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Sample records for antibody-functionalized single-walled carbon

  1. Detecting Lyme Disease Using Antibody-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Mitchell B; Goldsmith, Brett R; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2013-01-01

    We examined the potential of antibody-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) for use as a fast and accurate sensor for a Lyme disease antigen. Biosensors were fabricated on oxidized silicon wafers using chemical vapor deposition grown carbon nanotubes that were functionalized using diazonium salts. Attachment of Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme) flagellar antibodies to the nanotubes was verified by Atomic Force Microscopy and electronic measurements. A reproducible shift in the turn-off voltage of the semiconducting SWNT FETs was seen upon incubation with Borrelia burgdorferi flagellar antigen, indicative of the nanotube FET being locally gated by the residues of flagellar protein bound to the antibody. This sensor effectively detected antigen in buffer at concentrations as low as 1 ng/ml, and the response varied strongly over a concentration range coinciding with levels of clinical interest. Generalizable binding chemistry gives this biosensing platform the potential to...

  2. Superconductivity in single wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Yavari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   By using Greens function method we first show that the effective interaction between two electrons mediated by plasmon exchange can become attractive which in turn can lead to superconductivity at a high critical temperature in a singl wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. The superconducting transition temperature Tc for the SWCNT (3,3 obtained by this mechanism agrees with the recent experimental result. We also show as the radius of SWCNT increases, plasmon frequency becomes lower and leads to lower Tc.

  3. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekchang, SRC; Govindaraj, A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes. The purified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been characterised by low-angle X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spect...

  4. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  5. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R C Vivekchand; A Govindaraj

    2003-10-01

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized singlewalled carbon nanotubes. The purified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been characterised by low-angle X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Enhancement of semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes photoluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Gaufrès, Etienne; Izard, Nicolas; Vivien, Laurent; Kazaoui, Saïd; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric

    2009-01-01

    International audience Photoluminescence properties of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWNT) thin films with different metallic single wall carbon nanotubes (m-SWNT) concentrations are reported. s-SWNT purified samples are obtained by polymer assisted selective extraction. We show that a few m-SWNT in the sample generates a drastic quenching of the emission. Therefore, highly purified s-SWNT films are a strongly luminescent material and a good candidate for future applications in...

  7. Photophysics of polymer-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J; Loi, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are successfully dispersed in two conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2’-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV) solutions. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in the near-infrare

  8. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Ciudad Universitaria, Codigo Postal 04510, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Magana, L.F., E-mail: fernando@fisica.unam.m [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Codigo Postal 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Arellano, J.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco. Avenida San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas Codigo Postal 02200, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-06

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H{sub 2}). Nitrogen coverage was C{sub 8}N.

  9. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  10. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  11. Chromatographic size separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesberg, G. S.; Muster, J.; Krstic, V.; Burghard, M.; Roth, S.

    The efficient purification of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is reported. Carbon nanospheres, metal particles, and amorphous carbon could be successfully removed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) applied to surfactant stabilised dispersions of SWNT raw material. In addition, length separation of the tubes was achieved. The SWNTs obtained can be adsorbed in high densities onto chemically modified substrates. As determined by AFM investigations, the purified material consists of about equal fractions of both individual SWNTS and ropes of SWNTs.

  12. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a graphene helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Kap; Lee, Sohyung; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Min, Bong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Il; Lee, Kyung-Il; An, Kay Hyeok; John, Phillip

    2014-08-27

    Evidence is presented in this paper that certain single-wall carbon nanotubes are not seamless tubes, but rather adopt a graphene helix resulting from the spiral growth of a nano-graphene ribbon. The residual traces of the helices are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The analysis also shows that the tubular graphene material may exhibit a unique armchair structure and the chirality is not a necessary condition for the growth of carbon nanotubes. The description of the structure of the helical carbon nanomaterials is generalized using the plane indices of hexagonal space groups instead of using chiral vectors. It is also proposed that the growth model, via a graphene helix, results in a ubiquitous structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:24838196

  13. Production of single-walled carbon nanotube grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Robert H; Xu, Ya-Qiong; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-12-03

    A method of forming a nanotube grid includes placing a plurality of catalyst nanoparticles on a grid framework, contacting the catalyst nanoparticles with a gas mixture that includes hydrogen and a carbon source in a reaction chamber, forming an activated gas from the gas mixture, heating the grid framework and activated gas, and controlling a growth time to generate a single-wall carbon nanotube array radially about the grid framework. A filter membrane may be produced by this method.

  14. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Rachel M [ORNL; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Glass-Mattie, Dana F [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Saxton, Arnold [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Donnel, Robert L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may be pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  15. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Rachel M [ORNL; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Glass-Mattie, Dana F [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Saxton, Arnold [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Donnel, Robert L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  16. Quantitative optical imaging of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Lihong H.

