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Sample records for anticancer agent ixabepilone

  1. Anticancer agents from marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianjun; Zhou, Feng; Al-Kareef, Ammar M Q; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponges are currently one of the richest sources of anticancer active compounds found in the marine ecosystems. More than 5300 different known metabolites are from sponges and their associated microorganisms. To survive in the complicated marine environment, most of the sponge species have evolved chemical means to defend against predation. Such chemical adaptation produces many biologically active secondary metabolites including anticancer agents. This review highlights novel secondary metabolites in sponges which inhibited diverse cancer species in the recent 5 years. These natural products of marine sponges are categorized based on various chemical characteristics.

  2. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. I...

  3. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  4. Ixabepilone: a new treatment option for the management of taxane-resistant metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobham, Marta Vallee; Donovan, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Ixabepilone (Ixempra ® ; Bristol-Myers Squibb) is a novel microtubule stabilizing agent recently approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). This article focuses on considerations for ixabepilone administration and adverse event (AE) management, drawing from the biomedical literature indexed in PubMed, published abstracts from the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings, and the manufacturer’s prescribing information for ixabepilone. Administered as monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine in clinical studies, ixabepilone demonstrated positive clinical response rates, prolonged progression-free survival, and a favorable safety profile in patients with MBC. Treatment-related AEs were predictable and manageable with dose modification, treatment interruption, and active management. As ixabepilone undergoes development in earlier lines of breast cancer therapy and in other solid tumors, oncology nurses will encounter more and more patients receiving ixabepilone therapy. If nurses are acquainted with the unique management strategies associated with ixabepilone treatment, as detailed herein, patients are more likely to receive the full benefit of therapy

  5. Ixabepilone: a new chemotherapeutic option for refractory metastatic breast cancer

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    Shannon Puhalla

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Shannon Puhalla, Adam BrufskyUPMC Magee-Womens Cancer Program, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Taxane therapy is commonly used in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. However, most patients will eventually become refractory to these agents. Ixabepilone is a newly approved chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Although it targets microtubules similarly to docetaxel and paclitaxel, ixabepilone has activity in patients that are refractory to taxanes. This review summarizes the pharmacology of ixapebilone and clinical trials with the drug both as a single agent and in combination. Data were obtained using searches of PubMed and abstracts of the annual meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium from 1995 to 2008. Ixapebilone is a semi-synthetic analog of epothilone B that acts to induce apoptosis of cancer cells via the stabilization of microtubules. Phase I clinical trials have employed various dosing schedules ranging from daily to weekly to 3-weekly. Dose-limiting toxicites included neuropathy and neutropenia. Responses were seen in a variety of tumor types. Phase II studies verified activity in taxane-refractory metastatic breast cancer. The FDA has approved ixabepilone for use as monotherapy and in combination with capecitabine for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Ixabepilone is an efficacious option for patients with refractory metastatic breast cancer. The safety profile is similar to that of taxanes, with neuropathy and neutropenia being dose-limiting. Studies are ongoing with the use of both iv and oral formulations and in combination with other chemotherapeutic and biologic agents.Keywords: ixabepilone, epothilone, metastatic breast cancer, taxane-refractory

  6. Early clinical development of targeted anticancer agents

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    van Brummelen, E.M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Van Brummelen studied the safety and preliminary signs of efficacy of several novel targeted anticancer agents in phase I trials. In her thesis, she reports the results of trials with the immunotherapies pembrolizumab and cergutuzumab-amunaleukin, and with combinations of inhibitors of the MEK and

  7. Profile and potential of ixabepilone in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

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    Smaglo BG

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Brandon G Smaglo, Michael J PishvaianLombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: The management of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a challenge for medical oncologists because of both the aggressive nature of the disease and the relative paucity of effective systemic treatments with activity against this type of tumor. In the effort to discover new agents and combinations that may augment the therapeutic arsenal available for the management of this cancer, early phase clinical trials have been performed using ixabepilone, an epothilone B analog, with promising results. Targeting the microtubule system with certain taxanes in the management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma has been validated; ixabepilone also targets the microtubule system, interfering with it in an alternate manner from the taxane mechanism. Ixabepilone has demonstrated activity in cancers that have become taxane-resistant as well as those that never had any demonstrable taxane susceptibility. The available data for the use of ixabepilone in the management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are limited but promising. Single-arm studies have demonstrated both clinical efficacy and tolerable toxicity for the use of ixabepilone as monotherapy. The trial data available for ixabepilone used as a part of combination therapy are similar: it has been paired with chemotherapy (carboplatin, irinotecan and biologic therapy (dasatinib, sunitinib at the Phase I level to treat solid tumors in general, again with tolerable side effects and a suggestion of benefit. A single Phase II study has evaluated combination therapy with ixabepilone in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer, pairing it with cetuximab with clinical benefit. Although these trials are promising with regard to addition of ixabepilone to the slim armamentarium for management of pancreatic cancer, further work is still to be done. Importantly, this work bears the burden of

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs: multitargeted anticancer agents

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    Ververis K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Katherine Ververis,1 Alison Hiong,1 Tom C Karagiannis,1,* Paul V Licciardi2,*1Epigenomic Medicine, Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct, 2Allergy and Immune Disorders, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors are an emerging class of therapeutics with potential as anticancer drugs. The rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors (and other chromatin-modifying agents as anticancer therapies arose from the understanding that in addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes such as dysregulation of HDAC enzymes can alter phenotype and gene expression, disturb homeostasis, and contribute to neoplastic growth. The family of HDAC inhibitors is large and diverse. It includes a range of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds that differ in terms of structure, function, and specificity. HDAC inhibitors have multiple cell type-specific effects in vitro and in vivo, such as growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in malignant cells. HDAC inhibitors have the potential to be used as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Currently, there are two HDAC inhibitors that have received approval from the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, Zolinza and depsipeptide (romidepsin, Istodax. More recently, depsipeptide has also gained FDA approval for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Many more clinical trials assessing the effects of various HDAC inhibitors on hematological and solid malignancies are currently being conducted. Despite the proven anticancer effects of particular HDAC inhibitors against certain cancers, many aspects of HDAC enzymes and HDAC inhibitors are still not fully understood. Increasing our understanding of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, their targets and mechanisms of action will be critical for the

  9. Liposomal Drug Delivery of Anticancer Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Palle Jacob

    In the first part of the thesis the work towards a new generation of liposomal drug delivery systems for anticancer agents is described. The drug delivery system takes advantage of the elevated level of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) IIA in many tumors and the enhanced permeability......-trans retinoic acid, α-tocopheryl succinate and calcitriol were examined for their ability to be incorporated into the investigated drug delivery system and syntheses of the phospholipid prodrugs are described. The majority of the phospholipid prodrugs were able to form particles with diameters close to 100 nm...... that upon sPLA2 triggering the formulated phospholipid prodrugs displayed IC50 values in range from 3–36 μM and complete cell death was observed when higher drug concentrations were applied. Promising for the drug delivery system the majority of the phospholipid prodrugs remain non-toxic in the absence...

  10. RhoB mediates antitumor synergy of combined ixabepilone and sunitinib in human ovarian serous cancer.

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    Vishnu, Prakash; Colon-Otero, Gerardo; Kennedy, Gregory T; Marlow, Laura A; Kennedy, William P; Wu, Kevin J; Santoso, Joseph T; Copland, John A

    2012-03-01

    The aim was to evaluate antitumor activity of the combination of ixabepilone and sunitinib in pre-clinical models of chemotherapy naïve and refractory epithelial ovarian tumors, and to investigate the mechanism of synergy of such drug combination. HOVTAX2 cell line was derived from a metastatic serous papillary epithelial ovarian tumor (EOC) and a paclitaxel-resistant derivative was established. Dose response curves for ixabepilone and sunitinib were generated and synergy was determined using combination indexes. The molecular mechanism of antitumor synergy was examined using shRNA silencing. The combination of ixabepilone and sunitinib demonstrated robust antitumor synergy in naïve and paclitaxel-resistant HOVTAX2 cell lines due to increased apoptosis. The GTPase, RhoB, was synergistically upregulated in cells treated with ixabepilone and sunitinib. Using shRNA, RhoB was demonstrated to mediate antitumor synergy. These results were validated in two other EOC cell lines. Ixabepilone plus sunitinib demonstrated antitumor synergy via RhoB in naïve and paclitaxel-resistant cells resulting in apoptosis. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism of action leading to antitumor synergy and provides 'proof-of-principle' for combining molecular targeted agents with cytotoxic chemotherapy to improve antitumor efficacy. RhoB could be envisioned as an early biomarker of response to therapy in a planned Phase II clinical trial to assess the efficacy of ixabepilone combined with a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor such as sunitinib. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of antitumor synergy between these two classes of drugs in EOC and the pivotal role of RhoB in this synergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Some medicinal plants as natural anticancer agents

    OpenAIRE

    Govind Pandey; S Madhuri

    2009-01-01

    India is the largest producer of medicinal plants and is rightly called the "Botanical garden of the World". The medicinal plants, besides having natural therapeutic values against various diseases, also provide high quality of food and raw materials for livelihood. Considerable works have been done on these plants to treat cancer, and some plant products have been marketed as anticancer drugs, based on the traditional uses and scientific reports. These plants may promote host resistance agai...

  12. Novel microtubule-targeting agents – the epothilones

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    Daniel R Budman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Kit L Cheng, Thomas Bradley, Daniel R Budman1Monter Cancer Center, North Shore – LIJ Health Systems, Lake Success, New York, USAAbstract: Epothilones are a new class of antimicrotubule agents currently in clinical trials. Their chemical structures are distinct from taxanes and are more amenable to synthetic modification. Six epothilones have been studied in preclinical and clinical trials: patupilone (epothilone B, ixabepilone (BMS247550, BMS 310705, sagopilone (ZK-EPO, KOS-862 (epothilone D, and KOS-1584. In vitro data have shown increased potency in taxane-sensitive and taxane-resistant cancer cell lines. This enhanced cytotoxic effect has been attributed to epothilone being a poor substrate for p-glycoprotein drug resistance protein and having high affinity to the various β tubulin isoforms. Phase I clinical data have shown different dose-limiting toxicities for each of the epothilones. These effects are drug specific, dose specific, and schedule of administration specific. While diarrhea and myelosuppression are the dose-limiting toxicities for patupilone and BMS 310705, respectively, neurologic toxicity, as seen with taxanes, is the dose-limiting toxicity of ixabepilone, sagopilone, and KOS-862. In an effort to decrease neurologic toxicity, investigators have modified dosing schedules with limited success. Ixabepilone has the most mature clinical results with published phase II and III data, and regulatory approval for clinical use in the treatment of breast cancer. Ixabepilone has also been combined with other anticancer agents and has regulatory approval in combination with capecitabine for heavily treated breast cancer.Keywords: microtubule-targeting agents, epothilones, taxanes, ixabepilone

  13. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

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    Jin-Jian Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made.

  14. Underestimated potential of organometallic rhenium complexes as anticancer agents.

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    Leonidova, Anna; Gasser, Gilles

    2014-10-17

    In the recent years, organometallic compounds have become recognized as promising anti-cancer drug candidates. While radioactive (186/188)Re compounds are already used in clinics for cancer treatment, cold Re organometallic compounds have mostly been explored as luminescent probes for cell imaging and photosensitizers in photocatalysis. However, a growing number of studies have recently revealed the potential of Re organometallic complexes as anti-cancer agents. Several compounds have displayed cytotoxicity equaling or exceeding that of the well-established anti-cancer drug cisplatin. In this review, we present the currently known Re organometallic complexes that have shown anti-proliferative activity on cancer cell lines. A particular emphasis is placed on their cellular uptake and localization as well as their potential mechanism of action.

  15. Management of advanced breast cancer with the epothilone B analog, ixabepilone

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    William Gradishar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available William GradisharRobert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Despite the activity of standard chemotherapies in advanced breast cancer, disease progression remains inevitable. Most patients exposed to anthracyclines and taxanes develop resistance and a significant subset shows primary resistance. The increasing use of these agents as adjuvant therapy may result in more anthracycline- and taxane-resistant patients in the metastatic setting; few treatment options are available for patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC resistant to multiple chemotherapies. The heterogeneity of breast cancer represents another therapeutic challenge. Breast cancers may be classified as luminal, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2-positive, or estrogen receptor-, progesterone receptor-, and human epidermal growth factor 2-negative (ER/PR/HER2-negative, triple negative. HER2-positive and ER/PR/HER2-negative tumors are associated with poor prognosis owing to aggressive disease and poor long-term response to therapy. The epothilone B analog ixabepilone has low susceptibility to multiple mechanisms of resistance and has demonstrated activity in patients with MBC resistant to anthracyclines, taxanes, and/or capecitabine. Ixabepilone is the first epothilone to be approved, as monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine, for treatment of resistant/refractory MBC or locally advanced breast cancer. Treatment with ixabepilone is an option for patients with ER/PR/HER2-negative or HER2-positive disease and/or primary resistance to taxanes.Keywords: breast cancer, drug resistance, epothilone, HER2-positive, ixabepilone, ER/PR/HER2-negative (triple negative

  16. Synthetic Methods of Quinoline Derivatives as Potent Anticancer Agents.

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    Sharma, Vaibhav; Mehta, Dinesh Kumar; Das, Rina

    2017-01-01

    On account of significant biological activities, quinoline derivatives have drawn more attention to the synthesis and biological activities in the search for new therapeutic agents. Several new synthetic approaches have been implemented to derive new molecules from quinoline and all the synthesized molecules showed effective anticancer activity. Some molecules are synthesized using quinolones as precursor reactant, which is another effective product of quinoline, also showing significant activity against malignant tumors. The presence of nitrogen in it and its ability to bind with enzymes like gyrase, topoisomerase II and kinase have also proven it with antitumor activity. This review encapsulates the recent advances in the synthesis and anticancer activity of Quinoline derivatives. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent: A review.

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    Rauf, Abdur; Imran, Muhammad; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Nadeem, Muhammad; Peters, Dennis G; Mubarak, Mohammad S

    2016-12-21

    Owing to their antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity, grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are the archetypal paradigms of fruits used not only for nutritional purposes, but also for exclusive therapeutics. Grapes are a prominent and promising source of phytochemicals, especially resveratrol, a phytoalexin antioxidant found in red grapes which has both chemopreventive and therapeutic effects against various ailments. Resveratrol's role in reducing different human cancers, including breast, cervical, uterine, blood, kidney, liver, eye, bladder, thyroid, esophageal, prostate, brain, lung, skin, gastric, colon, head and neck, bone, ovarian, and cervical, has been reviewed. This review covers the literature that deals with the anti-cancer mechanism of resveratrol with special reference to antioxidant potential. Furthermore, this article summarizes the literature pertaining to resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent.

  18. Pro-oxidant natural products as anticancer agents.

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    Martin-Cordero, Carmen; Leon-Gonzalez, Antonio Jose; Calderon-Montano, Jose Manuel; Burgos-Moron, Estefania; Lopez-Lazaro, Miguel

    2012-07-01

    Cancer cells produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that lead to a state of increased basal oxidative stress. Since this state of oxidative stress makes cancer cells vulnerable to agents that further augment ROS levels, the use of pro-oxidant agents is emerging as an exciting strategy to selectively target tumor cells. Natural products have provided a significant contribution to the development of several drugs currently used in cancer chemotherapy. Although many natural products are known to affect the redox state of the cell, most studies on these compounds have focused on their antioxidant activity instead of on their pro-oxidant properties. This article provides an overview of natural products with pro-oxidant and anticancer activities, with special focus on plant secondary metabolites, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  19. Preclinical evaluation of molecular-targeted anticancer agents for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Mechthild; Zips, Daniel; Thames, Howard D.; Kummermehr, Johann; Baumann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The combination of molecular-targeted agents with irradiation is a highly promising avenue for cancer research and patient care. Molecular-targeted agents are in themselves not curative in solid tumours, whereas radiotherapy is highly efficient in eradicating tumour stem cells. Recurrences after high-dose radiotherapy are caused by only one or few surviving tumour stem cells. Thus, even if a novel agent has the potential to kill only few tumour stem cells, or if it interferes in mechanisms of radioresistance of tumours, combination with radiotherapy may lead to an important improvement in local tumour control and survival. To evaluate the effects of novel agents combined with radiotherapy, it is therefore necessary to use experimental endpoints which reflect the killing of tumour stem cells, in particular tumour control assays. Such endpoints often do not correlate with volume-based parameters of tumour response such as tumour regression and growth delay. This calls for radiotherapy specific research strategies in the preclinical testing of novel anti-cancer drugs, which in many aspects are different from research approaches for medical oncology

  20. Targeting apoptotic machinery as approach for anticancer therapy: Smac mimetics as anticancer agents

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    Nevine M.Y. Elsayed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a chief regulator of cellular homeostasis. Impairment of apoptotic machinery is a main characteristic of several diseases such as cancer, where the evasion of apoptosis is a cardinal hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis is regulated by contribution of pro- and anti- apoptotic proteins, where caspases are the main executioners of the apoptotic machinery. IAP (inhibitors of apoptosis proteins is a family of endogenous inhibitors of apoptosis, which perform their function through interference with the function of caspases. Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases is endogenous inhibitor of IAPs, thus it is one of the major proapoptotic endogenous proteins. Thus, the development of Smac mimetics has evolved as an approach for anticancer therapy. Several Smac mimetic agents have been introduced to clinical trial such as birinapanet 12. Herein, the history of development of Smac mimetics along with the recent development in this field is briefly discussed.

  1. [Molecular mechanism regulating effect of anti-cancer agents].

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    Saya, Hideyuki

    2009-01-01

    Faithful genome duplication is achieved by accurate coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Abnormalities occurring in this process are checked by biochemical signal transduction pathways, called checkpoints, which ensure the orderly progression of events in the cell cycle. Checkpoints prevent transition into subsequent phases until all processes in the previous phase are completed. Defects in cell cycle checkpoints result in gene mutations, chromosome damage, and aneuploidy, all of which contribute to tumorigenesis. However, it has recently been uncovered that the impairment of checkpoint function is the major reason why DNA damaging anti-cancer agents can selectively kill cancer cells. Given that G1 and G2 checkpoint functions are generally impaired in cancer cells, cells with DNA damage are unable to maintain G2 arrest and eventually die as they enter mitosis. This process is known as mitotic catastrophe.

  2. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States); Sethakorn, Nan [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States); Bissonnette, Marc [Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Puri, Neelu, E-mail: neelupur@uic.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, Rockford, IL (United States)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  3. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L.; Sethakorn, Nan; Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T.; Bissonnette, Marc; Puri, Neelu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC

  4. Towards safety of oral anti-cancer agents, the need to educate our pharmacists

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    Sanaa Saeed Mekdad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The global prevalence of cancer is rising. Use of oral anticancer medications has expanded exponentially. Knowledge about these medications as well as safe handling guidelines has not kept abreast with the rapidity these medications are applied in clinical practice. They pose serious hazards on all personal involved in handling these medications as well as on patients and their caregivers. We addressed the gaps in knowledge and safe handling of oral anticancer agents among pharmacists in institutional based cancer care. Materials and Methods: We used a 41 item questionnaire to explore three domains, pharmacists’ knowledge, safe handling practice and confidence and self-improving strategies towards these agents among pharmacists in multicentre specialized cancer care. Results: Participants included 120 pharmacists dedicated to handle and dispense oral anticancer agents. About 20% of Pharmacists have adequate knowledge about oral anticancer agents. Less than 50% apply safe handling principles adequately. Only a quarter are confident in educating cancer patients and their caregivers about Oral Anti-Cancer Agents. Conclusions: Pharmacists’ knowledge about Oral Anticancer agents needs to be improved. Safe handling and dispensing practice of these medications should be optimized. Pharmacists’ confidence towards educating patients and their caregiver needs to be addressed. Enhancing safety of oral anticancer agents should be a priority. Involving all key players, research and quality improving projects are needed to improve all aspects of the safety of oral anticancer agents.

  5. Adherence and patients' experiences with the use of oral anticancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, L.; Boons, C.C.; Kropff, F.; Ven, P.M. van de; Swart, E.L.; Smit, E.F.; Zweegman, S.; Kroep, J.R.; Timmer-Bonte, J.N.; Boven, E.; Hugtenburg, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    A rapidly growing number of oral anticancer agents has become available in oncology and hematology. Though these introductions have several benefits, medication adherence is an issue of concern. Little is known about the factors influencing adherence to treatment with oral anticancer agents in daily

  6. Anticancer activity of streptochlorin, a novel antineoplastic agent, in cholangiocarcinoma

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    Kwak TW

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tae Won Kwak,1,* Hee Jae Shin,2,* Young-Il Jeong,1 Myoung-Eun Han,3 Sae-Ock Oh,3 Hyun-Jung Kim,4 Do Hyung Kim,5 Dae Hwan Kang1 1Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, 2Marine Natural Products Chemistry Laboratory, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, 3Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Gyeongnam, 4Genewel Co Ltd. Gyeonggi-do, 5School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Gyeongnam, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the anticancer activity of streptochlorin, a novel antineoplastic agent, in cholangiocarcinoma. Methods: The anticancer activity of streptochlorin was evaluated in vitro in various cholangiocarcinoma cell lines for apoptosis, proliferation, invasiveness, and expression of various protein levels. A liver metastasis model was prepared by splenic injection of HuCC-T1 cholangiocarcinoma cells using a BALB/c nude mouse model to study the systemic antimetastatic efficacy of streptochlorin 5 mg/kg at 8 weeks. The antitumor efficacy of subcutaneously injected streptochlorin was also assessed using a solid tumor xenograft model of SNU478 cells for 22 days in the BALB/c nude mouse. Results: Streptochlorin inhibited growth and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor by cholangiocarcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis in vitro. In addition, streptochlorin effectively inhibited invasion and migration of cholangiocarcinoma cells. Secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in cholangiocarcinoma cells were also suppressed by treatment with streptochlorin. Streptochlorin effectively regulated metastasis of HuCC-T1 cells in a mouse model of liver metastasis. In a tumor xenograft study using SNU478 cells, streptochlorin significantly inhibited tumor growth without changes in body weight

  7. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  8. Identification of N-arylsulfonylpyrimidones as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Santhosh; Boggu, Pulla Reddy; Yun, Jieun; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2018-03-01

    For confirming the role of five membered ring of imidazolidinone moiety of N-arylsulfonylimidazolidinones (7) previously reported with highly potent anticancer agent, a series of N-arylsulfonylpyrimidones (10a-g) and N-arylsulfonyltetrahydropyrimidones (11a-e) were prepared and their anti-proliferating activity was measured against human cancer cell lines (renal ACHN, colon HCT-15, breast MDA-MB-231, lung NCI-H23, stomach NUGC-3, and prostate PC-3) using XTT assay. Among them, 1-(1-acetylindolin-5-ylsulfonyl)-4-phenyltetrahydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (11d, mean GI 50  = 3.50 µM) and ethyl 5-(2-oxo-4-phenyltetrahydropyrimidin-1(2H)-ylsulfonyl)-indoline-1-carboxylate (11e, mean GI 50  = 0.26 µM) showed best growth inhibitory activity against human cancer cell lines. Considering the activity results, N-arylsulfonyltetrahydropyrimidones (11) exhibited more potent activity compared to N-arylsulfonylpyrimidones (10) and comparable activity to N-arylsulfonylimidazolidinones (7). Especially, tetrahydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one analogs containing acylindolin-5-ylsulfonyl moiety at position 1 demonstrated their strong growth inhibitory activity against human cancer cell lines.

  9. Quinones derived from plant secondary metabolites as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Wu, Guo-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Shan; Huang, Ming-Qing; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2013-03-01

    Quinones are plant-derived secondary metabolites that present some anti-proliferation and anti-metastasis effects in various cancer types both in vitro and in vivo. This review focuses on the anti-cancer prospects of plant-derived quinones, namely, aloe-emodin, juglone, β-lapachol, plumbagin, shikonin, and thymoquinone. We intend to summarize their anti-cancer effects and investigate the mechanism of actions to promote the research and development of anti-cancer agents from quinones.

  10. Bioactivity-Guided Isolation of Anticancer Agents from Bauhinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Flowers of Bauhinia kockiana were investigated for their anticancer properties. Methods: Gallic acid (1), and methyl gallate (2), were isolated via bioassay-directed isolation, and they exhibited anticancer properties towards several cancer cell lines, examined using MTT cell viability assay. Pyrogallol (3) was ...

  11. Patient satisfaction with information on oral anticancer agent use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boons, Christel C L M; Timmers, Lonneke; van Schoor, Natasja M; Swart, Eleonora L; Hendrikse, N Harry; Janssen, Jeroen J W M; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G

    2018-01-01

    Adequate information on oral anticancer agent (OACA) use is an essential element of optimal cancer care. The present study aimed to get insight into the experiences of patients with information on OACA treatment and their characteristics regarding information dissatisfaction. Patients of four Dutch university hospitals using OACA participated in this observational study and completed the Satisfaction with Information about Medicines Scale (SIMS), EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30, Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, and Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire-Specific. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with dissatisfaction with information. Patients (n = 208) using capecitabine (35%), lenalidomide (15%), imatinib (14%), temozolomide (12%), sunitinib (11%), thalidomide (5%), dasatinib (4%), erlotinib (2%), and nilotinib (2%) participated. Information on the following SIMS-items was inadequate: how OACA elicit their effect, how long it takes before treatment works, how to conclude that treatment is effective, the risk of side effects and its management, interference with sex life, drowsiness, interference with other medication and alcohol and what to do in case of a missed dose. Younger age, hematological malignancy, dyspnoea, positive perception of consequences of the cancer, low perception of treatment control, and indifferent attitude towards OACA were associated with dissatisfaction with information. In conclusion, a considerable number of patients would have appreciated receiving more information on specific issues relating to the consequences of OACA treatment such as the effects and side effects of OACA and the interference of treatment with various aspects of their daily life. Oncologists, hematologists, lung-oncologists and pharmacists may reconsider the provision of information on OACA treatment. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Inventory of oral anticancer agents : Pharmaceutical formulation aspects with focus on the solid dispersion technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawicki, E.; Schellens, J. H M; Beijnen, J. H.; Nuijen, B.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution from the pharmaceutical formulation is a prerequisite for complete and consistent absorption of any orally administered drug, including anticancer agents (oncolytics). Poor dissolution of an oncolytic can result in low oral bioavailability, high variability in blood concentrations and

  13. Synthesis of chalcone incorporated quinazoline derivatives as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapavat Madhavi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of ten novel chalcone incorporated quinazoline derivatives (11a–11j were designed and synthesized. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anticancer activities against four human cancer cell lines (A549, HT-29, MCF-7 and A375. Among them, four compounds, 11f, 11g, 11i and 11j showed more potent anticancer activity than the control drug, Combretastatin – A4.

  14. Resistance to cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic anticancer agents: similarities and differences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broxterman, H.J.; Lankelma, J.; Hoekman, K.

    2003-01-01

    Intrinsic resistance to anticancer drugs, or resistance developed during chemotherapy, remains a major obstacle to successful treatment. This is the case both for resistance to cytotoxic agents, directed at malignant cells, and for resistance to anti-angiogenic agents, directed at non-malignant

  15. Diterpenes and Their Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Muhammad Torequl

    2017-05-01

    As therapeutic tools, diterpenes and their derivatives have gained much attention of the medicinal scientists nowadays. It is due to their pledging and important biological activities. This review congregates the anticancer diterpenes. For this, a search was made with selected keywords in PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Scopus, The American Chemical Society and miscellaneous databases from January 2012 to January 2017 for the published articles. A total 28, 789 published articles were seen. Among them, 240 were included in this study. More than 250 important anticancer diterpenes and their derivatives were seen in the databases, acting in the different pathways. Some of them are already under clinical trials, while others are in the nonclinical and/or pre-clinical trials. In conclusion, diterpenes may be one of the lead molecules in the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Ganoderma lucidum Polysaccharides as An Anti-cancer Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohretoglu, Didem; Huang, Shile

    2017-11-13

    The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) has been used for centuries in Asian countries to treat various diseases and to promote health and longevity. Clinical studies have shown beneficial effects of G. lucidum as an alternative adjuvant therapy in cancer patients without obvious toxicity. G. lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) is the main bioactive component in the water soluble extracts of this mushroom. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies has demonstrated that GLP possesses potential anticancer activity through immunomodulatory, anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects. Here, we briefly summarize these anticancer effects of GLP and the underlying mechanisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Myxobacterial epothilones and tubulysins as promising anticancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dömling, Alexander; Richter, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Tubulin-binding agents play a pivotal role in current cancer therapy and there are many efforts in pre-clinical and clinical development of known and novel cytotoxic agents ongoing. In this article a known class, epothilones, as well as a novel class, tubulysins, are presented. © Springer 2005.

  18. A phase II trial of the epothilone B analog ixabepilone (BMS-247550 in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Ott

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ixabepilone (BMS-247550, an epothilone B analog, is a microtubule stabilizing agent which has shown activity in several different tumor types and preclinical models in melanoma. In an open label, one-arm, multi-center phase II trial the efficacy and toxicity of this epothilone was investigated in two different cohorts: chemotherapy-naïve (previously untreated and previously treated patients with metastatic melanoma.Eligible patients had histologically-confirmed stage IV melanoma, with an ECOG performance status of 0 to 2. Ixabepilone was administered at a dose of 20 mg/m(2 on days 1, 8, and 15 during each 28-day cycle. The primary endpoint was response rate (RR; secondary endpoints were time to progression (TTP and toxicity. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and 23 were evaluable for response. Initial serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH levels were elevated in 6/11 (55% of the previously treated and in 5/13 (38% of the previously untreated patients. No complete or partial responses were seen in either cohort. One patient in the previously treated group developed neutropenia and fatal septic shock. Seventeen patients (8 in the previously untreated group and 9 in the previously treated group progressed after 2 cycles, whereas six patients (3 in each group had stable disease after 2-6 cycles. Median TTP was 1.74 months in the previously untreated group (95% CI = 1.51 months, upper limit not estimated and 1.54 months in the previously treated group (95% CI = 1.15 months, 2.72 months. Grade 3 and/or 4 toxicities occurred in 5/11 (45% of previously untreated and in 5/13 (38% of previously treated patients and included neutropenia, peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, diarrhea, and dyspnea.Ixabepilone has no meaningful activity in either chemotherapy-naïve (previously untreated or previously treated patients with metastatic melanoma. Further investigation with ixabepilone as single agent in the treatment of melanoma is not warranted.Clinical Trials.gov NCT

  19. Phytochemicals and Biogenic Metallic Nanoparticles as Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupuleti Visweswara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Several classes of drugs are available to treat different types of cancer. Currently, researchers are paying significant attention to the development of drugs at the nanoscale level to increase their target specificity and to reduce their concentrations. Nanotechnology is a promising and growing field with multiple subdisciplines, such as nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles. These materials have gained prominence in science due to their size, shape, and potential efficacy. Nanomedicine is an important field involving the use of various types of nanoparticles to treat cancer and cancerous cells. Synthesis of nanoparticles targeting biological pathways has become tremendously prominent due to the higher efficacy and fewer side effects of nanodrugs compared to other commercial cancer drugs. In this review, different medicinal plants and their active compounds, as well as green-synthesized metallic nanoparticles from medicinal plants, are discussed in relation to their anticancer activities.

  20. Phytochemicals and Biogenic Metallic Nanoparticles as Anticancer Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pasupuleti Visweswara; Nallappan, Devi; Madhavi, Kondeti; Rahman, Shafiqur; Jun Wei, Lim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Several classes of drugs are available to treat different types of cancer. Currently, researchers are paying significant attention to the development of drugs at the nanoscale level to increase their target specificity and to reduce their concentrations. Nanotechnology is a promising and growing field with multiple subdisciplines, such as nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles. These materials have gained prominence in science due to their size, shape, and potential efficacy. Nanomedicine is an important field involving the use of various types of nanoparticles to treat cancer and cancerous cells. Synthesis of nanoparticles targeting biological pathways has become tremendously prominent due to the higher efficacy and fewer side effects of nanodrugs compared to other commercial cancer drugs. In this review, different medicinal plants and their active compounds, as well as green-synthesized metallic nanoparticles from medicinal plants, are discussed in relation to their anticancer activities. PMID:27057273

  1. Chrysin-piperazine conjugates as antioxidant and anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rahul V; Mistry, Bhupendra; Syed, Riyaz; Rathi, Anuj K; Lee, Yoo-Jung; Sung, Jung-Suk; Shinf, Han-Seung; Keum, Young-Soo

    2016-06-10

    Synthesis of 7-(4-bromobutoxy)-5-hydroxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one intermediate treating chrysin with 1,4-dibromobutane facilitated combination of chrysin with a wide range of piperazine moieties which were equipped via reacting the corresponding amines with bis(2-chloroethyl)amine hydrochloride in diethylene glycol monomethyl ether solvent. Free radical scavenging potential of prepared products was analyzed in vitro adopting DPPH and ABTS bioassay in addition to the evaluation of in vitro anticancer efficacies against cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and CaSki) and an ovarian cancer cell line SK-OV-3 using SRB assay. Bearable toxicity of 7a-w was examined employing Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. In addition, cytotoxic nature of the presented compounds was inspected utilizing Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). Overall, 7a-w indicated remarkable antioxidant power in scavenging DPPH(·) and ABTS(·+), particularly analogs 7f, 7j, 7k, 7l, 7n, 7q, 7v, 7w have shown promising free radical scavenging activity. Analogs 7j and 7o are identified to be highly active candidates against HeLa and CaSki cell lines, whereas 7h and 7l along with 7j proved to be very sensitive towards ovarian cancer cell line SKOV-3. None of the newly prepared scaffolds showed cytotoxic nature toward hBM-MSCs cells. From the structure-activity point of view, nature and position of the electron withdrawing and electron donating functional groups on the piperazine core may contribute to the anticipated antioxidant and anticancer action. Different spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, Mass) and elemental analysis (CHN) were utilized to confirm the desired structure of final compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro method determing sensitivity of anticancer agents by incorporation of radioactive precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakibara, Satoshi

    1983-01-01

    A new sensitivity test of anticancer agents was developed to measure the lethal effects of cancer cells by the incorporation of radioactive precursors. The thousand cancer cells were cultured in a microplate in the presence of anticancer agents. These cells were exposed to radioactive precursors. Two or three days later, the cancer cells were harvested on a glass fiver filter by a multiple automatic cell-harvester and the incorporation of precursors was counted by a liquid scintillation counter. In this study, the in vivo results of drug testing in animal model systems were compared with drug sensitivities. Mice inoculated Ehrlich ascites cells were treated with various kinds of anticancer drugs. The development of the cells was compatible with the result of the sensitivity test. The growths of Lauson and ME-180 cells derived from human cancers implanted subcutaneously to nude mice were also well correlated with this sensitivity test. (author)

  3. Pharmaceutical development of the novel metal-based anticancer agents NAMI-A and AP 5280

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, M. (Marjan)

    2002-01-01

    The pharmaceutical development of the two novel metal-based anticancer agents NAMI-A and AP 5280 is described in this thesis, starting with the development of analytical methods for the quality control of drug substance and final product, via the formulation process leading to a stable, intravenous

  4. Design and development of polynuclear ruthenium and platinum polypyridyl complexes in search of new anticancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilden, Karlijn van der

    2006-01-01

    The research described in this Ph.D. Thesis has been devoted to the design and development of polynuclear polypyridyl ruthenium and ruthenium-platinum complexes in search of new anticancer agents. A variety of polynuclear ruthenium and ruthenium-platinum complexes has been synthesized with a long

  5. Targeted Anticancer Immunotoxins and Cytotoxic Agents with Direct Killing Moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Kawakami

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the progress of the bioinformatics approach to characterize cell-surface antigens and receptors on tumor cells, it remains difficult to generate novel cancer vaccines or neutralizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics. Among targeted cancer therapeutics, biologicals with targetable antibodies or ligands conjugated or fused to toxins or chemicals for direct cell-killing ability have been developed over the last 2 decades. These conjugated or fused chimeric proteins are termed immunotoxins or cytotoxic agents. Two agents, DAB389IL-2 (ONTAKTM targeting the interleukin-2 receptor and CD33-calicheamicin (Mylotarg®, have been approved by the FDA for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML, respectively. Such targetable agents, including RFB4(dsFv-PE38 (BL22, IL13-PE38QQR, and Tf-CRM107, are being tested in clinical trials. Several agents using unique technology such as a cleavable adapter or immunoliposomes with antibodies are also in the preclinical stage. This review summarizes the generation, mechanism, and development of these agents. In addition, possible future directions of this therapeutic approach are discussed.

  6. National Cancer Institute Formulary: A Public-Private Partnership Providing Investigators Access to Investigational Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, J V; Ansher, S S; Zwiebel, J A; Ivy, P; Conley, B; Abrams, J S; Doroshow, J H

    2017-05-01

    As part of the White House Cancer Moonshot Initiative, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has developed a drug formulary to provide investigational anticancer agents to the extramural research community. This article describes how the NCI Formulary functions, how researchers may apply for access to drugs in the formulary, and the NCI's initial goals for formulary participation. Approved investigators may apply for access to formulary agents at: https://nciformulary.cancer.gov. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  7. Development of novel alkylating drugs as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicka, Elzbieta; Tolcher, Anthony W

    2004-06-01

    Although conventional alkylating drugs have proven efficacy in the treatment of malignancies, the agents themselves are not selective. Therefore, non-specific alkylation of cellular nucleophilic targets may contribute to many of the observed toxic effects. Novel approaches to drug discovery have resulted in candidate agents that are focused on 'soft alkylation'--alkylators with greater target selectivity. This review highlights the discovery of small molecule drugs that bind to DNA with higher selectivity, act in a unique hypoxic tumor environment, or covalently bind specific protein targets overexpressed in cancer, such as topoisomerase II, glutathione transferase pi1, beta-tubulin and histone deacetylase.

  8. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of novel pyrrolizine derivatives as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Ahmed M; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A; Abdellatif, Khaled R A

    2014-04-01

    A new series of novel pyrrolizine derivatives has been synthesized and biologically evaluated as potential anticancer agents. The starting compounds, 6-amino-7-cyano-N-(3,5-disubstitutedphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolizine-5-carboxamides 11a-b, were reacted with different acid chlorides, aldehydes and isocyanates to give the target compounds 12-14. Structural characterizations of the new compounds were performed using spectral and elemental analysis. All compounds were tested for their anticancer activity against human breast cancer and prostate cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and PC-3 respectively. With exception of compounds 11a and 13a, results revealed that all the tested compounds showed half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values less than 40μM. Compound 12b and the three urea derivatives 14b-d showed the most potent anticancer activity with IC50 values less than 2.73μM. The anticancer activity of these compounds was mediated, at least in part, via the induction of apoptosis as indicated by its ability to activate caspase-3/7. In light of the high potency of our novel compounds in targeting both breast and prostate cancers, these compounds warrant continued preclinical development as potential anticancer agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A phase II evaluation of ixabepilone in the treatment of recurrent/persistent carcinosarcoma of the uterus, an NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Carolyn K; Deng, Wei; Dizon, Don S; Lankes, Heather A; Birrer, Michael J; Lomme, Michele M; Powell, Matthew A; Kendrick, James E; Saltzman, Joel N; Warshal, David; Tenney, Meaghan E; Kushner, David M; Aghajanian, Carol

    2017-01-01

    The primary objectives were to determine the objective response rate (ORR) and safety profile of ixabepilone in women with recurrent or persistent uterine carcinosarcoma (UCS). Secondary objectives included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Exploratory translational objectives included characterization of class III beta tubulin expression and its association with response, PFS, and OS. Patients had measurable disease; up to two prior chemotherapeutic regimens were allowed, but must have included a taxane. Women received ixabepilone 40mg/m 2 as a 3hour IV infusion on day 1 of a 21daycycle. Treatment was continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Forty-two women were enrolled, with 34 eligible and evaluable. Median age was 68years. ECOG performance status was 0 in 56% of women, 38% had received radiation, and 15% had received 2 lines of chemotherapy. Overall ORR was 11.8% (4/34, 90% CI 4.2-25.1%); all were partial responses. Stable disease for at least 8weeks was achieved in 8 patients (23.5%). Median PFS and OS were 1.7mo and 7.7mo, respectively, with a median follow-up of 37mo. Six month PFS was 20.6%. Major grade≥3 toxicities were neutropenia (47%), fatigue (15%), dehydration (15%), hypertension (15%), and hyponatremia (15%); grade 2 peripheral neuropathy was reported in 18%. In this small sample size, class III beta tubulin expression in the primary tumor was not associated with the response to ixabepilone, PFS, or OS. In this cohort of women, single agent ixabepilone showed modest but insufficient clinical activity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Cranberry as promising natural source of potential anticancer agents: current evidence and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsargyris, Athanasios; Tampaki, Ekaterini-Christina; Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2012-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that dietary modification can lower the risk for several cancer types' development. Cranberry in particular, has been shown to have anti-oxidative, -inflammatory and -proliferative properties in vitro. To present the latest knowledge regarding the role of cranberry extracts against human cancer several types. A review of the literature documenting both in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects of whole cranberry and/or its extracts is conducted. Current data provide evidence for several anti-cancer properties of either whole cranberry and/or its extracts. The discovery of the specific cranberry components and the appropriate concentrations that exert such beneficial effects along with verification of the preliminary in vitro results in in vivo settings could potentially lead to the invention of novel safer and efficient anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  11. Mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives: a new class of anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Felipe A R; Bomfim, Igor da S; Cavalcanti, Bruno C; Pessoa, Claudia; Goncalves, Raoni S B; Wardell, James L; Wardell, Solange M S V; de Souza, Marcus V N

    2014-01-01

    A series of 23 racemic mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives, 4-[3-(aryl)hexahydro[1,3]oxazolo[3,4-a]pyridin-1-yl]-2,8-bis(trifluoromethyl)quinolines, derived from (R*, S*)-(±)-mefloquine and arenealdehydes, have been evaluated for their activity against four cancer cell lines (HCT-8, OVCAR-8, HL-60, and SF-295). Good cytotoxicities have been determined with IC50 values ranging from 0.59 to 4.79 μg/mL. In general compounds with aryl groups having strong electron-releasing substituents, such as HO and MeO, or electron-rich heteroaryl groups, for example imidazol-2-y-l, are active. However, other factors such as steric effects may play a role. As both the active and non-active conformations of the mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives are similar, it is concluded that molecular conformations do not play a significant role either. This study is the first to evaluate mefloquine derivatives as antitumor agents. The mefloquine-oxazolidine derivatives are considered to be useful leads for the rational design of new antitumor agents. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Some Anticancer Agents Act on Human Serum Paraoxonase-1 to Reduce Its Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, Zuhal; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2016-08-01

    Human serum paraoxonase (hPON1) is an important antioxidant enzyme. It protects low-density lipoproteins against oxidative stress and prevents atherosclerosis development. Anticancer agents have cardiotoxic effects, and this situation can lead to significant complications. Our aim was to evaluate the in vitro effects of some of the anticancer agents such as cetuximab, paclitaxel, etoposide, docetaxel, and ifosfamide on the activity of hPON1 in this study. For this reason, PON1 was purified from human serum with a specific activity of 3654.2 EU/mg and 16.84% yield using simple chromatographic methods. The five chemotherapeutic agents dose dependently decreased in vitro hPON1 activity. IC50 values for cetuximab, paclitaxel, etoposide, docetaxel, and ifosfamide were 0.0111, 0.042, 0.226, 0.665, and 23.3 mm, respectively. Ki constants were 0.0194, 0.0165, 0.131, 0.291, and 8.973 mm, respectively. The inhibition mechanisms of cetuximab, etoposide, docetaxel, and ifosfamide were non-competitive, and for paclitaxel was competitive. Consequently, inhibition of hPON1 by these anticancer agents may explain some of the cardiotoxic actions of these drugs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner-Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa's expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space.

  14. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaolin Bao

    Full Text Available Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU, camptothecin (CPT, and paclitaxel (TAX. The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer.

  15. Caffeine-hydrazones as anticancer agents with pronounced selectivity toward T-lymphoblastic leukaemia cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaplánek, R.; Jakubek, M.; Rak, J.; Kejik, Z.; Havlík, M.; Dolenský, B.; Frydrych, I.; Hajduch, M.; Kolář, M.; Bogdanová, K.; Králová, Jarmila; Dzubak, P.; Král, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, Jun (2015), s. 19-29 ISSN 0045-2068 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0060; GA MŠk CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0041; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Program:EE; LD Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Anticancer agents * Cancer treatment * Caffeine -hydrazones * Leukaemia * Selectivity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.252, year: 2015

  16. Electrochemical and calorimetric investigation of interaction of novel biscationic anticancer agents with DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Láuris Lucia da; Donnici, Claudio Luis; Lopes, Júlio César Dias; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca; Abreu, Fabiane Caxico de; Paula, Francine Santos de; Bravo, Carlos E. Salas; Santoro, Marcelo Matos; Denadai, Ângelo Márcio Leite; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa; Montanari, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    ELECTROCHEMICAL AND CALORIMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF INTERACTION OF NOVEL BISCATIONIC ANTICANCER AGENTS WITH DNA. Biscationic amidines bind in the DNA minor groove and present biological activity against a range of infectious diseases. Two new biscationic compounds (bis-alpha,omega-S-thioureido, amino and sulfide analogues) were synthesized in good yields and fully characterized, and their interaction with DNA was also investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to measure the ...

  17. Phase IB trial of ixabepilone and vorinostat in metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Thehang; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Blanchard, Suzette; Anyang, Bean; Hurria, Arti; Yang, Lixin; Beumer, Jan H; Somlo, George; Yen, Yun

    2018-01-01

    To translate promising preclinical data on the combination of vorinostat and ixabepilone for metastatic breast cancer (MBC) into clinical trials. We conducted a randomized two-arm Phase IB clinical trial of ascending doses of vorinostat and ixabepilone in prior -treated MBC patients. To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), 37 patients were randomized to schedule A: every-3-week ixabepilone + vorinostat (days 1-14), or schedule B: weekly ixabepilone + vorinostat (days 1-7; 15-21) Pharmacokinetics were assessed. Nineteen additional patients were randomized to schedule A or B and objective response rate (ORR), clinical benefit rate (CBR), toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed. The schedule A MTD was vorinostat 300 mg daily (days 1-14), ixabepilone 32 mg/m 2 (day 2); 21-day cycle 27% dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). The schedule B MTD was vorinostat 300 mg daily (days 1-7; 15-21), ixabepilone 16 mg/m 2 (days 2, 9, 16); 28-day cycle; no DLTs. Vorinostat and ixabepilone clearances were 194 L/h and 21.3 L/h/m 2 , respectively. Grade 3 peripheral sensory neuropathy was reported in 8% (A) and 21% (B) of patients. The ORR and CBR were 22 and 22% (A); 30 and 35% (B). Median PFS was 3.9 (A) and 3.7 (B) months. OS was 14.8 (A) and 17.1 (B) months. We established the MTD of vorinostat and ixabepilone. This drug combination offers a novel therapy for previously treated MBC patients. The potential for lower toxicity and comparable efficacy compared to current therapies warrants further study.

  18. Can Some Marine-Derived Fungal Metabolites Become Actual Anticancer Agents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson G. M. Gomes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine fungi are known to produce structurally unique secondary metabolites, and more than 1000 marine fungal-derived metabolites have already been reported. Despite the absence of marine fungal-derived metabolites in the current clinical pipeline, dozens of them have been classified as potential chemotherapy candidates because of their anticancer activity. Over the last decade, several comprehensive reviews have covered the potential anticancer activity of marine fungal-derived metabolites. However, these reviews consider the term “cytotoxicity” to be synonymous with “anticancer agent”, which is not actually true. Indeed, a cytotoxic compound is by definition a poisonous compound. To become a potential anticancer agent, a cytotoxic compound must at least display (i selectivity between normal and cancer cells (ii activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR cancer cells; and (iii a preferentially non-apoptotic cell death mechanism, as it is now well known that a high proportion of cancer cells that resist chemotherapy are in fact apoptosis-resistant cancer cells against which pro-apoptotic drugs have more than limited efficacy. The present review thus focuses on the cytotoxic marine fungal-derived metabolites whose ability to kill cancer cells has been reported in the literature. Particular attention is paid to the compounds that kill cancer cells through non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms.

  19. Safe handling and administration considerations of oral anticancer agents in the clinical and home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Joanne

    2012-12-01

    The use of hormonal, chemotherapeutic, and targeted biologic oral agents has exponentially increased since the early 2000s. Oral therapies have the advantage of persistent exposure of the cytotoxic drug to tumor cells and the tumor environment. The use of oral anticancer agents provides therapeutic drug treatment for patients with cancer in the comfort of their home or alternative settings, such as retirement homes and assisted living or extended-care facilities. Practices to ensure safe storage, handling, administration, and disposal of oral agents are necessary to prevent additional exposure of hazardous substances to the environment, professionals, patients, family members, and caretakers. Providers should consider potential barriers to adherence and compliance, and develop strategies to ensure optimal therapeutic benefit prior to initiation of oral agents.

  20. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Asfar S

    2013-01-01

    “ Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24358870

  1. Glycosides from Medicinal Plants as Potential Anticancer Agents: Emerging Trends towards Future Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haroon; Saeedi, Mina; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Mubarak, Mohammad S; Bishayee, Anupam

    2018-04-03

    Cancer continues to be a global burden, despite the advancement of various technological and pharmaceutical improvements over the past two decades. Methods for treating cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy in addition to other specialized techniques. On the other hand, medicinal plants have been traditionally employed either as the complementary medicine or dietary agents in the treatment and management of cancer. Medicinal plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites with interesting biological and pharmacological activities. Among these metabolites, glycosides are naturally occurring substances and have outstanding therapeutic potential and clinical utility. Different medical research engines such GoogleScholar, PubMed, SpringerLink, ScienceDirect were used to collect related literature on the subject matter. In this regard, only peer reviewed journals were considered. Emerging results showed that numerous glycosides isolated from various plants possessed marked anticancer activity against a variety of cancer cell lines. Accordingly, the aim of the present review is to shed light on the anticancer effects of glycosides, analyze possible mechanisms of action, and highlight the role of these natural agents as complementary and alternative medicine in combating and managing cancer. The glycosides isolated from different plants demonstrated potent cytotoxic effects against various cancer cell lines in initial preclinical studies. The anticancer effect was mediated through multiple mechanisms; however further detail studies are needed to understand the full potential of glycosides for clinical utility. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Polylactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles for controlled delivery of anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhani H

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available R Dinarvand1,2, N Sepehri1, S Manoochehri1, H Rouhani1, F Atyabi1,21Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, 2Nanotechnology Research Centre, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: The effectiveness of anticancer agents may be hindered by low solubility in water, poor permeability, and high efflux from cells. Nanomaterials have been used to enable drug delivery with lower toxicity to healthy cells and enhanced drug delivery to tumor cells. Different nanoparticles have been developed using different polymers with or without surface modification to target tumor cells both passively and/or actively. Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA, a biodegradable polyester approved for human use, has been used extensively. Here we report on recent developments concerning PLGA nanoparticles prepared for cancer treatment. We review the methods used for the preparation and characterization of PLGA nanoparticles and their applications in the delivery of a number of active agents. Increasing experience in the field of preparation, characterization, and in vivo application of PLGA nanoparticles has provided the necessary momentum for promising future use of these agents in cancer treatment, with higher efficacy and fewer side effects.Keywords: nanotechnology, polymeric nanocarriers, targeting, anticancer agents, surface modification

  3. Exploiting Cancer Metal Metabolism using Anti-Cancer Metal-Binding Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlot, Angelica M; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Jansson, Patric J; Sahni, Sumit; Huang, Michael L; Lane, Darius L; Lok, Hiu; Richardson, Des R

    2017-07-05

    Metals are vital cellular elements necessary for multiple indispensable biological processes of living organisms, including energy transduction and cell proliferation. Interestingly, alterations in metal levels and also changes in the expression of proteins involved in metal metabolism have been demonstrated in a variety of cancers. Considering this and the important role of metals for cell growth, the development of drugs that sequester metals have become an attractive target for the development of novel anti-cancer agents. Interest in this field has surged with the design and development of new generations of chelators of the thiosemicarbazone class. These ligands have shown potent anti-cancer and anti-metastatic activity in vitro and in vivo. Due to their efficacy and safe toxicological assessment, some of these agents have recently entered multi-center clinical trials as therapeutics for advanced and resistant tumors. This review highlights the role, and changes in homeostasis, of metals in cancer and emphasizes the pre-clinical development and clinical assessment of metal ion-binding agents, namely, thiosemicarbazones, as anti-tumor agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Inner conflict in patients receiving oral anticancer agents: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Kaori; Komatsu, Hiroko; Takahashi, Tsunehiro

    2015-04-14

    To explore the experiences of patients receiving oral anticancer agents. A qualitative study using semistructured interviews with a grounded theory approach. A university hospital in Japan. 14 patients with gastric cancer who managed their cancer with oral anticancer agents. Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict between rational belief and emotional resistance to taking medication due to confrontation with cancer, doubt regarding efficacy and concerns over potential harm attached to use of the agent. Although they perceived themselves as being adherent to medication, they reported partial non-adherent behaviours. The patients reassessed their lives through the experience of inner conflict and, ultimately, they recognised their role in medication therapy. Patients with cancer experienced inner conflict, in which considerable emotional resistance to taking their medication affected their occasional non-adherent behaviours. In patient-centred care, it is imperative that healthcare providers understand patients' inner conflict and inconsistency between their subjective view and behaviour to support patient adherence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma N

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nan Ma,1–3 Ying Wang,3 Bing-Xin Zhao,3 Wen-Cai Ye,1,3 Sheng Jiang2 1Department of Natural Medicinal Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, 2Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Natural Products, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The copper(I-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents. Keywords: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antimicrotubule agents

  6. Assessment of adherence with oral anticancer agents in oncology clinical trials: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsbaken, J J; Eickhoff, J C; Buss, B A; Mably, M S; Kolesar, J M

    2016-02-01

    Despite recommendations for adherence reporting in clinical trials involving an oral anticancer agent, the frequency and methods of adherence reporting are inconsistent. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine the frequency and type of adherence measures used in oncology and hematology clinical trials of oral anticancer agents and their association with study characteristics including quality, cancer type, stage and treatment type. PubMed was searched of all randomized controlled clinical trials assessing self-administered pharmacological interventions in patients with cancer and published over two years, between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012 were evaluated. We identified 70 publications in the PubMed database, comprising 45,118 total patients. Adherence reporting was present in 14 of 70 trials (20%); quantitative reporting was present in three of 70 trials (4%). Method of adherence assessment varied and included medication count, medication diaries and patient self-report. There was no association between adherence reporting and study quality or other study characteristics, although there was a trend towards increased reporting in breast cancer studies, with 46% of the studies reporting adherence (p = 0.0621). In a preliminary analysis, hematology studies (mean Jadad score 2.19 ± 1.47) were found to have significantly lower quality when compared to non-hematology trials (mean Jadad score 3.39 ± 1.37, p = 0.0034). This systematic review demonstrates adherence reporting in clinical trials of oral anticancer agents is infrequent. When reported, adherence was not associated with overall study quality or other study characteristics. Given the potential effects of non-adherence on study power and validity, adherence reporting should be encouraged in oncology and hematology clinical trials. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. A review of the evidence for occupational exposure risks to novel anticancer agents - A focus on monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Julie; Alexander, Marliese; Byrne, Jenny; MacMillan, Kent; Mollo, Adele; Kirsa, Sue; Green, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Evidence of occupational exposure risks to novel anticancer agents is limited and yet to be formally evaluated from the Australian healthcare perspective. From March to September 2013 medical databases, organizational policies, drug monographs, and the World Wide Web were searched for evidence relating to occupational exposure to monoclonal antibodies, fusion proteins, gene therapies, and other unclassified novel anticancer agents. Australian legislation, national and international guidelines, and drug company information excluded novel agents or provided inconsistent risk assessments and safe handling recommendations. Monoclonal antibody guidelines reported conflicting information and were often divergent with available evidence and pharmacologic rationale demonstrating minimal internalisation ability and occupational exposure risk. Despite similar physiochemical, pharmacologic, and internalisation properties to monoclonal antibodies, fusion proteins were included in only a minority of guidelines. Clinical directives for the safe handling of gene therapies and live vaccines were limited, where available focusing on prevention against exposure and cross-contamination. Although mechanistically different, novel small molecule agents (proteasome inhibitors), possess similar physiochemical and internalisation properties to traditional cytotoxic agents warranting cytotoxic classification and handling. Novel agents are rapidly emerging into clinical practice, and healthcare personnel have few resources to evaluate risk and provide safety recommendations. Novel agents possess differing physical, molecular and pharmacological profiles compared to traditional cytotoxic anticancer agents. Evaluation of occupational exposure risk should consider both toxicity and internalisation. Evidence-based guidance able to direct safe handling practices for novel anticancer agents across a variety of clinical settings is urgently required. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Discovery of a synthetic Aminopeptidase N inhibitor LB-4b as a potential anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Jia, Yuping; Wang, Xuejian; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Hao; Xu, Wenfang

    2013-05-01

    APN inhibitors have been considered as potential anticancer agents for years. LB-4b is the first synthetic APN inhibitor to be evaluated for both of its anti-invasion and anti-angiogenesis effects. As a potent synthetic APN inhibitor (IC50=850 nM, versus bestatin of 8.1 μM), LB-4b was determined to have more significant block effects to cancer cell invasion and angiogenesis than bestatin. Besides, it is able to be easily synthesized with a high total yield, while the reported synthetic methods of bestatin are much more complex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of Degradation Properties of Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) Matrix for Anticancer Agent Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghani, S. M.; Mohamed, M. S. W.; Yahya, A. F.; Noorsal, K.

    2010-01-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(PLA 50 GA 50 ) is a biodegradable and biocompatible polymer. It offers tremendous potential as a basis for drug delivery, either as drug delivery system alone or in conjugate with a medical device. The PLA 50 GA 50 is the material of choice for relatively shorter-duration applications, while the homopolymer PLA (poly-L-lactide) and PGA (polyglycolide) are preferred for longer term delivery of drugs. This paper discusses the degradation properties of poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(PLA 50 GA 50 ) at inherent viscosity of 0.89 dL/g as preliminary studies for anticancer agent delivery.

  10. Synthesis and Evaluation of Aminothiazole-Paeonol Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ying Tsai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives were synthesized and characterized using 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, IR, mass spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography. All the new synthesized compounds were evaluated according to their anticancer effect on seven cancer cell lines. The experimental results indicated that these compounds possess high anticancer potential regarding human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS cells and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29 cells. Among these compounds, N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylthiazol-2-yl]-4-methoxybenzenesulfonamide (13c had the most potent inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 4.0 µM to AGS, 4.4 µM to HT-29 cells and 5.8 µM to HeLa cells. The 4-fluoro-N-[4-(2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenylthiazol-2-yl]benzenesulfonamide (13d was the second potent compound, showing IC50 values of 7.2, 11.2 and 13.8 µM to AGS , HT-29 and HeLa cells, respectively. These compounds are superior to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU for relatively higher potency against AGS and HT-29 human cancer cell lines along with lower cytotoxicity to fibroblasts. Novel aminothiazole-paeonol derivatives in this work might be a series of promising lead compounds to develop anticancer agents for treating gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma.

  11. Largazole Analogues as Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Anticancer Agents: An Overview of Structure-Activity Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Giulio; Di Fabio, Romano; Ferrante, Luca; Summa, Vincenzo; Botta, Maurizio

    2017-12-07

    Since the time of its identification, the natural compound largazole rapidly caught the attention of the medicinal chemistry community for its impressive potency as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and its strong antiproliferative activity against a broad panel of cancer cell lines. The design of largazole analogues is an expanding field of study, due to their remarkable potential as novel anticancer therapeutics. At present, a large ensemble of largazole analogues has been reported, allowing the identification of important structure-activity relationships (SAR) that can guide the design of novel compounds with improved HDAC inhibitory profiles, anticancer activity, and pharmacokinetic properties. The aim of this review is to concisely summarize the information obtained by biological evaluations of the various largazole analogues reported to date, with particular attention given to the latest analogues, as well as to analyze the various SAR obtained from this data, with the purpose of providing useful guidelines for the development of novel potent and selective HDAC inhibitors to be used as anticancer agents. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  13. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  14. The potential of brown-algae polysaccharides for the development of anticancer agents: An update on anticancer effects reported for fucoidan and laminaran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjeewa, K K Asanka; Lee, Jung-Suck; Kim, Won-Suck; Jeon, You-Jin

    2017-12-01

    In recent decades, attention to cancer-preventive treatments and studies on the development of anticancer drugs have sharply increased owing to the increase in cancer-related death rates in every region of the world. However, due to the adverse effects of synthetic drugs, much attention has been given to the development of anticancer drugs from natural sources because of fewer side effects of natural compounds than those of synthetic drugs. Recent studies on compounds and crude extracts from marine algae have shown promising anticancer properties. Among those compounds, polysaccharides extracted from brown seaweeds play a principal role as anticancer agents. Especially, a number of studies have revealed that polysaccharides isolated from brown seaweeds, such as fucoidan and laminaran, have promising effects against different cancer cell types in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we reviewed in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties reported for fucoidan and laminaran toward various cancer cells from 2013 to 2016. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Highly adaptable triple-negative breast cancer cells as a functional model for testing anticancer agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance.

  16. Covalent Organic Framework Material bearing Phloroglucinol Building Units as a Potent Anticancer Agent

    KAUST Repository

    Bhanja, Piyali

    2017-08-23

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) having periodicity in pores of nanoscale dimensions can be suitably designed for the organic building units bearing reactive functional groups at their surfaces. Thus, they are an attractive option as an anticancer agent to overcome the limitations of chemotherapy. Herein, we first report a new porous biodegradable nitrogen containing COF material, EDTFP-1 (ethylenedianiline-triformyl phloroglucinol), synthesized using 4,4\\'-ethylenedianiline and 2,4,6-triformylphloroglucinol via Schiff base condensation reaction. EDTFP-1 exhibited 3D-hexagonal porous structure with average pores of ca. 1.5 nm dimension. Here, we have explored the anti-cancer potentiality of EDTFP-1. Result demonstrated an enhanced cytotoxicity was observed against four cancer cells HCT 116, HepG2, A549, and MIA-Paca2 with significant lower IC50 on HCT116 cells. Additionally, EDTFP-1-induced cell death was associated with the characteristic apoptotic changes like cell membrane blebbing, nuclear DNA fragmentation, externalization of phosphatidylserine from the cell membrane followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential as well as modulation of pro and anti-apoptotic proteins. Further, the result depicted a direct correlation between the generations of ROS with mitochondrial-dependant apoptosis through the involvement of p53 phosphorylation upon EDTFP-1 induction, suggesting this COF material is a novel chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment.

  17. 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin Acts as a Novel Anticancer Agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Yokoo

    Full Text Available 2-Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CyD is a cyclic oligosaccharide that is widely used as an enabling excipient in pharmaceutical formulations, but also as a cholesterol modifier. HP-β-CyD has recently been approved for the treatment of Niemann-Pick Type C disease, a lysosomal lipid storage disorder, and is used in clinical practice. Since cholesterol accumulation and/or dysregulated cholesterol metabolism has been described in various malignancies, including leukemia, we hypothesized that HP-β-CyD itself might have anticancer effects. This study provides evidence that HP-β-CyD inhibits leukemic cell proliferation at physiologically available doses. First, we identified the potency of HP-β-CyD in vitro against various leukemic cell lines derived from acute myeloid leukemia (AML, acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. HP-β-CyD treatment reduced intracellular cholesterol resulting in significant leukemic cell growth inhibition through G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Intraperitoneal injection of HP-β-CyD significantly improved survival in leukemia mouse models. Importantly, HP-β-CyD also showed anticancer effects against CML cells expressing a T315I BCR-ABL mutation (that confers resistance to most ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and hypoxia-adapted CML cells that have characteristics of leukemic stem cells. In addition, colony forming ability of human primary AML and CML cells was inhibited by HP-β-CyD. Systemic administration of HP-β-CyD to mice had no significant adverse effects. These data suggest that HP-β-CyD is a promising anticancer agent regardless of disease or cellular characteristics.

  18. Natural Product-Derived Spirooxindole Fragments Serve as Privileged Substructures for Discovery of New Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Zheng, Yi-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Jing; Qi, Ping-Ping; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The utility of natural products for identifying anticancer agents has been highly pursued in the last decades and over 100 drug molecules in clinic are natural products or natural product-derived compounds. Natural products are believed to be able to cover unexplored chemical space that is normally not occupied by commercially available molecule libraries. However, the low abundance and synthetic intractability of natural products have limited their applications in drug discovery. Recently, the identification of biologically relevant fragments derived from biologically validated natural products has been recognized as a powerful strategy in searching new biological probes and drugs. The spirocyclic oxindoles, as privileged structural scaffolds, have shown their potential in designing new drugs. Several anticancer drug candidates such as SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres are undergoing clinical trials or preclinical studies. To highlight the significant progress, we focus on illustrating the discovery of SAR405838, RO8994, CFI-400945 and their bioisosteres for cancer therapy using substructure-based strategies and discussing modes of action, binding models and preclinical data.

