehicle for poorly water-soluble drugs. In this study, we show the development of a drug delivery system using L-PGDS, one that enables the direct clinical use of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), a poorly water-soluble anti-cancer drug. In the presence of 2 mM L-PGDS, the concentration of SN-38 in PBS increased 1,130-fold as compared with that in PBS. Calorimetric experiments revealed that L-PGDS bound SN-38 at a molecular ratio of 1:3 with a dissociation constant value of 60 μM. The results of an in vitro growth inhibition assay revealed that the SN-38/L-PGDS complexes showed high anti-tumor activity against 3 human cancer cell lines, i.e., Colo201, MDA-MB-231, and PC-3 with a potency similar to that of SN-38 used alone. The intravenous administration of SN-38/L-PGDS complexes to mice bearing Colo201 tumors showed a pronounced anti-tumor effect. Intestinal mucositis, which is one of the side effects of this drug, was not observed in mice administered SN-38/L-PGDS complexes. Taken together, L-PGDS enables the direct usage of SN-38 with reduced side effects.

  14. Human Lipocalin-Type Prostaglandin D Synthase-Based Drug Delivery System for Poorly Water-Soluble Anti-Cancer Drug SN-38.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Nakatsuji

    Full Text Available Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS is a member of the lipocalin superfamily, which is composed of secretory transporter proteins, and binds a wide variety of small hydrophobic molecules. Using this function, we have reported the feasibility of using L-PGDS as a novel drug delivery vehicle for poorly water-soluble drugs. In this study, we show the development of a drug delivery system using L-PGDS, one that enables the direct clinical use of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38, a poorly water-soluble anti-cancer drug. In the presence of 2 mM L-PGDS, the concentration of SN-38 in PBS increased 1,130-fold as compared with that in PBS. Calorimetric experiments revealed that L-PGDS bound SN-38 at a molecular ratio of 1:3 with a dissociation constant value of 60 μM. The results of an in vitro growth inhibition assay revealed that the SN-38/L-PGDS complexes showed high anti-tumor activity against 3 human cancer cell lines, i.e., Colo201, MDA-MB-231, and PC-3 with a potency similar to that of SN-38 used alone. The intravenous administration of SN-38/L-PGDS complexes to mice bearing Colo201 tumors showed a pronounced anti-tumor effect. Intestinal mucositis, which is one of the side effects of this drug, was not observed in mice administered SN-38/L-PGDS complexes. Taken together, L-PGDS enables the direct usage of SN-38 with reduced side effects.

  15. Cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitors including palbociclib as anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskoski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) are important regulatory components that are required for cell cycle progression. The levels of the cell cycle CDKs are generally constant and their activities are controlled by cyclins, proteins whose levels oscillate during each cell cycle. Additional CDK family members were subsequently discovered that play significant roles in a wide range of activities including the control of gene transcription, metabolism, and neuronal function. In response to mitogenic stimuli, cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle produce cyclins of the D type that activate CDK4/6. These activated enzymes catalyze the monophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein. Then CDK2-cyclin E catalyzes the hyperphosphorylation of Rb that promotes the release and activation of the E2F transcription factors, which in turn lead to the generation of several proteins required for cell cycle progression. As a result, cells pass through the G1-restriction point and are committed to complete cell division. CDK2-cyclin A, CDK1-cyclin A, and CDK1-cyclin B are required for S, G2, and M-phase progression. Increased cyclin or CDK expression or decreased levels of endogenous CDK inhibitors such as INK4 or CIP/KIP have been observed in various cancers. In contrast to the mutational activation of EGFR, Kit, or B-Raf in the pathogenesis of malignancies, mutations in the CDKs that cause cancers are rare. Owing to their role in cell proliferation, CDKs represent natural targets for anticancer therapies. Abemaciclib (LY2835219), ribociclib (Lee011), and palbociclib (Ibrance(®) or PD0332991) target CDK4/6 with IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. Palbociclib and other CDK inhibitors bind in the cleft between the small and large lobes of the CDKs and inhibit the binding of ATP. Like ATP, palbociclib forms hydrogen bonds with residues in the hinge segment of the cleft. Like the adenine base of ATP, palbociclib interacts with catalytic spine residues CS6 and CS7

  16. A remotely operated drug delivery system with an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2015-07-22

    Implantable drug delivery devices are becoming attractive due to their abilities of targeted and controlled dose release. Currently, two important issues are functional lifetime and non-controlled drug diffusion. In this work, we present a drug delivery device combining an electrolytic pump and a thermo-responsive valve, which are both remotely controlled by an electromagnetic field (40.5 mT and 450 kHz). Our proposed device exhibits a novel operation mechanism for long-term therapeutic treatments using a solid drug in reservoir approach. Our device also prevents undesired drug liquid diffusions. When the electromagnetic field is on, the electrolysis-induced bubble drives the drug liquid towards the Poly (N-Isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) valve that consists of PNIPAM and iron micro-particles. The heat generated by the iron micro-particles causes the PNIPAM to shrink, resulting in an open valve. When the electromagnetic field is turned off, the PNIPAM starts to swell. In the meantime, the bubbles are catalytically recombined into water, reducing the pressure inside the pumping chamber, which leads to the refilling of the fresh liquid from outside the device. A catalytic reformer is included, allowing more liquid refilling during the limited valve\\'s closing time. The amount of body liquid that refills the drug reservoir can further dissolve the solid drug, forming a reproducible drug solution for the next dose. By repeatedly turning on and off the electromagnetic field, the drug dose can be cyclically released, and the exit port of the device is effectively controlled.

  17. Deprive to kill: glutamine closes the gate to anticancer monocarboxylic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-12-01

    Killing properties of antitumor drugs can be enhanced by strategies targeting biochemical adaptations of cancer cells. Recently, we reported that depriving cancer cells of glutamine is a feasible approach to enhance antitumor effects of the alkylating analog of pyruvic acid, 3-bromopyruvate, which rely on the induction of autophagic cell death by metabolic-oxidative stress. 3-bromopyruvate chemopotentiation is the result of its increased intracellular uptake mediated by the monocarboxylate transporter 1, whose expression is post-transcriptionally increased upon glutamine withdrawal. Overall, our results identified the metabolic condition able to increase the selectivity of 3-bromopyruvate targets in neoplastic tissues, thereby providing a stage for its use in clinical settings for targeting malignancies and represent a proof of principle that modulation of glutamine availability can influence the delivery of monocarboxylic drugs into tumors. PMID:22932475

  18. Molecular interaction of a kinase inhibitor midostaurin with anticancer drug targets, S100A8 and EGFR: transcriptional profiling and molecular docking study for kidney cancer therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenat Mirza

    Full Text Available The S100A8 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR proteins are proto-oncogenes that are strongly expressed in a number of cancer types. EGFR promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by activating molecular pathways. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A8 in tumor cell differentiation and progression is largely unclear and not studied in kidney cancer (KC. S100A8 and EGFR are potential therapeutic biomarkers and anticancer drug targets for KC. In this study, we explored molecular mechanisms of interaction profiles of both molecules with potential anticancer drugs. We undertook transcriptional profiling in Saudi KCs using Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST arrays. We identified 1478 significantly expressed genes, including S100A8 and EGFR overexpression, using cut-off p value <0.05 and fold change ≥2. Additionally, we compared and confirmed our findings with expression data available at NCBI's GEO database. A significant number of genes associated with cancer showed involvement in cell cycle progression, DNA repair, tumor morphology, tissue development, and cell survival. Atherosclerosis signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, notch signaling, and IL-12 signaling were the most significantly disrupted signaling pathways. The present study provides an initial transcriptional profiling of Saudi KC patients. Our analysis suggests distinct transcriptomic signatures and pathways underlying molecular mechanisms of KC progression. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the kinase inhibitor "midostaurin" has amongst the selected drug targets, the best ligand properties to S100A8 and EGFR, with the implication that its binding inhibits downstream signaling in KC. This is the first structure-based docking study for the selected protein targets and anticancer drug, and the results indicate S100A8 and EGFR as attractive anticancer targets and midostaurin with effective drug properties for therapeutic intervention in KC.

  19. EFFECTS OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS AS BACTERIAL EFFLUX PUMP INHIBITORS ON QUORUM SENSING REGULATED BEHAVIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aybey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropic drugs are known to have antimicrobial activity against several groups of microorganisms. The antidepressant agents such as duloxetine, paroxetine, hydroxyzine and venlafaxine are shown to act as efflux pump inhibitors in bacterial cells. In order to the investigation of the effects of psychotropic drugs were determined for clinically significant pathogens by using standart broth microdillusion method. The anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS activity of psychotropic drugs was tested against four test pathogens using the agar well diffusion method. All drugs showed strong inhibitory effect on the growth of S. typhimurium. Additionally, quorum sensing-regulated behaviors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production were investigated. Most effective drugs on swarming, swimming and twitching motility and alkaline protease production, respectively, were paroxetine and duloxetine; duloxetine; hydroxyzine and venlafaxine; paroxetine and venlafaxine; venlafaxine. Accordingly, psychotropic drugs were shown strongly anti-QS activity by acting as bacterial efflux pump inhibitors and effection on motility and alkaline protease production of P. aeruginosa.

  20. In vitro characterization of the human biotransformation of marine derived anti-cancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Brandon, E.F.A. (Esther Fleur Annette)

    2004-01-01

    Cancer is the second cause of death in The Netherlands. Although the treatment options over the past few decades have substantially improved, the cure rate for patients with advanced cancer remains low. In addition, hopefully new therapies will induce less severe side effects compared to the present therapies. Overall, new anti cancer drugs are still very much needed to improve treatment outcome of patients. Many active cytotoxic agents originate from natural resources, mainly plants (e.g. pa...

  1. Deprive to kill: Glutamine closes the gate to anticancer monocarboxylic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Cardaci, Simone; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Killing properties of antitumor drugs can be enhanced by strategies targeting biochemical adaptations of cancer cells. Recently, we reported that depriving cancer cells of glutamine is a feasible approach to enhance antitumor effects of the alkylating analog of pyruvic acid, 3-bromopyruvate, which rely on the induction of autophagic cell death by metabolic-oxidative stress. 3-bromopyruvate chemopotentiation is the result of its increased intracellular uptake mediated by the monocarboxylate tr...

  2. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The presence of biologically active monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) on the leaf surfaces of medicinally important Catharanthus roseus has led to questions about the secretion processes involved and their prevalence within MIA-producing species of plants. This report shows that a transporter closely related to those involved in cuticle assembly in plants and belonging to the pleiotropic drug resistance family of ATP-binding cassette transporters is specialized for transport of the MIA ca...

  3. Overcoming EMT-associated resistance to anti-cancer drugs via Src/FAK pathway inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Catherine; Nicholes, Katrina; Bustos, Daisy; Lin, Eva; Song, Qinghua; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Settleman, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and has been associated with cancer metastasis and drug resistance. For example, in EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), EMT has been associated with acquired resistance to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Moreover, “EGFR-addicted” cancer cell lines induced to undergo EMT become erlotinib-resistant in vitro. To identify potential therapeutic vulnerabilities specifically within these mesenchymal, erl...

  4. Smart multifunctional drug delivery towards anticancer therapy harmonized in mesoporous nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seonmi; Singh, Rajendra K.; Khanal, Dipesh; Patel, Kapil D.; Lee, Eun-Jung; Leong, Kam W.; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine seeks to apply nanoscale materials for the therapy and diagnosis of diseased and damaged tissues. Recent advances in nanotechnology have made a major contribution to the development of multifunctional nanomaterials, which represents a paradigm shift from single purpose to multipurpose materials. Multifunctional nanomaterials have been proposed to enable simultaneous target imaging and on-demand delivery of therapeutic agents only to the specific site. Most advanced systems are also responsive to internal or external stimuli. This approach is particularly important for highly potent drugs (e.g. chemotherapeutics), which should be delivered in a discreet manner and interact with cells/tissues only locally. Both advances in imaging and precisely controlled and localized delivery are critically important in cancer treatment, and the use of such systems - theranostics - holds great promise to minimise side effects and boost therapeutic effectiveness of the treatment. Among others, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) are considered one of the most promising nanomaterials for drug delivery. Due to their unique intrinsic features, including tunable porosity and size, large surface area, structural diversity, easily modifiable chemistry and suitability for functionalization, and biocompatibility, MSNPs have been extensively utilized as multifunctional nanocarrier systems. The combination or hybridization with biomolecules, drugs, and other nanoparticles potentiated the ability of MSNPs towards multifunctionality, and even smart actions stimulated by specified signals, including pH, optical signal, redox reaction, electricity and magnetism. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art of multifunctional, smart drug delivery systems centered on advanced MSNPs, with special emphasis on cancer related applications.

  5. Immobilization of coacervate microcapsules in multilayer sodium alginate beads for efficient oral anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao; Song, Ruixi; Sun, Guohui; Kong, Ming; Bao, Zixian; Li, Yang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Cha, Dongsu; Park, Hyunjin; Chen, Xiguang

    2014-03-10

    We have designed and evaluated coacervate microcapsules-immobilized multilayer sodium alginate beads (CMs-M-ALG-Beads) for oral drug delivery. The CMs-M-ALG-Beads were prepared by immobilization of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) loaded chitosan/carboxymethyl coacervate microcapsules (DOX:CS/CMCS-CMs) in the core and layers of the multilayer sodium alginate beads. The obtained CMs-M-ALG-beads exhibited layer-by-layer structure and rough surface with many nanoscale particles. The swelling characteristic and drug release results indicated that 4-layer CMs-M-ALG-Beads possessed favorable gastric acid tolerance (the swelling rate <5%, the cumulative drug release rate <3.8%). In small intestine, the intact DOX:CS/CMCS-CMs were able to rapidly release from CMs-M-ALG-Beads with the dissolution of ALG matrix. Ex vivo intestinal mucoadhesive and permeation showed that CMs-M-ALG-Beads exhibited continued growth for P(app) values of DOX, which was 1.07-1.15 folds and 1.28-1.38 folds higher than DOX:CS:CMCS-CMs in rat jejunum and ileum, respectively, demonstrating that CMs-M-ALG-Beads were able to enhance the absorption of DOX by controlled releasing DOX:CS/CMCS-CMs and prolonging the contact time between the DOX:CS/CMCS-CMs and small intestinal mucosa.

  6. Aptamer-functionalized hydrogel as effective anti-cancer drugs delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Jianfei; Cai, Feng; Zhang, Feifei; Yang, Min; Bi, Sai; Gui, Rijun; Li, Yanhui; Xia, Yanzhi

    2015-10-01

    An aptamer-functionalized hydrogel has been developed, which can be regulated by the AS1411 aptamer with the sol-gel conversion. Also the hydrogel can be further utilized for the controlled encapsulation and release of the cancer drugs. Specially, the AS1411 initiates the hybridization of acrydite-modified oligonucleotides to form the hydrogels and the presence of the target protein nucleolin leads the gel to dissolve as a result of reducing the cross-linking density by competitive target-aptamer binding. Based on the rheology of hydrogels, it is possible to utilize this material for storing and releasing molecules. In this research, the cancer drug doxorubicin is encapsulated inside the gel during the formation of the hydrogel and then released in the presence of nucleolin. Further experiments are carried out to prove the specific recognition of target matter. In vitro researches confirm that the aptamer-functionalized hydrogels can be used as drug carriers in targeted therapy and other biotechnological applications. PMID:26142627

  7. Turning an antiviral into an anticancer drug: nanoparticle delivery of acyclovir monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2013-09-28

    Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) drug acyclovir (ACV) is phosphorylated by the viral thymidine kinase (TK), but not the cellular TK. Phosphorylated ACV inhibits cellular DNA synthesis and kills the infected cells. We hypothesize that ACV monophosphate (ACVP), which is an activated metabolite of ACV, should be efficient in killing cells independent of HSV-TK. If so, ACVP should be a cytotoxic agent if properly delivered to the cancer cells. The Lipid/Calcium/Phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a membrane/core structure were used to encapsulate ACVP to facilitate the targeted delivery of ACVP to the tumor. The LCP NPs showed entrapment efficiency of ~70%, the nano-scaled particle size and positive zeta potential. Moreover, ACVP-loaded LCP NPs (A-LCP NPs) exhibited concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against H460 cells and increased S-phase arrest. More importantly, a significant reduction of the tumor volume over 4 days following administration (pACV and ACVP) and blank LCP NPs showed little or no therapeutic effect. It was also found that the high efficacy of A-LCP NPs was associated with the ability to induce dramatic apoptosis of the tumor cells, as well as significantly inhibit tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, with the help of LCP NPs, monophosphorylation modification of ACV can successfully modify an HSV-TK-dependent antiviral drug into an anti-tumor drug.

  8. Identification of proton-pump inhibitor drugs that inhibit Trichomonas vaginalis uridine nucleoside ribohydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Tara A; Burburan, Paola J; Matubia, Vivian N; Ramcharan, Sandy S; Rosario, Irving; Parkin, David W; Stockman, Brian J

    2014-02-15

    Trichomonas vaginalis continues to be a major health problem with drug-resistant strains increasing in prevalence. Novel antitrichomonal agents that are mechanistically distinct from current therapies are needed. The NIH Clinical Compound Collection was screened to find inhibitors of the uridine ribohydrolase enzyme required by the parasite to scavenge uracil for its growth. The proton-pump inhibitors omeprazole, pantoprazole, and rabeprazole were identified as inhibitors of this enzyme, with IC50 values ranging from 0.3 to 14.5 μM. This suggests a molecular mechanism for the in vitro antitrichomonal activity of these proton-pump inhibitors, and may provide important insights toward structure-based drug design.

  9. In situ cultured preantral follicles is a useful model to evaluate the effect of anticancer drugs on caprine folliculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Denise Damasceno; Lima, Laritza Ferreira de; Rodrigues, Giovanna Quintino; Carvalho, Adeline de Andrade; Castro, Simone Vieira; Campello, Cláudio Cabral; Pessoa, Cláudia do Ó; Gadelha, Carla Renata Figueiredo; Figueiredo, José Ricardo de; Bordignon, Vilceu; Rodrigues, Ana Paula Ribeiro

    2016-08-01

    Despite the increase in the incidence of cancer, the number of women who survive cancer treatment is growing. However, one of the principal results of chemotherapy is premature ovarian failure (POF). The aim of this study was to use the in situ culture preantral follicles as an in vitro model to evaluate the toxicity of two anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DXR) and paclitaxel (PTX), on the integrity and development of ovarian follicles. Fragments of the ovarian cortex of goats were cultured in vitro for 1 or 7 days in α-MEM(+) supplemented with different concentrations of DXR (0.003, 0.03, or 0.3 µg/mL) and PTX (0.001, 0.01, or 0.1 µg/mL). Analyses were performed before and after culture to evaluate tissue integrity by classical histology, apoptosis by TUNEL assay, DNA laddering kit and the detection of activated caspase 3, and DNA damage by the immune detection of phosphorylated histone H2A.x (H2AXph139). Both DXR and PTX reduced the number of morphologically normal primordial and developing follicles. Positive staining for TUNEL and active caspase 3 was detected in all the samples (P < 0.05). Therefore, we propose the in situ culture of caprine preantral follicles as a useful experimental model for assessing the toxic effects of the chemotherapeutic agents on ovarian folliculogenesis. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:773-781, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27311936

  10. Shiga Toxin 1, as DNA Repair Inhibitor, Synergistically Potentiates the Activity of the Anticancer Drug, Mafosfamide, on Raji Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Sestili

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin 1 (Stx1, produced by pathogenic Escherichia coli, targets a restricted subset of human cells, which possess the receptor globotriaosylceramide (Gb3Cer/CD77, causing hemolytic uremic syndrome. In spite of the high toxicity, Stx1 has been proposed in the treatment of Gb3Cer/CD77-expressing lymphoma. Here, we demonstrate in a Burkitt lymphoma cell model expressing this receptor, namely Raji cells, that Stx1, at quasi-non-toxic concentrations (0.05–0.1 pM, inhibits the repair of mafosfamide-induced DNA alkylating lesions, synergistically potentiating the cytotoxic activity of the anticancer drug. Conversely, human promyelocytic leukemia cells HL-60, which do not express Gb3Cer/CD77, were spared by the toxin as previously demonstrated for CD34+ human progenitor cells, and hence, in this cancer model, no additive nor synergistic effects were observed with the combined Stx1/mafosfamide treatment. Our findings suggest that Stx1 could be used to improve the mafosfamide-mediated purging of Gb3Cer/CD77+ tumor cells before autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  11. An alternative approach for quantitative bioanalysis using diluted blood to profile oral exposure of small molecule anticancer drugs in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liederer, Bianca M; Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M; Ubhayakar, Savita S; Deng, Yuzhong

    2013-02-01

    A quantitative bioanalytical method for pharmacokinetic studies using diluted whole blood from serially bled mice was developed. Oral exposure profiles in mice for five model anticancer compounds dacarbazine, gefitinib, gemcitabine, imatinib, and topotecan were determined following discrete and cassette (five-in-one) dosing. Six micro blood samples per animal were collected and added to a fixed amount of water. This dilution served several purposes: the red blood cells were lysed; an anticoagulant was unnecessary and the fluid volume of diluted sample was sufficient for bioanalytical assays. AUC values obtained from blood concentrations were within twofold for discrete and cassette dosing except for imatinib (2.1-fold difference) and in agreement with those obtained from plasma concentrations after discrete dosing. All compounds were stable in plasma and diluted blood samples for at least 2 weeks at approximately -80°C. Matrix and intermatrix effects were evaluated to ensure robustness and integrity of the bioanalytical assays. This method provides significant process improvement by enhancing efficiency for sample collection and processing and reducing resources (e.g., reduced compound, cost, and animal requirement) compared with conventional methods. Our study demonstrates the applicability of using diluted micro blood samples for small molecule quantitative bioanalysis to support mouse studies in drug discovery. PMID:23225118

  12. Affinity of anticancer drug, daunomycin, to core histones in solution:comparison of free and cross-linked proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Azra RABBANI; Sayeh ABDOSAMADI; Naghmeh SARI-SARAF

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The interaction of anthracyclinc anticancer drugs with chromatin, nuclco-somes and historic H1 has been extensively studied. In the present study, for the first time, we have investigated the binding of anthracycline antibiotic, daunomycin,to free and cross-linked thymus core histones (CL-core) in solution and in the absence of DNA. Methods: Fluorescence, UV/Vis spectroscopy and equilibrium dialysis techniques were used. Results: The UV spectroscopy results show that daunomycin induces hypochromicity in the absorption spectra of the core histones.Fluorescence emission intensity is decreased upon daunomycin binding and the process is concentration dependent. The equilibrium dialysis shows that the bind-ing is positive cooperative with the binding sites as Scatchard plot and Hill Coef-ficient confirm it. Conclusion: The results suggest that daunomycin shows much higher affinity to core histories free in solution than to CL-core, implying that the binding is most likely due to the accessibility of these proteins to the environment.It is suggested that daunomycin binds strongly to open state of histones, such as in tumor cells, rather than to their compact structure seen in normal chromatin.