  19. Cultivation and utility of Piptoporus betulinus fruiting bodies as a source of anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Wiater, Adrian; Siwulski, Marek; Lemieszek, Marta K; Kunaszewska, Justyna; Kaczor, Józef; Rzeski, Wojciech; Janusz, Grzegorz; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    Piptoporus betulinus is a wood-rotting basidiomycete used in medicine and biotechnology. However, to date, no indoor method for cultivation of this mushroom fruiting bodies has been developed. Here we present the first report of successful production of P. betulinus mature fruiting bodies in artificial conditions. Four P. betulinus strains were isolated from natural habitats and their mycelia were inoculated into birch sawdust substrate supplemented with organic additives. All the strains effectively colonized the medium but only one of them produced fruiting bodies. Moisture and organic supplementation of the substrate significantly determined the fruiting process. The biological efficiency of the P. betulinus PB01 strain cultivated on optimal substrate (moisture and organic substance content of 55 and 65 and 25 or 35 %, respectively) ranged from 12 to 16 %. The mature fruiting bodies reached weight in the range from 50 to 120 g. Anticancer properties of water and ethanol extracts isolated from both cultured and nature-derived fruiting bodies of P. betulinus were examined in human colon adenocarcinoma, human lung carcinoma and human breast cancer cell lines. The studies revealed antiproliferative and antimigrative properties of all the investigated extracts. Nevertheless the most pronounced effects demonstrated the ethanol extracts, obtained from fruiting bodies of cultured P. betulinus. Summarizing, our studies proved that P. betulinus can be induced to fruit in indoor artificial culture and the cultured fruiting bodies can be used as a source of potential anticancer agents. In this respect, they are at least as valuable as those sourced from nature.

  20. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: a unique, ultrasensitive tool for exploring the pharmacology of metal-based anticancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, E.E.M.

    2007-01-01

    After the discovery of the antiproliferative effects of cisplatin, the drug has developed into one of the most frequently used anticancer agents. Unfortunately, the use of cisplatin is hampered by severe side effects and by the resistance of several tumour types. These limitations have led to the

  1. Platinum Complexes with Edda (Ethylenediamine -N, N - Diacetate Ligands as Potential Anticancer Agents

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    Jurisevic Milena

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The design of platinum based drugs is not a new field of interest. Platinum complexes are widely used as anticancer agents and currently, approximately 30 platinum(II and platinum(IV entered into some of the phases of clinical trials. A special place in today’s research belongs to platinum complexes with diammine ligands. A large number of edda (ethylenediamine- N, N’-diacetate-type ligands and their corresponding metal complexes has been successfully synthesized. This article summarizes recent progress in research on edda-type-platinum complexes. Some of these agents achieves better effect compared to the gold standard (cisplatin. It has been shown that there is a possible relationship between the length of the ligand ester group carbon chain and its cytotoxic effect. In most cases the longer the ester chain is the greater is the antitumor activity. Of particular interest are the noticeable effects of some new platinum compound with edda-type ligand on cell lines that are known to have a high level of cisplatin-resistance. Exanimate complexes appear to have a different mode of mechanism of action compared with cisplatin which includes apoptotic and necrotic cell death. There are indications that further investigations of these compounds may be very useful in overcoming the problems associated global cancer statistic.

  2. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of callophycin A and analogues as potential chemopreventive and anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Park, Eun-Jung; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Guendisch, Daniela; Marler, Laura; Pezzuto, John M; Wright, Anthony D; Sun, Dianqing

    2011-11-01

    Callophycin A was originally isolated from the red algae Callophycus oppositifolius and shown to mediate anticancer and cytotoxic effects. In our collaborative effort to identify potential chemopreventive and anticancer agents with enhanced potency and selectivity, we employed a tetrahydro-β-carboline-based template inspired by callophycin A for production of a chemical library. Utilizing a parallel synthetic approach, 50 various functionalized tetrahydro-β-carboline derivatives were prepared and assessed for activities related to cancer chemoprevention and cancer treatment: induction of quinone reductase 1 (QR1) and inhibition of aromatase, nitric oxide (NO) production, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced NFκB activity, and MCF7 breast cancer cell proliferation. Biological results showed that the n-pentyl urea S-isomer 6a was the strongest inducer of QR1 with an induction ratio (IR) value of 4.9 at 50 μM [the concentration to double the activity (CD)=3.8 μM] and its corresponding R-isomer 6f had an IR value of 4.3 (CD=0.2 μM). The isobutyl carbamate derivative 3d with R stereochemistry demonstrated the most potent inhibitory activity of NFκB, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of 4.8 μM, and also showed over 60% inhibition at 50 μM of NO production (IC(50)=2.8 μM). The R-isomer urea derivative 6j, having an appended adamantyl group, exhibited the most potent MCF7 cell proliferation inhibitory activity (IC(50)=14.7 μM). The S-isomer 12a of callophycin A showed the most potent activity in aromatase inhibition (IC(50)=10.5 μM). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangping; Chen, Yu; Li, Guanying; Zhang, Pingyu; Jin, Chengzhi; Zeng, Leli; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Clinical acceptance of photodynamic therapy is currently hindered by poor depth efficacy and inefficient activation of the cell death machinery in cancer cells during treatment. To address these issues, photoactivation using two-photon absorption (TPA) is currently being examined. Mitochondria-targeted therapy represents a promising approach to target tumors selectively and may overcome the resistance in current anticancer therapies. Herein, four ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RuL1-RuL4) have been designed and developed to act as mitochondria-targeted two-photon photodynamic anticancer agents. These complexes exhibit very high singlet oxygen quantum yields in methanol (0.74-0.81), significant TPA cross sections (124-198 GM), remarkable mitochondrial accumulation, and deep penetration depth. Thus, RuL1-RuL4 were utilized as one-photon and two-photon absorbing photosensitizers in both monolayer cells and 3D multicellular spheroids (MCSs). These Ru(II) complexes were almost nontoxic towards cells and 3D MCSs in the dark and generate sufficient singlet oxygen under one- and two-photon irradiation to trigger cell death. Remarkably, RuL4 exhibited an IC50 value as low as 9.6 μM in one-photon PDT (λirr = 450 nm, 12 J cm(-2)) and 1.9 μM in two-photon PDT (λirr = 830 nm, 800 J cm(-2)) of 3D MCSs; moreover, RuL4 is an order of magnitude more toxic than cisplatin in the latter test system. The combination of mitochondria-targeting and two-photon activation provides a valuable paradigm to develop ruthenium(II) complexes for PDT applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The anticancer agent prodigiosin is not a multidrug resistance protein substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahian, Fatemeh; Moghimi, Bahareh; Dinmohammadi, Farideh; Ghamghami, Mahsa; Hamidi, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Seyed Abbas

    2013-03-01

    The brilliant red pigments prodiginines are natural secondary metabolites that are produced by select species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These molecules have received significant attention due to their reported antibacterial, antifungal, immunosuppressive, and anticancer activities. In this study, a Serratia marcescens SER1 strain was isolated and verified using 16s rDNA. The prodigiosin was purified using silica chromatography and was analyzed by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The cell cytotoxic effects of the purified prodigiosin on multiple drug resistant cell lines that overexpress MDR1, BCRP, or MRP2 pumps were analyzed. Prodigiosin had nearly identical cytotoxic effects on the resistant cells in comparison to their parental lines. In agreement with the same prodigiosin cytotoxicity, FACS analysis of prodigiosin accumulation and efflux in MDR overexpressing cell lines also indicated that this pro-apoptotic agent operates independently of the presence of the MDR1, BCRP, or MRP transporter and may be a potential treatment for malignant cancer cells that overexpress multidrug resistance transporters.

  5. Preformulation studies of a novel camptothecin anticancer agent, CKD-602: physicochemical characterization and hydrolytic equilibrium kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Seok-Kyu; Lim, Jong-Lae; Shin, Hee-Jong; Hong, Chung Il

    2002-06-04

    (20S)-7-(2-isopropylamino)ethylcamptothecin.HCl (CKD-602), a new camptothecin (CPT) anticancer agent, is a pale yellowish crystalline compound. DSC thermogram exhibited a melt endotherm near 270 degrees C, and CKD-602 was found to be slightly hygroscopic. The solubility of CKD-602 in deionized water was 8.22 mg/ml, and two pK(a) values were measured to be 2.32 and 9.15, respectively. A pH-dependent partition coefficient behavior in octanol-buffer was observed. CKD-602 in solid state was stable over the range of temperature and humidity, but decomposed slightly by light. The hydrolysis of CKD-602 occurred reversibly and rapidly in aqueous buffer solutions. The conversion rate constants (k(f): from the lactone to the carboxylate and k(r): from the carboxylate to the lactone) and the final equilibrium ratio (K(eq)) between two species were dependent on the pH of aqueous solutions.

  6. Synergistic Anticancer Effect of Tocotrienol Combined with Chemotherapeutic Agents or Dietary Components: A Review

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    Takahiro Eitsuka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol (T3, unsaturated vitamin E, is gaining a lot of attention owing to its potent anticancer effect, since its efficacy is much greater than that of tocopherol (Toc. Various factors are known to be involved in such antitumor action, including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis induction, antiangiogenesis, anti-metastasis, nuclear factor-κB suppression, and telomerase inhibition. Owing to a difference in the affinity of T3 and Toc for the α-tocopherol transfer protein, the bioavailability of orally ingested T3 is lower than that of Toc. Furthermore, cellular uptake of T3 is interrupted by coadministration of α-Toc in vitro and in vivo. Based on this, several studies are in progress to screen for molecules that can synergize with T3 in order to augment its potency. Combinations of T3 with chemotherapeutic drugs (e.g., statins, celecoxib, and gefitinib or dietary components (e.g., polyphenols, sesamin, and ferulic acid exhibit synergistic actions on cancer cell growth and signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the current status of synergistic effects of T3 and an array of agents on cancer cells, and discuss their molecular mechanisms of action. These combination strategies would encourage further investigation and application in cancer prevention and therapy.

  7. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents

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    Josephine S. Modica-Napolitano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy.

  8. The potential for substance P antagonists as anti-cancer agents in brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Vink, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Despite recent advances in cancer treatment and diagnosis, the prognosis for patients with CNS tumours remains extremely poor. This is, in part, due to the difficulty in completely removing tumours surgically, and also because of the presence of the blood brain barrier, which can prevent the entry of chemotherapeutic agents typically used in cancer treatment. Despite the presence of the blood brain barrier, tumour cells are capable of entering and colonising the brain to form secondary brain tumours. Additionally, tumour related disruption of the blood brain barrier is associated with the clinical presentation of many patients, with accompanying increases in intracranial pressure due, in part, to the development of vasogenic oedema. Vasogenic oedema results because the newly formed angiogenic vessels within brain tumours do not retain the highly selective properties of the blood brain barrier, and thus allow for the extravasation of plasma proteins and water into the brain parenchyma. Tachykinins, and in particular substance P, have been implicated in blood brain barrier disruption and the genesis of cerebral oedema in other CNS insults via a process known as neurogenic inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that substance P may play a similar role in CNS tumours. It has been well established that an upregulation of substance P and its receptors occurs in a number of different cancer types, including CNS neoplasms. In addition to disrupting blood brain barrier permeability, substance P and the NK1 receptors facilitate promotion of tumour growth and the development of cerebral oedema. Accordingly, recent patents describe the potential of NK1 receptor antagonists as anti-cancer agents suggesting that substance P may provide a novel cancer treatment target. This review will examine the role of substance P in the development of CNS tumours.

  9. A computational approach to tuning the photochemistry of platinum(IV) anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Hui-Chung; Zhao, Yao; Farrer, Nicola J; Anastasi, Anna E; Clarkson, Guy; Sadler, Peter J; Deeth, Robert J

    2012-08-20

    Diazido Pt(IV) complexes are inert stable prodrugs that can be photoactivated to produce Pt(II) species with promising anticancer activity. Our studies of the photochemistry of Pt(IV) complexes, [Pt(X)(2) (Y)(2) (Z)(2) ](0/-1) (X=N-ligands (NH(3) , pyridine, etc.)/S(CH(3) )(2) /H(-) , Y=(pseudo)halogen (N(3) (-) , I(-) ), Z=OR(-) , R=H, Ac) by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) show close agreement with spectroscopic data. Broad exploration of cis/trans geometries, trans influences, the nature of the OR(-) and (pseudo)halogen ligands, electron-withdrawing/donating/delocalising substituents on the N-ligands, and intramolecular H bonds shows that: 1) the design of platinum(IV) complexes with intense bands shifted towards longer wavelengths (from 289 to ∼330 nm) can be achieved by introducing intramolecular H bonds involving the OH ligands and 2-hydroxyquinoline or by iodido ligands; 2) mesomeric electron-withdrawing substituents on pyridine result in low-energy absorption with significant intensity in the visible region; and 3) the distinct makeup of the molecular orbitals involved in the electronic transitions for cis/trans-{Pt(N(3) )(2) } isomers results in different photoproducts. In general, the comparison of the optimised geometries shows that Pt(IV) complexes with longer PtL bonds are more likely to undergo photoreduction with longer-wavelength light. The novel complex trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N(3) )(2) (OH)(2) (NH(3) )(4-nitropyridine)] with predicted absorption in the visible region has been synthesised. The experimental UV/Vis spectrum in aqueous solution correlates well with the intense band in the computed spectrum, whereas the overlay in the low-energy region can be improved by a solvent model. This combined computational and experimental study shows that TDDFT can be used to tune the coordination environment for optimising photoactive Pt(IV) compounds as anticancer agents. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

  10. Immune mechanisms regulating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEGylated liposomal anticancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gina

    integrated approaches, we were able to identify the immunological mechanisms at the molecular, tissue, and clinical levels that may contribute to inter-individual variability in PK and PD of PLD. This dissertation research has a potential to make an impact on development of future NP-based anticancer therapeutics as well as on clinical use of PLD (DoxilRTM) and other PEGylated liposomal anticancer agents.

  11. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

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    Al-Balas QA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Qosay A Al-Balas,1 Mohammad A Hassan,1 Nizar A Al-Shar’i,1 Nizar M Mhaidat,2 Ammar M Almaaytah,3 Fatima M Al-Mahasneh,1 Israa H Isawi1 1Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Background: The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs.Methods: Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I.Results: Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM.Conclusion: We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may

  12. C60-fullerenes as Drug Delivery Carriers for Anticancer Agents: Promises and Hurdles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Raza, Kaisar

    2017-01-01

    C60-fullerenes (CFs) constitute a carbon-allotropic family with cage-like fused-ring structure, comprising of 20 hexagons and 12 pentagons. Since discovery in 1985, CFs attracted the scientists from various strata for unique properties like tensile strength, nanometeric size, symmetric nature, thermal and photo conductivity, chemical tailoring opportunities and drug loading capabilities. Surprisingly, CFs are also established to possess antiviral, neuroprotective, antiinflammatory, MRI contrast and antioxidant properties. Though extensively explored for chemical modifications and therapeutic benefits, CFs and derivatives also offer immense promises in drug delivery, especially to the cancerous cells. The present review is an attempt to highlight the promises of CFs in drug delivery, esp. of anticancer agents. The review also analyzes the safety concerns of CF-based drug delivery and attempts to discuss the promises and challenges in the light of preclinical and clinical data. The raw material (research/review articles) for the manuscript was collected from Pubmed, Google scholar and Scopus and the keywords used were fullerenes, nanotechnology, nanomedicine, functionalization, safety, drug delivery and biomedical applications. The drug release rate controlling behavior, higher drug loading, immuno-neutrality, substantial biocompatibility, capability to bypass mononuclear phagocytic system, long circulating nature and tissue extraction by virtue of enhanced permeability and retention effect are the major promises of these nanocarriers. On the other hand, the concerns like elimination from the biological system, anticipated tissue toxicity, stability of the final product, sterility issues and commercial viability pose challenges in proper utilization of CFs as ideal drug delivery carriers. However, a few commercial products based on CFs with human safety evidences provide a ray of hope. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Novel quinolines carrying pyridine, thienopyridine, isoquinoline, thiazolidine, thiazole and thiophene moieties as potential anticancer agents

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    Ghorab Mostafa M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As a part of ongoing studies in developing new anticancer agents, novel 1,2-dihydropyridine 4, thienopyridine 5, isoquinolines 6–20, acrylamide 21, thiazolidine 22, thiazoles 23–29 and thiophenes 33–35 bearing a biologically active quinoline nucleus were synthesized. The structure of newly synthesized compounds was confirmed on the basis of elemental analyses and spectral data. All the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against the breast cancer cell line MCF7. 2,3-Dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamides 27, 25, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (34, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (7, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-4H-cyclohepta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (35, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (6, 2-cyano-3-(dimethylamino-N-(quinolin-3-ylacrylamide (21, 1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitriles (11 and (8 exhibited higher activity (IC50 values of 27–45 μmol L–1 compared to doxorubicin (IC50 47.9 μmol L–1. LQ quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (12, 2-thioxo-2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (28 and quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (15 show activity comparable to doxorubicin, while (quinolin-3-yl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (9, 2,3-dihydrothiazole-5-carboxamide (24, thieno [3,4-c] pyridine-4(5H-one (5, cyclopenta[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (33 and (quinolin-3-yl-6-stryl-1,2-dihydroisoquinoline-7-carbonitrile (10 exhibited moderate activity, lower than doxorubicin.

  14. Development of a mouse model for testing therapeutic agents: the anticancer effect of dienogest on endometrial neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Fumitaka; Tashiro, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Munekage; Honda, Ritsuo; Ohba, Takashi; Suzuki, Akira; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    As the number of younger women with endometrial carcinoma has increased, fertility-sparing treatments have received more attention. Although there have been several reports on conservative treatments with progestins for endometrial carcinoma, only medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is available in Japan. Dienogest has been developed as a fourth-generation progestin for treating endometriosis. Because of its high progesterone activity, its antitumor activity has attracted attention. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of dienogest on endometrial neoplasms using mouse model of endometrial carcinoma. Pten(loxP/loxP) mice were injected with MPA or dienogest subcutaneously to evaluate the anticancer effect against endometrial neoplasms that developed in the mice. One week after injections, histopathological analyzes were performed. Endometrial neoplasms were found in one of the eight (12.5%) mice from each group treated with either dienogest or MPA. In contrast, they were found in seven of eight (87.5%) mice not treated with progestins. Each progestin treatment showed anticancer activity against endometrial neoplasms that developed in the mice compared to those without treatment. Dienogest and MPA showed potent anticancer activity against endometrial neoplasms in our mouse model. The present study demonstrated that dienogest might be a useful therapeutic agent for human endometrial neoplasms.

  15. Pharmaceutical development of investigational anticancer agents: focus on EO-9, AP5346, and GMP implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoot, Sabina Cornelia van der

    2006-01-01

    The development of new anticancer drugs can be divided into six phases: characterization of the API (structural and analytical), solubility- and stability studies, design of the formulation, manufacturing, quality control analysis, and (bio)compatibility studies. Structural and analytical

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor is a robust enhancer of anticancer agents against hepatocellular carcinoma multicellular spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui J

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jie Cui,1,2 Ya-Huan Guo,3 Hong-Yi Zhang,4 Li-Li Jiang,1 Jie-Qun Ma,1 Wen-Juan Wang,1 Min-Cong Wang,1 Cheng-Cheng Yang,1 Ke-Jun Nan,1 Li-Ping Song5 1Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, 2Department of Oncology, Yan'an University Affiliated Hospital, Yan'an, 3Department of Oncology, Shaanxi Province Cancer Hospital, Xi'an, 4Department of Urology, Yan'an University Affiliated Hospital, Yan'an, 5Department of Radiotherapy, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China Purpose: Celecoxib, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2, was investigated for enhancement of chemotherapeutic efficacy in cancer clinical trials. This study aimed to determine whether celecoxib combined with 5-fluorouracil or sorafenib or gefitinib is beneficial in HepG2 multicellular spheroids (MCSs, as well as elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: The human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 MCSs were used as in vitro models to investigate the effects of celecoxib combined with 5-fluorouracil or sorafenib or gefitinib treatment on cell growth, apoptosis, and signaling pathway. Results: MCSs showed resistance to drugs compared with monolayer cells. Celecoxib combined with 5-fluorouracil or sorafenib exhibited a synergistic action. Exposure to celecoxib (21.8 µmol/L plus 5-fluorouracil (8.1 × 10-3 g/L or sorafenib (4.4 µmol/L increased apoptosis but exerted no effect on COX2, phosphorylated epidermal growth-factor receptor (p-EGFR and phosphorylated (p-AKT expression. Gefitinib (5 µmol/L, which exhibits no growth-inhibition activity as a single agent, increased the inhibitory effect of celecoxib. Gefitinib (5 µmol/L plus celecoxib (21.8 µmol/L increased apoptosis. COX2, p-EGFR, and p-AKT were inhibited. Conclusion: Celecoxib combined with 5-fluorouracil or sorafenib or gefitinib may be superior to single-agent therapy in HepG2

  17. Advancements in the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC: The Role of Ixabepilone

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    Massimo Cristofanilli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful management of breast cancer in the metastatic setting is often confounded by resistance to chemotherapeutics, in particular anthracyclines and taxanes. The limited number of effective treatment options for patients with more aggressive biological subtypes, such as triple-negative metastatic breast cancer, is especially concerning. As such, a therapy clinically proven to be effective in this subtype would be of great value. Ixabepilone, a novel synthetic lactam analog of epothilone B, demonstrated better clinical outcomes in metastatic disease, particularly in triple-negative breast cancer. Most recently, studies have shown the activity of ixabepilone in the neoadjuvant setting, suggesting a role for this drug in primary disease. Notably, treating in the neoadjuvant setting might allow clinicians to explore the predictive value of biomarkers and response to treatment, as pharmacogenomic approaches to therapy continue to evolve. In this article, we review the efficacy and safety data of ixabepilone as a monotherapy and as a component of combination therapy for metastatic and primary breast cancer.

  18. Synthesis and Evaluation of New Pyrazoline Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents in HepG-2 Cell Line

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    Weijie Xu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major public health concern worldwide. Adverse effects of cancer treatments still compromise patients’ quality of life. To identify new potential anticancer agents, a series of novel pyrazoline derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxic effects on HepG-2 (human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and primary hepatocytes. Compound structures were confirmed by 1H-NMR, mass spectrometry, and infrared imaging. An in vitro assay demonstrated that several compounds exerted cytotoxicity in the micromolar range. Benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl-[5-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-phenyl-3-(2-hydroxy-phenyl-4,5-dihydo-pyrazol-1-yl]-methanone (b17 was the most effective anticancer agent against HepG-2 cells owing to its notable inhibitory effect on HepG-2 with an IC50 value of 3.57 µM when compared with cisplatin (IC50 = 8.45 µM and low cytotoxicity against primary hepatocytes. Cell cycle analysis and apoptosis/necrosis evaluation using this compound revealed that b17 notably arrested HepG-2 cells in the G2/M phase and induced HepG-2 cells apoptosis. Our findings indicate that compound b17 may be a promising anticancer drug candidate.

  19. Design, synthesis, biological assessment and molecular docking studies of new 2-aminoimidazole-quinoxaline hybrids as potential anticancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarimasir, Zahra; Bekhradnia, Ahmadreza; Morteza-Semnani, Katayoun; Rafiei, Alireza; Razzaghi-Asl, Nima; Kardan, Mostafa

    2018-04-01

    In a search for novel antiproliferative agents, a series of quinoxaline derivatives containing 2-aminoimidazole (8a-8x) were designed and synthesized. The structures of synthesized compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, Mass Spectroscopy and analyzed using HSQC, COSY, ROESY, HMBC techniques. The anticancer activity of all derivatives were evaluated for colon cancer and breast cancer cell lines by the MTT assay and acridine orange/ethidium bromide double staining method. The anti-cancer effect in human colon cancer (HCT-116) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cell lines exhibited that compounds 8a, 8s, 8t, 8w, 8x appeared as potent antiproliferative agents and especially inhibited the human colon cancer cell proliferation with percentage of inhibition by over 50%. The most active compound was (E)-4-phenyl-1-((quinoxalin-2-ylmethylene)amino)-1H-imidazol-2-amine (8a) with the highest inhibition for MCF-7 (83.3%) and HCT-116 (70%) cell lines after 48 and 24 h, respectively. Molecular docking studies of these derivatives within c-kit active site as a validated target might be suggested them as appropriate candidates for further efforts toward more potent anticancer compounds.

  20. Growth inhibitory effect of the Src inhibitor dasatinib in combination with anticancer agents on uterine cervical adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Eri; Nishimura, Masato; Mineda, Ayuka; Kawakita, Takako; Abe, Akiko; Irahara, Minoru

    2017-11-01

    Uterine cervical adenocarcinoma has a poor clinical prognosis when compared with squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, the development of new treatment strategies for uterine cervical adenocarcinoma is necessary. Src is a proto-oncogene that is important in cancer progression. Dasatinib is a Src inhibitor that has been reported to be effective when used in combination with anticancer drugs. The present study aimed to confirm Src expression in human cervical adenocarcinoma cell lines and to determine the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of dasatinib on Src signaling in vitro . Western blot analysis was performed to investigate Src expression in cervical adenocarcinoma cell lines (HeLa and TCO-2 cells). The cells were cultured for 48 h with the addition of different concentrations of anticancer drugs (paclitaxel or oxaliplatin). Viable cell count was measured using a colorimetric (WST-1) assay. The concentrations of anticancer agents were fixed according to the results obtained, and the same experiments were performed using the drugs in combination with dasatinib at various concentrations to determine the concentrations that significantly affected the number of viable cells. The presence or absence of apoptosis was investigated using a caspase-3/7 assay. Signal transduction in each cell line was examined using western blotting. Src was activated in the two cell lines, and cell proliferation was significantly suppressed by each anticancer drug in combination with 10 µM dasatinib. Caspase-3/7 activity was also increased and Src signaling was suppressed by each anticancer drug in combination with dasatinib. In conclusion, Src is overexpressed in cervical adenocarcinoma cell lines, and dasatinib inhibits intracellular Src signaling and causes apoptosis. The results of the present study suggest that Src may be targeted in novel therapeutic strategies for cervical adenocarcinoma.

  1. Plant Secondary Metabolites as Anticancer Agents: Successes in Clinical Trials and Therapeutic Application

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    Ana M. L. Seca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a multistage process resulting in an uncontrolled and abrupt division of cells and is one of the leading causes of mortality. The cases reported and the predictions for the near future are unthinkable. Food and Drug Administration data showed that 40% of the approved molecules are natural compounds or inspired by them, from which, 74% are used in anticancer therapy. In fact, natural products are viewed as more biologically friendly, that is less toxic to normal cells. In this review, the most recent and successful cases of secondary metabolites, including alkaloid, diterpene, triterpene and polyphenolic type compounds, with great anticancer potential are discussed. Focusing on the ones that are in clinical trial development or already used in anticancer therapy, therefore successful cases such as paclitaxel and homoharringtonine (in clinical use, curcumin and ingenol mebutate (in clinical trials will be addressed. Each compound’s natural source, the most important steps in their discovery, their therapeutic targets, as well as the main structural modifications that can improve anticancer properties will be discussed in order to show the role of plants as a source of effective and safe anticancer drugs.

  2. Hydrazides/hydrazones as antimicrobial and anticancer agents in the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2013-06-01

    Hydrazide/hydrazone derivatives are of quite interest for medicinal chemists because of their vast spectrum of biological activity. Literature reports reveal that the hydrazide derivatives have been extensively studied for their biological profile during the past decade. The aim of the present work is to collect literature reports focusing the antimicrobial and anticancer study of different hydrazide/hydrazone derivatives carried out during the past decade which will serve as a valuable source of information for the researchers working in the field of antimicrobial and anticancer research.

  3. The chemistry and biology of the anticancer agent, taxol: A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taxol, is conceivably the single most essential anticancer drug, today. It was first isolated in exceptionally low yield from the bark of the Western Yew, Taxus brevifolia. The clinical effectiveness of Taxol has impelled an incredible endeavor to obtain this intricate molecule synthetically. Owing to the chemical complication of ...

  4. Evaluation of bishexadecyltrimethyl ammonium palladium tetrachloride based dual functional colloidal carrier as an antimicrobial and anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Sandeep; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Kaur, Baljinder; Kant, Ravi; Guru, Santosh Kumar; Bhushan, Shashi; Jaglan, Sundeep

    2016-04-21

    We have developed a dual function carrier using bishexadecyltrimethyl ammonium palladium tetrachloride, which has anticancer as well as antibacterial activity, using a ligand insertion method with a simple and easy work procedure. The complex is prepared by a simple and cost effective method using hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium chloride and palladium chloride under controlled stoichiometry. Herein, we report the aggregation (self assembly) of the metallosurfactant having palladium as a counter ion, in aqueous medium along with its binding affinity with bovine serum albumin. The palladium surfactant has exhibited excellent antimicrobial efficacy against fungus and bacteria (both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria). Cytotoxicity of palladium surfactant against cancerous (Human leukemia HL-60, pancreatic MIA-Pa-Ca-2 and prostate cancer PC-3) and healthy cells (fR2 human breast epithelial cells) was also evaluated using MTT assay. The present dual functional moiety shows a low IC50 value and has potential to be used as an anticancer agent. Our dual function carrier which itself possesses antimicrobial and anticancer activity represents a simple and effective system and can also be utilized as a drug carrier in the future.

  5. Phytosterols as a natural anticancer agent: Current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Naiyer; Khan, Wajahatullah; Md, Shadab; Ali, Asgar; Saluja, Sundeep Singh; Sharma, Sadhana; Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Ali Fathi; Afify, Mohamed Abdelaziz; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed Saeed

    2017-04-01

    Phytosterols are naturally occurring compounds in plants, structurally similar to cholesterol. The human diet is quite abundant in sitosterol and campesterol. Phytosterols are known to have various bioactive properties including reducing intestinal cholesterol absorption which alleviates blood LDL-cholesterol and cardiovascular problems. It is indicated that phytosterol rich diets may reduce cancer risk by 20%. Phytosterols may also affect host systems, enabling antitumor responses by improving immune response recognition of cancer, affecting the hormone dependent endocrine tumor growth, and by sterol biosynthesis modulation. Moreover, phytosterols have also exhibited properties that directly inhibit tumor growth, including reduced cell cycle progression, apoptosis induction, and tumor metastasis inhibition. The objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on occurrences, chemistry, pharmacokinetics and potential anticancer properties of phytosterols in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, anticancer effects of phytosterols have strongly been suggested and support their dietary inclusion to prevent and treat cancers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. In Silico Molecular Docking Analysis of Natural Pyridoacridines as Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Docking studies are proved to be an essential tool that facilitates the structural diversity of natural products to be harnessed in an organized manner. In this study, pyridoacridines containing natural anticancer pigments were subjected to docking studies using Glide (Schrodinger. Investigations were carried out to find out the potential molecular targets for these selected pigments. The docking was carried out on different cancer macromolecules involved in different cell cycle pathways, that is, CDK-2, CDK-6, Bcl-2, VEGFR-2, IGF-1R kinase, and G-Quadruplexes. CDK-6 was found to be the most suitable anticancer target for the pyridoacridines. In addition, effectiveness of the study was further evaluated by performing docking of known inhibitors against their respective selected macromolecules. However, the results are preliminary and experimental evaluation will be carried out in near future.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of andrographolide analogues as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Ranjan; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Siddharth, Sumit; Mohapatra, Purusottam; Das, Dipon; Satapathy, Shakti Ranjan; Das, Supriya; Maiti, Nakul C; Maulik, Prakas R; Kundu, Chanakya Nath; Chowdhury, Chinmay

    2014-10-06

    A new family of andrographolide analogues were synthesized and screened in vitro against kidney (HEK-293) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. The anti-cancer effects of the active analogues (2b, 2c and 4c) were determined by multiple cell based assays such as MTT, immunostaining, FACS, western blotting and transcriptional inhibition of NF-κB activity. Importantly, these compounds were found to possess higher anti-cancer potency than andrographolide and low toxicity to normal (VERO and MCF-10A) cells. Increased level of Bax/Bcl-xL ratio, caspase 3, and sub G1 population, higher expression level of tumor suppressor protein p53 and lower expression level of NF-κB suggested potent apoptotic property of the active analogues. Data revealed that the andrographolide derivative-mediated cell death in cancer cells was p53 dependent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of chalcones incorporated pyrazole moiety as anticancer and antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Magda F; Mohamed, Mervat S; Shouman, Samia A; Fathi, Mohamed M; Abdelhamid, Ismail Abdelshafy

    2012-11-01

    A newly synthesized series of chalcone derivatives containing pyrazole rings were synthesized and evaluated for their cytotoxic activities in vitro against several human cancer cell lines. Most of the prepared compounds showed potential cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, HEPG-2, and HCT-116. Also the compounds were evaluated as antimicrobial agents. The three compounds 3, 4, and 5 were proved to be better anticancer agents than the positive standard doxorubicin with IC50 values (4.7, 4.4, and 3.9 μg/ml) against the same human cancer cell lines, whereas compounds 5 and 6 showed the most active antimicrobial compounds in comparison to the other chalcones.

  9. [Quod medicina aliis, aliis est acre venenum**--venoms as a source of anticancer agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucińska, Małgorzata; Ruciński, Piotr; Murias, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Natural product derived from plants and animals were used in folk medicine for centuries. The venoms produced by animals for hunting of self-defence are rich in bioactive compounds with broad spectrum of biological activity. The papers presents the most promising compounds isolated from venoms of snakes, scorpions and toads. For these compounds both: mechanism of anticancer activity as well as possibilities of clinical use are presented.

  10. Enhancement of Selectivity of an Organometallic Anticancer Agent by Redox Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Mos, Magdalena; Sadler, Peter J

    2015-10-08

    Combination with redox modulators can potentiate the anticancer activity and maximize the selectivity of organometallic complexes with redox-based mechanisms of action. We show that nontoxic doses of l-buthionine sulfoximine increase the selectivity of organo-Os complex FY26 for human ovarian cancer cells versus normal lung fibroblasts to 63-fold. This increase is not due to changes in the mechanism of action of FY26 but to the decreased response of cancer cells to oxidative stress.

  11. Safety of selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 microspheres combined with systemic anticancer agents: expert consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Andrew; Brown, Daniel B; Feilchenfeldt, Jonas; Marshall, John; Wasan, Harpreet; Fakih, Marwan; Gibbs, Peter; Knuth, Alexander; Sangro, Bruno; Soulen, Michael C; Pittari, Gianfranco; Sharma, Ricky A

    2017-12-01

    Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with microspheres labelled with the β-emitter yttrium-90 (Y-90) enables targeted delivery of radiation to hepatic tumors. SIRT is primarily used to treat inoperable primary or metastatic liver tumors. Eligible patients have usually been exposed to a variety of systemic anticancer therapies, including cytotoxic agents, targeted biologics, immunotherapy and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). All these treatments have potential interactions with SIRT; however, robust evidence on the safety of these potential combinations is lacking. This paper provides current clinical experiences and expert consensus guidelines for the use of SIRT in combination with the anticancer treatment agents likely to be encountered in clinical practice. It was agreed by the expert panel that precautions need to be taken with certain drugs, but that, in general, systemic therapies do not necessarily have to be stopped to perform SIRT. The authors recommend stopping vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors 4-6 weeks before SIRT, and restart after the patient has recovered from the procedure. It may also be prudent to stop potent radiosensitizers such as gemcitabine therapy 4 weeks before SIRT, and restart treatment at least 2‒4 weeks later. Data from phase III studies combining SIRT with fluorouracil (5FU) or folinic acid/5FU/oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) suggest that hematological toxicity is more common from the combination than it is from chemotherapy without SIRT. There is no evidence to suggest that chemotherapy increases SIRT-specific gastro-intestinal or liver toxicities.

  12. Dual pH-sensitive oxidative stress generating micellar nanoparticles as a novel anticancer therapeutic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanga; Kwon, Byeongsu; Yang, Wonseok; Han, Eunji; Yoo, Wooyoung; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Lee, Dongwon

    2014-12-28

    Cancer cells are under oxidative stress due to a large production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which involve in cell proliferation and cancer promotion and progression. On the other hand, ROS promotes cell death, depending on the rate of ROS production and the activity of antioxidant systems. Recently, "oxidation therapy" has arisen as a promising anticancer strategy, which can be achieved by inducing the generation of cytotoxic level of ROS or inhibiting the antioxidant systems in tumor cells. Here, we report oxidative stress amplifying nanoplatforms as novel anticancer therapeutics, which are able not only to suppress antioxidant but also to generate ROS simultaneously in acidic tumor microenvironments. The oxidative stress amplifying nanoplatforms are composed of dual pH-sensitive PBCAE copolymer, polymeric prodrug of BCA (benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibiting zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP). PBCAE was designed to incorporate ROS-generating BCA in its backbone via acid-cleavable acetal linkages and self-assemble to form micelles that encapsulate ZnPP. In vitro proof-of-concept studies revealed that ZnPP encapsulated in PBCAE micelles suppressed HO-1 to make cancer cells more vulnerable to BCA-induced ROS, leading to enhanced apoptotic cell death. In addition, ZnPP-loaded PBCAE micelles significantly suppressed the tumor growth in human cancer xenograft mouse models. We believe that oxidative stress amplifying micellar nanoparticles have a great potential as novel redox anticancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Physicochemical investigations of biogenic chitosan-silver nanocomposite as antimicrobial and anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Nithya; Kumari, Henry Linda Jeeva; Singaravelu, Chandra Mohan; Kandasamy, Ruckmani; Kandasamy, Jothivenkatachalam

    2016-11-01

    Chitosan (CS), a seaweed polysaccharide is a natural macromolecule which is widely being used in medical applications because of its distinctive antimicrobial and anticancer properties. Silver, a noble metal, is also receiving wide attention for its potential usage in antimicrobial and anticancer therapeutics. In this study, an effective way of reduction of silver using chitosan at varying reaction temperatures and an optimised concentration of silver were performed. The optical, structural, spectral, morphological and elemental studies of the biosynthesized chitosan-silver (CS-Ag) nanocomposites were characterized by several techniques. The synthesized CS-Ag nanocomposites exhibit particle size around 20nm and were further exploited for potent biological applications in nanomedicine due to their nanometric sizes and biocompatibility of chitosan. The antimicrobial activity of the biosynthesized CS-Ag nanocomposites exhibits zone of inhibition ranged between 09.666±0.577 and 19.000±1.000 (mm). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were from 8 to 128μgmL -1 and 16 to 256μgmL -1 respectively, with the highest antimicrobial activity shown against Gram-negative Salmonella sp. The synergistic effect of chitosan and silver as a composite in nanometric size revealed significant IC 50 value of 29.35μgmL -1 and a maximum of 95.56% inhibition at 100μgmL -1 against A549 lung cancer cell line, resulting in potent anticancer effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Anthracenedione Derivatives as Anticancer Agents Isolated from Secondary Metabolites of the Mangrove Endophytic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-ye Zhang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we report anticancer activity of 14 anthracenedione derivatives separated from the secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403 and Guignardia sp. (No. 4382. Some of them inhibited potently the growth of KB and KBv200 cells, among which compound 6 displayed strong cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 3.17 and 3.21 μM to KB and KBv200 cells, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism involved in the apoptosis induced by compound 6 is probably related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, the structure-activity relationships of these compounds are discussed.

  15. Anthracenedione Derivatives as Anticancer Agents Isolated from Secondary Metabolites of the Mangrove Endophytic Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang; Tao; Liang; Chen; Mi; Zheng; Wang; She; Lin; To; Fu

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we report anticancer activity of 14 anthracenedione derivatives separated from the secondary metabolites of the mangrove endophytic fungi Halorosellinia sp. (No. 1403) and Guignardia sp. (No. 4382). Some of them inhibited potently the growth of KB and KBv200 cells, among which compound 6 displayed strong cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 3.17 and 3.21 μM to KB and KBv200 cells, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mechanism involved in the apoptosis induced by co...

  16. Biological evaluation of indolizine-chalcone hybrids as new anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sujin; Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Seong Hwan; Kim, Ikyon

    2018-01-20

    A new chemical space was explored based on an indolizine-chalcone hybrid, which was readily accessible by base-mediated aldol condensation of indolizine bearing a 7-acetyl group with various (hetero)aromatic aldehydes. Their anticancer effect was evaluated, revealing that indolizine-chalcone hybrids with 3,5-dimethoxyphenyl group (4h) or the halogen at the meta position (4j and 4l) could have the potential to induce the caspase-dependent apoptosis of human lymphoma cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Curcumin as a clinically-promising anti-cancer agent: pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwidjaja, Jeffry; McLachlan, Andrew J; Boddy, Alan V

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its anti-cancer properties. While a diverse array of in vitro and preclinical research support the prospect of curcumin use as an anti-cancer therapeutic, most human studies have failed to meet the intended clinical expectation. Poor systemic availability of orally-administered curcumin may account for this disparity. Areas covered: This descriptive review aims to concisely summarise available clinical studies investigating curcumin pharmacokinetics when administered in different formulations. A critical analysis of pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based interactions of curcumin with concomitantly administered drugs is also provided. Expert opinion: The encouraging clinical results of curcumin administration are currently limited to people with colorectal cancer, given that sufficient curcumin concentrations persist in colonic mucosa. Higher parent curcumin systemic exposure, which can be achieved by several newer formulations, has important implications for optimal treatment of cancers other than those in gastrointestinal tract. Curcumin-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are also almost exclusively in the enterocytes, owing to extensive first pass metabolism and poor curcumin bioavailability. Greater scope of these interactions, i.e. modulation of the systemic elimination of co-administered drugs, may be expected from more-bioavailable curcumin formulations. Further studies are still warranted, especially with newer formulations to support the inclusion of curcumin in cancer therapy regimens.

  18. Synthesis, SAR and pharmacological characterization of novel anthraquinone cation compounds as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Zhu, Li; Fan, Lulu; Zhao, Wenna; Wang, Jianlong; Hao, Xianxiao; Zhu, Yunhui; Hu, Xiufang; Yuan, Yaofeng; Shao, Jingwei; Wang, Wenfeng

    2017-01-05

    Emodin, a natural anthraquinone derivative isolated from Rheum palmatum L., has been demonstrated to exhibit good anti-cancer effect. In this study, a series of novel quaternary ammonium salts of emodin, anthraquinone and anthrone were synthesized and their anticancer activities were tested in vitro. The effects of emodin quaternary ammonium salts on cell viability, apoptosis, intracellular ROS, and mitochondrial membrane potential were investigated in A375, BGC-823, HepG2 and HELF cells. The results demonstrated that compound 4a induced morphological changes and decreased cell viability. Apoptosis triggered by compound 4a was visualized using DAPI staining and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. Compound 4a-induced apoptosis of A375 cells were showed to be associated with the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) as a result of the up-regulation of P53 and Caspase-3. When cancer cells were treated with emodin derivative, their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) rose significantly and the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased. Additionally, confocal microscopy assay confirmed that compound 4a was primarily located in the mitochondria of A375 cells. These results suggested that compound 4a has the potential for use in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation data supporting the characterization of novel copper complexes as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceyda Acilan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Three copper(II complexes, Cu(Sal-Gly(phen, Cu(Sal-Glypheamine, Cu(Sal-Glyphepoxy were synthesized and characterized for their anticancer properties and mechanism of action (Acilan et al., in press [1]. Here, we provide supporting data on colon cancer cell lines complementing our previous findings in cervix cells. This paper also contains a data table for the fold changes and p-values of all genes analyzed in this study via a custom RT-qPCR array. All compounds induced DNA damage (based on 8-oxo-guanidine, ɣH2AX staining in cells and apoptosis (based on elevated DNA condensation/fragmentation, Annexin V staining, caspase 3/7 activity and mitochondrial membrane depolarization in HCT-116 colon cancer cells. The increase in oxidative stress was also further confirmed in these cells. Further interpretation of the data presented here can be found in the article entitled “Synthesis, biological characterization and evaluation of molecular mechanisms of novel copper complexes as anticancer agents” (Acilan et al., in press [1].

  20. Mathematical modeling analysis of intratumoral disposition of anticancer agents and drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popilski, Hen; Stepensky, David

    2015-05-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by complex morphology. Numerous factors relating to the composition of the cells and tumor stroma, vascularization and drainage of fluids affect the local microenvironment within a specific location inside the tumor. As a result, the intratumoral drug/drug delivery system (DDS) disposition following systemic or local administration is non-homogeneous and its complexity reflects the differences in the local microenvironment. Mathematical models can be used to analyze the intratumoral drug/DDS disposition and pharmacological effects and to assist in choice of optimal anticancer treatment strategies. The mathematical models that have been applied by different research groups to describe the intratumoral disposition of anticancer drugs/DDSs are summarized in this article. The properties of these models and of their suitability for prediction of the drug/DDS intratumoral disposition and pharmacological effects are reviewed. Currently available mathematical models appear to neglect some of the major factors that govern the drug/DDS intratumoral disposition, and apparently possess limited prediction capabilities. More sophisticated and detailed mathematical models and their extensive validation are needed for reliable prediction of different treatment scenarios and for optimization of drug treatment in the individual cancer patients.

  1. Genome-wide transcriptional effects of the anti-cancer agent camptothecin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Veloso

    Full Text Available The anti-cancer drug camptothecin inhibits replication and transcription by trapping DNA topoisomerase I (Top1 covalently to DNA in a "cleavable complex". To examine the effects of camptothecin on RNA synthesis genome-wide we used Bru-Seq and show that camptothecin treatment primarily affected transcription elongation. We also observed that camptothecin increased RNA reads past transcription termination sites as well as at enhancer elements. Following removal of camptothecin, transcription spread as a wave from the 5'-end of genes with no recovery of transcription apparent from RNA polymerases stalled in the body of genes. As a result, camptothecin preferentially inhibited the expression of large genes such as proto-oncogenes, and anti-apoptotic genes while smaller ribosomal protein genes, pro-apoptotic genes and p53 target genes showed relative higher expression. Cockayne syndrome group B fibroblasts (CS-B, which are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR, showed an RNA synthesis recovery profile similar to normal fibroblasts suggesting that TCR is not involved in the repair of or RNA synthesis recovery from transcription-blocking Top1 lesions. These findings of the effects of camptothecin on transcription have important implications for its anti-cancer activities and may aid in the design of improved combinatorial treatments involving Top1 poisons.

  2. Preclinical Pharmacology of BA-TPQ, a Novel Synthetic Iminoquinone Anticancer Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezell, Scharri J.; Li, Haibo; Xu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiangrong; Gurpinar, Evrim; Zhang, Xu; Rayburn, Elizabeth R.; Sommers, Charnell I.; Yang, Xinyi; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2010-01-01

    Marine natural products and their synthetic derivatives represent a major source of novel candidate anti-cancer compounds. We have recently tested the anti-cancer activity of more than forty novel compounds based on an iminoquinone makaluvamine scaffold, and have found that many of the compounds exert potent cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines. One of the most potent compounds, BA-TPQ [(11,12),7-(benzylamino)-1,3,4,8-tetrahydropyrrolo[4,3,2-de]quinolin-8(1H)-one], was active against a variety of human cancer cell lines, and inhibited the growth of breast and prostate xenograft tumors in mice. However, there was some toxicity noted in the mice following administration of the compound. In order to further the development of BA-TPQ, and in a search for potential sites of accumulation that might underlie the observed toxicity of the compound, we accomplished preclinical pharmacological studies of the compound. We herein report the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of BA-TPQ, including its stability in plasma, plasma protein binding, metabolism by S9 enzymes, and plasma and tissue distribution. We believe these studies will be useful for further investigations, and may be useful for other investigators examining the use of similar compounds for cancer therapy. PMID:20714427

  3. Preclinical Pharmacology of BA-TPQ, a Novel Synthetic Iminoquinone Anticancer Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiwen Zhang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Marine natural products and their synthetic derivatives represent a major source of novel candidate anti-cancer compounds. We have recently tested the anti-cancer activity of more than forty novel compounds based on an iminoquinone makaluvamine scaffold, and have found that many of the compounds exert potent cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines. One of the most potent compounds, BA-TPQ [(11,12,7-(benzylamino-1,3,4,8-tetrahydropyrrolo[4,3,2-de]quinolin-8(1H-one], was active against a variety of human cancer cell lines, and inhibited the growth of breast and prostate xenograft tumors in mice. However, there was some toxicity noted in the mice following administration of the compound. In order to further the development of BA-TPQ, and in a search for potential sites of accumulation that might underlie the observed toxicity of the compound, we accomplished preclinical pharmacological studies of the compound. We herein report the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of BA-TPQ, including its stability in plasma, plasma protein binding, metabolism by S9 enzymes, and plasma and tissue distribution. We believe these studies will be useful for further investigations, and may be useful for other investigators examining the use of similar compounds for cancer therapy.

  4. THE ROLE OF RED PIGMENT PRODIGIOSIN FROM BACTERIA OF EARTHWORM GUT AS AN ANTICANCER AGENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sruthy P.B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Earthworms are the most ancient invertebrate animals on earth which can be used as a good source of pharmaceutical compounds. A study was carried out to find out the distribution of microorganisms in the gut of earthworm, Eudrilus eugeniae. Significant number of microbial populations in the gut of earthworm was observed and it was gradually increased from the initial day to final day of composting. Pigmented colonies of bacteria from earthworm gut were selectively isolated, the pigment was extracted from the culture broth and a presumptive test was carried out for the confirmation of prodigiosin. The pigment component was separated using thin layer chromatography and the structural elucidation of the compound was performed using U.V. spectroscopy. The inhibitory effect of prodigiosin on bacterial pathogens was studied and the results confirmed the antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria. The anticancer activity of the prodigiosin pigment was evaluated under in vitro conditions against the breast cancer cell lines and it was observed that prodigiosin induced the apoptosis in MCF-7 cell lines in a dose dependent manner. Then the potential isolate was subjected to morphological and biochemical analysis and it was confirmed that the colonies were of Serratia marcescens. The results obtained from the present study indicated that earthworm gut is promising and could be a vital source of habitat possessing antimicrobial and anticancer activity.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Celecoxib Derivatives as Possible Anti-Inflammatory, Analgesic, Antioxidant, Anticancer and Anti-HCV Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amartya Basu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel N-(3-substituted aryl/alkyl-4-oxo-1,3-thiazolidin-2-ylidene-4-[5-(4-methylphenyl-3-(trifluoromethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]benzenesulfonamides 2a–e were synthesized by the addition of ethyl a-bromoacetate and anhydrous sodium acetate in dry ethanol to N-(substituted aryl/alkylcarbamothioyl-4-[5-(4-methylphenyl-3-(trifluoro-methyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]benzene sulfonamides 1a–e, which were synthesized by the reaction of alkyl/aryl isothiocyanates with celecoxib. The structures of the isolated products were determined by spectral methods and their anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antioxidant, anticancer and anti-HCV NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp activities evaluated. The compounds were also tested for gastric toxicity and selected compound 1a was screened for its anticancer activity against 60 human tumor cell lines. These investigations revealed that compound 1a exhibited anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and further did not cause tissue damage in liver, kidney, colon and brain compared to untreated controls or celecoxib. Compounds 1c and 1d displayed modest inhibition of HCV NS5B RdRp activity. In conclusion, N-(ethylcarbamothioyl-4-[5-(4-methylphenyl-3-(trifluoromethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]benzenesulfonamide (1a may have the potential to be developed into a therapeutic agent.

  6. Current approaches to improve the anticancer chemotherapy with alkylating agents: state of the problem in world and Ukraine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iatsyshyna A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents are frequently used in many established anticancer chemotherapies. They alkylate the genomic DNA at various sites. Alkylation of the guanine at the O6-position is cytotoxic, it has the strongest mutagenic potential, as well as can cause the tumor development. Alkyl groups at the O6-position of guanine are removed by the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT. The effectiveness of alkylating chemotherapy is limited by MGMT in cancer cells and adverse toxic side effects in normal cells. Different approaches consisting in the modulation of the MGMT expression and activity are under development now to improve the cancer chemotherapy. They include two main directions, in particular, the increase in chemosensitivity of cancer cells to alkylating drugs and the protection of normal cells from the toxic side effects of chemotherapy. This review is focused on current attempts to improve the alkylating chemotherapy of malignant tumours worldwide and state of the issue in Ukraine

  7. Platinum, palladium, gold and ruthenium complexes as anticancer agents: Current clinical uses, cytotoxicity studies and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarević, Tatjana; Rilak, Ana; Bugarčić, Živadin D

    2017-12-15

    Metallodrugs offer potential for unique mechanism of drug action based on the choice of the metal, its oxidation state, the types and number of coordinated ligands and the coordination geometry. This review illustrates notable recent progress in the field of medicinal bioinorganic chemistry as many new approaches to the design of innovative metal-based anticancer drugs are emerging. Current research addressing the problems associated with platinum drugs has focused on other metal-based therapeutics that have different modes of action and on prodrug and targeting strategies in an effort to diminish the side-effects of cisplatin chemotherapy. Examples of metal compounds and chelating agents currently in clinical use, clinical trials or preclinical development are highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Library construction and biological evaluation of enmein-type diterpenoid analogues as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dahong; Xu, Shengtao; Cai, Hao; Pei, Lingling; Wang, Lei; Wu, Xiaoming; Yao, Hequan; Jiang, Jieyun; Sun, Yijun; Xu, Jinyi

    2013-05-01

    A library of promising enmein-type 14-O-diterpenoid derivatives was constructed from a commercially available kaurene-type oridonin by practical and efficient synthetic methods. These synthetic derivatives were evaluated for their antiproliferative activities against a set of four human cancer cell lines. The IC50 values are similar to or improved over those of the parent molecule and paclitaxel, the latter of which was used as a positive control. Compound 29 was further investigated for its apoptotic properties against human hepatocarcinoma Bel-7402 cells to better understand its mode of action. Moreover, compound 29 was shown to have potent antitumor activity in vivo in studies with a murine model of gastric cancer (MGC-803 mice). These results warrant further preclinical investigations of these diterpenoid-based analogues as potential novel anticancer chemotherapeutics. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Benzothiazole-2-thiol Derivatives as Potential Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo-Ting Yu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel benzothiazole-2-thiol derivatives were synthesized and their structures determined by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and HRMS (ESI. The effects of all compounds on a panel of different types of human cancer cell lines were investigated. Among them, pyridinyl-2-amine linked benzothiazole-2-thiol compounds 7d, 7e, 7f and 7i exhibited potent and broad-spectrum inhibitory activities. Compound 7e displayed the most potent anticancer activity on SKRB-3 (IC50 = 1.2 nM, SW620 (IC50 = 4.3 nM, A549 (IC50 = 44 nM and HepG2 (IC50 = 48 nM and was found to induce apoptosis in HepG2 cancer cells.

  10. Lappaol F, a novel anticancer agent isolated from plant arctium Lappa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing; Liu, Kanglun; Shen, Xiaoling; Jin, Weixin; Jiang, Lingyan; Sheikh, M Saeed; Hu, Yingjie; Huang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to search for new cancer-fighting therapeutics, we identified a novel anticancer constituent, Lappaol F, from plant Arctium Lappa L. Lappaol F suppressed cancer cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner in human cancer cell lines of various tissue types. We found that Lappaol F induced G(1) and G(2) cell-cycle arrest, which was associated with strong induction of p21 and p27 and reduction of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Depletion of p21 via genetic knockout or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) approaches significantly abrogated Lappaol F-mediated G(2) arrest and CDK1 and cyclin B1 suppression. These results suggest that p21 seems to play a crucial role in Lappaol F-mediated regulation of CDK1 and cyclin B1 and G(2) arrest. Lappaol F-mediated p21 induction was found to occur at the mRNA level and involved p21 promoter activation. Lappaol F was also found to induce cell death in several cancer cell lines and to activate caspases. In contrast with its strong growth inhibitory effects on tumor cells, Lappaol F had minimal cytotoxic effects on nontumorigenic epithelial cells tested. Importantly, our data also demonstrate that Lappaol F exhibited strong growth inhibition of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Lappaol F was well tolerated in treated animals without significant toxicity. Taken together, our results, for the first time, demonstrate that Lappaol F exhibits antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and has strong potential to be developed as an anticancer therapeutic.

  11. Hypersensitivity reactions to anticancer agents: Data mining of the public version of the FDA adverse event reporting system, AERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaeda Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, adverse event reports (AERs submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA database were reviewed to confirm platinum agent-associated hypersensitivity reactions. The present study was performed to confirm whether the database could suggest the hypersensitivity reactions caused by anticancer agents, paclitaxel, docetaxel, procarbazine, asparaginase, teniposide, and etoposide. Methods After a revision of arbitrary drug names and the deletion of duplicated submissions, AERs involving candidate agents were analyzed. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 was applied to evaluate the susceptibility to hypersensitivity reactions, and standardized official pharmacovigilance tools were used for quantitative detection of signals, i.e., drug-associated adverse events, including the proportional reporting ratio, the reporting odds ratio, the information component given by a Bayesian confidence propagation neural network, and the empirical Bayes geometric mean. Results Based on 1,644,220 AERs from 2004 to 2009, the signals were detected for paclitaxel-associated mild, severe, and lethal hypersensitivity reactions, and docetaxel-associated lethal reactions. However, the total number of adverse events occurring with procarbazine, asparaginase, teniposide, or etoposide was not large enough to detect signals. Conclusions The FDA's adverse event reporting system, AERS, and the data mining methods used herein are useful for confirming drug-associated adverse events, but the number of co-occurrences is an important factor in signal detection.

  12. Electrochemical and calorimetric investigation of interaction of novel biscationic anticancer agents with DNA; Investigacao eletroquimica e calorimetrica da interacao de novos agentes antitumorais biscationicos com DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lauris Lucia da; Donnici, Claudio Luis; Lopes, Julio Cesar Dias, E-mail: cdonnici@terra.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Goulart, Marilia Oliveira Fonseca; Abreu, Fabiane Caxico de; Paula, Francine Santos de [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil). Campus A.C. Simoes. Inst. de Quimica e Biotecnologia; Bravo, Carlos E. Salas; Santoro, Marcelo Matos [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Denadai, Angelo Marcio Leite [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica, Timoteo, MG (Brazil). Campus VII; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas; Montanari, Carlos Alberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Biscationic amidines bind in the DNA minor groove and present biological activity against a range of infectious diseases. Two new biscationic compounds (bis-{alpha}-{omega}-S-thioureido, amino and sulfide analogues) were synthesized in good yields and fully characterized, and their interaction with DNA was also investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to measure the thermodynamic properties of binding interactions between DNA and these ligands. A double stranded calf thymus DNA immobilized on an electrode surface was used to study the possible DNA-interacting abilities of these compounds towards dsDNA in situ. A remarkable interaction of these compounds with DNA was demonstrated and their potential application as anticancer agents was furthered. (author)

  13. Clinical pharmacology of the novel marine-derived anticancer agent Ecteinascidin 743 administered as a 1- and 3-h infusion in a phase I study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kesteren, Charlotte; Twelves, Chris; Bowman, Angela; Hoekman, Klaas; López-Lázaro, Luis; Jimeno, José; Guzman, Cecilia; Mathôt, Ron A. A.; Simpson, Andrew; Vermorken, Jan B.; Smyth, John; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Hillebrand, Michel J. X.; Rosing, Hilde; Beijnen, Jos H.

    2002-01-01

    Ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743) is an anticancer agent derived from the Caribbean tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata. In the present article, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ET-743 are described within a phase I study. Forty patients with solid tumors initially received ET-743 as a 1-h i.v.

  14. Synthesis, cytotoxicity, and pro-apoptosis activity of etodolac hydrazide derivatives as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çıkla, Pelin; Özsavcı, Derya; Bingöl-Özakpınar, Özlem; Şener, Azize; Çevik, Özge; Özbaş-Turan, Suna; Akbuğa, Jülide; Şahin, Fikrettin; Küçükgüzel, Ş Güniz

    2013-05-01

    Etodolac hydrazide and a novel series of etodolac hydrazide-hydrazones 3-15 and etodolac 4-thiazolidinones 16-26 were synthesized in this study. The structures of the new compounds were determined by spectral (FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HREI-MS) methods. Some selected compounds were determined at one dose toward the full panel of 60 human cancer cell lines by the National Cancer Institute (NCI, Bethesda, USA). 2-(1,8-Diethyl-1,3,4,9-tetrahydropyrano[3,4-b]indole-1-yl)acetic acid[(4-chlorophenyl)methylene]hydrazide 9 demonstrated the most marked effect on the prostate cancer cell line PC-3, with 58.24% growth inhibition at 10(-5) M (10 µM). Using the MTT colorimetric method, compound 9 was evaluated in vitro against the prostate cell line PC-3 and the rat fibroblast cell line L-929, for cell viability and growth inhibition at different doses. Compound 9 exhibited anticancer activity with an IC(50) value of 54 µM (22.842 µg/mL) against the PC-3 cells and did not display any cytotoxicity toward the L-929 rat fibroblasts, compared to etodolac. In addition, this compound was evaluated for caspase-3 and Bcl-2 activation in the apoptosis pathway, which plays a key role in the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of bile acid amides of [Formula: see text]-cyanostilbenes as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Devesh S; Singh, Rajnish Prakash; Lohitesh, K; Jha, Prabhat N; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Sakhuja, Rajeev

    2017-12-13

    A series of amino-substituted [Formula: see text]-cyanostilbene derivatives and their bile acid (cholic and deoxycholic acid) amides were designed and synthesized. A comparative study on the anticancer and antibacterial activity evaluation on the synthesized analogs was carried against the human osteosarcoma (HOS) cancer cell line, and two gram -ve (E. coli and S. typhi) and two gram [Formula: see text]ve (B. subtilis and S. aureus) bacterial strains. All the cholic acid [Formula: see text]-cyanostilbene amides showed an [Formula: see text] in the range 2-13 [Formula: see text] against human osteosarcoma cells (HOS) with the most active analog (6g) possessing an [Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text]. One of the amino-substituted [Formula: see text]-cyanostilbene, 4e, was found to possess an [Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text]. An increase in the number of cells at the sub-[Formula: see text] phase of the cell was observed in the in vitro cell cycle analysis of two most active compounds in the series (4e, 6g) suggesting a clear indication toward induction of apoptotic cascade. With respect to antibacterial screening, amino-substituted [Formula: see text]-cyanostilbenes were found to be more active than their corresponding bile acid amides. The synthesized compounds were also subjected to in silico study to predict their physiochemical properties and drug-likeness score.

  16. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  17. The Use of 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 as an Anticancer Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Marcinkowska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The notion that vitamin D can influence the incidence of cancer arose from epidemiological studies. The major source of vitamin D in the organism is skin production upon exposure to ultra violet-B. The very first observation of an inverse correlation between exposure of individuals to the sun and the likelihood of cancer was reported as early as 1941. In 1980, Garland and Garland hypothesised, from findings from epidemiological studies of patients in the US with colon cancer, that vitamin D produced in response to sun exposure is protective against cancer as opposed to sunlight per se. Later studies revealed inverse correlations between sun exposure and the occurrence of prostate and breast cancers. These observations prompted laboratory investigation of whether or not vitamin D had an effect on cancer cells. Vitamin D is not active against cancer cells, but the most active metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D has profound biological effects. Here, we review the anticancer action of 1,25D, clinical trials of 1,25D to date and the prospects of the future therapeutic use of new and low calcaemic analogues.

  18. Anti-cancer agents in Saudi Arabian herbals revealed by automated high-content imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjar, Dina

    2017-06-13

    Natural products have been used for medical applications since ancient times. Commonly, natural products are structurally complex chemical compounds that efficiently interact with their biological targets, making them useful drug candidates in cancer therapy. Here, we used cell-based phenotypic profiling and image-based high-content screening to study the mode of action and potential cellular targets of plants historically used in Saudi Arabia\\'s traditional medicine. We compared the cytological profiles of fractions taken from Juniperus phoenicea (Arar), Anastatica hierochuntica (Kaff Maryam), and Citrullus colocynthis (Hanzal) with a set of reference compounds with established modes of action. Cluster analyses of the cytological profiles of the tested compounds suggested that these plants contain possible topoisomerase inhibitors that could be effective in cancer treatment. Using histone H2AX phosphorylation as a marker for DNA damage, we discovered that some of the compounds induced double-strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the active fraction isolated from Juniperus phoenicea revealed possible anti-cancer compounds. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of cell-based phenotypic screening of natural products to reveal their biological activities.

  19. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei A; Vovk, Mykhaylo V; Mel& #x27; nychenko, Nina V; Sukach, Volodymyr A

    2012-10-23

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  20. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Vovk, Mykhaylo V.; Mel' nychenko, Nina V.; Sukach, Volodymyr A.

    2012-08-14

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  1. Recent advances in the development of 1,8-naphthalimide based DNA targeting binders, anticancer and fluorescent cellular imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Swagata; Veale, Emma B; Phelan, Caroline M; Murphy, Samantha A; Tocci, Gillian M; Gillespie, Lisa J; Frimannsson, Daniel O; Kelly, John M; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2013-02-21

    The development of functional 1,8-naphthalimide derivatives as DNA targeting, anticancer and cellular imaging agents is a fast growing area and has resulted in several such derivatives entering into clinical trials. This review gives an overview of the many discoveries and the progression of the use of 1,8-naphthalimides as such agents and their applications to date; focusing mainly on mono-, bis-naphthalimide based structures, and their various derivatives (e.g. amines, polyamine conjugates, heterocyclic, oligonucleotide and peptide based, and those based on metal complexes). Their cytotoxicity, mode of action and cell-selectivity are discussed and compared. The rich photophysical properties of the naphthalimides (which are highly dependent on the nature and the substitution pattern of the aryl ring) make them prime candidates as probes as the changes in spectroscopic properties such as absorption, dichroism, and fluorescence can all be used to monitor their binding to biomolecules. This also makes them useful species for monitoring their uptake and location within cells without the use of co-staining. The photochemical properties of the compounds have also been exploited, for example, for photocleavage of nucleic acids and for the destruction of tumour cells.

  2. New pyrazolopyrimidine inhibitors of protein kinase d as potent anticancer agents for prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuj Tandon

    Full Text Available The emergence of protein kinase D (PKD as a potential therapeutic target for several diseases including cancer has triggered the search for potent, selective, and cell-permeable small molecule inhibitors. In this study, we describe the identification, in vitro characterization, structure-activity analysis, and biological evaluation of a novel PKD inhibitory scaffold exemplified by 1-naphthyl PP1 (1-NA-PP1. 1-NA-PP1 and IKK-16 were identified as pan-PKD inhibitors in a small-scale targeted kinase inhibitor library assay. Both screening hits inhibited PKD isoforms at about 100 nM and were ATP-competitive inhibitors. Analysis of several related kinases indicated that 1-NA-PP1 was highly selective for PKD as compared to IKK-16. SAR analysis showed that 1-NA-PP1 was considerably more potent and showed distinct substituent effects at the pyrazolopyrimidine core. 1-NA-PP1 was cell-active, and potently blocked prostate cancer cell proliferation by inducing G2/M arrest. It also potently blocked the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells, demonstrating promising anticancer activities on multiple fronts. Overexpression of PKD1 or PKD3 almost completely reversed the growth arrest and the inhibition of tumor cell invasion caused by 1-NA-PP1, indicating that its anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities were mediated through the inhibition of PKD. Interestingly, a 12-fold increase in sensitivity to 1-NA-PP1 could be achieved by engineering a gatekeeper mutation in the active site of PKD1, suggesting that 1-NA-PP1 could be paired with the analog-sensitive PKD1(M659G for dissecting PKD-specific functions and signaling pathways in various biological systems.

  3. Development of multimodal imaging strategies for the pharmacology of anticancer agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brulle, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical imaging in oncology is booming. It allows, using representative animal models of human cancers, to understand the mechanisms of development of pathologies and to assess the therapeutic efficiency of a new treatment. The main objective of this work was to develop two ortho-topic models of cancer (pancreas and colon) and to assess on them the reference treatments as well as a new therapeutic strategy by non-thermal plasma so called Plasma Gun. The two cancer models developed showed good representation in relation to human cancers, with the appearance of distant metastases and hypoxia. 5-fluorouracil for the HCT116-luc ortho-topic model of colorectal carcinoma and gemcitabine for the MIA PaCa2-luc pancreatic adenocarcinoma model, have induced discrete effects at low dose which can be detected thanks imaging modalities. After validation of our experimental steps, a new therapeutic strategy, Plasma Gun was evaluated and showed significant effects on tumor growth inhibition. The second objective was to carry out tools for the induction and the characterization of bone metastases and for high resolution imaging of the vasculature. On the one hand, bone metastases obtained by injection of PC3M-luc cells intracardially, was evaluated and quantified with different imaging modalities (bioluminescence, scintigraphy and Computed Tomography). And the other hand, the achievement of a high resolution imaging of vascularization, was possible by the casting method that restores the 3D structure of the vascular architecture following injection of a resin in the circulation. Developments makes during this thesis are new tools for preclinical evaluation of novel anticancer therapies. (author) [fr

  4. Bioimaging of isosteric osmium and ruthenium anticancer agents by LA-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Matthias H M; Theiner, Sarah; Kornauth, Christoph; Meier-Menches, Samuel M; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Koellensperger, Gunda; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2018-03-01

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to study the spatial distribution of two metallodrugs with anticancer activities in vivo, namely the organoruthenium plecstatin-1 (1) and its isosteric osmium analogue (2), in liver, kidneys, muscles and tumours of treated mice bearing a CT-26 tumour after single-dose i.p. administration. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the spatial distribution of an osmium drug candidate has been investigated using LA-ICP-MS in tissues. Independent measurements of the average ruthenium and osmium concentration via microwave digestion and ICP-MS in organs and tumours were in good agreement with the LA-ICP-MS results. Matrix-matched standards (MMS) ranging from 1 to 30 μg g -1 were prepared to quantify the spatial distributions of the metals and the average metal content of the MMS samples was additionally quantified by ICP-MS after microwave digestion. The recoveries for osmium and ruthenium in the MMS were 105% and 101% on average, respectively, validating the sample preparation procedure of the MMS. Preparation of MMS was carried out under an argon atmosphere to prevent oxidation of osmium-species to the volatile OsO 4 . The highest metal concentrations were found in the liver, followed by kidney, lung and tumour tissues, while muscles displayed only very low quantities of the respective metal. Both metallodrugs accumulated in the cortex of the kidneys more strongly compared to the medulla. Interestingly, osmium from 2 was largely located at the periphery and tissue edges, whereas ruthenium from 1 was observed to penetrate deeper into the organs and tumours.

  5. Immune cell-based screening assay for response to anticancer agents: applications in pharmacogenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frick A

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amber Frick,1 Yuri Fedoriw,2 Kristy Richards,3,4 Blossom Damania,3,5 Bethany Parks,6 Oscar Suzuki,1 Cristina S Benton,1 Emmanuel Chan,1 Russell S Thomas,7 Tim Wiltshire1,3 1Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, School of Medicine, 3Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, 4Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, 5Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 6The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 7Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Background: Interpatient variability in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely due to complex genetic differences and is difficult to ascertain in humans. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at examining interstrain differences in viability on normal, noncancerous immune cells following chemotherapeutic cytotoxic insult. Drug effects were investigated by comparing selective chemotherapeutic agents, such as BEZ-235 and selumetinib, against conventional cytotoxic agents targeting multiple pathways, including doxorubicin and idarubicin. Methods: Splenocytes were isolated from 36 isogenic strains of mice using standard procedures. Of note, the splenocytes were not stimulated to avoid attributing responses to pathways involved with cellular stimulation rather than toxicity. Cells were incubated with compounds on a nine-point logarithmic dosing scale ranging from 15 nM to 100 µM (37°C, 5% CO2. At 4 hours posttreatment, cells were labeled with antibodies and physiological indicator dyes and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. Cellular phenotypes (eg, viability were collected and analyzed using flow cytometry. Dose-response curves with response normalized to the zero dose as a function of log concentration

  6. A General Synthetic Procedure for 2-chloromethyl-4(3H-quinazolinone Derivatives and Their Utilization in the Preparation of Novel Anticancer Agents with 4-Anilinoquinazoline Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lan Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In our ongoing research on novel anticancer agents with 4-anilinoquinazoline scaffolds, a series of novel 2-chloromethyl-4(3H-quinazolinones were needed as key intermediates. An improved one-step synthesis of 2-chloromethyl-4(3H-quinazolinones utilizing o-anthranilic acids as starting materials was described. Based on it, 2-hydroxy-methyl-4(3H-quinazolinones were conveniently prepared in one pot. Moreover, two novel 4-anilinoquinazoline derivatives substituted with chloromethyl groups at the 2-position were synthesized and showed promising anticancer activity in vitro.

  7. Mitochondrial complex II, a novel target for anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klučková, Katarína; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1827, č. 5 (2013), s. 552-564 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1937; GA ČR GAP301/12/1851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrion * Complex II * Anti- cancer agent Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2013

  8. The Optimum Irradiation Dose in Preservation of Mahkota Dewa (Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff) Boerl.) As Anticancer Agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendig Winarno; Ermin Katrin W; Wisnurahadi; Swasono R Tamat

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to obtain the optimum irradiation dose, in order to preserve and protect the damage of anticancer compounds in mahkota dewa bark. The specimens of mahkota dewa bark were irradiated using 60 Co at the variation doses of 0; 5; 7,5 ; 10; 15; and 20 kGy, respectively at the dose rate of 10 kGy/h. The irradiated and control samples were macerated in n-hexane and ethyl acetate, respectively, then the ethyl acetate extract was then fractionated using chromatography column to obtain 8 fractions. The examination of irradiated and control samples of mahkota dewa bark against microbe contaminants showed that irradiation at doses ≥5 kGy could inhibit the growth of bacteria, mold and yeast and destroyed them. The cytotoxicity test of irradiated ethyl acetate extract of mahkota dewa bark against leukemia L1210 cell showed that irradiation at the dose up to 20 kGy can decreased cytotoxic activities performance, however these IC 50 values lower than 50 μg/ml, which is the cytotoxic activity threshold for extract. The cytotoxic activity test of fraction 6, the most active fraction in mahkota dewa bark, showed that irradiation at the dose up to 20 kGy can also decreased the cytotoxic activities performance, however these IC 50 values was lower than 20 μg/ml, which is the cytotoxic activity threshold for fraction. Analysis of 2,4’-dihydroxy-4 methoxy benzophenone-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in fraction 6 of irradiated samples showed that the concentration of this compound in irradiated samples significantly decreased, compared to the control sample. Decreasing the concentration of 2,4’-dihydroxy-4 methoxy benzophenone-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside was not comparable to the cytotoxic activity of ethyl acetate extract or fraction 6, therefore this compound can not be used as marker of irradiation effect on decreasing the cytotoxic activity of the mahkota dewa bark. Irradiation at doses of 5 up to 20 k

  9. In vitro assessment of a computer-designed potential anticancer agent in cervical cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Helen Visagie

    cost effective and time consuming. This study evaluated the anticancer potential of ESE-15-ol, an in silico-designed compound in vitro. Research demonstrated that ESE-15-ol exerts antiproliferative activity accompanied with apoptosis induction at a nanomolar concentration compared to the micromolar range required by 2ME2. This study is the first study to demonstrate the influence of ESE-15-ol on morphology, cell cycle progression and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells. In silico-design by means of receptor- and ligand molecular modeling is thus effective in improving compound bioavailability while preserving apoptotic activity in vitro.

  10. The thioredoxin system mediates redox-induced cell death in human colon cancer cells: implications for the mechanism of action of anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Rigas, Basil

    2008-10-15

    Anticancer agents act, at least in part, by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). We examined the redox effect on SW480 and HT-29 colon cancer cells of four anticancer compounds, arsenic trioxide, phosphoaspirin, phosphosulindac, and nitric oxide-donating aspirin (NO-ASA). All compounds inhibited the growth of both cell lines (IC(50), 10-90 micromol/L) and induced RONS detected by a general RONS molecular probe. NO-ASA, which induced at least four individual RONS (NO, H(2)O(2), superoxide anion, and peroxynitirte), induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death that was RONS-mediated (cell death paralleled RONS levels and was abrogated by N-acetyl cysteine but not by diphenylene iodonium, which displayed prooxidant activity and enhanced cell death). Nuclear factor-kappaB and mitogen-activated protein kinases were modulated by RONS. Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1), an oxidoreductase involved in redox regulation, was heavily oxidized in response to RONS and mediated the growth inhibitory effect of the anticancer agents; knocking-down trx-1 expression by small interfering RNA abrogated cell death induced by them. These compounds also inhibited the activity of Trx reductase that reduces oxidized Trx-1, whereas the Trx reductase inhibitor aurothiomalate synergized with NO-ASA in the induction of cell death. Our findings indicate that the Trx system mediates to a large extent redox-induced cell death in response to anticancer agents. This mechanism of action may be shared by more anticancer agents and deserves further assessment as a candidate mechanism for the pharmacologic control of cancer.

  11. Molecular predictors of therapeutic response to specific anti-cancer agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Heiser, Laura M.; Gibb, William J.; Kuo, Wen-lin; Wang, Nicholas J.

    2016-11-29

    Herein is described the use of a collection of 50 breast cancer cell lines to match responses to 77 conventional and experimental therapeutic agents with transcriptional, proteomic and genomic subtypes found in primary tumors. Almost all compounds produced strong differential responses across the cell lines produced responses that were associated with transcriptional and proteomic subtypes and produced responses that were associated with recurrent genome copy number abnormalities. These associations can now be incorporated into clinical trials that test subtype markers and clinical responses simultaneously.

  12. Retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504): a novel heat shock protein inhibitor as an anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Britt Erika; Vesole, David H

    2009-09-01

    Heat shock proteins are vital to cell survival under conditions of stress. They bind client proteins to assist in protein stabilization, translocation of polypeptides across cell membranes and recovery of proteins from aggregates. Heat shock protein inhibitors are a diverse group of novel agents that have been demonstrated to have pro-apoptotic effects on malignant cells through inhibition of ATP binding on the ATP/ADP-binding pocket of the heat shock protein. Initial development of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, were limited by hepatotoxicity and the need for solvent carrying agents. In contrast, retaspimycin, or IPI-504, a derivative of geldanamycin and 17-AAG, is highly soluble in water and generally well tolerated. In Phase I/II trials, retaspimycin has shown activity in NSCLC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The most promising activity was observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Phase I/II trials are currently underway to evaluate the dosing schedules and activity of IPI-504 in breast cancer. Given the in vitro activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, melanoma, leukemia and pancreatic cancer, current and future trials are of clinical interest. This article reviews IPI-504 and its utility in a wide variety of cancer phenotypes.

  13. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical trials as anti-cancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrillo Richard L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Histone deacetylases (HDACs can regulate expression of tumor suppressor genes and activities of transcriptional factors involved in both cancer initiation and progression through alteration of either DNA or the structural components of chromatin. Recently, the role of gene repression through modulation such as acetylation in cancer patients has been clinically validated with several inhibitors of HDACs. One of the HDAC inhibitors, vorinostat, has been approved by FDA for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL for patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies. Other inhibitors, for example, FK228, PXD101, PCI-24781, ITF2357, MGCD0103, MS-275, valproic acid and LBH589 have also demonstrated therapeutic potential as monotherapy or combination with other anti-tumor drugs in CTCL and other malignancies. At least 80 clinical trials are underway, testing more than eleven different HDAC inhibitory agents including both hematological and solid malignancies. This review focuses on recent development in clinical trials testing HDAC inhibitors as anti-tumor agents.

  14. A high-throughput quantitative expression analysis of cancer-related genes in human HepG2 cells in response to limonene, a potential anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafidh, Rand R; Hussein, Saba Z; MalAllah, Mohammed Q; Abdulamir, Ahmed S; Abu Bakar, Fatimah

    2017-11-14

    Citrus bioactive compounds, as active anticancer agent, have been under focus by several studies worldwide. However, the underlying genes responsible for the anticancer potential have not been sufficiently highlighted. The current study investigated the gene expression profile of hepatocellular carcinoma, HepG2, cells after treatment with Limonene. The concentration that killed 50% of HepG2 cells was used to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of limonene anticancer activity. The apoptotic induction was detected by flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence microscope. Two of pro-apoptotic events, caspase-3 activation and phosphatidylserine translocation were manifested by confocal fluorescence microscopy. High-throughput real-time PCR was used to profile 1023 cancer-related genes in 16 different gene families related to the cancer development. In comparison to untreated cells, limonene increased the percentage of apoptotic cells up to 89.61%, by flow cytometry, and 48.2% by fluorescence microscopy. There was a significant limonene-driven differential gene expression of HepG2 cells in 15 different gene families. Limonene was shown to significantly (>2log) up-regulate and down-regulate 14 and 59 genes, respectively. The affected gene families, from most to least affected, were apoptosis induction, signal transduction, cancer genes augmentation, alteration in kinases expression, inflammation, DNA damage repair, and cell cycle proteins. The current study reveals that limonene could be a promising, cheap, and effective anticancer compound. The broad spectrum of limonene anticancer activity is interesting for anticancer drug development. Further research is needed to confirm the current findings and to examine the anticancer potential of limonene along with underlying mechanisms on different cell lines. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. One-pot synthesis and biological evaluation of N-(aminosulfonyl)-4-podophyllotoxin carbamates as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Hui; Guan, Xiao-Wen; Feng, Shi-Liang; Ma, You-Zhen; Chen, Shi-Wu; Hui, Ling

    2017-07-01

    A series of N-(aminosulfonyl)-4-podophyllotoxin carbamates were synthesized via the Burgess-type intermediate, and their antiproliferative activities were evaluated. Most of them possessed more potent cytotoxic effects against four human tumor cell lines (HeLa, A-549, HCT-8 and HepG2) and less toxic to normal human fetal lung fibroblast WI-38 cells than etoposide. In particular, N-(morpholinosulfonyl)-4-podophyllotoxin carbamate (9) exhibited the most potent activity towards these four tumor cells with IC 50 values in the range of 0.5-16.5μM. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis revealed that 9 induced cell apoptosis by up-regulating the expression of p53 and ROS. Meanwhile, 9 effectively inhibited tubulin polymerization and microtubule assembly at cellular levels in HeLa cells. In addition, 9 could induce cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase in HeLa cells by up-regulating levels of cyclinB1 and cdc2 and decreasing the expression of p-cdc2. These results indicated that 9 had potential for further development as anticancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New Substituted Diquinolinyl-Pyridine Ligands as Anticancer Agents by Targeting G-Quadruplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rabindra Nath; Chevret, Edith; Desplat, Vanessa; Rubio, Sandra; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Guillon, Jean

    2017-12-30

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are stacked non-canonical nucleic acid structures found in specific G-rich DNA or RNA sequences in the human genome. G4 structures are liable for various biological functions; transcription, translation, cell aging as well as diseases such as cancer. These structures are therefore considered as important targets for the development of anticancer agents. Small organic heterocyclic molecules are well known to target and stabilize G4 structures. In this article, we have designed and synthesized 2,6-di-(4-carbamoyl-2-quinolyl)pyridine derivatives and their ability to stabilize G4-structures have been determined through the FRET melting assay. It has been established that these ligands are selective for G4 over duplexes and show a preference for the parallel conformation. Next, telomerase inhibition ability has been assessed using three cell lines (K562, MyLa and MV-4-11) and telomerase activity is no longer detected at 0.1 μM concentration for the most potent ligand 1c . The most promising G4 ligands were also tested for antiproliferative activity against the two human myeloid leukaemia cell lines, HL60 and K562.

  17. Rollover Cyclometalated Bipyridine Platinum Complexes as Potent Anticancer Agents: Impact of the Ancillary Ligands on the Mode of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babak, Maria V; Pfaffeneder-Kmen, Martin; Meier-Menches, Samuel M; Legina, Maria S; Theiner, Sarah; Licona, Cynthia; Orvain, Christophe; Hejl, Michaela; Hanif, Muhammad; Jakupec, Michael A; Keppler, Bernhard K; Gaiddon, Christian; Hartinger, Christian G

    2018-03-05

    Platinum-based anticancer coordination compounds are widely used in the treatment of many tumor types, where they are very effective but also cause severe side effects. Organoplatinum compounds are significantly less investigated than the analogous coordination compounds. We report here rollover cyclometalated Pt compounds based on 2,2'-bipyridine which are demonstrated to be potent antitumor agents both in vitro and in vivo. Variation of the co-ligands on the Pt(2,2'-bipyridine) backbone resulted in the establishment of structure-activity relationships. They showed that the biological activity was in general inversely correlated with the reaction kinetics to biomolecules as shown for amino acids, proteins, and DNA. The less stable compounds caused higher reactivity with biomolecules and were shown to induce p53-dependent DNA damage. In contrast, the presence of bulky PTA and PPh 3 ligands was demonstrated to cause lower reactivity and increased antineoplastic activity. Such compounds were devoid of DNA-damaging activity and induced ATF4, a component of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. The lead complex inhibited tumor growth similar to oxaliplatin while showing no signs of toxicity in test mice. Therefore, we demonstrated that it is possible to fine-tune rollover-cyclometalated Pt(II) compounds to target different cancer pathways and be a means to overcome the side effects associated with cisplatin and analogous compounds in cancer chemotherapy.

  18. Psoralea glandulosa as a Potential Source of Anticancer Agents for Melanoma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Madrid

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of identifying novel agents with antigrowth and pro-apoptotic activity on melanoma cancer, the present study was undertaken to investigate the biological activity of the resinous exudate of aerial parts from Psoralea glandulosa, and its active components (bakuchiol (1, 3-hydroxy-bakuchiol (2 and 12-hydroxy-iso-bakuchiol (3 against melanoma cells (A2058. In addition, the effect in cancer cells of bakuchiol acetate (4, a semi-synthetic derivative of bakuchiol, was examined. The results obtained show that the resinous exudate inhibited the growth of cancer cells with IC50 value of 10.5 μg/mL after 48 h of treatment, while, for pure compounds, the most active was the semi-synthetic compound 4. Our data also demonstrate that resin is able to induce apoptotic cell death, which could be related to an overall action of the meroterpenes present. In addition, our data seem to indicate that the apoptosis correlated to the tested products appears, at least in part, to be associated with an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS production. In summary, our study provides the first evidence that P. glandulosa may be considered a source of useful molecules in the development of analogues with more potent efficacy against melanoma cells.

  19. DNA interaction studies of new nano metal based anticancer agent: validation by spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Chandra Sharma, Girish; Arjmand, Farukh [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Azam, Ameer, E-mail: tsartaj62@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, UP (India)

    2010-05-14

    A new nano dimensional heterobimetallic Cu-Sn containing complex as a potential drug candidate was designed, synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance parameters of the complex revealed that the Cu(II) ion exhibits a square pyramidal geometry with the two pyrazole nitrogen atoms, the amine nitrogen atom and the carboxylate oxygen of the phenyl glycine chloride ligand located at the equatorial sites and the coordinated chloride ion occupying an apical position. {sup 119}Sn NMR spectral data showed a hexa-coordinated environment around the Sn(IV) metal ion. TEM, AFM and XRD measurements illustrate that the complex could induce the condensation of CT-DNA to a particulate nanostructure. The interaction of the Cu-Sn complex with CT-DNA was investigated by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, as well as cyclic voltammetric measurements. The results indicated that the complex interacts with DNA through an electrostatic mode of binding with an intrinsic binding constant K{sub b} = 8.42 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. The Cu-Sn complex exhibits effective cleavage of pBR322 plasmid DNA by an oxidative cleavage mechanism, monitored at different concentrations both in the absence and in the presence of reducing agents.

  20. Psoralea glandulosa as a Potential Source of Anticancer Agents for Melanoma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Alejandro; Cardile, Venera; González, César; Montenegro, Ivan; Villena, Joan; Caggia, Silvia; Graziano, Adriana; Russo, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of identifying novel agents with antigrowth and pro-apoptotic activity on melanoma cancer, the present study was undertaken to investigate the biological activity of the resinous exudate of aerial parts from Psoralea glandulosa, and its active components (bakuchiol (1), 3-hydroxy-bakuchiol (2) and 12-hydroxy-iso-bakuchiol (3)) against melanoma cells (A2058). In addition, the effect in cancer cells of bakuchiol acetate (4), a semi-synthetic derivative of bakuchiol, was examined. The results obtained show that the resinous exudate inhibited the growth of cancer cells with IC50 value of 10.5 μg/mL after 48 h of treatment, while, for pure compounds, the most active was the semi-synthetic compound 4. Our data also demonstrate that resin is able to induce apoptotic cell death, which could be related to an overall action of the meroterpenes present. In addition, our data seem to indicate that the apoptosis correlated to the tested products appears, at least in part, to be associated with an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In summary, our study provides the first evidence that P. glandulosa may be considered a source of useful molecules in the development of analogues with more potent efficacy against melanoma cells. PMID:25860949

  1. Platinum anticancer agents and antidepressants: desipramine enhances platinum-based cytotoxicity in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Engelmann, Brigitte J; Pullen, Nicholas; Stewart, Jennifer K; Ryan, John J; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2012-01-01

    A unique synergistic effect on platinum drug cytotoxicity is noted in the presence of the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine is used for treating neuropathic pain, particularly in prostate cancer patients. The clinically used drugs cisplatin (cis-[PtCl(2)(NH(3))(2)]), oxaliplatin [1,2-diaminocyclohexaneoxalatoplatinum(II)], and the cationic trinuclear agent BBR3464 [{trans-PtCl(NH(3))(2)}(2)-μ-(trans-Pt(NH(3))(2)(H(2)N(CH(2))(6)NH(2))(2))](4+), which has undergone evaluation in phase II clinical trials for activity in lung and ovarian cancers, were evaluated. Surprisingly, desipramine greatly augments the cytotoxicity of all the platinum-based chemotherapeutics in HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Desipramine enhanced cellular accumulation of cisplatin, but had no effect on the accumulation of oxaliplatin or BBR3464, suggesting that enhanced accumulation could not be a consistent means by which desipramine altered the platinum-drug-mediated cytotoxicity. The desipramine/cisplatin combination resulted in increased levels of p53 as well as mitochondrial damage, caspase activation, and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase cleavage, suggesting that desipramine may synergize with cisplatin more than with other platinum chemotherapeutics partly by activating distinct apoptotic pathways. The study argues that desipramine may be a means of enhancing chemoresponsiveness of platinum drugs and the results warrant further investigation. The results emphasize the importance of understanding the differential pharmacological action of adjuvants employed in combinations with cancer chemotherapeutics. © SBIC 2011

  2. Bacterial biosynthesis and maturation of the didemnin anti-cancer agents

    KAUST Repository

    Xü, Ying

    2012-05-23

    The anti-neoplastic agent didemnin B from the Caribbean tunicate Trididemnum solidum was the first marine drug to be clinically tested in humans. Because of its limited supply and its complex cyclic depsipeptide structure, considerable challenges were encountered during didemnin B\\'s development that continue to limit aplidine (dehydrodidemnin B), which is currently being evaluated in numerous clinical trials. Herein we show that the didemnins are bacterial products produced by the marine α-proteobacteria Tistrella mobilis and Tistrella bauzanensis via a unique post-assembly line maturation process. Complete genome sequence analysis of the 6,513,401 bp T. mobilis strain KA081020-065 with its five circular replicons revealed the putative didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster (did) on the 1,126,962 bp megaplasmid pTM3. The did locus encodes a 13-module hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase enzyme complex organized in a collinear arrangement for the synthesis of the fatty acylglutamine ester derivatives didemnins X and Y rather than didemnin B as first anticipated. Imaging mass spectrometry of T. mobilis bacterial colonies captured the time-dependent extracellular conversion of the didemnin X and Y precursors to didemnin B, in support of an unusual post-synthetase activation mechanism. Significantly, the discovery of the didemnin biosynthetic gene cluster may provide a long-term solution to the supply problem that presently hinders this group of marine natural products and pave the way for the genetic engineering of new didemnin congeners. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Synthesis of Triazole Derivatives of Levoglucosenone As Promising Anticancer Agents: Effective Exploration of the Chemical Space through retro-aza-Michael//aza-Michael Isomerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Borini Etichetti, Carla M; Di Benedetto, Carolina; Girardini, Javier E; Martins, Felipe Terra; Spanevello, Rolando A; Suárez, Alejandra G; Sarotti, Ariel M

    2018-03-08

    The design and synthesis of biomass-derived triazoles and the in vitro evaluation as potential anticancer agents are described. The discovery of base-catalyzed retro-aza-Michael//aza-Michael isomerizations allowed the exploration of the chemical space by affording novel types of triazoles, difficult to obtain otherwise. Following this strategy, 2,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles could be efficiently obtained from the corresponding 1,4-disubstituted analogues.

  4. First report of anti-cancer agent, lapachol producing endophyte, Aspergillus niger of Tabebuia argentea and its in vitro cytotoxicity assays

    OpenAIRE

    Channabasava; Melappa Govindappa

    2014-01-01

    All parts of Tabebuia argentia were used for isolation and identified the lapachol producing endophytes were used for evaluation of in vitro cytotoxicity (antimitotic, antiproliferative, determination of cell viability, DNA fragmentation). Five endophytes (leaf endophytes, Alternaria alternata, Alternaria sp., Aspegerillus niger, Penicillium sp. and the bark endophyte, A. alternata) are able to produce potent anticancer agent lapachol. The 3rd and 4th fractions of endophytic extracts (A. nige...

  5. Evaluation of SD-208, a TGF-β-RI Kinase Inhibitor, as an Anticancer Agent in Retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puran Fadakar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children resulting from genetic alterations and transformation of mature retinal cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of SD-208, TGF-β-RI kinase inhibitor, on the expression of some miRNAs including a miR-17/92 cluster in retinoblastoma cells. Prior to initiate this work, the cell proliferation was studied by Methyl Thiazolyl Tetrazolium (MTT and bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU assays. Then, the expression patterns of four miRNAs (18a, 20a, 22, and 34a were investigated in the treated SD-208 (0.0, 1, 2 and 3 µM and untreated Y-79 cells. A remarkable inhibition of the cell proliferation was found in Y-79 cells treated with SD-208 versus untreated cells. Also, the expression changes were observed in miRNAs 18a, 20a, 22 and 34a in response to SD-208 treatment (P<0.05. The findings of the present study suggest that the anti-cancer effect of SD-208 may be exerted due to the regulation of specific miRNAs, at least in this particular retinoblastoma cell line. To the best of the researchers’ knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the SD-208 could alter the expression of tumor suppressive miRNAs as well as oncomiRs in vitro. In conclusion, the present data suggest that SD-208 could be an alternative agent in retinoblastoma treatment.

  6. Comparison of the crystal structures of the potent anticancer and anti-angiogenic agent regorafenib and its monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng Ying; Wu, Su Xiang; Zhou, Xin Bo; Gu, Jian Ming; Hu, Xiu Rong

    2016-04-01

    Regorafenib {systematic name: 4-[4-({[4-chloro-3-(trifluoromethy)phenyl]carbamoyl}amino)-3-fluorophenoxy]-1-methylpyridine-2-carboxamide}, C21H15ClF4N4O3, is a potent anticancer and anti-angiogenic agent that possesses various activities on the VEGFR, PDGFR, raf and/or flt-3 kinase signaling molecules. The compound has been crystallized as polymorphic form I and as the monohydrate, C21H15ClF4N4O3·H2O. The regorafenib molecule consists of biarylurea and pyridine-2-carboxamide units linked by an ether group. A comparison of both forms shows that they differ in the relative orientation of the biarylurea and pyridine-2-carboxamide units, due to different rotations around the ether group, as measured by the C-O-C bond angles [119.5 (3)° in regorafenib and 116.10 (15)° in the monohydrate]. Meanwhile, the conformational differences are reflected in different hydrogen-bond networks. Polymorphic form I contains two intermolecular N-H...O hydrogen bonds, which link the regorafenib molecules into an infinite molecular chain along the b axis. In the monohydrate, the presence of the solvent water molecule results in more abundant hydrogen bonds. The water molecules act as donors and acceptors, forming N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen-bond interactions. Thus, R4(2)(28) ring motifs are formed, which are fused to form continuous spiral ring motifs along the a axis. The (trifluoromethyl)phenyl rings protrude on the outside of these motifs and interdigitate with those of adjacent ring motifs, thereby forming columns populated by halogen atoms.

  7. Preparation, characterization and in vitro release kinetics of polyaspartamide-based conjugates containing antimalarial and anticancer agents for combination therapy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Aderibigbe, BA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is treated by combination of two drugs in order to overcome drug resistance. Antimalarials have been found to be more effective by combining them with low doses of anticancer drugs. Polymer-drug conjugates containing aminoquinoline...

  8. A Mn(II) complex of boradiazaindacene (BODIPY) loaded graphene oxide as both LED light and H2O2 enhanced anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Lei; Shao, Jian; Chen, Qiu-Yun; Li, Cheng-Hao; Kong, Meng-Yun; Fang, Fang; Ji, Ling; Boison, Daniel; Huang, Tao; Gao, Jing; Feng, Chang-Jian

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cells are more susceptible to H2O2 induced cell death than normal cells. H2O2-activatable and O2-evolving nanoparticles could be used as photodynamic therapy agents in hypoxic environments. In this report, a photo-active Mn(II) complex of boradiazaindacene derivatives (Mn1) was used as a dioxygen generator under irradiation with LED light in water. Moreover, the in vitro biological evaluation for Mn1 and its loaded graphene oxide (herein called Mn1@GO) on HepG-2 cells in normal and hypoxic conditions has been performed. In particular, Mn1@GO can react with H2O2 resulting active anticancer species, which show high inhibition on both HepG-2 cells and CoCl2-treated HepG-2 cells (hypoxic cancer cells). The mechanism of LED light enhanced anticancer activity for Mn1@GO on HepG-2 cells was discussed. Our results show that Mn(II) complexes of boradiazaindacene (BODIPY) derivatives loaded GO can be both LED light and H2O2-activated anticancer agents in hypoxic environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential cytotoxic pathways of topoisomerase I and II anticancer agents after overexpression of the E2F-1/DP-1 transcription factor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofland, K; Petersen, B O; Falck, J

    2000-01-01

    and drug sensitivity in detail, we established human osteosarcoma U-20S-TA cells expressing full-length E2F-1/ DP-1 under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter, designated UE1DP-1 cells. Topoisomerase I levels and activity as well as the number of camptothecin-induced DNA single- and double...... of an E2F-1/ DP-1-induced post-DNA damage pathway rather than an increase in the number of replication forks caused by the S-phase initiation. In contrast, topoisomerase IIalpha levels (but not topoisomerase IIbeta levels), together with topoisomerase IIalpha promoter activity, increased 2--3-fold in UE1......-targeted anticancer drugs. However, the mechanism by which this occurs appears to be qualitatively different. The UE1DP-1 cell model may be used to elucidate post-DNA damage mechanisms of cell death induced by topoisomerase I-directed anticancer agents....

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs as anti-cancer and anti-microbial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Sayed; Nam, Young-Joo; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, a series of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs were synthesized and then evaluated in terms of their cytotoxic activities against four human cancer cell lines, e.g. lung cancer (A549), ovarian cancer (SK-OV-3), skin cancer (SK-MEL-2), and colon cancer (HCT15), as well as anti-microbial activities against three microbes, e.g. Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, and Aspergillus niger. The title compounds were synthesized by Knoevenagel condensation reaction of benzyl cyanide or p-nitrobenzyl cyanide with substituted benzaldehydes in good yields. Most of the compounds exhibited significant suppressive activities against the growth of all cancer cell lines. Compound 3c was most active in inhibiting the growth of A549, SK-OV-3, SK-MEL-2, and HCT15 cells lines with IC50 values of 0.57, 0.14, 0.65, and 0.34 mg/mL, respectively, followed by compounds 3f, 3i, and 3h. Compound 3c exhibited 2.4 times greater cytotoxic activity against HCT15 cells, whereas it showed similar potency against SK-OV-3 cells to that of the standard anti-cancer agent doxorubicin. Structure-activity relationship study revealed that electron-donating groups at the para-position of phenyl ring B were more favorable for improved cytotoxic activity, whereas the presence of electron-withdrawing groups was unfavorable compare to unsubstituted acrylonitrile. An optimal electron density on phenyl ring A of (Z)-2,3-diphenylacrylonitrile analogs was crucial for their cytotoxic activities against human cancer cell lines used in the present study. Qualitative structure-cytotoxic activity relationships were studied using physicochemical parameters; a good correlation between calculated polar surface area (PSA), a lipophobic parameter, and cytotoxic activity was found. Moreover, all compounds showed significant anti-bacterial activities against S. typhi, whereas compound 3k showed potent inhibition against both S. aureus and S. typhi bacterial strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  11. Design, synthesis and molecular modeling studies of novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives as potential anti-cancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Vivek; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A series of novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives 4a-x have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for potential anti-cancer activity. The anti-cancer activity of synthesized compounds 4a-x were evaluated against selected human cancer cell line of breast (MCF-7) using sulforhodamine B (SRB) method. Among the synthesized compounds, 4x having 2-cyano phenyl group showed significant cytotoxic activity which is comparable to that of adriamycin as standard anti-cancer drug. The SAR study revealed that the substituted phenyl group on oxadiazole ring attached to thiazolidine-2,4-dione moiety showed significant growth inhibitory activity against MCF-7 cell line. The result of molecular modeling studies showed that compounds 4f, 4o and 4x having similar structural alignment as crystal ligand of protein.

  12. Post-marketing research and its outcome for novel anticancer agents approved by both the FDA and EMA between 2005 and 2010: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitoun, Jean-David; Baron, Gabriel; Vivot, Alexandre; Atal, Ignacio; Downing, Nicholas S; Ross, Joseph S; Ravaud, Philippe

    2018-01-15

    Post-marketing research in oncology has rarely been described. We aimed to characterize post-marketing trials for a consistent set of anticancer agents over a long period. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of post-marketing trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov through September 2014 for novel anticancer agents approved by both the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency between 2005 and 2010. All relevant post-marketing trials were classified according to indication, primary outcome, starting date, sponsors, and planned enrollment. Supplemental indications were retrieved from regulatory documents and publication rate was assessed by two different methods. Ten novel anticancer agents were eligible: five were indicated for hematologic malignancies and the remaining five for solid cancers (three for kidney cancer). We identified 2,345 post-marketing trials; 1,362 (58.1%) targeted an indication other than the originally approved one. We observed extreme variations among drugs in both number of post-marketing trials (range 8-530) and overall population to be enrolled per trial (1-8,381). Post-marketing trials assessed almost all types of cancers, the three most frequently studied cancers being leukemia, kidney cancer and myeloma. In all, 6.6% of post-marketing trials had a clinical endpoint as a primary outcome, and 35.9% and 54.1% had a safety or surrogate endpoint, respectively, as a primary outcome. Nine drugs obtained approval for supplemental indications. The publication rate at 10 years was 12.3 to 26.1% depending on the analysis method. In conclusion, we found that post-marketing research in oncology is highly heterogeneous and the publication rate of launched trials is low. © 2017 UICC.

  13. Anti-cancer agents based on 4-(hetero)Ary1-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl Amino derivatives and a method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A.; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-29

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. ##STR00001## In particular, the invention relates N-substituted derivatives of 4-(hetero)aryl-1,2,5-oxadiazol-3-yl amines having the structural Formula (I) and (II), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. Meaning of R1 and R2 in the Formula (I) and (II) are defined in claim 1. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  14. N-Phenyl-2-p-tolylthiazole-4-carboxamide derivatives: Syn-thesis and cytotoxicity evaluation as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohammadi-Farani

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: A new series of phenylthiazole derivatives were synthesized and their anticancer activity was assessed against cancerous cell lines. More structural modifications and derivatization is necessary to achieve to the more potent compounds.       

  15. Vitamin E analogs, a novel group of "mitocans," as anticancer agents: The importance of being redox-silent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Tomasetti, M.; Zhao, Y.; Dong, L.F.; Birringer, M.; Wang, X. F.; Low, P.; Wu, K.; Salvatore, B.A.; Ralph, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 5 (2007), s. 1185-1199 ISSN 0026-895X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : vitamin E analogs * redox-silence * anticancer drugs Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.622, year: 2007

  16. Liquid Chromatography - Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry : The gold standard for quantitative bioanalysis of anti-cancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vainchtein, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand the pharmacologic mechanisms of action, efficacy and toxicity of any anti-cancer drug it is important to know how the compound is transformed in the body: either into active metabolites or inactive and toxic (degradation) products. This information may lead to the success or failure of

  17. Inhibitory effects of sizofiran on anticancer agent- or X-ray-induced sister chromatid exchanges and mitotic block in murine bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhi-Bo; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Arika, Tadashi; Hosokawa, Masuo.

    1993-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of a biological response modifier (RRM), sizofiran, on sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in the bone marrow cells of mice treated with various anticancer agents or irradiation were investigated. Sizofiran (10 mg/kg i.m.) inhibited SCEs induced by mitomycin C (2 mg/kg i.v.), adriamycin (20 mg/kg i.v.) and cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg i.v.) by about 20%, respectively. Analysis of the SCEs in vivo after irradiation plus sizofiran indicated that SCE levels were significantly lower than those observed in mice exposed to irradiation without sizofiran. Moreover, the effects of sizofiran were dependent on the timing of administration. Our results indicated that sizofiran should be administered simultaneously or soon after irradiation in order to minimize damage. Sizofiran also markedly restored the bone marrow cell mitosis which had been suppressed by anticancer agents, and this action was closely correlated with the prevention of increase in SCEs. These results indicate that in addition to immunopotentiating activity, sizofiran may play a role in preventing chromosomal damage induced by cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  18. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media.

  19. Di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), an anticancer agent, exerts an anti-inflammatory effect in activated human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sun-Young; Han, Na-Ra; Yoon, Kyoung Wan; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2017-10-01

    Inflammation has been closely associated with the development and progression of cancer. Previously, we reported that mast cells play a critical role in tumor growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of an anticancer agent, di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), on an activated human mast cell line, in this case HMC-1 cells. We evaluated the effect and specific molecular mechanism of Dp44mT on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI) using HMC-1 cells. Here, we demonstrated that Dp44mT significantly decreased the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor without exposing activated HMC-1 cells to any cytotoxicity. In activated mast cells, Dp44mT mitigated the strong production and mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, in this case, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin, through a blockade of caspase-1 and nuclear factor-κB activities. Furthermore, phosphorylations of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family included in inflammatory signaling cascades were significantly inhibited by a Dp44mT treatment. Overall, our results indicate that the anticancer agent Dp44mT has an anti-inflammatory effect and may be of therapeutic importance for the treatment of mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  20. Oxidative Stress Mediates through Apoptosis the Anticancer Effect of Phospho-Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: Implications for the Role of Oxidative Stress in the Action of Anticancer AgentsS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Huang, Liqun; Mackenzie, Gerardo G.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between oxidative stress, cytokinetic parameters, and tumor growth in response to novel phospho-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), agents with significant anticancer effects in preclinical models. Compared with controls, in SW480 colon and MCF-7 breast cancer cells, phospho-sulindac, phospho-aspirin, phospho-flurbiprofen, and phospho-ibuprofen (P-I) increased the levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) and decreased GSH levels and thioredoxin reductase activity, whereas the conventional chemotherapeutic drugs (CCDs), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), irinotecan, oxaliplatin, chlorambucil, paclitaxel, and vincristine, did not. In both cell lines, phospho-NSAIDs induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation much more potently than CCDs. We then treated nude mice bearing SW480 xenografts with P-I or 5-FU that had an opposite effect on RONS in vitro. Compared with controls, P-I markedly suppressed xenograft growth, induced apoptosis in the xenografts (8.9 ± 2.7 versus 19.5 ± 3.0), inhibited cell proliferation (52.6 ± 5.58 versus 25.8 ± 7.71), and increased urinary F2-isoprostane levels (10.7 ± 3.3 versus 17.9 ± 2.2 ng/mg creatinine, a marker of oxidative stress); all differences were statistically significant. 5-FU's effects on tumor growth, apoptosis, proliferation, and F2-isoprostane were not statistically significant. F2-isoprostane levels correlated with the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of cell growth. P-I induced oxidative stress only in the tumors, and its apoptotic effect was restricted to xenografts. Our data show that phospho-NSAIDs act against cancer through a mechanism distinct from that of various CCDs, underscore the critical role of oxidative stress in their effect, and indicate that pathways leading to oxidative stress may be useful targets for anticancer strategies. PMID:21646387

  1. Enhancement of the photo-electric effect with pharmacological agents in synchrotron radiation based anti-cancer radiotherapy: a methodological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corde, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    Anti-cancer therapy rests on three main principles: 1) anatomic confinement of irradiation; 2) temporal fractioning of treatment; 3) treatment of tissues that are more sensitive to radiation than surrounding healthy tissue. Under those principles hides the goal of radiotherapy: to deposit more of the X-ray energy in the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. This goal is hard to reach since one of the causes of the failures in radiotherapy is the continuing evolution of the tumor. Could synchrotron radiation be more effective as an X-ray source for radiotherapy? The variation of the radiation-matter interaction cross-sections as a function of X-ray energy and atomic number of the medium show that certain energies and certain elements are more suitable to obtain the largest number of interactions and the largest amount of deposited energy. Synchrotron radiation allows to select precisely those energies because of its high spectral intensity. Its spectral characteristics (energy of the photons between 10 and 100 keV) allow to trigger the photoelectric effect with a maximum of probability on heavy elements introduced close to cancerous cells. It has been shown that: 1) synchrotron radiation based tomodensitometry is a quantitative imaging technique, potentially powerful for radiotherapy since it insures in-vivo the measurement of intra-tumoral concentration of contrast agent (I or Gd); 2) in the presence of iodinated contrast agent the lethal effect of X-rays on cell survival is increased and the gain in radio sensitivity depends on X-ray energy; 3) at the cellular scale the lethality of irradiation can be optimised again by transporting heavy atoms (I, Pt) inside the DNA, which is the biological target of the irradiation. This reinforcement of the killing efficiency of low energy X-rays using a physical mechanism aimed at a pharmacological agent is an original concept in anti-cancer radiotherapy. (author) [fr

  2. Half-Sandwich Iridium(III) and Ruthenium(II) Complexes Containing P^P-Chelating Ligands: A New Class of Potent Anticancer Agents with Unusual Redox Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, JuanJuan; Tian, Meng; Tian, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Shumiao; Yan, Chao; Shao, Changfang; Liu, Zhe

    2018-02-19

    A series of half-sandwich Ir III pentamethylcyclopentadienyl and Ru II arene complexes containing P^P-chelating ligands of the type [(Cp x /arene)M(P^P)Cl]PF 6 , where M = Ir, Cp x is pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp*), or 1-biphenyl-2,3,4,5-tetramethyl cyclopentadienyl (Cp xbiPh ); M = Ru, arene is 3-phenylpropan-1-ol (bz-PA), 4-phenylbutan-1-ol (bz-BA), or p-cymene (p-cym), and P^P is 2,20-bis(diphenylphosphino)-1,10-binaphthyl (BINAP), have been synthesized and fully characterized, three of them by X-ray crystallography, and their potential as anticancer agents explored. All five complexes showed potent anticancer activity toward HeLa and A549 cancer cells. The introduction of a biphenyl substituent on the Cp* ring for the iridium complexes has no effect on the antiproliferative potency. Ruthenium complex [(η 6 -p-cym)Ru(P^P)Cl]PF 6 (5) displayed the highest potency, about 15 and 7.5 times more active than the clinically used cisplatin against A549 and HeLa cells, respectively. No binding to 9-MeA and 9-EtG nucleobases was observed. Although these types of complexes interact with ctDNA, DNA appears not to be the major target. Compared to iridium complex [(η 5 -Cp*)Ir(P^P)Cl]PF 6 (1), ruthenium complex (5) showed stronger ability to interfere with coenzyme NAD + /NADH couple through transfer hydrogenation reactions and to induce ROS in cells, which is consistent with their anticancer activities. The redox properties of the complexes 1, 5, and ligand BINAP were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Complexes 1 and 5 arrest cell cycles at the S phase, Sub-G 1 phase and G 1 phase, respectively, and cause cell apoptosis toward A549 cells.

  3. KCN1, a Novel Synthetic Sulfonamide Anticancer Agent: In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Pancreatic Cancer Activities and Preclinical Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, Elizabeth R.; Xu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiangrong; Zhang, Xu; Nag, Subhasree Ashok; Wu, Xuming; Wang, Ming-Hai; Wang, Hui; Van Meir, Erwin G.; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activity and pharmacological properties of 3,4-dimethoxy-N-[(2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-yl)methyl]-N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide, KCN1. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro activity of KCN1 on cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution of pancreatic cancer cells, using the MTT and BrdUrd assays, and flow cytometry. The in vivo anti-cancer effects of KCN1 were evaluated in two distinct xenograft models of pancreatic cancer. We also developed an HPLC method for the quantitation of the compound, and examined its stability in mouse plasma, plasma protein binding, and degradation by mouse S9 microsomal enzymes. Furthermore, we examined the pharmacokinetics of KCN1 following intravenous or intraperitoneal injection in mice. Results showed that, in a dose-dependent manner, KCN1 inhibited cell growth and induced cell cycle arrest in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, and showed in vivo anticancer efficacy in mice bearing Panc-1 or Mia Paca-2 tumor xenografts. The HPLC method provided linear detection of KCN1 in all of the matrices in the range from 0.1 to 100 µM, and had a lower limit of detection of 0.085 µM in mouse plasma. KCN1 was very stable in mouse plasma, extensively plasma bound, and metabolized by S9 microsomal enzymes. The pharmacokinetic studies indicated that KCN1 could be detected in all of the tissues examined, most for at least 24 h. In conclusion, our preclinical data indicate that KCN1 is a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer, providing a basis for its future development. PMID:23028659

  4. KCN1, a novel synthetic sulfonamide anticancer agent: in vitro and in vivo anti-pancreatic cancer activities and preclinical pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine the in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activity and pharmacological properties of 3,4-dimethoxy-N-[(2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromen-6-ylmethyl]-N-phenylbenzenesulfonamide, KCN1. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro activity of KCN1 on cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution of pancreatic cancer cells, using the MTT and BrdUrd assays, and flow cytometry. The in vivo anti-cancer effects of KCN1 were evaluated in two distinct xenograft models of pancreatic cancer. We also developed an HPLC method for the quantitation of the compound, and examined its stability in mouse plasma, plasma protein binding, and degradation by mouse S9 microsomal enzymes. Furthermore, we examined the pharmacokinetics of KCN1 following intravenous or intraperitoneal injection in mice. Results showed that, in a dose-dependent manner, KCN1 inhibited cell growth and induced cell cycle arrest in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro, and showed in vivo anticancer efficacy in mice bearing Panc-1 or Mia Paca-2 tumor xenografts. The HPLC method provided linear detection of KCN1 in all of the matrices in the range from 0.1 to 100 µM, and had a lower limit of detection of 0.085 µM in mouse plasma. KCN1 was very stable in mouse plasma, extensively plasma bound, and metabolized by S9 microsomal enzymes. The pharmacokinetic studies indicated that KCN1 could be detected in all of the tissues examined, most for at least 24 h. In conclusion, our preclinical data indicate that KCN1 is a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer, providing a basis for its future development.

  5. Tungsten oxide-graphene oxide (WO3-GO) nanocomposite as an efficient photocatalyst, antibacterial and anticancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevitha, G.; Abhinayaa, R.; Mangalaraj, D.; Ponpandian, N.

    2018-05-01

    Functioning of ultrasonically prepared tungsten oxide-graphene oxide (WO3-GO) nanocomposite as a photocatalyst, antibacterial and anticancer system was investigated and the obtained results were compared with that of pure WO3 nanoparticles. Structural, morphological, compositional and optical properties of the prepared WO3 nanoparticles and WO3-GO nanocomposite were studied. Photocatalytic efficiency of the system on organic dyes such as methylene blue (MB, cationic) and indigo carmine (IC, anionic) was investigated. The enhanced efficiency of the WO3-GO nanocomposite system was evaluated under sunlight and compared with that of pure WO3. The degradation efficiency values for MB and IC were found to be 97.03% and 95.43% at 180 and 120 min respectively. Antibacterial activity of the WO3-GO nanocomposite under visible light was tested and improved inhibition results were observed for Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis after 6 h of light exposure. The photocatalytic degradation efficiency and antibacterial activity of the WO3-GO nanocomposite are attributed to the improved electron-hole pair separation rate. Investigation on anticancer activity of WO3-GO nanocomposite was tested on human lung cancer (A-549) cell line and the IC50 value was found to be 139.6 ± 4.53 μg/mL. The results obtained in this study may be used as a platform for the development of photocatalysis applications based on WO3-GO nanocomposite.

  6. Synthesis and anticancer activity of some novel indolo[3,2-b]andrographolide derivatives as apoptosis-inducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yaping; Xin, Zhengyuan; Wan, Yumeng; Li, Jiabin; Ye, Boping; Xue, Xiaowen

    2015-01-27

    A series of novel indolo[3,2-b]andrographolide derivatives were designed, synthesized and screened in vitro against three human cancer cell lines MCF7 (human breast cancer), HCT116 (human colon cancer), and DU145 (human prostate cancer). Fourteen compounds 6b, 6e, 6i, 6j, 6l, 6m, 6n, 12a, 12b, 13a, 13b, 15a, 17a, and 17b exhibited better anti-cancer activities than andrographolide for all three human cancer lines, with compound 6l displaying best activity with IC50 values of 1.85, 1.22 and 1.24 μM against MCF7, HCT116 and DU145 respectively. Preliminary anti-cancer mechanistic investigation was performed in terms of the cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis assays of compound 6l against HCT116 using flow cytometry, and the results suggested that compound 6l inhibited tumor proliferation through inducing early and late cellular apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner and causing cell cycle arrest in the S-phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Rational design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of third generation α-noscapine analogues as potent tubulin binding anti-cancer agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Manchukonda

    Full Text Available Systematic screening based on structural similarity of drugs such as colchicine and podophyllotoxin led to identification of noscapine, a microtubule-targeted agent that attenuates the dynamic instability of microtubules without affecting the total polymer mass of microtubules. We report a new generation of noscapine derivatives as potential tubulin binding anti-cancer agents. Molecular modeling experiments of these derivatives 5a, 6a-j yielded better docking score (-7.252 to -5.402 kCal/mol than the parent compound, noscapine (-5.505 kCal/mol and its existing derivatives (-5.563 to -6.412 kCal/mol. Free energy (ΔG bind calculations based on the linear interaction energy (LIE empirical equation utilizing Surface Generalized Born (SGB continuum solvent model predicted the tubulin-binding affinities for the derivatives 5a, 6a-j (ranging from -4.923 to -6.189 kCal/mol. Compound 6f showed highest binding affinity to tubulin (-6.189 kCal/mol. The experimental evaluation of these compounds corroborated with theoretical studies. N-(3-brormobenzyl noscapine (6f binds tubulin with highest binding affinity (KD, 38 ± 4.0 µM, which is ~ 4.0 times higher than that of the parent compound, noscapine (KD, 144 ± 1.0 µM and is also more potent than that of the first generation clinical candidate EM011, 9-bromonoscapine (KD, 54 ± 9.1 µM. All these compounds exhibited substantial cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 72.9 µM; compound 6f showed prominent anti-cancer efficacy with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 26.9 µM in cancer cells of different tissues of origin. These compounds perturbed DNA synthesis, delayed the cell cycle progression at G2/M phase, and induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Collectively, the study reported here identified potent, third generation noscapinoids as new anti-cancer agents.

  8. Role of cytochrome P450 2J2 on cell proliferation and resistance to an anticancer agent in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Geun Hye; Park, So Mi; Han, Ho Jae; Baek, Kyoung Min; Kim, Joong Sun; Chang, Woochul; Lee, Ho Jin; Yun, Seung Pil; Ryu, Jung Min; Lee, Min Young

    2017-11-01

    The present study examined the role of human cytochrome P450 2J2 (CYP2J2) on cell proliferation and resistance to an anticancer agent using stable hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells overexpressing CYP2J2. Overexpression of CYP2J2 significantly increased HepG2 cell proliferation and the expression levels of cell cycle regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)2 and Cdk4. CYP2J2-overexpressing HepG2 cells exhibited high levels of Akt phosphorylation compared with those observed in wild-type HepG2 cells. Although Akt phosphorylation in both cell lines was significantly attenuated by LY294002, a specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling inhibitor, the levels of Akt phosphorylation following treatment with LY294002 were higher in CYP2J2-overexpressing HepG2 cells than in wild-type HepG2 cells. Cell counting revealed that proliferation was reduced by LY294002 in both cell lines; however, CYP2J2-overexpressing HepG2 cell numbers were higher than those of wild-type HepG2 cells following treatment with LY294002. These results indicated that increased cell proliferation by CYP2J2 overexpression is mediated by increased Akt activity. It was also demonstrated that doxorubicin, an anticancer agent, reduced cell viability, induced a significant increase in the B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 associated X protein (Bax)/Bcl-2 ratio and decreased pro-caspase-3 levels in wild-type HepG2 cells. However, the doxorubicin-induced reduction in cell viability was significantly attenuated by enhanced upregulation of CYP2J2 expression. The increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the decrease in pro-caspase-3 levels were also recovered by CYP2J2 overexpression. In conclusion, CYP2J2 serves important roles in cancer cell proliferation and resistance to the anticancer agent doxorubicin in HepG2 cells.

  9. Eupalmerin acetate, a novel anticancer agent from Caribbean gorgonian octocorals, induces apoptosis in malignant glioma cells via the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamaru, Arifumi; Iwado, Eiji; Kondo, Seiji; Newman, Robert A; Vera, Burnilda; Rodríguez, Abimael D; Kondo, Yasuko

    2007-01-01

    The marine ecosystem is a vast but largely untapped resource for potential naturally based medicines. We tested 15 compounds derived from organisms found in the Caribbean Sea (14 gorgonian octocoral-derived compounds and one sponge-derived compound) for their anticancer effects on human malignant glioma U87-MG and U373-MG cells. Eupalmerin acetate (EPA) was chosen as the lead compound based on its longer-term stability and greater cytotoxicity than those of the other compounds we tested in these cell types. EPA induced G(2)-M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway; it translocated Bax from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria and dissipated the mitochondrial transmembrane potential in both cell types. EPA was found to increase phosphorylated c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) by >50% in both U87-MG and U373-MG cells. A specific JNK inhibitor, SP600125, inhibited EPA-induced apoptosis, confirming the involvement of the JNK pathway in EPA-induced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, 7 days of daily intratumoral injections of EPA significantly suppressed the growth of s.c. malignant glioma xenografts (P < 0.01, on day 19). These results indicate that EPA is therapeutically effective against malignant glioma cells in vitro and in vivo and that it, or a similar marine-based compound, may hold promise as a clinical anticancer agent.

  10. Evaluation of a curcumin analog as an anti-cancer agent inducing ER stress-mediated apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Yi; Sun, Yusheng; Ren, Luqing; Huang, Yi; Cai, Yuepiao; Weng, Qiaoyou; Shen, Xueqian; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances have highlighted the importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cell death processes. Pharmacological interventions that effectively enhance tumor cell death through activating ER stress have attracted a great deal of attention for anti-cancer therapy. A bio-evaluation on 113 curcumin analogs against four cancer cell lines was performed through MTT assay. Furthermore, real time cell assay and flow cytometer were used to evaluate the apoptotic induction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(5-bromo-2-ethoxyphenyl)penta-1,4-dien-3-one (B82). Western blot, RT-qPCR, and siRNA were then utilized to confirm whether B82-induced apoptosis is mediated through activating ER stress pathway. Finally, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of B82 was evaluated. B82 exhibited strong anti-tumor activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cells. Treatment with B82 significantly induced apoptosis in H460 cells in vitro and inhibited H460 tumor growth in vivo. Further studies demonstrated that the B82-induced apoptosis is mediated by activating ER stress both in vitro and in vivo. A new monocarbonyl analog of curcumin, B82, exhibited anti-tumor effects on H460 cells via an ER stress-mediated mechanism. B82 could be further explored as a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of NSCLC

  11. Effects of intra-arterial chemotherapy with a new lipophilic anticancer agent, estradiol-chlorambucil (KM2210), dissolved in lipiodol on experimental liver tumor in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egawa, H.; Maki, A.; Mori, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Mitsuhashi, S.; Bannai, K.; Asano, K.; Ozawa, K. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    Anticancer effects and biodistribution of a new lipophilic anticancer agent, estradiol-chlorambucil (KM2210), dissolved in lipiodol (LPD) were investigated as an intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) on Walker 256 carcinosarcoma grown in the liver of 136 Wistar rats. All rats treated with KM2210 (10 mg)-LPD survived for 90 days after administration, whereas none of the rats with LPD alone were alive for more than 19 days. Histological examination revealed that there was no viable tumor cell in the encapsulated necrotic tumor at 21 days after administration. There was no significant liver dysfunction or leukopenia due to KM2210. The biodistribution study using (14C, 3H)KM2210-LPD solution showed that KM2210 accumulated selectively in tumor and that the tumor-to-normal-liver and tumor-to-blood ratios were 10 and 1,000, respectively, at 21 days after administration. These results suggest that KM2210 has potential clinical application in the treatment of human liver cancer.

  12. Theoretical investigation of inclusion complex formation of Gold (III – Dimethyldithiocarbamate anticancer agents with cucurbit[n = 5,6]urils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabiollah Mahdavifar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold (III-N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate [DMDT(AuX2] complexes have recently gained increasing attention as potential anticancer agents because of their strong tumor cell growth–inhibitory effects, generally achieved by exploiting non-cisplatin-like mechanisms of action. The goal of our research work is to encapsulate the gold(III dimethyldithiocarbamate complexes as anticancer with cucurbit[n]urils (CB[n = 5, 6] by accurate calculations, to predict the inclusion complex formation of gold(III species with cucurbiturils (CB[n = 5, 6]. The calculations were carried out just for the 1:1 stoichiometric complexes. Upon encapsulation, binding energy, thermodynamic parameters, structural parameters and electronic structures of complexes are investigated. The results of the thermodynamic calculations and the binding energy show that the inclusion process is exothermic and the CB[6]/[DMDT(AuBr2] complex is more stable than other complexes. The final geometry of CB[n]/drugs indicates that the drugs were expelled from the cavity of CB[n]. NBO calculations reveal that the hydrogen bonding between CB[n] and drugs and electrostatic interactions are the major factors contributing to the overall stabilities of the complexes.

  13. Anti-cancer agents based on N-acyl-2, 3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b] quinoline derivatives and a method of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gakh, Andrei; Krasavin, Mikhail; Karapetian, Ruben; Rufanov, Konstantin A; Konstantinov, Igor; Godovykh, Elena; Soldatkina, Olga; Sosnov, Andrey V

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds that can be used as anti-cancer agents in the prostate cancer therapy. In particular, the invention relates to N-acyl derivatives of 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]quinolines having the structural Formula (I), ##STR00001## stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof. The meaning of R1 is independently selected from H; C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl substituents; R2 is selected from C1-C6 Alkyl, cyclo-Alkyl or iso-Alkyl; substituted or non-substituted, fused or non-fused to substituted or non-substituted aromatic ring, aryl or heteroaryl groups. The invention also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  14. First report of anti-cancer agent, lapachol producing endophyte, Aspergillus niger of Tabebuia argentea and its in vitro cytotoxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channabasava

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available All parts of Tabebuia argentia were used for isolation and identified the lapachol producing endophytes were used for evaluation of in vitro cytotoxicity (antimitotic, antiproliferative, determination of cell viability, DNA fragmentation. Five endophytes (leaf endophytes, Alternaria alternata, Alternaria sp., Aspegerillus niger, Penicillium sp. and the bark endophyte, A. alternata are able to produce potent anticancer agent lapachol. The 3rd and 4th fractions of endophytic extracts (A. niger and Penicillium sp. exhibited the pure lapachol. The 3rd fraction of A. niger lapachol strongly inhibited the Allium cepa root actively growing cells at various stages of cell cycle in antimitotic assay and the index was 22.5 mg/mL, the yeast cells were died due to toxicity and possessed the cell necrosis and they exhibited the DNA fragmentation. Present promised endophytes can be used for production of lapachol using endophyte A. niger for large scale production of lapachol within short period of time.

  15. Indole-based hydrazide-hydrazones and 4-thiazolidinones: synthesis and evaluation as antitubercular and anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihan-Üstündağ, Gökçe; Şatana, Dilek; Özhan, Gül; Çapan, Gültaze

    2016-01-01

    A new series of indolylhydrazones (6) and indole-based 4-thiazolidinones (7, 8) have been designed, synthesized and screened for in vitro antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. 4-Thiazolidinone derivatives 7g-7j, 8g, 8h and 8j displayed notable antituberculosis (anti-TB) activity showing 99% inhibition at MIC values ranging from 6.25 to 25.0 µg/ml. Compounds 7g, 7h, 7i, 8h and 8j demonstrated anti-TB activity at concentrations 10-fold lower than those cytotoxic for the mammalian cell lines. The indolylhydrazone derivative 6b has also been evaluated for antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines at the National Cancer Institute (USA). Compound 6b showed an interesting anticancer profile against different human tumor-derived cell lines at sub-micromolar concentrations with obvious selectivity toward colon cancer cell line COLO 205.