  13. Microfluidic assisted synthesis of multi-functional polycaprolactone microcapsules: incorporation of CdTe quantum dots, Fe3O4 superparamagnetic nanoparticles and tamoxifen anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C-H; Huang, K-S; Lin, Y-S; Lu, K; Tzeng, C-C; Wang, E-C; Lin, C-H; Hsu, W-Y; Chang, J-Y

    2009-04-01

    This paper demonstrates a proof-of-concept approach for encapsulating the anticancer drug tamoxifen, Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) into size-controlled polycaprolactone (PCL) microcapsules utilizing microfluidic emulsification, which combined magnetic targeting, fluorescence imaging and drug controlled release properties into one drug delivery system. Cross-linking the composite PCL microcapsules with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) tailored their size, morphology, optical and magnetic properties and drug release behaviors. The flow conditions of the two immiscible solutions were adjusted in order to successfully generate various sizes of polymer droplets. The result showed superparamagnetic and fluorescent properties, and was used as a controlled drug release vehicle. The composite magnetic and fluorescent PCL microcapsules are potential candidates for a smart drug delivery system. PMID:19294308

  14. Cationic drug-based self-assembled polyelectrolyte complex micelles: Physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, and anticancer activity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Thiruganesh; Poudel, Bijay Kumar; Ruttala, Himabindu; Choi, Ju Yeon; Hieu, Truong Duy; Umadevi, Kandasamy; Youn, Yu Seok; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2016-10-01

    Nanofabrication of polymeric micelles through self-assembly of an ionic block copolymer and oppositely charged small molecules has recently emerged as a promising method of formulating delivery systems. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the interaction of cationic drugs doxorubicin (DOX) and mitoxantrone (MTX) with the anionic block polymer poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO-b-PAA) and to study the influence of these interactions on the pharmacokinetic stability and antitumor potential of the formulated micelles in clinically relevant animal models. To this end, individual DOX and MTX-loaded polyelectrolyte complex micelles (PCM) were prepared, and their physicochemical properties and pH-responsive release profiles were studied. MTX-PCM and DOX-PCM exhibited a different release profile under all pH conditions tested. MTX-PCM exhibited a monophasic release profile with no initial burst, while DOX-PCM exhibited a biphasic release. DOX-PCM showed a higher cellular uptake than that shown by MTX-PCM in A-549 cancer cells. Furthermore, DOX-PCM induced higher apoptosis of cancer cells than that induced by MTX-PCM. Importantly, both MTX-PCM and DOX-PCM showed prolonged blood circulation. MTX-PCM improved the AUCall of MTX 4-fold compared to a 3-fold increase by DOX-PCM for DOX. While a definite difference in blood circulation was observed between MTX-PCM and DOX-PCM in the pharmacokinetic study, both MTX-PCM and DOX-PCM suppressed tumor growth to the same level as the respective free drugs, indicating the potential of PEGylated polymeric micelles as effective delivery systems. Taken together, our results show that the nature of interactions of cationic drugs with the polyionic copolymer can have a tremendous influence on the biological performance of a delivery system. PMID:27318960

  15. Impact analysis of ICH S9 on non-clinical development of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Milton; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Beken, Sonja

    2015-10-01

    Cancer presents a major healthcare challenge worldwide, with several millions new cases a year, and represents a therapeutic area with a high need for new drugs. To respond to this, the parties of the International Conference for Harmonization agreed in 2007 to develop a guideline on nonclinical requirements for oncology therapeutics' development (ICH S9), which came into effect in early 2010. This guideline includes recommendations to facilitate and accelerate the development and marketing of cancer therapeutic agents for serious and life threatening malignancies and aims to address this need through a refinement and a reduction in the use of experimental animals, following the 3Rs principles. To assess the impact of ICH S9 on drug development and reduction of animal use, we performed an analysis of Marketing Authorization Applications at the European Medicines Agency relevant to the period in which the development of the guideline was approaching the final steps and its early implementation period. From the analysis performed, a consistent trend towards a decrease in the average number of non-clinical studies performed (-40.7%) and number of animals used per development program (-58.1%) for new chemical entities has been detected, highlighting increasing compliance by companies to the recommendations of ICH S9. PMID:26232707

  16. Arsenic-Based Drugs: From Fowler's Solution to Modern Anticancer Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibaud, Stéphane; Jaouen, Gérard

    Although arsenic is a poison and has a predominantly unfavorable reputation, it has been used as pharmaceutical agent since the first century BC. In 1786, Thomas Fowler reported the effects of arsenic in the cure of agues, remittent fevers, and periodic headaches. From this time on and despite abusive use, some interesting indications began to appear for trypanosomiasis, syphilis, and blood diseases. The first significant organoarsenical drug (atoxyl) was synthesized by Pierre Antoine Béchamp in 1859 by chemically reacting arsenic acid with aniline but additional experimentations on the properties of arsenic led Paul Ehrlich, the founder of chemotherapy, to the discovery of salvarsan in 1910. From the Second World War, Ernst A.H. Friedheim greatly improved the treatment of trypanosomiasis by melaminophenyl arsenicals. Until the 1990s some organoarsenicals were used for intestinal parasite infections but carcinogenic effects were displayed and all the drugs have been withdrawn in USA, in Europe, and elsewhere. In 2003, arsenic trioxide (Trisenox®) was re-introduced for the treatment of very specific hematological malignancies.

  17. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-09-24

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is highly specialized for the biosynthesis of many different monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), many of which have powerful biological activities. Such MIAs include the commercially important chemotherapy drugs vinblastine, vincristine, and other synthetic derivatives that are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline. However, previous studies have shown that biosynthesis of these MIAs involves extensive movement of metabolites between specialized internal leaf cells and the leaf epidermis that require the involvement of unknown secretory processes for mobilizing catharanthine to the leaf surface and vindoline to internal leaf cells. Spatial separation of vindoline and catharanthine provides a clear explanation for the low levels of dimers that accumulate in intact plants. The present work describes the molecular cloning and functional identification of a unique catharanthine transporter (CrTPT2) that is expressed predominantly in the epidermis of young leaves. CrTPT2 gene expression is activated by treatment with catharanthine, and its in planta silencing redistributes catharanthine to increase the levels of catharanthine-vindoline drug dimers in the leaves. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CrTPT2 is closely related to a key transporter involved in cuticle assembly in plants and that may be unique to MIA-producing plant species, where it mediates secretion of alkaloids to the plant surface. PMID:24019465

  18. Nanomedicine-nanoemulsion formulation improves safety and efficacy of the anti-cancer drug paclitaxel according to preclinical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, King C; Maturo, Claudia; Rodriguez, Robert; Nguyen, Hoang-Lan; Shorr, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Paclitaxel is an important anticancer drug and is currently used to treat a variety of cancers, including ovarian carcinomas, breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. The objectives of the studies were to assess and compare the safety and efficacy of EmPAC (a newly developed nanoemulsion formulation of paclitaxel) versus Taxol (the injectable formulation of paclitaxel involving the use of polyethylated or polyoxyl castor oil currently used in the clinic). The objectives were also to investigate the mechanism for the improved safety and efficacy of EmPAC over Taxol. These results showed that EmPAC had better anti-tumor efficacy than Taxol, according to in vitro cell culture studies and studies in animal tumor models. EmPAC had improved anti-tumor efficacy even in tumor cell lines that are known to be multi-drug resistant. Part of the mechanism of action for the improved efficacy may be related to EmPAC inducing greater cellular uptake of paclitaxel into tumor cells than Taxol did, according to the in vitro cell culture radioactive-labeled studies and in vitro cell culture antibody studies. It may also partly be because EmPAC delivered more paclitaxel to the tumor mass than Taxol, while the delivery of paclitaxel to other tissues (e.g., blood, muscle, liver, spleen, kidney and lung) were similar between the two formulations of paclitaxel, according to studies in animals with tumor xenograft. EmPAC also had better safety than Taxol according to toxicology studies in rabbits. This may be because EmPAC does not contain the toxic ingredients used in formulating Taxol (such as polyethylated or polyoxyl castor oil). These results support the clinical development of the nanoemulsion formulation of paclitaxel.

  19. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Van Kanegan, Michael J.; Dunn, Denise E.; Kaltenbach, Linda S.; Bijal Shah; Dong Ning He; Daniel D. McCoy; Peiying Yang; Jiangnan Peng; Li Shen; Lin Du; Cichewicz, Robert H.; Newman, Robert A; Lo, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-0...

  20. Ultrasonication assisted Layer-by-Layer technology for the preparation of multi-functional anticancer drugs paclitaxel and lapatinib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingcai

    In this dissertation, ultrasonication assisted Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technology for the preparation of multifunctional poorly water-soluble anticancer drug nanoparticles, paclitaxel and lapatinib, has been developed. Many FDA approved drugs are very low soluble in water; therefore, it is very difficult to load and control their release and targeting efficiently, which greatly confines their application. The development of this method will pave the way for the development and application of those low soluble anticancer drugs. In the first part of this dissertation, the first approach for powerful ultrasonication, the top-down approach (sonicating bulk drug crystals in polyelectrolyte solution), was successfully applied for the preparation of the nanoparticles of paclitaxel. For this approach, a 200 nm diameter was a kind of "magic" barrier for colloidal particles prepared. This diameter barrier may be related to the nucleation size of the solvent vapor microbubbles. Consequently, agents enhancing bubbling formation (such as NH4HCO3) were applied to decrease paclitaxel colloid particles to 100-120 nm. Those paclitaxel nanoparticles were Layer-by-Layer coated with a 10-20 nm polycation/polyanion shell to provide aqueous colloidal stability and slower particle dissolution. However, a large obstacle of these powerful ultrasonication methods was a necessity of long ca 45 minutes high power ultrasonication which resulted in TiO2 contamination from titanium electrode. The small amount of TiO2 contamination from ultrasonication did negatively affect the in vivo testing of this system in mice, and had to be removed before low toxicity of the Layer-by-Layer coated paclitaxel nanoparticles were observed. In the second part of the dissertation, the second approach for sonication, the bottom-up approach (sonicating drug in a water-miscible organic solvent followed by slow water add-in) was successfully applied for the preparation of the nanoparticles of lapatinib and paclitaxel

  1. Interaction of anticancer drug methotrexate with nucleic acids analyzed by multi-spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Changqun; Chen, Xiaoming; Gong, Hang

    2009-02-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) as an antifolate, which is widely used as chemotherapeutic drugs. A high-dose MTX therapy has a direct toxicity influence on the non-germinal cells, especially the liver cells. It is known that the inject dose for adults is 10-30 mg and is half for children for routine use, while our experiments showed that the optimum dosage of MTX which enhanced the RLS intensities to the maximum is 4.54 ng ml -1. The interaction of methotrexate (MTX) with nucleic acids in aqueous solution in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), a kind of cationic surfactant similar to the Human cells, were investigated based on the measurements of resonance light scattering (RLS), UV-vis, fluorescence and NMR spectra, etc. The interaction has been proved to give a ternary complex of MTX-CTMAB-DNA in BR buffer (pH 9.30), which exhibits strong enhanced RLS signals at 339.5 nm.

  2. Novel designed polyoxyethylene nonionic surfactant with improved safety and efficiency for anticancer drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chang Li,1 Chunmeng Sun,1 Shasha Li,1 Peng Han,2 Huimin Sun,3 Ammar Ouahab,1 Yan Shen,1 Yourui Xu,1 Yerong Xiong,1 Jiasheng Tu11State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 2Chinese Pharmacopoeia Commission, Beijing, 3National Institute for Food and Drug Control, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: In order to limit the adverse reactions caused by polysorbate 80 in Taxotere®, a widely used formulation of docetaxel, a safe and effective nanocarrier for this drug has been developed based on micelles formed by a new class of well-defined polyoxyethylene sorbitol oleate (PSO with sorbitol as the matrix in aqueous solution. The physicochemical properties of the amphiphilic surfactant and the resulting micelles can be easily fine-tuned by the homogeneous sorbitol matrix and pure oleic acid. Composition, critical micelle concentration, and entrapment efficiency were investigated by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, fluorospectrophotometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography. In vitro and in vivo evaluation revealed that PSO had exceptionally low hemolysis and histamine release rates compared with commercial polysorbate 80. Moreover, the tumor targeting delivery of PSO was investigated by in vivo imaging in S180 tumor-bearing mice. The results suggest that this novel delivery system, PSO, provides an acceptable alternative to polysorbate 80 for delivery of docetaxel. Further, due to the hypoallergenic nature of PSO, the mechanism of pseudoallergy caused by the polyoxyethylene nonionic surfactant was investigated. Based on in vitro cell analysis, it was assumed that the initial contact of polyoxyethylene nonionic surfactant with mast cells provoked pseudoallergy via polyamine receptor-mediated endocytosis.Keywords: polyoxyethylene nonionic surfactant, sorbitol, isosorbide, pseudoallergy

  3. Dual drug delivery using 'smart' liposomes for triggered release of anticancer agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ankit; Gulbake, Arvind; Jain, Ashish; Shilpi, Satish; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K., E-mail: drskjainin@yahoo.com [Dr. Hari Singh Gour Vishwavidyalaya, Pharmaceutics Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-07-15

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most fatal gynecologic cancers. In this debut study, dual approach using synergistically active combination of paclitaxel-topotecan (Pac-Top; 20:1, w/w) is investigated with utilization of characteristic features of tumor micro-environment and additionally overexpressed folate receptors (FR-{alpha}) to achieve targeting to tumor site. Various liposomes namely liposomes, PEGylated liposomes, and FR-targeted PEGylated liposomes with lipid compositions viz. DPPC:DMPG (85.5:9.5), DPPC:DMPG:mPEG{sub 2000}-DSPE (85.5:9.5:5), and DPPC:DMPG:mPEG{sub 2000}-DSPE:DSPE-PEG-folate (85.5:9.5:4.5:0.5), respectively, were developed using thin film casting method. These were nanometric in size around 200 nm. In vitro drug release study showed initial burst release followed by sustained release for more than 72 h at physiological milieu (37 {+-} 0.5 Degree-Sign C, pH 7.4) while burst release (i.e., more than 90 %) within 5 min at simulated tumor milieu (41 {+-} 1 Degree-Sign C, pH 4). SRB cytotoxicity assay in OVCAR-3 cell line revealed Pac-Top free (20:1, w/w) to be more toxic (GI{sub 50} = 6.5 {mu}g/ml) than positive control (Adriamycin, GI{sub 50} = 9.1 {mu}g/ml) and FR-targeted PEGylated liposomes GI{sub 50} (14.7 {mu}g/ml). Moreover, florescence microscopy showed the highest cell uptake of FR-targeted PEGylated liposomes so called 'smart liposomes' which has not only mediated effective targeting to FR-{alpha} but also triggered release of drugs upon hyperthermia.

  4. Folic acid-conjugated pH/temperature/redox multi-stimuli responsive polymer microspheres for delivery of anti-cancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongrong; Feng, Fuli; Wang, Yinsong; Yang, Xiaoying; Yang, Xinlin; Yang, Victor C

    2014-09-01

    The folic acid (FA)-conjugated pH/temperature/redox multi-stimuli responsive poly(methacrylic acid-co-N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-glycidyl methacrylate-co-N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine) microspheres were prepared by a two-stage distillation-precipitation polymerization with subsequent surface modification with FA. The microspheres were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamical light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectra, UV-vis spectra and elemental analysis. The degradation of the functional microspheres could be triggered by a reductive reagent, such as glutathione, due to presence of BAC crosslinker. The drug-loaded microspheres exhibited a pH/temperature/redox multi-stimuli responsive drug release character for doxorubicin hydrochloride as a model anti-cancer drug, which was efficiently loaded into the microspheres with a high loading capacity of 208.0% and an encapsulation efficiency of 85.4%. In vitro drug delivery study indicated that the FA-conjugated microspheres could deliver Dox into MCF-7 cells more efficiently than the microspheres without functionalization of FA. Furthermore, WST-1 assay showed that the microspheres had no obvious toxicity to MCF-7 cells even at a high concentration of 2000 μg mL(-1). The resultant microsphere may be a promising vector for delivery of anti-cancer drugs as it exhibits a low cytotoxicity and degradability, precise molecular targeting property and multi-stimuli responsively controlled drug release. PMID:24935187

  5. 1C-gene array for toxic response using RNA isolated from HepG2 cells treated with anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yulong; Bao, Yijia P.; Xie, Xinying; Mooney, Jeffrey L.; Mueller, Uwe R.; Lai, Fang

    2002-06-01

    The possibility of using microarray technology for mechanistic understanding of drug toxicity has opened up a new research field in Toxicology. In an attempt to build knowledge in the field, we have designed a 1C-gene array composed of 85 known human genes with toxicological interests and 15 control genes. HepG2 cells were treated with ethanol and two anticancer drugs, mitomycin C and doxorubicin. RNA were isolated and labeled by fluorescent dyes, then hybridized to the 1C-gene array. Our results showed that a number of cytochrome P450 genes, such as CYP4F2/3, CYP3A3, CYP24, and CYP51, were consistently responsive to the toxicant treatment. However, different genes response to different toxicants. For example, CYP24 and CYP51 were up regulated by the ethanol treatment but remained unresponsive to the other two drugs. The anticancer drugs, but not ethanol differentially regulated several other genes including CYP3A3, TNFRSF6 and CHES1, implying that the two drugs might function through a similar mechanism, which differs from that of ethanol. The reproducibility of our results suggests that microarray- based expression analysis may offer a rapid and efficient means of assessing drug toxicity.

  6. Recursive Random Lasso (RRLasso for Identifying Anti-Cancer Drug Targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Park

    Full Text Available Uncovering driver genes is crucial for understanding heterogeneity in cancer. L1-type regularization approaches have been widely used for uncovering cancer driver genes based on genome-scale data. Although the existing methods have been widely applied in the field of bioinformatics, they possess several drawbacks: subset size limitations, erroneous estimation results, multicollinearity, and heavy time consumption. We introduce a novel statistical strategy, called a Recursive Random Lasso (RRLasso, for high dimensional genomic data analysis and investigation of driver genes. For time-effective analysis, we consider a recursive bootstrap procedure in line with the random lasso. Furthermore, we introduce a parametric statistical test for driver gene selection based on bootstrap regression modeling results. The proposed RRLasso is not only rapid but performs well for high dimensional genomic data analysis. Monte Carlo simulations and analysis of the "Sanger Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer dataset from the Cancer Genome Project" show that the proposed RRLasso is an effective tool for high dimensional genomic data analysis. The proposed methods provide reliable and biologically relevant results for cancer driver gene selection.

  7. Models of Heart Failure Based on the Cardiotoxicity of Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Valentina; Pirozzi, Flora; Lazzarini, Edoardo; Marone, Giancarlo; Rizzo, Paola; Agnetti, Giulio; Tocchetti, Carlo G; Ghigo, Alessandra; Ameri, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complication of oncological treatments that may have dramatic clinical impact. It may acutely worsen a patient's condition or it may present with delayed onset, even years after treatment, when cancer has been cured or is in stable remission. Several studies have addressed the mechanisms of cancer therapy-related HF and some have led to the definition of disease models that hold valid for other and more common types of HF. Here, we review these models of HF based on the cardiotoxicity of antineoplastic drugs and classify them in cardiomyocyte-intrinsic, paracrine, or potentially secondary to effects on cardiac progenitor cells. The first group includes HF resulting from the combination of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and activation of the DNA damage response, which is typically caused by anthracyclines, and HF resulting from deranged myocardial energetics, such as that triggered by anthracyclines and sunitinib. Blockade of the neuregulin-1/ErbB4/ErbB2, vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and platelet-derived growth factor /platelet-derived growth factor receptor pathways by trastuzumab, sorafenib and sunitinib is proposed as paradigm of cancer therapy-related HF associated with alterations of myocardial paracrine pathways. Finally, anthracyclines and trastuzumab are also presented as examples of antitumor agents that induce HF by affecting the cardiac progenitor cell population. PMID:27103426

  8. ATOX1 gene silencing increases susceptibility to anticancer therapy based on copper ionophores or chelating drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, Vincenza; Spampinato, Giorgia; Musso, Nicolò; Trovato Salinaro, Angela; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Condorelli, Daniele Filippo

    2016-03-01

    Copper is a catalytic cofactor required for the normal function of many enzymes involved in fundamental biological processes but highly cytotoxic when in excess. Therefore its homeostasis and distribution is strictly regulated by a network of transporters and intracellular chaperones. ATOX1 (antioxidant protein 1) is a copper chaperone that plays a role in copper homeostasis by binding and transporting cytosolic copper to ATPase proteins in the trans-Golgi network. In the present study the Caco-2 cell line, a colon carcinoma cell line, was used as an in vitro model to evaluate if ATOX1 deficiency could affect sensitivity to experimentally induced copper dyshomeostasis. Silencing of ATOX1 increased toxicity of a short treatment with a high concentration of Cu(2+). Copper ionophores, such as 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinoline, induced a copper-dependent cell toxicity which was significantly potentiated after ATOX1 silencing. The copper chelator TPEN (N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine) produced a form of cell toxicity that was reversed by the addition of Cu(2+). ATOX1 silencing increased Caco-2 cell sensitivity to TPEN toxicity. Our results suggest the possibility of a therapy with copper-chelating or ionophore drugs in subtypes of tumors showing specific alterations in ATOX1 expression. PMID:26784148

  9. Low-density lipoprotein peptide-combined DNA nanocomplex as an efficient anticancer drug delivery vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Tao, Jun; Hua, Haiying; Sun, Pengchao; Zhao, Yongxing

    2015-08-01

    DNA is a type of potential biomaterials for drug delivery due to its nanoscale geometry, loading capacity of therapeutics, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Unfortunately, DNA is easily degraded by DNases in the body circulation and has low intracellular uptake. In the present study, we selected three cationic polymers polyethylenimine (PEI), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor targeted peptide (RLT), to modify DNA and improve the issues. A potent anti-tumor anthracycline-doxorubicin (DOX) was intercalated into DNA non-covalently and the DOX/DNA was then combined with PEI, CTAB, and RLT, respectively. Compact nanocomplexes were formed by electrostatic interaction and could potentially protect DNA from DNases. More importantly, RLT had the potential to enhance intracellular uptake by LDL receptor mediated endocytosis. In a series of in vitro experiments, RLT complexed DNA enhanced intracellular delivery of DOX, increased tumor cell death and intracellular ROS production, and reduced intracellular elimination of DOX. All results suggested that the easily prepared and targeted RLT/DNA nanocomplexes had great potential to be developed into a formulation for doxorubicin with enhanced anti-tumor activity.

  10. The anticancer drug tamoxifen counteracts the pathology in a mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorchies, Olivier M; Reutenauer-Patte, Julie; Dahmane, Elyes; Ismail, Heham M; Petermann, Olivier; Patthey- Vuadens, Ophélie; Comyn, Sophie A; Gayi, Elinam; Piacenza, Tony; Handa, Robert J; Décosterd, Laurent A; Ruegg, Urs T

    2013-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting,respiratory and cardiac impairments, and premature death. No treatment exists so far, and the identification of active substances to fight DMD is urgently needed. We found that tamoxifen, a drug used to treat estrogen-dependent breast cancer, caused remarkable improvements of muscle force and of diaphragm and cardiac structure in the mdx(5Cv) mouse model of DMD. Oral tamoxifen treatment from 3 weeks of age for 15 months at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day stabilized myofiber membranes, normalized whole body force, and increased force production and resistance to repeated contractions of the triceps muscle above normal values. Tamoxifen improved the structure of leg muscles and diminished cardiac fibrosis by~ 50%. Tamoxifen also reduced fibrosis in the diaphragm, while increasing its thickness,myofiber count, and myofiber diameter, thereby augmenting by 72% the amount of contractile tissue available for respiratory function. Tamoxifen conferred a markedly slower phenotype to the muscles.Tamoxifen and its metabolites were present in nanomolar concentrations in plasma and muscles,suggesting signaling through high-affinity targets. Interestingly, the estrogen receptors ERa and ERb were several times more abundant in dystrophic than in normal muscles, and tamoxifen normalized the relative abundance of ERb isoforms. Our findings suggest that tamoxifen might be a useful therapy for DMD.