  16. Essential oils from Egyptian aromatic plants as antioxidant and novel anticancer agents in human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan, M. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of tumor growth using extracts from aromatic plants are rapidly emerging as important new drug candidates for cancer therapy. The cytotoxicity and in vitro anticancer evaluation of the essential oils from thyme, juniper and clove has been assessed against five different human cancer cell lines (liver HepG2, breast MCF-7, prostate PC3, colon HCT116 and lung A549. A GC/MS analysis revealed that α-pinene, thymol and eugenol are the major components of Egyptian juniper, thyme and clove oils with concentrations of 31.19%, 79.15% and 82.71%, respectively. Strong antioxidant profiles of all the oils are revealed in vitro by DPPH and β-carotene bleaching assays. The results showed that clove oil was similarly potent to the reference drug, doxorubicin in prostate, colon and lung cell lines. Thyme oil was more effective than the doxorubicin in breast and lung cell lines while juniper oil was more effective than the doxorubicin in all the tested cancer cell lines except prostate cancer. In conclusion, the essential oils from Egyptian aromatic plants can be used as good candidates for novel therapeutic strategies for cancer as they possess significant anticancer activity.Los inhibidores de crecimiento de tumores usando extractos de plantas aromáticas están emergiendo con rapidez como nuevos e importantes medicamentos para el tratamiento del cáncer. La citotoxicidad y la acción anticancerígena in vitro de aceites esenciales de tomillo, enebro y clavo han sido evaluadas en cinco líneas celulares de cáncer humano (hígado HepG2, mama MCF-7, próstata PC3, colon HCT116 y pulmón A549. Los análisis de GC/MS mostraron que α-pineno, timol y eugenol son los principales componentes de los aceites egipcios de enebro, tomillo y clavo, con concentraciones de 31,19%, 79,15% y 82,71%, respectivamente. Se demuestra, mediante ensayos in vitro de blanqueo de DPPH y β-caroteno, el enérgico perfil antioxidante de todos los aceites. Los resultados

  17. PK of immunoconjugate anticancer agent CMD-193 in rats: ligand-binding assay approach to determine in vivo immunoconjugate stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azher; Gorovits, Boris; Leal, Mauricio; Fluhler, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a new generation of anticancer therapeutics. The objective of this manuscript is to propose a methodology that can be used to assess the stability of the ADCs by using the PK data obtained by ligand-binding assays that measure various components of ADCs. The ligand-binding assays format of different components of ADCs provided unique valuable PK information. The mathematical manipulation of the bioanalytical data provided an insight into the in vivo integrity, indicating that the loading of the calicheamicin on the G193 antibody declines in an apparent slow first-order process. This report demonstrates the value of analyzing various components of the ADC and their PK profiles to better understand the disposition and in vivo stability of ADCs.

  18. Facile synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Euphorbia antiquorum L. latex extract and evaluation of their biomedical perspectives as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran Rajkuberan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reveals the rapid biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (EAAgNPs using aqueous latex extract of Euphorbia antiquorum L as a potential bioreductant. Synthesized EAAgNPs generate the surface plasmonic resonance peak at 438 nm in UV–Vis spectrophotometer. Size and shape of EAAgNPs were further characterized through transmission electron microscope (TEM which shows well-dispersed spherical nanoparticles with size ranging from 10 to 50 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis (EDAX confirms the presence of silver (Ag as the major constituent element. X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern of EAAgNPs corresponding to (111, (200, (220 and (311 planes, reveals that the generated nanoparticles were face centered cubic crystalline in nature. Interestingly, fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis shows the major role of active phenolic constituents in reduction and stabilization of EAAgNPs. Phyto-fabricated EAAgNPs exhibits significant antimicrobial and larvicidal activity against bacterial human pathogens as well as disease transmitting blood sucking parasites such as Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti (IIIrd instar larvae. On the other hand, in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of bioformulated EAAgNPs has shown potential anticancer activity against human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa. The preliminary biochemical (MTT assay and microscopic studies depict that the synthesized EAAgNPs at minimal dosage (IC50 = 28 μg triggers cellular toxicity response. Hence, the EAAgNPs can be considered as an environmentally benign and non-toxic nanobiomaterial for biomedical applications. Keywords: Crystal structure, Euphorbia antiquorum L., Silver nanoparticles, Anticancer, Human pathogens

  19. Proof of Concept of a Mobile Health Short Message Service Text Message Intervention That Promotes Adherence to Oral Anticancer Agent Medications: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Sandra L; Given, Charles W; Sikorskii, Alla; Coursaris, Constantinos K; Majumder, Atreyee; DeKoekkoek, Tracy; Schueller, Monica; Given, Barbara A

    2016-06-01

    This multisite, randomized controlled trial assigned 75 adult cancer patients prescribed an oral anticancer agent to either an experimental group that received daily text messages for adherence for 21 days plus usual care or a control group that received usual care. Measures were administered at baseline, weekly (Weeks 1-8), and at exit (Week 9). A satisfaction survey was conducted following the intervention. Acceptability, feasibility, and satisfaction were examined. Primary outcomes were adherence and symptoms. Secondary outcomes were depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, cognition, physical function, and social support. Mixed or general linear models were used for the analyses comparing trial groups. Effect sizes (ES) were estimated to gauge clinical significance. Regarding acceptability, 57.2% (83 of 145) of eligible patients consented, 88% (n = 37 of 42) receiving text messages read them most or all of the time, and 90% (n = 38) were satisfied. The differences between experimental and control groups' ES were 0.29 for adherence, 0.21 for symptom severity, and 0.21 for symptom interference, and differences were not statistically significant. Furthermore, perceived social support was higher (p = 0.04; ES = 0.54) in the experimental group. Proof of concept and preliminary efficacy of a mobile health intervention using text messages to promote adherence for patients prescribed oral anticancer agents were demonstrated. Patients accepted and had high satisfaction with the intervention, and adherence improved after the intervention. Text messages show promise. Additional research is needed prior to use in practice.

  20. Drug repurposing of novel quinoline acetohydrazide derivatives as potent COX-2 inhibitors and anti-cancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Chelli Sai; Manikandan, A.; Sridhar, P.; Sivakumar, A.; Siva Kumar, B.; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara

    2018-02-01

    Novel QuinolineAcetohydrazide (QAh) derivatives (9a-n) were firstly evaluated in silico to determine their anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer efficacy via the mechanisms of COX1 and COX2 inhibition, and NF-ĸB, HDAC and Human Topoisomerase I pathways respectively. In the studied set, the trifluoro substituted QAh derivatives: (E)-N'-(4-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazid and (E)-N'-(3-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazide are determined to be potential leads, indicated from their best docked scores, relative ligand efficiency, and significant structural attributes evaluated by ab initio simulations. The only setback being their partition co-efficient that retrieved a red flag in the evaluation of their Lipinski parameters. The experimental in vitro studies confirmed the significant enhancement as COX-2 inhibitors and appreciable enhancement in MTT assay of breast and skin cancer cell lines. Significantly, trifluoro substituent in the quinoline scaffold can be reasoned to note the excellent binding affinity to all the evaluated drug targets.

  1. Benzene-poly-carboxylic acid complex, a novel anti-cancer agent induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Fares

    Full Text Available Some cases of breast cancer are composed of clones of hormonal-independent growing cells, which do not respond to therapy. In the present study, the effect of Benzene-Poly-Carboxylic Acid Complex (BP-C1 on growth of human breast-cancer cells was tested. BP-C1 is a novel anti-cancer complex of benzene-poly-carboxylic acids with a very low concentration of cis-diammineplatinum (II dichloride. Human breast cancer cells, MCF-7 and T47D, were used. Cell viability was detected by XTT assay and apoptosis was detected by Flow Cytometry and by annexin V/FITC/PI assay. Caspases were detected by western blot analysis and gene expression was measured by using the Applied Biosystems® TaqMan® Array Plates. The results showed that exposure of the cells to BP-C1 for 48 h, significantly (P<0.001 reduced cell viability, induced apoptosis and activated caspase 8 and caspace 9. Moreover, gene expression experiments indicated that BP-C1 increased the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (CASP8AP1, TNFRSF21, NFkB2, FADD, BCL10 and CASP8 and lowered the level of mRNA transcripts of inhibitory apoptotic genes (BCL2L11, BCL2L2 and XIAP. These findings may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of human cancer using BP-C1 analog.

  2. Structure and biological properties of mixed-ligand Cu(II) Schiff base complexes as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Yi; Li, Jinlong; Fan, Boyi; Xu, Bohui; Zhou, Min; Yang, Feng

    2017-07-07

    We synthesized two mixed-ligand Cu(II) complexes containing different aroylhydrazone ligands and a pyridine co-ligand, namely, [Cu(L1)(Py)] (C1) and [Cu(L2)(Py)(Br)] (C2) (L1 = (E)-2-hydroxy-N'-((2-hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)methylene)benzohydrazide, Py = pyridine, L2 = (E)-2-hydroxy-N'-(phenyl(pyridin-2-yl)methylene)benzohydrazide), and assessed their chemical and biological properties to understand their marked activity. C2 showed better anticancer activity than C1 in various human cancer cell lines, including the cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cell line A549cisR. Both Cu(II) complexes, especially C2, displayed promising anti-metastatic activity against HepG2 cells. Spectroscopic titration and agarose gel electrophoresis experiments indicated that C2 exhibited binding affinity toward calf-thymus DNA and efficient pBR322 DNA-cleaving ability. Further mechanistic studies showed that C2 effectively induced DNA damage and thus led to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, and also stimulated mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by reactive oxygen species and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of 13-n-Alkyl Berberine and Palmatine Analogues as Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available By introducing long carbon-chain alkyl groups at the C-13 position of berberine and palmatine, 13-n-hexyl/13-n-octyl berberine and palmatine chloride analogues 4ad were synthesized and examined by MTT assays for cytotoxic activity in seven human cancer cell lines (7701QGY, SMMC7721, HepG2, CEM, CEM/VCR, KIII, Lewis, yielding IC50 values of 0.02 ± 0.01–13.58 ± 2.84 μM. 13-n-Octyl palmatine (compound 4d gave the most potent inhibitor activity, with an IC50 of 0.02 ± 0.01 μM for SMMC7721. In all cases, the 13-n-alkyl berberine and palmatine analogues 4ad were more cytotoxic than berberine and palmatine. In addition, compounds 4ad also exhibited more potent cytotoxicity than berberine and palmatine in mice with S180 sarcoma xenografted in vivo. The primary screening results indicated that the 13-n-hexyl/13-n-octyl berberine and palmatine analogues might be valuable source for new potent anticancer drug candidates.

  4. Stimuli-responsive protamine-based biodegradable nanocapsules for enhanced bioavailability and intracellular delivery of anticancer agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishna; Thomas, Midhun B.; Pulakkat, Sreeranjini [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Materials Engineering (India); Gnanadhas, Divya P.; Chakravortty, Dipshikha [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology (India); Raichur, Ashok M., E-mail: amr@materials.iisc.ernet.in [Indian Institute of Science, Department of Materials Engineering (India)

    2015-08-15

    Enzyme- and pH-responsive polyelectrolyte nanocapsules having diameters in the range of 200 ± 20 nm were fabricated by means of Layer-by-Layer assembly of biopolymers, protamine, and heparin, and then loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin. The incorporation of the FDA-approved peptide drug protamine as a wall component rendered the capsules responsive to enzyme stimuli. The stimuli-responsive drug release from these nanocapsules was evaluated, and further modulation of capsule permeability to avoid premature release was demonstrated by crosslinking the wall components. The interaction of the nanocapsules with cancer cells was studied using MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These capsules were readily internalized and disintegrated inside the cells, culminating in the release of the loaded doxorubicin and subsequent cell death as observed by confocal microscopy and MTT Assay. The bioavailability studies performed using BALB/c mice revealed that the encapsulated doxorubicin exhibited enhanced bioavailability compared to free doxorubicin. Our results indicate that this stimuli-responsive system fabricated from clinically used FDA-approved molecules and exhibiting minimal premature release has great potential for drug-delivery applications.

  5. Discovery and development of anticancer agents from marine sponges: perspectives based on a chemistry-experimental therapeutics collaborative program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriote, Frederick A; Tenney, Karen; Media, Joseph; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Edelstein, Matthew; Johnson, Tyler A; Amagata, Taro; Crews, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative program was initiated in 1990 between the natural product chemistry laboratory of Dr. Phillip Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz and the experimental therapeutics laboratory of Dr. Fred Valeriote at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The program focused on the discovery and development of anticancer drugs from sponge extracts. A novel in vitro disk diffusion, solid tumor selective assay was used to examine 2,036 extracts from 683 individual sponges. The bioassay-directed fractionation discovery component led to the identification of active pure compounds from many of these sponges. In most cases, pure compound was prepared in sufficient quantities to both chemically identify the active compound(s) as well as pursue one or more of the biological development components. The latter included IC50, clonogenic survival-concentration exposure, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and therapeutic assessment studies. Solid tumor selective compounds included fascaplysin and 10-bromofascaplysin (Fascaplysinopsis), neoamphimedine, 5-methoxyneoamphimedine and alpkinidine (Xestospongia), makaluvamine C and makaluvamine H (Zyzzya), psymberin (Psammocinia and Ircinia), and ethylplakortide Z and ethyldidehydroplakortide Z (Plakortis). These compounds or analogs thereof continue to have therapeutic potential.

  6. Biological evaluation of octahydropyrazin[2,1-a:5,4-a']diisoquinoline derivatives as potent anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornowicz, Agnieszka; Pawłowska, Natalia; Czajkowska, Anna; Czarnomysy, Robert; Bielawska, Anna; Bielawski, Krzysztof; Michalak, Olga; Staszewska-Krajewska, Olga; Kałuża, Zbigniew

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic activity and antiproliferative potency of novel octahydropyrazin[2,1-a:5,4-a']diisoquinoline derivatives (1-7) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Annexin V binding assay and disruption of the mitochondrial potential were performed to determine apoptosis. The activity of caspases 3, 8, 9, and 10 was measured after 24 h of incubation with tested compounds to explain detailed molecular mechanism of induction of apoptosis. The results from experiments were compared with effects obtained after incubation in the presence of camptothecin and etoposide. Our study demonstrated that the most active compounds in both analyzed breast cancer cell lines were compounds 3 and 4. We also observed that all compounds induced apoptosis. We demonstrated the higher activity of caspases 3, 8, 9, and 10, which confirmed that induction of apoptosis is associated with external and internal cell death pathway. Our study revealed that the novel compounds in group of diisoquinoline derivatives are promising candidates in anticancer treatment by activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways.

  7. Investigation of the interaction of radiation and cardiotoxic anticancer agents using a fetal mouse heart organ culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.; Rethorst, R.D.; Cox, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    The fetal mouse heart organ culture was utilized in an attempt to predict the cardiotoxic effects of combinations of radiation, Adriamycin (ADR), and Dihydroxyanthraquinone (DHAQ), antineoplastic agents which have been shown to produce clinical cardiomyopathy. Seventeen-day fetal hearts were removed and placed in a culture system of micro-titer plates. A single heart was placed in each well on a piece of aluminum mesh to keep the heart above the culture medium but bathed by capillary action. The plates were then placed in a 100% oxygen environment at 37 0 C. Treatments were performed on day 1 after culture: radiation doses (Cs-137) of 10, 20, or 40 Gy; drug treatment with 10, 30, or 100 μg/ml of ADR; 5, 20, or 50 μg/ml of DHAQ; and combinations and sequences of drug and radiation. Hearts were checked every day for functional activity as evidenced by a continuous heart beat. Untreated hearts beat rhythmically for up to 9 days; treated hearts stopped beating earlier. Using an endpoint of functional retention time, dose response curves were obtained for all individual agents and for combinations of agents. This system may help to predict the cardiotoxic effects that result from the use of these drugs and radiation. It may also aid in the development of new anthracycline chemotherapeutic agents that lack cardiotoxicity

  8. Tumor microenvironment in focus: LA-ICP-MS bioimaging of a preclinical tumor model upon treatment with platinum(IV)-based anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiner, Sarah; Kornauth, Christoph; Varbanov, Hristo P; Galanski, Markus; Van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Egger, Alexander E; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2015-08-01

    The selection of drug candidates for entering clinical development relies on in vivo testing in (solid) tumor animal models. However, the heterogeneity of tumor tissue (e.g. in terms of drug uptake or tissue composition) is rarely considered when testing novel drug candidates. Therefore, we used the murine colon cancer CT-26 tumor model to study the spatially-resolved drug distribution in tumor tissue upon repetitive treatment of animals over two weeks with three investigational platinum(IV)-based anticancer agents, oxaliplatin or satraplatin. A quantitative laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) imaging method revealed a heterogeneous platinum distribution, which correlated well with the histologic features of the tumor and surrounding tissue at the microscopic level. In most of the cases, higher amounts of intratumoral platinum were found in the surrounding tissue than in the malignant parts of the sample. This indicates that determination of average platinum amounts (e.g. by microwave-assisted digestion of the sample followed by analysis with ICP-MS) might overestimate the drug uptake in tumor tissue causing misleading conclusions. In addition, we studied the platinum distribution in the kidneys of treated animals to probe if accumulation in the cortex and medulla predict potential nephrotoxicity. A 10-fold increase of platinum in the cortex of the kidney over the medulla was observed for oxaliplatin and satraplatin. Although these findings are similar to those in the platinum distribution of the nephrotoxic anticancer drug cisplatin, treatment with the compounds of our study did not show signs of nephrotoxicity in clinical use or clinical trials (oxaliplatin, satraplatin) and did not result in the alteration of renal structures. Thus, predicting the side effects based on bioimaging data by LA-ICP-MS should be considered with caution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first LA-ICP-MS study on spatially-resolved platinum

  9. Study of Bioreductive Anticancer Agent RH-1-Induced Signals Leading the Wild-Type p53-Bearing Lung Cancer A549 Cells to Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulpinas, Aurimas; Imbrasaitė, Aušra; Krestnikova, Natalija; Šarlauskas, Jonas; Čėnas, Narimantas; Kalvelytė, Audronė Valerija

    2016-01-19

    Aziridinylquinone RH-1 (2,5-diaziridinyl-3-hydroxymethyl-6-methyl-cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1,4-dione) is a potential anticancer agent. RH-1 action is associated with quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) which reduces this diaziridinylbenzoquinone into DNA-alkylating hydroquinone and is overexpressed in many tumors. Another suggested mechanism of RH-1 toxicity is the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) arising from its redox cycling. In order to improve anticancer action of this and similar antitumor quinones, we investigated the involvement of different signaling molecules in cytotoxicity induced by RH-1 by using wild-type tumor suppressor p53 bearing nonsmall cell lung carcinoma A549 cells as a model. Gradual and prolonged increase of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK, P38, and JNK phosphorylation was observed during 24-h RH-1 treatment. In parallel, activation of DNA damage-sensing ATM kinase, upregulation, and phosphorylation of TP53 (human p53) took place. Inhibition studies revealed that RH-1-induced A549 apoptosis involved the NQO1-ATM-p53 signaling pathway and ROS generation. TP53 participated in ROS- and DNA damage-induced cell death differently. Moreover, MAP kinase JNK was another TP53 activator and death inducer in A549 cells. At the same time, rapid and prolonged activation of AKT kinase during RH-1 treatment was found, and it proved to be antiapoptotic kinase in our model system. Therefore, we identified that different and opposite cell death regulating signaling pathways, which may counteract one another, are induced in cancer cells during chemotherapeutic RH-1 treatment.

  10. Advancing drug therapy for brain tumours: a current review of the pro-inflammatory peptide Substance P and its antagonists as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Kimberley; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Vink, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of the Substance P (SP)/NK1 receptor system in the development and progression of cancer strongly supports its potential as a therapeutic target in malignancies. Novel strategies for approaching cancer treatment are urgently required particularly with regard to tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), which are notoriously difficult to effectively treat and associated with extremely poor prognosis for many patients. This is due, in part, to the presence of the highly specialised blood-brain barrier, which is known to restrict common treatments such as chemotherapy and hinder early tumour diagnosis. Additionally, tumours of the CNS are difficult to surgically resect completely, often contributing to the resurgence of the disease many years later. Interestingly, despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier, circulating tumour cells are able to gain entry to the brain and form secondary brain tumours; however, the underlying mechanisms of this process remain unclear. Tachykinins, in particular Substance P, have been implicated in early blood-brain barrier disruption via neurogenic inflammation in a number of other CNS pathologies. Recent evidence also suggests that Substance P may play a central role in the development of CNS tumours. It has been well established that a number of tumour cells express Substance P, NK1 receptors and mRNA for the tachykinin NK1 receptor. This increase in the Substance P/NK1 receptor system is known to induce proliferation and migration of tumour cells as well as stimulate angiogenesis, thus contributing to tumour progression. Accordingly, the NK1 receptor antagonist presents a novel target for anti-cancer therapy for which a number of patents have been filed. This review will examine the role of Substance P in the development of CNS tumours and its potential application as an anti-cancer agent.

  11. Comparing the Suitability of Autodock, Gold and Glide for the Docking and Predicting the Possible Targets of Ru(II-Based Complexes as Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo A. Adeniyi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In cancer chemotherapy, metal-based complexes have been recognized as the most promising means of inhibiting cancer growth due to the successful application of cis-platin and its derivatives above many of the existing organic anticancer agents. The limitations in their rational design can be traced to the complexity of the mechanism of their operations, lack of proper knowledge of their targets and lack of force fields in docking packages to appropriately define the metal centre of the organometallic complexes. In this paper, some of the promising anticancer complexes of Ru(II such as the rapta-based complexes formulated as [Ru(η6-p-cymeneL2(pta] and those with unusual ligands are considered. CatB and kinases which have been experimentally confirmed as possible targets of the complexes are also predicted by the three methods as one of the most targeted receptors while TopII and HDAC7 are predicted by two and one of the methods as best targets. The interesting features of the binding of the complexes show that some of the complexes preferentially target specific macromolecules than the others, which is an indication of their specificity and possibility of their therapeutic combination without severe side effects that may come from competition for the same target. Also, introduction of unusual ligands is found to significantly improve the activities of most of the complexes studied. Strong correlations are observed for the predicted binding sites and the orientation of the complexes within the binding site by the three methods of docking. However there are disparities in the ranking of the complexes by the three method of docking, especially that of Glide.

  12. Analysis of the antiproliferative effects of 3-deazaneoplanocin A in combination with standard anticancer agents in rhabdoid tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, Rebekka; Borchardt, Christiane; Clemens, Dagmar; Kool, Marcel; Dirksen, Uta; Frühwald, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    Rhabdoid tumors (RTs) are highly aggressive pediatric malignancies with a rather poor prognosis. New therapeutic approaches and optimization of already established treatment protocols are urgently needed. The histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is highly overexpressed in RTs and associated strongly with epigenetic silencing in cancer. EZH2 is involved in aggressive cell growth and stem cell maintenance. Thus, EZH2 is an attractive therapeutic target in RTs. The aim of the study presented here was to analyze the effects of a pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 alone and in combination with other anticancer drugs on RTs cells in vitro. The antitumor activity of the S-adenosyl-homocysteine-hydrolase inhibitor 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) alone and in combination with conventional cytostatic drugs (doxorubicin, etoposide) or epigenetic active compounds [5-Aza-CdR, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)] was assessed by MTT cell proliferation assays on three RT cell lines (A204, BT16, G401). Combinatorial treatment with DZNep synergistically and significantly enhanced the antiproliferative activity of etoposide, 5-Aza-CdR, and SAHA. In functional analyses, pretreatment with DZNep significantly increased the effects of 5-Aza-CdR and SAHA on apoptosis, cell cycle progression, and clonogenicity. Microarray analyses following sequential treatment with DZNep and 5-Aza-CdR or SAHA showed changes in global gene expression affecting apoptosis, neuronal development, and metabolic processes. In-vitro analyses presented here show that pharmacological inhibition of EZH2 synergistically affects the antitumor activity of the epigenetic active compounds 5-Aza-CdR and SAHA. Sequential treatment with these drugs combined with DZNep may represent a new therapeutic approach in RTs.

  13. Improved clearance of radioiodinated hypericin as a targeted anticancer agent by using a duodenal drainage catheter in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; Feng, Yuanbo; Verbruggen, Alfons; Oyen, Raymond; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-12-01

    We sought to reduce the radioactive intestinal waste after intravenous injection of necrosis avid iodine-131-labeled hypericin in dual-targeting anticancer radiotherapy and to study its pharmacokinetics in rats using a newly designed catheter. Iodine-123-labeled hypericin was prepared with iodogen as oxidant and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. After iodine-123-labeled hypericin administration, duodenal juice was collected via a catheter from groups of rats (n = 5) at intervals of 0-4, 4-8 or 20-24 h. The content was assessed by gamma-counting. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of iodine-123-labeled hypericin were investigated in rats without (n = 5) and with continuous catheterization (n = 5) for 9 h. After labeling, a high radiochemical yield was obtained with iodine-123-labeled hypericin (>95%), as confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. In the duodenal aspirate from animals with intermittent catheterization during 24 h, radioactivity accounted for 46% of the total with two peaks at 3 h and 8 h, suggesting enterohepatic circulation. Rats with 9 h of catheterization exhibited one peak representing 20% of the radioactivity. Major metabolites appeared to be conjugated iodine-123-labeled hypericin forms. In rats without and with catheter, iodine-123-labeled hypericin showed exponential elimination from plasma with no significant dehalogenation. Delayed iodine-123-labeled hypericin excretion, a higher maximum concentration (Cmax), larger area under concentration-time curve [AUC(0-∞)] and a longer mean residence time were observed in non-catheterized animals (P elimination of iodine-131-labeled hypericin can be prevented using this approach.

  14. Anti-cancer effects of newly developed chemotherapeutic agent, glycoconjugated palladium (II) complex, against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Mamoru; Kamiya, Takeshi; Joh, Takashi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Ohi, Hiromi; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Shibahara, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Mori, Yoshinori; Tanida, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent for various types of advanced cancer, including gastric cancer. However, almost all cancer cells acquire resistance against CDDP, and this phenomenon adversely affects prognosis. Thus, new chemotherapeutic agents that can overcome the CDDP-resistant cancer cells will improve the survival of advanced cancer patients. We synthesized new glycoconjugated platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes, [PtCl 2 (L)] and [PdCl 2 (L)]. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure to CDDP, and gene expression in the CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells was analyzed. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by [PtCl 2 (L)] and [PdCl 2 (L)] in CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells were evaluated. DNA double-strand breaks by drugs were assessed by evaluating phosphorylated histone H2AX. Xenograft tumor mouse models were established and antitumor effects were also examined in vivo. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells exhibit ABCB1 and CDKN2A gene up-regulation, as compared with CDDP-sensitive gastric cancer cells. In the analyses of CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells, [PdCl 2 (L)] overcame cross-resistance to CDDP in vitro and in vivo. [PdCl 2 (L)] induced DNA double-strand breaks. These results indicate that [PdCl 2 (L)] is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CDDP-resistant gastric cancer and may have clinical applications

  15. Synthesis and serotonin transporter activity of sulphur-substituted alpha-alkyl phenethylamines as a new class of anticancer agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cloonan, Suzanne M.; Keating, John J.; Butler, Stephen G.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that some serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) ligands have the potential to act as pro-apoptotic agents in the treatment of cancer adds greatly to their diverse pharmacological application. 4-Methylthioamphetamine (MTA) is a selective ligand for SERT over other monoamine transport......The discovery that some serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) ligands have the potential to act as pro-apoptotic agents in the treatment of cancer adds greatly to their diverse pharmacological application. 4-Methylthioamphetamine (MTA) is a selective ligand for SERT over other monoamine...... transporters. In this study, a novel library of structurally diverse 4-MTA analogues were synthesised with or without N-alkyl and/or C-alpha methyl or ethyl groups so that their potential SERT-dependent antiproliferative activity could be assessed. Many of the compounds displayed SERT-binding activity as well...... as cytotoxic activity. While there was no direct correlation between these two effects, a number of derivatives displayed anti-tumour effects in lymphoma, leukaemia and breast cancer cell lines, showing further potential to be developed as possible chemotherapeutic agents. (C) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All...

  16. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-conventional dosing of oral anticancer agents in oncology and malignant haematology: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebbari, Faouzi; Stoner, Nicola; Lavender, Verna

    2017-12-06

    Recent advances in cancer therapeutics have resulted in significantly improved overall survival and progression-free survival for patients. Targeted oral systemic anticancer therapies (SACT) offer a range of treatment approaches that differ from traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy: non-cytotoxic oral SACT target malignant disease continuously, have less broad and more favourable safety profiles, which can improve patients' quality of life (QoL). Toxicities associated with daily oral SACT administration can, however, result in non-adherence and a reduced QoL. Non-conventional dosing of oral SACT, where unlicensed doses/schedules of drugs are prescribed, is one approach increasingly adopted by clinicians to reduce toxicities and subsequent non-adherence and to improve QoL. Guidance governing this practice is, however, limited. This systematic review aims to identify evidence about prescribing practices of, and outcomes from, non-conventional dosing of oral SACT in oncology and malignant haematology. A search using the following electronic databases will be conducted: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Cochrane Registry of Controlled Trials. Studies will be selected based on predefined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Critical appraisal will be conducted to identify potential biases, strengths and limitations of included studies. Extracted data will be tabulated to sort and summarise key findings. An initial literature search indicated that studies reporting non-standard dosing of oral SACT intervention studies are diverse and heterogeneous in study design. Extracted data will, therefore, be tabulated, and together with a narrative synthesis of integrated key findings, will be presented and discussed in reference to the strengths and weaknesses of the evidence base. If sufficient stratified data is available (e.g. age group, tumour type, disease stage) or intervention (drug, dosing schedule), sub-group analysis

  18. Surfactant protein-D predicts prognosis of interstitial lung disease induced by anticancer agents in advanced lung cancer: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kota; Kato, Motoyasu; Shukuya, Takehito; Mori, Keita; Sekimoto, Yasuhito; Ihara, Hiroaki; Kanemaru, Ryota; Ko, Ryo; Shibayama, Rina; Tajima, Ken; Koyama, Ryo; Shimada, Naoko; Nagashima, Osamu; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Sasaki, Shinichi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-05-02

    Interstitial lung diseases induced by anticancer agents (ILD-AA) are rare adverse effects of anticancer therapy. However, prognostic biomarkers for ILD-AA have not been identified in patients with advanced lung cancer. Our aim was to analyze the association between serum biomarkers sialylated carbohydrate antigen Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) and surfactant protein D (SP-D), and clinical characteristics in patients diagnosed with ILD-AA. Between April 2011 and March 2016, 1224 advanced lung cancer patients received cytotoxic agents and epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors at Juntendo University Hospital and Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital. Of these patients, those diagnosed with ILD-AA were enrolled in this case control study. ΔKL-6 and ΔSP-D were defined as the difference between the levels at the onset of ILD-AA and their respective levels prior to development of ILD-AA. We evaluated KL-6 and SP-D at the onset of ILD-AA, ΔKL-6 and ΔSP-D, the risk factors for death related to ILD-AA, the chest high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, and survival time in patients diagnosed with ILD-AA. Thirty-six patients diagnosed with ILD-AA were enrolled in this study. Among them, 14 patients died of ILD-AA. ΔSP-D in the patients who died was significantly higher than that in the patients who survived. However, ΔKL-6 did not differ significantly between the two groups. Moreover, ΔSP-D in patients who exhibited diffuse alveolar damage was significantly higher than that in the other patterns on HRCT. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to set the optimal cut off value for ΔSP-D at 398 ng/mL. Survival time for patients with high ΔSP-D (≥ 398 ng/mL) was significantly shorter than that for patients with low ΔSP-D. Multivariate analysis revealed that ΔSP-D was a significant prognostic factor of ILD-AA. This is the first research to evaluate high ΔSP-D (≥ 398 ng/mL) in patients with ILD-AA and to

  19. Can the chemotherapeutic agents perform anticancer activity through miRNA expression regulation? Proposing a new hypothesis [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Doss, C George Priya; Sarin, Renu; Hsu, Minna J; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2015-11-01

    In the recent advancement of cancer therapy, mortality of the immortal cancer cells begins to decline, and it shows great promise for the chemotherapy regimen supported by targeted therapy. In this post-genomic era boosted by the discovery of microRNA (miRNA), it has been understood that miRNA regulates gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. On the other hand, some studies have also indicated that miRNA expression level has changed during the treatment of chemotherapy. Data based on various previous studies, we propose that the chemotherapeutic agents modulate miRNA expression that might perform anticancerous activities through cellular changes such as DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis.

  20. Study of anti-cancer effects of chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithra, K.; Vijayaraghavan, S.; Prakasarao, Aruna; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of the variations in the spectroscopic patterns of the key bio molecules using Native fluorescence spectroscopy, without exogenous labels, has emerged as a new trend in the characterization of the Physiological State and the Discrimination of Pathological from normal conditions of cells and tissues as the relative concentration of these bio-molecules serve as markers in evaluating the presence of cancer in the body. The aim of this unique study is to use these features of Optical spectroscopy in monitoring the behavior of cells to treatment and thus to evaluate the response to Chemotherapeutic agents and Radiation in Breast Cancer Patients. The results of the study conducted using NFS of Human blood plasma of biopsy proved Breast Cancer patients undergoing treatment are promising, enhancing the scope of Native fluorescence Spectroscopy emerging as a promising technology in the evaluation of Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancer Patients.

  1. Development of a new anti-cancer agent for targeted radionuclide therapy: β- radiolabeled RAFT-RGD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitprin, A.

    2013-01-01

    β-emitters radiolabeled RAFT-RGD as new agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. The αvβ3 integrin is known to play an important role in tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor proliferation, survival and metastasis. Because of its overexpression on neo-endothelial cells such as those present in growing tumors, as well as on tumor cells of various origins, αvβ3 integrin is an attractive molecular target for diagnosis and therapy of the rapidly growing and metastatic tumors. A tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK])4 (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets integrin αvβ3 in vitro and in vivo. RAFT-RGD has been used for tumor imaging and drug targeting. This study is the first to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the β-emitters radiolabeled tetrameric RGD peptide RAFT-RGD in a Nude mouse model of αvβ3 -expressing tumors. An injection of 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD in mice with αvβ3 -positive tumors caused a significant growth delay as compared with mice treated with 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RAD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In comparison, an injection of 30 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD had no efficacy for the treatment of αvβ3 -negative tumors. 90 Y-RAFT-RGD and 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent αvβ3 -expressing tumor targeting agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  2. Pt(IV/Re(I Chitosan Conjugates as a Flexible Platform for the Transport of Therapeutic and/or Diagnostic Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Gabano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New chitosan derivatives modified with (3-carboxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (1 and coupled with (OC-6-44-diammine(4-carboxypropanoatodichloridoethanolatoplatinum(IV (2, were synthesized and their preliminary biological evaluation carried out in human tumor cells. Some of these derivatives were also loaded with a chelating ligand (3 that was derived from bis(quinolin-2-ylmethylamine to obtain chitosan-based nanoparticles for an EPR-mediated delivery of Pt(IV prodrugs and Re(I tricarbonyl complexes (4, to explore a multimodal theranostic approach to cancer. The cytotoxicity of the different chitosan conjugates (C12, C123, and C1234, carrying different combinations of the Pt(IV complex, the chelator and the Re(I complex, was evaluated in the A2780 human ovarian cancer cell line using the MTT assay. The Pt(IV-containing nanosystems showed low to moderate cytotoxic activity (IC50 values in the range 13.5–33.7 µM and was comparable to that found for the free Pt(IV complex (IC50 = 13.7 µM. Therefore, the Pt(IV-chitosan conjugation did not enhance the cytotoxic activity of the Pt(IV prodrug, which certainly reflects the inefficient cellular uptake of the nanoconjugates. Nevertheless, a clearer view of their potential for the delivery of anticancer agents requires further in vivo tests because the EPR effect increases extravasation and retention within the tumor tissue, not necessarily within the tumor cells.

  3. Supramolecular chiro-biomedical assays and enantioselective HPLC analyses for evaluation of profens as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, potential anticancer agents and common xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Hussain, Iqbal; Saleem, Kishwar; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Bazylak, Grzegorz

    2008-06-01

    The permanent world-wide increase in therapeutic administration of racemic profens as easy available non-prescribed analgesic drugs and a common first-choice anti-inflammatory agents was recently linked with renewed interest in their beneficial use, also as enantiopure formulations, to treat and/or prevent a variety of human malignancies including its four major types as colorectal, breast, lung, and prostate cancer. This underlies the continuous need of selecting perfectly suited chiral separation methods of profens capable to determine nanolevels of a distomer in presence of the eutomer in a variety of complex biological and environmental media. Thus, current improvements for direct enantiomeric separations of profens by well defined supramolecular-based chiral HPLC and recently developed monolithic, combinatorial, bimodal and polymeric chiral stationary phases employing a modern supramolecular chirality concepts has been outlined in this review. The use of diverse supramolecular approaches for chiral HPLC as an easy accessible tool enabling fast development of nanoscale enantioselective, high-throughput and gradient screening procedures for in situ monitoring of stereoselective ADME properties of profens in range of anticancer drug discovery technologies has been also addressed.

  4. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel 6-Hydroxy-benzo[d][1,3]oxathiol-2-one Schiff Bases as Potential Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza de Lucas Chazin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of discovering new anticancer agents, we have designed and synthesized novel 6-hydroxy-benzo[d][1,3]oxathiol-2-one Schiff bases. The synthesis started with the selective nitration at 5-position of 6-hydroxybenzo[d][1,3]oxathiol-2-one (1 leading to the nitro derivative 2. The nitro group of 2 was reduced to give the amino intermediate 3. Schiff bases 4a–r were obtained from coupling reactions between 3 and various benzaldehydes and heteroaromatic aldehydes. All the new compounds were fully identified and characterized by NMR (1H and 13C and specifically for 4q by X-ray crystallography. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the compounds was evaluated against cancer cell lines (ACP-03, SKMEL-19 and HCT-116 by using MTT assay. Schiff bases 4b and 4o exhibited promising cytotoxicity against ACP-03 and SKMEL-19, respectively, with IC50 values lower than 5 μM. This class of compounds can be considered as a good starting point for the development of new lead molecules in the fight against cancer.

  5. 2,3-Diaryl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine derivatives as potential anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Marie Kirwen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the suitability of the 3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine ring system in developing novel anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents incorporating a diaryl pharmacophore. Eight 2,3-diaryl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine derivatives retrieved from our in-house database were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against nine cancer cell lines. The results indicated that the compounds showed moderate cytotoxic activity against MCF-7, MDA-MB-468, K562 and SaOS2 cells, with K562 being the most sensitive among the four cancer cell lines. The eight 2,3-diaryl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine derivatives were also evaluated for their COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity in vitro. The results showed that compound 3f exhibited 2-fold selectivity with IC50 values of 9.2 and 21.8 µmol/L against COX-2 and COX-1, respectively. Molecular docking studies on the most active compound 3f revealed a binding mode similar to that of celecoxib in the active site of the COX-2 enzyme.

  6. Development and Validation of a HPLC Method for Quantitation of BA-TPQ, a Novel Iminoquinone Anticancer Agent, and an Initial Pharmacokinetic Study in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Hongxia; Rayburn, Elizabeth R.; Zhang, Xu; Gurpinar, Evrim; Yang, Xinyi; Sommers, Charnell I.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2013-01-01

    We herein describe the development and validation of a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for the quantitation of 7-(benzylamino)-1, 3, 4, 8-tetrahydropyrrolo [4, 3, 2-de]quinolin-8(1H)-one (BA-TPQ), a newly synthesized iminoquinone anticancer agent. BA-TPQ was extracted from plasma and tissue samples by first precipitating proteins with acetonitrile followed by a liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was carried out using a gradient flow rate on a Zorbax SB C-18 column, and the effluent was monitored by UV detection at 346 nm. The method was found to be precise, accurate, and specific, with a linear range from 3.91 to 1955.0 ng/mL in plasma, 19.55 to 1955.0 ng/mL in spleen, brain, and liver homogenates, and 19.55 to 3910.0 ng/mL in heart, lung and kidney homogenates. The method was stable under all relevant conditions. Using this method, we also carried out an initial study determining plasma pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of BA-TPQ in mice following intravenous administration. In summary, this simple and sensitive HPLC method can be used in future preclinical and clinical studies of BA-TPQ. PMID:20845374

  7. Evaluation of SD-208, a TGF-β-RI Kinase Inhibitor, as an Anticancer Agent in Retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadakar, Puran; Akbari, Abolfazl; Ghassemi, Fariba; Mobini, Gholam Reza; Mohebi, Masoumeh; Bolhassani, Manzar; Abed Khojasteh, Hoda; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-06-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children resulting from genetic alterations and transformation of mature retinal cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of SD-208, TGF-β-RI kinase inhibitor, on the expression of some miRNAs including a miR-17/92 cluster in retinoblastoma cells. Prior to initiate this work, the cell proliferation was studied by Methyl Thiazolyl Tetrazolium (MTT) and bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assays. Then, the expression patterns of four miRNAs (18a, 20a, 22, and 34a) were investigated in the treated SD-208 (0.0, 1, 2 and 3 µM) and untreated Y-79 cells. A remarkable inhibition of the cell proliferation was found in Y-79 cells treated with SD-208 versus untreated cells. Also, the expression changes were observed in miRNAs 18a, 20a, 22 and 34a in response to SD-208 treatment (Pretinoblastoma cell line. To the best of the researchers' knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that the SD-208 could alter the expression of tumor suppressive miRNAs as well as oncomiRs in vitro. In conclusion, the present data suggest that SD-208 could be an alternative agent in retinoblastoma treatment.

  8. QSAR Modeling on Benzo[c]phenanthridine Analogues as Topoisomerase I Inhibitors and Anti-cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Ngoc-Phuong Huynh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Benzo[c]phenanthridine (BCP derivatives were identified as topoisomerase I (TOP-I targeting agents with pronounced antitumor activity. In this study, hologram-QSAR, 2D-QSAR and 3D-QSAR models were developed for BCPs on topoisomerase I inbibitory activity and cytotoxicity against seven tumor cell lines including RPMI8402, CPT-K5, P388, CPT45, KB3-1, KBV-1and KBH5.0. The hologram, 2D, and 3D-QSAR models were obtained with the square of correlation coefficient R2 = 0.58 − 0.77, the square of the crossvalidation coefficient q2 = 0.41 − 0.60 as well as the external set’s square of predictive correlation coefficient r2 = 0.51 − 0.80. Moreover, the assessment method based on reliability test with confidence level of 95% was used to validate the predictive power of QSAR models and to prevent over-fitting phenomenon of classical QSAR models. Our QSAR model could be applied to design new analogues of BCPs with higher antitumor and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity.

  9. Development of a chimeric recombinant disintegrin as a cost-effective anticancer agent with promising translational potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minea, Radu; Helchowski, Corey; Rubino, Barbara; Brodmann, Kyle; Swenson, Stephen; Markland, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Vicrostatin (VCN) is a chimeric recombinant disintegrin generated in Origami B (DE3) E. coli as a genetic fusion between the C-terminal tail of a viperid disintegrin echistatin and crotalid disintegrin contortrostatin (CN). The therapeutic modulation of multiple integrin pathways via soluble disintegrins was previously shown by us and others to elicit potent anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic effects in several animal cancer models. Despite these favorable attributes, these polypeptides are notoriously difficult to produce recombinantly in significant quantity due to their structure which requires the correct pairing of multiple disulfide bonds for biological activity. In this report, we show that VCN can be reliably produced in large amounts (yields in excess of 200mg of active purified disintegrin per liter of bacterial culture) in Origami B (DE3), an E. coli expression strain engineered to support the folding of disulfide-rich heterologous proteins directly in its oxidative cytoplasmic compartment. VCN retains the integrin binding specificity of both parental molecules it was derived from, but with a different binding affinity profile. While competing for the same integrin receptors that are preferentially upregulated in the tumor microenvironment, VCN exerts a potent inhibitory effect on endothelial cell (EC) migration and tube formation in a dose-dependent manner, by forcing these cells to undergo significant actin cytoskeleton reorganization when exposed to this agent in vitro. Moreover, VCN has a direct effect on breast cancer cells inhibiting their in vitro motility. In an effort to address our main goal of developing a clinically relevant delivery method for recombinant disintegrins, VCN was efficiently packaged in liposomes (LVCN) and evaluated in vivo in an animal breast cancer model. Our data demonstrate that LVCN is well tolerated, its intravenous administration inducing a significant delay in tumor growth and an increase in animal survival, results

  10. Bacteriophages displaying anticancer peptides in combined antibacterial and anticancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Majewska, Joanna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Lecion, Dorota; Hodyra, Katarzyna; Nasulewicz-Goldeman, Anna; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Novel anticancer strategies have employed bacteriophages as drug carriers and display platforms for anticancer agents; however, bacteriophage-based platforms maintain their natural antibacterial activity. This study provides the assessment of combined anticancer (engineered) and antibacterial (natural) phage activity in therapies. An in vivo BALB/c mouse model of 4T1 tumor growth accompanied by surgical wound infection was applied. The wounds were located in the areas of tumors. Bacteriophages (T4) were modified with anticancer Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg (YIGSR) peptides by phage display and injected intraperitoneally. Tumor growth was decreased in mice treated with YIGSR-displaying phages. The acuteness of wounds, bacterial load and inflammatory markers in phages-treated mice were markedly decreased. Thus, engineered bacteriophages combine antibacterial and anticancer activity.

  11. Synergistic antiproliferative effect of cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (II) and a new anticancer agent, plasmanyl-(N-acyl)-ethanolamine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaevich, I S; Vlasenkova, N K; Gerasimova, G K

    1991-01-01

    The action of a new anticancer agent, the semisynthetic alkyl-phospholipid plasmanyl-(N-acyl)-ethanolamine (sPNAE), namely 1-O-octadecyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(N-palmitoyl)-ethanolamine, on protein kinase C (PKC) was investigated, and it was found to inhibit in a dose-dependent manner PKC isolated from mouse brain. The inhibition was competitive with respect to phosphatidylserine (K(i) = 20 microM). Lyso-PNAE, a possible cell metabolite of sPNAE, also inhibited PKC. A two-site model was used to calculate the binding affinity and the number of binding sites for phorbol ester in a culture of human melanoma BRO cells. The values of Kd, the dissociation constant, were K'd = 0.5 nM and K"d = 72 nM, whereas the values of Bmax, the number of binding sites, were B'max = 4.6 x 10(4) sites cell-1, and B"max = 2.9 x 10(5) sites cell-1. sPNAE was able to reduce the affinity of BRO cells for phorbol ester with almost no changes in the number of binding sites: K'd = 1.6 nM, K"d = 557 nM, and B'max = 4 x 10(4), B"max = 1.9 x 10(5). These data suggest that sPNAE may inhibit PKC in intact cells. Since various inhibitors of PKC may enhance the antiproliferative activity of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP), we investigated the effect of the combination of sPNAE and cis-DDP on the proliferation of BRO cells. sPNAE synergistically enhanced the antiproliferative activity of cis-DDP.

  12. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of guanylhydrazones. Synthesis of 2-(2-methylthio-2-aminovinyl)-1-methylpyridinium iodides and 2-(2-methylthio-2-aminovinyl)-1-methylquinolinium iodides as potential radioprotective and anticancer agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almassian, B.

    1985-01-01

    The finding of appreciable antileukemic activity in a series of 2-(2-methylthio-2-amino)vinyl-1-methylquinolinium iodides (Foye et al., 1980, 1983) suggested that greater basicity, as compared with the corresponding dithioacetic acids, was contributing to the increase in activity. The addition of a greater degree of basicity in the design of anticancer possibilities in this series was considered worth investigation, particularly in view of the activity of a series of bis(quanylhydrazones) synthesized at Lederle Laboratories. Accordingly, a series of guanylhydrazones of 4-pyridine-,2-pyridine- and 4-quinolinecarboxyaldehydes was synthesized for anticancer as well as antibacterial screening. Also, substitution of additional basic functions in the 2-(2-methylthio-2-amino) vinyl-1-methylquinolinium and pyridinium iodide series has been made. Appreciable antimicrobial activities have been found with both 2-pyridine and 4-quinolinealdehyde guanylhydrazones, as well as with 2-(2-methylthio-2-amino)vinyl-1-methyl-pyridinium iodides. The overall approach to the synthesis of potential anticancer agents in this project is thus to observe the effect of increasing basicity of these compounds on DNA binding and anticancer activity

  13. Câncer e agentes antineoplásicos ciclo-celular específicos e ciclo-celular não específicos que interagem com o DNA: uma introdução Cancer and cell cicle-specific and cell cicle nonspecific anticancer DNA-interactive agents: an introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia de Almeida

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The chemotherapy agents against cancer may be classified as "cell cycle-specific" or "cell cycle-nonspecific". Nevertheless, several of them have their biological activity related to any kind of action on DNA such as: antimetabolic agents (DNA synthesis inhibition, inherently reactive agents (DNA alkylating electrophilic traps for macromolecular nucleophiles from DNA through inter-strand cross-linking - ISC - alkylation and intercalating agents (drug-DNA interactions inherent to the binding made due to the agent penetration in to the minor groove of the double helix. The earliest and perhaps most extensively studied and most heavily employed clinical anticancer agents in use today are the DNA inter-strand cross-linking agents.

  14. Oral delivery of anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanki, Kaushik; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    The present report focuses on the various aspects of oral delivery of anticancer drugs. The significance of oral delivery in cancer therapeutics has been highlighted which principally includes improvement in quality of life of patients and reduced health care costs. Subsequently, the challenges...... incurred in the oral delivery of anticancer agents have been especially emphasized. Sincere efforts have been made to compile the various physicochemical properties of anticancer drugs from either literature or predicted in silico via GastroPlus™. The later section of the paper reviews various emerging...... trends to tackle the challenges associated with oral delivery of anticancer drugs. These invariably include efflux transporter based-, functional excipient- and nanocarrier based-approaches. The role of drug nanocrystals and various others such as polymer based- and lipid based...

  15. Eco-sustainable synthesis and biological evaluation of 2-phenyl 1,3-benzodioxole derivatives as anticancer, DNA binding and antibacterial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan Dutta Gupta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The current research and development scenario in medicinal chemistry demands small molecules synthesized in a simple, fast and effective way with enhanced activity and fewer side effects than the existing ones. Therefore, one-pot, microwave assisted green and efficient synthesis of a series of derivatives belonging to 2-phenyl 1,3-benzodioxole (1a–14a and 2-phenyl 1,3-benzodioxole-4-ol (1b–14b class were carried out and subsequently investigated for their anticancer, antibacterial and DNA binding potential. Compound 3c proved to be the most active one among the screened derivatives possessing anticancer and antibacterial potency greater than the standard reference compound (cisplatin and cinoxacin for anticancer and antibacterial activity, respectively. The most active compound in terms of DNA binding capacity was found to be 5b. A rewarding feature of the work is a facile, convenient, eco friendly one step synthesis of compounds demonstrating attenuated activity against cancer and bacterial cell with an inherent potential of binding to DNA. Subsequently, a hit molecule for further anticancer, antibacterial (compound 3c and DNA binding studies (compound 5b was also identified.

  16. HSP32 (HO-1) inhibitor, copoly(styrene-maleic acid)-zinc protoporphyrin IX, a water-soluble micelle as anticancer agent: In vitro and in vivo anticancer effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Greish, Khaled; Qin, Haibo; Liao, Long; Nakamura, Hideaki; Takeya, Motohiro; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    We reported previously the antitumor effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibition by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP). ZnPP per se is poorly water soluble and thus cannot be used as anticancer chemotherapeutic. Subsequently, we developed water-soluble micelles of ZnPP using styrene-maleic acid copolymer (SMA), which encapsulated ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP). In this report, the in vitro and in vivo therapeutic effects of SMA-ZnPP are described. In vitro experiments using 11 cultured tumor cell lines and six normal cell lines revealed a remarkable cytotoxicity of SMA-ZnPP against various tumor cells; average IC(50) is about 11.1 μM, whereas the IC(50) to various normal cells is significantly higher, that is, more than 50 μM. In the pharmacokinetic study, we found that SMA-ZnPP predominantly accumulated in the liver tissue after i.v. injection, suggesting its applicability for liver cancer. As expected, a remarkable antitumor effect was achieved in the VX-2 tumor model in the liver of rabbit that is known as one the most difficult tumor models to cure. Antitumor effect was also observed in murine tumor xenograft, that is, B16 melanoma and Meth A fibrosarcoma. Meanwhile, no apparent side effects were found even at the dose of ∼7 times higher concentration of therapeutics dose. These findings suggest a potential of SMA-ZnPP as a tool for anticancer therapy toward clinical development, whereas further investigations are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Could the FDA-approved anti-HIV PR inhibitors be promising anticancer agents? An answer from enhanced docking approach and molecular dynamics analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arodola OA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Olayide A Arodola, Mahmoud ES SolimanMolecular Modelling and Drug Design Lab, School of Health Sciences, Westville Campus, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South AfricaAbstract: Based on experimental data, the anticancer activity of nelfinavir (NFV, a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI, was reported. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of NFV is yet to be verified. It was hypothesized that the anticancer activity of NFV is due to its inhibitory effect on heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90, a promising target for anticancer therapy. Such findings prompted us to investigate the potential anticancer activity of all other FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. To accomplish this, “loop docking” – an enhanced in-house developed molecular docking approach – followed by molecular dynamic simulations and postdynamic analyses were performed to elaborate on the binding mechanism and relative binding affinities of nine FDA-approved HIV-1 PIs against human Hsp90. Due to the lack of the X-ray crystal structure of human Hsp90, homology modeling was performed to create its 3D structure for subsequent simulations. Results showed that NFV has better binding affinity (ΔG =−9.2 kcal/mol when compared with other PIs: this is in a reasonable accordance with the experimental data (IC50 3.1 µM. Indinavir, saquinavir, and ritonavir have close binding affinity to NFV (ΔG =−9.0, −8.6, and −8.5 kcal/mol, respectively. Per-residue interaction energy decomposition analysis showed that hydrophobic interaction (most importantly with Val534 and Met602 played the most predominant role in drug binding. To further validate the docking outcome, 5 ns molecular dynamic simulations were performed in order to assess the stability of the docked complexes. To our knowledge, this is the first account of detailed computational investigations aimed to investigate the potential anticancer activity and the binding

  18. Phytochemical, Anticancer and Antioxidant Evaluation of Potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Key words: anticancer, antioxidant, C. surinamensis, phytochemical investigation, plant extract ... agents active against cancer and infectious diseases ..... (2004). Wine polyphenols and ethanol do not significantly scavenge superoxide nor affect endothelial nitric oxide production. Journal of. Nutritional. Biochemistry.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new C-12(α/β)-(N-) sulfamoyl-phenylamino-14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives as potent anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandanur, Sai Giridhar Sarma; Nanduri, Srinivas; Golakoti, Nageswara Rao

    2017-07-01

    Andrographolide, the major diterpenoidal constituent of Andrographis paniculata (Acanthaceae) and its derivatives have been reported to possess plethora of biological properties including potent anti-cancer activity. In this work, synthesis and in-vitro anti-cancer evaluation of new C-12-substituted aryl amino 14-deoxy-andrographolide derivatives (III a-f) are reported. The substitutions include various sulfonamide moieties -SO 2 -NH-R 1 . The new derivatives (III a-e) exhibited improved cytotoxicity (GI 50 , TGI and LC 50 ) compared to andrographolide (I) and the corresponding 3,14,19-O-triacetyl andrographolide (II) when evaluated against 60 NCI cell line panel. Compounds III c and III e are found to be non-toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) cells compared to reference drug THZ-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Frondoside A from sea cucumber and nymphaeols from Okinawa propolis: Natural anti-cancer agents that selectively inhibit PAK1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Tawata, Shinkichi; Maruta, Hiroshi

    2017-05-30

    A sulfated saponin called "Frondoside A" (FRA) from sea cucumber and ingredients from Okinawa propolis (OP) have been previously shown to suppress the PAK1-dependent growth of A549 lung cancer as well as pancreatic cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanism underlying their anti-cancer action still remains to be clarified. In this study, for the first time, we found that both FRA and OP directly inhibit PAK1 in vitro in a selective manner (far more effectively than two other oncogenic kinases, LIMK and AKT). Furthermore, at least two major anti-cancer ingredients of OP, nymphaeols A and C, also directly inhibit PAK1 in vitro in a selective manner. To the best of our knowledge, FRA is the first marine compound that selectively inhibits PAK1. Likewise, these nymphaeols are the first propolis ingredients that selectively inhibit PAK1.

  1. Anticancer chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This document examines chemotherapeutic agents for use in veterinary oncology. It lists some of the most common categories of chemotherapeutic drugs, such as alkylating agents and corticosteroids. For each category, the paper lists some example drugs, gives their mode of action, tumors usually susceptible to the drug, and common side effects. A brief discussion of mechanisms of drug resistance is also provided. (MHB)

  2. Anticancer Synergy Between Polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Lewandowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemoprevention has recently gained a new dimension due to the possibility of studying the mechanisms of action of chemopreventive agents at the molecular level. Many compounds have been proved to inhibit early stages of carcinogenesis in experimental models. These compounds include both recognized drugs (such as tamoxifen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and natural constituents of edible and therapeutic plants, particularly polyphenols. Phenolics are characterized by high structural diversity and, consequently, a very broad spectrum of biological activities. They are increasingly looked upon as a valuable alternative or a support for synthetic drugs, as evidenced by a growing number of clinical trials regarding the use of phenolic compounds and polyphenol-rich extracts in chemoprevention and therapy. In the present work, we discuss the effectiveness of natural polyphenols as cancer preventive and therapeutic agents resulting from their synergy with synthetic or semisynthetic anticancer drugs as well as with other phenolic compounds of plant origin.

  3. Synthesis and serotonin transporter activity of 1,3-bis(aryl)-2-nitro-1-propenes as a new class of anticancer agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNamara, Yvonne M.; Cloonan, Suzanne M.; Knox, Andrew J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Structural derivatives of 4-MTA, an illegal amphetamine analogue have been previously shown to have anticancer effects in vitro. In this study we report the synthesis of a series of novel 1,3-bis(aryl)-2-nitro-1-propene derivatives related in structure to 4-MTA. A number of these compounds...... of the serotonin transporter, a high affinity target for amphetamines and independent of protein tyrosine phosphatases and tubulin dynamics both of which have been previously associated with nitrostyrene-induced cell death. We demonstrate that a number of these compounds induce caspase activation, PARP cleavage...

  4. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  5. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/15s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asfar S Azmi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. Discovery of Novel Bromophenol Hybrids as Potential Anticancer Agents through the Ros-Mediated Apoptotic Pathway: Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jun Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of bromophenol hybrids with N-containing heterocyclic moieties were designed, and their anticancer activities against a panel of five human cancer cell lines (A549, Bel7402, HepG2, HCT116 and Caco2 using MTT assay in vitro were explored. Among them, thirteen compounds (17a, 17b, 18a, 19a, 19b, 20a, 20b, 21a, 21b, 22a, 22b, 23a, and 23b exhibited significant inhibitory activity against the tested cancer cell lines. The structure-activity relationships (SARs of bromophenol derivatives were discussed. The promising candidate compound 17a could induce cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and induce apoptosis in A549 cells, as well as caused DNA fragmentations, morphological changes and ROS generation by the mechanism studies. Furthermore, compound 17a suppression of Bcl-2 levels (decrease in the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and down-regulation in the expression levels of Bcl-2 in A549 cells were observed, along with activation caspase-3 and PARP, which indicated that compound 17a induced A549 cells apoptosis in vitro through the ROS-mediated apoptotic pathway. These results might be useful for bromophenol derivatives to be explored and developed as novel anticancer drugs.

  7. Anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norenberg, Jeffrey P.

    2017-04-04

    A subject afflicted with a cancer or precancerous condition is treated by administering an agent that increases expression of somatostatin receptors, and a cytotoxic recognition ligand. In an alternative embodiment, somatostatin analogs, which are radiolabeled are used to treat cancer or precancerous conditions.

  8. Protein phosphatase 2A inhibition and circumvention of cisplatin cross-resistance by novel TCM-platinum anticancer agents containing demethylcantharidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Kenneth K W; Wang, Xinning; Yu, Chun Wing; Ho, Yee-Ping; Au-Yeung, Steve C F

    2004-09-01

    Novel TCM-platinum compounds [Pt(C(8)H(8)O(5))(NH(2)R)(2)] 1-5, derived from integrating demethylcantharidin, a modified component from a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with a platinum moiety, possess anticancer and protein phosphatase 2A inhibition properties. The compounds are able to circumvent cisplatin resistance by apparently targeting the DNA repair mechanism. Novel isosteric analogues [Pt(C(9)H(10)O(4))(NH(2)R)(2)] A and B, devoid of PP2A-inhibitory activity, were found to suffer from an enhanced DNA repair and were cross-resistant to cisplatin. The results advocate a well-defined structure-activity requirement associating the PP2A-inhibiting demethylcantharidin with the circumvention of cisplatin cross-resistance demonstrated by TCM-Pt compounds 1-5.

  9. Design and docking of novel series of hybrid xanthones as anti-cancer agent to target human DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Mohan Nainwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase (topo IIα is a homodimeric protein catalyzes topological vicissitudes by adding or by soothing super coiling transpiration, occurs in human DNA during DNA replication as an outcome chromosome segregation and condensation occurs during meiosis I and recombination. To prevent the cleavage and religation activity we administered novel hybrid substituted Xanthone series of drugs. The toxicity prediction showed outstanding results which impetus to study its anticancer activities by targeting topoisomerase (topo IIα. We developed the homology model of the topoisomerase (topo IIα due to the unavailability of 3D structure in the Protein Data Bank. Structural assessment of the modeled protein and confirmed the quality of the model. The ligands were docked using Autodock4.2 software and binding energy was reported. The compound XM9, XN2, XM7, XLNU and XNS scored lowest binding energy and highest binding affinity. The interaction sites and the hydrogen bond were observed.

  10. Bio-synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. and its therapeutic evaluation as anticancer and antimicrobial agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Amit Kumar [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India); Tripathy, Debabrata [Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, 793002 Meghalaya (India); Choudhary, Alka [Department of Natural Products, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India); Aili, Pavan Kumar [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India); Chatterjee, Anupam [Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, 793002 Meghalaya (India); Singh, Inder Pal [Department of Natural Products, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India); Banerjee, Uttam Chand, E-mail: ucbanerjee@niper.ac.in [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology Biotechnology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, 160062 Punjab (India)

    2015-08-01

    The present study aims to develop an easy and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using extracts from the medicinal plant, Potentilla fulgens and evaluation of its anticancer and antimicrobial properties. The various parts of P. fulgens were screened and the root extract was found to have the highest potential for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The root extracts were able to quickly reduce Ag{sup +} to Ag{sup 0} and stabilized the nanoparticles. The synthesis of nanoparticles was confirmed by UV–Visible spectrophotometry and further characterized using Zeta sizer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electron microscopic study showed that the size of the nanoparticle was in the range of 10 to 15 nm and spherical in shape. The studies of phytochemical analysis of nanoparticles indicated that the adsorbed components on the surface of nanoparticles were mainly flavonoid in nature. Furthermore, nanoparticles were evaluated as cytotoxic against various cancer cell lines and 0.2 to 12 μg/mL nanoparticles showed good toxicity. The IC{sub 50} value of nanoparticles was found to be 4.91 and 8.23 μg/mL against MCF-7 and U-87 cell lines, respectively. Additionally, the apoptotic effect of synthesized nanoparticles on normal and cancer cells was studied using trypan blue assay and flow-cytometric analysis. The results indicate the synthesized nanoparticle ability to kill cancer cells compared to normal cells. The nanoparticles also exhibited comparable antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. - Highlights: • Bio-synthesis of AgNPs using a medicinal plant Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. • Optimization of NP synthesis and its characterization using various techniques • Determination of therapeutic potential in terms of anticancer and antimicrobial properties • To know the mechanistic

  11. Bio-synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. and its therapeutic evaluation as anticancer and antimicrobial agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Tripathy, Debabrata; Choudhary, Alka; Aili, Pavan Kumar; Chatterjee, Anupam; Singh, Inder Pal; Banerjee, Uttam Chand

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to develop an easy and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using extracts from the medicinal plant, Potentilla fulgens and evaluation of its anticancer and antimicrobial properties. The various parts of P. fulgens were screened and the root extract was found to have the highest potential for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The root extracts were able to quickly reduce Ag + to Ag 0 and stabilized the nanoparticles. The synthesis of nanoparticles was confirmed by UV–Visible spectrophotometry and further characterized using Zeta sizer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electron microscopic study showed that the size of the nanoparticle was in the range of 10 to 15 nm and spherical in shape. The studies of phytochemical analysis of nanoparticles indicated that the adsorbed components on the surface of nanoparticles were mainly flavonoid in nature. Furthermore, nanoparticles were evaluated as cytotoxic against various cancer cell lines and 0.2 to 12 μg/mL nanoparticles showed good toxicity. The IC 50 value of nanoparticles was found to be 4.91 and 8.23 μg/mL against MCF-7 and U-87 cell lines, respectively. Additionally, the apoptotic effect of synthesized nanoparticles on normal and cancer cells was studied using trypan blue assay and flow-cytometric analysis. The results indicate the synthesized nanoparticle ability to kill cancer cells compared to normal cells. The nanoparticles also exhibited comparable antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. - Highlights: • Bio-synthesis of AgNPs using a medicinal plant Potentilla fulgens Wall. ex Hook. • Optimization of NP synthesis and its characterization using various techniques • Determination of therapeutic potential in terms of anticancer and antimicrobial properties • To know the mechanistic apoptosis effect of

  12. Distribution of withaferin A, an anticancer potential agent, in different parts of two varieties of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal. grown in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, A S; Dharmadasa, R M; Samarasinghe, Kosala

    2013-02-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal. (Family: Solanaceae) is a therapeutically important medicinal plant in traditional and Ayurveda systems of medicine in Sri Lanka. Witheferin A, is a potential anticancer compound found in W. somnifera. In the present study, attempts have been made to compare witheferin A content, in different parts of (root, stem, bark, leaf) two varieties of (LC1 and FR1) W. somnifera grown in same soil and climatic conditions. Ground sample (1g) of leaves, bark, stem and roots of two W. somnifera varieties were extracted with CHCl3 three times. Thin Layer Chromatographic analysis (TLC) of withaferin A in both plant extracts were performed on pre-coated Silica gel 60 GF254 plates in hexane: ethyl acetate: methanol (2: 14: 1) mobile phase. Densitometer scanning was performed at lambda(max) = 215 nm. HPLC of W. somnifera extracts was performed using Kromasil C18 reverse phase column. Both varieties of W. somnifera differed in withaferin A. After visualizing TLC plates with vanillin-sulphuric acid leaf and bark extracts of both varieties showed high intensity purple colour spots (R(f) 0.14) than in stem and roots. The highest amount of withaferin A (3812 ppm) was observed in leaves of variety LC1 while the lowest amount was observed in roots of variety FR1 (5 ppm). According to the results it could be concluded that content of Witheferin A was vary leaf > bark > stem > roots in both varieties. Therefore, there is a high potential of incorporation of leaves and bark of W. somnifera for the preparation of Ayurveda drug leading to anticancer activity instead of roots.

  13. Efficacy of a non-hypercalcemic vitamin-D2 derived anti-cancer agent (MT19c and inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in an ovarian cancer xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Moore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous vitamin-D analogs exhibited poor response rates, high systemic toxicities and hypercalcemia in human trials to treat cancer. We identified the first non-hypercalcemic anti-cancer vitamin D analog MT19c by altering the A-ring of ergocalciferol. This study describes the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action of MT19c in both in vitro and in vivo models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Antitumor efficacy of MT19c was evaluated in ovarian cancer cell (SKOV-3 xenografts in nude mice and a syngenic rat ovarian cancer model. Serum calcium levels of MT19c or calcitriol treated animals were measured. In-silico molecular docking simulation and a cell based VDR reporter assay revealed MT19c-VDR interaction. Genomewide mRNA analysis of MT19c treated tumors identified drug targets which were verified by immunoblotting and microscopy. Quantification of cellular malonyl CoA was carried out by HPLC-MS. A binding study with PPAR-Y receptor was performed. MT19c reduced ovarian cancer growth in xenograft and syngeneic animal models without causing hypercalcemia or acute toxicity. MT19c is a weak vitamin-D receptor (VDR antagonist that disrupted the interaction between VDR and coactivator SRC2-3. Genome-wide mRNA analysis and western blot and microscopy of MT19c treated xenograft tumors showed inhibition of fatty acid synthase (FASN activity. MT19c reduced cellular levels of malonyl CoA in SKOV-3 cells and inhibited EGFR/phosphoinositol-3kinase (PI-3K activity independently of PPAR-gamma protein. SIGNIFICANCE: Antitumor effects of non-hypercalcemic agent MT19c provide a new approach to the design of vitamin-D based anticancer molecules and a rationale for developing MT19c as a therapeutic agent for malignant ovarian tumors by targeting oncogenic de novo lipogenesis.

  14. Ultrastructural changes of erythrocytes in whole blood after exposure to prospective in silico-designed anticancer agents: a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Repsold

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Novel, in silico-designed anticancer compounds were synthesized in our laboratory namely, 2-ethyl-3-O-sulphamoyl-estra-1,3,5(10,15-tetraen-17-ol (ESE-15-ol and 2-ethyl-3-O-sulphamoyl-estra-1,3,5(1016-tetraene (ESE-16. These compounds were designed to have improved bioavailability when compared to their source compound, 2-methoxyestradiol. This theoretically would be due to their increased binding affinity to carbonic anhydrase II, present in erythrocytes. Since the novel compounds under investigation are proposed to be transported within erythrocytes bound to carbonic anhydrase II, the morphological effect which they may exert on whole blood and erythrocytes is of great significance. A secondary outcome included revision of previously reported procedures for the handling of the whole blood sample. The purpose of this study was twofold. Firstly, the ultrastructural morphology of a healthy female's erythrocytes was examined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM after exposure to the newly in silico-designed compounds. Morphology of erythrocytes following exposure to ESE-15-ol and ESE-16 for 3 minutes and 24 hours at 22°C were described with the use of SEM. The haemolytic activity of the compounds after 24 hours exposure were also determined with the ex vivo haemolysis assay. Secondly, storage conditions of the whole blood sample were investigated by determining morphological changes after a 24 hour storage period at 22°C and 37°C. RESULTS: No significant morphological changes were observed in the erythrocyte morphology after exposure to the novel anticancer compounds. Storage of the whole blood samples at 37°C for 24 hours resulted in visible morphological stress in the erythrocytes. Erythrocytes incubated at 22°C for 24 hours showed no structural deformity or distress. CONCLUSIONS: From this research the optimal temperature for ex vivo exposure of whole blood samples to ESE-15-ol and ESE-16 for 24 hours was determined to be 22

  15. Study on the thermodynamics of the binding of iminium and alkanolamine forms of the anticancer agent sanguinarine to human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Maidul; Khan, Asma Yasmeen; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Energetics of sanguinarine–human serum albumin has been elucidated. ► The alkanolamine binds stronger than iminium. ► Enthalpy driven binding for iminium was revealed. ► Alkanolamine form binding was favored by negative enthalpy and entropy changes. ► Spectroscopic results support calorimetry data. - Abstract: Sanguinarine is an anticancer plant alkaloid that can exist in the charged iminium and neutral alkanolamine forms. The thermodynamics of the interaction of the two forms with human serum albumin was investigated using calorimetric techniques, and the data supplemented with circular dichroism and spectrofluorimetric studies. The thermodynamic results show that there is only one class of binding for sanguinarine on HSA. The equilibrium constant was four times higher for the alkanolamine (K a = 2.18 · 10 5 M −1 ) than for iminium (K a = 5.97 · 10 4 M −1 ). The binding was enthalpy driven for iminium and favoured by both a negative enthalpy and a stronger favourable entropy contribution for the alkanolamine. Temperature dependent calorimetric data yielded values of ΔC p ∘ that are consistent with the involvement of different molecular forces in the complexation of the two forms of sanguinarine to HSA. The fluorescence quenching data suggest a static quenching mechanism. Synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroic data are consistent with a conformational change in the protein on binding that was also higher for the alkanolamine form.

  16. Synthesis, characterization of some novel 1,3,4-oxadiazole compounds containing 8-hydroxy quinolone moiety as potential antibacterial and anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Mahadev Adimule

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work a series of novel derivatives of 8-hydroxy quinolone substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazole compounds were synthesized by convergent synthetic method and studied for their antibacterial and anticancer properties. The cell lines used for cytotoxic evaluation were HeLa, Caco-2 and MCF7. The synthetic chemistry involved conversion of various substituted aromatic acids into ethyl ester 2a-e. The ethyl ester was converted into corresponding carbohydrazide 3a-e. Carbohydrazides are reacted with chloroacetic acid, phosphorous oxytrichloride and irradiated with microwave in order to obtain the various key intermediates 2-(chloromethyl-5-(substituted phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole 4a-e. The 2-(chloromethyl-5-(substituted phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole was reacted with 8-hydroxy quinolone in presence of sodium hydride and obtained a series of 8-hydroxy quinoline substituted 1,3,4-oxadiazoles 5a-e. Among the synthesised compounds, the cytotoxicity of the compound 5b i.e. 8-{[5-(2,4-dichlorophenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]methoxy}quinoline against MCF7 with IC50 of 5.3µM and the compound 5e i.e. 8-{[5-(4-bromophenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]methoxy}quinoline showed MIC of < 6.25µg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus which is comparable with the known standards. The standards used for cytotoxic evaluation was 5-fluorouracil and for antibacterial was nitrofurazone

  17. Synthesis and DFT study on Hantzsch reaction to produce asymmetrical compounds of 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives for P-glycoprotein inhibition as anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollazadeh, Shirin; Moosavi, Fatemeh; Hadizadeh, Farzin; Seifi, Mahmoud; Behravan, Javad; Iman, Maryam

    2018-02-19

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) causes the efflux of cancer chemotherapy drugs from tumor cells, so it's inhibition can be one target for design and synthesis of new anticancer drugs. In this study new compounds of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) were recommended as inhibitors of P-gp. We synthesized new symmetrical DHP with 36% - 43% yield by the reaction of new reactants. In biological studies, these compounds have high lipophilicity, and thus low water solubility. Four reactants I with different reactivity was computed and compared using DFT study. The LUMO-map was differently distributed on each reactant. Amine intermediate underwent tautomerism as atransition state and it seems to play important role in reaction progress. Calculations were performed to select suitable reactants. Two different reactants I, including one polar group and a non-polar group, were used to produce asymmetric compounds with 49%-60% yield. These asymmetric DHPs were more soluble than symmetric DHPs. In the final step another selected symmetric product (by elimination of chlorine atom) was synthesized with high yield (74%) with using DFT study. In this study, selected reactants by DFT calculation have increased yield of reaction from 36% to 74% without any catalyst. Diversity of products is noticeable topic. Racemic asymmetric compounds with R and S enantiomers have potential for enantiomeric separation. Each of these enantiomers could have different physiological effect. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Drug delivery system for an anticancer agent, chlorogenate-Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide nanohybrid synthesised using direct co-precipitation and ion exchange methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahuie, Farahnaz; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-09-01

    A nano-structured drug-inorganic clay hybrid involving an active anticancer compound, which is chlorogenic acid (CA) intercalated into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide, has been assembled via ion-exchange and co-precipitation methods to form a nanohybrid CZAE (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using an ion-exchange method) and CZAC (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using a direct method), respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that the CA-LDH had a hybrid structure in which the anionic chlorogenate is arranged between the interlayers as a horizontal monolayer at 90 and 20° angles from the x axis for CZAE and CZAC, respectively. Both nanohybrids have the properties of mesoporous materials. The high loading percentage of chlorogenic acid (approximately 43.2% for CZAE and 45.3% for CZAC) with basal spacings of 11.7 and 12.6 Å for CZAE and CZAC, respectively, corroborates the successful intercalation of chlorogenic acid into the interlayer gallery of layered double hydroxides. Free chlorogenic acid and the synthesised nanocomposites (CZAE, CZAC) were assessed for their cytotoxicity against various cancer cells. The Fourier transform infrared data supported the formation of both nanohybrids, and a thermal analysis showed that the nanohybrids are more thermally stable than their counterparts. The chlorogenate shows a sustained release, and the release rate of chlorogenate from CZAE and CZAC nanohybrids at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8 due to their different release mechanisms. The release rate of chlorogenate from both nanohybrids can be described as pseudo-second order. The present investigation revealed the potential of the nanohybrids to enhance the in vitro anti-tumour effect of chlorogenic acid in liver and lung cancer cells in vitro.

  19. Synthesis of novel quinoline-based 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazoles as potential anticancer, antifungal, antibacterial and antiprotozoal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Prada, Jonathan; Robledo, Sara M; Vélez, Iván D; Crespo, María Del Pilar; Quiroga, Jairo; Abonia, Rodrigo; Montoya, Alba; Svetaz, Laura; Zacchino, Susana; Insuasty, Braulio

    2017-05-05

    A new series of N-substituted 2-pyrazolines 9a-f, 10a-f, 11a-f, 12a-f and 13a-f were obtained from the cyclocondensation reaction of [(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)amino]chalcones 8a-f with hydrazine hydrate and its derivatives. Fourteen of the synthesized compounds including the starting chalcones were selected by US National Cancer Institute (NCI) for testing their anticancer activity against 60 different human cancer cell lines, with the most important GI 50 values ranging from 0.28 to 11.7 μM (0.13-6.05 μg/mL) and LC 50 values ranging from 2.6 to > 100 μM (1.2 to > 51.7 μg/mL), for chalcones 8a,d and pyrazolines 10c,d. All compounds were assessed for antibacterial activity against wild type and multidrug resistant gram negative and gram positive bacteria, with MIC values ranging from 31.25 to 500 μg/mL. Additionally, the novel compounds were tested for antifungal and antiparasitic properties. Although these compounds showed mild activity against Candida albicans, chalcones 8a and 8e showed high activity against Cryptococcus neoformans with MIC 50  = 7.8 μg/mL. For anti-Plasmodium falciparum activity the 2-pyrazoline 11b was the most active with EC 50  = 5.54 μg/mL. Regarding the activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, compound 10a was highly active with EC 50  = 0.70 μg/mL. Chalcone 8a had good activity against Leishmania panamensis amastigotes with EC 50  = 0.79 μg/mL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A chemical preformulation study of a host-guest complex of cucurbit[7]uril and a multinuclear platinum agent for enhanced anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Alan R; Florence, Alastair J; McInnes, Fiona J; Wheate, Nial J

    2009-10-07

    Single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction have been used to examine the host-guest complex of cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and the model dinuclear platinum anticancer complex trans-[{PtCl(NH(3))(2)}(2)mu-dpzm](2+) (di-Pt, dpzm= 4,4'-dipyrazolylmethane). The single crystal structure shows that the host-guest complex forms with the di-Pt dpzm ligand within the CB[7] cavity and with the platinum groups just beyond the macrocycle portals. Binding is stabilised through hydrophobic interactions and six hydrogen bonds between the platinum ammine ligands and the dpzm pyrazole amine to the CB[7] carbonyls. Each host-guest complex crystallises with two chloride counterions and 5.5 water molecules. The unit cell comprises four asymmetric units, each of which contains three crystallographically independent CB[7]-di-Pt moieties. X-Ray powder diffraction demonstrated structural consistency of the bulk crystals with a single polycrystalline phase that is identical with the single crystal structure. Finally, the effect of CB[7] encapsulation of the thermal stability of di-Pt was examined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). From the TGA experiments it was found that free CB[7] and the CB[7]-di-Pt complex lose 11 and 3.5% of their mass respectively, through the loss of water molecules, upon heating to 160 degrees C. The DSC results showed that the free dpzm ligand melts between 186 and 199 degrees C, with a standard enthalpy of fusion of 27.92 kJ mol(-1). As a 2+ inorganic salt the metal complex does not melt but undergoes several decomposition events between 140 and 290 degrees C. Encapsulation by CB[7] completely stabilises di-Pt with no decomposition of either the macrocycle or metal complex at temperatures up to 290 degrees C.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and absorption of the anticancer agents dasatinib and GDC-0941 under various gastric conditions in dogs--reversing the effect of elevated gastric pH with betaine HCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jodie; Dalziel, Gena; Dean, Brian; Ware, Joseph A; Salphati, Laurent

    2013-11-04

    Changes in gastric pH can impact the dissolution and absorption of compounds presenting pH-dependent solubility. We assessed, in dogs, the effects of gastric pH-modifying agents on the oral absorption of two weakly basic anticancer drugs, dasatinib and GDC-0941. We also tested whether drug-induced hypochlorhydria could be temporarily mitigated using betaine HCl. Pretreatments with pentagastrin, famotidine, betaine HCl, or combinations of famotidine and betaine HCl were administered orally to dogs prior to drug dosing. The gastric pH was measured under each condition for up to 7 h, and the exposure of the compounds tested was calculated. The average gastric pH in fasted dogs ranged from 1.45 to 3.03. Pentagastrin or betaine HCl treatments lowered the pH and reduced its variability between dogs compared to control animals. In contrast, famotidine treatment maintained gastric pH at values close to 7 for up to 5 h, while betaine HCl transiently reduced the pH to approximately 2 in the famotidine-treated dogs. Famotidine pretreatment lowered GDC-0941 exposure by 5-fold, and decreased dasatinib measurable concentrations 30-fold, compared to the pentagastrin-treated dogs. Betaine HCl restored GDC-0941 AUC in famotidine-treated dogs to levels achieved in control animals, and increased dasatinib AUC to 1.5-fold that measured in control dogs. The results confirmed the negative impact of acid-reducing agents on the absorption of weakly basic drugs. They also suggested that betaine HCl coadministration may be a viable strategy in humans treated with acid-reducing agents in order to temporarily reduce gastric pH and restore drug exposure.

  2. Potential of N-aryl(benzyl,heteryl-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthioacetamides as anticancer and antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii M. Antypenko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The death rate from cancer and infectious diseases is still very high, therefore research in this area is extremely important and promising as in medical, so in economic point of view. Thus, potassium salt of tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-thion was modified per alkylation by N-aryl(benzyl,heterylacetamides with proper confirmation of newly synthesized compounds’ structures by FT-IR, LC–MS, 1H NMR and elemental analysis data. The substances were tested for bioluminescence inhibition against Photobacterium leiognathi Sh1 (5–50 μg/mL to check their cytotoxicity. Then they were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities (100 μg against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Candida albicans. It was found that compounds 1.1, 1.5, 1.10, 1.31, 1.33 possessed light activity against K. pneumonia. The US National Cancer Institute (NCI has chosen 19 compounds and screened them for ability to inhibit in 10 μM concentration 60 different human tumor cell lines. The LOX IMVI cell line of melanoma appeared to be the most sensitive one, and N-(6-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthioacetamide (1.31 and N-(3-fluorobenzyl-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthioacetamide (1.19 exhibited high growth inhibition rate, and N-(6-methoxybenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthioacetamide (1.32 showed lethal antitumor activity against it. The latter compound 1.32 showed the best anticancer results, also inhibiting growth of leukemia SR cell line, NCI-H460 of non-small cell lung cancer, KM12 of colon cancer and SF-295 of CNS cancer. The in silico molecular docking studies have predicted the affinity of the synthesized substances to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR.

  3. Drug delivery system for an anticancer agent, chlorogenate-Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide nanohybrid synthesised using direct co-precipitation and ion exchange methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barahuie, Farahnaz [Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hussein, Mohd Zobir, E-mail: mzobir@putra.upm.edu.my [Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Arulselvan, Palanisamy [Laboratory of Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Fakurazi, Sharida [Laboratory of Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Zainal, Zulkarnain [Materials Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-15

    A nano-structured drug-inorganic clay hybrid involving an active anticancer compound, which is chlorogenic acid (CA) intercalated into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide, has been assembled via ion-exchange and co-precipitation methods to form a nanohybrid CZAE (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using an ion-exchange method) and CZAC (a chlorogenic acid-Zn/Al nanohybrid synthesised using a direct method), respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that the CA-LDH had a hybrid structure in which the anionic chlorogenate is arranged between the interlayers as a horizontal monolayer at 90 and 20° angles from the x axis for CZAE and CZAC, respectively. Both nanohybrids have the properties of mesoporous materials. The high loading percentage of chlorogenic acid (approximately 43.2% for CZAE and 45.3% for CZAC) with basal spacings of 11.7 and 12.6 Å for CZAE and CZAC, respectively, corroborates the successful intercalation of chlorogenic acid into the interlayer gallery of layered double hydroxides. Free chlorogenic acid and the synthesised nanocomposites (CZAE, CZAC) were assessed for their cytotoxicity against various cancer cells. The Fourier transform infrared data supported the formation of both nanohybrids, and a thermal analysis showed that the nanohybrids are more thermally stable than their counterparts. The chlorogenate shows a sustained release, and the release rate of chlorogenate from CZAE and CZAC nanohybrids at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8 due to their different release mechanisms. The release rate of chlorogenate from both nanohybrids can be described as pseudo-second order. The present investigation revealed the potential of the nanohybrids to enhance the in vitro anti-tumour effect of chlorogenic acid in liver and lung cancer cells in vitro. - Highlights: • We intercalated chlorogenic into Zn/Al-layered double hydroxide by ion-exchange and coprecipitation methods. • The two methods gave nanocomposites

  4. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  5. In vitro synergistic anticancer activity of the combination of T-type calcium channel blocker and chemotherapeutic agent in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Joon Seok; Sohn, Joo Mi; Leem, Dong Gyu; Park, Byeongyeon; Nam, Ji Hye; Shin, Dong Hyun; Shin, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2016-02-01

    As a result of our continuous research, new 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivative containing ureido group, KCP10043F was synthesized and evaluated for T-type Ca(2+) channel (Cav3.1) blockade, cytotoxicity, and cell cycle arrest against human non-small cell lung (A549) cells. KCP10043F showed both weaker T-type Ca(2+) channel blocking activity and less cytotoxicity against A549 cells than parent compound KYS05090S [4-(benzylcarbamoylmethyl)-3-(4-biphenylyl)-2-(N,N',N'-trimethyl-1,5-pentanediamino)-3,4-dihydroquinazoline 2 hydrochloride], but it exhibited more potent G1-phase arrest than KYS05090S in A549 cells. This was found to be accompanied by the downregulations of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D2, cyclin D3, and cyclin E at the protein levels. However, p27(KIP1) as a CDK inhibitor was gradually upregulated at the protein levels and increased recruitment to CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 after KCP10043F treatment. Based on the strong G1-phase cell cycle arrest of KCP10043F in A549 cells, the combination of KCP10043F with etoposide (or cisplatin) resulted in a synergistic cell death (combination index=0.2-0.8) via the induction of apoptosis compared with either agent alone. Taken together with these overall results and the favorable in vitro ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) profiles of KCP10043F, therefore, it could be used as a potential agent for the combination therapy on human lung cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intracellular uptake and behavior of two types zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) micelles, SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP as anticancer agents; unique intracellular disintegration of SMA micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hideaki; Fang, Jun; Gahininath, Bharate; Tsukigawa, Kenji; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2011-11-07

    SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP are micellar drugs, encapsulating zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) with styrene maleic acid copolymer (SMA) and covalent conjugate of ZnPP with polyethylene glycol (PEG) respectively. Their intracellular uptake rate and subcellular localization were investigated. We found SMA-ZnPP showed higher and more efficient (about 2.5 times) intracellular uptake rate than PEG-ZnPP, although both SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP micelles were localized at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and inhibited the target enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) similarly. Both micellar ZnPP were taken up into the tumor cells by endocytosis. Furthermore SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP were examined for their drug releasing mechanisms. Liberation of ZnPP from the SMA micelle appears to depend on cellular amphiphilic components such as lecithin, while that for PEG-ZnPP depends on hydrolytic cleavage. These results indicate that these micelle formulations make water insoluble ZnPP to water soluble practical anticancer agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring the Effect of Polypyridyl Ligands on the Anticancer Activity of Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complexes: From Proteosynthesis Inhibitors to Photodynamic Therapy Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracharova, Jitka; Vigueras, Gloria; Novohradsky, Vojtech; Cutillas, Natalia; Janiak, Christoph; Kostrhunova, Hana; Kasparkova, Jana; Ruiz, José; Brabec, Viktor

    2018-03-26

    A series of five kinetically inert bis-cyclometalated Ir III complexes of general formula [Ir(C^N) 2 (N^N)][PF 6 ] [C^N=2-phenyl-1-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-κN,C; N^N=1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 1), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, 2), dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz, 3), benzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppn, 4), and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine-10,11-imidazolone (dppz-izdo, 5)] were designed and synthesized to explore the effect of the degree of π conjugation of the polypyridyl ligand on their toxicity in cancer cells. We show that less-lipophilic complexes 1 and 2 exhibit the highest toxicity [sub-micromolar inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) values] in A2780, HeLa, and MCF-7 cancer cells, and they are markedly more efficient than clinically used platinum drugs. It is noteworthy that the investigated Ir agents display the capability to overcome acquired and inherent resistance to conventional cisplatin (in A2780cisR and MCF-7 cells, respectively). We demonstrate that the Ir complexes, unlike clinically used platinum antitumor drugs, do not kill cells through DNA-damage response. Rather, they kill cells by inhibiting protein translation by targeting preferentially the endoplasmic reticulum. Our findings also reveal that the toxic effect of the Ir complexes can be significantly potentiated by irradiation with visible light (by more than two orders of magnitude). The photopotentiation of the investigated Ir complexes can be attributed to a marked increase (≈10-30-fold) in intracellular reactive oxygen species. Collectively, these data highlight the functional diversity of antitumor metal-based drugs and the usefulness of a mechanism-based rationale for selecting candidate agents that are effective against chemoresistant tumors for further preclinical testing. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. BlueBerry Isolate, Pterostilbene, Functions as a Potential Anticancer Stem Cell Agent in Suppressing Irradiation-Mediated Enrichment of Hepatoma Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For many malignancies, radiation therapy remains the second option only to surgery in terms of its curative potential. However, radiation-induced tumor cell death is limited by a number of factors, including the adverse response of the tumor microenvironment to the treatment and either intrinsic or acquired mechanisms of evasive resistance, and the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs. In this study, we demonstrated that using different doses of irradiation led to the enrichment of CD133+ Mahlavu cells using flow cytometric method. Subsequently, CD133+ Mahlavu cells enriched by irradiation were characterized for their stemness gene expression, self-renewal, migration/invasion abilities, and radiation resistance. Having established irradiation-enriched CD133+ Mahlavu cells with CSC properties, we evaluated a phytochemical, pterostilbene (PT, found abundantly in blueberries, against irradiation-enriched CSCs. It was shown that PT treatment dose-dependently reduced the enrichment of CD133+ Mahlavu cells upon irradiation; PT treatment also prevented tumor sphere formation, reduced stemness gene expression, and suppressed invasion and migration abilities as well as increasing apoptosis of CD133+ Mahlavu CSCs. Based on our experimental data, pterostilbene could be used to prevent the enrichment of CD133+ hepatoma CSCs and should be considered for future clinical testing as a combined agent for HCC patients.

  9. Dendrimer-encapsulated naphthalocyanine as a single agent-based theranostic nanoplatform for near-infrared fluorescence imaging and combinatorial anticancer phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taratula, Olena; Schumann, Canan; Duong, Tony; Taylor, Karmin L.; Taratula, Oleh

    2015-02-01

    Multifunctional theranostic platforms capable of concurrent near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging and phototherapies are strongly desired for cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, the integration of separate imaging and therapeutic components into nanocarriers results in complex theranostic systems with limited translational potential. A single agent-based theranostic nanoplatform, therefore, was developed for concurrent NIR fluorescence imaging and combinatorial phototherapy with dual photodynamic (PDT) and photothermal (PTT) therapeutic mechanisms. The transformation of a substituted silicon naphthalocyanine (SiNc) into a biocompatible nanoplatform (SiNc-NP) was achieved by SiNc encapsulation into the hydrophobic interior of a generation 5 polypropylenimine dendrimer following surface modification with polyethylene glycol. Encapsulation provides aqueous solubility to SiNc and preserves its NIR fluorescence, PDT and PTT properties. Moreover, an impressive photostability in the dendrimer-encapsulated SiNc has been detected. Under NIR irradiation (785 nm, 1.3 W cm-2), SiNc-NP manifested robust heat generation capability (ΔT = 40 °C) and efficiently produced reactive oxygen species essential for PTT and PDT, respectively, without releasing SiNc from the nanopaltform. By varying the laser power density from 0.3 W cm-2 to 1.3 W cm-2 the therapeutic mechanism of SiNc-NP could be switched from PDT to combinatorial PDT-PTT treatment. In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that phototherapy mediated by SiNc can efficiently destroy chemotherapy resistant ovarian cancer cells. Remarkably, solid tumors treated with a single dose of SiNc-NP combined with NIR irradiation were completely eradicated without cancer recurrence. Finally, the efficiency of SiNc-NP as an NIR imaging agent was confirmed by recording the strong fluorescence signal in the tumor, which was not photobleached during the phototherapeutic procedure.Multifunctional theranostic platforms capable of

  10. Binding and molecular dynamic studies of sesquiterpenes (2R-acetoxymethyl-1,3,3-trimethyl-4t-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-1t-cyclohexanol) derived from marine Streptomyces sp. VITJS8 as potential anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naine, S Jemimah; Devi, C Subathra; Mohanasrinivasan, V; Doss, C George Priya; Kumar, D Thirumal

    2016-03-01

    ) analysis showed that protein-ligand complex reaches equilibration state around 10 ns that illustrates the docked complex is stable. We propose the possible mechanism of sesquiterpenes to play a significant role in antitumor cascade. Hence, our studies open up a new facet for a potent drug as an anticancer agent.

  11. Improving the spectrophotometric determination of the alkylating activity of anticancer agents: a new insight into the mechanism of the NBP method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierickx, Karen M E; Journé, Fabrice; Gerbaux, Pascal; Morandini, Renato; Kauffmann, Jean-Michel; Ghanem, Ghanem E

    2009-02-15

    In this paper, the mechanism of the nitrobenzylpyridine (NBP) method to measure the alkylating activity of drugs originally described by Epstein et al. [J. Epstein, R.W. Rosenthal, R.J. Ess, Anal. Chem. 27 (1955) 1435-1439] and modified later by others was revisited using melphalan, m-sarcolysin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide. Its direct application to determine the activity of these drugs in human serum and aqueous media is described and discussed. This method, based on the formation of a chromophore due to the reaction between the alkylating agent and NBP, was significantly improved by extracting as quickly as possible the reaction product(s) into chloroform before adding alkali to develop the color. This significantly limited the degradation by hydrolysis of the products and enhanced the yield of the end chromophore in the organic phase. The reaction time was optimized by monitoring each compound color development. The best reaction time for each compound was selected and a higher stability of the extracted color over at least 1h was obtained (compared to a couple of minutes in previous studies). Most interestingly, water evaporation due to heating had little or no effect on the linearity of standard curves evaluated in the micromolar concentration range. Both the sensitivity and reproducibility of the method were therefore significantly improved. There appears to be a direct correlation between compound hydrolysis and alkylation activity; the relative reactivity is different among the compounds owing to the rate of (i) production, (ii) the relative proportions and (iii) the hydrolysis of the intermediates. A general mechanism for the nucleophilic competitive substitution is proposed.

  12. Anticancer and antibacterial secondary metabolites from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The emergence of multiple-drug resistance bacteria has become a major threat and thus calls for an urgent need to search for new effective and safe anti-bacterial agents. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate the anticancer and antibacterial activities of secondary metabolites from Penicillium sp., ...

  13. Mitochondrially targeted anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biasutto, L.; Dong, L.A.; Zoratti, M.; Neužil, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2010), s. 670-681 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrial targeting * pro-oxidant effect * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.238, year: 2010

  14. Proteomics of cancer cell lines resistant to microtubule-stabilizing agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Angeletti, Ruth H; Horwitz, Susan Band

    2014-01-01

    was compared with two drug-resistant daughter cell lines, an EpoB-resistant cell line (EpoB8) and an ixabepilone-resistant cell line (Ixab80). All 2D DIGE results were validated by Western blot analyses. A variety of cytoskeletal and cytoskeleton-associated proteins were differentially expressed in drug......Despite the clinical success of microtubule-interacting agents (MIA), a significant challenge for oncologists is the inability to predict the response of individual patients with cancer to these drugs. In the present study, six cell lines were compared by 2D DIGE proteomics to investigate cellular...... resistance to the class of MIAs known as microtubule-stabilizing agents (MSA). The human lung cancer cell line A549 was compared with two drug-resistant daughter cell lines, a taxol-resistant cell line (AT12) and an epothilone B (EpoB)-resistant cell line (EpoB40). The ovarian cancer cell line Hey...

  15. CancerHSP: anticancer herbs database of systems pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weiyang; Li, Bohui; Gao, Shuo; Bai, Yaofei; Shar, Piar Ali; Zhang, Wenjuan; Guo, Zihu; Sun, Ke; Fu, Yingxue; Huang, Chao; Zheng, Chunli; Mu, Jiexin; Pei, Tianli; Wang, Yuan; Li, Yan; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-06-01

    The numerous natural products and their bioactivity potentially afford an extraordinary resource for new drug discovery and have been employed in cancer treatment. However, the underlying pharmacological mechanisms of most natural anticancer compounds remain elusive, which has become one of the major obstacles in developing novel effective anticancer agents. Here, to address these unmet needs, we developed an anticancer herbs database of systems pharmacology (CancerHSP), which records anticancer herbs related information through manual curation. Currently, CancerHSP contains 2439 anticancer herbal medicines with 3575 anticancer ingredients. For each ingredient, the molecular structure and nine key ADME parameters are provided. Moreover, we also provide the anticancer activities of these compounds based on 492 different cancer cell lines. Further, the protein targets of the compounds are predicted by state-of-art methods or collected from literatures. CancerHSP will help reveal the molecular mechanisms of natural anticancer products and accelerate anticancer drug development, especially facilitate future investigations on drug repositioning and drug discovery. CancerHSP is freely available on the web at http://lsp.nwsuaf.edu.cn/CancerHSP.php.

  16. Developing Exposure/Response Models for Anticancer Drug Treatment: Special Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Mould, DR; Walz, A-C; Lave, T; Gibbs, JP; Frame, B

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer agents often have a narrow therapeutic index (TI), requiring precise dosing to ensure sufficient exposure for clinical activity while minimizing toxicity. These agents frequently have complex pharmacology, and combination therapy may cause schedule-specific effects and interactions. We review anticancer drug development, showing how integration of modeling and simulation throughout development can inform anticancer dose selection, potentially improving the late-phase success rate. ...

  17. Developing Exposure/Response Models for Anticancer Drug Treatment: Special Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, DR; Walz, A-C; Lave, T; Gibbs, JP; Frame, B

    2015-01-01

    Anticancer agents often have a narrow therapeutic index (TI), requiring precise dosing to ensure sufficient exposure for clinical activity while minimizing toxicity. These agents frequently have complex pharmacology, and combination therapy may cause schedule-specific effects and interactions. We review anticancer drug development, showing how integration of modeling and simulation throughout development can inform anticancer dose selection, potentially improving the late-phase success rate. This article has a companion article in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics with practical examples. PMID:26225225

  18. In vivo evaluation on the effects of HemoHIM in promoting anticancer activities and reducing the side-effects of anticancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran; Ju, Eun Jin; Cho, Eun Hee

    2009-07-15

    In this project, we aimed to obtain the preclinical in vivo evaluation data for the development of the herbal composition (HemoHIM) as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment that can reduce the side-effects of anticancer drugs and enhance their anticancer activities. Firstly, in vitro studies showed that HemoHIM did not show any effects on the tumor cell growth inhibition by 2 anticancer drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), which indicated that at least HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the activities of anticancer drugs. Next, the in vivo studies with mice implanted with tumor cells(B16F0, LLC1) showed that HemoHIM partially enhanced the anticancer activities of drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), and improved endogenous anticancer immune activities. Furthermore, in the same animal models, HemoHIM effectively reduced the side-effects of anticancer drugs (liver and renal toxicities by cisplatin, immune and hematopoietic disorders by 5-FU). These results collectively showed that HemoHIM can enhance the activities of anticancer drugs and reduce their side-effects in vitro and in vivo and HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The results of this project can be utilized as the basic preclinical data for the development and approval of HemoHIM as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment

  19. In vivo evaluation on the effects of HemoHIM in promoting anticancer activities and reducing the side-effects of anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Sung Kee; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran; Ju, Eun Jin; Cho, Eun Hee

    2009-07-01

    In this project, we aimed to obtain the preclinical in vivo evaluation data for the development of the herbal composition (HemoHIM) as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment that can reduce the side-effects of anticancer drugs and enhance their anticancer activities. Firstly, in vitro studies showed that HemoHIM did not show any effects on the tumor cell growth inhibition by 2 anticancer drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), which indicated that at least HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the activities of anticancer drugs. Next, the in vivo studies with mice implanted with tumor cells(B16F0, LLC1) showed that HemoHIM partially enhanced the anticancer activities of drugs (cisplatin, 5-FU), and improved endogenous anticancer immune activities. Furthermore, in the same animal models, HemoHIM effectively reduced the side-effects of anticancer drugs (liver and renal toxicities by cisplatin, immune and hematopoietic disorders by 5-FU). These results collectively showed that HemoHIM can enhance the activities of anticancer drugs and reduce their side-effects in vitro and in vivo and HemoHIM does not exert any adverse effects on the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The results of this project can be utilized as the basic preclinical data for the development and approval of HemoHIM as the auxiliary agent for the anticancer treatment

  20. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modelling & Simulation for Anticancer Drugs with Complex Absorption Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Huixin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death in the world. In recent years, targeted anticancer agents have shown to be a major breakthrough in the battle against cancer. These targeted anticancer agents, mostly administered orally, specifically target molecular defects of tumour cells

  1. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Liqing; Kang, Lin; Jin, Mingji; Sun, Ping; Xin, Xin; Gao, Zhonggao; Bae, You Han

    2017-06-01

    Anticancer therapy has always been a vital challenge for the development of nanomedicine. Repeated single therapeutic agent may lead to undesirable and severe side effects, unbearable toxicity and multidrug resistance due to complex nature of tumor. Nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy can synergistically improve antitumor outcomes through multiple-target therapy, decreasing the dose of each therapeutic agent and reducing side effects. There are versatile combinational anticancer strategies such as chemotherapeutic combination, nucleic acid-based co-delivery, intrinsic sensitive and extrinsic stimulus combinational patterns. Based on these combination strategies, various nanocarriers and drug delivery systems were engineered to carry out the efficient co-delivery of combined therapeutic agents for combination anticancer therapy. This review focused on illustrating nanomedicine-based combination anticancer therapy between nucleic acids and small-molecular drugs for synergistically improving anticancer efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oncolytic viruses as anticancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman eWoller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy has shown impressive results in preclinical studies and first promising therapeutic outcomes in clinical trials as well. Since viruses are known for a long time as excellent vaccination agents, oncolytic viruses are now designed as novel anticancer agents combining the aspect of lysis-dependent cytoreductive activity with concomitant induction of antitumoral immune responses. Antitumoral immune activation by oncolytic virus infection of tumor tissue comprises both, immediate effects of innate immunity and also adaptive responses for long lasting antitumoral activity which is regarded as the most prominent challenge in clinical oncology. To date, the complex effects of a viral tumor infection on the tumor microenvironment and the consequences for the tumor-infiltrating immune cell compartment are poorly understood. However, there is more and more evidence that a tumor infection by an oncolytic virus opens up a number of options for further immunomodulating interventions such as systemic chemotherapy, generic immunostimulating strategies, dendritic cell-based vaccines, and antigenic libraries to further support clinical efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy.

  3. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi H.J. Kao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides being widely known as the major active ingredients, the different biological pathways by which they exert their anti-cancer effect remain poorly defined. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of action may lead to more widespread use of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.The aim of this paper is to summarise the various bioactive mechanisms that have been proposed for the anti-cancer properties of triterpenes and polysaccharides extracted from G. lucidum. A literature search of published papers on NCBI with keywords “Ganoderma” and “cancer” was performed. Among those, studies which specifically examined the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides were selected to be included in this paper.We have found five potential mechanisms which are associated with the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and three potential mechanisms for Ganoderma polysaccharides. In addition, G. lucidum has been used in combination with known anti-cancer agents to improve the anti-cancer efficacies. This suggests Ganoderma’s bioactive pathways may compliment that of anti-cancer agents. In this paper we present several potential anti-cancer mechanisms of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides which can be used for the development of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.

  4. The preventive effect of granisetron on digestive tract symptoms induced by arterial infusion of anticancer and hypertensive agents in combination with radiotherapy. A study of forty patients with bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Shigeaki; Hirasawa, Teruyuki; Uchiyama, Kouichi; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Nasu, Takahito; Shinohara, Youichi

    1995-01-01

    Forty patients with bladder cancer who underwent radiotherapy with angiotensin II, a hypertensor, and two cycles of arterial infusion of anticancer chemotherapies, including cisplatin 100 mg/body, were randomly assigned to a granisetron group and a non-granisetron group for comparative study of its prophylactic effect on nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Granisetron proved significantly effective in preventing nausea, as 75% of granisetron-administered patients experienced either only slight nausea or none at all, against only 22.5% in the non-granisetron group. The number of vomiting episodes was zero during the three-day observation period in 28 out of 40 (70%) granisetron-administered patients compared with 6 patients (15%) in the non-granisetron group. A significant difference in prophylactic effect on anorexia was demonstrated between the granisetron and non-granisetron group, indicating that control of alimentary symptoms such as nausea and vomiting influences the severity of anorexia. As to the safety, nausea was lengthened and deteriorated in one patient. Though the physician in charge judged it to be an adverse event too minor to question the safety of granisetron. Thus, granisetron proved to be highly effective and safe in preventing nausea, vomiting and anorexia in patients under concomitant administration of radiotherapy with hypertensor and arterial infusion of anticancer chemotherapies. (author)

  5. Synergistic Effect of Eicosapentaenoic Acid on Antiproliferative Action of Anticancer Drugs in a Cancer Cell Line Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogo, Ayako; Miyake, Sachi; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Matsumoto, Hideo; Teramoto, Fusako; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    It has been found experimentally and clinically that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) exerts an anticancer effect and that it has a minimal adverse event profile relative to other anticancer drugs. Any synergy between EPA and other anticancer drugs could be of therapeutic relevance, especially in elderly or high-risk patients. Therefore, we investigated the synergism between anticancer drugs and EPA experimentally. EPA was coadministered in vitro with various anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, docetaxel, 5-fluorouracil and cis-diamminedichloridoplatinum[II]) to TE-1 cells, which were derived from human esophageal cancer tumors. Cell proliferation was measured by the water soluble tetrazolium-1 method. Sub-threshold concentrations of EPA, which alone produced no anticancer effect, caused a synergistic suppressive effect on TE-1 cell proliferation when combined with other anticancer agents. Coadministration of EPA with other anticancer drugs may represent a new therapeutic paradigm offering a reduced side effect profile. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Anticancer Activity of Papaver Somniferum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Döne Aslı Güler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the pharmacological activity of extracts of Papaver somniferum, a poppy species. P. somniferum products are still considered as a unique source of drug for many diseases. The present study was designed to determine antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of P. somniferum extracts on HeLa (Human Cervix Carcinoma, HT29 (Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma, C6 (Rat Brain Tumor Cells, and Vero (African Green Monkey Kidney cell lines. Alkaloids-rich extracts of P. somniferum exhibited antiproliferative effects on various cancer cell lines, especially at high concentrations. We assessed the ability of extracts of P. somniferum to harm the membrane of the cells. Results indicated that P. somniferum extracts destroy cellular membrane in tumor cell lines at high concentrations. Remarkably, the LDH test results disclosed that cytotoxicity of P. somniferum on cells was low at mid concentrations. This may indicate its cytostatic potential. The results of this study support the efficacy of P. somniferum extracts as an anticancer agent.

  7. Discovery of diethyl 2,5-diaminothiophene-3,4-dicarboxylate derivatives as potent anticancer and antimicrobial agents and screening of anti-diabetic activity: synthesis and in vitro biological evaluation. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorov, Khurshed; Ma, Hai-Rong; Zhao, Jiang-Yu; Zhao, Hai-Qing; Chen, Hua; Bobakulov, Khayrulla; Xin, Xue-Lei; Elmuradov, Burkhon; Shakhidoyatov, Khusnutdin; Aisa, Haji A

    2014-09-12

    Series of diethyl 2,5-diaminothiophene-3,4-dicarboxylate (DDTD) derivatives: azomethines of DDTD (2a-l) have been synthesized and screened for their anticancer, antimicrobial and anti-diabetic activities. The novel synthesized compounds were characterized by (1)H, (13)C NMR, MS and FT-IR analyses. All compounds were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against three types of cancer cell line such as T47D and MCF-7 (human breast cancer), Hela (human cervical cancer) and Ishikawa (human endometrial cancer) lines. The results showed that most compounds exhibited significant antiproliferative activity against breast cancer cells. The majority of azomethines DDTD influenced strongly against breast cancer cells T47D and MCF-7, among them compounds 2b (2.3 μM), 2c (12.1 μM), 2e (13.2 μM), 2i (14.9 μM), 2j (16.0 μM), 2k (7.1 μM), 2l (8.6 μM) manifest potent anticancer activity against cancer cell T47D than Doxorubicin (DOX, 15.5 μM). Compound 2j has shown potent activity on all three types of cancer cells concurrently and IC50 values were considerably low in comparison with positive control DOX. In addition, all compounds were tested for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 (Gram positive bacteria), Escherichia coli ATCC 11229 (Gram negative bacteria) and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (Fungi) strains and 2j which contains in the ring nitrofurfural fragment, showed the highest effect on the three species of microbial pathogens simultaneously. Some compounds induced enzymatic inhibition in a concentration-dependent manner on PTP-1B inhibitor. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Melatonin Anticancer Effects: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Di Bella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT, the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, not only regulates circadian rhythm, but also has antioxidant, anti-ageing and immunomodulatory properties. MLT plays an important role in blood composition, medullary dynamics, platelet genesis, vessel endothelia, and in platelet aggregation, leukocyte formula regulation and hemoglobin synthesis. Its significant atoxic, apoptotic, oncostatic, angiogenetic, differentiating and antiproliferative properties against all solid and liquid tumors have also been documented. Thanks, in fact, to its considerable functional versatility, MLT can exert both direct and indirect anticancer effects in factorial synergy with other differentiating, antiproliferative, immunomodulating and trophic molecules that form part of the anticancer treatment formulated by Luigi Di Bella (Di Bella Method, DBM: somatostatin, retinoids, ascorbic acid, vitamin D3, prolactin inhibitors, chondroitin-sulfate. The interaction between MLT and the DBM molecules counters the multiple processes that characterize the neoplastic phenotype (induction, promotion, progression and/or dissemination, tumoral mutation. All these particular characteristics suggest the use of MLT in oncological diseases.

  9. Marine Fungi: A Source of Potential Anticancer Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil K. Deshmukh; Ved Prakash; Nihar Ranjan

    2018-01-01

    Metabolites from marine fungi have hogged the limelight in drug discovery because of their promise as therapeutic agents. A number of metabolites related to marine fungi have been discovered from various sources which are known to possess a range of activities as antibacterial, antiviral and anticancer agents. Although, over a thousand marine fungi based metabolites have already been reported, none of them have reached the market yet which could partly be related to non-comprehensive screenin...

  10. Anticancer effects of Ganoderma lucidum: a review of scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, John W M; Gohel, Mayur Danny I

    2005-01-01

    "Lingzhi" (Ganoderma lucidum), a popular medicinal mushroom, has been used in China for longevity and health promotion since ancient times. Investigations into the anticancer activity of lingzhi have been performed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, supporting its application for cancer treatment and prevention. The proposed anticancer activity of lingzhi has prompted its usage by cancer patients. It remains debatable as to whether lingzhi is a food supplement for health maintenance or actually a therapeutic "drug" for medical proposes. Thus far there has been no report of human trials using lingzhi as a direct anticancer agent, despite some evidence showing the usage of lingzhi as a potential supplement to cancer patients. Cellular immune responses and mitogenic reactivity of cancer patients have been enhanced by lingzhi, as reported in two randomized and one nonrandomized trials, and the quality of life of 65% of lung cancer patients improved in one study. The direct cytotoxic and anti-angiogenesis mechanisms of lingzhi have been established by in vitro studies; however, clinical studies should not be neglected to define the applicable dosage in vivo. At present, lingzhi is a health food supplement to support cancer patients, yet the evidence supporting the potential of direct in vivo anticancer effects should not be underestimated. Lingzhi or its products can be classified as an anticancer agent when current and more direct scientific evidence becomes available.

  11. Dose calculation of anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Bo; Klumpen, Heinz-Josef; Gurney, Howard

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anticancer drugs are characterized by a narrow therapeutic window and significant inter-patient variability in therapeutic and toxic effects. Current body surface area (BSA)-based dosing fails to standardize systemic anticancer drug exposure and other alternative dosing strategies also

  12. Phytochemicals as Adjunctive with Conventional Anticancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaei, Mohammad Hosein; Bahramsoltani, Roodabeh; Rahimi, Roja

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is defined as the abnormal proliferations of cells which could occur in any tissue and can cause life-threatening malignancies with high financial costs for both patients and health care system. Plant-derived secondary metabolites are shown to have positive role in various diseases and conditions. The aim of the present study is to summarize clinical evidences on the benefits of phytochemicals as adjuvant therapy along with conventional anticancer therapies. Electronic databases including Pubmed, Scopus and Cochrane library were searched with the keywords "chemotherapeutic", "anticancer", "antineoplastic" or "radiotherapy" with "plant", "extract", "herb", or "phytochemical", until July 2015. Only clinical studies were included in this review. The findings showed that positive effects of phytochemicals are due to their direct anticarcinogenic activity, induction of relief in cancer complications, as well as their protective role against side effects of conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Results obtained from current review demonstrated that numerous phytochemical agents from different chemical categories including alkaloid, benzopyran, coumarin, carotenoid, diarylheptanoid, flavonoid, indole, polysaccharide, protein, stilbene, terpene, and xanthonoid possess therapeutic effect in patients with different types of cancer. Polyphenols are the most studied components. Curcumin, ginsenosides, lycopene, homoharringtonine, aviscumine, and resveratrol are amongst the major components with remarkable volumes of clinical evidence indicating their direct anticancer activities in different types of cancer including hepatocarcinoma, prostate cancer, leukemia and lymphoma, breast and ovarian cancer, and gastrointestinal cancers. Cannabinoids, cumarin, curcumin, ginsenosides, epigallocatechin gallate, vitexin, and salidroside are phytochemicals with significant alleviative effect on synthetic chemotherapy- induced toxicities. There is lack of evidence from clinical

  13. Structure-based development of novel triazoles and related thiazolotriazoles as anticancer agents and Cdc25A/B phosphatase inhibitors. Synthesis, in vitro biological evaluation, molecular docking and in silico ADME-T studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostom, Sherif A F; Badr, Mona H; Abd El Razik, Heba A; Ashour, Hayam M A

    2017-10-20

    Synthesis of twenty nine new 1,2,4-triazoles and some derived thiazolothiadiazoles (structurally-relevant to some reported triazoles with anticancer and/or Cdc25A/B inhibitory activities) is described in this study. The obtained NCI's in vitro antitumor data revealed that five analogs (12, 15, 18, 19 and 22) displayed considerable tumor percentage growth inhibitory activity (GI%), among which the analog 18 possessed a special antitumor potential and spectrum. Additionally, the same five analogs showed a marginal GI effect on the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A indicating higher selectivity towards cancer cells. The same active analogs 12, 15, 18, 19 and 22 were further assessed for their in vitro Cdc25A/B phosphatase inhibitory activity (a possible antitumor target), where 18 and 22 displayed a distinctive inhibitory affinity towards the Cdc25B isozyme (6.7 and 8.4 μM, respectively). Docking of 12, 15, 18, 19 and 22 with the active site of human Cdc25B phosphatase enzyme demonstrated superior binding profile by the top-scoring analog 18 relative to a reported Cdc25 phosphatase ligand. In silico calculations of molecular properties revealed that all of the active compounds comply with Lipinski's RO5 and Veber's criteria for good bioavailability suggesting good drug-likeness upon oral administration with a predicted high safety profile. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Natural flora and anticancer regime: milestones and roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Ira; Thomas, Noel Vinay; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-07-01

    Cancer has long been an area of extensive research both at the molecular as well as pharmaceutical level. However, lack of understanding of the underlying molecular signalling and the probable targets of therapeutics is a major concern in successful treatment of cancer. The situation becomes even worse, with the increasing side effects of the existing synthetic commercial drugs. Natural compounds especially those derived from plants have been best explored for their anticancer properties and most of them have been efficient against the known molecular targets of cancer. However, advent of biotechnology and resulting advances in medical arena have let to the increasing knowledge of newer carcinogenic signaling agents which has made the anticancer drug discovery even more demanding. The present review aims to bring forward the molecular mediators of cancer and compiles the plant derived anticancer agents with special emphasis on their clinical status. Since marine arena has proved to be a tremendous source of pharmaceutical agents, this review also focuses on the anticancer potential of marine plants especially algae. This is a comprehensive review covering major aspects of cancer mediation and utilization of marine flora for remediation of this deadly disease.

  15. Preparation of thermo and pH-responsive polymer@Au/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core/shell nanoparticles as a carrier for delivery of anticancer agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani, Marjan [University of Tabriz, Laboratory of Polymer, Faculty of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamishehkar, Hamed, E-mail: hamishehkarh@tbzmed.ac.ir [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Drug Applied Research Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arsalani, Naser; Entezami, Ali Akbar, E-mail: aentezami@tabrizu.ac.ir [University of Tabriz, Laboratory of Polymer, Faculty of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    In this work, a thermo and pH-responsive poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-itaconic acid containing thiol side groups were successfully synthesized to prepare Doxorubicin-loaded polymer@Au/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} core/shell nanoparticles (DOX-NPs). Copolymer and NPs were fully characterized by FT-IR, HNMR, photo-correlation spectroscopy, SEM, X-ray diffraction, vibrating-sample magnetometer, thermal gravimetric analysis, and UV–Vis spectroscopy. The stimuli-responsive characteristics of NPs were evaluated by in vitro release study in simulated cancerous environment. The biocompatibility and cytotoxic properties of NPs and DOX-NPs are explored by MTT method. The prepared NPs with the size of 50 nm showed paramagnetic characteristics with suitable and stable dispersion at physiological medium and high loading capacity (up to 55 %) of DOX. DOX-NPs yielded a pH- and temperature-triggered release of entrapped drugs at tumor tissue environment (59 % of DOX release) compared to physiological condition (20 % of DOX release) during 48 h. In vitro cytotoxicity studies indicated that the NPs showed no cytotoxicity on A549 cells at different amounts after incubation for 72 h confirming its suitability as a drug carrier. DOX-NPs, on the other hand, caused an efficient anticancer performance as verified by MTT assay test. It was concluded that developed NPs by us in this study may open the possibilities for targeted delivery of DOX to the cancerous tissues.

  16. Hyaluronic acid for anticancer drug and nucleic acid delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosio, Franco; Arpicco, Silvia; Stella, Barbara; Fattal, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is widely used in anticancer drug delivery, since it is biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic, and non-immunogenic; moreover, HA receptors are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Exploiting this ligand-receptor interaction, the use of HA is now a rapidly-growing platform for targeting CD44-overexpressing cells, to improve anticancer therapies. The rationale underlying approaches, chemical strategies, and recent advances in the use of HA to design drug carriers for delivering anticancer agents, are reviewed. Comprehensive descriptions are given of HA-based drug conjugates, particulate carriers (micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, microparticles), inorganic nanostructures, and hydrogels, with particular emphasis on reports of preclinical/clinical results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. TAILORING IMMUNOTOXIN AS ANTICANCER DRUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoso Cornain

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The conventional treatments for cancer have been considered unsatisfatory, with limited efficiency in terms of discriminative cancer cell adverse reaction against the normal compartments, a number of immunological approaches had been implemented. Since cancer cells could exhibit tumor specific antigen (s, a highly specific antibody could be used to direct any anticancer drug, biological agent or radioisotope selectively against the cancer cells and does not harm the normal cells. The specific antibody could be raised by immunization with purified tumor specific antigen (s. The biological agent could be obtained as toxin, either derived from bacteria e.g. diphtheria toxin or derived from plants e.g. castor ricin, which could destroy and kill cancer cells after contacts. A hybrid molecule constructed between antibody and toxin has been known as "immunotoxin". The selectivity of the antibody against a given tumor specific antigen could be increased by using a monoclonal antibody, made by hybridoma technique and immunological engineering. Accordingly, the efficiency of the destructive or killing effect of the toxin could be eventually increased by purification technique, biochemical and genetic engineering. In a preliminary study ricin from castor (Ricinus communis have been purified and separated into two protein fractions (RCAI = 12.000 dalton and RCA II = 60.000 - 65.000 dalton. The latter showed toxin property, and was tested in vitro both against normal cells and against cancer cells. In the microcy totoxicity assay the ricin showed both the short term and the long term killing effect as measured after 1, 4, 16 and 24 hours. The killing effect against cancer cells was stronger as compared to that against normal cells. The acute or short term effect was observed at lower concentration of ricin (10-6 and 10-12 g/ml after 1 and 4 hours contacts. The long term effect resulted in 90% and nearly 100% cytotoxicity in higher concentration of ricin

  18. Acupuncture as anticancer treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Frączek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mystery of Traditional Chinese Medicine has been attracting people for years. Acupuncture, ranked among the most common services of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, has recently gained a lot of interest in the scientific world. Contemporary researchers have been continuously trying to shed light on its possible mechanism of action in human organism. Numerous studies pertaining to acupuncture’s application in cancer symptoms or treatment-related side effects management have already been published. Moreover, since the modern idea of acupuncture’s immunomodulating effect seems to be promising, scientists have propounded a concept of its potential application as part of direct anti-tumor therapy. In our previous study we summarized possible use of acupuncture in management of cancer symptoms and treatment-related ailments, such as chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, xerostomia, vasomotor symptoms, neutropenia, fatigue, anxiety, insomnia, lymphoedema after mastectomy and peripheral neuropathy. This article reviews the studies concerning acupuncture as a possible tool in modern anticancer treatment.

  19. 3D QSAR studies for the beta-tubulin binding site of microtubule-stabilizing anticancer agents (MSAAs): a pseudoreceptor model for taxanes based on the experimental structure of tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Laura; Manetti, Fabrizio; Corelli, Federico; Botta, Maurizio

    2003-09-01

    The antimitotic agent paclitaxel continues to play an important role in the cancer chemotherapy. However, its inefficacy on certain resistant cells and toxic side effects have led to the search of new taxanes with improved biological activity. By means of a pseudoreceptor modeling approach, we have developed a binding site model for a series of taxanes. It is the first 3D QSAR model derived from the experimentally determined tubulin structure obtained by electron crystallography studies. The model is able to correlate quantitatively the structural properties of the studied compounds with their biological data.

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 2-aralkyl-5-substituted-6-(4'-fluorophenyl)-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazole derivatives as potent anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Subhas S; Panjamurthy, Kuppusamy; Kumar, Sujeet; Nambiar, Mridula; Ramareddy, Sureshbabu A; Chiruvella, Kishore K; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2011-06-01

    Levamisole, the imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole derivative has been reported as a potential antitumor agent. In the present study, we synthesized, characterized and evaluated biological activity of its novel analogues with substitution in the aralkyl group and on imidazothiadiazole molecules with same chemical backbone but different side chains namely 2-aralkyl-6-(4'-fluorophenyl)-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazoles (SCR1), 2-aralkyl-5-bromo-6-(4'-fluorophenyl)-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]-thiadiazoles (SCR2), 2-aralkyl-5-formyl-6-(4'-fluorophenyl)-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]-thiadiazoles (SCR3) and 2-aralkyl-5-thiocyanato-6-(4'-fluorophenyl)-imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]-thiadiazoles (SCR4) on leukemia cells. The cytotoxic studies showed that 3a, 4a, and 4c exhibited strong cytotoxicity while others had moderate cytotoxicity. Among these we chose 4a (IC50, 8 μM) for understanding its mechanism of cytotoxicity. FACS analysis in conjunction with mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation studies indicated that 4a induced apoptosis without cell cycle arrest suggesting that it could be used as a potential chemotherapeutic agent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis of some new heterocyclic compounds bearing a sulfonamide moiety and studying their combined anticancer effect with γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hossary, E.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    In search for new cytotoxic agents with improved anticancer profile, some new halogen-containing quinoline and pyrimido[4,5-b]quinoline derivatives bearing a free sulfonamide moiety were synthesized. All the newly synthesized target compounds were subjected to in vitro anticancer screening against human breast cancer cell line (MCF7). The most potent compounds, as concluded from the in vitro anticancer screening, were selected to be evaluated again for their in vitro anticancer activity in combination with radiation. Also, the newly synthesized compounds were docked in the active site of the carbonic anhydrase enzyme

  2. Molecular cytotoxic mechanisms of anticancer hydroxychalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzevari, Omid; Galati, Giuseppe; Moridani, Majid Y; Siraki, Arno; O'Brien, Peter J

    2004-06-30

    Chalcones are being considered as anticancer agents as they are natural compounds that are particularly cytotoxic towards K562 leukemia or melanoma cells. In this study, we have investigated phloretin, isoliquiritigenin, and 10 other hydroxylated chalcones for their cytotoxic mechanisms towards isolated rat hepatocytes. All hydroxychalcones partly depleted hepatocyte GSH and oxidized GSH to GSSG. These chalcones also caused a collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased oxygen uptake. Furthermore, glycolytic or citric acid cycle substrates prevented cytotoxicity and mitochondrial membrane potential collapse. The highest pKa chalcones were the most effective at collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential which suggests that the cytotoxic activity of hydroxychalcones are likely because of their ability to uncouple mitochondria.

  3. Curcumin Nanotechnologies and Its Anticancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Parasuraman Aiya; Panati, Kalpana; Narala, Venkata Ramireddy

    2017-04-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Curcumin is a well-established anticancer agent in vitro but its efficacy is yet to be proven in clinical trials. Poor bioavailability of curcumin is the principal reason behind the lack of efficiency of curcumin in clinical trials. Many studies prove that the bioavailability of curcumin can be improved by administering it through nanoparticle drug carriers. This review focuses on the efforts made in the field of nanotechnology to improve the bioavailability of curcumin. Nanotechnologies of curcumin come in various shapes and sizes. The simplest curcumin nanoparticle that increased the bioavailability of curcumin is the curcumin-metal complex. On the other hand, we have intricate thermoresponsive nanoparticles that can release curcumin upon stimulation (analogous to a remote control). Future research required for developing potent curcumin nanoparticles is also discussed.