  11. Gossypol-Capped Mitoxantrone-Loaded Mesoporous SiO2 NPs for the Cooperative Controlled Release of Two Anti-Cancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heleg-Shabtai, Vered; Aizen, Ruth; Sharon, Etery; Sohn, Yang Sung; Trifonov, Alexander; Enkin, Natalie; Freage, Lina; Nechushtai, Rachel; Willner, Itamar

    2016-06-15

    Mesoporous SiO2 nanoparticles, MP-SiO2 NPs, are functionalized with the boronic acid ligand units. The pores of the MP-SiO2 NPs are loaded with the anticancer drug mitoxantrone, and the pores are capped with the anticancer drug gossypol. The resulting two-drug-functionalized MP-SiO2 NPs provide a potential stimuli-responsive anticancer drug carrier for cooperative chemotherapeutic treatment. In vitro experiments reveal that the MP-SiO2 NPs are unlocked under environmental conditions present in cancer cells, e.g., acidic pH and lactic acid overexpressed in cancer cells. The effective unlocking of the capping units under these conditions is attributed to the acidic hydrolysis of the boronate ester capping units and to the cooperative separation of the boronate ester bridges by the lactate ligand. The gossypol-capped mitoxantrone-loaded MP-SiO2 NPs reveals preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells and cooperative chemotherapeutic activities toward the cancer cells. The MCF-10A epithelial breast cells and the malignant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells treated with the gossypol-capped mitoxantrone-loaded MP-SiO2 NPs revealed after a time-interval of 5 days a cell death of ca. 8% and 60%, respectively. Also, the gossypol-capped mitoxantrone-loaded MP-SiO2 NPs revealed superior cancer-cell death (ca. 60%) as compared to control carriers consisting of β-cyclodextrin-capped mitoxantrone-loaded (ca. 40%) under similar loading of the mitoxantrone drug. The drugs-loaded MP-SiO2 NPs reveal impressive long-term stabilities. PMID:27186957

  12. Deep sea as a source of novel-anticancer drugs: update on discovery and preclinical/clinical evaluation in a systems medicine perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Patrizia; Del Bufalo, Alessandra; Fini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The deep-sea habitat is a source of very potent marine-derived agents that may inhibit the growth of human cancer cells "in vitro" and "in vivo". Salinosporamide-A, Marizomib, by Salinispora species is a proteasome inhibitor with promising anticancer activity (Phase I/II trials). Different deep-sea-derived drugs are under preclinical evaluation. Cancer is a complex disease that may be represented by network medicine. A simple consequence is the change of the concept of target entity from a single protein to a whole molecular pathway and or cellular network. Deep-sea-derived drugs fit well to this new concept. PMID:26600744

  13. Anticancer drug mithramycin interacts with core histones: An additional mode of action of the DNA groove binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mithramycin (MTR is a clinically approved DNA-binding antitumor antibiotic currently in Phase 2 clinical trials at National Institutes of Health for treatment of osteosarcoma. In view of the resurgence in the studies of this generic antibiotic as a human medicine, we have examined the binding properties of MTR with the integral component of chromatin – histone proteins – as a part of our broad objective to classify DNA-binding molecules in terms of their ability to bind chromosomal DNA alone (single binding mode or both histones and chromosomal DNA (dual binding mode. The present report shows that besides DNA, MTR also binds to core histones present in chromatin and thus possesses the property of dual binding in the chromatin context. In contrast to the MTR–DNA interaction, association of MTR with histones does not require obligatory presence of bivalent metal ion like Mg2+. As a consequence of its ability to interact with core histones, MTR inhibits histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18, an important signature of active chromatin, in vitro and ex vivo. Reanalysis of microarray data of Ewing sarcoma cell lines shows that upon MTR treatment there is a significant down regulation of genes, possibly implicating a repression of H3K18Ac-enriched genes apart from DNA-binding transcription factors. Association of MTR with core histones and its ability to alter post-translational modification of histone H3 clearly indicates an additional mode of action of this anticancer drug that could be implicated in novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Core/shell structured hollow mesoporous nanocapsules: a potential platform for simultaneous cell imaging and anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Chen, Hangrong; Zeng, Deping; Tian, Yunbo; Chen, Feng; Feng, Jingwei; Shi, Jianlin

    2010-10-26

    A potential platform for simultaneous anticancer drug delivery and MRI cell imaging has been demonstrated by uniform hollow inorganic core/shell structured multifunctional mesoporous nanocapsules, which are composed of functional inorganic (Fe(3)O(4), Au, etc.) nanocrystals as cores, a thin mesoporous silica shell, and a huge cavity in between. The synthetic strategy for the creation of huge cavities between functional core and mesoporous silica shell is based on a structural difference based selective etching method, by which solid silica middle layer of Fe(2)O(3)@SiO(2)@mSiO(2) (or Au@SiO(2)@mSiO(2)) composite nanostructures was selectively etched away while the mesoporous silica shell could be kept relatively intact. The excellent biocompatibility of obtained multifunctional nanocapsules (Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2)) was demonstrated by very low cytotoxicity against various cell lines, low hemolyticity against human blood red cells and no significant coagulation effect against blood plasma. The cancer cell uptake and intracellular location of the nanocapsules were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and bio-TEM. Importantly, the prepared multifunctional inorganic mesoporous nanocapsules show both high loading capacity (20%) and efficiency (up to 100%) for doxorubicin simultaneously because of the formation of the cavity, enhanced surface area/pore volume and the electrostatic interaction between DOX molecules and mesoporous silica surface. Besides, the capability of Fe(3)O(4)@mSiO(2) nanocapsules as contrast agents of MRI was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, indicating the simultaneous imaging and therapeutic multifunctionalities of the composite nanocapsules. Moreover, the concept of multifunctional inorganic nanocapsules was extended to design and prepare Gd-Si-DTPA grafted Au@mSiO(2) nanocapsules for nanomedical applications, further demonstrating the generality of this strategy for the preparation of various multifunctional mesoporous nanocapsules

  15. Modeling of hyaluronic acid containing anti-cancer drugs-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid bioconjugates for targeted delivery to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul-e-Saba, Adulphakdee, A.; Madthing, A.; Zafar, M. N.; Abdullah, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular modeling of hyaluronan (HA), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polyethylene glycol-bis-amine (PEG-bis-amine), Curcumin, Cisplatin and the conjugate HA-PEG-PLGA containing Curcumin/Cisplatin were performed using Discovery Studio 2.5 to better understand issues and constraints related to targeted delivery of potent anticancer drugs to cancer cells. HA, a versatile biopolymer is a ligand of cancer cell receptor, CD44 that can be particularly useful in a receptor-mediated cellular uptake of drug-incorporated nanoparticles. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers, PLGA and PEG, serve as polymeric micelles for controlled-release of drug. Curcumin as a natural anticancer agent has poor solubility that limits its use in drug therapeutics, while platinum-based Cisplatin exhibits systemic cytotoxicity. These can be overcome via drug delivery in polymeric biocompatible vehicles. The PLGA-PEG-HA conjugate shows the total measurement of 105 bond length with average bond length of 1.274163 Å. The conjugation between PEG and HA occurs at C8-O1 atoms and can be manipulated to improve properties.

  16. Metallomics for drug development: a further insight into intracellular activation chemistry of a ruthenium(III)-based anticancer drug gained using a multidimensional analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matczuk, Magdalena; Prządka, Monika; Aleksenko, Svetlana S; Czarnocki, Zbigniew; Pawlak, Katarzyna; Timerbaev, Andrei R; Jarosz, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism by which the most relevant ruthenium anticancer drugs are activated in tumors to commence their tumor-inhibiting action remains one of the challenging research tasks of present-day metallomics. This contribution aims to capture and identify eventually more reactive species of one of two bis-indazole tetrachloridoruthenate(III) compounds that are progressing in clinical trials. In view of the fact that the transport of ruthenium into cancer cells is governed by transferrin receptors, the susceptibility of the Ru drug adduct with holo-transferrin to exposure by glutathione and ascorbic acid (at their cancer cytosol concentrations) was studied by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), following isolation of the reaction products by ultrafiltration. Next, capillary electrophoresis coupled to ICP-MS was applied to monitor changes in the Ru speciation both under simulated cancer cytosol conditions and in real cytosol and to assign the charge state of novel metal species. The latter were identified by using tandem electrospray ionization MS in the respective ion mode. The formation of ruthenium(II) species was for the first time revealed, in which the central metal is coordinated by the reduced (GSH) or the oxidized (GSSG) form of glutathione, i.e. [Ru(II)HindCl4(GSH)](2-) and [Ru(II)HindCl4(GSSG)](2-), respectively (Hind = indazole). Ascorbic acid released the ruthenium functionality from the protein-bound form in a different way, the products of adduct cleavage containing aqua ligands. Distribution of low-molecular mass species of Ru in human cytosol was found to have very much in common with the ruthenium speciation assayed under simulated cytosol conditions.

  17. Titanium(IV) targets phosphoesters on nucleotides: implications for the mechanism of action of the anticancer drug titanocene dichloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, M; Guo, Z; Sadler, P J

    2001-09-01

    Abstract Reactions between the anticancer drug titanocene dichloride (Cp2TiCl2) and various nucleotides and their constituents in aqueous solution or N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) have been investigated by 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy and in the solid state by IR spectroscopy. In aqueous solution over the pH* (pH meter reading in D2O) range 2.3-6.5, CMP forms one new species with Ti(IV) bound only to the phosphate group. In acidic media at pH*TMP approximately AMP > CMP. At pH* > 7.0, hydrolysis of Cp2TiCl2 predominated and little reaction with the nucleotides was observed. Binding of deoxyribose 5'-phosphate and 4-nitrophenyl phosphate to Cp2TiCl2(aq) via their phosphate groups was detected by 31P NMR spectroscopy, but no reaction between Cp2TiCl2(aq) and deoxyguanosine, 9-ethylguanine or deoxy-D-ribose was observed in aqueous solution. The nucleoside phosphodiesters 3',5'-cyclic GMP and 2',3'-cyclic CMP did not react with Cp2TiCl2(aq) in aqueous solution; however, in the less polar solvent DMF, 3',5'-cyclic GMP coordination to [Cp2Ti]2+ via its phosphodiester group was readily observed. Binding of titanocene to the phosphodiester group of the dinucleotide GpC was also observed in DMF by 31P NMR. The nucleoside triphosphates ATP and GTP reacted more extensively with Cp2TiCl2(aq) than their monophosphates; complexes with bound phosphate groups were formed in acidic media and to a lesser extent at neutral pH. Cleavage of phosphate bonds in ATP (and GTP) by Cp2TiCl2(aq) to form inorganic phosphate, AMP (or GMP) and ADP (or GDP) was observed in aqueous solutions. In addition, titanocene binding to ATP was not inhibited by Mg(II), but the ternary complex titanocene-ATP-Mg appeared to form. These reactions contrast markedly with those of the drug cisplatin, which binds predominantly to the base nitrogen atoms of nucleotides and only weakly to the phosphate groups. The high affinity of Ti(IV) for phosphate groups may be important for its biological activity. PMID:11681703

  18. Analysis of damaged DNA / proteins interactions: Methodological optimizations and applications to DNA lesions induced by platinum anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA lesions contribute to the alteration of DNA structure, thereby inhibiting essential cellular processes. Such alterations may be beneficial for chemotherapies, for example in the case of platinum anticancer agents. They generate bulky adducts that, if not repaired, ultimately cause apoptosis. A better understanding of the biological response to such molecules can be obtained through the study of proteins that directly interact with the damages. These proteins constitute the DNA lesions interactome. This thesis presents the development of tools aiming at increasing the list of platinum adduct-associated proteins. Firstly, we designed a ligand fishing system made of damaged plasmids immobilized onto magnetic beads. Three platinum drugs were selected for our study: cisplatin, oxali-platin and satra-platin. Following exposure of the trap to nuclear extracts from HeLa cancer cells and identification of retained proteins by proteomics, we obtained already known candidates (HMGB1, hUBF, FACT complex) but also 29 new members of the platinated-DNA interactome. Among them, we noted the presence of PNUTS, TOX4 and WDR82, which associate to form the recently-discovered PTW/PP complex. Their capture was then confirmed with a second model, namely breast cancer cell line MDA MB 231, and the biological consequences of such an interaction now need to be elucidated. Secondly, we adapted a SPRi bio-chip to the study of platinum-damaged DNA/proteins interactions. Affinity of HMGB1 and newly characterized TOX4 for adducts generated by our three platinum drugs could be validated thanks to the bio-chip. Finally, we used our tools, as well as analytical chemistry and biochemistry methods, to evaluate the role of DDB2 (a factor involved in the recognition of UV-induced lesions) in the repair of cisplatin adducts. Our experiments using MDA MB 231 cells differentially expressing DDB2 showed that this protein is not responsible for the repair of platinum damages. Instead, it appears to act

  19. Developing multi-cellular tumor spheroid model (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Zheng; Zhu, Yu-Xia; Ma, Hui-Chao; Chen, Si-Nan; Chao, Ji-Ye; Ruan, Wen-Ding; Wang, Duo; Du, Feng-guang; Meng, Yue-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a 3D MCTS-CCA system was constructed by culturing multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening. The CCA scaffolds were fabricated by spray-spinning. The interactions between the components of the spray-spun fibers were evidenced by methods of Coomassie Blue stain, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Co-culture indicated that MCF-7 cells showed a spatial growth pattern of multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the CCA fibrous scaffold with increased proliferation rate and drug-resistance to MMC, ADM and 5-Aza comparing with the 2D culture cells. Significant increases of total viable cells were found in 3D MCTS groups after drug administration by method of apoptotic analysis. Glucose-lactate analysis indicated that the metabolism of MCTS in CCA scaffold was closer to the tumor issue in vivo than the monolayer cells. In addition, MCTS showed the characteristic of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) which is subverted by carcinoma cells to facilitate metastatic spread. These results demonstrated that MCTS in CCA scaffold possessed a more conservative phenotype of tumor than monolayer cells, and anticancer drug screening in 3D MCTS-CCA system might be superior to the 2D culture system. PMID:26952417

  20. 1H NMR detection of mobile lipids as a marker for apoptosis: The case of anti-cancer drug-loaded liposomes and polymeric micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchio, T.; Toniutti, M.; Kautz, R.; Torchilin, V.P.

    2009-01-01

    Cultured cancer cells undergoing apoptosis show an increase in the NMR signal at a chemical shift of 1.3 ppm (-CH2-) corresponding to the so-called “mobile lipids” (ML) originating from the mobile acyl chains in triacylglycerides. A single NMR spectrum can provide an overview of the cellular metabolic changes caused by anticancer drugs providing qualitative and quantitative information on cellular metabolites. With this in mind, we studied the appearance of ML resonance in BT-20 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells after their exposure to paclitaxel-loaded liposomes and polymeric micelles as a method to follow the apoptotic activity initiated by drug-loaded pharmaceutical nanocarriers. BT-20 and MCF-7 cells were incubated with 1.5 μg/mL paclitaxel–loaded liposomes or micelles for 24, 48 and 72 hrs in DMEM medium. Empty liposomes and micelles and untreated cells were used as controls. The progression of apoptosis induced in cancer cells by drug-loaded nanocarriers was readily detectable by NMR with a markedly increased area of the ML peak at 1.3 ppm. The presence of liposome- and micelle-forming materials did not induce or interfere with the increase in ML signals. Thus, the use of NMR for the detection of ML as a marker of apoptosis can be successfully applied to the study of pharmacological effects of anti-cancer drugs loaded into pharmaceutical nanocarriers. PMID:19737025

  1. A New Anticancer Drug

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Haiyan; Zhao Baohua

    2002-01-01

    @@ After some six years of hard work, a research team headed by Prof. Liu Zhivu (Z.Y. Liu) at the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, CAS, has scored major progress in independently generating a novel cancer killer called epothilone. Their findings have been granted three patents, and their research paper Total Synthesis of Epothilone: A Thorough Stereospecific Expoxidation of the 3-0-(4-methoxy) Benzyl Ether of Epothilone C has been accepted for publication in the Chemistry - European Journal.

  2. A novel hybrid drug between two potent anti-tubulin agents as a potential prolonged anticancer approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Paolo; Pavan, Barbara; Simoni, Daniele; Baruchello, Riccardo; Rondanin, Riccardo; Mischiati, Carlo; Feriotto, Giordana; Ferraro, Luca; Hsu, Lih-Ching; Lee, Ray M; Dalpiaz, Alessandro

    2016-08-25

    We report the design, synthesis and biological characterisation of a novel hybrid drug by conjugation of two tubulin inhibitors, a hemiasterlin derivative A (H-Mpa-Tle-Aha-OH), obtained by condensation of three non-natural amino acids, and cis-3,4',5-trimethoxy-3'aminostilbene (B). As we have previously demonstrated synergy between A and B, we used a monocarbonyl derivative of triethylene glycol as linker (L) to synthesise compounds A-L and A-L-B; via HPLC we analysed the release of its potential hydrolysis products A, A-L, B and B-L in physiological fluids: the hybrid A-L-B undergo hydrolysis in rat whole blood of the ester bond between A and L (half-life=118.2±9.5min) but not the carbamate bond between B and L; the hydrolysis product B-L was further hydrolyzed, but with a slower rate (half-life=288±12min). The compound A-L was the faster hydrolyzed conjugate (half-life=25.4±1.1min). The inhibitory activity of the compounds against SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell growth was analysed. The IC50 values were 7.48±1.27nM for A, 40.3±6.28nM for B, 738±38.5nM for A-L and 37.9±2.11nM for A-L-B. The anticancer effect of A-L-B was evidenced to be obtained via microtubule dynamics suppression. Finally, we stated the expression of the active efflux transporters P-gp (ABCB1) and MRP1 (ABCC1) in the human normal colon epithelial NCM460 cell line by reverse-transcription PCR. Via permeation studies across NCM460 monolayers we demonstrate the poor aptitude of A to interact with active efflux transporters (AET): indeed, the ratio between its permeability coefficients for the basolateral (B)→apical (A) and B→A transport was 1.5±0.1, near to the ratio of taltobulin (1.12±0.06), an hemiasterlin derivative able to elude AETs, and significantly different form the ratio of celiprolol (3.4±0.2), an AET substrate. PMID:27262542

  3. On the development of models in mice of advanced visceral metastatic disease for anti-cancer drug testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shan; Munoz, Raquel; Kerbel, Robert S

    2007-12-01

    It is well known clinically that advanced, bulky visceral metastatic disease is generally much less responsive to most anti-cancer therapies, compared to microscopic metastatic disease. This problem is exacerbated when treating cancers that have been previously exposed to multiple lines of therapy, and which have acquired a 'refractory' phenotype. However, mimicking such clinical treatment situations in preclinical mouse models involving the testing of new or existing cancer therapies is extremely rare. Treatment of 'metastasis', in retrospect, usually involves minimal residual disease and therapy naïve tumors. This could account in many instances for the failure to reproduce highly encouraging preclinical results in subsequent phase I or phase II clinical trials. To that end, we have embarked on an experimental program designed to develop models of advanced, visceral metastatic disease, in some cases involving tumors previously exposed to various therapies. The strategy first involves the orthotopic transplantation of a human cancer cell line, such as breast cancer cell line, into the mammary fat pads of immune deficient mice, followed by surgical resection of the resultant primary tumors that develops. Recovery of distant macroscopic metastases, usually in the lungs, is then undertaken, which can take up to 4 months to visibly form. Cell lines are established from such metastases and the process of orthotopic transplantation, surgical resection, and recovery of distant metastases is undertaken, at least one more time. Using such an approach highly metastatically aggressive variant sublines can be obtained, provided they are once again injected into an orthotopic site and the primary tumors removed by surgery. By waiting sufficient time after removal of the primary tumors, about only 1 month, mice with extensive metastatic disease in sites such as the lungs, liver, and lymph nodes can be obtained. An example of therapy being initiated in an advanced stage of such

  4. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of phase II drug metabolizing/antioxidant enzymes gene response by anticancer agent sulforaphane in rat lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-Yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-10-01

    This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (iv) administration of an anticancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN). SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of each of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted and converted to cDNA, quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed, and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko's indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus and bootstrap method. SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-κB, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5-fold) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increases (>5-fold) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus and the bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after iv administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD response of lymphocyte mRNA expression is

  5. Developing an Anticancer Copper(II) Pro-Drug Based on the His242 Residue of the Human Serum Albumin Carrier IIA Subdomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jinxu; Zhang, Yao; Gou, Yi; Zhang, Zhenlei; Zhou, Zuping; Wu, Xiaoyang; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    To increase delivery efficiency, anticancer activity, and selectivity of anticancer metal agents in vivo, we proposed to develop the anticancer metal pro-drug based on His242 residue of the human serum albumin (HSA) carrier IIA subdomain. To confirm our hypothesis, we prepared two Cu(II) compounds [Cu(P4 mT)Cl and Cu(Bp44 mT)Cl] by modifying Cu(II) compound ligand structure. Studies with two HSA complex structures revealed that Cu(P4 mT)Cl bound to the HSA subdomain IIA via hydrophobic interactions, but Cu(Bp44 mT)Cl bound to the HSA subdomain IIA via His242 replacement of a Cl atom of Cu(Bp44 mT)Cl, and a coordination to Cu(2+). Furthermore, Cu(II) compounds released from HSA could be regulated at different pHs. In vivo data revealed that the HSA-Cu(Bp44 mT) complex increased copper's selectivity and capacity of inhibiting tumor growth compared to Cu(Bp44 mT)Cl alone. PMID:27017838

  6. 常用抗肿瘤药物基因组学研究进展%Research progress on pharmacogenomics of anti-cancer drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝志英; 李云娥

    2013-01-01

    药物基因组学的研究进展在指导临床个体化用药、阐明个体差异方面具有重要作用。常用抗肿瘤药物在肿瘤治疗中使用频率最高,是一线方案的首选药物。通过对常用抗肿瘤药物基因组学的分析研究,找到不同患者在基因层面的个体差异,达到预测化疗疗效、选定最佳剂量、减少不良反应的目的,从而实现真正意义上的个体化用药。%Research progress on pharmacogenomics plays an important role in aspects such as guiding individualized medication in clinical setting and illustrating difference between individuals. Commonly anti-cancer drugs in the treatment of tumor in the highest frequency of use, is the preferred first-line drugs regimen.Through analysis and research on pharmacogenomics of commonly anti-cancer drugs, differences of the genetic level between patients are identified with the aim of predicting effects of chemotherapy, determining optimal dosage and reducing adverse reaction. As a result, true individualized medication can be realized.

  7. Proapoptotic and Antiproliferative Effects of Thymus caramanicus on Human Breast Cancer Cell Line (MCF-7 and Its Interaction with Anticancer Drug Vincristine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Esmaeili-Mahani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymus caramanicus Jalas is one of the species of thymus that grows in the wild in different regions of Iran. Traditionally, leaves of this plant are used in the treatment of diabetes, arthritis, and cancerous situation. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the selective cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties of Thymus caramanicus extract (TCE. MCF-7 human breast cancer cells were used in this study. Cytotoxicity of the extract was determined using MTT and neutral red assays. Biochemical markers of apoptosis (caspase 3, Bax, and Bcl-2 and cell proliferation (cyclin D1 were evaluated by immunoblotting. Vincristine was used as anticancer control drug in extract combination therapy. The data showed that incubation of cells with TCE (200 and 250 μg/mL significantly increased cell damage, activated caspase 3 and Bax/Bcl2 ratio. In addition, cyclin D1 was significantly decreased in TCE-treated cells. Furthermore, concomitant treatment of cells with extract and anticancer drug produced a significant cytotoxic effect as compared to extract or drugs alone. In conclusion, thymus extract has a potential proapoptotic/antiproliferative property against human breast cancer cells and its combination with chemotherapeutic agent vincristine may induce cell death effectively and be a potent modality to treat this type of cancer.