  4. Synergistic Anticancer Action of Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization and Glycolysis Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosic, Milica; Arsikin-Csordas, Katarina; Paunovic, Verica; Firestone, Raymond A; Ristic, Biljana; Mircic, Aleksandar; Petricevic, Sasa; Bosnjak, Mihajlo; Zogovic, Nevena; Mandic, Milos; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica

    2016-10-28

    We investigated the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effect of combining lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP)-inducing agent N-dodecylimidazole (NDI) with glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG). NDI-triggered LMP and 2DG-mediated glycolysis block synergized in inducing rapid ATP depletion, mitochondrial damage, and reactive oxygen species production, eventually leading to necrotic death of U251 glioma cells but not primary astrocytes. NDI/2DG-induced death of glioma cells was partly prevented by lysosomal cathepsin inhibitor E64 and antioxidant α-tocopherol, suggesting the involvement of LMP and oxidative stress in the observed cytotoxicity. LMP-inducing agent chloroquine also displayed a synergistic anticancer effect with 2DG, whereas glucose deprivation or glycolytic inhibitors iodoacetate and sodium fluoride synergistically cooperated with NDI, thus further indicating that the anticancer effect of NDI/2DG combination was indeed due to LMP and glycolysis block. The two agents synergistically induced ATP depletion, mitochondrial depolarization, oxidative stress, and necrotic death also in B16 mouse melanoma cells. Moreover, the combined oral administration of NDI and 2DG reduced in vivo melanoma growth in C57BL/6 mice by inducing necrotic death of tumor cells, without causing liver, spleen, or kidney toxicity. Based on these results, we propose that NDI-triggered LMP causes initial mitochondrial damage that is further increased by 2DG due to the lack of glycolytic ATP required to maintain mitochondrial health. This leads to a positive feedback cycle of mitochondrial dysfunction, ATP loss, and reactive oxygen species production, culminating in necrotic cell death. Therefore, the combination of LMP-inducing agents and glycolysis inhibitors seems worthy of further exploration as an anticancer strategy. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Recent Advances in chemistry and pharmacology of 2-methoxyestradiol: An anticancer investigational drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Sathish; Raghuvanshi, Dushyant Singh; Hasanain, Mohammad; Alam, Sarfaraz; Sarkar, Jayanta; Mitra, Kalyan; Khan, Feroz; Negi, Arvind S

    2016-06-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2), an estrogen hormone metabolite is a potential cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Presently, it is an investigational drug under various phases of clinical trials alone or in combination therapy. Its anticancer activity has been attributed to its antitubulin, antiangiogenic, pro-apoptotic and ROS induction properties. This anticancer drug candidate has been explored extensively in last twenty years for its detailed chemistry and pharmacology. Present review is an update of its chemistry and biological activity. It also extends an assessment of potential of 2ME2 and its analogues as possible anticancer drug in future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antidiabetic and anticancer activities of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganogpichayagrai, Aunyachulee; Palanuvej, Chanida; Ruangrungsi, Nijsiri

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are a major global public health problem. Plant-derived agents with undesirable side-effects were required. This study aimed to evaluate antidiabetic and anticancer activities of the ethanolic leaf extract of Mangifera indica cv. Okrong and its active phytochemical compound, mangiferin. Antidiabetic activities against yeast α-glucosidase and rat intestinal α-glucosidase were determined using 1 mM of p-nitro phenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. Inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic α-amylase was performed using 1 mM of 2-chloro-4 nitrophenol-α-D-maltotroside-3 as substrate. Nitrophenol product was spectrophotometrically measured at 405 nm. Anticancer activity was evaluated against five human cancer cell lines compared to two human normal cell lines using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Mango leaf extract and mangiferin exhibited dose-dependent inhibition against yeast α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 0.0503 and 0.5813 mg/ml, respectively, against rat α-glucosidase with the IC50 of 1.4528 and 0.4333 mg/ml, respectively, compared to acarbose with the IC50 of 11.9285 and 0.4493 mg/ml, respectively. For anticancer activity, mango leaf extract, at ≥200 μg/ml showed cytotoxic potential against all tested cancer cell lines. In conclusion, mango leaf possessed antidiabetic and anticancer potential in vitro. PMID:28217550

  7. Anticancer activity of Amauroderma rude.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunwei Jiao

    Full Text Available More and more medicinal mushrooms have been widely used as a miraculous herb for health promotion, especially by cancer patients. Here we report screening thirteen mushrooms for anti-cancer cell activities in eleven different cell lines. Of the herbal products tested, we found that the extract of Amauroderma rude exerted the highest activity in killing most of these cancer cell lines. Amauroderma rude is a fungus belonging to the Ganodermataceae family. The Amauroderma genus contains approximately 30 species widespread throughout the tropical areas. Since the biological function of Amauroderma rude is unknown, we examined its anti-cancer effect on breast carcinoma cell lines. We compared the anti-cancer activity of Amauroderma rude and Ganoderma lucidum, the most well-known medicinal mushrooms with anti-cancer activity and found that Amauroderma rude had significantly higher activity in killing cancer cells than Ganoderma lucidum. We then examined the effect of Amauroderma rude on breast cancer cells and found that at low concentrations, Amauroderma rude could inhibit cancer cell survival and induce apoptosis. Treated cancer cells also formed fewer and smaller colonies than the untreated cells. When nude mice bearing tumors were injected with Amauroderma rude extract, the tumors grew at a slower rate than the control. Examination of these tumors revealed extensive cell death, decreased proliferation rate as stained by Ki67, and increased apoptosis as stained by TUNEL. Suppression of c-myc expression appeared to be associated with these effects. Taken together, Amauroderma rude represented a powerful medicinal mushroom with anti-cancer activities.

  8. Anticancer Activity of Amauroderma rude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiangling; Li, Haoran; Li, Xiang-Min; Pan, Hong-Hui; Cai, Mian-Hua; Zhong, Hua-Mei; Yang, Burton B.

    2013-01-01

    More and more medicinal mushrooms have been widely used as a miraculous herb for health promotion, especially by cancer patients. Here we report screening thirteen mushrooms for anti-cancer cell activities in eleven different cell lines. Of the herbal products tested, we found that the extract of Amauroderma rude exerted the highest activity in killing most of these cancer cell lines. Amauroderma rude is a fungus belonging to the Ganodermataceae family. The Amauroderma genus contains approximately 30 species widespread throughout the tropical areas. Since the biological function of Amauroderma rude is unknown, we examined its anti-cancer effect on breast carcinoma cell lines. We compared the anti-cancer activity of Amauroderma rude and Ganoderma lucidum, the most well-known medicinal mushrooms with anti-cancer activity and found that Amauroderma rude had significantly higher activity in killing cancer cells than Ganoderma lucidum. We then examined the effect of Amauroderma rude on breast cancer cells and found that at low concentrations, Amauroderma rude could inhibit cancer cell survival and induce apoptosis. Treated cancer cells also formed fewer and smaller colonies than the untreated cells. When nude mice bearing tumors were injected with Amauroderma rude extract, the tumors grew at a slower rate than the control. Examination of these tumors revealed extensive cell death, decreased proliferation rate as stained by Ki67, and increased apoptosis as stained by TUNEL. Suppression of c-myc expression appeared to be associated with these effects. Taken together, Amauroderma rude represented a powerful medicinal mushroom with anti-cancer activities. PMID:23840494

  9. Anticancer Drug-Incorporated Layered Double Hydroxide Nanohybrids and Their Enhanced Anticancer Therapeutic Efficacy in Combination Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Layered double hydroxide (LDH nanoparticles have been studied as cellular delivery carriers for anionic anticancer agents. As MTX and 5-FU are clinically utilized anticancer drugs in combination therapy, we aimed to enhance the therapeutic performance with the help of LDH nanoparticles. Method. Anticancer drugs, MTX and 5-FU, and their combination, were incorporated into LDH by reconstruction method. Simply, LDHs were thermally pretreated at 400°C, and then reacted with drug solution to simultaneously form drug-incorporated LDH. Thus prepared MTX/LDH (ML, 5-FU/LDH (FL, and (MTX + 5-FU/LDH (MFL nanohybrids were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, zeta potential measurement, dynamic light scattering, and so forth. The nanohybrids were administrated to the human cervical adenocarcinoma, HeLa cells, in concentration-dependent manner, comparing with drug itself to verify the enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion. All the nanohybrids successfully accommodated intended drug molecules in their house-of-card-like structures during reconstruction reaction. It was found that the anticancer efficacy of MFL nanohybrid was higher than other nanohybrids, free drugs, or their mixtures, which means the multidrug-incorporated LDH nanohybrids could be potential drug delivery carriers for efficient cancer treatment via combination therapy.

  10. Impact of dosage timing on the bioavailability of oral anticancer medications: Is pre-prandial dosing equivalent to post-prandial dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guo; Wu, Dan-Na; Yu, Yichao; Li, Guo-Fu; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2018-01-01

    Many oral anticancer agents are recommended to be given either at least 1 h before or 2 h after a meal, according to the prescribing information. However, the effect of dosage timing of an oral anticancer agent with reference to food intake on anticancer treatment remains unclear. As shown by the literature survey and labeling analysis for oral anticancer drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration from 2010 to 2016, labeling information regarding dosage timing for several anticancer drugs appeared not be optimum, leading to suboptimal bioavailability and plasma drug concentrations. This supports a call to regularly recalibrate the labeling information for dosage timing of oral anticancer medications to minimize the risks of compromised efficacy or unintended toxicities.

  11. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmad, Nihal

    2005-01-01

    .... Therefore, the search for novel agents and approaches for the treatment of CaP continues. Natural plant-based products have shown promise as anticancer agents. Sanguinarine (13-methyl[ 1,3]benzodioxolo[5,6-c]- 1,3-dioxolo[4,5-i]phenanthridinium...

  12. Peptide-based proteasome inhibitors in anticancer drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micale, Nicola; Scarbaci, Kety; Troiano, Valeria; Ettari, Roberta; Grasso, Silvana; Zappalà, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The identification of the key role of the eukaryotic 26S proteasome in regulated intracellular proteolysis and its importance as a target in many pathological conditions wherein the proteasomal activity is defective (e.g., malignancies, autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.) prompted several research groups to the development of specific inhibitors of this multicatalytic complex with the aim of obtaining valid drug candidates. In regard to the anticancer therapy, the peptide boronate bortezomib (Velcade®) represents the first molecule approved by FDA for the treatment of multiple myeloma in 2003 and mantle cell lymphoma in 2006. Since then, a plethora of molecules targeting the proteasome have been identified as potential anticancer agents and a few of them reached clinical trials or are already in the market (i.e., carfilzomib; Kyprolis®). In most cases, the design of new proteasome inhibitors (PIs) takes into account a proven peptide or pseudopeptide motif as a base structure and places other chemical entities throughout the peptide skeleton in such a way to create an efficacious network of interactions within the catalytic sites. The purpose of this review is to provide an in-depth look at the current state of the research in the field of peptide-based PIs, specifically those ones that might find an application as anticancer agents. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG): An updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ren-You; Li, Hua-Bin; Sui, Zhong-Quan; Corke, Harold

    2018-04-13

    Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world, especially in Asian countries. Consumption of green tea has been demonstrated to possess many health benefits, which mainly attributed to the main bioactive compound epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a flavone-3-ol polyphenol, in green tea. EGCG is mainly absorbed in the intestine, and gut microbiota play a critical role in its metabolism prior to absorption. EGCG exhibits versatile bioactivities, with its anti-cancer effect most attracting due to the cancer preventive effect of green tea consumption, and a great number of studies intensively investigated its anti-cancer effect. In this review, we therefore, first stated the absorption and metabolism process of EGCG, and then summarized its anti-cancer effect in vitro and in vivo, including its manifold anti-cancer actions and mechanisms, especially its anti-cancer stem cell effect, and next highlighted its various molecular targets involved in cancer inhibition. Finally, the anti-cancer effect of EGCG analogs and nanoparticles, as well as the potential cancer promoting effect of EGCG were also discussed. Understanding of the absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of EGCG can be of importance to better utilize it as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent.

  14. Recent discoveries of anticancer flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Demetrio; Maggio, Benedetta; Raimondi, Maria Valeria; Plescia, Fabiana; Daidone, Giuseppe

    2017-12-15

    In this review we report the recent advances in anticancer activity of the family of natural occurring flavonoids, covering the time span of the last five years. The bibliographic data will be grouped, on the basis of biological information, in two great categories: reports in which the extract plants bioactivity is reported and the identification of each flavonoid is present or not, and reports in which the anticancer activity is attributable to purified and identified flavonoids from plants. Wherever possible, the targets and mechanisms of action as well as the structure-activity relationships of the molecules will be reported. Also, in the review it was thoroughly investigated the recent discovery on flavonoids containing the 2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one system even if some examples of unusual flavonoids, bearing a non-aromatic B-ring or other ring condensed to the base structure are reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery Using Carbohydrate-Based Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbari, Javad; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Alibakhshi, Abbas; Tabarzad, Maryam; Hejazi, Maryam; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2018-02-12

    Polymeric drug delivery systems in the form of nanocarriers are the most interesting vehicles in anticancer therapy. Among different types of biocompatible polymers, carbohydrate-based polymers or polysaccharides are the most common natural polymers with complex structures consisting of long chains of monosaccharide or disaccharide units bound by glycosidic linkages. Their appealing properties such as availability, biocompatibility, biodegradability, low toxicity, high chemical reactivity, facile chemical modification and low cost led to their extensive applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical fields including development of nano-vehicles for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic agents. Generally, reducing systemic toxicity, increasing short half-lives and tumor localization of agents are the top priorities for a successful cancer therapy. Polysaccharide-based or - coated nanosystems with respect to their advantageous features as well as accumulation in tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect can provide promising carrier systems for the delivery of noblest impressive agents. Most challenging factor in cancer therapy was the toxicity of anti-cancer therapeutic agents for normal cells and therefore, targeted delivery of these drugs to the site of action can be considered as an interesting therapeutic strategy. In this regard, several polysaccharides exhibited selective affinity for specific cell types, and so they can act as a targeting agent in drug delivery systems. Accordingly, different aspects of polysaccharide applications in cancer treatment or diagnosis were reviewed in this paper. In this regard, after a brief introduction of polysaccharide structure and its importance, the pharmaceutical usage of carbohydrate-based polymers was considered according to the identity of accompanying active pharmaceutical agents. It was also presented that the carbohydrate based polymers have been extensively considered as promising materials in

  16. Tumor-selective coronaviruses as potential anti-cancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Würdinger, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Despite much progress in the treatment of certain types of cancer, generally the successes of cancer therapy are still largely insufficient and new treatment options are therefore urgently needed. Oncolytic virotherapy may offer an unconventional approach to selectively eradicate cancer cells, while

  17. Isolation of a potential anticancer agent with protein phosphatase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the HPLC machine and the sample analytes (50. µL) were injected into the machine. The HPLC machine consists of Waters 2695. Separation Module, Waters 2487 UV detector channel and Waters ... a cooling system to supply refrigerant to the shelves and condenser, and a vacuum system to reduce pressure in the.

  18. Isolation of a potential anticancer agent with protein phosphatase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: It was found that a colorectal cancer cell line, HT-29, was susceptible to Fraction S1 and Citrinin 9318. A propidium iodide (PI)-incorporated DNA assay was used to show that there was G2/M arrest in HT-29 by Citrinin 9318. Conclusion: Citrinin 9318 inhibits the viability of HT-29 via mitotic block. The results suggest ...

  19. Clinical pharmacology of novel anticancer agents : Focus on oral formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weger, V.A.

    2017-01-01

    The taxanes paclitaxel and docetaxel have a low oral bioavailability, as a result of poor water solubility and high first-pass effect. The water-solubility could be improved by the development of solid dispersion formulations for oral use. In this thesis it is shown that the combination of the solid

  20. Chrysin-benzothiazole conjugates as antioxidant and anticancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mistry, B.M.; Patel, Rahul V.; Keum, Y.S.; Kim, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 23 (2015), s. 5561-5565 ISSN 0960-894X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Chrysin * Benzothiazole * Cervical cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.486, year: 2015

  1. Gold-based complexes : synthesis and evaluation as anticancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertrand, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Tegenwoordig bevatten een groot deel van de geneesmiddelcocktails, die gebruikt worden tijdens chemotherapie bij kanker, platinaverbindingen. Ondanks hun therapeutisch succes wordt de toepassing ervan beperkt door ernstige bijwerkingen. Een van de strategieën ter verbetering is het vervangen van

  2. Sea Cucumbers Metabolites as Potent Anti-Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveena B. Janakiram

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sea cucumbers and their extracts have gained immense popularity and interest among researchers and nutritionists due to their nutritive value, potential health benefits, and use in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. Many areas of the world use sea cucumbers in traditional foods and folk medicine. Though the actual components and their specific functions still remain to be investigated, most sea cucumber extracts are being studied for their anti-inflammatory functions, immunostimulatory properties, and for cancer prevention and treatment. There is large scope for the discovery of additional bioactive, valuable compounds from this natural source. Sea cucumber extracts contain unique components, such as modified triterpene glycosides, sulfated polysaccharides, glycosphingolipids, and esterified phospholipids. Frondanol A5, an isopropyl alcohol/water extract of the enzymatically hydrolyzed epithelia of the edible North Atlantic sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa, contains monosulfated triterpenoid glycoside Frondoside A, the disulfated glycoside Frondoside B, the trisulfated glycoside Frondoside C, 12-methyltetradecanoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and fucosylated chondroitin sulfate. We have extensively studied the efficacy of this extract in preventing colon cancer in rodent models. In this review, we discuss the anti-inflammatory, immunostimulatory, and anti-tumor properties of sea cucumber extracts.

  3. Anticancer agent CHS-828 inhibits cellular synthesis of NAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, U.H.; Christensen, M.K.; Bjorkling, F.

    2008-01-01

    different class. We then showed that nicotinamide protects against CHS-828-mediated cytotoxicity. Finally, we observed that treatment with CHS-828 depletes cellular NAD levels in sensitive cancer cells. In conclusion, these results strongly suggest that, like FK866, CHS-828 kills cancer cells by depleting...

  4. Chrysin-piperazine conjugates as antioxidant and anticancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patel, Rahul V.; Mistry, B.M.; Syed, R.; Rathi, A.K.; Lee, Y. J.; Sung, J.S.; Shinf, H.S.; Keum, Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 88, JUN 10 (2016), s. 166-177 ISSN 0928-0987 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Chrysin * Antioxidant * Piperazines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.756, year: 2016

  5. Supramolecular approach for target transport of photodynamic anticancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kejík, Z.; Kaplánek, R.; Bříza, T.; Králová, Jarmila; Martásek, P.; Král, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2012), s. 106-116 ISSN 1061-0278 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/1291; GA ČR GA203/09/1311 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : photodynamic therapy * photosensitisers * targeted transport * combination therapy * cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.546, year: 2012

  6. Rationale and clinical use of multitargeting anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melisi, Davide; Piro, Geny; Tamburrino, Anna; Carbone, Carmine; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2013-08-01

    Human solid tumors contain genetically distinct subpopulations of tumor cells that can be enriched under selective pressure of specific treatments. This heterogeneous nature reflects the dynamism of drug response and it represents a fundamental driver of resistance. Moreover, the complexity of cancer disease is increased by the activity of cross-talking, redundant signaling pathways, escape pathways and compensatory events, which triggers activation of secondary growth and survival. Broad multi-targeted approaches are requested to overcome a complex, heterogeneous, and dynamic disease such as cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cisplatin encapsulated nanoparticle as a therapeutic agent for anticancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eka Putra, Gusti Ngurah Putu; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of manipulating size of biomaterials encapsulated drug into nano-scale particles has been researched and developed in treating cancer. Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, therefore it is critical to treat cancers challenging with therapeutic modality of various mechanisms. Our preliminary investigation has studied cisplatin encapsulated into lipid-based nanoparticle and examined the therapeutic effect on xenografted animal model. We used mice with tumor volume ranging from 195 to 214 mm3 and then few mice were grouped into three groups including: control (PBS), lipid platinum chloride (LPC) nanoparticles and CDDP (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) at dose of 3mg cisplatin /kg body weight. The effect of the treatment was observed for 12 days post-injection. It showed that LPC NPs demonstrated a better therapeutic effect compared to CDDP at same 3mg cisplatin/kg drug dose of tumor size reduction, 96.6% and 11.1% respectively. In addition, mouse body weight loss of LPC, CDDP and PBS treated group are 12.1%, 24.3% and 1.4%. It means that by compared to CDDP group, LPC group demonstrated less side effect as not much reduction of body weight have found. Our findings have shown to be a potential modality to further investigate as a feasible cancer therapy modality.

  8. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by the anticancer agent 2-methoxyestradiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, Thilo; D'Amico, Gabriela; Quintero, Marisol; Palacios-Callender, Miriam; Hollis, Veronica; Lam, Francis; Moncada, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2), a naturally occurring metabolite of estradiol, is known to have antiproliferative, antiangiogenic, and proapoptotic activity. Mechanistically, 2ME2 has been shown to downregulate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) and to induce apoptosis in tumour cells by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study we report that 2ME2 inhibits mitochondrial respiration in both intact cells and submitochondrial particles, and that this effect is due to inhibition of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). The prevention by 2ME2 of hypoxia-induced stabilisation of HIF1α in HEK293 cells was found not to be due to an effect on HIF1α synthesis but rather to an effect on protein degradation. This is in agreement with our recent observation using other inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration which bring about rapid degradation of HIF1α in hypoxia due to increased availability of oxygen and reactivation of prolyl hydroxylases. The concentrations of 2ME2 that inhibited complex I also induced the generation of ROS. 2ME2 did not, however, cause generation of ROS in 143B rho - cells, which lack a functional mitochondrial ETC. We conclude that inhibition of mitochondrial respiration explains, at least in part, the effect of 2ME2 on hypoxia-dependent HIF1α stabilisation and cellular ROS production. Since these actions of 2ME2 occur at higher concentrations than those known to inhibit cell proliferation, it remains to be established whether they contribute to its therapeutic effect

  9. Recent advancements in oxadiazole-based anticancer agents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oxadiazole moiety as histone deacetylase inhibitors. Among the series of naphthalene based oxadazoles, compounds 11 and 12 appeared as the most potent and selective compounds against HDAC1. Compound 11 was more effective against U937 leukemia cells with. IC50 value of 7.8 μM than reference drug (SAHA).

  10. Biological Activities of Fusarochromanone: a Potent Anti-cancer Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-03

    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Mahdavian E., Palyok P., Adelmund S., Williams-Hart T., Furmanski B...durations, trypsinized, collected and pelleted to- gether with any material floating in the medium. Cells were fixed in cold 70% ethanol, resuspended...component causing tibial dyschondroplasia in broiler chickens , and trichothecenes from fusarium roseum ’Graminearum’. Appl Environ Microbiol 1985, 50:102

  11. Anticancer Effects of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. Extract and Rosemary Extract Polyphenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessy Moore

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display enhanced growth rates and a resistance to apoptosis. The ability of cancer cells to evade homeostasis and proliferate uncontrollably while avoiding programmed cell death/apoptosis is acquired through mutations to key signaling molecules, which regulate pathways involved in cell proliferation and survival. Compounds of plant origin, including food components, have attracted scientific attention for use as agents for cancer prevention and treatment. The exploration into natural products offers great opportunity to evaluate new anticancer agents as well as understand novel and potentially relevant mechanisms of action. Rosemary extract has been reported to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and anticancer properties. Rosemary extract contains many polyphenols with carnosic acid and rosmarinic acid found in highest concentrations. The present review summarizes the existing in vitro and in vivo studies focusing on the anticancer effects of rosemary extract and the rosemary extract polyphenols carnosic acid and rosmarinic acid, and their effects on key signaling molecules.

  12. Glutamic acid and its derivatives: candidates for rational design of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Wani, Waseem A; Haque, Ashanul; Saleem, Kishwar

    2013-05-01

    Throughout the history of human civilizations, cancer has been a major health problem. Its treatment has been interesting but challenging to scientists. Glutamic acid and its derivative glutamine are known to play interesting roles in cancer genesis, hence, it was realized that structurally variant glutamic acid derivatives may be designed and developed and, might be having antagonistic effects on cancer. The present article describes the state-of-art of glutamic acid and its derivatives as anticancer agents. Attempts have been made to explore the effectivity of drug-delivery systems based on glutamic acid for the delivery of anticancer drugs. Moreover, efforts have also been made to discuss the mechanism of action of glutamic acid derivatives as anticancer agents, clinical applications of glutamic acid derivatives, as well as recent developments and future perspectives of glutamic acid drug development have also been discussed.

  13. Synthesis, Cytotoxicity and Mechanistic Evaluation of 4-Oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide Derivatives: Finding New Potential Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana da S. M. Forezi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As part of a continuing search for new potential anticancer candidates, we describe the synthesis, cytotoxicity and mechanistic evaluation of a series of 4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives as novel anticancer agents. The inhibitory activity of compounds 10–18 was determined against three cancer cell lines using the MTT colorimetric assay. The screening revealed that derivatives 16b and 17b exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against the gastric cancer cell line but was not active against a normal cell line, in contrast to doxorubicin, a standard chemotherapeutic drug in clinical use. Interestingly, no hemolytical activity was observed when the toxicity of 16b and 17b was tested against blood cells. The in silico and in vitro mechanistic evaluation indicated the potential of 16b as a lead for the development of novel anticancer agents against gastric cancer cells.

  14. Genetic Interactions of STAT3 and Anticancer Drug Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays critical roles in tumorigenesis and malignant evolution and has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target for cancer. A number of STAT3 inhibitors have been evaluated for their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo in experimental tumor models and several approved therapeutic agents have been reported to function as STAT3 inhibitors. Nevertheless, most STAT3 inhibitors have yet to be translated to clinical evaluation for cancer treatment, presumably because of pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and safety issues. In fact, a major cause of failure of anticancer drug development is lack of efficacy. Genetic interactions among various cancer-related pathways often provide redundant input from parallel and/or cooperative pathways that drives and maintains survival environments for cancer cells, leading to low efficacy of single-target agents. Exploiting genetic interactions of STAT3 with other cancer-related pathways may provide molecular insight into mechanisms of cancer resistance to pathway-targeted therapies and strategies for development of more effective anticancer agents and treatment regimens. This review focuses on functional regulation of STAT3 activity; possible interactions of the STAT3, RAS, epidermal growth factor receptor, and reduction-oxidation pathways; and molecular mechanisms that modulate therapeutic efficacies of STAT3 inhibitors

  15. Anticancer activity of Ficus religiosa engineered copper oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, Renu; Maheswari, Ramasamy; Karthik, Selvaraju [Department of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamilnadu (India); Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian, E-mail: shivashangari@gmail.com [Regional Forensic Science Laboratory, Tiruchirapalli, Tamilnadu (India); Ravikumar, Vilwanathan, E-mail: ravikumarbdu@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-11-01

    The design, synthesis, characterization and application of biologically synthesized nanomaterials have become a vital branch of nanotechnology. There is a budding need to develop a method for environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis, that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on an eco-friendly process for rapid synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa leaf extract as reducing and protecting agent. The synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles were confirmed by UV–vis spectrophotometer, absorbance peaks at 285 nm. The copper oxide nanoparticles were analyzed with field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum. The FE-SEM and DLS analyses exposed that copper oxide nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average particle size of 577 nm. FT-IR spectral analysis elucidates the occurrence of biomolecules required for the reduction of copper oxide ions. Zeta potential studies showed that the surface charge of the formed nanoparticles was highly negative. The XRD pattern revealed that synthesized nanoparticles are crystalline in nature. Further, biological activities of the synthesized nanoparticles were confirmed based on its stable anti-cancer effects. The apoptotic effect of copper oxide nanoparticles is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) involving the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in A549 cells. The observed characteristics and results obtained in our in vitro assays suggest that the copper nanoparticles might be a potential anticancer agent. - Highlights: • Biogenic synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles by leaf extract of Ficus religiosa • Characterized via UV–vis, FT-IR, DLS, FE-SEM with EDAX and XRD • Protein may act as an encapsulating, reducing and stabilizing

  16. Anticancer activity of Ficus religiosa engineered copper oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, Renu; Maheswari, Ramasamy; Karthik, Selvaraju; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2014-01-01

    The design, synthesis, characterization and application of biologically synthesized nanomaterials have become a vital branch of nanotechnology. There is a budding need to develop a method for environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis, that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on an eco-friendly process for rapid synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa leaf extract as reducing and protecting agent. The synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles were confirmed by UV–vis spectrophotometer, absorbance peaks at 285 nm. The copper oxide nanoparticles were analyzed with field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum. The FE-SEM and DLS analyses exposed that copper oxide nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average particle size of 577 nm. FT-IR spectral analysis elucidates the occurrence of biomolecules required for the reduction of copper oxide ions. Zeta potential studies showed that the surface charge of the formed nanoparticles was highly negative. The XRD pattern revealed that synthesized nanoparticles are crystalline in nature. Further, biological activities of the synthesized nanoparticles were confirmed based on its stable anti-cancer effects. The apoptotic effect of copper oxide nanoparticles is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) involving the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in A549 cells. The observed characteristics and results obtained in our in vitro assays suggest that the copper nanoparticles might be a potential anticancer agent. - Highlights: • Biogenic synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles by leaf extract of Ficus religiosa • Characterized via UV–vis, FT-IR, DLS, FE-SEM with EDAX and XRD • Protein may act as an encapsulating, reducing and stabilizing

  17. Anticancer Activity of Sea Cucumber Triterpene Glycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry L. Aminin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Triterpene glycosides are characteristic secondary metabolites of sea cucumbers (Holothurioidea, Echinodermata. They have hemolytic, cytotoxic, antifungal, and other biological activities caused by membranotropic action. These natural products suppress the proliferation of various human tumor cell lines in vitro and, more importantly, intraperitoneal administration in rodents of solutions of some sea cucumber triterpene glycosides significantly reduces both tumor burden and metastasis. The anticancer molecular mechanisms include the induction of tumor cell apoptosis through the activation of intracellular caspase cell death pathways, arrest of the cell cycle at S or G2/M phases, influence on nuclear factors, NF-κB, and up-down regulation of certain cellular receptors and enzymes participating in cancerogenesis, such as EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor, Akt (protein kinase B, ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinases, FAK (focal adhesion kinase, MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9 and others. Administration of some glycosides leads to a reduction of cancer cell adhesion, suppression of cell migration and tube formation in those cells, suppression of angiogenesis, inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation and tumor invasion. As a result, marked growth inhibition of tumors occurs in vitro and in vivo. Some holothurian triterpene glycosides have the potential to be used as P-gp mediated MDR reversal agents in combined therapy with standard cytostatics.

  18. Indigofera suffruticosa: An Alternative Anticancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeymesson Raphael Cardoso Vieira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigofera suffruticosa Mill (Fabeceae occurs in the Northeast countryside and has intensive popular use in the treatment of infectious, inflammatory and other processes. The main aim of the present work was to investigate the cytotoxic and antitumor effects of aqueous extracts of leaves of I. suffruticosa obtained by infusion and maceration as well as to evaluate the toxicological properties. Aqueous extracts did not exhibit cytotoxicity against HEp-2 (human epidermoid cancer cell cell lines by MTT method. From the aqueous extract by infusion, the toxicological assay showed low order of toxicity. The antitumor effect of aqueous extracts by infusion (64.53% and maceration (62.62% against sarcoma 180 in mice at a dose of 50 mg kg−1 (intraperitoneally, based on low order of toxicity was comparable to the control group, which showed 100% development. Considering the low order of toxicity and that it is highly effective in inhibiting growth of solid tumors, the aqueous extracts of leaves of I. suffruticosa may be used as an alternative anticancer agent.

  19. Curcumin mediates anticancer effects by modulating multiple cell signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B; Bordoloi, Devivasha; Harsha, Choudhary; Banik, Kishore; Gupta, Subash C; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2017-08-01

    Curcumin, a component of a spice native to India, was first isolated in 1815 by Vogel and Pelletier from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and, subsequently, the chemical structure of curcumin as diferuloylmethane was reported by Milobedzka et al. [(1910) 43., 2163-2170]. Since then, this polyphenol has been shown to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal activities. The current review primarily focuses on the anticancer potential of curcumin through the modulation of multiple cell signaling pathways. Curcumin modulates diverse transcription factors, inflammatory cytokines, enzymes, kinases, growth factors, receptors, and various other proteins with an affinity ranging from the pM to the mM range. Furthermore, curcumin effectively regulates tumor cell growth via modulation of numerous cell signaling pathways and potentiates the effect of chemotherapeutic agents and radiation against cancer. Curcumin can interact with most of the targets that are modulated by FDA-approved drugs for cancer therapy. The focus of this review is to discuss the molecular basis for the anticancer activities of curcumin based on preclinical and clinical findings. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Identification of potential anticancer compounds from Oplopanax horridus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Zhang, Zhiyu; Huang, Wei-Hua; Du, Guang-Jian; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Calway, Tyler; Yu, Chunhao; Nass, Rachael; Zhao, Jing; Du, Wei; Li, Shao-Ping; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2013-08-15

    Oplopanax horridus is a plant native to North America. Previous reports have demonstrated that this herb has antiproliferative effects on cancer cells but study mostly focused on its extract or fractions. Because there has been limited phytochemical study on this herb, its bioactive compounds are largely unknown. We recently isolated and identified 13 compounds, including six polyynes, three sesquiterpenes, two steroids, and two phenolic acids, of which five are novel compounds. In this study, we systemically evaluated the anticancer effects of compounds isolated from O. horridus. Their antiproliferative effects on a panel of human colorectal and breast cancer cells were determined using the MTS assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptotic effects were analyzed by flow cytometry. The in vivo antitumor effect was examined using a xenograft tumor model. Among the 13 compounds, strong antiproliferative effects were observed from falcarindiol and a novel compound oplopantriol A. Falcarindiol showed the most potent antiproliferative effects, significantly inducing pro-apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the S and G2/M phases. The anticancer potential of falcarindiol was further verified in vivo, significantly inhibiting HCT-116 tumor growth in an athymic nude mouse model at 15 mg/kg. We also analyzed the relationship between polyyne structures and their pharmacological activities. We observed that both the terminal hydroxyl group and double bond obviously affected their anticancer potential. Results from this study supplied valuable information for future semi-synthesis of polyyne derivatives to develop novel cancer chemopreventive agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development: 2016 conference insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Victor A; Abrey, Lauren E; Heffron, Timothy P; Tonge, Peter J; Dar, Arvin C; Weiss, William A; Gallo, James M

    2017-07-18

    CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development November 2016, AZ, USA The 2016 second CNS Anticancer Drug Discovery and Development Conference addressed diverse viewpoints about why new drug discovery/development focused on CNS cancers has been sorely lacking. Despite more than 70,000 individuals in the USA being diagnosed with a primary brain malignancy and 151,669-286,486 suffering from metastatic CNS cancer, in 1999, temozolomide was the last drug approved by the US FDA as an anticancer agent for high-grade gliomas. Among the topics discussed were economic factors and pharmaceutical risk assessments, regulatory constraints and perceptions and the need for improved imaging surrogates of drug activity. Included were modeling tumor growth and drug effects in a medical environment in which direct tumor sampling for biological effects can be problematic, potential new drugs under investigation and targets for drug discovery and development. The long trajectory and diverse impediments to novel drug discovery, and expectation that more than one drug will be needed to adequately inhibit critical intracellular tumor pathways were viewed as major disincentives for most pharmaceutical/biotechnology companies. While there were a few unanimities, one consensus is the need for continued and focused discussion among academic and industry scientists and clinicians to address tumor targets, new drug chemistry, and more time- and cost-efficient clinical trials based on surrogate end points.

  2. Biological evaluation of tubulysin A: A potential anticancer and antiangiogenic natural product

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Hollingshead, Melinda; Holbeck, Susan; Schauer-Vukašinović, Vesna; Camalier, Richard F.; Dömling, Alexander; Agarwal, Seema

    2006-01-01

    Tubulysin A (tubA) is a natural product isolated from a strain of myxobacteria that has been shown to depolymerize microtubules and induce mitotic arrest. The potential of tubA as an anticancer and antiangiogenic agent is explored in the present study. tubA shows potent antiproliferative activity in

  3. Design, synthesis, characterization and biological studies of ruthenium and gold compounds with anticancer properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garza-Ortiz, Ariadna

    2008-01-01

    The design of novel anticancer agents is one of the most active fields in Medicinal Chemistry, as the number of effective drugs for treatment of cancer is still very limited. This demand for new drugs is even higher, considering the high cancer-prevalence rate in our society. The therapeutic

  4. High throughput screening of South African plants for anti-cancer properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fouché, Gerda

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants have a long history of use in the treatment of cancer and over 60% of currently used anti-cancer agents are derived in one way or another from natural sources. South Africa has a rich plant biodiversity with only a limited number reported...

  5. 10 Gallium Complexes as Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2018-02-05

    Clinical trials have shown gallium nitrate, a group 13 (formerly IIIa) metal salt, to have antineoplastic activity against non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and urothelial cancers. Interest in gallium as a metal with anticancer properties emerged when it was discovered that 67Ga(III) citrate injected in tumor-bearing animals localized to sites of tumor. Animal studies showed non-radioactive gallium nitrate to inhibit the growth of implanted solid tumors. Following further evaluation of its efficacy and toxicity in animals, gallium nitrate, Ga(NO3)3, was designated an investigational drug by the National Cancer Institute (USA) and advanced to Phase 1 and 2 clinical trials. Gallium(III) shares certain chemical characteristics with iron(III) which enable it to interact with iron-binding proteins and disrupt iron-dependent tumor cell growth. Gallium's mechanisms of action include the inhibition of cellular iron uptake and disruption of intracellular iron homeostasis, these effects result in inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase and mitochondrial function, and changes in the expression in proteins of iron transport and storage. Whereas the growth-inhibitory effects of gallium become apparent after 24 to 48 hours of incubation of cells, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is seen with 1 to 4 hours of incubation. Gallium-induced ROS consequently triggers the upregulation of metallothionein and hemoxygenase-1 genes. Beyond the first generation of gallium salts such as gallium nitrate and gallium chloride, a new generation of gallium-ligand complexes such as tris(8-quinolinolato)gallium(III) (KP46) and gallium maltolate has emerged. These agents are being evaluated in the clinic while other ligands for gallium are in preclinical development. These newer agents appear to possess greater antitumor efficacy and a broader spectrum of antineoplastic activity than the earlier generation of gallium compounds.

  6. Ganoderma: insights into anticancer effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kladar, Nebojša V; Gavarić, Neda S; Božin, Biljana N

    2016-09-01

    The genus Ganoderma includes about 80 species growing on cut or rotten trees. The most commonly used species is Ganoderma ludicum. Biomolecules responsible for the health benefits of Ganoderma are polysaccharides with an immunostimulative effect and triterpenes with a cytotoxic action. For more than 2000 years, it has been used traditionally in the treatment of various pathological conditions and recently, its immunoregulatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antioxidant, hepatoprotective, and anticancer potential has been confirmed. A wide range of Ganoderma extracts and preparations arrest the cell cycle in different phases and consequently inhibit the growth of various types of cancer cells. Extracts containing polysaccharides stimulate immunological reactions through the production of various cytokines and mobilization of immune system cells. In-vivo studies have confirmed the anticancer potential and the antimetastatic effects of compounds originating from Ganoderma. There is also evidence for the chemopreventive action of Ganoderma extracts in bladder, prostate, liver, and breast cancer. The results of clinical studies suggest the combined use of G. lucidum with conventional chemotherapy/radiotherapy, but the methodology and the results of these studies are being questioned. Therefore, a constant need for new clinical trials exists.

  7. Liposome Delivery Systems for Inhalation: A Critical Review Highlighting Formulation Issues and Anticancer Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudokas, Mindaugas; Najlah, Mohammad; Alhnan, Mohamed Albed; Elhissi, Abdelbary

    2016-01-01

    This is a critical review on research conducted in the field of pulmonary delivery of liposomes. Issues relating to the mechanism of nebulisation and liposome composition were appraised and correlated with literature reports of liposome formulations used in clinical trials to understand the role of liposome size and composition on therapeutic outcome. A major highlight was liposome inhalation for the treatment of lung cancers. Many in vivo studies that explored the potential of liposomes as anticancer carrier systems were evaluated, including animal studies and clinical trials. Liposomes can entrap anticancer drugs and localise their action in the lung following pulmonary delivery. The safety of inhaled liposomes incorporating anticancer drugs depends on the anticancer agent used and the amount of drug delivered to the target cancer in the lung. The difficulty of efficient targeting of liposomal anticancer aerosols to the cancerous tissues within the lung may result in low doses reaching the target site. Overall, following the success of liposomes as inhalable carriers in the treatment of lung infections, it is expected that more focus from research and development will be given to designing inhalable liposome carriers for the treatment of other lung diseases, including pulmonary cancers. The successful development of anticancer liposomes for inhalation may depend on the future development of effective aerosolisation devices and better targeted liposomes to maximise the benefit of therapy and reduce the potential for local and systemic adverse effects. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Mono- and Dinuclear Phosphorescent Rhenium(I) Complexes: Impact of Subcellular Localization on Anticancer Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Chen, Mu-He; Hao, Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-06-01

    Elucidation of relationship among chemical structure, cellular uptake, localization, and biological activity of anticancer metal complexes is important for the understanding of their mechanisms of action. Organometallic rhenium(I) tricarbonyl compounds have emerged as potential multifunctional anticancer drug candidates that can integrate therapeutic and imaging capabilities in a single molecule. Herein, two mononuclear phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes (Re1 and Re2), along with their corresponding dinuclear complexes (Re3 and Re4), were designed and synthesized as potent anticancer agents. The subcellular accumulation of Re1-Re4 was conveniently analyzed by confocal microscopy in situ in live cells by utilizing their intrinsic phosphorescence. We found that increased lipophilicity of the bidentate ligands could enhance their cellular uptake, leading to improved anticancer efficacy. The dinuclear complexes were more potent than the mononuclear counterparts. The molecular anticancer mechanisms of action evoked by Re3 and Re4 were explored in detail. Re3 with a lower lipophilicity localizes to lysosomes and induces caspase-independent apoptosis, whereas Re4 with higher lipophilicity specially accumulates in mitochondria and induces caspase-independent paraptosis in cancer cells. Our study demonstrates that subcellular localization is crucial for the anticancer mechanisms of these phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  10. Anticancer and antimetastatic effects of cordycepin, an active component of Cordyceps sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, a fungus that parasitizes on the larva of Lepidoptera, has been used as a valued traditional Chinese medicine. We investigated the effects of water extracts of Cordyceps sinensis (WECS), and particularly focused on its anticancer and antimetastatic actions. Based on in vitro studies, we report that WECS showed an anticancer action, and this action was antagonized by an adenosine A3 receptor antagonist. Moreover, this anticancer action of WECS was promoted by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor. These results suggest that one of the components of WECS with an anticancer action might be an adenosine or its derivatives. Therefore, we focused on cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine) as one of the active ingredients of WECS. According to our experiments, cordycepin showed an anticancer effect through the stimulation of adenosine A3 receptor, followed by glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β activation and cyclin D1 suppression. Cordycepin also showed an antimetastatic action through inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by cancer cells and suppressing the invasiveness of cancer cells via inhibiting the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, and accelerating the secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 from cancer cells. In conclusion, cordycepin, an active component of WECS, might be a candidate anticancer and antimetastatic agent. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anticancer and antimetastatic effects of cordycepin, an active component of Cordyceps sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Nakamura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordyceps sinensis, a fungus that parasitizes on the larva of Lepidoptera, has been used as a valued traditional Chinese medicine. We investigated the effects of water extracts of Cordyceps sinensis (WECS, and particularly focused on its anticancer and antimetastatic actions. Based on in vitro studies, we report that WECS showed an anticancer action, and this action was antagonized by an adenosine A3 receptor antagonist. Moreover, this anticancer action of WECS was promoted by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor. These results suggest that one of the components of WECS with an anticancer action might be an adenosine or its derivatives. Therefore, we focused on cordycepin (3′-deoxyadenosine as one of the active ingredients of WECS. According to our experiments, cordycepin showed an anticancer effect through the stimulation of adenosine A3 receptor, followed by glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3β activation and cyclin D1 suppression. Cordycepin also showed an antimetastatic action through inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by cancer cells and suppressing the invasiveness of cancer cells via inhibiting the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9, and accelerating the secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 from cancer cells. In conclusion, cordycepin, an active component of WECS, might be a candidate anticancer and antimetastatic agent.

  12. Functional and structural characteristics of anticancer peptide Pep27 analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Youn-Kyung

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A secreted peptide Pep27 initiates the cell death program in S. pneumoniae through signal transduction. This study was undertaken to evaluate the relation between the structure and cytotoxic activity of Pep27 and its analogues on cancer cells. Results Pep27anal2 characterized substituting (2R→W, (4E→W, (11S→W and (13Q→W in native Pep27, exhibited greater hydrophobicity and anticancer activity than Pep27 and other analogues. The IC50 values of Pep27anal2 were approximately 10 – 30 μM in a number of cell lines (AML-2, HL-60, Jurkat, MCF-7 and SNU-601. Confocal microscopy showed that Pep27anal2-FITC was localized in the plasma membrane, and then moving from the membrane to subcellular compartments with the initiation of membrane blebbing. Flow cytometric analysis using propidium iodide and Annexin V also revealed that Pep27anal2 induced apoptosis with minor membrane damage. Electron microscopy revealed that Pep27 induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. The anticancer activity of Pep27anal2 was neither abrogated by pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-fmk nor related to cytochrome c release from mitochondria. The 3D solution structures of these two Pep27 peptides revealed that both form a random coil conformation in water; however, they adopted stable α-helical conformations in solutions. Conclusion The results indicate that Pep27anal2 can penetrate the plasma membrane, and then induce apoptosis in both caspase-and cytochrome c-independent manner. The hydrophobicity of Pep27anal2 appears to play an important role in membrane permeabilization and/or anticancer properties. The structure-functional relationships of these peptides are also discussed. It is proposed that Pep27anal2 is a potential candidate for anticancer therapeutic agents.

  13. Clinical pharmacology of novel anticancer drug formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuurman, F.E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies outlined in this thesis describe the impact of drug formulations on pharmacology of anticancer drugs. It consists of four parts and starts with a review describing the mechanisms of low oral bioavailability of anti-cancer drugs and strategies for improvement of the bioavailability. The

  14. Gene expression profiling of breast tumor cell lines to predict for therapeutic response to microtubule-stabilizing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadra, Gais; Finetti, Pascal; Toiron, Yves; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Borg, Jean-Paul; Bertucci, François; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2012-04-01

    Microtubule-targeting agents, including taxanes (Tax) and ixabepilone (Ixa), are important components of modern breast cancer chemotherapy regimens, but no molecular parameter is currently available that can predict for their efficiency. We sought to develop pharmacogenomic predictors of Tax- and Ixa-response from a large panel of human breast tumor cell lines (BTCL), then to evaluate their performance in clinical samples. Thirty-two BTCL, representative of the molecular diversity of breast cancers (BC), were treated in vitro with Tax (paclitaxel (Pac), docetaxel (Doc)), and ixabepilone (Ixa), then classified as drug-sensitive or resistant according to their 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s). Baseline gene expression data were obtained using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 human oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene expression set (GES) predictors of response to taxanes were derived, then tested for validation internally and in publicly available gene expression datasets. In vitro IC50s of Pac and Doc were almost identical, whereas some Tax-resistant BTCL retained sensitivity to Ixa. GES predictors for Tax-sensitivity (333 genes) and Ixa-sensitivity (79 genes) were defined. They displayed a limited number of overlapping genes. Both were validated by leave-n-out cross-validation (n = 4; for overall accuracy (OA), P = 0.028 for Tax, and P = 0.0005 for Ixa). The GES predictor of Tax-sensitivity was tested on publicly available external datasets and significantly predicted Pac-sensitivity in 16 BTCL (P = 0.04 for OA), and pathological complete response to Pac-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in BC patients (P = 0.0045 for OA). Applying Tax and Ixa-GES to a dataset of clinically annotated early BC patients identified subsets of tumors with potentially distinct phenotypes of drug sensitivity: predicted Ixa-sensitive/Tax-resistant BC were significantly (P Tax-sensitive BC. Genomic predictors for Tax- and Ixa-sensitivity can be derived from BTCL and may be helpful for better

  15. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  16. [Anticancer propaganda: myth or reality?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demin, E V; Merabishvili, V M

    2014-01-01

    The authors raise a very important problem of anticancer propaganda aimed at the early detection of cancer to be solved nowadays by means of screening and constructive interaction between oncologists and the public. To increase the level of knowledge of the population in this area it is necessary to expand the range of its adequate awareness of tumor diseases. Only joint efforts can limit the destructive effect of cancer on people's minds, so that every person would be responsible for his own health, clearly understanding the advantages of early visit to a doctor. This once again highlights the need of educational work with the public, motivational nature of which allows strengthening the value of screening in the whole complex of measures to fight cancer.

  17. The anticancer activity of propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Nikliński

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Propolis and its compounds have been the subject of many studies due to their antimicrobial and antiinflammatory activity; however, it is now known that they also possess antitumor properties. This review aims to summarize the results of studies on the mechanism of activity of propolis and its active compounds such as CAPE and chrysin in the apoptotic process, and their influence on the proliferation of cancer cells. Our review shows that propolis and its presented compounds induce apoptosis pathways in cancer cells. The antiproliferative effects of propolis, CAPE or chrysin in cancer cells are the result of the suppression of complexes of cyclins, as well as cell cycle arrest. The results of in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that propolis, CAPE and chrysin may inhibit tumor cell progression and may be useful as potential chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive anticancer drugs.

  18. Marine Fungi: A Source of Potential Anticancer Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Sunil K; Prakash, Ved; Ranjan, Nihar

    2017-01-01

    Metabolites from marine fungi have hogged the limelight in drug discovery because of their promise as therapeutic agents. A number of metabolites related to marine fungi have been discovered from various sources which are known to possess a range of activities as antibacterial, antiviral and anticancer agents. Although, over a thousand marine fungi based metabolites have already been reported, none of them have reached the market yet which could partly be related to non-comprehensive screening approaches and lack of sustained lead optimization. The origin of these marine fungal metabolites is varied as their habitats have been reported from various sources such as sponge, algae, mangrove derived fungi, and fungi from bottom sediments. The importance of these natural compounds is based on their cytotoxicity and related activities that emanate from the diversity in their chemical structures and functional groups present on them. This review covers the majority of anticancer compounds isolated from marine fungi during 2012-2016 against specific cancer cell lines.

  19. Marine Fungi: A Source of Potential Anticancer Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K. Deshmukh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolites from marine fungi have hogged the limelight in drug discovery because of their promise as therapeutic agents. A number of metabolites related to marine fungi have been discovered from various sources which are known to possess a range of activities as antibacterial, antiviral and anticancer agents. Although, over a thousand marine fungi based metabolites have already been reported, none of them have reached the market yet which could partly be related to non-comprehensive screening approaches and lack of sustained lead optimization. The origin of these marine fungal metabolites is varied as their habitats have been reported from various sources such as sponge, algae, mangrove derived fungi, and fungi from bottom sediments. The importance of these natural compounds is based on their cytotoxicity and related activities that emanate from the diversity in their chemical structures and functional groups present on them. This review covers the majority of anticancer compounds isolated from marine fungi during 2012–2016 against specific cancer cell lines.

  20. Phytochemicals as Anticancer and Chemopreventive Topoisomerase II Poisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketron, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    Phytochemicals are a rich source of anticancer drugs and chemopreventive agents. Several of these chemicals appear to exert at least some of their effects through interactions with topoisomerase II, an essential enzyme that regulates DNA supercoiling and removes knots and tangles from the genome. Topoisomerase II-active phytochemicals function by stabilizing covalent protein-cleaved DNA complexes that are intermediates in the catalytic cycle of the enzyme. As a result, these compounds convert topoisomerase II to a cellular toxin that fragments the genome. Because of their mode of action, they are referred to as topoisomerase II poisons as opposed to catalytic inhibitors. The first sections of this article discuss DNA topology, the catalytic cycle of topoisomerase II, and the two mechanisms (interfacial vs. covalent) by which different classes of topoisomerase II poisons alter enzyme activity. Subsequent sections discuss the effects of several phytochemicals on the type II enzyme, including demethyl-epipodophyllotoxins (semisynthetic anticancer drugs) as well as flavones, flavonols, isoflavones, catechins, isothiocyanates, and curcumin (dietary chemopreventive agents). Finally, the leukemogenic potential of topoisomerase II-targeted phytochemicals is described. PMID:24678287

  1. Gene signature critical to cancer phenotype as a paradigm for anticancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, E R; McMurray, H R; Hassane, D C; Newman, L; Salzman, P; Jordan, C T; Land, H

    2013-08-15

    Malignant cell transformation commonly results in the deregulation of thousands of cellular genes, an observation that suggests a complex biological process and an inherently challenging scenario for the development of effective cancer interventions. To better define the genes/pathways essential to regulating the malignant phenotype, we recently described a novel strategy based on the cooperative nature of carcinogenesis that focuses on genes synergistically deregulated in response to cooperating oncogenic mutations. These so-called 'cooperation response genes' (CRGs) are highly enriched for genes critical for the cancer phenotype, thereby suggesting their causal role in the malignant state. Here, we show that CRGs have an essential role in drug-mediated anticancer activity and that anticancer agents can be identified through their ability to antagonize the CRG expression profile. These findings provide proof-of-concept for the use of the CRG signature as a novel means of drug discovery with relevance to underlying anticancer drug mechanisms.

  2. Anticancer Activity of Tetrahydrocorysamine against Pancreatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MTT) and flow cytometry assays. The effect of TCSM on the expressions of mitochondria-mediated apoptotic proteins were investigated by Western blot assay. Xenograft assay was used to evaluate the anticancer activity of TCSM in vivo.

  3. Anticancer Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy with Lung Cancer-Targeted Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ji-Eun; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a non-invasive and non-surgical method representing an attractive alternative choice for lung cancer treatment. Photosensitizers selectively accumulate in tumor tissue and lead to tumor cell death in the presence of oxygen and the proper wavelength of light. To increase the therapeutic effect of PDT, we developed both photosensitizer- and anticancer agent-loaded lung cancer-targeted nanoparticles. Both enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect-based passive targeting and hyaluronic-acid-CD44 interaction-based active targeting were applied. CD44 is a well-known hyaluronic acid receptor that is often introduced as a biomarker of non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, a combination of PDT and chemotherapy is adopted in the present study. This combination concept may increase anticancer therapeutic effects and reduce adverse reactions. We chose hypocrellin B (HB) as a novel photosensitizer in this study. It has been reported that HB causes higher anticancer efficacy of PDT compared to hematoporphyrin derivatives 1 . Paclitaxel was selected as the anticancer drug since it has proven to be a potential treatment for lung cancer 2 . The antitumor efficacies of photosensitizer (HB) solution, photosensitizer encapsulated hyaluronic acid-ceramide nanoparticles (HB-NPs), and both photosensitizer- and anticancer agent (paclitaxel)-encapsulated hyaluronic acid-ceramide nanoparticles (HB-P-NPs) after PDT were compared both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro phototoxicity in A549 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cells and the in vivo antitumor efficacy in A549 tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The HB-P-NP treatment group showed the most effective anticancer effect after PDT. In conclusion, the HB-P-NPs prepared in the present study represent a potential and novel photosensitizer delivery system in treating lung cancer with PDT.

  4. Modulation of anticancer drug toxicity by solcoseryl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sołtysiak-Pawluczuk, D; Jedrych, A; Jastrzebski, Z; Czyzewska-Szafran, H; Danysz, A

    1991-01-01

    The studies of the effect of solcoseryl on toxicity of selected anticancer drugs were performed in mice. The observed differential influence of solcoseryl was dependent on the type of anticancer drug as well as on the schedule of solcoseryl administration. The protective effect of the biostimulator was noticed exclusively against 5-FU toxicity. The results of our studies could provide possible implications for therapeutic approach.

  5. Nanomelatonin triggers superior anticancer functionality in a human malignant glioblastoma cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sanjeev Kumar; Srivastava, Anup Kumar; Dev, Atul; Kaundal, Babita; Choudhury, Subhasree Roy; Karmakar, Surajit

    2017-09-01

    Melatonin (MEL) has promising medicinal value as an anticancer agent in a variety of malignancies, but there are difficulties in achieving a therapeutic dose due to its short half-life, low bioavailability, poor solubility and extensive first-pass metabolism. In this study chitosan/tripolyphosphate (TPP) nanoparticles were prepared by an ionic gelation method to overcome the therapeutic challenges of melatonin and to improve its anticancer efficacy. Characterization of the melatonin-loaded chitosan (MEL-CS) nanoformulation was performed using transmission and scanning electron microscopies, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. In vitro release, cellular uptake and efficacy studies were tested for their enhanced anticancer potential in human U87MG glioblastoma cells. Confocal studies revealed higher cellular uptake of MEL-CS nanoparticles and enhanced anticancer efficacy in human malignant glioblastoma cancer cells than in healthy non-malignant human HEK293T cells in mono- and co-culture models. Our study has shown for the first time that MEL-CS nanocomposites are therapeutically more effective as compared to free MEL at inducing functional anticancer efficacy in the human brain tumour U87MG cell line.

  6. Anti-cancer effects of xanthones from pericarps of mangosteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akao, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Iinuma, Munekazu; Nozawa, Yoshinori

    2008-03-01

    Mangosteen, Garcinia mangostana Linn, is a tree found in South East Asia, and its pericarps have been used as traditional medicine. Phytochemical studies have shown that they contain a variety of secondary metabolites, such as oxygenated and prenylated xanthones. Recent studies revealed that these xanthones exhibited a variety of biological activities containing anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer effects. We previously investigated the anti-proliferative effects of four prenylated xanthones from the pericarps; alpha-mangostin, beta-mangostin, gamma-mangostin, and methoxy-beta-mangostin in various human cancer cells. These xanthones are different in the number of hydroxyl and methoxy groups. Except for methoxy-beta-mangostin, the other three xanthones strongly inhibited cell growth at low concentrations from 5 to 20 microM in human colon cancer DLD-1 cells. Our recent study focused on the mechanism of alpha-mangostin-induced growth inhibition in DLD-1 cells. It was shown that the anti-proliferative effects of the xanthones were associated with cell-cycle arrest by affecting the expression of cyclins, cdc2, and p27; G1 arrest by alpha-mangostin and beta-Mangostin, and S arrest by gamma-mangostin. alpha-Mangostin found to induce apoptosis through the activation of intrinsic pathway following the down-regulation of signaling cascades involving MAP kinases and the serine/threonine kinase Akt. Synergistic effects by the combined treatment of alpha-mangostin and anti-cancer drug 5-FU was to be noted. alpha-Mangostin was found to have a cancer preventive effect in rat carcinogenesis bioassay and the extract from pericarps, which contains mainly alpha-mangostin and gamma-mangostin, exhibited an enhancement of NK cell activity in a mouse model. These findings could provide a relevant basis for the development of xanthones as an agent for cancer prevention and the combination therapy with anti-cancer drugs.

  7. Marine Invertebrate Metabolites with Anticancer Activities: Solutions to the “Supply Problem”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson G. M. Gomes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine invertebrates provide a rich source of metabolites with anticancer activities and several marine-derived agents have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, the limited supply of promising anticancer metabolites from their natural sources is a major hurdle to their preclinical and clinical development. Thus, the lack of a sustainable large-scale supply has been an important challenge facing chemists and biologists involved in marine-based drug discovery. In the current review we describe the main strategies aimed to overcome the supply problem. These include: marine invertebrate aquaculture, invertebrate and symbiont cell culture, culture-independent strategies, total chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis, and a number of hybrid strategies. We provide examples illustrating the application of these strategies for the supply of marine invertebrate-derived anticancer agents. Finally, we encourage the scientific community to develop scalable methods to obtain selected metabolites, which in the authors’ opinion should be pursued due to their most promising anticancer activities.

  8. Potentiating the Anticancer Properties of Bisphosphonates by Nanocomplexation with the Cationic Amphipathic Peptide, RALA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Ashley S; Pentlavalli, Sreekanth; Cunningham, Richard; McCrudden, Cian M; McErlean, Emma M; Redpath, Philip; Ali, Ahlam A; Annett, Stephanie; McBride, John W; McCaffrey, Joanne; Robson, Tracy; Migaud, Marie E; McCarthy, Helen O

    2016-04-04

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are a class of bone resorptive drug with a high affinity for the hydroxyapatite structure of bone matrices that are used for the treatment of osteoporosis. However, clinical application is limited by a common toxicity, BP-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. There is emerging evidence that BPs possess anticancer potential, but exploitation of these antiproliferative properties is limited by their toxicities. We previously reported the utility of a cationic amphipathic fusogenic peptide, RALA, to traffic anionic nucleic acids into various cell types in the form of cationic nanoparticles. We hypothesized that complexation with RALA could similarly be used to conceal a BP's hydroxyapatite affinity, and to enhance bioavailability, thereby improving anticancer efficacy. Incubation of RALA with alendronate, etidronate, risedronate, or zoledronate provoked spontaneous electrostatic formation of cationic nanoparticles that did not exceed 100 nm in diameter and that were stable over a range of temperatures and for up to 6 h. The nanoparticles demonstrated a pH responsiveness, possibly indicative of a conformational change, that could facilitate release of the BP cargo in the endosomal environment. RALA/BP nanoparticles were more potent anticancer agents than their free BP counterparts in assays investigating the viability of PC3 prostate cancer and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Moreover, RALA complexation potentiated the tumor growth delay activity of alendronate in a PC3 xenograft model of prostate cancer. Taken together, these findings further validate the use of BPs as repurposed anticancer agents.

  9. Design, Synthesis and Anticancer Evaluation of Fangchinoline Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazhou Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Twenty fangchinoline derivatives were synthesized from the natural product fangchinoline, and their anticancer activities on human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line, human prostate cancer PC3 cell line, human melanoma WM9 cell line and human leukaemia HEL and K562 cell lines were evaluated. The biological result showed that those derivatives exhibited potent activities on inhibiting cancer cell growth, and the structure-activity relationships were investigated. Among them, compound 4g, which was protected by benzoyl group in 7-phenolic position and nitrified in 14-position, showed impressive inhibition on all 5 cancer cell lines, especially WM9 cell line, with an IC50 value of 1.07 µM. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that compound 4g may induce cancer cell death by apoptotic means. These research results suggested that compound 4g could be a lead for the further development toward an anticancer agent against human melanoma WM9 in the future.

  10. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory-Organometallic Anticancer Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Păunescu, Emilia; McArthur, Sarah; Soudani, Mylène; Scopelliti, Rosario; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-02-15

    Compounds that combine metal-based drugs with covalently linked targeted organic agents have been shown, in some instances, to exhibit superior anticancer properties compared to the individual counterparts. Within this framework, we prepared a series of organometallic ruthenium(II)- and osmium(II)-p-cymene complexes modified with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin and diclofenac. The NSAIDs are attached to the organometallic moieties via monodentate (pyridine/phosphine) or bidentate (bipyridine) ligands, affording piano-stool Ru(II) and Os(II) arene complexes of general formula [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(N)], where N is a pyridine-based ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate}, [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(P)], where P is a phosphine ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate, and [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl(N,N')][Cl], where N,N' is a bipyridine-based ligand, (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetate), (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetate), (bis(2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate), or (bis(2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate). The antiproliferative properties of the complexes were assessed in human ovarian cancer cells (A2780 and A2780cisR, the latter being resistant to cisplatin) and nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Some of the complexes are considerably more cytotoxic than the original drugs and also display significant cancer cell selectivity.

  11. Mushrooms as therapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushila Rathee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mushrooms have been known for their nutritional and culinary values and used as medicines and tonics by humans for ages. In modern terms, they can be considered as functional foods which can provide health benefits beyond the traditional nutrients. There are monographs that cover the medicinal and healing properties of some individual traditional mushrooms. There has been a recent upsurge of interest in mushrooms not only as a health food which is rich in protein but also as a source of biologically active compounds of medicinal value which include complementary medicine/dietary supplements for anticancer, antiviral, hepatoprotective, immunopotentiating and hypocholesterolemic agents. However the mechanisms of the various health benefits of mushrooms to humans still require intensive investigation, especially given the emergence of new evidence of their health benefits. In the present paper the medicinal potential of mushrooms is being discussed.

  12. Anticancer activity of eco-friendly gold nanoparticles against lung and liver cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    S. Rajeshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have many applications in biomedical field. Improving delivery of anticancer agents to tumors using nanoparticles is one of the most promising research arenas in the field of nanotechnology. Eco-friendly gold nanoparticles synthesis was studied using marine bacteria Enterococcus sp. The nanoparticle synthesis started at 2 h of incubation time was identified by the formation of ruby red in the reaction mixture and SPR band centered at 545 nm. XRD shows that the strong four i...

  13. Anticancer Properties of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian Gooseberry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tiejun; Sun, Qiang; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is a wealth of information emanating from both in vitro and in vivo studies indicating fruit extract of the Phyllanthus emblica tree, commonly referred to as Indian Gooseberries, has potent anticancer properties. The bioactivity in this extract is thought to be principally mediated by polyphenols, especially tannins and flavonoids. It remains unclear how polyphenols from Phyllanthus emblica can incorporate both cancer-preventative and antitumor properties. The antioxidant function of Phyllanthus emblica can account for some of the anticancer activity, but clearly other mechanisms are equally important. Herein, we provide a brief overview of the evidence supporting anticancer activity of Indian Gooseberry extracts, suggest possible mechanisms for these actions, and provide future directions that might be taken to translate these findings clinically.

  14. Anticancer Properties of Phyllanthus emblica (Indian Gooseberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiejun Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a wealth of information emanating from both in vitro and in vivo studies indicating fruit extract of the Phyllanthus emblica tree, commonly referred to as Indian Gooseberries, has potent anticancer properties. The bioactivity in this extract is thought to be principally mediated by polyphenols, especially tannins and flavonoids. It remains unclear how polyphenols from Phyllanthus emblica can incorporate both cancer-preventative and antitumor properties. The antioxidant function of Phyllanthus emblica can account for some of the anticancer activity, but clearly other mechanisms are equally important. Herein, we provide a brief overview of the evidence supporting anticancer activity of Indian Gooseberry extracts, suggest possible mechanisms for these actions, and provide future directions that might be taken to translate these findings clinically.