  8. Enhanced sensitivity of A549 cells to the cytotoxic action of anticancer drugs via suppression of Nrf2 by procyanidins from Cinnamomi Cortex extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Takashi; Itoi, Ayano; Kawana, Ayako; Nishiyama, Takahito; Ogura, Kenichiro [Department of Drug Metabolism and Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Hiratsuka, Akira, E-mail: hiratuka@toyaku.ac.jp [Department of Drug Metabolism and Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} We found a novel inhibitor of Nrf2 known as a chemoresistance factor. {yields} Overexpressed Nrf2 in lung cancer cells was suppressed by Cinnamomi Cortex extract. {yields} Cytotoxic action of anticancer drugs in cells treated with the extract was enhanced. {yields} Procyanidin tetramers and pentamers were active components in suppressing Nrf2. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an important cytoprotective transcription factor because Nrf2-regulated enzymes play a key role in antioxidant and detoxification processes. Recent studies have reported that lung cancer cells overexpressing Nrf2 exhibit increased resistance to chemotherapy. Suppression of overexpressed Nrf2 is needed for a new therapeutic approach against lung cancers. In the present study, we found that Cinnamomi Cortex extract (CCE) has an ability to suppress Nrf2-regulated enzyme activity and Nrf2 expression in human lung cancer A549 cells with high Nrf2 activity. Moreover, we demonstrated that CCE significantly enhances sensitivity of A549 cells to the cytotoxic action of doxorubicin and etoposide as well as increasing the intracellular accumulation of both drugs. These results suggest that CCE might be an effective concomitant agent to reduce anticancer drug resistance derived from Nrf2 overexpression. Bioactivity-guided fractionation revealed that procyanidin tetramers and pentamers contained in CCE were active components in suppressing Nrf2.

  9. Localized sequence-specific release of a chemopreventive agent and an anticancer drug in a time-controllable manner to enhance therapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen-Yu; Lin, Kun-Ju; Huang, Chieh-Cheng; Chiang, Wei-Lun; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lin, Wei-Chih; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Chang, Yen; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2016-09-01

    Combination chemotherapy with multiple drugs commonly requires several injections on various schedules, and the probability that the drug molecules reach the diseased tissues at the proper time and effective therapeutic concentrations is very low. This work elucidates an injectable co-delivery system that is based on cationic liposomes that are adsorbed on anionic hollow microspheres (Lipos-HMs) via electrostatic interaction, from which the localized sequence-specific release of a chemopreventive agent (1,25(OH)2D3) and an anticancer drug (doxorubicin; DOX) can be thermally driven in a time-controllable manner by an externally applied high-frequency magnetic field (HFMF). Lipos-HMs can greatly promote the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in tumor cells by reducing their cytoplasmic expression of an antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase) by 1,25(OH)2D3, increasing the susceptibility of cancer cells to the cytotoxic action of DOX. In nude mice that bear xenograft tumors, treatment with Lipos-HMs under exposure to HFMF effectively inhibits tumor growth and is the most effective therapeutic intervention among all the investigated. These empirical results demonstrate that the synergistic anticancer effects of sequential release of 1,25(OH)2D3 and DOX from the Lipos-HMs may have potential for maximizing DOX cytotoxicity, supporting more effective cancer treatment. PMID:27294541

  10. Nanoporous capsules of block co-polymers of [(MeO-PEG-NH)-b-(L-GluA)]-PCL for the controlled release of anticancer drugs for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amgoth, Chander; Dharmapuri, Gangappa; Kalle, Arunasree M.; Paik, Pradip

    2016-03-01

    Herein, new nanoporous capsules of the block co-polymers of MeO-PEG-NH-(L-GluA)10 and polycaprolactone (PCL) have been synthesized through a surfactant-free cost-effective self-assembled soft-templating approach for the controlled release of drugs and for therapeutic applications. The nanoporous polymer capsules are designed to be biocompatible and are capable of encapsulating anticancer drugs (e.g., doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and imatinib mesylate (ITM)) with a high extent (˜279 and ˜480 ng μg-1, respectively). We have developed a nanoformulation of porous MeO-PEG-NH-(L-GluA)10-PCL capsules with DOX and ITM. The porous polymer nanoformulations have been programmed in terms of the release of anticancer drugs with a desired dose to treat the leukemia (K562) and human carcinoma cells (HepG2) in vitro and show promising IC50 values with a very high mortality of cancer cells (up to ˜96.6%). Our nanoformulation arrests the cell divisions due to ‘cellular scenescence’ and kills the cancer cells specifically. The present findings could enrich the effectiveness of idiosyncratic nanoporous polymer capsules for use in various other nanomedicinal and biomedical applications, such as for killing cancer cells, immune therapy, and gene delivery.

  11. Deep sea as a source of novel-anticancer drugs: update on discovery and preclinical/clinical evaluation in a systems medicine perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Patrizia; Del Bufalo, Alessandra; Fini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The deep-sea habitat is a source of very potent marine-derived agents that may inhibit the growth of human cancer cells “in vitro” and “in vivo”. Salinosporamide-A, Marizomib, by Salinispora species is a proteasome inhibitor with promising anticancer activity (Phase I/II trials). Different deep-sea-derived drugs are under preclinical evaluation. Cancer is a complex disease that may be represented by network medicine. A simple consequence is the change of the concept of target entity from a si...

  12. Evolutionary relationships of Aurora kinases: Implications for model organism studies and the development of anti-cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Denis R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As key regulators of mitotic chromosome segregation, the Aurora family of serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cell division. Abnormalities in Aurora kinases have been strongly linked with cancer, which has lead to the recent development of new classes of anti-cancer drugs that specifically target the ATP-binding domain of these kinases. From an evolutionary perspective, the species distribution of the Aurora kinase family is complex. Mammals uniquely have three Aurora kinases, Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, while for other metazoans, including the frog, fruitfly and nematode, only Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases are known. The fungi have a single Aurora-like homolog. Based on the tacit assumption of orthology to human counterparts, model organism studies have been central to the functional characterization of Aurora kinases. However, the ortholog and paralog relationships of these kinases across various species have not been rigorously examined. Here, we present comprehensive evolutionary analyses of the Aurora kinase family. Results Phylogenetic trees suggest that all three vertebrate Auroras evolved from a single urochordate ancestor. Specifically, Aurora-A is an orthologous lineage in cold-blooded vertebrates and mammals, while structurally similar Aurora-B and Aurora-C evolved more recently in mammals from a duplication of an ancestral Aurora-B/C gene found in cold-blooded vertebrates. All so-called Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases of non-chordates are ancestral to the clade of chordate Auroras and, therefore, are not strictly orthologous to vertebrate counterparts. Comparisons of human Aurora-B and Aurora-C sequences to the resolved 3D structure of human Aurora-A lends further support to the evolutionary scenario that vertebrate Aurora-B and Aurora-C are closely related paralogs. Of the 26 residues lining the ATP-binding active site, only three were variant and all were specific to Aurora-A. Conclusions In

  13. Hepatocyte SLAMF3 reduced specifically the multidrugs resistance protein MRP-1 and increases HCC cells sensitization to anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Grégory; Debuysscher, Véronique; Ouled-Haddou, Hakim; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Demey, Baptiste; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Al Bagami, Mohammed; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Naassila, Mickael; Marcq, Ingrid; Bouhlal, Hicham

    2016-05-31

    Multidrug resistance MDR proteins (MRPs) are members of the C family of a group of proteins named ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. MRPs can transport drugs including anticancer drugs, nucleoside analogs, antimetabolites and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Drugs used in HCC therapy, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, are substrates of uptake and/or efflux transporters. Variable expression of MRPs at the plasma membrane of tumor cells may contribute to drug resistance and subsequent clinical response. Recently, we reported that the hepatocyte SLAMF3 expression (Signaling Lymphocytic Activation Molecule Family member 3) was reduced in tumor cells from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to its high expression in adjacent tissues. In the present study, we make a strong correlation between induced SLAMF3 overexpression and the specific loss of MRP-1 expression and its functionalities as a drugs resistance transporter. No changes were observed on expression of ABCG2 and MDR. More importantly, we highlight a strong inverse correlation between MRP-1 and SLAMF3 expression in patients with HCC. We propose that the SLAMF3 overexpression in cancerous cells could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to improve the drugs sensibility of resistant cells and thus control the therapeutic failure in HCC patients. PMID:27081035

  14. Analysis on anticancer drugs used in Guigang City People’s Hospital from 2011 to 2013%2011-2013年贵港市人民医院抗肿瘤药物的使用情况分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林洪奇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the usage of anticancer drugs in Guigang City People’s Hospital from 2011 to 2013. Methods The data were drawn from the HIS system in the hospital retrospectively, and the consumption sum, sales volume, and component ratio of anticancer drugs were analyzed. Results Consumption sum of anticancer drugs increased year by year substantially during 2011-2013, especially antimetabolite and anticancer drugs from plants and their derivatives, but alkylating drugs showed a downward trend in demand. Consumption sum of top three drugs in anticancer drugs were gemcitabine, docetaxel, and pemetrexed. The largest sale of the anticancer drugs was fluorouracil, then was gemcitabine. Conclusion The growth rate of sales of anticancer drugs in Guigang City People’s Hospital closes to the national level. The antimetabolite and anticancer drugs from plants and their derivatives have a big demand in the market, therefore the varieties of production and optimization should be intensified.%目的:分析2011-2013年贵港市人民医院抗肿瘤药物的使用情况和用药趋势。方法通过回顾性检索贵港市人民医院HIS系统2011-2013年的数据,并对各类抗肿瘤药物的销售金额、销售量及构成比等进行统计。结果2011-2013年抗肿瘤药物的销售金额逐年增大,尤其抗代谢药和植物来源抗肿瘤药及其衍生物的增长幅度较大,烷化剂类药物的销售金额却呈下降趋势。销售金额前3位的抗肿瘤药分别是吉西他滨、多西他赛、培美曲塞。销量最大的抗肿瘤药是氟尿嘧啶,其次是吉西他滨。结论贵港市人民医院抗肿瘤药物的销售金额增长率接近全国水平,抗代谢药和植物来源抗肿瘤药及其衍生物的市场需求大,应加大对其品种的生产和优化力度。

  15. Developing Anticancer Copper(II) Pro-drugs Based on the Nature of Cancer Cells and the Human Serum Albumin Carrier IIA Subdomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Yi; Qi, Jinxu; Ajayi, Joshua-Paul; Zhang, Yao; Zhou, Zuping; Wu, Xiaoyang; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    To synergistically enhance the selectivity and efficiency of anticancer copper drugs, we proposed and built a model to develop anticancer copper pro-drugs based on the nature of human serum albumin (HSA) IIA subdomain and cancer cells. Three copper(II) compounds of a 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone Schiff-base ligand in the presence pyridine, imidazole, or indazole ligands were synthesized (C1-C3). The structures of three HSA complexes revealed that the Cu compounds bind to the hydrophobic cavity in the HSA IIA subdomain. Among them, the pyridine and imidazole ligands of C1 and C2 are replaced by Lys199, and His242 directly coordinates with Cu(II). The indazole and Br ligands of C3 are replaced by Lys199 and His242, respectively. Compared with the Cu(II) compounds alone, the HSA complexes enhance cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells approximately 3-5-fold, but do not raise cytotoxicity levels in normal cells in vitro through selectively accumulating in cancer cells to some extent. We find that the HSA complex has a stronger capacity for cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase of MCF-7 by targeting cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and down-regulating the expression of CDK1 and cyclin B1. Moreover, the HSA complex promotes MCF-7 cell apoptosis possibly through the intrinsic reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated mitochondrial pathway, accompanied by the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  16. 香豆素类化合物在肿瘤治疗上的应用%Application of Anticancer Drugs with Coumarin Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄月芬

    2015-01-01

    Coumarins are a group of compounds with anα-benzopyrone structure.In recent years,the researchers have explored the influence of coumarins on enzymes and cell pathways related to the metabolism of tumor cells,and isolated or synthesized many structurally specific coumarin derivatives with excellent anti-tumor activity,which proves adequately the importance of coumarin skeleton in the research and development of anticancer drugs.In this paper, we reviewed the application of many natural and synthetic coumarins which are classified by classical coumarin struc-tures on exploring new anticancer drugs.%香豆素( Coumarins)的基本结构是苯骈α-吡喃酮的一类化合物。近年来研究者报道了在肿瘤细胞信号转导通路和代谢的影响上香豆素具有的作用,从而发现了香豆素类化合物具有的抗肿瘤活性,并充分证明了目前香豆素类化合物在抗癌药物研发中的重要性。本文以香豆素的基本结构进行分类,对香豆素类化合物的抗肿瘤作用的研究进展进行综述。

  17. MOLECULAR MODELING AND DRUG DISCOVERY OF POTENTIAL INHIBITORS FOR ANTICANCER TARGET GENE MELK (MATERNAL EMBRYONIC LEUCINE ZIPPER KINASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha. K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK, a member of the AMP serine/threonine kinase family, exhibits multiple features consistent with the potential utility of this gene as an anticancer target. Reports show that MELK functions as a cancer-specific protein kinase, and that down-regulation of MELK results in growth suppression of breast cancer cells. There are many inhibitors which bind to kinases and are in clinical trials too. In our study we have taken a library of different inhibitors and docked those using GLIDE Induced Fit. From docking result we can conclude that Syk inhibitor II, Rho kinase inhibitor IV, p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor III, HA 1004, Dihydrochloride and IKK -2 inhibitor VI have good binding affinity towards MELK and may have anticancer activity.

  18. Short term culture of breast cancer tissues to study the activity of the anticancer drug taxol in an intact tumor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity of breast tumors to anticancer drugs depends upon dynamic interactions between epithelial tumor cells and their microenvironment including stromal cells and extracellular matrix. To study drug-sensitivity within different compartments of an individual tumor ex vivo, culture models directly established from fresh tumor tissues are absolutely essential. We prepared 0.2 mm thick tissue slices from freshly excised tumor samples and cultivated them individually in the presence or absence of taxol for 4 days. To visualize viability, cell death, and expression of surface molecules in different compartments of non-fixed primary breast cancer tissues we established a method based on confocal imaging using mitochondria- and DNA-selective dyes and fluorescent-conjugated antibodies. Proliferation and apoptosis was assessed by immunohistochemistry in sections from paraffin-embedded slices. Overall viability was also analyzed in homogenized tissue slices by a combined ATP/DNA quantification assay. We obtained a mean of 49 tissue slices from 22 breast cancer specimens allowing a wide range of experiments in each individual tumor. In our culture system, cells remained viable and proliferated for at least 4 days within their tissue environment. Viability of tissue slices decreased significantly in the presence of taxol in a dose-dependent manner. A three-color fluorescence viability assay enabled a rapid and authentic estimation of cell viability in the different tumor compartments within non-fixed tissue slices. We describe a tissue culture method combined with a novel read out system for both tissue cultivation and rapid assessment of drug efficacy together with the simultaneous identification of different cell types within non-fixed breast cancer tissues. This method has potential significance for studying tumor responses to anticancer drugs in the complex environment of a primary cancer tissue

  19. Short term culture of breast cancer tissues to study the activity of the anticancer drug taxol in an intact tumor environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Wolfgang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitivity of breast tumors to anticancer drugs depends upon dynamic interactions between epithelial tumor cells and their microenvironment including stromal cells and extracellular matrix. To study drug-sensitivity within different compartments of an individual tumor ex vivo, culture models directly established from fresh tumor tissues are absolutely essential. Methods We prepared 0.2 mm thick tissue slices from freshly excised tumor samples and cultivated them individually in the presence or absence of taxol for 4 days. To visualize viability, cell death, and expression of surface molecules in different compartments of non-fixed primary breast cancer tissues we established a method based on confocal imaging using mitochondria- and DNA-selective dyes and fluorescent-conjugated antibodies. Proliferation and apoptosis was assessed by immunohistochemistry in sections from paraffin-embedded slices. Overall viability was also analyzed in homogenized tissue slices by a combined ATP/DNA quantification assay. Results We obtained a mean of 49 tissue slices from 22 breast cancer specimens allowing a wide range of experiments in each individual tumor. In our culture system, cells remained viable and proliferated for at least 4 days within their tissue environment. Viability of tissue slices decreased significantly in the presence of taxol in a dose-dependent manner. A three-color fluorescence viability assay enabled a rapid and authentic estimation of cell viability in the different tumor compartments within non-fixed tissue slices. Conclusion We describe a tissue culture method combined with a novel read out system for both tissue cultivation and rapid assessment of drug efficacy together with the simultaneous identification of different cell types within non-fixed breast cancer tissues. This method has potential significance for studying tumor responses to anticancer drugs in the complex environment of a primary cancer tissue.

  20. Molecular mass spectrometry in metallodrug development: A case of mapping transferrin-mediated transformations for a ruthenium(III) anticancer drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarosz, Maciej [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego St. 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Matczuk, Magdalena, E-mail: mmatczuk@ch.pw.edu.pl [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego St. 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Pawlak, Katarzyna [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego St. 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Timerbaev, Andrei R. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 19, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-03

    Highlights: • Extra- and intra-cellular interactions of Ru(III) anticancer drug candidate. • ESI-TOF-MS mapping of the ruthenium species bound to transferring. • ESI-QqQ-MS identification of released Ru species under cytosol simulated conditions. - Abstract: Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques have been used to characterize the speciation of a Ru(III) anticancer drug, indazolium trans-[tetrachloridobis(1H-indazole) ruthenate(III)], upon its binding to transferrin and the impact of cellular reducing components on drug–transferrin adducts. Using time-of-flight ESI-MS, the polymorphism of apo- (iron-free) and holo-form (iron-saturated) of the protein was confirmed. While the ruthenium moieties bound to each of five isoforms under simulated extracellular conditions are essentially identical in numbers for apo- and holo-transferrin, distinct differences were found in the composition of Ru(III) species attached to either of the protein forms, which are dominated by differently coordinated aquated complexes. On the other hand, at least one of the Ru-N bonds in metal-organic framework remains intact even after prolonged interaction with the protein. Triple quadrupole tandem ESI-MS measurements demonstrated that the ruthenium species released from drug adducts with holo-transferrin in simulated cancer cytosol are underwent strong ligand exchange (as compared to the protein-bound forms) but most strikingly, they contain the metal center in the reduced Ru(II) state. In vitro probing the extra- and intracellular interactions of promising Ru(III) drug candidate performed by ESI-MS is thought to shed light on the transportation to tumor cells by transferrin and on the activation to more reactive species by the reducing environment of solid tumors.

  1. Aqueous-core PEG-coated PLA nanocapsules for an efficient entrapment of water soluble anticancer drugs and a smart therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosco, Donato; Paolino, Donatella; De Angelis, Francesco; Cilurzo, Felisa; Celia, Christian; Di Marzio, Luisa; Russo, Diego; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias; Fresta, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Novel PEGylated PLA nanocapsules (PEG-AcPLA nanocapsules), loading high percentage of water soluble drugs have been formulated by using multiple emulsion technique without using conventional stabilizers. In particular, sodium deoxycholate hydrate has been used to obtain nanocapsules having a mean diameter of about 200 nm and a polydispersity index of ∼ 0.1. Gemcitabine hydrochloride (GEM) was used as a model of hydrophilic drug. GEM-loaded PEG-AcPLA nanocapsules demonstrated a high encapsulation efficacy and the drug-release followed a zero-order kinetic. MTT-assay evidenced an increased antitumor effect of GEM-loaded PEG-AcPLA nanocapsules compared to the free drug on different cancer cell lines and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed a significant improvement of cell interaction at 6h of incubation. In vivo anticancer activity of GEM-loaded PEG-AcPLA nanocapsules using two xenograft murine models of human solid tumors further supported the efficacy of this nano-drug, thus providing preliminary results about the potential clinical application of this innovative nanotherapeutic. PMID:25460850

  2. Potent Sensitisation of Cancer Cells to Anticancer Drugs by a Quadruple Mutant of the Human Deoxycytidine Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safiatou T Coulibaly

    Full Text Available Identifying enzymes that, once introduced in cancer cells, lead to an increased efficiency of treatment constitutes an important goal for biomedical applications. Using an original procedure whereby mutant genes are generated based on the use of conditional lentivector genome mobilisation, we recently described, for the first time, the identification of a human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK mutant (G12 that sensitises a panel of cancer cell lines to treatment with the dCK analogue gemcitabine. Here, starting from the G12 variant itself, we generated a new library and identified a mutant (M36 that triggers even greater sensitisation to gemcitabine than G12. With respect to G12, M36 presents an additional mutation located in the region that constitutes the interface of the dCK dimer. The simple presence of this mutation halves both the IC50 and the proportion of residual cells resistant to the treatment. Furthermore, the use of vectors with self-inactivating LTRs leads to an increased sensitivity to treatment, a result compatible with a relief of the transcriptional interference exerted by the U3 promoter on the internal promoter that drives the expression of M36. Importantly, a remarkable effect is also observed in treatments with the anticancer compound cytarabine (AraC, for which a 10,000 fold decrease in IC50 occurred. By triggering the sensitisation of various cancer cell types with poor prognosis to two commonly used anticancer compounds M36 is a promising candidate for suicide gene approaches.

  3. Ab initio study on the noncovalent adsorption of camptothecin anticancer drug onto graphene, defect modified graphene and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Nabanita; Deka, Ramesh C

    2013-09-01

    The application of graphene and related nanomaterials like boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, BN-graphene hybrid nanomaterials, and graphene oxide (GO) for adsorption of anticancer chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CPT) along with the effect on electronic properties prior to functionalization and after functionalization has been reported using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The inclusion of dispersion correction to DFT is instrumental in accounting for van der Waals π-π stacking between CPT and the nanomaterial. The adsorption of CPT exhibits significant strain within the nanosheets and noncovalent adsorption of CPT is thermodynamically favoured onto the nanosheets. In case of GO, surface incorporation of functional groups result in significant crumpling along the basal plane and the interaction is basically mediated by H-bonding rather than π-π stacking. Docking studies predict the plausible binding of CPT, CPT functionalized graphene and GO with topoisomerase I (top 1) signifying that CPT interacts through π stacking with AT and GC base pairs of DNA and in presence of nano support, DNA bases preferentially gets bound to the basal plane of graphene and GO rather than the edges. At a theoretical level of understanding, our studies point out the noncovalent interaction of CPT with graphene based nanomaterials and GO for loading and delivery of anticancer chemotherapeutic along with active binding to Top1 protein.

  4. Identification of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase responsible for biosynthesis of the potential anti-cancer drug sansalvamide in Fusarium solani

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romans Fuertes, Patricia; Søndergaard, Teis Esben; Sandmann, Manuela Ilse Helga;

    2016-01-01

    Sansalvamide is a cyclic pentadepsipeptide produced by Fusarium solani and has shown promising results as potential anti-cancer drug. The biosynthetic pathway has until now remained unidentified, but here we used an Agrobacterium tumefaciens- mediated transformation (ATMT) approach to generate...... knock-out mutants of two candidate non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS29 and NRPS30). Comparative studies of secondary metabolites in the two deletion mutants and wild type confirmed the absence of sansalvamide in the NRPS30 deletion mutant, implicating this synthetase in the biosynthetic pathway...... biosynthetic pathway. Using comparative bioinformatic analyses of the catalytic domains in the destruxin and sansalvamide NRPSs, we were able to propose a model for sansalvamide biosynthesis. Orthologues of the gene clusters were also identified in species from several other genera including Acremonium...