  15. Anticancer activity of Ficus religiosa engineered copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Renu; Maheswari, Ramasamy; Karthik, Selvaraju; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2014-11-01

    The design, synthesis, characterization and application of biologically synthesized nanomaterials have become a vital branch of nanotechnology. There is a budding need to develop a method for environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis, that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on an eco-friendly process for rapid synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa leaf extract as reducing and protecting agent. The synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis spectrophotometer, absorbance peaks at 285 nm. The copper oxide nanoparticles were analyzed with field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum. The FE-SEM and DLS analyses exposed that copper oxide nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average particle size of 577 nm. FT-IR spectral analysis elucidates the occurrence of biomolecules required for the reduction of copper oxide ions. Zeta potential studies showed that the surface charge of the formed nanoparticles was highly negative. The XRD pattern revealed that synthesized nanoparticles are crystalline in nature. Further, biological activities of the synthesized nanoparticles were confirmed based on its stable anti-cancer effects. The apoptotic effect of copper oxide nanoparticles is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) involving the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in A549 cells. The observed characteristics and results obtained in our in vitro assays suggest that the copper nanoparticles might be a potential anticancer agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetic polymer nanospheres for anticancer drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JurIkova, A; Csach, K; Koneracka, M; Zavisova, V; Tomasovicova, N; Lancz, G; Kopcansky, P; Timko, M; Miskuf, J; Muckova, M

    2010-01-01

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) polymer (PLGA) nanospheres loaded with biocom-patible magnetic fluid as a magnetic carrier and anticancer drug Taxol were prepared by the modified nanoprecipitation method with size of 200-250 nm in diameter. The PLGA polymer was utilized as a capsulation material due to its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Taxol as an important anticancer drug was chosen for its significant role against a wide range of tumours. Thermal properties of the drug-polymer system were characterized using thermal analysis methods. It was determined the solubility of Taxol in PLGA nanospheres. Magnetic properties investigated using SQUID magnetometry showed superparamagnetism of the prepared magnetic polymer nanospheres.

  17. Mechanisms of resistance to alkylating agents

    OpenAIRE

    Damia, G.; D‘Incalci, M.

    1998-01-01

    Alkylating agents are the most widely used anticancer drugs whose main target is the DNA, although how exactly the DNA lesions cause cell death is still not clear. The emergence of resistance to this class of drugs as well as to other antitumor agents is one of the major causes of failure of cancer treatment. This paper reviews some of the best characterized mechanisms of resistance to alkylating agents. Pre- and post-target mechanisms are recognized, the former able to limit the formation of...

  18. Systemic anticancer therapy (SACT) for lung cancer and its potential for interactions with other medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Systemic anticancer therapy, comprising chemotherapy agents alongside targeted therapies and immunotherapy, is clinically indicated for late-stage lung cancer. It is delivered in regimens often containing multiple anticancer agents as well as supportive care medicines to reduce side effects, raising potential for polypharmacy and therefore the possibility of drug-drug interactions with medicines taken for comorbidities. A pharmacy-led process commonly performed to assist safe prescribing in secondary care is medicines reconciliation; its benefit in minimising interactions involving systemic anticancer therapy medicines has not been assessed previously. The objectives were to characterise the potential drug-drug interactions between systemic anticancer therapy medicines for lung cancer and other medicines and to evaluate the rate of medicines reconciliation being performed and the extent of documentation of potential interactions (clinical audit). This retrospective case series study involved recording the medicines being taken by lung cancer patients undergoing systemic anticancer therapy elicited in consultations at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, United Kingdom. Potential interactions were identified and characterised in terms of severity using the British National Formulary and other sources. Patient consultation records were also searched for documentation of medicines reconciliation and acknowledgement of potential drug-drug interactions. Twenty-three patients were included in this study. Eighty-eight potential drug-drug interactions were identified across 21 patients, 39% (34/88) of which involved the supportive care medicine dexamethasone. 3.0% of consultations included a documented medicines reconciliation, and 15.9% of potential interactions were documented in the notes, with no correlation between the two. Potentially serious interactions were significantly more likely to be documented ( p medicines exist; particular attention should be paid to

  19. Randomized anticancer and cytotoxicity activities of Guibourtia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: The plants were screened for the presence of coumarins, alkaloids, flavonoids, anthraquinones, steroids and terpenoids using thin layer chromatography. Anticancer screening was performed on a panel of three cancer cell lines, while cytotoxicity was determined using a human fibroblast cell line, ...

  20. Anticancer and antiproliferative activity of natural brassinosteroids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, J.; Swaczynová, Jana; Kolář, Z.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 2 (2008), s. 418-426 ISSN 0031-9422 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Brassinosteroids * Anticancer activity * Cell cycle Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2008

  1. PEGylated Silk Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wongpinyochit, Thidarat; Uhlmann, Petra; Urquhart, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    clinically established and emerging anticancer drugs. Overall, PEGylated silk nanoparticles showed high encapsulation efficiency (>93%) and a pH-dependent release over 14 days. Finally, we demonstrated significant cytotoxicity of drug loaded silk nanoparticles applied as single and combination nanomedicines...

  2. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to the anticancer activity of aminoalkanol derivatives of xanthone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypniewski, Daniel; Szkaradek, Natalia; Loch, Tomasz; Waszkielewicz, Anna M; Gunia-Krzyżak, Agnieszka; Matczyńska, Daria; Sołtysik, Dagna; Marona, Henryk; Bednarek, Ilona

    2017-11-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in the action of anticancer agents. In this study, we investigated the role of ROS in the anticancer mechanism of new aminoalkanol derivatives of xanthone. Most xanthones used in the study displayed significant pro-oxidant effects similar to those of gambogic acid, one of the most active anticancer xanthones. The pro-oxidant activity of our xanthones was shown both directly (by determination of ROS induction, effects on the levels of intracellular antioxidants, and expression of antioxidant enzymes) and indirectly by demonstrating that the overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase decreases ROS-mediated cell senescence. We also observed that mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular apoptosis enhancement correlated with xanthone-induced oxidative stress. Finally, we showed that the use of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine partly reversed these effects of aminoalkanol xanthones. Our results demonstrated that novel aminoalkanol xanthones mediated their anticancer activity primarily through ROS elevation and enhanced oxidative stress, which led to mitochondrial cell death stimulation; this mechanism was similar to the activity of gambogic acid.

  3. Thiazolidinone motif in anticancer drug discovery. Experience of DH LNMU medicinal chemistry scientific group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subtel’na I. Yu.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim was analysis of 4-thiazolidinones and related heterocyclic systems anticancer activity data and formation of some rational design directions of potential anticancer agents. Synthetic research carried out in Danylo Halytsky Lviv National Medical University (DH LNMU allowed us to propose a whole number of new molecular design directions of biological active 4-thiazolidinones and related heterocyclic systems, as well as obtain directed library that numbers over 5000 of novel compounds. At the present time in vitro anticancer activity screening was carried out for more than 1000 compounds (US NCI protocol (Developmental Therapeutic Program, among them 167 compounds showed high antitumor activity level. For the purpose of optimization and rational design of highly active molecules with optimal «drug-like» characteristics and discovering of possible mechanism of action SAR, QSAR analysis and molecular docking were carried out. The ultimate aim of the project is creating of innovative synthetic drug with special mechanism of action and sufficient pharmacological and toxicological features. Some aspects of structure–activity relationships were determined and structure design directions were proposed. The series of active compounds with high anticancer activity and/or selectivity levels were selected.

  4. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  5. Auranofin displays anticancer activity against ovarian cancer cells through FOXO3 activation independent of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, See-Hyoung; Lee, Jung Han; Berek, Jonathan S; Hu, Mickey C-T

    2014-10-01

    Auranofin is a gold-containing compound classified by the World Health Organization as a clinically established rheumatoid arthritis therapeutic agent. Through drug screening for novel anticancer therapeutics, we unexpectedly identified auranofin as a potent anticancer agent against a p53-null ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cell line. However, the molecular mechanism underlying auranofin-mediated anticancer activity in ovarian cancer cells is basically unknown. Here, we show that auranofin inhibits proliferation and survival of SKOV3 cells in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Auranofin treatment activates the pro-apoptotic caspase-3, increases protein levels of apoptosis-inducing proteins Bax and Bim and reduces the expression of the anti-apoptotic mediator Bcl-2 in SKOV3 cells. Moreover, auranofin downregulates IκB kinase (IKK)-β and promotes nuclear localization and the activation of FOXO3 tumor suppressor, leading to cellular apoptosis in SKOV3 cells. In contrast, silencing FOXO3 diminishes the pro-apoptotic signaling of auranofin in SKOV3 cells. These results suggest that auranofin may induce caspase-3-mediated apoptosis in a FOXO3-dependent manner. The observed upregulation of pro-apoptotic genes and apoptosis in cancer cells without p53 in response to auranofin suggests a novel p53-independent mechanism underlying auranofin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells.

  6. Array of translational systems pharmacodynamic models of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Mager, Donald E

    2016-12-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that is characterized by an uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. Drug development in oncology is particularly challenging and is associated with one of the highest attrition rates of compounds despite substantial investments in resources. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling seeks to couple experimental data with mathematical models to provide key insights into factors controlling cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutics and cancer progression. PK/PD modeling of anti-cancer compounds is equally challenging, partly based on the complexity of biological and pharmacological systems. However, reliable mechanistic and systems PK/PD models for anti-cancer agents have been developed and successfully applied to: (1) provide insights into fundamental mechanisms implicated in tumor growth, (2) assist in dose selection for first-in-human phase I studies (e.g., effective dose, escalating doses, and maximal tolerated doses), (3) design and optimize combination drug regimens, (4) design clinical trials, and (5) establish links between drug efficacy and safety and the concentrations of measured biomarkers. In this commentary, classes of relevant mechanism-based and systems PK/PD models of anti-cancer agents that have shown promise in translating preclinical data and enhancing stages of the drug development process are reviewed. Specific features of such models are discussed including their strengths and limitations along with a prospectus of using these models alone or in combination for cancer therapy.

  7. The design and development of imidazothiazole-chalcone derivatives as potential anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ahmed; Kashi Reddy, Methuku; Viswanath, Arutla

    2013-03-01

    Imidazothiazole derivatives have long been therapeutically used for the treatment of various diseases. In recent years, the imidazothiazole and chalcone moieties have emerged as important pharmacophores in the development of antitumor agents. Imidazothiazole-chalcone conjugates can be accessed by covalently binding these two powerful pharamacophore units. These conjugates are known to exhibit a wide range of biological properties, including anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities. Their promising biological profile and easy synthetic accessibility have triggered investigations directed at the design and development of new imidazothiazole-chalcone conjugate derivatives as potential chemotherapeutics. The present review focuses on recent reports of the syntheses and anticancer properties of various imidazothiazoles, chalcones and imidazothiazole-linked chalcone conjugates. Furthermore, the authors discuss the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of imidazothiazoles and chalcones and their conjugates as new antitumor agents, as well as in vitro and in vivo evaluation, clinical use and their future therapeutic applications. A large number of imidazothiazoles, chalcones and a new series of imidazothiazole-chalcone conjugates possess potent anticancer activity that could be further developed as drug candidates. Imidazothiazole-based conjugates could also display synergistic effect, and still there is a need to use the drug combinations permitting lower dose and development of new generation of drugs. Despite encouraging observed results for their response to tumors in clinical studies, full characterization of their toxicity is further required for their clinical usage as safe drugs for the treatment of cancer.

  8. Ethnobotany and ethnopharmacy--their role for anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Michael; Bremner, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Local and traditional knowledge has been the starting point for many successful drug development projects over the last decades. Here we discuss some examples of anti-cancer drugs which have had enormous impact as anti-cancer agents (camptothecan, taxol and derivatives) and a few examples of drugs currently under various stages of preclinical development. Ethnobotanists investigate the relationship between humans and plants in all its complexity, and such research is generally based on a detailed observation and study of the use a society makes of plants. The requirements of modern research on natural products as, for example, outlined in the Convention on Biological Diversity (Rio Convention) and the overall approach in ethnobotanical research are also discussed. Selected phytochemical-pharmacological studies based on traditional plant use are used to highlight the potential of ethnobotany driven anti-cancer research. The link between traditionally used plants and targets of the NF-kappaB pathway is discussed using on an EU-funded, multidisciplinary project as an example. Lastly the potential of chemopreventive agents derived from traditional food plants is briefly addressed.

  9. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: BMS-247550—microtubule stabilization as successful targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabla, Navjotsingh; Sparreboom, Alex

    2015-03-15

    In a landmark article published in the May 1, 2001, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, Lee and colleagues reported the original preclinical studies demonstrating anticancer activity of BMS-247550 (ixabepilone) against taxane-sensitive and taxane-resistant cancers. Subsequent clinical trials established the clinical efficacy of ixabepilone, leading to its regulatory approval for the treatment of drug-resistant metastatic or locally advanced breast cancers. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Development of polycationic amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Varan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paclitaxel is a potent anticancer drug that is effective against a wide spectrum of cancers. To overcome its bioavailability problems arising from very poor aqueous solubility and tendency to recrystallize upon dilution, paclitaxel is commercially formulated with co-solvents such as Cremophor EL® that are known to cause serious side effects during chemotherapy. Amphiphilic cyclodextrins are favored oligosaccharides as drug delivery systems for anticancer drugs, having the ability to spontaneously form nanoparticles without surfactant or co-solvents. In the past few years, polycationic, amphiphilic cyclodextrins were introduced as effective agents for gene delivery in the form of nanoplexes. In this study, the potential of polycationic, amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles were evaluated in comparison to non-ionic amphiphilic cyclodextrins and core–shell type cyclodextrin nanoparticles for paclitaxel delivery to breast tumors. Pre-formulation studies were used as a basis for selecting the suitable organic solvent and surfactant concentration for the novel polycationic cyclodextrin nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were then extensively characterized with particle size distribution, polydispersity index, zeta potential, drug loading capacity, in vitro release profiles and cytotoxicity studies.Results: Paclitaxel-loaded cyclodextrin nanoparticles were obtained in the diameter range of 80−125 nm (depending on the nature of the cyclodextrin derivative where the smallest diameter nanoparticles were obtained with polycationic (PC βCDC6. A strong positive charge also helped to increase the loading capacity of the nanoparticles with paclitaxel up to 60%. Interestingly, cyclodextrin nanoparticles were able to stabilize paclitaxel in aqueous solution for 30 days. All blank cyclodextrin nanoparticles were demonstrated to be non-cytotoxic against L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. In addition, paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles have a

  11. Nanoparticle engineering enhances anticancer efficacy of andrographolide in MCF-7 cells and mice bearing EAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Partha; Das, Suvadra; Mondal, Anushree; Chatterji, Urmi; Mukherjee, Arup

    2012-12-01

    Success in cancer chemotherapy relies on efficient delivery of anti-neoplastic drugs, with minimal side-effects on non-cancerous cells. Nanoparticulation of prospective anti-cancer drugs, that were deemed unsuitable due to short biological half life, poor water solubility and low cellular permeability, has been hypothesized to generate superior chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced non-specific action and fewer side-effects. In lieu of the above, different synthetic modulations on the putative anti-cancer compound andrographolide (AG) were explored to improve its therapeutic efficiency. Our results indicated that PLGA-nanoparticulation of andrographolide diterpenoid enhanced its anti-cancer properties three fold. Chitosan coating of AG nanoparticles further accentuated cellular localization, induced G1 cell cycle arrest and increased cellular toxicity and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. The charge modulated nanoparticles were seen to traverse more efficiently through the cytoplasm and accumulate in the nucleus, thus enhancing their anti-proliferative efficacy. In vivo studies confirm that the nanoparticles reduced tumor weight by 68.21% as compared to 24.7% by AG, and increased the life span of mice infected with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) by 78.08% as compared to 23.5% for AG alone. This was achieved through development of slow release-type nanoparticle cargo delivery devices, and enhanced the efficiency of AGnps for targeting cancer cells. AG nanoparticles also showed sufficient promise as safe anti-cancer drugs since they had minimal impact on animal hematology. Hence, we successfully prepared non-toxic and delivery-efficient andrographolide nanoparticles, and established for the first time that PLGA-nanoparticulation of andrographolide and additional chitosan coating increased its anti-cancer efficacy in human breast cancer cells and mouse EAC model.

  12. Role of ginsenosides in reactive oxygen species-mediated anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodrul, Islam M.D.; Wang, Chenying; Chen, Xiangfeng; Du, Jing; Sun, Hongxiang

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is still a global public health problem, which is the leading cause of death in most countries. Ginseng has been used for centuries all over the world as a panacea that promotes longevity. As the king of herb plants, ginseng holds great promise as a new treatment option which is used either by itself or in combination with other medicinal ingredients that is widely accepted as complementary and alternative medicine in cancer therapy. Ginsenosides, the major pharmacologically active ingredients of ginseng, have been shown to have multiple medicinal effects including prominent anticancer activity. The purpose of this review is to give our perspective about the roles of ginsenosides in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated anticancer therapy. Additionally, to provide new sheds light for further improvement and carry out pre-clinical and clinical trials to develop it successfully into a potential anticancer agent. Panax herbs and their derivate/metabolites ginsenosides exert beneficial effects for treating various types of cancers. The mechanism of ROS-mediated anticancer activities of ginsenosides varies depending on the specific type of cancer cells involved. Ginsenosides may suppress cancer cell proliferation through anti-oxidation on tumor initiation and induce apoptosis, paraptosis or autophagy via generation of ROS on tumor progression, promotion, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis by various signaling pathways e.g., activation of AMPK, MEK, ASK-1/JNK, ESR2-NCF1-ROS, ER-dependent PI3K/Akt/Nrf2, P53-CHOP, ROS-JNK-autophagy, and/or inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. These multiple effects rather than a single may play a crucial role in emerging ginsenosides as a successful anticancer drug. PMID:29416826

  13. Quinonaphthothiazines, syntheses, structures and anticancer activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeleń, M.; Pluta, K.; Suwińska, K.; Morak-Młodawska, B.; Latocha, M.; Shkurenko, A.

    2015-11-01

    Two new types of pentacyclic azaphenothiazines being quinonaphthothiazines were obtaining from the reactions of dichlorodiquinolinyl disulfide with 1- and 2-naphthylamines. As the reactions could proceed in many ways, the proper structure elucidation was crucial. The structure determination was based on the 2D NMR spectra (NOESY, HSQC and HMBC) of the methyl derivatives. The final structure evidences came from X-ray analysis of the monocrystals. The new quinonaphthothiazines represent angularly fused pentacyclic ring systems which is folded along the N-S axis. The parent NH-compounds were transformed into the N-derivatives. Some quinonaphthothiazines exhibited promising anticancer activity against glioblastoma SNB-19, melanoma C-32 and human ductal breast epithelial tumor T47D cell lines. The anticancer activity dependent on the nature of the substituents and the ring fusion between the thiazine and naphthalene moieties. Two compounds were more active than the reference drug, cisplatin.

  14. Ruthenium complexes as antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangfei; Collins, J Grant; Keene, F Richard

    2015-04-21

    One of the major advances in medical science has been the development of antimicrobials; however, a consequence of their widespread use has been the emergence of drug-resistant populations of microorganisms. There is clearly a need for the development of new antimicrobials--but more importantly, there is the need for the development of new classes of antimicrobials, rather than drugs based upon analogues of known scaffolds. Due to the success of the platinum anticancer agents, there has been considerable interest in the development of therapeutic agents based upon other transition metals--and in particular ruthenium(II/III) complexes, due to their well known interaction with DNA. There have been many studies of the anticancer properties and cellular localisation of a range of ruthenium complexes in eukaryotic cells over the last decade. However, only very recently has there been significant interest in their antimicrobial properties. This review highlights the types of ruthenium complexes that have exhibited significant antimicrobial activity and discusses the relationship between chemical structure and biological processing--including site(s) of intracellular accumulation--of the ruthenium complexes in both bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  15. Proteomics of anti-cancer drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Hana; Martinková, Jiřina; Hrabáková, Rita; Skalníková, Helena; Novák, Petr; Hajdůch, M.; Gadher, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Supplement 1 (2009), s. 84-84 E-ISSN 1742-4658. [34th FEBS Congress. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : proteomics * anti-cancer drugs * biomarkers Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  16. Peptide-Mediated Liposomal Drug Delivery System Targeting Tumor Blood Vessels in Anticancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chung Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors are known to recruit new blood vessels to support their growth. Therefore, unique molecules expressed on tumor endothelial cells can function as targets for the antiangiogenic therapy of cancer. Current efforts are focusing on developing therapeutic agents capable of specifically targeting cancer cells and tumor-associated microenvironments including tumor blood vessels. These therapies hold the promise of high efficacy and low toxicity. One recognized strategy for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of conventional chemotherapeutics is to encapsulate anticancer drugs into targeting liposomes that bind to the cell surface receptors expressed on tumor-associated endothelial cells. These anti-angiogenic drug delivery systems could be used to target both tumor blood vessels as well as the tumor cells, themselves. This article reviews the mechanisms and advantages of various present and potential methods using peptide-conjugated liposomes to specifically destroy tumor blood vessels in anticancer therapy.

  17. In vitro anticancer activity of extracts of Mentha Spp. against human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Hussain, Shabir; Gupta, Moni; Saxena, Ajit Kumar

    2014-10-01

    In vitro anticancer potential of methanolic and aqueous extracts of whole plants of Mentha arvensis, M. longifolia, M. spicata and M. viridis at concentration of 100 μg/ml was evaluated against eight human cancer cell lines--A-549, COLO-205, HCT-116, MCF-7, NCI-H322, PC-3, THP-1 and U-87MG from six different origins (breast, colon, glioblastoma, lung, leukemia and prostate) using sulphorhodamine blue (SRB) assay. Methanolic extracts of above-mentioned Mentha Spp. displayed anti-proliferative effect in the range of 70-97% against four human cancer cell lines, namely COLO-205, MCF-7, NCI-H322 and THP-1; however, aqueous extracts were found to be active against HCT-116 and PC-3. The results indicate that Mentha Spp. contain certain constituents with cytotoxic properties which may find use in developing anticancer agents.

  18. Anticancer effects of different seaweeds on human colon and breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavou, Ghislain; Kwak, Dong Hoon; Obiang-Obonou, Brice Wilfried; Maranguy, Cyr Abel Ogandaga; Dinzouna-Boutamba, Sylvatrie-Danne; Lee, Dae Hoon; Pissibanganga, Ordelia Gwenaelle Manvoudou; Ko, Kisung; Seo, Jae In; Choo, Young Kug

    2014-09-24

    Seafoods and seaweeds represent some of the most important reservoirs of new therapeutic compounds for humans. Seaweed has been shown to have several biological activities, including anticancer activity. This review focuses on colorectal and breast cancers, which are major causes of cancer-related mortality in men and women. It also describes various compounds extracted from a range of seaweeds that have been shown to eradicate or slow the progression of cancer. Fucoidan extracted from the brown algae Fucus spp. has shown activity against both colorectal and breast cancers. Furthermore, we review the mechanisms through which these compounds can induce apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. By considering the ability of compounds present in seaweeds to act against colorectal and breast cancers, this review highlights the potential use of seaweeds as anticancer agents.

  19. Anticancer Principles from Medicinal Piper (胡椒 Hú Jiāo Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Hu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethnomedical uses of Piper (胡椒 Hú Jiāo plants as anticancer agents, in vitro cytotoxic activity of both extracts and compounds from Piper plants, and in vivo antitumor activity and mechanism of action of selected compounds are reviewed in the present paper. The genus Piper (Piperaceae contains approximately 2000 species, of which 10 species have been used in traditional medicines to treat cancer or cancer-like symptoms. Studies have shown that 35 extracts from 24 Piper species and 32 compounds from Piper plants possess cytotoxic activity. Amide alkaloids account for 53% of the major active principles. Among them, piplartine (piperlongumine shows the most promise, being toxic to dozens of cancer cell lines and having excellent in vivo activity. It is worthwhile to conduct further anticancer studies both in vitro and in vivo on Piper plants and their active principles.

  20. Anticancer activity of Carica papaya: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T T; Shaw, Paul N; Parat, Marie-Odile; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2013-01-01

    Carica papaya is widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical countries and is used as food as well as traditional medicine to treat a range of diseases. Increasing anecdotal reports of its effects in cancer treatment and prevention, with many successful cases, have warranted that these pharmacological properties be scientifically validated. A bibliographic search was conducted using the key words "papaya", "anticancer", and "antitumor" along with cross-referencing. No clinical or animal cancer studies were identified and only seven in vitro cell-culture-based studies were reported; these indicate that C. papaya extracts may alter the growth of several types of cancer cell lines. However, many studies focused on specific compounds in papaya and reported bioactivity including anticancer effects. This review summarizes the results of extract-based or specific compound-based investigations and emphasizes the aspects that warrant future research to explore the bioactives in C. papaya for their anticancer activities. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Anticancer Effects of Colchicine on Hypopharyngeal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung Hae; Joo, Young Hoon; Shin, Eun Young; Park, Eun Ji; Kim, Min Sik

    2017-11-01

    Colchicine is an alkaloid widely used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, such as gout. It suppresses cell division by inhibiting mitosis. We investigated the anticancer effects of colchicine on human hypopharyngeal cancer cells and the mechanisms underlying its anticancer effects. XTT cell proliferation assay showed that colchicine inhibited the growth and proliferation of human hypopharyngeal cancer cells (FaDu and SNU1041) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Colchicine also inhibited the migration, invasion, and adhesion of hypopharyngeal cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. The levels of mRNA expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) decreased after treatment with colchicine. Further investigation revealed that colchicine inhibited the phosphorylation of the FAK/SRC complex and paxillin. Tumor volume ratios in colchicine-treated mice (0.1 mg/kg, every 2 days for 14 days) increased less than in control mice. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that colchicine can suppress cell invasion, migration, and adhesion through reduced expression of MMP9, the uPA system, and the FAK/SRC complex. Colchicine has the potential to prevent disease progression in hypopharyngeal cancer and may have application as an adjunctive treatment. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Green tea phytocompounds as anticancer: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Ullah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Green tea is universally considered significant and its benefits have been experimentally explored by researchers and scientists. Anticancer potential of green tea has been completely recognized now. Green tea contains anti-cancerous constituents and nutrients that have powerful remedial effects. By using electronic data base (1998–2015, different compounds in green tea possessing anticancer activity including epigallocatechin-3-gallate, paclitaxel and docetaxel combinations, ascorbic acid, catechins, lysine, synergistic arginine, green tea extract, proline, and green tea polyphenols has been reported. Green tea extracts exhibited remedial potential against cancer of lung, colon, liver, stomach, leukemic cells, prostate, breast, human cervical cells, head, and neck. For centuries, green tea has been utilized as medicine for therapeutic purposes. It originated in China and extensively used in Asian countries for blood pressure depression and as anticancer medicine. Green tea has therapeutic potential against many diseases such as lowering of blood pressure, Parkinson’s disease, weight loss, esophageal disease, skin-care, cholesterol, Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes.

  3. Nitroxides as Antioxidants and Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Lewandowski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitroxides are stable free radicals that contain a nitroxyl group with an unpaired electron. In this paper, we present the properties and application of nitroxides as antioxidants and anticancer drugs. The mostly used nitroxides in biology and medicine are a group of heterocyclic nitroxide derivatives of piperidine, pyrroline and pyrrolidine. The antioxidant action of nitroxides is associated with their redox cycle. Nitroxides, unlike other antioxidants, are characterized by a catalytic mechanism of action associated with a single electron oxidation and reduction reaction. In biological conditions, they mimic superoxide dismutase (SOD, modulate hemoprotein’s catalase-like activity, scavenge reactive free radicals, inhibit the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reactions and suppress the oxidation of biological materials (peptides, proteins, lipids, etc.. The use of nitroxides as antioxidants against oxidative stress induced by anticancer drugs has also been investigated. The application of nitroxides and their derivatives as anticancer drugs is discussed in the contexts of breast, hepatic, lung, ovarian, lymphatic and thyroid cancers under in vivo and in vitro experiments. In this article, we focus on new natural spin-labelled derivatives such as camptothecin, rotenone, combretastatin, podophyllotoxin and others. The applications of nitroxides in the aging process, cardiovascular disease and pathological conditions were also discussed.

  4. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Eckschlager

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis cannot be explained only by genetic alterations, but also involves epigenetic processes. Modification of histones by acetylation plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and is controlled by the balance between histone deacetylases (HDAC and histone acetyltransferases (HAT. HDAC inhibitors induce cancer cell cycle arrest, differentiation and cell death, reduce angiogenesis and modulate immune response. Mechanisms of anticancer effects of HDAC inhibitors are not uniform; they may be different and depend on the cancer type, HDAC inhibitors, doses, etc. HDAC inhibitors seem to be promising anti-cancer drugs particularly in the combination with other anti-cancer drugs and/or radiotherapy. HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, romidepsin and belinostat have been approved for some T-cell lymphoma and panobinostat for multiple myeloma. Other HDAC inhibitors are in clinical trials for the treatment of hematological and solid malignancies. The results of such studies are promising but further larger studies are needed. Because of the reversibility of epigenetic changes during cancer development, the potency of epigenetic therapies seems to be of great importance. Here, we summarize the data on different classes of HDAC inhibitors, mechanisms of their actions and discuss novel results of preclinical and clinical studies, including the combination with other therapeutic modalities.

  5. In Vitro and in Vivo Antitumoral Effects of Combinations of Polyphenols, or Polyphenols and Anticancer Drugs: Perspectives on Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Fantini

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis is a multistep process triggered by genetic alterations that activate different signal transduction pathways and cause the progressive transformation of a normal cell into a cancer cell. Polyphenols, compounds ubiquitously expressed in plants, have anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, anticancer, and immunomodulatory properties, all of which are beneficial to human health. Due to their ability to modulate the activity of multiple targets involved in carcinogenesis through direct interaction or modulation of gene expression, polyphenols can be employed to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. However, the main problem related to the use of polyphenols as anticancer agents is their poor bioavailability, which might hinder the in vivo effects of the single compound. In fact, polyphenols have a poor absorption and biodistribution, but also a fast metabolism and excretion in the human body. The poor bioavailability of a polyphenol will affect the effective dose delivered to cancer cells. One way to counteract this drawback could be combination treatment with different polyphenols or with polyphenols and other anti-cancer drugs, which can lead to more effective antitumor effects than treatment using only one of the compounds. This report reviews current knowledge on the anticancer effects of combinations of polyphenols or polyphenols and anticancer drugs, with a focus on their ability to modulate multiple signaling transduction pathways involved in cancer.

  6. Recent advances on the anti-cancer properties of Nigella sativa, a widely used food additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin F. Majdalawieh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of naturally-occurring agents to regulate tumorigenesis is on the rise. Several herbal extracts, pure plant-derived active constituents, and food additives have been reported to possess potent anti-cancer properties and cancer-ameliorating effects. The wide-range anti-cancer effects of Nigella sativa, also known as black seed or black cumin, have been extensively studied using different in vitro and in vivo models. Here, we provide a comprehensive, analytical review of the reported anti-cancer properties of N. sativa seed extracts. This review focuses on analyzing experimental findings related to the ability of N. sativa to exert anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, cytotoxic, anti-mutagenic, anti-metastatic, and NK cytotoxic activity enhancing effects against various primary cancer cells and cancer cell lines. Moreover, we underline the molecular mechanisms of action and the signal transduction pathways implicated in the suppression of tumorigenesis by N. sativa. The major signaling pathway utilized by N. sativa to manifest its anti-cancer activity is the iNOS signaling pathway. This review underscores the recent developments that highlight an effective therapeutic potential of N. sativa to suppress tumor development, reduce tumor incidence, and ameliorate carcinogenesis. In sum, experimental findings reported in the last two decades strongly suggest that N. sativa fractions could serve, alone or in combination with known chemotherapeutic drugs, as effective agents to control tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis, and hence, treatment of a wide range of cancers.

  7. Nanotech revolution for the anti-cancer drug delivery through blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraglia, M; De Rosa, G; Salzano, G; Santini, D; Lamberti, M; Sperlongano, P; Lombardi, A; Abbruzzese, A; Addeo, R

    2012-03-01

    Nanotechnology-based drug delivery was born as a chance for pharmaceutical weapons to be delivered in the body sites where drug action is required. Specifically, the incorporation of anti-cancer agents in nanodevices of 100-300 nm allows their delivery in tissues that have a fenestrated vasculature and a reduced lymphatic drainage. These two features are typical of neoplastic tissues and, therefore, allow the accumulation of nanostructured devices in tumours. An important issue of anti-cancer pharmacological strategies is the overcoming of anatomical barriers such as the bloodbrain- barrier (BBB) that protects brain from toxicological injuries but, at the same time, makes impossible for most of the pharmacological agents with anti-cancer activity to reach tumour cells placed in the brain and derived from either primary tumours or metastases. In fact, only highly lipophilic molecules can passively diffuse through BBB to reach central nervous system (CNS). Another possibility is to use nanotechnological approaches as powerful tools to across BBB, by both prolonging the plasma half-life of the drugs and crossing fenestrations of BBB damaged by brain metastases. Moreover, modifications of nanocarrier surface with specific endogenous or exogenous ligands can promote the crossing of intact BBB as in the case of primary brain tumours. This aim can be achieved through the binding of the nanodevices to carriers or receptors expressed by the endothelial cells of BBB and that can favour the internalization of the nanostructured devices delivering anti-cancer drugs. This review summarizes the most meaningful advances in the field of nanotechnologies for brain delivery of drugs.

  8. Novel molecular, cytotoxical, and immunological study on promising and selective anticancer activity of Mung bean sprouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafidh Rand R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anticancer and immunomodulatory activity of mung bean sprouts (MBS and the underlying mechanisms against human cervical and hepatocarcinoma cancer cells were explored. Methods MBS cytotoxicity and MBS-induced anticancer cytokines, TNF-α and IFN-β from cancer cells, and immunological cytokines, IL-4, IFN-γ, and IL-10 from peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC were assessed by MTS and ELISA assays. Apoptotic cells were investigated by flow cytometry. The expression level of apoptotic genes (Bax, BCL-2, Capsases 7–9 and cell cycle regulatory genes (cyclin D, E, and A and tumor suppressor proteins (p27, p21, and p53 was assessed by real-time qPCR in the cancer cells treated with extract IC50. Results The cytotoxicity on normal human cells was significantly different from HeLa and HepG2 cells, 163.97 ± 5.73, 13.3 ± 0.89, and 14.04 ± 1.5 mg/ml, respectively. The selectivity index (SI was 12.44 ± 0.83 for HeLa and 11.94 ± 1.2 for HepG2 cells. Increased levels of TNF-α and IFN-β were observed in the treated HeLa and HepG2 culture supernatants when compared with untreated cells. MBS extract was shown to be an immunopolarizing agent by inducing IFNγ and inhibiting IL-4 production by PBMC; this leads to triggering of CMI and cellular cytotoxicity. The extract induced apoptosis, in a dose and time dependent manner, in treated HeLa and HepG2, but not in untreated, cells (P Conclusion MBS extract was shown to be a potent anticancer agent granting new prospects of anticancer therapy using natural products.

  9. Anticancer Efficacy of Polyphenols and Their Combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Niedzwiecki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols, found abundantly in plants, display many anticarcinogenic properties including their inhibitory effects on cancer cell proliferation, tumor growth, angiogenesis, metastasis, and inflammation as well as inducing apoptosis. In addition, they can modulate immune system response and protect normal cells against free radicals damage. Most investigations on anticancer mechanisms of polyphenols were conducted with individual compounds. However, several studies, including ours, have indicated that anti-cancer efficacy and scope of action can be further enhanced by combining them synergistically with chemically similar or different compounds. While most studies investigated the anti-cancer effects of combinations of two or three compounds, we used more comprehensive mixtures of specific polyphenols and mixtures of polyphenols with vitamins, amino acids and other micronutrients. The mixture containing quercetin, curcumin, green tea, cruciferex, and resveratrol (PB demonstrated significant inhibition of the growth of Fanconi anemia head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9 secretion, cell migration and invasion through Matrigel. PB was found effective in inhibition of fibrosarcoma HT-1080 and melanoma A2058 cell proliferation, MMP-2 and -9 expression, invasion through Matrigel and inducing apoptosis, important parameters for cancer prevention. A combination of polyphenols (quercetin and green tea extract with vitamin C, amino acids and other micronutrients (EPQ demonstrated significant suppression of ovarian cancer ES-2 xenograft tumor growth and suppression of ovarian tumor growth and lung metastasis from IP injection of ovarian cancer A-2780 cells. The EPQ mixture without quercetin (NM also has shown potent anticancer activity in vivo and in vitro in a few dozen cancer cell lines by inhibiting tumor growth and metastasis, MMP-2 and -9 secretion, invasion

  10. From old alkylating agents to new minor groove binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyo, Stéphane; Montaudon, Danièle; Pourquier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents represent the oldest class of anticancer agents with the approval of mechloretamine by the FDA in 1949. Even though their clinical use is far beyond the use of new targeted therapies, they still occupy a major place in the treatment of specific malignancies, sometimes representing the unique option for the treatment of refractory tumors. Here, we are reviewing the major classes of alkylating agents, with a particular focus on the latest generations of compounds that specifically target the minor groove of the DNA. These naturally occurring derivatives have a unique mechanism of action that explains the recent regain of interest in developing new classes of alkylating agents that could be used in combination with other anticancer drugs to enhance tumor response in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomaterial-based regional chemotherapy: Local anticancer drug delivery to enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side-effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Zak, Jerzy K

    2016-05-01

    Since the majority of anticancer pharmacological agents affect not only cancer tissue but also normal cells, chemotherapy is usually accompanied with severe side effects. Regional chemotherapy, as the alternative version of conventional treatment, leads to the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs and, simultaneously, reduction of toxic effects to healthy tissues. This paper provides an insight into different approaches of local delivery of chemotherapeutics, such as the injection of anticancer agents directly into tumor tissue, the use of injectable in situ forming drug carriers or injectable platforms in a form of implants. The wide range of biomaterials used as reservoirs of anticancer drugs is described, i.e. poly(ethylene glycol) and its copolymers, polyurethanes, poly(lactic acid) and its copolymers, poly(ɛ-caprolactone), polyanhydrides, chitosan, cellulose, cyclodextrins, silk, conducting polymers, modified titanium surfaces, calcium phosphate based biomaterials, silicone and silica implants, as well as carbon nanotubes and graphene. To emphasize the applicability of regional chemotherapy in cancer treatment, the commercially available products approved by the relevant health agencies are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic Strategies to Enhance the Anticancer Efficacy of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone acetylation is a posttranslational modification that plays a role in regulating gene expression. More recently, other nonhistone proteins have been identified to be acetylated which can regulate their function, stability, localization, or interaction with other molecules. Modulating acetylation with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi has been validated to have anticancer effects in preclinical and clinical cancer models. This has led to development and approval of the first HDACi, vorinostat, for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma. However, to date, targeting acetylation with HDACi as a monotherapy has shown modest activity against other cancers. To improve their efficacy, HDACi have been paired with other antitumor agents. Here, we discuss several combination therapies, highlighting various epigenetic drugs, ROS-generating agents, proteasome inhibitors, and DNA-damaging compounds that together may provide a therapeutic advantage over single-agent strategies.

  13. Detection of Alkylating Agents using Electrical and Mechanical Means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerchikov, Yulia; Borzin, Elena; Gannot, Yair; Shemesh, Ariel; Meltzman, Shai; Hertzog-Ronen, Carmit; Eichen, Yoav; Tal, Shay; Stolyarova, Sara; Nemirovsky, Yael; Tessler, Nir

    2011-01-01

    Alkylating agents are reactive molecules having at least one polar bond between a carbon atom and a good leaving group. These often simple molecules are frequently used in organic synthesis, as sterilizing agents in agriculture and even as anticancer agents in medicine. Unfortunately, for over a century, some of the highly reactive alkylating agents are also being used as blister chemical warfare agents. Being relatively simple to make, the risk is that these will be applied by terrorists as poor people warfare agents. The detection and identification of such alkylating agents is not a simple task because of their high reactivity and simple structure of the reactive site. Here we report on new approaches to the detection and identification of such alkylating agents using electrical (organic field effect transistors) and mechanical (microcantilevers) means.

  14. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Superbugs and Drugs" Home | Contact Us General Background: Antibiotic Agents What is an antibacterial and how are ... with the growth and reproduction of bacteria. While antibiotics and antibacterials both attack bacteria, these terms have ...

  15. Dapson in heterocyclic chemistry, part VIII: synthesis, molecular docking and anticancer activity of some novel sulfonylbiscompounds carrying biologically active 1,3-dihydropyridine, chromene and chromenopyridine moieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Said Mansour S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several new sulfonebiscompounds having a biologically active 1,2-dihydropyridine-2-one 3–19, acrylamide 20, chromene 21, 22 and chromenopyridine 23, 24 moieties were synthesized and evaluated as potential anticancer agents. The structures of the products were confirmed via elemental analyses and spectral data. The screening tests showed that many of the biscompounds obtained exhibited good anticancer activity against human breast cell line (MCF7 comparable to doxorubicin which was used as reference drug. Compounds 11, 17 and 24 showed IC50 values 35.40 μM, 29.86 μM and 30.99 μM, respectively. In order to elucidate the mechanism of action of the synthesized compounds as anticancer agents, docking on the active site of farnesyltransferase and arginine methyltransferase was also performed and good results were obtained.

  16. Investigation of antibacterial and anti-cancer activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of antibacterial and anti-cancer activities of Streptomyces sp SRF1 culture filtrate. Kusavadee Sangdee, Benjaporn Buranrat, Prapairat Seephonkai, Nilawan Surapong, Aphidech Sangdee ...

  17. Oral anticancer drugs: how limited dosing options and dose reductions may affect outcomes in comparative trials and efficacy in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Vinay; Massey, Paul R; Fojo, Tito

    2014-05-20

    Historically, cancer medicine has avoided the problem of unequal dosing by comparing maximum-tolerated doses of intravenous regimens with proportionate dose reductions for toxicity. However, in recent years, with the development of numerous oral anticancer agents, dosing options are arbitrarily and increasingly limited by the size of pills. We contend that an underappreciated consequence of pill size is unequal dosing in comparative clinical trials and that this can have an impact on outcomes. We discuss how comparative effectiveness trials can be unbalanced and how the use of doses that are not sustainable might affect outcomes, especially marginal ones. We further argue that because of their poor tolerability and their limited dosing options, which often result in large dose adjustments in response to toxicity, the real-world clinical effectiveness of oral anticancer agents may be diminished and may not emulate results achieved in registration trials. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. VEGF pathway targeting agents, vessel normalization and tumor drug uptake : from bench to bedside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arjaans, Marlous; Schroder, Carolien P.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Dafni, Urania; Kleibeuker, Josee E.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway targeting agents have been combined with other anticancer drugs, leading to improved efficacy in carcinoma of the cervix, stomach, lung, colon and rectum, ovary, and breast. Vessel normalization induced by VEGF pathway targeting agents influences

  19. Nano-zirconia - Evaluation of its antioxidant and anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Siripireddy; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Ranjan, Shivendu; Dasgupta, Nandita; Chidambaram, Ramalingam

    2017-05-01

    Bioactivity of nanomaterials largely depends on its size, shape and crystalline nature. In this work, the smaller sized spherical shaped nano-zirconia (ZrO 2 NPs) (of ~9 to 11nm) was fabricated and studied its biological activity especially antioxidant and cytotoxicity against human colon carcinoma (HCT-116) and human lung carcinoma (A-549) cell lines. To have its real applications in biological aspects readily available Eucalyptus globulus (E. globulus) leaf extract was used as an effective capping and reducing agent for its synthesis. The prepared ZrO 2 NPs was characterized by using different sophisticated instrumentations such as UV-visible spectrophotometer, XRD, FTIR, TEM, SAED, EDX, DLS and fluorescence spectroscopy. Cellular mitochondrial activity i.e. cell viability was measured by MTT assay and anti-oxidant activity was determined by DPPH assay. The smaller sized ZrO 2 NPs showed strong antioxidant activity as well as cytotoxicity on human cancer cell lines. Comparative cytotoxic studies were conducted on human cancerous cell lines using different techniques. Results confirmed the efficient anti-cancer activities of the fabricated ZrO 2 NPs towards the tested cell lines as well as efficient anti-oxidant activity. This is the first study in which E. globulus leaf extract was used to synthesize smaller spherical shaped ZrO 2 NPs for improved bioactivity i.e. antioxidant and cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mitosis-targeted anti-cancer therapies: where they stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K-S; Koh, C-G; Li, H-Y

    2012-10-18

    The strategy of clinically targeting cancerous cells at their most vulnerable state during mitosis has instigated numerous studies into the mitotic cell death (MCD) pathway. As the hallmark of cancer revolves around cell-cycle deregulation, it is not surprising that antimitotic therapies are effective against the abnormal proliferation of transformed cells. Moreover, these antimitotic drugs are also highly selective and sensitive. Despite the robust rate of discovery and the development of mitosis-selective inhibitors, the unpredictable complexities of the human body's response to these drugs still herald the biggest challenge towards clinical success. Undoubtedly, the need to bridge the gap between promising preclinical trials and effective translational bedside treatment prompts further investigations towards mapping out the mechanistic pathways of MCD, understanding how these drugs work as medicine in the body and more comprehensive target validations. In this review, current antimitotic agents are summarized with particular emphasis on the evaluation of their clinical efficacy as well as their limitations. In addition, we discuss the basis behind the lack of activity of these inhibitors in human trials and the potential and future directions of mitotic anticancer strategies.

  1. Immunogenic Apoptosis as a Novel Tool for Anticancer Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Montico

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunogenic apoptosis, or more appropriately called immunogenic cell death (ICD, is a recently described form of apoptosis induced by a specific set of chemotherapeutic drugs or by physical therapeutic modalities, such as ionizing irradiation and photodynamic therapy. The peculiar characteristic of ICD is the ability to favor recognition and elimination of dying tumor cells by phagocytes in association with the release of pro-inflammatory molecules (such as cytokines and high-mobility group box-1. While in vitro and animal models pointed to ICD as one of the molecular mechanisms mediating the clinical efficacy of some anticancer agents, it is hard to clearly demonstrate its contribution in cancer patients. Clinical evidence suggests that the induction of ICD alone is possibly not sufficient to fully subvert the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. However, interesting results from recent studies contemplate the exploitation of ICD for improving the immunogenicity of cancer cells to use them as an antigen cargo in the development of dendritic cell (DC vaccines. Herein, we discuss the effects of danger signals expressed or released by cancer cells undergoing ICD on the maturation and activation of immature and mature DC, highlighting the potential added value of ICD in adoptive immunotherapy protocols.

  2. Gamma irradiation reduces the immunological toxicity of doxorubicin, anticancer drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Sung, Nak-Yun; Raghavendran, H. Balaji; Yoon, Yohan; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Yoo, Young-Choon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Hwang, Young-Jeong; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anticancer agent, but exhibits some immunological toxicity to patients during chemotherapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the immunological response and the inhibition activity on in vivo tumor mass of DOX. The results showed that DOX irradiated at 10 and 20 kGy reduce the inhibition of mouse peritoneal macrophage proliferation and induce the release of cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) when compared with non-irradiated DOX. The cytotoxicity against human breast (MCF-7), murine colon adenocarcinoma (Colon 26) and human monocytic (THP-1) tumor cell were not significantly different between non-irradiated and irradiated DOX (P<0.05). In vivo study on the tumor mass inhibition, gamma-irradiated DOX showed a considerable inhibition of tumor mass and this effect was statistically non-significant as compared with non-irradiated DOX. In conclusion, gamma irradiation could be regarded as a potential method for reducing the immunological toxicity of DOX. Further researches is needed to reveal the formation and activity of radiolysis products by gamma irradiation.

  3. Gamma irradiation reduces the immunological toxicity of doxorubicin, anticancer drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Sung, Nak-Yun; Raghavendran, H. Balaji; Yoon, Yohan; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young-Choon [Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Konyang University, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Myung-Woo [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Young-Jeong [Division of Food Science, International University of Korea, Jinju 660-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon [Team for Radiation Food Science and Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used anticancer agent, but exhibits some immunological toxicity to patients during chemotherapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the immunological response and the inhibition activity on in vivo tumor mass of DOX. The results showed that DOX irradiated at 10 and 20 kGy reduce the inhibition of mouse peritoneal macrophage proliferation and induce the release of cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) when compared with non-irradiated DOX. The cytotoxicity against human breast (MCF-7), murine colon adenocarcinoma (Colon 26) and human monocytic (THP-1) tumor cell were not significantly different between non-irradiated and irradiated DOX (P<0.05). In vivo study on the tumor mass inhibition, gamma-irradiated DOX showed a considerable inhibition of tumor mass and this effect was statistically non-significant as compared with non-irradiated DOX. In conclusion, gamma irradiation could be regarded as a potential method for reducing the immunological toxicity of DOX. Further researches is needed to reveal the formation and activity of radiolysis products by gamma irradiation.

  4. Anticancer effects of deproteinized asparagus polysaccharide on hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jianfeng; Xiang, Yanjie; Lin, Shengming; Xin, Dongwei; Liu, Xiaoyu; Weng, Lingling; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Minguang

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies in the world whose chemoprevention became increasingly important in HCC treatment. Although the anticancer effects of asparagus constituents have been investigated in several cancers, its effects on hepatocellular carcinoma have not been fully studied. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of the deproteinized asparagus polysaccharide on the hepatocellular carcinoma cells using the in vitro and in vivo experimental model. Our data showed that deproteinized asparagus polysaccharide might act as an effective inhibitor on cell growth in vitro and in vivo and exert potent selective cytotoxicity against human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells. Further study showed that it could potently induce cell apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in the more sensitive Hep3B and HepG2 cell lines. Moreover, deproteinized asparagus polysaccharide potentiated the effects of mitomycin both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies revealed that deproteinized asparagus polysaccharide might exert its activity through an apoptosis-associated pathway by modulating the expression of Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3. In conclusion, deproteinized asparagus polysaccharide exhibited significant anticancer activity against hepatocellular carcinoma cells and could sensitize the tumoricidal effects of mitomycin, indicating that it is a potential therapeutic agent (or chemosensitizer) for liver cancer therapy.

  5. Pattern Alopecia during Hormonal Anticancer Therapy in Patients with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin; Kim, Ju-Ik; Yun, Seok-Kweon; Kim, Han-Uk; Ihm, Chull-Wan

    2014-12-01

    We report five cases of pattern alopecia in female patients who are undergoing hormonal anticancer therapy for the prevention of recurrence of breast cancer after surgery. Three patients demonstrated male pattern alopecia with receding frontal hairlines, and two patients demonstrated female pattern alopecia without receding hairlines. The detailed clinical history showed that the pattern alopecia of the patients developed after the full recovery of global hair loss of the entire scalp due to previous cytotoxic chemotherapy. All of the adjuvant hormonal anticancer drugs that were used in the patients are antiestrogenic agents, either aromatase inhibitors or selective estrogen receptor modulators. Considering androgen effect on the hair follicles of the fronto-parietal scalp, the androgen-estrogen imbalance caused by the drugs was thought to be the reason for the onset of pattern alopecia in the patients. In general, alopecia that develops during cytotoxic chemotherapy is well known to both physicians and patients; however, the diagnosis of pattern alopecia during hormonal anticancer therapy in breast cancer patients seems to be overlooked.

  6. Anticancer Effects of Sinulariolide-Conjugated Hyaluronan Nanoparticles on Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan Yin Hsiao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most clinically challenging malignant diseases worldwide. Sinulariolide (SNL, extracted from the farmed coral species Sinularia flexibilis, has been used for suppressing malignant cells. For developing anticancer therapeutic agents, we aimed to find an alternative for non-small cell lung cancer treatment by using SNL as the target drug. We investigated the SNL bioactivity on A549 lung cancer cells by conjugating SNL with hyaluronan nanoparticles to form HA/SNL aggregates by using a high-voltage electrostatic field system. SNL was toxic on A549 cells with an IC50 of 75 µg/mL. The anticancer effects of HA/SNL aggregates were assessed through cell viability assay, apoptosis assays, cell cycle analyses, and western blotting. The size of HA/SNL aggregates was approximately 33–77 nm in diameter with a thin continuous layer after aggregating numerous HA nanoparticles. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the HA/SNL aggregate-induced apoptosis was more effective at a lower SNL dose of 25 µg/mL than pure SNL. Western blotting indicated that caspases-3, -8, and -9 and Bcl-xL and Bax played crucial roles in the apoptotic signal transduction pathway. In summary, HA/SNL aggregates exerted stronger anticancer effects on A549 cells than did pure SNL via mitochondria-related pathways.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and anticancer activity of kaempferol-zinc(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Lv-Ying; Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Cai, Ji-Ye; Deng, Sui-Ping

    2016-06-01

    According to the previous studies, the anticancer activity of flavonoids could be enhanced when they are coordinated with transition metal ions. In this work, kaempferol-zinc(II) complex (kaempferol-Zn) was synthesized and its chemical properties were characterized by UV-VIS, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, elemental analysis, electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) and fluorescence spectroscopy, which showed that the synthesized complex was coordinated with a Zn(II) ion via the 3-OH and 4-oxo groups. The anticancer effects of kaempferol-Zn and free kaempferol on human oesophageal cancer cell line (EC9706) were compared. MTT results demonstrated that the killing effect of kaempferol-Zn was two times higher than that of free kaempferol. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed the morphological and ultrastructural changes of cellular membrane induced by kaempferol-Zn at subcellular or nanometer level. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis indicated that kaempferol-Zn could induce apoptosis in EC9706 cells by regulating intracellular calcium ions. Collectively, all the data showed that kaempferol-Zn might be served as a kind of potential anticancer agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Proteomic and metallomic strategies for understanding the mode of action of anticancer metallodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbiani, Chiara; Magherini, Francesca; Modesti, Alessandra; Messori, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin and its introduction in the clinics, metal compounds have been intensely investigated in view of their possible application in cancer therapy. In this frame, a deeper understanding of their mode of action, still rather obscure, might turn crucial for the design and the obtainment of new and better anticancer agents. Due to the extreme complexity of the biological systems, it is now widely accepted that innovative and information-rich methods are absolutely needed to afford such a goal. Recently, both proteomic and metallomic strategies were successfully implemented for the elucidation of specific mechanistic features of anticancer metallodrugs within an innovative "Systems Biology" perspective. Particular attention was paid to the following issues: i) proteomic studies of the molecular basis of platinum resistance; ii) proteomic analysis of cellular responses to cytotoxic metallodrugs; iii) metallomic studies of the transformation and fate of metallodrugs in cellular systems. Notably, those pioneering studies, that are reviewed here, allowed a significant progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of metal based drugs at the cellular level. A further extension of those studies and a closer integration of proteomic and metallomic strategies and technologies might realistically lead to rapid and significant advancements in the mechanistic knowledge of anticancer metallodrugs.

  9. Novel anticancer activity of phloroglucinol against breast cancer stem-like cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Uddin, Nizam [Department of Life Science, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Jin-Won [College of Medicine and Applied Radiological Science Research Institute, Jeju National University, Jeju-si 690-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changil [Department of Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Yongjoon, E-mail: hiswork@hanmail.net [Department of Life Science, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae, E-mail: sj0420@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, Research Institute for Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-01

    Poor prognosis of breast cancer patients is closely associated with metastasis and relapse. There is substantial evidence supporting that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are primarily responsible for relapse in breast cancer after anticancer treatment. However, there is a lack of suitable drugs that target breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSCs). Here, we report that phloroglucinol (PG), a natural phlorotannin component of brown algae, suppresses sphere formation, anchorage-independent colony formation and in vivo tumorigenicity. In line with these observations, treatment with PG also decreased CD44{sup +} cancer cell population as well as expression of CSC regulators such as Sox2, CD44, Oct4, Notch2 and β-catenin. Also, treatment with PG sensitized breast cancer cells to anticancer drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide, and taxol as well as to ionizing radiation. Importantly, PG inhibited KRAS and its downstream PI3K/AKT and RAF-1/ERK signaling pathways that regulate the maintenance of CSCs. Taken together, our findings implicate PG as a good candidate to target BCSCs and to prevent the disease relapse. - Highlights: • Phloroglucinol suppresses in vivo tumor formation. • Phloroglucinol sensitizes breast cancer cells to anticancer agents. • Phloroglucinol inhibits breast cancer stem-like cells. • Phloroglucinol inhibits PI3K/AKT and KRAS/RAF/ERK signaling pathways.

  10. Potential anticancer properties of bioactive compounds of Gymnema sylvestre and its biofunctionalized silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Kantha Deivi; Arun, Lilly Baptista; Annamalai, Sathesh Kumar; Arunachalam, Aarrthy M

    2015-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre is an ethno-pharmacologically important medicinal plant used in many polyherbal formulations for its potential health benefits. Silver nanoparticles (SNPs) were biofunctionalized using aqueous leaf extracts of G. sylvestre. The anticancer properties of the bioactive compounds and the biofunctionalized SNPs were compared using the HT29 human adenoma colon cancer cell line. The preliminary phytochemical screening for bioactive compounds from aqueous extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, triterpenes, flavonoids, steroids, and saponins. Biofunctionalized SNPs were synthesized using silver nitrate and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction for size and shape. The characterized biofunctionalized G. sylvestre were tested for its in vitro anticancer activity against HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. The biofunctionlized G. sylvestre SNPs showed the surface plasmon resonance band at 430 nm. The scanning electron microscopy images showed the presence of spherical nanoparticles of various sizes, which were further determined using the Scherrer equation. In vitro cytotoxic activity of the biofunctionalized green-synthesized SNPs (GSNPs) indicated that the sensitivity of HT29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells for cytotoxic drugs is higher than that of Vero cell line for the same cytotoxic agents and also higher than the bioactive compound of the aqueous extract. Our results show that the anticancer properties of the bioactive compounds of G. sylvestre can be enhanced through biofunctionalizing the SNPs using the bioactive compounds present in the plant extract without compromising their medicinal properties.

  11. Marine Cyanobacteria Compounds with Anticancer Properties: A Review on the Implication of Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosário Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine cyanobacteria have been considered a rich source of secondary metabolites with potential biotechnological applications, namely in the pharmacological field. Chemically diverse compounds were found to induce cytoxicity, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities. The potential of marine cyanobacteria as anticancer agents has however been the most explored and, besides cytotoxicity in tumor cell lines, several compounds have emerged as templates for the development of new anticancer drugs. The mechanisms implicated in the cytotoxicity of marine cyanobacteria compounds in tumor cell lines are still largely overlooked but several studies point to an implication in apoptosis. This association has been related to several apoptotic indicators such as cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative damage, alterations in caspase cascade, alterations in specific proteins levels and alterations in the membrane sodium dynamics. In the present paper a compilation of the described marine cyanobacterial compounds with potential anticancer properties is presented and a review on the implication of apoptosis as the mechanism of cell death is discussed.

  12. Learning from host-defense peptides: cationic, amphipathic peptoids with potent anticancer activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    Full Text Available Cationic, amphipathic host defense peptides represent a promising group of agents to be developed for anticancer applications. Poly-N-substituted glycines, or peptoids, are a class of biostable, peptidomimetic scaffold that can display a great diversity of side chains in highly tunable sequences via facile solid-phase synthesis. Herein, we present a library of anti-proliferative peptoids that mimics the cationic, amphipathic structural feature of the host defense peptides and explore the relationships between the structure, anticancer activity and selectivity of these peptoids. Several peptoids are found to be potent against a broad range of cancer cell lines at low-micromolar concentrations including cancer cells with multidrug resistance (MDR, causing cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. They can penetrate into cells, but their cytotoxicity primarily involves plasma membrane perturbations. Furthermore, peptoid 1, the most potent peptoid synthesized, significantly inhibited tumor growth in a human breast cancer xenotransplantation model without any noticeable acute adverse effects in mice. Taken together, our work provided important structural information for designing host defense peptides or their mimics for anticancer applications. Several cationic, amphipathic peptoids are very attractive for further development due to their high solubility, stability against protease degradation, their broad, potent cytotoxicity against cancer cells and their ability to overcome multidrug resistance.

  13. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danbo Yang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(L-g-glutamylglutamine-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX. PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic.

  14. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Danbo; Yu, Lei; Van, Sang

    2010-01-01

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic

  15. The anticancer effect of Ocimum tenuiflorum leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam, S.N.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among females in Malaysia. Ocimum tenuiflorum L., (O. tenuiflorum commonly known as ruku in Malaysia, is usually cultivated as a garden ornamental plant because of its small purplish and some yellowish flower. The specific objective of this research is to investigate the anticancer of O. tenuiflorum against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and human fibroblast cell line (HS-27. In addition, another objective is to determine the mineral and heavy metal determination of O. tenuiflorum. O. tenuiflorum exhibited anticancer activity against MCF-7 (a hormone-dependent breast cancer cell line. The viability of MCF-7 cells decreased significantly after treatment with various concentrations of methanolic plant extracts (25 and 100 μg/mL, as shown via 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The crude extracts show the lower IC50 (less than 100 μg/mL value against the cancer cell lines and show no effect on HS-27. The high content of calcium in the leaves of O. tenuiflorum may play a role in decreasing the risk of certain cancer. The concentrations of heavy metals (Pb and As detected in O. tenuiflorum are safe for consumption.

  16. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Danbo [Biomedical Engineering and Technology Institute, Institutes for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Yu, Lei, E-mail: yu-lei@gg.nitto.co.jp [Biomedical Engineering and Technology Institute, Institutes for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Biomedical Group, Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States); Van, Sang [Biomedical Group, Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States)

    2010-12-23

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic.

  17. Investigating the optimal size of anticancer nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Yang, Xujuan; Yin, Qian; Cai, Kaimin; Wang, Hua; Chaudhury, Isthier; Yao, Catherine; Zhou, Qin; Kwon, Mincheol; Hartman, James A; Dobrucki, Iwona T; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Borst, Luke B; Lezmi, Stéphane; Helferich, William G; Ferguson, Andrew L; Fan, Timothy M; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-10-28

    Nanomedicines (NMs) offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. However, extension of progression-free interval and overall survival time achieved by Food and Drug Administration-approved NMs remain modest. To develop next generation NMs to achieve superior anticancer activities, it is crucial to investigate and understand the correlation between the physicochemical properties of NMs (particle size in particular) and their interactions with biological systems to establish criteria for NM optimization. Here, we systematically evaluated the size-dependent biological profiles of three monodisperse drug-silica nanoconjugates (NCs; 20, 50, and 200 nm) through both experiments and mathematical modeling and aimed to identify the optimal size for the most effective anticancer drug delivery. Among the three NCs investigated, the 50-nm NC shows the highest tumor tissue retention integrated over time, which is the collective outcome of deep tumor tissue penetration and efficient cancer cell internalization as well as slow tumor clearance, and thus, the highest efficacy against both primary and metastatic tumors in vivo.

  18. Exploiting tumor cell senescence in anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a physiological process of irreversible cell-cycle arrest that contributes to various physiological and pathological processes of aging. Whereas replicative senescence is associated with telomere attrition after repeated cell division, stress-induced premature senescence occurs in response to aberrant oncogenic signaling, oxidative stress, and DNA damage which is independent of telomere dysfunction. Recent evidence indicates that cellular senescence provides a barrier to tumorigenesis and is a determinant of the outcome of cancer treatment. However, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, which contributes to multiple facets of senescent cancer cells, may influence both cancer-inhibitory and cancer-promoting mechanisms of neighboring cells. Conventional treatments, such as chemo- and radiotherapies, preferentially induce premature senescence instead of apoptosis in the appropriate cellular context. In addition, treatment-induced premature senescence could compensate for resistance to apoptosis via alternative signaling pathways. Therefore, we believe that an intensive effort to understand cancer cell senescence could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for improving the efficacy of anticancer therapies. This review summarizes the current understanding of molecular mechanisms, functions, and clinical applications of cellular senescence for anticancer therapy. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(2): 51-59] PMID:24411464

  19. Anticancer Phenolics from Dryopteris fragrans (L. Schott

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Dong Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most major diseases that threatens human health and life. The aim of this work was to obtain novel anticancer molecules from D. fragrans, a kind of medicinal plant. The structure of the new compound was identified using spectroscopic data (1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and two dimensions NMR. Its anticancer properties were evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay against four human cells including lung cancer cells (A549, breast cancer cells (MCF-7, gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and noncancerous human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. A new phenylpropanoid—(E-caffeic acid-9-O-β-d-xylpyranosyl-(1→2-β-d-glucopyranosyl ester (1, with seven known compounds (2–8—was isolated. The IC50 value of compound 1 against MCF-7 cells was 2.65 ± 0.14 µM, and the IC50 values of compound 8 against three cancer cells were below 20 µM.

  20. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting towards intracellular targets, which increases their success comparatively to specific one-target drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials.