  5. Extracellular biosynthesis of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 nanoparticles, their biodistribution and bioconjugation with the chemically modified anticancer drug taxol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Ali Khan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As a part of our programme to develop nanobioconjugates for the treatment of cancer, we first synthesized extracellular, protein-capped, highly stable and well-dispersed gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 nanoparticles by using thermophilic fungus Humicola sp. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles in rats was checked by radiolabelling with Tc-99m. Finally, these nanoparticles were bioconjugated with the chemically modified anticancer drug taxol with the aim of characterizing the role of this bioconjugate in the treatment of cancer. The biosynthesized Gd2O3 nanoparticles were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS. The Gd2O3–taxol bioconjugate was confirmed by UV–vis spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy and was purified by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC.

  6. Influence of family history, irradiation and anti-cancer drug (mitomycin C) on the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms in breast carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of family history, irradiation and anti-cancer drug (Mitomycin C) on the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms was analysed using the person-year method in 1359 Japanese breast carcinoma patients. There were 111 multiple primary neoplasms, including bilaterl breast cancer, in 109 patients; the incidence rate was 0.0072 per person-year. The incidence rate in patients with a family history of cancer was 1.29 times higher than in those without. In the bilateral breast cancer group there was about a 3 times higher frequency of family history of breast cancer. Irradiation therapy raised the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms 1.28 fold, and Mitomycin C (40 mg) had no effect on the occurrence of neoplasms during a 10-year observation period. (author)

  7. A study of the molecular conformations and the vibrational, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Khan, Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    The structural stability and the vibrational spectra of the anticancer drug tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were investigated by the DFT B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) calculations. Tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were predicted to exist predominantly as non-planar structures. The vibrational frequencies and the 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the low energy structures of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene were computed at the DFT B3LYP level of theory. Complete vibrational assignments were provided by combined theoretical and experimental data of tamoxifen and triphenylethylene. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of both molecules were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the two molecules. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for tamoxifen is 0.29 and 4.72 ppm, whereas for triphenylethylene, it is 0.16 and 2.70 ppm, respectively.

  8. Novel anticancer agents from plant sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shah Unnati; Shah Ripal; Acharya Sanjeev; Acharya Niyati

    2013-01-01

    Plants remain an important source of new drugs,new drug leads and new chemical entities.Plant based drug discovery resulted mainly in the development of anticancer and anti-infectious agents,and continues to contribute to the new leads in clinical trials.Natural product drugs play a dominant role in pharmaceutical care.Several plant-derived compounds are currently successfully employed in cancer treatment.There are many classes of plant-derived cytotoxic natural products studied for further improvement and development of drugs.New anticancer drugs derived from research on plant antitumor agents will be continuously discovered.The basic aim of this review is to explore the potential of newly discovered anticancer compounds from medicinal plants,as a lead for anticancer drug development.It will be helpful to explore the medicinal value of plants and for new drug discovery from them for the researchers and scientists around the globe.

  9. PEG-PE-based micelles co-loaded with paclitaxel and cyclosporine A or loaded with paclitaxel and targeted by anticancer antibody overcome drug resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarisozen, Can; Vural, Imran; Levchenko, Tatyana; Hincal, A Atilla; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-05-01

    The over-expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of the acquired Multidrug Resistance (MDR). Combined treatment of MDR cancer cells with P-gp inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents could result in reversal of resistance in P-gp-expressing cells. In this study, paclitaxel (PTX) was co-encapsulated in actively targeted (anticancer mAb 2C5-modified) polymeric lipid-core PEG-PE-based micelles with Cyclosporine A (CycA), which is one of the most effective first generation P-gp inhibitors. Cell culture studies performed using MDCKII (parental and MDR1) cell lines to investigate the potential MDR reversal effect of the formulations. The average size of both empty and loaded PEG₂₀₀₀-PE/Vitamin E mixed micelles was found between 10 and 25 nm. Zeta potentials of the formulations were found between -7 and -35 mV. The percentage of PTX in the micelles was found higher than 3% for both formulations and cumulative PTX release of about 70% was demonstrated. P-gp inhibition with CycA caused an increase in the cytotoxicity of PTX. Dual-loaded micelles demonstrated significantly higher cytotoxicity in the resistant MDCKII-MDR1 cells than micelles loaded with PTX alone. Micelle modification with mAb 2C5 results in the highest cytotoxicity against resistant cells, with or without P-gp modulator, probably because of better internalization bypassing the P-gp mechanism. Our results suggest that micelles delivering a combination of P-gp modulator and anticancer drug or micelles loaded with only PTX, but targeted with mAb 2C5 represent a promising approach to overcome drug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:22506922

  10. A comprehensive biological insight of trinuclear copper(II)-tin(IV) chemotherapeutic anticancer drug entity: in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo systemic toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Yusra; Arjmand, Farukh; Zaidi, Nida; Usmani, Jawed Ahmad; Zubair, Haseeb; Akhtar, Kafil; Hossain, Mobarak; Shadab, G G H A

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), CDDP) causes severe systemic toxicity, which limits its application in cancer treatment. Nevertheless, incorporation of endogenously present essential metal ions (copper) in anticancer drug regimes in a heterometallic ligand scaffold can substantially modulate the toxic effects of non-essential metals (platinum), thereby reducing unwanted toxic side effects. A chiral l-tryptophan derived [bis(1,2-diaminobenzene) copper(II)] chloride complex [CuSn2(Trp)] was previously synthesized by us as an active chemotherapeutic agent. Furthermore, we have explored CuSn2(Trp) induced in vitro cytotoxicity in a panel of human cancer cell lines and in vivo acute and systemic toxicities in healthy female Rattus norvegicus (Wistar) rats. MTT assay showed that CuSn2(Trp) exhibits strong anticancer potency against ovarian (PA-1) and prostate carcinomas (PC-3) but lower potency towards liver (HepG2) and breast carcinomas (MCF-7). Further, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that CuSn2(Trp) kills PA-1 cells dose-dependently after 48 h treatment. Fluorescence microscopy and western blotting revealed that the plausible mechanism behind CuSn2(Trp) cytotoxicity was apoptosis, which was substantiated by cleavage of caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Furthermore, it has lower toxicity than CDDP in rats as evident from its eight fold (98.11 mg kg(-1)) more medial lethal dose (LD50) than CDDP (12 mg kg(-1)). Besides, the safety profile of CuSn2(Trp) was also established and no measurable DNA damage, nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and neurotoxicity were observed when assessed as a function of oxidative stress markers in contrast to CDDP at equivalent lower doses. Our findings are of high importance in the context of further in vivo cancer studies on the CuSn2(Trp) drug entity.

  11. Ternary metal complexes of guaifenesin drug: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and in vitro anticancer activity of the metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, W H; Mahmoud, N F; Mohamed, G G; El-Sonbati, A Z; El-Bindary, A A

    2015-01-01

    The coordination behavior of a series of transition metal ions named Cr(III), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) with a mono negative tridentate guaifenesin ligand (GFS) (OOO donation sites) and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) is reported. The metal complexes are characterized based on elemental analyses, IR, (1)H NMR, solid reflectance, magnetic moment, molar conductance, UV-vis spectral studies, mass spectroscopy, ESR, XRD and thermal analysis (TG and DTG). The ternary metal complexes were found to have the formulae of [M(GFS)(Phen)Cl]Cl·nH2O (M=Cr(III) (n=1) and Fe(III) (n=0)), [M(GFS)(Phen)Cl]·nH2O (M=Mn(II) (n=0), Zn(II) (n=0) and Cu(II) (n=3)) and [M(GFS)(Phen)(H2O)]Cl·nH2O (M=Co(II) (n=0), Ni(II) (n=0) and Cd(II) (n=4)). All the chelates are found to have octahedral geometrical structures. The ligand and its ternary chelates are subjected to thermal analyses (TG and DTG). The GFS ligand, in comparison to its ternary metal complexes also was screened for their antibacterial activity on gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Neisseria gonorrhoeae) and for in vitro antifungal activity against (Candida albicans). The activity data show that the metal complexes have antibacterial and antifungal activity more than the parent GFS ligand. The complexes were also screened for its in vitro anticancer activity against the Breast cell line (MFC7) and the results obtained show that they exhibit a considerable anticancer activity. PMID:26067934

  12. Polymer Nanoparticles Prepared by Sup ercritical Carb on Dioxide for in Vivo Anti-cancer Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maofang Hua; Xiufu Hua

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for producing polymer nanoparticles made of bovine serum albumin-poly(methyl methacrylate) conjugate by precipitating in supercritical CO2 is reported. The nanoparticles were loaded with the anti-tumor drug camptothecin. With albumin serving as a nutrient to cells, the drug-encapsulated nanoparticle shows an enhanced ability to kill cancer cells compared to that of the free drug in solution both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Coadministration of the FNIII14 Peptide Synergistically Augments the Anti-Cancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Drugs by Activating Pro-Apoptotic Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyoda, Takuya; Nagamine, Yumi; Nakane, Yoshitomi; Tokita, Yuya; Akari, Shougo; Otsuka, Kazuki; Fujita, Motomichi; Itagaki, Keisuke; Takizawa, You-Ichi; Orita, Hiroaki; Owaki, Toshiyuki; Taira, Jyunichi; Hayashi, Ryo; Kodama, Hiroaki; Fukai, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of drug resistance mediated by the interaction of tumor cells with the extracellular matrix (ECM), commonly referred to as cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), has been observed not only in hematopoietic tumor cells but also in solid tumor cells. We have previously demonstrated that a 22-mer peptide derived from fibronectin, FNIII14, can inhibit cell adhesion through the inactivation of β1 integrin; when coadministered with cytarabine, FNIII14 completely eradicates acute myelogenous leukemia by suppressing CAM-DR. In this study, we show that our FNIII14 peptide also enhances chemotherapy efficacy in solid tumors. Coadministration of FNIII14 synergistically enhances the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and aclarubicin in mammary tumor and melanoma cells, respectively. The solid tumor cell chemosensitization induced by FNIII14 is dependent upon the upregulation and activation of the pro-apoptotic protein, Bim. Furthermore, the metastasis of tumor cells derived from ventrally transplanted mammary tumor grafts is suppressed by the coadministration of FNIII14 and doxorubicin. These results suggest that the coadministration of our FNIII14 peptide with chemotherapy could achieve efficient solid tumor eradication by increasing chemosensitivity and decreasing metastasis. The major causes of tumor recurrence are the existence of chemotherapy-resistant primary tumor cells and the establishment of secondary metastatic lesions. As such, coadministering FNIII14 with anti-cancer drugs could provide a promising new approach to improve the prognosis of patients with solid tumors. PMID:27622612

  14. [Clopidogrel--proton pump inhibitors drug interaction: implications to clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo; Albuquerque, Aníbal

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have raised the concern that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) could potentially interfere with clopidogrel antiplatelet effect. This association is frequent in clinical practice and is recommended by recent consensus guidelines in patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Clopidogrel is a pro-drug which needs to be metabolized into its active metabolite, by cytochrome P450, especially by CYP2C19 isoenzyme. Various PPIs can inhibit CYP2C19, which could possibly decrease clopidogrel bioactivation process and, therefore, its antiplatelet effect. Various platelet function studies have shown that omeprazol can significantly decrease clopidogrel inhibitory effect on platelet P2Y12 receptor, leading to an increase in the number of patients who are "nonresponders" to clopidogrel. These pharmacokinetic studies also shown that this is not probably a class effect of PPIs, because they are metabolized to varying degrees by CYP2C19. The clinical impact of these observations remains uncertain, because various observational studies have shown conflicting results, and remains to demonstrate if PPIs can really increase the risk of cardiovascular events in patients taking clopidogrel. In this review we will discuss the pharmacokinetic basis underlying this drug interaction, the effect of different PPIs on platelet function tests and we will analyze in detail the potential clinical implications of using this association, both on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal events. Until further data is available, some clinical strategies can be recommended: (1) individual gastrointestinal risk assessment, with PPIs administration only to patients on dual anti-platelet therapy with additional GI risk factors; (2) preferential use of PPIs that have shown less interference with clopidogrel efficacy; (3) wide separation of PPI and clopidogrel dosing to minimize the risk of interaction (PPI may be given before breakfast and clopidogrel at

  15. Vulvovaginal candidiasis: species distribution, fluconazole resistance and drug efflux pump gene overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie-Yu; Liu, Jin-Hui; Liu, Fa-Di; Xia, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Zhi-Qin; Zhu, Na; Yan-Yan; Ying, Ying; Huang, Xiao-Tian

    2014-10-01

    The increasing incidence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and the emergence of fluconazole resistance are an indisputable fact. However, little information is available regarding the correlation between fluconazole resistance in vaginal Candida albicans and the expression of drug efflux pump genes. In this study, we investigated the species distribution, fluconazole susceptibility profiles and the mechanisms of fluconazole resistance in Candida strains. In total, 785 clinical Candida isolates were collected from patients with VVC. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species(n = 529) followed by C. glabrata (n = 164) and C. krusei (n = 57). Of all Candida isolates, 4.7% were resistant to fluconazole. We randomly selected 18 fluconazole resistant isolates of C. albicans to evaluate the expression of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1 and FLU1 genes. Compared with fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans isolates, CDR1 gene expression displayed 3.16-fold relative increase, which was statistically significant. CDR2, MDR1 and FLU1 overexpression was observed in several fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates, but statistical significance was not achieved. These results demonstrate a high frequency of non-albicans species (32.6%); however, C. albicans is the most common Candida species implicated in vaginitis, and this strain displays considerable fluconazole resistance. Meanwhile, our study further indicates that fluconazole resistance in C. albicans may correlate with CDR1 gene overexpression.

  16. Targeted anticancer therapy: overexpressed receptors and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alrokayan, Salman A; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-09-25

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancer cells and tissues is a promising field due to its potential to spare unaffected cells and tissues, but it has been a major challenge to achieve success in these therapeutic approaches. Several innovative approaches to targeted drug delivery have been devised based on available knowledge in cancer biology and on technological advancements. To achieve the desired selectivity of drug delivery, nanotechnology has enabled researchers to design nanoparticles (NPs) to incorporate anticancer drugs and act as nanocarriers. Recently, many receptor molecules known to be overexpressed in cancer have been explored as docking sites for the targeting of anticancer drugs. In principle, anticancer drugs can be concentrated specifically in cancer cells and tissues by conjugating drug-containing nanocarriers with ligands against these receptors. Several mechanisms can be employed to induce triggered drug release in response to either endogenous trigger or exogenous trigger so that the anticancer drug is only released upon reaching and preferentially accumulating in the tumor tissue. This review focuses on overexpressed receptors exploited in targeting drugs to cancerous tissues and the tumor microenvironment. We briefly evaluate the structure and function of these receptor molecules, emphasizing the elegant mechanisms by which certain characteristics of cancer can be exploited in cancer treatment. After this discussion of receptors, we review their respective ligands and then the anticancer drugs delivered by nanotechnology in preclinical models of cancer. Ligand-functionalized nanocarriers have delivered significantly higher amounts of anticancer drugs in many in vitro and in vivo models of cancer compared to cancer models lacking such receptors or drug carrying nanocarriers devoid of ligand. This increased concentration of anticancer drug in the tumor site enabled by nanotechnology could have a major impact on the efficiency of cancer

  17. Lack of a clinically significant drug-drug interaction in healthy volunteers between the HCV protease inhibitor boceprevir and the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole

    OpenAIRE

    Kanter, C.T.M.M. de; Colbers, A.P.; Blonk, M.I.; Wissen, C.P.W.G.M. van; Schouwenberg, B.J.J.W.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Burger, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can limit the solubility of concomitant drugs, which can lead to decreased absorption and exposure. Reduced efficacy can be a consequence and in the case of an antimicrobial agent this may contribute to development of resistance. Patients chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus can be treated with a boceprevir-containing regimen and it is relevant to know if interactions between PPIs and boceprevir exist. This study was designed to investigate...

  18. Early Identification of Clinically Relevant Drug Interactions with the Human Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP; ABCB11)

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Jenny M.; Matsson, Pär; Bergström, Christel A.S.; Hoogstraate, Janet; Norén, Agneta; LeCluyse, Edward L.; Artursson, Per

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis was performed to investigate how inhibition of the human bile salt export pump (BSEP/ABCB11) relates to clinically observed drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Inhibition of taurocholate (TA) transport was investigated in BSEP membrane vesicles for a data set of 250 compounds, and 86 BSEP inhibitors were identified. Structure-activity modeling identified BSEP inhibition to correlate strongly with compound lipophilicity, whereas positive molecular charge was associated w...

  19. Increases in Xu Zheng and Yu Zheng among Patients with Breast Cancer Receiving Different Anticancer Drug Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Miauh Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The objectives of this study were to compare yang-xu, yin-xu, and yu among patients with breast cancer right before, one month after, and three months after receiving target, chemo, or combined therapy. Method. After recruiting 126 patients from 4 hospitals in northern Taiwan, a longitudinal study was carried out with 61 patients receiving chemotherapy, 30 receiving target therapy, and 35 receiving combined therapy. Yang-xu, yin-xu, and yu were assessed using the Traditional Chinese Medical Constitutional Scale (TCMCS, with higher scores indicating more xu and yu. Results. There were significant increases in yang-xu, yin-xu, and yu at 1 month and 3 months after than before the start of the chemotherapy, target, or combined therapy. Patients receiving combined therapy had significantly higher scores in yang-xu and yin-xu than patients receiving chemo or target therapy. A history of coronary heart disease was associated with more yin-xu. Those patients who had undergone a mastectomy were associated with less yu zheng than those patients who had not. Conclusion and Implications. TCM doctors should focus their treatment on dealing with xu and yu in order to support their patients, as they complete their modern anticancer treatments.

  20. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Sara; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid; Ketabi, Sepideh

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were -4.128kcalmol(-1) and -2457.124kcalmol(-1) respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was -281.937kcalmol(-1) which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (-374.082 and -245.766kcalmol(-1)) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution. PMID:27287103

  1. Amino Acid transporters in cancer and their relevance to "glutamine addiction": novel targets for the design of a new class of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cells have an increased demand for amino acids because of their rapid proliferation rate. In addition to their need in protein synthesis, several amino acids have other roles in supporting cancer growth. There are approximately two-dozen amino acid transporters in humans, and tumor cells must upregulate one or more of these transporters to satisfy their demand for amino acids. If the transporters that specifically serve this purpose in tumor cells are identified, they can be targeted for the development of a brand new class of anticancer drugs; the logical basis of such a strategy would be to starve the tumor cells of an important class of nutrients. To date, four amino acid transporters have been found to be expressed at high levels in cancer: SLC1A5, SLC7A5, SLC7A11, and SLC6A14. Their induction occurs in a cancer type-specific manner with a direct or indirect involvement of the oncogene c-Myc. Further, these transporters are functionally coupled, thus maximizing their ability to promote cancer growth and chemoresistance. Progress has been made in preclinical studies, exploiting these transporters as drug targets in cancer therapy. These transporters also show promise in development of new tumor-imaging probes and in tumor-specific delivery of appropriately designed chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25855379

  2. A high capacity polymeric micelle of paclitaxel: Implication of high dose drug therapy to safety and in vivo anti-cancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhijian; Wan, Xiaomeng; Schulz, Anita; Bludau, Herdis; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A; Stern, Stephan T; Montgomery, Stephanie A; Yuan, Hong; Li, Zibo; Alakhova, Daria; Sokolsky, Marina; Darr, David B; Perou, Charles M; Jordan, Rainer; Luxenhofer, Robert; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2016-09-01

    The poor solubility of paclitaxel (PTX), the commercially most successful anticancer drug, has long been hampering the development of suitable formulations. Here, we present translational evaluation of a nanoformulation of PTX, which is characterized by a facile preparation, extraordinary high drug loading of 50% wt. and PTX solubility of up to 45 g/L, excellent shelf stability and controllable, sub-100 nm size. We observe favorable in vitro and in vivo safety profiles and a higher maximum tolerated dose compared to clinically approved formulations. Pharmacokinetic analysis reveals that the higher dose administered leads to a higher exposure of the tumor to PTX. As a result, we observed improved therapeutic outcome in orthotopic tumor models including particularly faithful and aggressive "T11" mouse claudin-low breast cancer orthotopic, syngeneic transplants. The promising preclinical data on the presented PTX nanoformulation showcase the need to investigate new excipients and is a robust basis to translate into clinical trials. PMID:27315213

  3. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosta, Sara; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid; Ketabi, Sepideh

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were -4.128kcalmol(-1) and -2457.124kcalmol(-1) respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was -281.937kcalmol(-1) which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (-374.082 and -245.766kcalmol(-1)) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution.

  4. 靶向抗肿瘤药物个体化用药的研究现状%Research current situation and prospect on personalized medicine by targeted anticancer drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁征; 宋洪涛

    2012-01-01

    随着靶向抗肿瘤药物在肿瘤治疗中地位日益提高,越来越多作用于不同靶点的药物在临床上应用;通过对药物生物标志物的研究来预测疗效和预后,对患者进行个体化治疗.本文对靶向抗肿瘤药物在个体化用药的现状和应用前景作一综述.%As the growing importance of targeted anticancer drugs in the tumor treatment, more and more drugs working through different targets are widely available in clinic. The study of biomarkers makes it possible for predicting efficacy and prognosis and personalized medicine. The research progress on current situation and prospect on personalized medicine by targeted anticancer drugs was summarized in this paper.

  5. Anticancer chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This document examines chemotherapeutic agents for use in veterinary oncology. It lists some of the most common categories of chemotherapeutic drugs, such as alkylating agents and corticosteroids. For each category, the paper lists some example drugs, gives their mode of action, tumors usually susceptible to the drug, and common side effects. A brief discussion of mechanisms of drug resistance is also provided. (MHB)

  6. Identification and evolution of drug efflux pump in clinical Enterobacter aerogenes strains isolated in 1995 and 2003.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Chevalier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high mortality impact of infectious diseases will increase due to accelerated evolution of antibiotic resistance in important human pathogens. Development of antibiotic resistance is a evolutionary process inducing the erosion of the effectiveness of our arsenal of antibiotics. Resistance is not necessarily limited to a single class of antibacterial agents but may affect many unrelated compounds; this is termed 'multidrug resistance' (MDR. The major mechanism of MDR is the active expulsion of drugs by bacterial pumps; the treatment of gram negative bacterial infections is compromised due to resistance mechanisms including the expression of efflux pumps that actively expel various usual antibiotics (beta-lactams, quinolones, .... METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Enterobacter aerogenes has emerged among Enterobacteriaceae associated hospital infections during the last twenty years due to its faculty of adaptation to antibiotic stresses. Clinical isolates of E. aerogenes belonging to two strain collections isolated in 1995 and 2003 respectively, were screened to assess the involvement of efflux pumps in antibiotic resistance. Drug susceptibility assays were performed on all bacterial isolates and an efflux pump inhibitor (PAbetaN previously characterized allowed to decipher the role of efflux in the resistance. Accumulation of labelled chloramphenicol was monitored in the presence of an energy poison to determine the involvement of active efflux on the antibiotic intracellular concentrations. The presence of the PAbetaN-susceptible efflux system was also identified in resistant E. aerogenes strains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For the first time a noticeable increase in clinical isolates containing an efflux mechanism susceptible to pump inhibitor is report within an 8 year period. After the emergence of extended spectrum beta-lactamases in E. aerogenes and the recent characterisation of porin mutations in clinical isolates, this study

  7. Nanotechnology in oncology: Characterization and in vitro release kinetics of cisplatin-loaded albumin nanoparticles: Implications in anticancer drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Das

    2011-01-01

    Results and Conclusions: Using the coacervation method, nanoparticles of less than 70 nm diameter were produced. Drug encapsulation measured by ultraviolet spectroscopy varied from 30% to 80% for different ratios of cisplatin and protein. In vitro release kinetics shows that the nanoparticle-based formulation has biphasic release kinetics and is capable of sustained release compared with the free drug (80% release in 45 h. The study proves the feasibility of the albumin-based cisplatin nanoparticle formulation as a sustained release vehicle of cisplatin.

  8. Interaction of the recently approved anticancer drug nintedanib with human acute phase reactant α 1-acid glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Ponnusamy, Kalaiarasan; Subbarao, Naidu; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the interaction of the newly approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Nintedanib (NTB) and Alpha-1 Acid Glycoprotein (AAG) has been carried out by utilizing UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking techniques. The obtained results showed enhancement of the UV-Vis peak of the protein upon binding to NTB with the fluorescence intensity of AAG is being quenched by NTB via the formation of ground state complex (i.e. Static quenching). Forster distance (Ro) obtained from fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is found to be 2.3 nm. The calculated binding parameters from the modified Stern-Volmer equation showed that NTB binds to AAG with a binding constant in the order of 103. Conformational alteration of the protein upon its binding to NTB was confirmed by the circular dichroism. Dynamic light scattering results showed that the binding interaction of NTB leads to the reduction in hydrodynamic radii of AAG. Dynamic molecular docking results showed that the NTB fits into the central binding cavity in AAG and hydrophobic interaction played the key role in the binding process also the docking studies were performed with methotrexate and clofarabine drugs to look into the common binding regions of these drugs on AAG molecule, it was found that five amino acid residues namely Phe 113, Arg 89, Tyr 126, Phe 48 and Glu 63 were common among the binding regions of three studied drugs this phenomenon of overlapping binding regions may influence the drug transport by the carrier molecule in turn affecting the metabolism of the drug and treatment outcome.

  9. Liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells Are Relatively Resistant to the Reported Anti-Cancer Stem Cell Drug Metformin

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Miller, Tyler C.; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Anderson, Andrew J.; Ray, Satyajit; Mullinax, John E.; Hari, Danielle M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Godbout, Jessica D.; Goldsmith, Paul K.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Rudloff, Udo; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Recently, we reported that liver Label Retaining Cancer Cells (LRCC) can initiate tumors with only 10 cells and are relatively resistant to the targeted drug Sorafenib, a standard of practice in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). LRCC are the only cancer stem cells (CSC) isolated alive according to a stem cell fundamental function, asymmetric cell division. Metformin has been reported to preferentially target many other types of CSC of different organs, including live...

  10. Fresh Water Cyanobacteria Geitlerinema sp. CCC728 and Arthrospira sp. CCC729 as an Anticancer Drug Resource

    OpenAIRE

    Akanksha Srivastava; Ratnakar Tiwari; Vikas Srivastava; Tej Bali Singh; Ravi Kumar Asthana

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of cancer patients worldwide, especially in third world countries, have raised concern to explore natural drug resources, such as the less explored fresh water filamentous cyanobacteria. Six strains of cyanobacteria (Phormidium sp. CCC727, Geitlerinema sp. CCC728, Arthrospira sp. CCC729, Phormidium sp. CCC731, Phormidium sp. CCC730, and Leptolyngbya sp. CCC732) were isolated (paddy fields and ponds in the Banaras Hindu University, campus) and five strains screened for ant...

  11. In situ synthesized BSA capped gold nanoparticles: effective carrier of anticancer drug methotrexate to MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawala, Priyanka; Tirmale, Amruta; Shiras, Anjali; Prasad, B L V

    2014-01-01

    The proficiency of MTX loaded BSA capped gold nanoparticles (Au-BSA-MTX) in inhibiting the proliferation of breast cancer cells MCF-7 as compared to the free drug Methotrexate (MTX) is demonstrated based on MTT and Ki-67 proliferation assays. In addition, DNA ladder gel electrophoresis studies, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay confirmed the induction of apoptosis by MTX and Au-BSA-MTX in MCF-7 cells. Notably, Au-BSA-MTX was found to have higher cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells compared with an equivalent dose of free MTX. The enhanced activity is attributed to the preferential uptake of Au-BSA-MTX particles by MCF-7 cells due to the presence of BSA that acts as a source of nutrient and energy to the rapidly proliferating MCF-7 cells. Moreover, the targeting ability of the drug MTX to the over expressed folate receptors on MCF-7 cells also contributes to the enhanced uptake and activity. Taken together, these results unveil that Au-BSA-MTX could be more effective than free drug for cancer treatment.

  12. Enhanced anticancer activity of nanopreparation containing an MMP2-sensitive PEG-drug conjugate and cell-penetrating moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Wang, Tao; Perche, Federico; Taigind, Anton; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-10-15

    In response to the challenges of cancer chemotherapeutics, including poor physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting, insufficient tumor cell internalization/bioavailability, and side effects, we developed a unique tumor-targeted micellar drug-delivery platform. Using paclitaxel as a model therapeutic, a nanopreparation composed of a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive self-assembly PEG 2000-paclitaxel conjugate (as a prodrug and MMP 2-sensitive moiety), transactivating transcriptional activator peptide-PEG1000-phosphoethanolamine (PE) (a cell-penetrating enhancer), and PEG1000-PE (a nanocarrier building block) was prepared. Several major drug delivery strategies, including self-assembly, PEGylation, the enhanced permeability and retention effect, stimulus sensitivity, a cell-penetrating moiety, and the concept of prodrug, were used in design of this nanoparticle in a collaborative manner. The nanopreparation allowed superior cell internalization, cytotoxicity, tumor targeting, and antitumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo over its nonsensitive counterpart, free paclitaxel and conventional micelles. This uniquely engineered nanoparticle has potential for effective intracellular delivery of drug into cancer cells. PMID:24062440

  13. Nanogels fabricated from bovine serum albumin and chitosan via self-assembly for delivery of anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuntao; Xu, Shasha; Xiong, Wenfei; Pei, Yaqiong; Li, Bin; Chen, Yijie

    2016-10-01

    In this study, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and chitosan (CS) were used to prepare BSA-CS nanogels by a simple green self-assembly technique. Then the nanogels were successfully used to entrap doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) with an entrapment ratio of 46.3%, aiming to realize the slow-release effect and lower the cytotoxicity of DOX. The IC50 values of DOX-loaded BSA-CS (DOX-BSA-CS) and free DOX obtained by MTT assay in SGC7901 cells were 0.22 and 0.05μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicity of DOX significantly decreased within 24h after encapsulation by the nanogels, indicating that the loaded drug could slowly release within 24h and the BSA-CS was a good slow release system. The cellular uptake experiments indicated DOX-BSA-CS diffused faster into the cancer cell than the bare drug. The flow cytometry and TUNEL assay proved DOX-BSA-CS could induce a larger apoptosis proportion of gastric cancer cells 7901 than the bare drug and it is promising to be used for curing gastric cancer. PMID:27262260

  14. Benchmarking of gastric cancer sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs ex vivo as a basis for drug selection in systemic and intraperitoneal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hultman, Bo; Mahteme, Haile; Sundbom, Magnus; Ljungman, Martin; Larsson, Rolf; Nygren, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background   The choice of drugs for treatment of advanced gastric cancer (GC) is empirical. The purpose of the current study was to benchmark ex vivo the sensitivity of GC tumor cells from patients to standard cytotoxic and some newly introduced targeted drugs (TDs), as a basis for drug selection in the treatment of GC. Methods   Tumor cell samples from patients with GC were analyzed for sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, mito­mycin C, doxorubicin and doceta...

  15. The influence of hospital drug formulary policies on the prescribing patterns of proton pump inhibitors in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Due; Schou, Mette; Kristiansen, Anja Sparre;

    2014-01-01

    for the recommended PPIs pantoprazole and lansoprazole to 14.6 and 26.1 %, respectively. The effect of a large discount on expensive PPI to hospital was 14.7 %, and this decreased to 2.6 % when coordinating drug policy in hospital and primary care. CONCLUSION: The likelihood of having an expensive PPI prescribed......AIM: This study had two aims: Firstly, to describe how prescriptions for proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in primary care were influenced by a change of the hospital drug policy, and secondly, to describe if a large discount on an expensive PPI (esomeprazole) to a hospital would influence prescribing...... policy on prescribings in primary care was measured by the likelihood of having a high-cost PPI prescribed before and after change of drug policy. RESULTS: In total, 9,341 hospital stays in 2009 and 2010 were included. The probability of a patient to be prescribed an expensive PPI after discharge...

  16. Verapamil, and Its Metabolite Norverapamil, Inhibit Macrophage-induced, Bacterial Efflux Pump-mediated Tolerance to Multiple Anti-tubercular Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Kristin N.; Szumowski, John D.; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2014-01-01

    Drug tolerance likely represents an important barrier to tuberculosis treatment shortening. We previously implicated the Mycobacterium tuberculosis efflux pump Rv1258c as mediating macrophage-induced tolerance to rifampicin and intracellular growth. In this study, we infected the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 with drug-sensitive and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains and found that tolerance developed to most antituberculosis drugs, including the newer agents moxifloxacin, PA-824,...

  17. A comparative study of the vibrational spectra of the anticancer drug melphalan and its fundamental molecules 3-phenylpropionic acid and L-phenylalanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Khan, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    The structural stability and the vibrational spectra of the anticancer drug melphalan and its parent compounds 3-phenylpropionic acid and L-phenylalanine were investigated by the DFT B3LYP/6-311G** calculations. Melphalan and its fundamental compounds were predicted to exist predominantly in non-planar structures. The vibrational frequencies of the low energy structures of melphalan, 3-phenylpropionic acid, and phenylalanine were computed at the DFT B3LYP level of theory. Complete vibrational assignments of the normal modes of melphalan, 3-phenylpropionic acid, and phenylalanine were provided by combined theoretical and experimental data of the molecules. The experimental infrared spectra of phenylalanine and melphalan show a significantly different pattern of the Cdbnd O stretching mode as compared to those of normal carboxylic acids. A comparison of the 3700-2000 cm-1 infrared spectral region of the three molecules suggests the presence of similar intermolecular H-bonding in their condensed phases. The observed infrared and Raman spectra are consistent with the presence of one predominant melphalan conformation at room temperature.

  18. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with affinity comparable to or better than the two known inhibitors. Binding interactions of curcumin with active site residues of the enzyme are also predicted. Curcumin appears to bind in an extendended conformation making extensive VDW contacts in the active site of the enzyme. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions with key active site residues is also observed. Thus, curcumin can be considered as a good lead compound in the development of new inhibitors of MMP-3 which is a potential target of anticancer drugs. The results of these studies can serve as a starting point for further computational and experimental studies. PMID:26420919

  19. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kanegan, Michael J; Dunn, Denise E; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Newman, Robert A; Lo, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0-4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0-4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD. PMID:27172999

  20. In Silico Identification and In Vitro and In Vivo Validation of Anti-Psychotic Drug Fluspirilene as a Potential CDK2 Inhibitor and a Candidate Anti-Cancer Drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Nan Shi

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Surgical resection and conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy ultimately fail due to tumor recurrence and HCC's resistance. The development of novel therapies against HCC is thus urgently required. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK pathways are important and well-established targets for cancer treatment. In particular, CDK2 is a key factor regulating the cell cycle G1 to S transition and a hallmark for cancers. In this study, we utilized our free and open-source protein-ligand docking software, idock, prospectively to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 FDA-approved small molecule drugs using a repurposing strategy and an ensemble docking methodology. Sorted by average idock score, nine compounds were purchased and tested in vitro. Among them, the anti-psychotic drug fluspirilene exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effect in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Huh7 cells. We demonstrated for the first time that fluspirilene treatment significantly increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, and decreased the expressions of CDK2, cyclin E and Rb, as well as the phosphorylations of CDK2 on Thr160 and Rb on Ser795. We also examined the anti-cancer effect of fluspirilene in vivo in BALB/C nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 cells. Our results showed that oral fluspirilene treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth. Fluspirilene (15 mg/kg exhibited strong anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of the leading cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (10 mg/kg. Moreover, the cocktail treatment with fluspirilene and 5-fluorouracil exhibited the highest therapeutic effect. These results suggested for the first time that fluspirilene is a potential CDK2 inhibitor and a candidate anti-cancer drug for the treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In view of the fact that fluspirilene has a long history

  1. Polyethylene glycol-conjugated chondroitin sulfate A derivative nanoparticles for tumor-targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Young; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Jun; Lee, Song Yi; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-10-20

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-decorated chondroitin sulfate A-deoxycholic acid (CSD) nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated for the selective delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) to ovarian cancer. CSD-PEG was synthesized via amide bond formation between the NH2 group of methoxypolyethylene glycol amine and the COOH group of CSD. CSD-PEG/DOX NPs with a 247nm mean diameter, negative zeta potential, and >90% drug encapsulation efficiency were prepared. Sustained and pH-dependent DOX release profiles from CSD-PEG NPs were observed in dissolution tests. Endocytosis of NPs by SKOV-3 cells (CD44 receptor-positive human ovarian cancer cells), based on the CSA-CD44 receptor interaction, was determined by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies. PEGylation of NPs also resulted in reduced drug clearance (CL) in vivo and improved relative bioavailability, compared to non-PEGylated NPs, as determined by the pharmacokinetic study performed after intravenous administration in rats. Developed CSD-PEG NPs can be a promising delivery vehicle for the therapy of CD44 receptor-expressing ovarian cancers. PMID:27474544

  2. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  3. The Structure-Dependent Electric Release and Enhanced Oxidation of Drug in Graphene Oxide-Based Nanocarrier Loaded with Anticancer Herbal Drug Berberine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Danni; Ruan, Pan; Meng, Ziyuan; Zhou, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the current investigation is to explore graphene oxide (GO) special electric and electrochemical properties in modulating and tuning drug delivery in tumor special environment of electrophysiology. The electric-sensitive drug release and redox behavior of GO-bearing berberine (Ber) was studied. Drug release in cell potential was applied in a designed electrode system: tumor environment was simulated at pH 6.2 with 0.1 V pulse voltage, whereas the normal was at pH 7.4 with 0.2 V. Quite different from the pH-depended profile, the electricity-triggered behavior indicated a high correlation with the carriers' structure: GO-based nanocomposite showed a burst release on its special "skin effect," whereas the PEGylated ones released slowly owing to the electroviscous effect of polymer. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the redox behaviors of colloid PEGylated GO toward absorbed Ber in pH 5.8 and 7.2 solutions. After drug loading, the oxidation of Ber was enhanced in a neutral environment, whereas the enhancement of PEG-GO was in an acidic one, which means a possible increased susceptibility of their biotransformation in vivo. The studies designed in this work may help to establish a kind of carrier system for the sensitive delivery and metabolic regulation of drugs according to the different electrophysiological environment in tumor therapy. PMID:26052932

  4. Profound activity of the anti-cancer drug bortezomib against Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes identifies the proteasome as a novel drug target for cestodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Stadelmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A library of 426 FDA-approved drugs was screened for in vitro activity against E. multilocularis metacestodes employing the phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI assay. Initial screening at 20 µM revealed that 7 drugs induced considerable metacestode damage, and further dose-response studies revealed that bortezomib (BTZ, a proteasome inhibitor developed for the chemotherapy of myeloma, displayed high anti-metacestodal activity with an EC50 of 0.6 µM. BTZ treatment of E. multilocularis metacestodes led to an accumulation of ubiquinated proteins and unequivocally parasite death. In-gel zymography assays using E. multilocularis extracts demonstrated BTZ-mediated inhibition of protease activity in a band of approximately 23 kDa, the same size at which the proteasome subunit beta 5 of E. multilocularis could be detected by Western blot. Balb/c mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes were used to assess BTZ treatment, starting at 6 weeks post-infection by intraperitoneal injection of BTZ. This treatment led to reduced parasite weight, but to a degree that was not statistically significant, and it induced adverse effects such as diarrhea and neurological symptoms. In conclusion, the proteasome was identified as a drug target in E. multilocularis metacestodes that can be efficiently inhibited by BTZ in vitro. However, translation of these findings into in vivo efficacy requires further adjustments of treatment regimens using BTZ, or possibly other proteasome inhibitors.

  5. Solubility and thermodynamic function of a new anticancer drug ibrutinib in 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol + water mixtures at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrutinib is a recently approved anticancer drug recommended for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. It has been reported as practically insoluble in water and hence it is available in the market at higher doses. Poor solubility of ibrutinib limits its development to oral solid dosage forms only. In this work, the solubilities of ibrutinib were measured in various 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol (Carbitol) + water mixtures at T = (298.15 to 323.15) and p = 0.1 MPa. The solubility of ibrutinib was measured using an isothermal method. The thermodynamics function of ibrutinib was also studied. The measured solubilities of ibrutinib were correlated and fitted with Van’t Hoff, the modified Apelblat and Yalkowsky models. The results of curve fitting of all three models showed good correlation of experimental solubilities of ibrutinib with calculated ones. The mole fraction solubility of ibrutinib was observed highest in pure 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol (2.67 · 10−2 at T = 298.15 K) and lowest in pure water (1.43 · 10−7 at T = 298.15 K) at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K. Thermodynamics data of ibrutinib showed an endothermic, spontaneous and an entropy-driven dissolution behavior of ibrutinib in all 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol + water mixtures. Based on these results, ibrutinib has been considered as practically insoluble in water and freely soluble in 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol. Therefore, 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol could be used as a physiologically compatible cosolvent for solubilization and stabilization of ibrutinib in an aqueous media. The solubility data of this work could be extremely useful in preformulation studies and formulation development of ibrutinib

  6. Screening of Drug Metabolizing Enzymes for the Ginsenoside Compound K In Vitro: An Efficient Anti-Cancer Substance Originating from Panax Ginseng.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xiao

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside compound K (CK, a rare ginsenoside originating from Panax Ginseng, has been found to possess unique pharmacological activities specifically as anti-cancers. However, the role of cytochrome P450s (CYPs in the metabolism of CK is unclear. In this study, we screened the CYPs for the metabolism of CK in vitro using human liver microsomes (HLMs or human recombinant CYPs. The results showed that CK inhibited the enzyme activities of CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 in the HLMs. The Km and Vmax values of CK were 84.20±21.92 μM and 0.28±0.04 nmol/mg protein/min, respectively, for the HLMs; 34.63±10.48 μM and 0.45±0.05 nmol/nmol P450/min, respectively, for CYP2C9; and 27.03±5.04 μM and 0.68±0.04 nmol/nmol P450/min, respectively, for CYP3A4. The IC50 values were 16.00 μM and 9.83 μM, and Ki values were 14.92 μM and 11.42μM for CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, respectively. Other human CYP isoforms, including CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and CYP2C19, showed minimal or no effect on CK metabolism. The results suggested that CK was a substrate and also inhibitors for both CYP2C9 and CYP3A4. Patients using CK in combination with therapeutic drugs that are substrates of CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 for different reasons should be careful, although the inhibiting potency of CK is much poorer than that of enzyme-specific inhibitors.

  7. Synthesis, structural characterization, in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer activity studies of ternary metal complexes containing glycine amino acid and the anti-inflammatory drug lornoxicam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Walaa H.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Dessouky, Maher M. I.

    2015-02-01

    Mixed ligand complexes were synthesized using lornoxicam (LOR) as the primary ligand and glycine amino acid (HGly) as the secondary ligand. They were characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, mass, 1H NMR, ESR spectral studies, TG-DTG, X-ray powder diffraction and physical analytical studies. From the molar conductance, magnetic moment and electronic spectral data of the synthesized complexes, general formulae of [M(LOR)2(Gly)]·Xn·yH2O where M = Cr(III) (X = Cl, n = 2, y = 3), Mn(II) (X = Cl, n = 1, y = 1), Co(II) (X = BF4, n = 1, y = 0), Ni(II) (X = Cl, n = 1, y = 0), Cu(II) (X = BF4, n = 1, y = 2) and Zn(II) (X = BF4, n = 1, y = 2) and (M = Fe(II) (X = BF4, n = 1, y = 1) and Fe(III) (X = Cl, n = 2, y = 1) with an octahedral structure were proposed. Thermal analyses show that the complexes lose water molecules of hydration initially and subsequently expel anionic parts and organic ligands in continuous steps. The kinetic parameters namely E, ΔH∗, ΔS∗ and ΔG∗ illustrate the spontaneous association of the metal and ligands in the formation of the complexes. The antimicrobial efficiency of the LOR and HGly ligands and the ternary complexes were examined by in vitro method against various pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains. The metal complexes were found to possess efficient antimicrobial properties compared to lornoxicam and most of these complexes could turn out to be excellent models for the design of effective antibiotic drug substances. Also, the two ligands, in comparison to ternary metal complexes are screened for their anticancer activity against breastic cancer cell line. The results showed that the metal complexes be more active than the parent LOR and glycine free ligands except Cr(III) ternary complex which was found to be inactive.

  8. Drug delivery system for an anticancer agent, chlorogenate-Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide nanohybrid synthesised using direct co-precipitation and ion exchange methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-09-01

    A nano-structured drug-inorganic clay hybrid involving an active anticancer compound, which is chlorogenic acid (CA) intercalated into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide, has been assembled via ion-exchange and co-precipitation methods to form a nanohybrid CZAE (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using an ion-exchange method) and CZAC (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using a direct method), respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that the CA-LDH had a hybrid structure in which the anionic chlorogenate is arranged between the interlayers as a horizontal monolayer at 90 and 20° angles from the x axis for CZAE and CZAC, respectively. Both nanohybrids have the properties of mesoporous materials. The high loading percentage of chlorogenic acid (approximately 43.2% for CZAE and 45.3% for CZAC) with basal spacings of 11.7 and 12.6 Å for CZAE and CZAC, respectively, corroborates the successful intercalation of chlorogenic acid into the interlayer gallery of layered double hydroxides. Free chlorogenic acid and the synthesised nanocomposites (CZAE, CZAC) were assessed for their cytotoxicity against various cancer cells. The Fourier transform infrared data supported the formation of both nanohybrids, and a thermal analysis showed that the nanohybrids are more thermally stable than their counterparts. The chlorogenate shows a sustained release, and the release rate of chlorogenate from CZAE and CZAC nanohybrids at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8 due to their different release mechanisms. The release rate of chlorogenate from both nanohybrids can be described as pseudo-second order. The present investigation revealed the potential of the nanohybrids to enhance the in vitro anti-tumour effect of chlorogenic acid in liver and lung cancer cells in vitro.