  1. A Comprehensive Review of N-Heterocycles as Cytotoxic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Jain, Subheet Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Scientific community is striving to understand the role of heterocycles and fused heterocycles in drug discovery programme due to its impact on multi-drug resistance (MDR) of anticancer drugs. Architecting of various scaffolds for cancer treatment has become gradually increased in many years. Till now there is no treatment which is so proficient that it can cure the cancer from the roots. Hence, it is very necessary to design novel anticancer agents with minimum side effects. Synthesis of hybrids from natural leads is one of the rationale approaches in medicinal chemistry. It remains a big challenge to invent new efficient drugs to beat cancer. The design and synthesis of fused molecules as anticancer agents is one of the great innovations of modern era. In drug discovery archetype, a variety of heterocycles have been considered for the development of novel lead compounds. This article presents some recent advancements in the field of anticancer heterocyclic agents all around the world and also attracted the structure activity relationship along with the structure of the most promising molecules along with IC50 values against various human cancer cell lines.

  2. Molecular trail for the anticancer behavior of a novel copper carbohydrazone complex in BRCA1 mutated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rakesh Sathish; Potti, Manoj Easwaran; Thankappan, Ratheeshkumar; Chandrika, Sivakumar Krishnankutty; Kurup, M R Prathapachandra; Srinivas, Priya

    2017-05-01

    Novel chelated metal complexes were synthesized from carbohydrazones to thiocarbohydrazones using metal-based drug designing platforms and their combination effect with Pb, a naphthaquinone were analyzed for anticancer activity in breast cancer cell lines. A panel of BRCA1 wild-type and mutated breast cancer cells: MCF-7 (BRCA1 + /ER + ), MDA-MB-231 (BRCA1 + /ERα - ), HCC-1937 (BRCA1 - /ERα - ), HCC1937/wt BRCA1, MX1 (BRCA1 - /ERα - ), and MDA-MB-436 (BRCA1 - /ERα - ) were screened for anti-cancer activity. Cu 2 (HL)(HSO 4 ) · H 2 O]SO 4  · 6 H 2 O (CS2) is the most potent anticancer agent among the copper carbohydrazone and thiocarbohydrazone complexes analyzed in this study. It can be suggested that the presence of sulphate, as pharmacologically active centre, can induce cytotoxicity more effectively when compared to chlorine, bromine, perchlorate, and methanol. This is the first report demonstrating that CS2 can bind to DNA by hindering BamH1 activity and could induce DNA double strand breaks as evidenced by γ-H2AX expression. In addition to this, CS2 could also act as a Topo II inhibitor at a much lower concentration than etoposide and induce apoptosis, making it a potent anticancer agent. In combination with Pb, a potent ROS inducer, CS2 could induce synergistic anti-cancer activity in HR/ BRCA1 defective breast cancer cells. This is the first study reporting the mechanism involved in the induction of apoptosis for a metal chelated copper carbohydrazone complex and its combination effects with Pb in HR defective, BRCA1 mutated breast cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Fatty acid composition and anticancer activity in colon carcinoma cell lines of Prunus dulcis seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mericli, Filiz; Becer, Eda; Kabadayı, Hilal; Hanoglu, Azmi; Yigit Hanoglu, Duygu; Ozkum Yavuz, Dudu; Ozek, Temel; Vatansever, Seda

    2017-12-01

    Almond oil is used in traditional and complementary therapies for its numerous health benefits due to high unsaturated fatty acids content. This study investigated the composition and in vitro anticancer activity of almond oil from Northern Cyprus and compared with almond oil from Turkey. Almond oil from Northern Cyprus was obtained by supercritical CO 2 extraction and analyzed by GC-MS. Almond oil of Turkey was provided from Turkish pharmacies. Different concentrations of almond oils were incubated for 24 and 48 h with Colo-320 and Colo-741 cells. Cell growth and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assays. Anticancer and antiprolifetarive activities of almond oils were investigated by immunocytochemistry using antibodies directed against to BMP-2, β-catenin, Ki-67, LGR-5 and Jagged 1. Oleic acid (77.8%; 75.3%), linoleic acid (13.5%; 15.8%), palmitic acid (7.4%; 6.3%), were determined as the major compounds of almond oil from Northern Cyprus and Turkey, respectively. In the MTT assay, both almond oils were found to be active against Colo-320 and Colo-741 cells with 1:1 dilution for both 24 h and 48 h. As a result of immunohistochemical staining, while both almond oils exhibited significant antiproliferative and anticancer activity, these activities were more similar in Colo-320 cells which were treated with Northern Cyprus almond oil. Almond oil from Northern Cyprus and Turkey may have anticancer and antiproliferative effects on colon cancer cells through molecular signalling pathways and, thus, they could be potential novel therapeutic agents.

  4. Antibacterial, Anticancer and Neuroprotective Activities of Rare Actinobacteria from Mangrove Forest Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Adzzie-Shazleen; Othman, Iekhsan; Fang, Chee-Mun; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2017-06-01

    Mangrove is a complex ecosystem that contains diverse microbial communities, including rare actinobacteria with great potential to produce bioactive compounds. To date, bioactive compounds extracted from mangrove rare actinobacteria have demonstrated diverse biological activities. The discovery of three novel rare actinobacteria by polyphasic approach, namely Microbacterium mangrovi MUSC 115 T , Sinomonas humi MUSC 117 T and Monashia flava MUSC 78 T from mangrove soils at Tanjung Lumpur, Peninsular Malaysia have led to the screening on antibacterial, anticancer and neuroprotective activities. A total of ten different panels of bacteria such as Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 43300, ATCC 70069, Pseudomonas aeruginosa NRBC 112582 and others were selected for antibacterial screening. Three different neuroprotective models (hypoxia, oxidative stress, dementia) were done using SHSY5Y neuronal cells while two human cancer cells lines, namely human colon cancer cell lines (HT-29) and human cervical carcinoma cell lines (Ca Ski) were utilized for anticancer activity. The result revealed that all extracts exhibited bacteriostatic effects on the bacteria tested. On the other hand, the neuroprotective studies demonstrated M. mangrovi MUSC 115 T extract exhibited significant neuroprotective properties in oxidative stress and dementia model while the extract of strain M. flava MUSC 78 T was able to protect the SHSY5Y neuronal cells in hypoxia model. Furthermore, the extracts of M. mangrovi MUSC 115 T and M. flava MUSC 78 T exhibited anticancer effect against Ca Ski cell line. The chemical analysis of the extracts through GC-MS revealed that the majority of the compounds present in all extracts are heterocyclic organic compound that could explain for the observed bioactivities. Therefore, the results obtained in this study suggested that rare actinobacteria discovered from mangrove environment could be potential sources of antibacterial, anticancer and

  5. Polymeric micelles in anticancer therapy : Targeting, imaging and triggered release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, Chris; Bult, Wouter; Bos, Mariska; Storm, Gert; Nijsen, J. Frank W.; Hennink, Wim E.

    2010-01-01

    Micelles are colloidal particles with a size around 5-100 nm which are currently under investigation as carriers for hydrophobic drugs in anticancer therapy. Currently, five micellar formulations for anticancer therapy are under clinical evaluation, of which Genexol-PM has been FDA approved for use

  6. Availability and affordability of anticancer medicines at the Ocean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The mean anticancer medicines prescribed per patient was 2.01, with the mean cost for anticancer drugs reported by patients to be 106,300 shillings. The availability of medicines at the ORCI for the management of cancer patients was about 50% of all surveyed medicines. As a result more than 70% of patients did ...

  7. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of extracts from Urginea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Increasing antibiotic resistance among human pathogenic microorganisms and the failure of conventional cancer therapies attracting great attention among scientists in the field of herbal medicine to develop natural antimicrobial and anticancer drugs. Thus, the antimicrobial and anticancer activities from fruits ...

  8. Anticancer Activity of Linalool Terpenoid: Apoptosis Induction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anticancer activity of linalool against human prostate cancer (DU145) cells. Methods: The anticancer activity of ... blebbing which are characteristic features of cell apoptosis. Conclusion: The findings of this study ..... terpenoids derived from herbal and dietary plants function as PPAR modulators and ...

  9. Prediction of anticancer activity of aliphatic nitrosoureas using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and development of new anticancer drugs with low toxicity is a very challenging task and computer aided methods are being increasingly used to solve this problem. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of aliphatic nitrosoureas using quantum chemical quantitative structure activity relation (QSAR) ...

  10. Comparative anticancer activity of dolaborane diterpenes from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at investigating the anticancer activity of tagalsins A, B, C, D, E, F and G isolated from the roots of Ceriops tagal. Their structures were established based on the IR, MS and NMR spectral data. Anticancer activity was evaluated using caspase-3 colourimetric assays and the minimum activation concentrations ...

  11. Evaluation of anticancer activity of Debregeasia Salicifolia extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the chemical composition of D. salicifolia extract containing flavonoids, anthraquinones and tannins. Anticancer properties of D. salicifolia can be linked with the presence of these chemicals. Key words: Anticancer, cytotoxic, Debregeasia salicifolia, MCF-7 cell line, 3-(4 ...

  12. Dermatologic adverse events associated with chemotherapy and targeted anticancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kowalska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic agents and drugs used for targeted tumor therapy often cause undesirable side effects of the skin which typically are toxic cutaneous reactions (toxicity grade 1 to 4. The first group of drugs that cause toxicities affecting the skin are inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. They cause a variety of skin changes (PRIDE syndrome, which are mainly manifested by papulopustular rash, also referred to as acneiform rash, occurring in 44–74% of patients. Another drug which causes cutaneous toxicities is inhibitor of CTLA4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4, which is represented by ipilimumab, used in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. The most common dermatological adverse event, observed in 40–64% of patients receiving ipilimumab, is generalized maculopapular rash with pruritus and dry skin, and in some cases vitiligo is also observed. BRAF and MEK inhibitors introduced for the treatment of advanced melanoma also cause skin rashes. BRAF inhibitors also affecting the proliferation of keratinocytes stimulate hypertrophic changes and cause the whole spectrum of lesions from benign and keratoacanthoma to squamous cell carcinoma. A hedgehog pathway inhibitor (vismodegib is used for the treatment of metastatic basal cell carcinoma. The most common adverse events it causes are reversible alopecia and dysgeusia, but it can also cause the development of keratoacanthoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Among the most common side effects of chemotherapy and targeted therapy are toxic changes within the hands and feet (hand-foot skin reaction – HFSR that early manifest as a neurological symptoms (numbness, paresthesia, and skin symptoms (erythematous swelling changes, blisters, hyperkeratosis occur later. Anti-cancer drugs can also cause serious skin diseases such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN and DRESS (drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, whose course and prognosis

  13. A Potential Adjuvant Agent of Chemotherapy: Sepia Ink Polysaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangping Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sepia ink polysaccharide (SIP isolated from squid and cuttlefish ink is a kind of acid mucopolysaccharide that has been identified in three types of primary structures from squid (Illex argentinus and Ommastrephes bartrami, cuttlefish Sepiella maindroni, and cuttlefish Sepia esculenta ink. Although SIP has been proved to be multifaceted, most of the reported evidence has illuminated its chemopreventive and antineoplastic activities. As a natural product playing a role in cancer treatment, SIP may be used as chemotherapeutic ancillary agent or functional food. Based on the current findings on SIP, we have summarized four topics in this review, including: chemopreventive, antineoplastic, chemosensitive, and procoagulant and anticoagulant activities, which are correlative closely with the actions of anticancer agents on cancer patients, such as anticancer, toxicity and thrombogenesis, with the latter two actions being common causes of death in cancer cases exposed to chemotherapeutic agents.

  14. A review on anticancer potential of bioactive heterocycle quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Obaid; Kumar, Suresh; Haider, Md Rafi; Ali, Md Rahmat; Kumar, Rajiv; Jaggi, Manu; Bawa, Sandhya

    2015-06-05

    The advent of Camptothecin added a new dimension in the field anticancer drug development containing quinoline motif. Quinoline scaffold plays an important role in anticancer drug development as their derivatives have shown excellent results through different mechanism of action such as growth inhibitors by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, disruption of cell migration, and modulation of nuclear receptor responsiveness. The anti-cancer potential of several of these derivatives have been demonstrated on various cancer cell lines. In this review we have compiled and discussed specifically the anticancer potential of quinoline derivatives, which could provide a low-height flying bird's eye view of the quinoline derived compounds to a medicinal chemist for a comprehensive and target oriented information for development of clinically viable anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA minor groove alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, W A

    2001-04-01

    Recent work on a number of different classes of anticancer agents that alkylate DNA in the minor groove is reviewed. There has been much work with nitrogen mustards, where attachment of the mustard unit to carrier molecules can change the normal patterns of both regio- and sequence-selectivity, from reaction primarily at most guanine N7 sites in the major groove to a few adenine N3 sites at the 3'-end of poly(A/T) sequences in the minor groove. Carrier molecules discussed for mustards are intercalators, polypyrroles, polyimidazoles, bis(benzimidazoles), polybenzamides and anilinoquinolinium salts. In contrast, similar targeting of pyrrolizidine alkylators by a variety of carriers has little effect of their patterns of alkylation (at the 2-amino group of guanine). Recent work on the pyrrolobenzodiazepine and cyclopropaindolone classes of natural product minor groove binders is also reviewed.

  16. Smac mimetic SM-164 potentiates APO2L/TRAIL- and doxorubicin-mediated anticancer activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuijun Zhang

    Full Text Available The members of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs family are key negative regulators of apoptosis. Overexpression of IAPs are found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and can contribute to chemotherapy resistance and recurrence of HCC. Small-molecule Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac mimetics have recently emerged as novel anticancer drugs through targeting IAPs. The specific aims of this study were to 1 examine the anticancer activity of Smac mimetics as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy in HCC cells, and 2 investigate the mechanism of anticancer action of Smac mimetics.Four HCC cell lines, including SMMC-7721, BEL-7402, HepG2 and Hep3B, and 12 primary HCC cells were used in this study. Smac mimetic SM-164 was used to treat HCC cells. Cell viability, cell death induction and clonal formation assays were used to evaluate the anticancer activity. Western blotting analysis and a pancaspase inhibitor were used to investigate the mechanisms.Although SM-164 induced complete cIAP-1 degradation, it displayed weak inhibitory effects on the viability of HCC cells. Nevertheless, SM-164 considerably potentiated Apo2 ligand or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (APO2L/TRAIL- and Doxorubicin-mediated anticancer activity in HCC cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that SM-164 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents resulted in enhanced activation of caspases-9, -3 and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, and also led to decreased AKT activation.Smac mimetics can enhance chemotherapeutic-mediated anticancer activity by enhancing apoptosis signaling and suppressing survival signaling in HCC cells. This study suggests Smac mimetics are potential therapeutic agents for HCC.

  17. Kefir: a powerful probiotics with anticancer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Mohammadreza; Moridnia, Abbas; Mortazavi, Deniz; Salehi, Mahsa; Bagheri, Marzieh; Sheikhi, Abdolkarim

    2017-09-27

    Probiotics and fermented milk products have attracted the attention of scientists from various fields, such as health care, industry and pharmacy. In recent years, reports have shown that dietary probiotics such as kefir have a great potential for cancer prevention and treatment. Kefir is fermented milk with Caucasian and Tibet origin, made from the incubation of kefir grains with raw milk or water. Kefir grains are a mixture of yeast and bacteria, living in a symbiotic association. Antibacterial, antifungal, anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects are some of the health beneficial properties of kefir grains. Furthermore, it is suggested that some of the bioactive compounds of kefir such as polysaccharides and peptides have great potential for inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in tumor cells. Many studies revealed that kefir acts on different cancers such as colorectal cancer, malignant T lymphocytes, breast cancer and lung carcinoma. In this review, we have focused on anticancer properties of kefir.

  18. Designing anticancer peptides by constructive machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisoni, Francesca; Neuhaus, Claudia; Gabernet, Gisela; Müller, Alex; Hiss, Jan; Schneider, Gisbert

    2018-04-21

    Constructive machine learning enables the automated generation of novel chemical structures without the need for explicit molecular design rules. This study presents the experimental application of such a generative model to design membranolytic anticancer peptides (ACPs) de novo. A recurrent neural network with long short-term memory cells was trained on alpha-helical cationic amphipathic peptide sequences and then fine-tuned with 26 known ACPs. This optimized model was used to generate unique and novel amino acid sequences. Twelve of the peptides were synthesized and tested for their activity on MCF7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells and selectivity against human erythrocytes. Ten of these peptides were active against cancer cells. Six of the active peptides killed MCF7 cancer cells without affecting human erythrocytes with at least threefold selectivity. These results advocate constructive machine learning for the automated design of peptides with desired biological activities. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Synthesis and anticancer evaluation of spermatinamine analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Moosa, Basem

    2016-02-04

    Spermatinamine was isolated from an Australian marine sponge, Pseudoceratina sp. as an inhibitor of isoprenylcystiene carboxyl methyltransferase (Icmt), an attractive and novel anticancer target. Herein, we report the synthesis of spermatinamine analogues and their cytotoxic evaluation against three human cancer cell lines i.e. cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), and prostate carcinoma (DU145). Analogues 12, 14 and 15 were found to be the most potent against one or more cell lines with the IC50 values in the range of 5 - 10 μM. The obtained results suggested that longer polyamine linker along with aromatic oxime substitution provided the most potent analogue compounds against cancer cell lines.

  20. Silk nanoparticles—an emerging anticancer nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Philipp Seib

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Silk is a sustainable and ecologically friendly biopolymer with a robust clinical track record in humans for load bearing applications, in part due to its excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Our ability to take bottom-up and top-down approaches for the generation of silk (inspired biopolymers has been critical in supporting the evolution of silk materials and formats, including silk nanoparticles for drug delivery. Silk nanoparticles are emerging as interesting contenders for drug delivery and are well placed to advance the nanomedicine field. This review covers the use of Bombyx mori and recombinant silks as an anticancer nanomedicine, highlighting the emerging trends and developments as well as critically assessing the current opportunities and challenges by providing a context specific assessment of this multidisciplinary field.

  1. System engineering approach to planning anticancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Świerniak, Andrzej; Smieja, Jaroslaw; Puszynski, Krzysztof; Psiuk-Maksymowicz, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the analysis of cancer dynamics and the mathematically based synthesis of anticancer therapy. It summarizes the current state-of-the-art in this field and clarifies common misconceptions about mathematical modeling in cancer. Additionally, it encourages closer cooperation between engineers, physicians and mathematicians by showing the clear benefits of this without stating unrealistic goals. Development of therapy protocols is realized from an engineering point of view, such as the search for a solution to a specific control-optimization problem. Since in the case of cancer patients, consecutive measurements providing information about the current state of the disease are not available, the control laws are derived for an open loop structure. Different forms of therapy are incorporated into the models, from chemotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy to immunotherapy and gene therapy, but the class of models introduced is broad enough to incorporate other forms of therapy as well. The book be...

  2. Anti-cancer properties and mechanisms of action of thymoquinone, the major active ingredient of Nigella sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Fayyad, Muneera W; Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2017-12-12

    Over the past two decades, studies have documented the wide-range anti-cancer effects of Nigella sativa, known as black seed or black cumin. Thymoquinone (TQ), its major active ingredient, has also been extensively studied and reported to possess potent anti-cancer properties. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the findings related to the anti-cancer activity of TQ. The review focuses on analyzing experimental studies performed using different in vitro and in vivo models to identify the anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, cytotoxic, anti-metastatic, and NK-dependent cytotoxic effects exerted by TQ. In addition, we pinpoint the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects and the signal transduction pathways implicated by TQ. Our analysis show that p53, NF-κB, PPARγ, STAT3, MAPK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways are among the most significant pathways through which TQ mediates its anti-cancer activity. Experimental findings and recent advances in the field highlight TQ as an effective therapeutic agent for the suppression of tumor development, growth and metastasis for a wide range of tumors.

  3. Anticancer screening of medicinal plant phytochemicals against Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2: An in-silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajahat Khan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2 is a member of serine/threonine protein kinases family and plays an important role in regulation of various eukaryotic cell division events. Over-expression of CDK2 during cell cycle may lead to several cellular functional aberrations including diverse types of cancers (lung cancer, primary colorectal carcinoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma and pancreatic carcinoma in humans. Medicinal plants phytochemicals which have anticancer potential can be used as an alternative drug resource. Methods: This study was designed to find out anticancer phytochemicals from medicinal plants which could inhibit CDK2 with the help of molecular docking technique. Molecular Operating Environment (MOE v2009 software was used to dock 2300 phytochemicals in this study. Results: The outcome of this study shows that four phytochemicals Kushenol T, Remangiflavanone B, Neocalyxins A and Elenoside showed the lowest S-score (-17.83, -17.57, -17.26, -17.17 respectively and binds strongly with all eight active residues Tyr15, Lys33, Ileu52, Lys56, Leu78, phe80, Asp145 and Phe146 of CDK2 binding site. These phytochemicals could successfully inhibit the CDK2. Conclusion: These phytochemicals can be considered as potential anticancer agents and used in drug development against CDK2. We anticipate that this study would pave way for phytochemical based novel small molecules as more efficacious and selective anti-cancer therapeutic compounds.

  4. NBM-HD-1: A Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor with Anticancer Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jan Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HDAC inhibitors (HDACis have been developed as promising anticancer agents in recent years. In this study, we synthesized and characterized a novel HDACi, termed NBM-HD-1. This agent was derived from the semisynthesis of propolin G, isolated from Taiwanese green propolis (TGP, and was shown to be a potent suppressor of tumor cell growth in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and rat glioma cells (C6, with an IC50 ranging from 8.5 to 10.3 μM. Western blot demonstrated that levels of p21(Waf1/Cip1, gelsolin, Ac-histone 4, and Ac-tubulin markedly increased after treatment of cancer cells with NBM-HD-1. After NBM-HD-1 treatment for 1–4 h, p-PTEN and p-AKT levels were markedly decreased. Furthermore, we also found the anticancer activities of NBM-HD-1 in regulating cell cycle regulators. Treatment with NBM-HD-1, p21(Waf1/Cip1 gene expression had markedly increased while cyclin B1 and D1 gene expressions had markedly decreased. On the other hand, we found that NBM-HD-1 increased the expressions of tumor-suppressor gene p53 in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, we showed that NBM-HD-1 exhibited potent antitumor activity in a xenograft model. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that this compound, NBM-HD-1, is a novel and potent HDACi with anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael E Hawtin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II is critical for DNA replication, transcription and chromosome segregation and is a well validated target of anti-neoplastic drugs including the anthracyclines and epipodophyllotoxins. However, these drugs are limited by common tumor resistance mechanisms and side-effect profiles. Novel topoisomerase II-targeting agents may benefit patients who prove resistant to currently available topoisomerase II-targeting drugs or encounter unacceptable toxicities. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative, a chemical scaffold not used previously for cancer treatment. Voreloxin is completing Phase 2 clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. This study defined voreloxin's anticancer mechanism of action as a critical component of rational clinical development informed by translational research.Biochemical and cell-based studies established that voreloxin intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II, causing DNA double-strand breaks, G2 arrest, and apoptosis. Voreloxin is differentiated both structurally and mechanistically from other topoisomerase II poisons currently in use as chemotherapeutics. In cell-based studies, voreloxin poisoned topoisomerase II and caused dose-dependent, site-selective DNA fragmentation analogous to that of quinolone antibacterials in prokaryotes; in contrast etoposide, the nonintercalating epipodophyllotoxin topoisomerase II poison, caused extensive DNA fragmentation. Etoposide's activity was highly dependent on topoisomerase II while voreloxin and the intercalating anthracycline topoisomerase II poison, doxorubicin, had comparable dependence on this enzyme for inducing G2 arrest. Mechanistic interrogation with voreloxin analogs revealed that intercalation is required for voreloxin's activity; a nonintercalating analog did not inhibit proliferation or induce G2 arrest, while an analog with enhanced intercalation was 9.5-fold more potent.As a first-in-class anticancer

  6. Cdt1 is differentially targeted for degradation by anticancer chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasia Stathopoulou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maintenance of genome integrity is crucial for the propagation of the genetic information. Cdt1 is a major component of the pre-replicative complex, which controls once per cell cycle DNA replication. Upon DNA damage, Cdt1 is rapidly targeted for degradation. This targeting has been suggested to safeguard genomic integrity and prevent re-replication while DNA repair is in progress. Cdt1 is deregulated in tumor specimens, while its aberrant expression is linked with aneuploidy and promotes tumorigenesis in animal models. The induction of lesions in DNA is a common mechanism by which many cytotoxic anticancer agents operate, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present study we examine the ability of several anticancer drugs to target Cdt1 for degradation. We show that treatment of HeLa and HepG2 cells with MMS, Cisplatin and Doxorubicin lead to rapid proteolysis of Cdt1, whereas treatment with 5-Fluorouracil and Tamoxifen leave Cdt1 expression unaffected. Etoposide affects Cdt1 stability in HepG2 cells and not in HeLa cells. RNAi experiments suggest that Cdt1 proteolysis in response to MMS depends on the presence of the sliding clamp PCNA. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that treatment of tumor cells with commonly used chemotherapeutic agents induces differential responses with respect to Cdt1 proteolysis. Information on specific cellular targets in response to distinct anticancer chemotherapeutic drugs in different cancer cell types may contribute to the optimization of the efficacy of chemotherapy.

  7. Gut microbiome and anticancer immune response: really hot Sh*t!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viaud, S; Daillère, R; Boneca, I G; Lepage, P; Langella, P; Chamaillard, M; Pittet, M J; Ghiringhelli, F; Trinchieri, G; Goldszmid, R; Zitvogel, L

    2015-02-01

    The impact of gut microbiota in eliciting innate and adaptive immune responses beneficial for the host in the context of effective therapies against cancer has been highlighted recently. Chemotherapeutic agents, by compromising, to some extent, the intestinal integrity, increase the gut permeability and selective translocation of Gram-positive bacteria in secondary lymphoid organs. There, anticommensal pathogenic Th17 T-cell responses are primed, facilitating the accumulation of Th1 helper T cells in tumor beds after chemotherapy as well as tumor regression. Importantly, the redox equilibrium of myeloid cells contained in the tumor microenvironment is also influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Hence, the anticancer efficacy of alkylating agents (such as cyclophosphamide) and platinum salts (oxaliplatin, cis-platin) is compromised in germ-free mice or animals treated with antibiotics. These findings represent a paradigm shift in our understanding of the mode of action of many compounds having an impact on the host-microbe mutualism.

  8. Poly-cyclodextrin functionalized porous bioceramics for local chemotherapy and anticancer bone reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Feng; Abdelkarim, Mohamed; Laurent, Thomas; Tabary, Nicolas; Degoutin, Stephanie; Simon, Nicolas; Peters, Fabian; Blanchemain, Nicolas; Martel, Bernard; Hildebrand, Hartmut F

    2014-08-01

    The progress in bone cancer surgery and multimodal treatment concept achieve only modest improvement in the overall survival, due to failure in clearing out residual cancer cells at the surgical margin and extreme side-effects of adjuvant postoperative treatments. Our study aims to propose a new method based on cyclodextrin polymer (polyCD) functionalized hydroxyapatite (HA) for achieving a high local drug concentration with a sustained release profile and a better control of residual malignant cells via local drug delivery and promotion of the reconstruction of bone defects. PolyCD, a versatile carrier for therapeutic molecules, can be incorporated into HA (bone regeneration scaffold) through thermal treatment. The parameters of polyCD treatment on the macroporous HA (porosity 65%) were characterized via thermogravimetric analysis. Good cytocompatibility of polyCD functionalized bioceramics was demonstrated on osteoblast cells by cell vitality assay. An antibiotic (gentamicin) and an anticancer agent (cisplatin) were respectively loaded on polyCD functionalized bioceramics for drug release test. The results show that polyCD functionalization leads to significantly improved drug loading quantity (30% more concerning gentamicin and twice more for cisplatin) and drug release duration (7 days longer concerning gentamicin and 3 days longer for cisplatin). Conclusively, this study offers a safe and reliable drug delivery system for bioceramic matrices, which can load anticancer agents (or/and antibiotics) to reduce local recurrence (or/and infection). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Sulforaphane mitigates genotoxicity induced by radiation and anticancer drugs in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Omika; Kumar, Arun; Adhikari, Jawahar S; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S; Agrawala, Paban K

    2013-12-12

    Sulforaphane, present in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, is a dietary anticancer agent. Sulforaphane, added 2 or 20 h following phytohemaglutinin stimulation to cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes of individuals accidentally exposed to mixed γ and β-radiation, reduced the micronucleus frequency by up to 70%. Studies with whole blood cultures obtained from healthy volunteers confirmed the ability of sulforaphane to ameliorate γ-radiation-induced genotoxicity and to reduce micronucleus induction by other DNA-damaging anticancer agents, such as bleomycin and doxorubicin. This reduction in genotoxicity in lymphocytes treated at the G(0) or G(1) stage suggests a role for sulforaphane in modulating DNA repair. Sulforaphane also countered the radiation-induced increase in lymphocyte HDAC activity, to control levels, when cells were treated 2 h after exposure, and enhanced histone H4 acetylation status. Sulforaphane post-irradiation treatment enhanced the CD 34(+)Lin(-) cell population in culture. Sulforaphane has therapeutic potential for management of the late effects of radiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecules of natural origin, semi-synthesis and synthesis with anti-inflammatory and anticancer utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, A M; Ferreira, L M; Branco, P S

    2012-01-01

    The development of new drugs that can be valuable for the evolution of diseases' treatment is a goal for different areas of research, namely natural products chemistry, molecular biology and biochemistry, pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry and analytical chemistry. Nature is the main source of compounds for pharmaceutical purposes, either by providing the natural organic chemical compounds of interest or as a source of inspiration for the design of new drugs. The known anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents belong to a great diversity of structural skeletons since inflammatory and cancer processes involve many different biological targets. Their origins extend to plants, fungi, bacteria, and marine organisms, besides those produced by semi-synthesis and total synthesis. The tasks of the organic chemist are the screening, the structure assignment, and the semi and total syntheses of active molecules. Herein the screening and assignment of new active structures is addressed, together with other aspects, namely the improvements, both in availability and in effectiveness of action that can be achieved from new derivatives by synthetic or semi-synthetic strategies. Some aspects of drug delivery of anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents are considered. The bibliography presented is far from being exhaustive due to the prodigious number of published works. Instead, the most significant contributions in the scope of this review are described. The active compounds are organised by their biosynthetic origins as terpenoids; macrolides, polyketides and ansamycins; phenolics; alkaloids; peptides; glycoconjugates; other compounds, and food compounds.

  11. Anticancer and antibacterial secondary metabolites from the endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. CAM64 against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouda, Jean-Bosco; Tamokou, Jean-de-Dieu; Mbazoa, Céline Djama; Sarkar, Prodipta; Bag, Prasanta Kumar; Wandji, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of multiple-drug resistance bacteria has become a major threat and thus calls for an urgent need to search for new effective and safe anti-bacterial agents. This study aims to evaluate the anticancer and antibacterial activities of secondary metabolites from Penicillium sp., an endophytic fungus associated with leaves of Garcinia nobilis. The culture filtrate from the fermentation of Penicillium sp. was extracted and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the major metabolites were isolated and identified by spectroscopic analyses and by comparison with published data. The antibacterial activity of the compounds was assessed by broth microdilution method while the anticancer activity was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The fractionation of the crude extract afforded penialidin A-C (1-3), citromycetin (4), p-hydroxyphenylglyoxalaldoxime (5) and brefelfin A (6). All of the compounds tested here showed antibacterial activity (MIC = 0.50 - 128 µg/mL) against Gramnegative multi-drug resistance bacteria, Vibrio cholerae (causative agent of dreadful disease cholera) and Shigella flexneri (causative agent of shigellosis), as well as the significant anticancer activity (LC 50 = 0.88 - 9.21 µg/mL) against HeLa cells. The results obtained indicate that compounds 1-6 showed good antibacterial and anticancer activities with no toxicity to human red blood cells and normal Vero cells.

  12. Synthesis, spectral and quantum chemical studies and use of (E)-3-[(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenylimino)methyl]benzene-1,2-diol and its Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes as an anion sensor, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, anti-microbial, anti-mutagenic and anti-cancer agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünver, Hüseyin; Boyacıoğlu, Bahadır; Zeyrek, Celal Tuğrul; Yıldız, Mustafa; Demir, Neslihan; Yıldırım, Nuray; Karaosmanoğlu, Oğuzhan; Sivas, Hülya; Elmalı, Ayhan

    2016-12-01

    We report the synthesis of a novel Schiff base (E)-3-[(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl) phenylimino)methyl] benzene-1,2-diol from the reaction of 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde with 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)aniline, and its Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes. The molecular structure of the Schiff base was experimentally determined using X-ray single-crystal data and was compared to the structure predicted by theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT), Hartree-Fock (HF) and Möller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2). In addition, nonlinear optical (NLO) effects of the compound was predicted using DFT. The antimicrobial activities of the compounds were investigated for their minimum inhibitory concentration. UV-Vis spectroscopy studies of the interactions between the compounds and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) showed that the compounds interacts with CT-DNA via intercalative binding. A DNA cleavage study showed that the Cu(II) complex cleaved DNA without any external agents. The compounds inhibited the base pair mutation in the absence of S9 with high inhibition rate. In addition, in vitro cytotoxicity of the Ni(II) complex towards HepG2 cell line was assayed by the MTT method. Also, the colorimetric response of the Schiff base in DMSO to the addition of equivalent amount of anions (F-, Br-, I-, CN-, SCN-, ClO4-, HSO4-, AcO-, H2PO4-, N3- and OH-) was investigated. In this regard, while the addition of F-, CN-, AcO- and OH- anions into the solution containing Schiff base resulted in a significant color change, the addition of Br-, I-, SCN-, ClO4-, HSO4-, H2PO4- and N3- anions resulted in no color change. The most discernable color change in the Schiff base was caused by CN-, which demonstrated that the ligand can be used to selectively detect CN-.

  13. Am(m)ines make the difference: organoruthenium am(m)ine complexes and their chemistry in anticancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babak, Maria V; Meier, Samuel M; Legin, Anton A; Adib Razavi, Mahsa S; Roller, Alexander; Jakupec, Michael A; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2013-03-25

    With the aim of systematically studying fundamental structure-activity relationships as a basis for the development of Ru(II) arene complexes (arene = p-cymene or biphenyl) bearing mono-, bi-, or tridentate am(m)ine ligands as anticancer agents, a series of ammine, ethylenediamine, and diethylenetriamine complexes were prepared by different synthetic routes. Especially the synthesis of mono-, di-, and triammine complexes was found to be highly dependent on the reaction conditions, such as stoichiometry, temperature, and time. Hydrolysis and protein-binding studies were performed to determine the reactivity of the compounds, and only those containing chlorido ligands undergo aquation or form protein adducts. These properties correlate well with in vitro tumor-inhibiting potency of the compounds. The complexes were found to be active in anticancer assays when meeting the following criteria: stability in aqueous solution and low rates of hydrolysis and binding to proteins. Therefore, the complexes least reactive to proteins were found to be the most cytotoxic in cancer cells. In general, complexes with biphenyl as arene ligand inhibited the growth of tumor cells more effectively than the cymene analogues, consistent with the increase in lipophilicity. This study highlights the importance of finding a proper balance between reactivity and stability in the development of organometallic anticancer agents. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Trading Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Wellman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Automated trading in electronic markets is one of the most common and consequential applications of autonomous software agents. Design of effective trading strategies requires thorough understanding of how market mechanisms operate, and appreciation of strategic issues that commonly manifest in trading scenarios. Drawing on research in auction theory and artificial intelligence, this book presents core principles of strategic reasoning that apply to market situations. The author illustrates trading strategy choices through examples of concrete market environments, such as eBay, as well as abst

  15. Isolation and identification of flavonoids from anticancer and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and identification of flavonoids from anticancer and neuroprotective extracts of Trigonella foenum graecum. Shabina Ishtiaq Ahmed, Muhammad Qasim Hayat, Saadia Zahid, Muhammad Tahir, Qaisar Mansoor, Muhammad Ismail, Kristen Keck, Robert Bates ...

  16. Investigations into the Mechanisms of Cell Death: The Common Link between Anticancer Nanotherapeutics and Nanotoxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocha, Shalini

    Nanotoxicology and anticancer nanotherapeutics are essentially two sides of the same coin. The nanotoxicology discipline deals with the nanoparticle (NP)-induced toxicity and mechanisms of cell death in healthy cells, whereas anticancer agents delivered via nano-based approaches aim to induce cell death in abnormally proliferating cancer cells. The objectives of the studies presented herein were two-fold; to (a) systematically study the physico-chemical properties and cell death mechanisms of model NPs and (b) utilize the knowledge gained from cell death-nanotoxicity studies in developing a potentially novel anticancer nanotherapeutic agent. For the first objective, the effect of a distinguishing characteristic, i.e., surface carbon coating on the matched pairs of carbon-coated and non-coated copper and nickel NPs (Cu, C-Cu, Ni and C-Ni) on the physico-chemical properties and toxicity in A549 alveolar epithelial cells were evaluated. The effect of carbon coating on particle size, zeta potential, oxidation state, cellular uptake, release of soluble metal and concentration dependent toxicity of Cu and Ni NPs was systematically evaluated. A significant effect of carbon coating was observed on the physico-chemical properties, interaction with cellular membranes, and overall toxicity of the NPs. C-Cu NPs, compared to Cu NPs, showed four-fold lower release of soluble copper, ten-fold higher cellular uptake and protection against surface oxidation. In toxicity assays, C-Cu NPs induced higher mitochondrial damage than Cu NPs whereas Cu NPs were associated with a significant damage to plasma membrane integrity. Nickel and carbon coated nickel NPs were less toxic compared to Cu and C-Cu NPs. Thus, by studying the effect of carbon coating, correlations between physico-chemical properties and toxicity of NPs were established. The second objective was focused on utilizing nano-based approaches for the intracellular delivery of an anticancer agent, Cytochrome c (Cyt c), to

  17. A nanocomplex of Cu(II) with theophylline drug; synthesis, characterization, and anticancer activity against K562 cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlabadi, Maryam; Daryanavard, Marzieh; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2018-03-01

    A new mononuclear of copper (II), [Cu(theophylline)2(H2O)3]·2H2O, has been synthesized by reaction of theophylline (1,3-dimethyl-7H-purine-2,6-dione) with copper (II) nitrate in water. Further, its nanocomplex has been prepared through the three different methods including sonication, grinding, and a combination thereof, sonication-grinding. The prepared nanocomplex was characterized using different techniques including FT-IR, UV-Vis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Moreover, the anticancer activity of the precursor complex, nanocomplex, free theophylline ligand, and the starting copper salt (Cu(NO3)2·3H2O) was investigated against the K562 cell line. The results show that the nanocomplex is an effective nano metal-based anticancer agent with IC50 = 11.7 μM.

  18. A new in vitro screening system for anticancer drugs for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanauske, U.; Hanauske, A.R.; Clark, G.M.; Tsen, D.; Buchok, J.; Hoff, D.D. von

    1989-01-01

    We have evaluated a semiautomated radiometric assay (BACTEC 460 system) for screening of activity of anticancer drugs against human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines. Cells from seven cell lines were exposed to standard antineoplastic agents at four different concentrations using a 1-h incubation. Alpha 2-interferon was tested using a continuous incubation. In vitro drug activity was analyzed as a function of the clinically achievable serum concentration. Our results indicate that two cell lines (CALU-3, SK-MES-1) exhibit in vitro drug sensitivity patterns closest to those observed in clinical studies. These two cell lines might therefore be most useful for screening new anticancer compounds for activity against non-small cell lung cancer. The radiometric assay is a semiautomated system which has advantages over other, more time-consuming screening systems

  19. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Piazza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  20. Anticancer activity of selected Colocasia gigantia fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornprasertpol, Apichai; Sereemaspun, Amornpun; Sooklert, Kanidta; Satirapipatkul, Chutimon; Sukrong, Suchada

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the anticancer potential of the extract of Colocasia gigantea C. gigantea), a plant member of the Araceae family. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of C. gigantea extract on cervical cancer (Hela) and human white blood cells (WBC) in vitro. The authors then identified the bioactive ingredients that demonstrated cytotoxicity on tested cells and evaluated those bioactive ingredients using the bioassay-guided fractionation method. The results showed that not all parts of C. gigantea promote cytotoxic activity. The dichloromethane leaf fraction showed significant cell proliferation effect on Hela cells, but not on WBCs. Only the n-hexane tuber fraction (Fr. 1T) exhibited significant cytotoxicity on Hela cells (IC50 = 585 μg/ml) and encouraged WBC cell proliferation. From GC-Mass spectrometry, 4,22-Stigmastadiene-3-one, Diazoprogesterone, 9-Octadecenoic acid (Z)-, hexyl ester and Oleic Acid were the components of Fr 1T that demonstrated cytotoxic potential. In conclusion, C. gigantea's Fr 1T shows potential for cervical cancer treatment.

  1. Potential Anticancer Properties of Grape Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kequan Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary intake of foods rich in antioxidant properties is suggested to be cancer protective. Foods rich in antioxidant properties include grape (Vitis vinifera, one of the world’s largest fruit crops and most commonly consumed fruits in the world. The composition and cancer-protective effects of major phenolic antioxidants in grape skin and seed extracts are discussed in this review. Grape skin and seed extracts exert strong free radical scavenging and chelating activities and inhibit lipid oxidation in various food and cell models in vitro. The use of grape antioxidants are promising against a broad range of cancer cells by targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and its downstream pathways, inhibiting over-expression of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 receptors, or modifying estrogen receptor pathways, resulting in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Interestingly, some of these activities were also demonstrated in animal models. However, in vivo studies have demonstrated inconsistent antioxidant efficacy. Nonetheless, a growing body of evidence from human clinical trials has demonstrated that consumption of grape, wine and grape juice exerts many health-promoting and possible anti-cancer effects. Thus, grape skin and seed extracts have great potential in cancer prevention and further investigation into this exciting field is warranted.

  2. MECHANOMAGNETIC REACTOR FOR ACTIVATION OF ANTICANCER DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orel V. E.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanomagnetochemical activation can increase the concentration of paramagnetic centers (free radicals in the anticancer drug, for example, doxorubicin that enables to influence its magnetic properties under external electromagnetic field and improve its magnetic sensitivity and antitumor activity. The principles of design and operation of mechanomagnetic reactor for implementation of this technology which includes mechanomagnetochemical activation and electromagnetic radiation of the drug are described in the paper. The methods of vibration magnetometry, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography were used for studying of doxorubicin mechanomagnetic activation effects. The studies have shown that a generator of sinusoidal electromagnetic wave, working chambers from caprolactam, fluoroplastic or organic materials with metal inserts and working bodies made from steel or agate depending on the required doxorubicin magnetic properties are expedient to use in the designed mechanomagnic reactor. Under influence of mechanomagnetochemical activation doxorubicin, which is diamagnetic, acquires the properties of paramagnetic without changing g-factors in the spectra of electron paramagnetic resonance. Mechanomagnetochemical activation of doxorubicin satisfies pharmacopoeia condi tions according to the results of liquid chromatography that points on perspective of this method using in technology of tumor therapy with nanosized structures and external electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Immunological monitoring of anticancer vaccines in clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Ogi, Chizuru; Aruga, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic anticancer vaccines operate by eliciting or enhancing an immune response that specifically targets tumor-associated antigens. Although intense efforts have been made for developing clinically useful anticancer vaccines, only a few Phase III clinical trials testing this immunotherapeutic strategy have achieved their primary endpoint. Here, we report the results of a retrospective research aimed at clarifying the design of previously completed Phase II/III clinical trials testing th...

  4. Radioprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kelle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since1949, a great deal of research has been carried out on the radioprotective activity of various chemical substances. Thiol compounds, compounds which contain –SH radical, different classes of pharmacological agents and other compounds such as vitamine C and WR-2721 have been shown to reduce mortality when administered prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. Recently, honey bee venom as well as that of its components melittin and histamine have shown to be valuable in reduction of radiation-induced damage and also provide prophylactic alternative treatment for serious side effects related with radiotherapy. It has been suggested that the radioprotective activity of bee venom components is related with the stimulation of the hematopoetic system.

  5. Sensitization for Anticancer Drug-Induced Apoptosis by Betulinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fulda

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously described that betulinic acid (BetA, a naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenoid, induces apoptosis in tumor cells through the mitochondrial pathway. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence that BetA cooperated with anticancer drugs to induce apoptosis and to inhibit clonogenic survival of tumor cells. Combined treatment with BetA and anticancer drugs acted in concert to induce loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c and Smac from mitochondria, resulting in activation of caspases and apoptosis. Overexpression of Bcl-2, which blocked mitochondrial perturbations, also inhibited the cooperative effect of BetA and anticancer drugs, indicating that cooperative interaction involved the mitochondrial pathway. Notably, cooperation of BetA and anticancer drugs was found for various cytotoxic compounds with different modes of action (e.g., doxorubicin, cisplatin, Taxol, VP16, or actinomycin D. Importantly, BetA and anticancer drugs cooperated to induce apoptosis in different tumor cell lines, including p53 mutant cells, and also in primary tumor cells, but not in human fibroblasts indicating some tumor specificity. These findings indicate that using BetA as sensitizer in chemotherapy-based combination regimens may be a novel strategy to enhance the efficacy of anticancer therapy, which warrants further investigation.

  6. A Systematic Review of Iran's Medicinal Plants With Anticancer Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Samani, Majid; Kooti, Wesam; Aslani, Elahe; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2016-04-01

    Increase in cases of various cancers has encouraged the researchers to discover novel, more effective drugs from plant sources. This study is a review of medicinal plants in Iran with already investigated anticancer effects on various cell lines. Thirty-six medicinal plants alongside their products with anticancer effects as well as the most important plant compounds responsible for the plants' anticancer effect were introduced. Phenolic and alkaloid compounds were demonstrated to have anticancer effects on various cancers in most studies. The plants and their active compounds exerted anticancer effects by removing free radicals and antioxidant effects, cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis. The investigated plants in Iran contain the compounds that are able to contribute effectively to fighting cancer cells. Therefore, the extract and active compounds of the medicinal plants introduced in this review article could open a way to conduct clinical trials on cancer and greatly help researchers and pharmacists develop new anticancer drugs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Study of phytochemical, anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, and anti-cancer properties of Allium wallichii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Jaya; Muhammad, BushraTaj; Thapa, Pratiksha; Shrestha, Bhupal Govinda

    2017-02-08

    There is growing interest in the use of plants for the treatment and prevention of cancer. Medicinal plants are currently being evaluated as source of promising anticancer agents. In this paper, we have investigated the anticancer potential of plant Allium wallichii, a plant native to Nepal and growing at elevations of 2300-4800 m. This is the first study of its kind for the plant mentioned. The dried plant was extracted in aqueous ethanol. Phytochemical screening, anti-microbial assay, anti-oxidant assay, cytotoxicity assay and the flow-cytometric analysis were done for analyzing different phytochemicals present, anti-microbial activity, anti-oxidant activity and anti-cancer properties of Allium wallichii. We observed the presence of steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, reducing sugars and glycosides in the plant extract and the plant showed moderate anti-microbial and anti-oxidant activity. The IC 50 values of Allium wallichii in different cancer cell lines are 69.69 μg/ml for Prostate cancer (PC3) cell line, 55.29 μg/ml for Breast Cancer (MCF-7) cell line and 46.51 μg/ml for cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line as compared to Doxorubicin (0.85 μg/ml). The cell viability assay using FACS showed that the IC 50 value of Allium wallichii for Burkitt's lymphoma (B-Lymphoma) cell line was 3.817 ± 1.99 mg/ml. Allium wallichii can be an important candidate to be used as an anticancer agent. Separation of pure compounds with bioassay guided extraction, spectrometric analysis and subsequent cytotoxicity assay of the pure bioactive compounds from Allium wallichii is highly recommended as the crude extract itself showed promising cytotoxicity.

  8. Photo-induced biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles from aqueous extract of Dunaliella salina and their anticancer potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ankit Kumar; Tiwari, Ratnakar; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Prabhakar; Riyazat Khadim, S K; Tiwari, Anupam; Srivastava, Vikas; Hasan, S H; Asthana, R K

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via green route, using biological entities is an area of interest, because one of the potential applications in the nanomedicine. In the present study, we have developed photo-induced, ecofriendly, low cost method for biosynthesis of the stable silver nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Dunaliella salina (AED) which act as both reducing as well as stabilizing agent. Biosynthesis of the AgNPs was optimized as: sunlight exposure (30min), AED (5% (v/v)) and AgNO 3 (4mM). Biosynthesis of AgNPs was monitored by using UV-Vis spectroscopy which exhibited sharp SPR band at 430nm after 30min of bright sunlight exposure. SEM and TEM analyses confirmed the presence of spherical AgNPs with average size of 15.26nm. Crystalline nature of AgNPs was confirmed by SAED and XRD analyses where Braggs reflection pattern at (111), (200), (220) and (311) corresponded to face centered cubic crystal lattice of metallic silver. FTIR analysis revealed the involvement of various functional groups present in AED. AFM analysis confirmed the average surface roughness of synthesized AgNPs as 8.48nm. AgNPs were also screened for anticancer potential using assay of calcein AM/PI, Annexin/PI and cancer biomarkers against cancer cell line (MCF-7), while normal cell line (MCF-10A) were kept as control. Interestingly, anticancer potential was comparable to the known anticancer drug (Cisplatin), and was not detrimental to the normal cell line. Therefore, such green synthesized AgNPs may be explored as anticancer agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Understanding Resistance to Targeted Anticancer Therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, C.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapeutic regimens are gradually changing from using relatively unspecific cytotoxic agents to selective, pathway-centered approaches. The mechanistic rationale of targeted approaches is to destruct the tumor by blocking aberrant cell signaling, crucial for tumor maintenance and growth, but

  10. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Anticancer Activities of Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles Using Marine Algae Ecklonia cava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayachandran Venkatesan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs has gained great interest as a simple and eco-friendly alternative to conventional chemical methods. In this study, AgNPs were synthesized by using extracts of marine algae Ecklonia cava as reducing and capping agents. The formation of AgNPs using aqueous extract of Ecklonia cava was confirmed visually by color change and their surface plasmon resonance peak at 418 nm, measured by UV-visible spectroscopy. The size, shape, and morphology of the biosynthesized AgNPs were observed by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis. The biosynthesized AgNPs were nearly spherical in shape with an average size around 43 nm. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis confirmed the presence of phenolic compounds in the aqueous extract of Ecklonia cava as reducing and capping agents. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis was also carried out to demonstrate the crystalline nature of the biosynthesized AgNPs. Antimicrobial results determined by an agar well diffusion assay demonstrated a significant antibacterial activity of the AgNPs against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Antioxidant results determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH scavenging assay revealed an efficient antioxidant activity of the biosynthesized AgNPs. The biosynthesized AgNPs also exhibited a strong apoptotic anticancer activity against human cervical cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate that aqueous extract of Ecklonia cava is an effective reducing agent for green synthesis of AgNPs with efficient antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities.

  11. Anticancer activity of botanical alkyl hydroquinones attributed to topoisomerase II poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.-P.; Fang, W.-H.; Lin, L.-I.; Chiou, Robin Y.; Kan, L.-S.; Chi, N.-H.; Chen, Y.-R.; Lin, T.-Y.; Lin, S.-B.

    2008-01-01

    Cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds have been isolated from many plants. We previously isolated 3 structurally similar cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds from the sap of the lacquer tree Rhus succedanea L. belonging to the sumac family, which have a long history of medicinal use in Asia. Each has an unsaturated alkyl chain attached to the 2-position of a hydroquinone ring. One of these isolates, 10'(Z),13'(E),15'(E)-heptadecatrienylhydroquinone [HQ17(3)], being the most cytotoxic, was chosen for studying the anticancer mechanism of these compounds. We found that HQ17(3) was a topoisomerase (Topo) II poison. It irreversibly inhibited Topo IIα activity through the accumulation of Topo II-DNA cleavable complexes. A cell-based assay showed that HQ17(3) inhibited the growth of leukemia HL-60 cells with an EC 50 of 0.9 μM, inhibited the topoisomerase-II-deficient cells HL-60/MX2 with an EC 50 of 9.6 μM, and exerted no effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells at concentrations up to 50 μM. These results suggest that Topo II is the cellular drug target. In HL-60 cells, HQ17(3) promptly inhibited DNA synthesis, induced chromosomal breakage, and led to cell death with an EC 50 about one-tenth that of hydroquinone. Pretreatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine could not attenuate the cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by HQ17(3). However, N-acetylcysteine did significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of hydroquinone. In F344 rats, intraperitoneal injection of HQ17(3) for 28 days induced no clinical signs of toxicity. These results indicated that HQ17(3) is a potential anticancer agent, and its structural features could be a model for anticancer drug design

  12. Anticancer activity and potential mechanisms of 1C, a ginseng saponin derivative, on prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu De Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: AD-2 (20(R-dammarane-3b, 12b, 20, 25-tetrol; 25-OH-PPD is a ginsenoside and isolated from Panax ginseng, showing anticancer activity against extensive human cancer cell lines. In this study, effects and mechanisms of 1C ((20R-3b-O-(L-alanyl-dammarane-12b, 20, 25-triol, a modified version of AD-2, were evaluated for its development as a novel anticancer drug. Methods: MTT assay was performed to evaluate cell cytotoxic activity. Cell cycle and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS were determined using flow cytometry analysis. Western blotting was employed to analyze signaling pathways. Results: 1C concentration-dependently reduces prostate cancer cell viability without affecting normal human gastric epithelial cell line-1 viability. In LNCaP prostate cancer cells, 1C triggered apoptosis via Bcl-2 family-mediated mitochondria pathway, downregulated expression of mouse double minute 2, upregulated expression of p53 and stimulated ROS production. ROS scavenger, N-acetylcysteine, can attenuate 1C-induced apoptosis. 1C also inhibited the proliferation of LNCaP cells through inhibition on Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Conclusion: 1C shows obvious anticancer activity based on inducing cell apoptosis by Bcl-2 family-mediated mitochondria pathway and ROS production, inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. These findings demonstrate that 1C may provide leads as a potential agent for cancer therapy. Keywords: 1C, AD-2, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, Wnt/β-catenin pathway

  13. In Vitro Anticancer Activity of a Nonpolar Fraction from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb. Makino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yantao Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gynostemma pentaphyllum (Thunb. Makino (GpM has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. Most previous studies have focused primarily on polar fractions of GpM for anticancer activities. In this study, a nonpolar fraction EA1.3A from GpM showed potent growth inhibitory activities against four cancer cell lines with IC50 ranging from 31.62 μg/mL to 38.02 μg/mL. Furthermore, EA1.3A also inhibited the growth of breast cancer cell MDA-MB-453 time-dependently, as well as its colony formation ability. EA1.3A induced apoptosis on MDA-MB-453 cells both dose-dependently and time-dependently as analyzed by flow cytometry and verified by western blotting analysis of apoptosis marker cleaved nuclear poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (cPARP. Additionally, EA1.3A induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Chemical components analysis of EA1.3A by GC-MS revealed that this nonpolar fraction from GpM contains 10 compounds including four alkaloids, three organic esters, two terpenes, and one catechol substance, and all these compounds have not been reported in GpM. In summary, the nonpolar fraction EA1.3A from GpM inhibited cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and regulation of cell cycle progression. Our study shed light on new chemical bases for the anticancer activities of GpM and feasibilities to develop new anticancer agents from this widely used medicinal plant.

  14. The effect of ultrasonificated extracts of Spirulina maxima on the anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung-Ho; Ahn, Juhee; Kang, Do-Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Yong

    2011-04-01

    The effect of ultrasonic extraction on extraction yields, cytotoxicity, and anticancer activity of Spirulina maxima was investigated in this study. Optimal extraction conditions were determined as 60 kHz frequency at 60°C for 30 min with 120 W intensity, which resulted in 19.3% of extraction yields and 19.1% of cytotoxicity on normal human cells. Yields from conventional water and ethanol extraction were 15.8% at 100°C and 8.3% at 80°C, respectively. It was found that the extracts obtained by ultrasonic extraction process selectively inhibited the digestive-related cancer cell lines, such as human stomach cancer cells, having 89% of the highest inhibition ratio and 4.5 of the highest selectivity. In adding 0.5 mg/mL of the extract, human promyelocytic leukemia cells' cell differentiation was increased 1.72 times over that of the control. Expression level of B cell lymphoma-2 from Hep3B cell was also effectively suppressed by the extract obtained at 60 kHz and 60°C, leading to the inhibition of the early step of carcinogenesis. This work suggests that anticancer activity of the extracts is due to water-soluble polysaccharides rather than proteins and is further supported by the result that the ultrasonification extraction process can efficiently extract relatively intact polysaccharides rather than digesting the proteins in S. maxima by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight and high performance size exclusion chromatography chromatogram analyses. Therefore, ultrasonic extraction increases both extraction yield and the biological activity of S. maxima extracts, which might be useful as an alternative natural anticancer agent in the medical and food industries.

  15. Surface decoration by Spirulina polysaccharide enhances the cellular uptake and anticancer efficacy of selenium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fang Yang1*, Quanming Tang1,2*, Xueyun Zhong3, Yan Bai1, Tianfeng Chen1, Yibo Zhang1, Yinghua Li1, Wenjie Zheng11Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China; 2South China Seas Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, China; 3Department of Pathology, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: A simple and solution-phase method for functionalization of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs with Spirulina polysaccharides (SPS has been developed in the present study. The cellular uptake and anticancer activity of SPS-SeNPs were also evaluated. Monodisperse and homogeneous spherical SPS-SeNPs with diameters ranging from 20 nm to 50 nm were achieved under optimized conditions, which were stable in the solution phase for at least 3 months. SPS surface decoration significantly enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of SeNPs toward several human cancer cell lines. A375 human melanoma cells were found extremely susceptible to SPS-SeNPs with half maximal (50% inhibitory concentration value of 7.94 µM. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms revealed that SPS-SeNPs inhibited cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis, as evidenced by an increase in sub-G1 cell population, deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, chromatin condensation, and phosphatidylserine translocation. Results suggest that the strategy to use SPS as a surface decorator could be an effective way to enhance the cellular uptake and anticancer efficacy of nanomaterials. SPS-SeNPs may be a potential candidate for further evaluation as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent against human cancers.Keywords: selenium nanoparticles, Spirulina polysaccharide, cellular uptake, anticancer, apoptosis

  16. Anti-cancer effect of Scutellaria baicalensis in combination with cisplatin in human ovarian cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Yoon; Joo, Jong Cheon; Lee, Yeon Kyu; Jang, Ik-Soon; Park, Soo Jung; Park, Yoon Jung

    2017-05-25

    Ovarian cancer is one of the major causes of death among females in worldwide. Cisplatin is a primary anti-cancer drug against ovarian cancer, but the recurrent tumors after treatment frequently show acquired chemoresistance. Extract of Scutellaria baicalensis (SbE) has been reported to have functional compounds including baicalin, which has anti-cancer effects. However, the anti-cancer effects of SbE in ovarian cancer and its underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated that the effects of SbE and/or cisplatin on cell death in the cisplatin sensitive ovarian cancer cell line A2780 (CSC) and the counterpart cell line that has cisplatin resistance (CRC). Molecular mechanisms of the effects, focusing on apoptosis and autophagy, were examined. Treatment of cisplatin or SbE reduced cell viability significantly in CSC and too much lesser extent in CRC. Cisplatin-induced cell death in CSC was mediated by p53-induced apoptosis acompanied by expresson of damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM). In CRC, decreased DRAM expression (p cisplatin resistance. Treatment of SbE also induced cell death in CSC by p53-dependent apoptosis, not in CRC. Autophagy was not induced by neither cisplatin nor SbE. Intriguingly, the combinational treatment of SbE and cisplatin significantly decreased cell viability in CRC. The cell death was mediated by autophagy with increased expression of Atg5 and Atg12 (p cisplatin was effective in CRC, leading to cell death via Beclin1-independent autophagy, suggesting that SbE treatment in combination with cisplatin has a potential as a chemotherapeutic agent in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer.

  17. From body art to anticancer activities: perspectives on medicinal properties of henna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Rohan; Dandawate, Prasad; Vyas, Alok; Padhye, Subhash; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer; Ahmad, Aamir; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2012-12-01

    Nature has been a rich source of therapeutic agents for thousands of years and an impressive number of modern drugs have been isolated from natural sources based on the uses of these plants in traditional medicine. Henna is one such plant commonly known as Persian Henna or Lawsonia inermis, a bushy, flowering tree, commonly found in Australia, Asia and along the Mediterranean coasts of Africa. Paste made from the leaves of Henna plant has been used since the Bronze Age to dye skin, hairs and fingernails especially at the times of festivals. In recent times henna paste has been used for body art paintings and designs in western countries. Despite such widespread use in dyeing and body art painting, Henna extracts and constituents possess numerous biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anticancer activities. The active coloring and biologically active principle of Henna is found to be Lawsone (2- hydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone) which can serve as a starting building block for synthesizing large number of therapeutically useful compounds including Atovaquone, Lapachol and Dichloroallyl lawsone which have been shown to possess potent anticancer activities. Some other analogs of Lawsone have been found to exhibit other beneficial biological properties such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antitubercular and antimalarial. The ability of Lawsone to undergo the redox cycling and chelation of trace metal ions has been thought to be partially responsible for some of its biological activities. Despite such diverse biological properties and potent anticancer activities the compound has remained largely unexplored and hence in the present review we have summarized the chemistry and biological activities of Lawsone along with its analogs and metal complexes.

  18. Use of proteasome inhibitors in anticancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Schmitt

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to cellular function has brought it to the forefront in the search for new anticancer therapies. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has proven promising in targeting various human cancers. The approval of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib for clinical treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma has validated the ubiquitin-proteasome as a rational target. Bortezomib has shown positive results in clinical use but some toxicity and side effects, as well as resistance, have been observed, indicating that further development of novel, less toxic drugs is necessary. Because less toxic drugs are necessary and drug development can be expensive and time-consuming, using existing drugs that can target the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in new applications, such as cancer therapy, may be effective in expediting the regulatory process and bringing new drugs to the clinic. Toward this goal, previously approved drugs, such as disulfiram, as well as natural compounds found in common foods, such as green tea polyphenol (--EGCG and the flavonoid apigenin, have been investigated for their possible proteasome inhibitory and cell death inducing abilities. These compounds proved quite promising in preclinical studies and have now moved into clinical trials, with preliminary results that are encouraging. In addition to targeting the catalytic activity of the proteasome pathway, upstream regulators, such as the 19S regulatory cap, as well as E1, E2, and E3, are now being investigated as potential drug targets. This review outlines the development of novel proteasome inhibitors from preclinical to clinical studies, highlighting their abilities to inhibit the tumor proteasome and induce apoptosis in several human cancers.

  19. Chloroquine potentiates the anti-cancer effect of 5-fluorouracil on colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kazuhito; Hiyoshi, Masaya; Kaneko, Manabu; Kitayama, Joji; Takahashi, Koki; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Tsuno, Nelson H; Sunami, Eiji; Tsurita, Giichiro; Kawai, Kazushige; Okaji, Yurai; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Shuno, Yasutaka; Hongo, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), the worldwide used anti-malarial drug, has recently being focused as a potential anti-cancer agent as well as a chemosensitizer when used in combination with anti-cancer drugs. It has been shown to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cell death in various types of cancer. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the chemotherapeutic agent of first choice in colorectal cancer, but in most cases, resistance to 5-FU develops through various mechanisms. Here, we focused on the combination of CQ as a mechanism to potentiate the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, and their proliferative ability, apoptosis and autophagy induction effects, and the affection of the cell cycle were evaluated. The proliferative ability of HT-29 was analyzed by the MTS assay. Apoptosis was quantified by flow-cytometry after double-staining of the cells with AnnexinV/PI. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow-cytometry after staining of cells with PI. Autophagy was quantified by flow-cytometry and Western blot analysis. Finally, to evaluate the fate of the cells treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, the colony formation assay was performed. 5-FU inhibited the proliferative activity of HT-29 cells, which was mostly dependent on the arrest of the cells to the G0/G1-phase but also partially on apoptosis induction, and the effect was potentiated by CQ pre-treatment. The potentiation of the inhibitory effect of 5-FU by CQ was dependent on the increase of p21 Cip1 and p27 Kip1 and the decrease of CDK2. Since CQ is reported to inhibit autophagy, the catabolic process necessary for cell survival under conditions of cell starvation or stress, which is induced by cancer cells as a protective mechanism against chemotherapeutic agents, we also analyzed the induction of autophagy in HT-29. HT-29 induced autophagy in response to 5-FU, and CQ inhibited this induction, a possible mechanism of the potentiation of the anti-cancer effect of 5-FU. Our

  20. Agent Building Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    AgentBuilder is a software component developed under an SBIR contract between Reticular Systems, Inc., and Goddard Space Flight Center. AgentBuilder allows software developers without experience in intelligent agent technologies to easily build software applications using intelligent agents. Agents are components of software that will perform tasks automatically, with no intervention or command from a user. AgentBuilder reduces the time and cost of developing agent systems and provides a simple mechanism for implementing high-performance agent systems.