  9. Suspicion of drug-drug interaction between high-dose methotrexate and proton pump inhibitors: a case report - should the practice be changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchon, F; Vantard, N; Gouraud, A; Schwiertz, V; Franchon, E; Pham, B N; Vial, T; You, B; Bouafia, F; Salles, G; Rioufol, C

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a potential drug-drug interaction in a woman treated by a first injection of high-dose methotrexate for a T-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Valaciclovir, fluoxetine and pantoprazole were given concomitantly. A methotrexate overdosage was shown at 36 h after infusion associated with a severe renal failure. Alkaline hyperhydration, folinic acid and carboxypeptidase G2 were given. Prescription analyses by pharmacists and literature research have permitted us to suggest that a drug-drug interaction between methotrexate and proton pump inhibitors (PPI) was responsible for this renal failure. Several mechanisms of interaction were suggested and might be related to the inhibition of renal methotrexate transporters by PPI, an increase in the methotrexate efflux to the blood by an upregulation of multidrug resistance protein 3 by PPI or genetic polymorphisms. This case shows that pharmacists can help physicians to optimize patient treatment: they consensually decided on the systematic discontinuation of PPI or a switch to ranitidine when patients were treated by high-dose methotrexate. PMID:21597286

  10. [Continuous intrathecal opiate therapy with a portable drug pump in cancer pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motsch, J; Bleser, W; Ismaily, A J; Distler, L

    1988-10-01

    Terminal cancer patients report substantial pain frequently. Pain control can be achieved in many patients with conventional methods and analgesics. However, significant numbers of patients remain in pain. For these patients, continuous intrathecal narcotics delivered by an external portable pump via a subcutaneous port, offer substantially improved pain control with minimal risk of serious systemic complications. Duration of treatment in our 40 cancer patients lasted up to 11 month. Continuous intrathecal morphine or fentanyl relieved pain till death due to cancer. Supraspinal side effects of opioids were only seen during the first week of intrathecal narcotic treatment. No serious complications like meningitis or other infections were observed. Postmortem examination also could not detect changes of the cord or signs of arachnoiditis due to intrathecal narcotics or the implanted catheter. We conclude, that continuous intrathecal narcotic infusion by means of small portable pump is a very efficient method to control terminal cancer pain and enables treatment on an outpatient basis until death.

  11. Novel Marine Compounds: Anticancer or Genotoxic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Jamal M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past several decades, marine organisms have generously gifted to the pharmaceutical industries numerous naturally bioactive compounds with antiviral, antibacterial, antimalarial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer potentials. But till date only few anticancer drugs (cytarabine, vidarabine have been commercially developed from marine compounds while several others are currently in different clinical trials. Majority of these compounds were tested in the tumor xenograft models, however, lack of anticancer potential data in the chemical- and/or oncogene-induced pre-initiation animal carcinogenesis models might have cost some of the marine anticancer compounds an early exit from the clinical trials. This review critically discusses importance of preclinical evaluation, failure of human clinical trials with certain potential anticancer agents, the screening tests used, and choice of biomarkers.

  12. Role of novel multidrug efflux pump involved in drug resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Bharathi Srinivasan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae have caused major therapeutic problems worldwide due to the emergence of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing strains. Although there are >10 major facilitator super family (MFS efflux pumps annotated in the genome sequence of the K. pneumoniae bacillus, apparently less is known about their physiological relevance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insertional inactivation of kpnGH resulting in increased susceptibility to antibiotics such as azithromycin, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, ertapenem, erythromycin, gentamicin, imipenem, ticarcillin, norfloxacin, polymyxin-B, piperacillin, spectinomycin, tobramycin and streptomycin, including dyes and detergents such as ethidium bromide, acriflavine, deoxycholate, sodium dodecyl sulphate, and disinfectants benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine and triclosan signifies the wide substrate specificity of the transporter in K. pneumoniae. Growth inactivation and direct fluorimetric efflux assays provide evidence that kpnGH mediates antimicrobial resistance by active extrusion in K. pneumoniae. The kpnGH isogenic mutant displayed decreased tolerance to cell envelope stressors emphasizing its added role in K. pneumoniae physiology. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The MFS efflux pump KpnGH involves in crucial physiological functions besides being an intrinsic resistance determinant in K. pneumoniae.

  13. A D-octapeptide drug efflux pump inhibitor acts synergistically with azoles in a murine oral candidiasis infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Niimi, Kyoko; Tansho, Shigeru; Ono, Yasuo; Monk, Brian C; Holmes, Ann R; Harding, David R K; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Clinical management of patients undergoing treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis with azole antifungals can be impaired by azole resistance. High-level azole resistance is often caused by the overexpression of Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p. Inhibition of this pump therefore represents a target for combination therapies that reverse azole resistance. We assessed the therapeutic potential of the D-octapeptide derivative RC21v3, a Cdr1p inhibitor, in the treatment of murine oral candidiasis caused by either the azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate MML611 or its azole-susceptible parental strain MML610. RC21v3, fluconazole (FLC), or a combination of both drugs were administered orally to immunosuppressed ICR mice at 3, 24, and 27 h after oral inoculation with C. albicans. FLC protected the mice inoculated with MML610 from oral candidiasis, but was only partially effective in MML611-infected mice. The co-application of RC21v3 (0.02 μmol per dose) potentiated the therapeutic performance of FLC for mice infected with either strain. It caused a statistically significant decrease in C. albicans cfu isolated from the oral cavity of the infected mice and reduced oral lesions. RC21v3 also enhanced the therapeutic activity of itraconazole against MML611 infection. These results indicate that RC21v3 in combination with azoles has potential as a therapy against azole-resistant oral candidiasis.

  14. Drug delivery system for an anticancer agent, chlorogenate-Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide nanohybrid synthesised using direct co-precipitation and ion exchange methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barahuie, Farahnaz [Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hussein, Mohd Zobir, E-mail: mzobir@putra.upm.edu.my [Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Arulselvan, Palanisamy [Laboratory of Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Fakurazi, Sharida [Laboratory of Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Zainal, Zulkarnain [Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-15

    A nano-structured drug-inorganic clay hybrid involving an active anticancer compound, which is chlorogenic acid (CA) intercalated into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide, has been assembled via ion-exchange and co-precipitation methods to form a nanohybrid CZAE (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using an ion-exchange method) and CZAC (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using a direct method), respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that the CA-LDH had a hybrid structure in which the anionic chlorogenate is arranged between the interlayers as a horizontal monolayer at 90 and 20° angles from the x axis for CZAE and CZAC, respectively. Both nanohybrids have the properties of mesoporous materials. The high loading percentage of chlorogenic acid (approximately 43.2% for CZAE and 45.3% for CZAC) with basal spacings of 11.7 and 12.6 Å for CZAE and CZAC, respectively, corroborates the successful intercalation of chlorogenic acid into the interlayer gallery of layered double hydroxides. Free chlorogenic acid and the synthesised nanocomposites (CZAE, CZAC) were assessed for their cytotoxicity against various cancer cells. The Fourier transform infrared data supported the formation of both nanohybrids, and a thermal analysis showed that the nanohybrids are more thermally stable than their counterparts. The chlorogenate shows a sustained release, and the release rate of chlorogenate from CZAE and CZAC nanohybrids at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8 due to their different release mechanisms. The release rate of chlorogenate from both nanohybrids can be described as pseudo-second order. The present investigation revealed the potential of the nanohybrids to enhance the in vitro anti-tumour effect of chlorogenic acid in liver and lung cancer cells in vitro. - Highlights: • We intercalated chlorogenic into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide by ion-exchange and coprecipitation methods. • The two methods gave nanocomposites

  15. A nucleoside anticancer drug, 1-(3-C-ethynyl-β-D-ribo-pentofuranosylcytosine (TAS106, sensitizes cells to radiation by suppressing BRCA2 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukushima Masakazu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel anticancer drug 1-(3-C-ethynyl-β-D-ribo-pentofuranosylcytosine (ECyd, TAS106 has been shown to radiosensitize tumor cells and to improve the therapeutic efficiency of X-irradiation. However, the effect of TAS106 on cellular DNA repair capacity has not been elucidated. Our aim in this study was to examine whether TAS106 modified the repair capacity of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs in tumor cells. Methods Various cultured cell lines treated with TAS106 were irradiated and then survival fraction was examined by the clonogenic survival assays. Repair of sublethal damage (SLD, which indicates DSBs repair capacity, was measured as an increase of surviving cells after split dose irradiation with an interval of incubation. To assess the effect of TAS106 on the DSBs repair activity, the time courses of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci formation were examined by using immunocytochemistry. The expression of DNA-repair-related proteins was also examined by Western blot analysis and semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Results In clonogenic survival assays, pretreatment of TAS106 showed radiosensitizing effects in various cell lines. TAS106 inhibited SLD repair and delayed the disappearance of γ-H2AX and 53BP1 foci, suggesting that DSB repair occurred in A549 cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated that TAS106 down-regulated the expression of BRCA2 and Rad51, which are known as keys among DNA repair proteins in the homologous recombination (HR pathway. Although a significant radiosensitizing effect of TAS106 was observed in the parental V79 cells, pretreatment with TAS106 did not induce any radiosensitizing effects in BRCA2-deficient V-C8 cells. Conclusions Our results indicate that TAS106 induces the down-regulation of BRCA2 and the subsequent abrogation of the HR pathway, leading to a radiosensitizing effect. Therefore, this study suggests that inhibition of the HR pathway may be useful to improve the therapeutic efficiency of

  16. Novel Anticancer Agents from Ascidiacea

    OpenAIRE

    Vervoort, Hélène C.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents an effort to contribute to the discovery and development of struc­turally and mechanistically novel anticancer drugs. In order to reach this goal it focusses on the biologically active secondary metabolites of marine invertebrates of the class As­cidiacea (phylum Chordata, subphylum Urochordata (Tunicata), class Ascidacea). Three distinct areas of research were combined. The first part concerns the discovery of two novel, naturally occurring didemnin depsipeptide...

  17. Novel Marine Compounds: Anticancer or Genotoxic?

    OpenAIRE

    Arif, Jamal M.; Al-Hazzani, Amal A.; Muhammed Kunhi; Fahad Al-Khodairy

    2004-01-01

    In the past several decades, marine organisms have generously gifted to the pharmaceutical industries numerous naturally bioactive compounds with antiviral, antibacterial, antimalarial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer potentials. But till date only few anticancer drugs (cytarabine, vidarabine) have been commercially developed from marine compounds while several others are currently in different clinical trials. Majority of these compounds were tested in the tumor xenograft mode...

  18. Mutation of Gly717Phe in human topoisomerase 1B has an effect on enzymatic function, reactivity to the camptothecin anticancer drug and on the linker domain orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenxing; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia;

    2015-01-01

    Human topoisomerase 1B controls the topological state of supercoiled DNA allowing the progression of fundamental cellular processes. The enzyme, which is the unique molecular target of the natural anticancer compound camptothecin, acts by cleaving one DNA strand and forming a transient protein...

  19. Toward Predicting Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Parallel Computational Approaches to Identify Multidrug Resistance Protein 4 and Bile Salt Export Pump Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, Matthew A.; Köck, Kathleen; Urban, Thomas J.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of drug toxicity. Inhibition of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), in addition to bile salt export pump (BSEP), might be a risk factor for the development of cholestatic DILI. Recently, we demonstrated that inhibition of MRP4, in addition to BSEP, may be a risk factor for the development of cholestatic DILI. Here, we aimed to develop computational models to delineate molecular features underlying MRP4 and BSEP inhibition. Models were ...

  20. Impact of proton pump inhibitor treatment on gastrointestinal bleeding associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use among post-myocardial infarction patients taking antithrombotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjerning Olsen, Anne-Marie; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Gislason, Gunnar H;

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding in post-myocardial infarction patients taking antithrombotics and treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)? METHODS: This was a nationwide cohort study based on linked...

  1. Investigating Effect of Drug Use on Short-term Complications and Bleeding in Patients Undergoing Off-pump CABG (OPCAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hadadzadeh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Opioid abuse is a major social and health problem in many parts of the world especially in Iran. There are not much information about effect of drugs (addiction on short-term complications and bleeding after CABG. This study aimed to assess the relationship between addiction with short-term complications and bleeding after CABG. Methods: This is a descriptive study in which 100 male patients who underwent off-pump CABG in Afshar hospital in yazd were followed during 3 months to investigate their short-term complications. preoperative and post-operative Hb, Plt, Pt, Ptt, bleeding and packed cells after operation were recorded. Then, collected data was analyzed by chi-square, fisher and exact test . Results: In this study, 30 patients were addicts and 70 male patients were non-addicts. All patients were males and similar in preoperative characteristics such as HTN, DM, HLP, CAD, LIMA usage and NYHA FC. Addicted patients were younger than non-addicts and most of them were cigarette smokers. Regarding medical and dietary recommendation after operation, addicted patients observed these recommendation significantly less than non-addicted patients. After operation, pulmonary, neurologic and infective complications were significantly more common in addicted patients. Conclusion: According the study results and other similar studies, drug use in patients with cardiovascular disease is noticeable. Moreover, regarding the postoperative outcomes in addicted patients, more studies needs to be conducted in this field.

  2. Adaptive and Mutational Resistance: Role of Porins and Efflux Pumps in Drug Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Lucía; Robert E W Hancock

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The substantial use of antibiotics in the clinic, combined with a dearth of new antibiotic classes, has led to a gradual increase in the resistance of bacterial pathogens to these compounds. Among the various mechanisms by which bacteria endure the action of antibiotics, those affecting influx and efflux are of particular importance, as they limit the interaction of the drug with its intracellular targets and, consequently, its deleterious effects on the cell. This review evaluates t...

  3. In vitro model systems to investigate bile salt export pump (BSEP) activity and drug interactions: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yaofeng; Woolf, Thomas F; Gan, Jinping; He, Kan

    2016-08-01

    The bile salt export pump protein (BSEP), expressed on the canalicular membranes of hepatocytes, is primarily responsible for the biliary excretion of bile salts. The inhibition of BSEP transport activity can lead to an increase in intracellular bile salt levels and liver injury. This review discusses the various in vitro assays currently available for assessing the effect of drugs or other chemical entities to modulate BSEP transport activity. BSEP transporter assays use one of the following platforms: Xenopus laevis oocytes; canalicular membrane vesicles (CMV); BSEP-expressed membrane vesicles; cell lines expressing BSEP; sandwich cultured hepatocytes (SCH); and hepatocytes in suspension. Two of these, BSEP-expressed insect membrane vesicles and sandwich cultured hepatocytes, are the most commonly used assays. BSEP membrane vesicles prepared from transfected insect cells are useful for assessing BSEP inhibition or substrate specificity and exploring mechanisms of BSEP-associated genetic diseases. This model can be applied in a high-throughput format for discovery-drug screening. However, experimental results from use of membrane vesicles may lack physiological relevance and the model does not allow for investigation of in situ metabolism in modulation of BSEP activity. Hepatocyte-based assays that use the SCH format provide results that are generally more physiologically relevant than membrane assays. The SCH model is useful in detailed studies of the biliary excretion of drugs and BSEP inhibition, but due to the complexity of SCH preparation, this model is used primarily for determining biliary clearance and BSEP inhibition in a limited number of compounds. The newly developed hepatocyte in suspension assay avoids many of the complexities of the SCH method. The use of pooled cryopreserved hepatocytes in suspension minimizes genetic variance and individual differences in BSEP activity and also provides the opportunity for higher throughput screening and cross

  4. CancerHSP: anticancer herbs database of systems pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weiyang; Li, Bohui; Gao, Shuo; Bai, Yaofei; Shar, Piar Ali; Zhang, Wenjuan; Guo, Zihu; Sun, Ke; Fu, Yingxue; Huang, Chao; Zheng, Chunli; Mu, Jiexin; Pei, Tianli; Wang, Yuan; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-06-01

    The numerous natural products and their bioactivity potentially afford an extraordinary resource for new drug discovery and have been employed in cancer treatment. However, the underlying pharmacological mechanisms of most natural anticancer compounds remain elusive, which has become one of the major obstacles in developing novel effective anticancer agents. Here, to address these unmet needs, we developed an anticancer herbs database of systems pharmacology (CancerHSP), which records anticancer herbs related information through manual curation. Currently, CancerHSP contains 2439 anticancer herbal medicines with 3575 anticancer ingredients. For each ingredient, the molecular structure and nine key ADME parameters are provided. Moreover, we also provide the anticancer activities of these compounds based on 492 different cancer cell lines. Further, the protein targets of the compounds are predicted by state-of-art methods or collected from literatures. CancerHSP will help reveal the molecular mechanisms of natural anticancer products and accelerate anticancer drug development, especially facilitate future investigations on drug repositioning and drug discovery. CancerHSP is freely available on the web at http://lsp.nwsuaf.edu.cn/CancerHSP.php.

  5. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Novel Concepts of Proton Pump Inhibitors as Antifibrotic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebre, Yohannes T; Raghu, Ganesh

    2016-06-15

    The prevalence of abnormal acid gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is higher in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) than in matched control subjects. Several studies demonstrated that more than one-third of patients with IPF have abnormal esophageal acid exposures. In addition, many of these studies indicate that the majority of patients with IPF have silent reflux with no symptoms of GER. Findings of abnormal reflux persist in a large proportion of patients with IPF placed on antacid therapy such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). This seemingly paradoxical observation suggests that either patients with IPF are somehow resistant to PPI-based intervention or PPIs are inherently unable to suppress acid GER. By contrast, patients with IPF who undergo Nissen fundoplication surgery are effectively relieved from the complications of GER, and retrospective studies suggest improved lung function. Retrospective, anecdotal data suggest a beneficial role of PPIs in IPF including stabilization of lung function, reduction in episodes of acute exacerbation, and enhanced longevity. The recent evidence-based guidelines for treatment of IPF approved conditional recommendation of PPIs for all patients with IPF regardless of their GER status. Recently, we have reported that PPIs possess antiinflammatory and antifibrotic activities by directly suppressing proinflammatory cytokines, profibrotic proteins, and proliferation of lung fibroblasts. Our study provides an alternative explanation for the beneficial effect of PPIs in IPF. In this Perspective, we reviewed emerging progress on antifibrotic effect of PPIs using IPF as a disease model. In addition, we summarized surgical and pharmacological interventions for GER and their downstream effect on lung physiology. PMID:27110898

  6. Recent progress on anticancer candidates in patents of herbal medicinal products

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, N.; Zhu, M.; Li, H.; Feng, Y.; Tsao, S

    2011-01-01

    Herbal medicines in treatment of cancer as complementary and alternative therapy are accepted increasingly with growing scientific evidences of biomedical research and clinical trials. Anticancer drugs discovered from herbal medicines have a long history and some of them have been used in clinical setting as the conventional anticancer drugs. Actually, herbal medicines are a source for anticancer drug discovery and drug development. Recently, research continuously focuses on clues from tradit...

  7. Telomerase activity and telomere length in human tumor cells with acquired resistance to anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, V; Dai, F; Spitz, M; Peters, G J; Fiebig, H H; Hussain, A; Burger, A M

    2009-11-01

    Telomeres and telomerase are targets for anticancer drug development and specific inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. However, it has been reported that standard cytotoxic agents can affect telomere length and telomerase activity suggesting that they also have of a role in drug resistance. in this study, telomere lengths and telomerase activity as well as drug efflux pump expression, glutathione (GSH) levels and polyadenosine-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage were assessed in a panel of human tumor cell lines made resistant to vindesine, gemcitabine and cisplatin. these included two lung cancer cell lines resistant to vindesine (LXFL 529L/Vind, LXFA 526L/Vind), a renal cancer cell line (RXF944L/Gem) and an ovarian cancer cell line (AG6000) resistant to gemcitabine, and one resistant to cisplatin (ADDP). The resistant clones were compared to their parental lines and evaluated for cross resistance to other cytotoxic agents. Several drug specific resistance patterns were found, and various complex patterns of cross resistance emerged from some cell lines, but these mechanisms of resistance could not be related to drug efflux pump expression, GSH levels or pARp cleavage. However, all displayed changes in telomerase activity and/or telomere length. Our studies present evidence that telomere maintenance should be taken into consideration in efforts not only to overcome drug resistance, but also to optimize the use of telomere-based therapeutics.

  8. Rational use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors in combination for rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang W Bolten

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang W BoltenDivision of Rheumatology, Klaus-Miehlke Klinik, Wiesbaden, GermanyAbstract: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are successfully used to alleviate pain and inflammation in rheumatic diseases. In an appreciable percentage of cases, the use of systemic NSAIDs is associated with adverse lesions of the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa up to life-threatening perforations, ulcers, and bleeding. Reliable warning signals mostly do not arise. Therefore, it is important to take preventive measures to reduce the GI risk. One established method is to assign cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2-specific inhibitors (coxibs instead of traditional NSAIDs (tNSAIDs. Coxibs spare in part the endogenous gastroprotective mechanisms. Another reliable choice to improve the GI safety is the comedication of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs to suppress gastric acid. A fixed NSAID/PPI combination ensures expected protective effects by improving patients’ PPI adherence and physicians’ PPI prescription persistence. A fixed combination of enteric-coated naproxen and immediate-release esomeprazole has just been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. PPI combinations with aspirin, other tNSAIDs, and coxibs are desirable. Patients in all risk groups, even patients at low risk of GI adverse events, benefit from concomitant protective measures. Moreover, the literature suggests that NSAID/PPI combinations are cost effective, including for patients in low-GI-risk groups. Pricing of fixed NSAID/PPI combinations will play a pivotal role for their broad acceptance in the future.Keywords: PPI, NSAID, fixed combination, gastrointestinal, adverse events, prevention

  9. The Contribution of Natural Products as Source of New Anticancer Drugs: Studies Carried Out at the National Experimental Oncology Laboratory from the Federal University of Ceará [A Contribuição dos Produtos Naturais como Fonte de Novos Fármacos Anticâncer: Estudos no Laboratório Nacional de Oncologia Experimental da Universidade Federal do Ceará

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula N. N. Alves; Raquel C. Montenegro; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V.; Manoel O. Moraes; Maria E.A. Moraes; Cláudia Pessoa; Socorro V. F. Madeira

    2010-01-01

    The history of anticancer chemotherapy is closely related to that of natural products, as over 60% of currently used drugs in cancer therapy are natural products or inspired by a natural compound. Despite the introduction of new drugs in the therapeutic arsenal of anticancer medicines, many tumors do not properly respond to treatment. Natural resources comprise the most promising possibilities of finding new and efficient molecules with impact in the therapy of resistant diseases. The Nationa...

  10. In silico identification of anti-cancer compounds and plants from traditional Chinese medicine database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Han, Fei-Fei; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Gao, Yue-Dong; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-05-01

    There is a constant demand to develop new, effective, and affordable anti-cancer drugs. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a valuable and alternative resource for identifying novel anti-cancer agents. In this study, we aim to identify the anti-cancer compounds and plants from the TCM database by using cheminformatics. We first predicted 5278 anti-cancer compounds from TCM database. The top 346 compounds were highly potent active in the 60 cell lines test. Similarity analysis revealed that 75% of the 5278 compounds are highly similar to the approved anti-cancer drugs. Based on the predicted anti-cancer compounds, we identified 57 anti-cancer plants by activity enrichment. The identified plants are widely distributed in 46 genera and 28 families, which broadens the scope of the anti-cancer drug screening. Finally, we constructed a network of predicted anti-cancer plants and approved drugs based on the above results. The network highlighted the supportive role of the predicted plant in the development of anti-cancer drug and suggested different molecular anti-cancer mechanisms of the plants. Our study suggests that the predicted compounds and plants from TCM database offer an attractive starting point and a broader scope to mine for potential anti-cancer agents.

  11. Polymeric micelles in anticancer therapy : targeting, imaging and triggered release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, Chris; Bult, Wouter; Bos, Mariska; Storm, Gert; Nijsen, J Frank W; Hennink, Wim E

    2010-01-01

    Micelles are colloidal particles with a size around 5-100 nm which are currently under investigation as carriers for hydrophobic drugs in anticancer therapy. Currently, five micellar formulations for anticancer therapy are under clinical evaluation, of which Genexol-PM has been FDA approved for use

  12. Resistance-nodulation-division efflux pump acrAB is modulated by florfenicol and contributes to drug resistance in the fish pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Rodrigo; Oliver, Cristian; Valdivia, Sharin; Valenzuela, Karla; Haro, Ronie E; Sánchez, Patricio; Olavarría, Víctor H; Valenzuela, Paulina; Avendaño-Herrera, Rubén; Romero, Alex; Cárcamo, Juan G; Figueroa, Jaime E; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-06-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is a fastidious intracellular pathogen responsible for high mortality rates in farmed salmonids, with serious economic consequences for the Chilean aquaculture industry. Oxytetracycline and florfenicol are the most frequently used antibiotics against P. salmonis, but routine use could contribute to drug resistance. This study identified differentiated florfenicol susceptibilities in two P. salmonis strains, LF-89 and AUSTRAL-005. The less susceptible isolate, AUSTRAL-005, also showed a high ethidium bromide efflux rate, indicating a higher activity of general efflux pump genes than LF-89. The P. salmonis genome presented resistance nodulation division (RND) family members, a family containing typical multidrug resistance-related efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, efflux pump acrAB genes were overexpressed in AUSTRAL-005 following exposure to the tolerated maximal concentration of florfenicol, in contrast to LF-89. These results indicate that tolerated maximum concentrations of florfenicol can modulate RND gene expression and increase efflux pump activity. We propose that the acrAB efflux pump is essential for P. salmonis survival at critical florfenicol concentrations and for the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. PMID:27190287

  13. Molecular pharmacokinetic determinants of anticancer kinase inhibitors in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Scholler

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the published data regarding the molecular determinants (drug metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters and orphan nuclear receptors of approved anticancer kinase inhibitors pharmacokinetics in humans. The clinical impact of these determinants (drug disposition and drug–drug interactions is also discussed.

  14. A novel osmotic pump-based controlled delivery system consisting of pH-modulated solid dispersion for poorly soluble drug flurbiprofen: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujuan; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Yingying; Zhao, Qianqian; Zhang, Lina; Yang, Xinggang; Liu, Dandan; Pan, Weisan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel controlled release osmotic pump capsule consisting of pH-modulated solid dispersion for poorly soluble drug flurbiprofen (FP) was developed to improve the solubility and oral bioavailability of FP and to minimize the fluctuation of plasma concentration. The pH-modulated solid dispersion containing FP, Kollidon® 12 PF and Na2CO3 at a weight ratio of 1/4.5/0.02 was prepared using the solvent evaporation method. The osmotic pump capsule was assembled by semi-permeable capsule shell of cellulose acetate (CA) prepared by the perfusion method. Then, the solid dispersion, penetration enhancer, and suspending agents were tableted and filled into the capsule. Central composite design-response surface methodology was used to evaluate the influence of factors on the responses. A second-order polynomial model and a multiple linear model were fitted to correlation coefficient of drug release profile and ultimate cumulative release in 12 h, respectively. The actual response values were in good accordance with the predicted ones. The optimized formulation showed a complete drug delivery and zero-order release rate. Beagle dogs were used to be conducted in the pharmacokinetic study. The in vivo study indicated that the relative bioavailability of the novel osmotic pump system was 133.99% compared with the commercial preparation. The novel controlled delivery system with combination of pH-modulated solid dispersion and osmotic pump system is not only a promising strategy to improve the solubility and oral bioavailability of poorly soluble ionizable drugs but also an effective way to reduce dosing frequency and minimize the plasma fluctuation.

  15. Some medicinal plants as natural anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Pandey

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available India is the largest producer of medicinal plants and is rightly called the "Botanical garden of the World". The medicinal plants, besides having natural therapeutic values against various diseases, also provide high quality of food and raw materials for livelihood. Considerable works have been done on these plants to treat cancer, and some plant products have been marketed as anticancer drugs, based on the traditional uses and scientific reports. These plants may promote host resistance against infection by re-stabilizing body equilibrium and conditioning the body tissues. Several reports describe that the anticancer activity of medicinal plants is due to the presence of antioxidants in them. In fact, the medicinal plants are easily available, cheaper and possess no toxicity as compared to the modern (allopathic drugs. Hence, this review article contains 66 medicinal plants, which are the natural sources of anticancer agents.

  16. Overcoming drug efflux-based multidrug resistance in cancer with nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xue; Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR),which significantly decreases the efficacy of anticancer drugs and causes tumor recurrence,has been a major challenge in clinical cancer treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs for decades.Several mechanisms of overcoming drug resistance have been postulated.Well known Pglycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug efflux transporters are considered to be critical in pumping anticancer drugs out of cells and causing chemotherapy failure.Innovative theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic)strategies with nanoparticles are rapidly evolving and are anticipated to offer opportunities to overcome these limits.In this review,we discuss the mechanisms of drug efflux-mediated resistance and the application of multiple nanoparticle-based platforms to overcome chemoresistance and improve therapeutic outcome.

  17. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role\\'as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic\\'drugs

  18. Breakthrough cancer medicine and its impact on novel drug development in China:report of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) and Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) Joint Session at the 17th CSCO Annual Meeting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Roger Luo; Ge Zhang; Li Xu; Pascal Qian; Li Yan; Jian Ding; Helen X. Chen; Hao Liu; Man-Cheong Fung; Maria Koehler; Jean Pierre Armand; Lei Jiang; Xiao Xu

    2014-01-01

    The US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) teamed up with Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) to host a joint session at the17th CSCO Annual Meeting on September 20th, 2014 in Xiamen, China. With a focus on breakthrough cancer medicines, the session featured innovative approaches to evaluate breakthrough agents and established a platform to interactively share successful experiences from case studies of 6 novel agents from both the United States and China. The goal of the session is to inspire scientific and practical considerations for clinical trial design and strategy to expedite cancer drug development in China. A panel discussion further provided in-depth advice on advancing both early and ful development of novel cancer medicines in China.

  19. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  20. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  1. In silico identification of anti-cancer compounds and plants from traditional Chinese medicine database

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Xing Dai; Wen-Xing Li; Fei-Fei Han; Yi-Cheng Guo; Jun-Juan Zheng; Jia-Qian Liu; Qian Wang; Yue-Dong Gao; Gong-Hua Li; Jing-Fei Huang

    2016-01-01

    There is a constant demand to develop new, effective, and affordable anti-cancer drugs. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a valuable and alternative resource for identifying novel anti-cancer agents. In this study, we aim to identify the anti-cancer compounds and plants from the TCM database by using cheminformatics. We first predicted 5278 anti-cancer compounds from TCM database. The top 346 compounds were highly potent active in the 60 cell lines test. Similarity analysis revealed t...

  2. Micro-porous surfaces in controlled drug delivery systems: design and evaluation of diltiazem hydrochloride controlled porosity osmotic pump using non-ionic surfactants as pore-former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibkia, Khosro; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Shokri, Mohammad Hosein; Arami, Zahra; Arash, Zeinab; Shokri, Javad

    2014-06-01

    The major problem associated with conventional drug delivery systems is unpredictable plasma concentrations. The aim of this study was to design a controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) of diltiazem hydrochloride to deliver the drug in a controlled manner. CPOP tablets were prepared by incorporation of drug in the core and subsequent coating with cellulose acetate as semi-permeable membrane. Non-ionic surfactants were applied as pore-formers as well. The effect of pore-formers concentration on the in vitro release of diltiazem was also studied. The formulations were compared based on four comparative parameters, namely, total drug released after 24 h (D24 h), lag-time (tL), squared correlation coefficient of zero order equation (RSQzero) and mean percent deviation from zero order kinetic (MPDzero). Results of scanning electron microscopy studies exhibited formation of pores in the membrane from where the drug release occurred. It was revealed that drug release rate was directly proportional to the concentration of the pore-formers. The value of D24 h in the formulations containing Tween 80 (10%) and Brij 35 (5%) were found to be more than 94.9%, and drug release followed zero order kinetic (RSQzero > 0.99 and MPDzero < 8%) with acceptable tL (lower than 1 h). PMID:23763379

  3. Spectrophotometric investigation of the chemical compatibility of the anticancer drugs irinotecan-HCl and epirubicin-HCl in the same infusion solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Filiz Arioz; Anilanmert, Beril; Pekin, Mursit

    2005-11-01

    The use of infusional chemotherapy, especially in an ambulatory setting, absolutely requires that the individual agents remain stable in solution at room temperature and that the drugs be compatible. Because of this, investigation of the chemical compatibilities of chemotherapeutic drug combinations given in the same infusion solution is quite important especially if the drugs are to remain in solution for long periods. Thus, the visual and chemical compatibility of irinotecan and epirubicin in the same infusion solution were investigated using both reference standards and pharmaceutical dosage forms. No sign of incompatibility was observed upon visual examination by means of effervescence, pH change, precipitation and colour change. But a chemical incompatibility was observed using a spectrophotometric method in the spectra of irinotecan-HCl and epirubicin-HCl. The molar ratio of epirubicin-HCl/irinotecan-HCl at which the interaction reached a maximum was found to be 2:1. The chemical interaction occurred immediately after admixing and no visual or spectral change was noticed for 24 h after the interaction had occurred. It is concluded that these drugs are chemically incompatible. While the applicability of these two drugs in combination is investigated in further pharmacological studies, their chemical interaction should also be a consideration. The positive or negative contribution of this interaction to the pharmacological effect of the combination might be of importance, and therefore should be investigated in further clinical trials. PMID:15947932

  4. Role of polymorphic bile salt export pump (BSEP, ABCB11) transporters in anti-tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury in a Chinese cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Ru Chen; Jing Wang; Shaowen Tang; Yuan Zhang; Xiaozhen Lv; Shanshan Wu; Zhirong Yang; Yinyin Xia; Dafang Chen; Siyan Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that the polymorphisms in bile salt export pump (BSEP, encoded by ABCB11) may play an important role in the development of anti-tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury (ATDILI) and we aim to investigate the association between genetic variants of ABCB11 and the risk of ATDILI in a Chinese cohort. A total of 89 tuberculosis patients with ATDILI and 356 matched ATDILI -free patients constituted cases and controls. Genetic polymorphisms of ABCB11 were determined by TaqMan singl...

  5. Factors determining the stability, size distribution, and cellular accumulation of small, monodisperse chitosan nanoparticles as candidate vectors for anticancer drug delivery: application to the passive encapsulation of [14C]-doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masarudin MJ

    2015-12-01

    readily accumulate the nanoparticles 30 minutes posttreatment and that nanoparticles persisted within cells for up to 24 hours posttreatment. As a proof of principle for use in anticancer therapeutic applications, a [14C]-radiolabeled form of the anticancer agent doxorubicin was efficiently encapsulated within the CNP, confirming the feasibility of using this system as a drug delivery vector. Keywords: nanobiotechnology, drug delivery, chitosan, chitosan nanoparticles, doxorubicin, FITC

  6. Single-stranded oligonucleotide adducts formed by Pt complexes favoring left-handed base canting: steric effect of flanking residues and relevance to DNA adducts formed by Pt anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Jamil S; Marzilli, Patricia A; Intini, Francesco P; Natile, Giovanni; Marzilli, Luigi G

    2011-09-01

    Platinum anticancer drug binding to DNA creates large distortions in the cross-link (G*G*) and the adjacent XG* base pair (bp) steps (G* = N7-platinated G). These distortions, which are responsible for anticancer activity, depend on features of the duplex (e.g., base pairing) and of the cross-link moiety (e.g., the position and canting of the G* bases). The duplex structure stabilizes the head-to-head (HH) over the head-to-tail (HT) orientation and right-handed (R) over left-handed (L) canting of the G* bases. To provide fundamental chemical information relevant to the assessment of such duplex effects, we examine (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) adducts (Bip = 2,2'-bipiperidine with S,R,R,S chiral centers at the N, C, C, and N chelate ring atoms, respectively; oligo = d(G*pG*) with 3'- and/or 5'-substituents). The moderately bulky (S,R,R,S)-Bip ligand favors L canting and slows rotation about the Pt-G* bonds, and the (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) models provide more useful data than do dynamic models derived from active Pt drugs. All 5'-substituents in (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) adducts favor the normal HH conformer (∼97%) by destabilizing the HT conformer through clashes with the 3'-G* residue rather than through favorable H-bonding interactions with the carrier ligand in the HH conformer. For all (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) adducts, the S pucker of the 5'-X residue is retained. For these adducts, a 5'-substituent had only modest effects on the degree of L canting for the (S,R,R,S)-BipPt(oligo) HH conformer. This small flanking 5'-substituent effect on an L-canted HH conformer contrasts with the significant decrease in the degree of R canting previously observed for flanking 5'-substituents in the R-canted (R,S,S,R)-BipPt(oligo) analogues. The present data support our earlier hypothesis that the distortion distinctive to the XG* bp step (S to N pucker change and movement of the X residue) is required for normal stacking and X·X' WC H bonding and to prevent XG* residue clashes.

  7. Computer Simulations on the Anticancer Drug Delivery System of Docetaxel and PLGA-PEG Copolymer%PLGA—PEG共聚物负载多西紫杉醇的药物输运体系的计算机模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红艳; 郭泓雨; 周健

    2012-01-01

    采用耗散粒子动力学模拟的方法研究了抗癌药物输运体系多西紫杉醇与聚乙丙交酯与聚乙二醇的共聚物(PLGA—PEG)的白组装形态,考察了共聚物浓度、共聚物组成和药物含量等对白组装形态的影响.模拟结果表明,不同浓度的PLGA.PEG能够和多西紫杉醇白组装成球状、柱状、层状等结构;一定的浓度下,亲水的PEG嵌段将疏水的PLGA嵌段包裹起来形成核壳结构,可用于疏水药物输运应用.在比较低的浓度下,不同组成的PLGA—PEG均会形成球状核壳结构,PEG嵌段较多时壳层较厚核尺寸较小,PLGA嵌段较多时核的尺寸较大但壳层较薄,综合考虑载药量和稳定性,模拟结果中PEG嵌段的摩尔分数为60%即PLGA40一PEG60作为载体时性能较佳.药物的含量对自组装结构也有影响,药物含量较小时形成球状结构,药物含量较大时,则会形成柱状结构.对PLGA00-PEG00体系,模拟结果显示药物、聚合物和水的最佳配比为5:10:90.本工作可为共聚物载药体系的设计与开发提供参考.%Molecular dynamics (MD) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations were integrated to study the morphologies of the drug delivery system self-assembled by amphiphilic block copolymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and anticancer drug docetaxel. In this work, the solubility parameters used in DPD simulations were calculated by MD simulations. In DPD simulations, the effects of copolymer concentration, copoly- mer composition and drug content on self-assembled morphologies were investigated. Simulation results show that the mor- phologies self-assembled by PLGA-PEG and docetaxel (Dtx) undergo the transition from spherical to cylindrical and finally to lamellar micelles when increasing the copolymer concentration from 10% to 50% while maintaining the mass ratio of co- polymer to drug as 5 ~ 1. In all cases

  8. Hydrolysis mechanisms of trans platinum-based anticancer drug with heterocyclic amine ligands: A comparative DFT study%杂环反铂(Ⅱ)抗癌药物水解反应机理的DFT研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李添; 周立新; 李娟

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the hydrolysis processes of the anticancer drugs trans-[PtCl2 (piperi-dine) ( Am)], Am = 2.-pico]ine( 1), 3-picoline(2) , 4-picoiine(3), trans-[PtCl; (piperidine) ( piper-azine)] (4), trans-[PtCl2 ( piperazme )2 ] (5 ) and trans-[ PtCl2 (iminoether )2 ] (6 ) have been studied using hybrid density functional theory (B3LYP) and iso-electnc focusing polarized con-tinuum model CIEF-PCM) solvation models. The hydrolysis reactions leading to the activated drug form a key step for the reaction with the target DNA. The stationary points on the poten-tial energy surfaces for the first and second hydrolysis steps, proceeding via a general SN2 pathway, were fully optimized and characterized. It is found that the processes of the reactions follow the established theory for ligand substitution in square planar complexes,that is, substi-tution reactions usually occur via Pt-Iigand exchange reactions with a trigonal-bipyramidsl transition stale structure; the geometries of the transition states (TS) agree with the previous related work and all of the reactions are endothermic; the barrier height of the second hydroly-sis is always higher than that of the first step for all the systems. In comparison with previous work on cisplatin, a faster rate of hydrolysis is determined for the reaction. We make a com-parison with previous work on the hydrolysis processes of analogous trans platinum-based anti- cancer drugs. The results provide detailed energy profiles for the mechanism of hydrolysis of 1, 2, 3. 4, 5 and 6, which may assist in understanding the reaction mechanism of the drug with the DNA target and in the design of novel Pt-based anticancer drugs with trans geometries.%用DFT-B3LYP方法和IEF-PCM溶剂化模型研究了反铂抗癌药物trans-[PtCl2(piperidine)(Am)](Am=2-picoline(1).3-picoline(2),4 picoline(3)),trans-[PtCl2(piperidine)(piperazine)](4),trans-[PtCl2(piperazine)2](5)and trans-[PtCl2(iminoether)2](6)的水解过程.水解反应是药物与DNA靶

  9. The views of patients and the general public about expensive anti-cancer drugs in the NHS: a questionnaire-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Valerie; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Parlour, Louise; Langridge, Carolyn; Fallowfield, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the views of patients and members of the public about who should pay for expensive new cancer drugs not recommended by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Design A study-specific questionnaire was used to elicit the views of patients and the general public between April and June 2010. It examined whether participants thought patients should be told about all possible cancer treatments, if the NHS should always fund non-NICE recommended dru...

  10. UV-vis spectra of the anticancer camptothecin family drugs in aqueous solution: specific spectroscopic signatures unraveled by a combined computational and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Nico; Chillemi, Giovanni; Gontrani, Lorenzo; Grandi, Andrea; Mancini, Giordano; Castelli, Silvia; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Zazza, Costantino; Barone, Vincenzo; Desideri, Alessandro

    2009-04-23

    The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum of camptothecin (CPT) has been been recorded in aqueous solution at pH 5.3, where the equilibrium among the different CPT forms is shifted toward the lactonic one. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) computations lead to a remarkable reproduction of the experimental spectrum only upon addition of explicit water molecules in interaction with specific moieties of the camptothecin molecule. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enforcing boundary periodic conditions for CPT embedded with 865 water molecules, with a force field derived from DFT computations, show that the experimental spectrum is due to the contributions of CPT molecules with different solvation patterns. A similar solvent effect is observed for several CPT derivatives, including the clinically relevant SN-38 and topotecan drugs. The quantitative agreement between TD-DFT/MD computations and experimental data allow us to identify specific spectroscopic signatures diagnostic of the drug environment and to develop procedures that can be used to monitor the drug-DNA/protein interaction. PMID:19334673

  11. Genomics in personalized cancer medicine and its impact on early drug development in China:report from the 6th Annual Meeting of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) at the 50th ASCO Annual Meeting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Shi-Yuan Cheng; Li-Fang Hou; Li Yan; Yun-Guang Tong

    2014-01-01

    The 6th Annual Meeting of the United States Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) was held in conjunction with the 50th Annual Meeting of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) on May 30, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois, the United States of America. With a focus on personalized medicine, the conference featured novel approaches to investigate genomic aberrations in cancer cells and innovative clinical trial designs to expedite cancer drug development in biomarker-defined patient populations. A panel discussion further provided in-depth advice on advancing development of personalized cancer medicines in China. The conference also summarized USCACA key initiatives and accomplishments, including two awards designated to recognize young investigators from China for their achievements and to support their training in the United States. As an effort to promote international col aboration, USCACA wil team up with Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) to host a joint session on“Breakthrough Cancer Medicines”at the upcoming CSCO Annual Meeting on September 20th, 2014 in Xiamen, China.

  12. Anti-Cancer Potential of a Novel SERM Ormeloxifene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Rishi Kumar; Sundram, Vasudha; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Jaggi, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Ormeloxifene is a non-steroidal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) that is used as an oral contraceptive. Recent studies have shown its potent anti-cancer activities in breast, head and neck, and chronic myeloid leukemia cells. Several in vivo and clinical studies have reported that ormeloxifene possesses an excellent therapeutic index and has been well-tolerated, without any haematological, biochemical or histopathological toxicity, even with chronic administration. A reasonably long period of time and an enormous financial commitment are required to develop a lead compound into a clinically approved anti-cancer drug. For these reasons and to circumvent these obstacles, ormeloxifene is a promising candidate on a fast track for the development or repurposing established drugs as anti-cancer agents for cancer treatment. The current review summarizes recent findings on ormeloxifene as an anti-cancer agent and future prospects of this clinically safe pharmacophore. PMID:23895678

  13. Production of Anti-Cancer Agent Using Microbial Biotransformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhyun Roh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biotransformation is a great model system to produce drugs and biologically active compounds. In this study, we elucidated the fermentation and production of an anti-cancer agent from a microbial process for regiospecific hydroxylation of resveratrol. Among the strains examined, a potent strain showed high regiospecific hydroxylation activity to produce piceatannol. In a 5 L (w/v 3 L jar fermentation, this wild type Streptomyces sp. in the batch system produced 205 mg of piceatannol (i.e., 60% yields from 342 mg of resveratrol in 20 h. Using the product, an in vitro anti-cancer study was performed against a human cancer cell line (HeLa. It showed that the biotransformed piceatannol possessed a significant anticancer activity. This result demonstrates that a biotransformation screening method might be of therapeutic interest with respect to the identification of anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Gold-based drug encapsulation within a ferritin nanocage: X-ray structure and biological evaluation as a potential anticancer agent of the Auoxo3-loaded protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Giarita; Monti, Daria Maria; Amoresano, Angela; Pontillo, Nicola; Petruk, Ganna; Pane, Francesca; Cinellu, Maria Agostina; Merlino, Antonello

    2016-07-21

    Auoxo3, a cytotoxic gold(iii) compound, was encapsulated within a ferritin nanocage. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, circular dichroism, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography confirm the potential-drug encapsulation. The structure shows that naked Au(i) ions bind to the side chains of Cys48, His49, His114, His114 and Cys126, Cys126, His132, His147. The gold-encapsulated nanocarrier has a cytotoxic effect on different aggressive human cancer cells, whereas it is significantly less cytotoxic for non-tumorigenic cells. PMID:27326513

  15. Crystal structure of Escherichia coli cytidine triphosphate synthetase, a nucleotide-regulated glutamine amidotransferase/ATP-dependent amidoligase fusion protein and homologue of anticancer and antiparasitic drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrizzi, James A; Kim, Hanseong; Anderson, Paul M; Baldwin, Enoch P

    2004-06-01

    Cytidine triphosphate synthetases (CTPSs) produce CTP from UTP and glutamine, and regulate intracellular CTP levels through interactions with the four ribonucleotide triphosphates. We solved the 2.3-A resolution crystal structure of Escherichia coli CTPS using Hg-MAD phasing. The structure reveals a nearly symmetric 222 tetramer, in which each bifunctional monomer contains a dethiobiotin synthetase-like amidoligase N-terminal domain and a Type 1 glutamine amidotransferase C-terminal domain. For each amidoligase active site, essential ATP- and UTP-binding surfaces are contributed by three monomers, suggesting that activity requires tetramer formation, and that a nucleotide-dependent dimer-tetramer equilibrium contributes to the observed positive cooperativity. A gated channel that spans 25 A between the glutamine hydrolysis and amidoligase active sites provides a path for ammonia diffusion. The channel is accessible to solvent at the base of a cleft adjoining the glutamine hydrolysis active site, providing an entry point for exogenous ammonia. Guanine nucleotide binding sites of structurally related GTPases superimpose on this cleft, providing insights into allosteric regulation by GTP. Mutations that confer nucleoside