    The development and application of optical imaging tools and probing techniques have been the subject of exciting research. These tools and techniques allow for non-invasive, simple sample preparation and relatively fast measurement of electronic and optical properties. They also provided crucial information on optoelectronic device application and development. As the field of nanostructure research emerged, they were modified and employed to understand various properties of these structures at the diffraction limit of light. Carbon nanotubes, up to hundreds of micrometers long and several nanometers thin, are perfect for testing and demonstrating newly-developed optical measurement platforms for individual nanostructures, due to their heterogeneous nature. By employing two quantitative imaging techniques, wide-field on-chip Rayleigh scattering spectroscopy and spatial modulation confocal absorption microscopy, we investigate the optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes. These techniques allow us to obtain the Rayleigh scattering intensity, absolute absorption cross section, spatial resolution, and spectral information of single-walled carbon nanotubes. By probing the optical resonance of hundreds of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a single measurement, the first technique utilizes Rayleigh scattering mechanism to obtain the chirality of carbon nanotubes. The second technique, by using high numerical aperture oil immersion objective lenses, we measure the absolute absorption cross section of a single-walled carbon nanotube. Combining all the quantitative values obtained from these techniques, we observe various interesting and recently discovered physical behaviors, such as long range optical coupling and universal optical conductivity on resonance, and demonstrate the possibility of accurate quantitative absorption measurement for individual structures at nanometer scale.

  17. Reinforcement of Epoxies Using Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Sharma, Jitendra; Chatterjee, Tirtha

    2008-03-01

    The reinforcement of bisphenol-A and bisphenol-F epoxies using single walled carbon nanotubes has been approached experimentally by understanding the nature of interactions between the matrices and nanotubes. Unassisted dispersions of single walled carbon nanotubes in epoxies were studied by a combination of radiation scattering (elastic small angle scattering and inelastic scattering), DSC based glass transition determination, melt rheology and solid-state mechanical testing in order to understand and correlate changes in local and global dynamics to the tailoring of composite mechanical properties. Significant changes in the glass transition temperature of the matrix can successfully account for changes in the viscoelastic properties of the epoxy dispersions for concentrations below the percolation threshold, while above the percolation threshold the network superstructure formed by the nanotubes controls the viscoelastic properties.

  18. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible Electronics and Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuyun SUN; Yugang SUN

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the use of electronic quality single-walled carbon nanotubes grown via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) approaches at high temperatures as building blocks for fabricating flexible field-effect devices, such as thin-film transistors (TFTs) and chemical sensors. Dry transfer printing technique is developed for forming films of CVD nanotubes on low-temperature plastic substrates. Examples of TFTs with the use of nanotubes and thin dielectrics and hydrogen sensors with the use of nanotubes decorated with palladium nanoparticles are discussed in detail to demonstrate the promising potentiality of single-walled carbon nanotubes for building high performance flexible devices, which can find applications where traditional devices on rigid substrates are not suitable.

  19. Thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotube crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Li-Jun; Liu Ji; Liu Zheng; Qiu Cai-Yu; Zhou Hai-Qing; Sun Lian-Feng

    2011-01-01

    In this work,the thermal properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) crystal are studied. The thermal conductivity of the SWCNT crystal is found to have a linear dependence on temperature in the temperature range from 1.9 K to 100.0 K. In addition,a peak (658 W/mK) is found at a temperature of about 100.0 K. The thermal conductivity decreases gradually to a value of 480 W/mK and keeps almost a constant in the temperature range from 100.0 K to 300.0 K. Meanwhile,the specific heat shows an obvious linear relationship with temperature in the temperature range from 1.9 K to 300.0 K. We discuss the possible mechanisms for these unique thermal properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube crystal.

  20. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  1. Material and structural instabilities of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Wu; K. C. Hwang; J. Song; Y. Huang

    2008-01-01

    The nonlinear atomistic interactions usually involve softening behavior. Instability resulting directly from this softening are called the material instability, while those unrelated to this softening are called the structural instability. We use the finite-deformation shell theory based on the interatomic potential to show that the tension instability of single-wall carbon nanotubes is the material instability, while the compression and torsion instabilities are structural instability.

  2. Transparent, conductive and flexible single-walled carbon nanotube films

    OpenAIRE

    Kaskela, Antti

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks have a large application potential for future electronics as transparent conductive films. SWCNT networks (SWCNT-N) offer improved flexibility when compared to the current industry standard transparent conductive films (TCF), an example of which is indium tin oxide (ITO). SWCNTs can be synthesised from abundant raw materials, whereas indium supply is limited and has been a target of aggressive trade policies, thus increasing supply risks and price v...

  3. Crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes/polyvinylidene fluoride composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing; Iftekharul Haque, Rubaiyet; Larsen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were purified and functionalized by nitric acid and octadecylamine. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the functionalization of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. Polyvinylidene flouride nanocomposites containing 1 wt......% purified or functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared by solution blending and injection molding. The dispersion of different carbon nanotubes in dimethylformamide and in polyvinylidene flouride has been investigated. Mechanical properties show that adding single-walled carbon nanotubes...

  4. Improvements in Production of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development has been directed toward improvement of a prior batch process in which single-walled carbon nanotubes are formed by catalytic disproportionation of carbon monoxide in a fluidized-bed reactor. The overall effect of the improvements has been to make progress toward converting the process from a batch mode to a continuous mode and to scaling of production to larger quantities. Efforts have also been made to optimize associated purification and dispersion post processes to make them effective at large scales and to investigate means of incorporating the purified products into composite materials. The ultimate purpose of the program is to enable the production of high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes in quantities large enough and at costs low enough to foster the further development of practical applications. The fluidized bed used in this process contains mixed-metal catalyst particles. The choice of the catalyst and the operating conditions is such that the yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes, relative to all forms of carbon (including carbon fibers, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and graphite) produced in the disproportionation reaction is more than 90 weight percent. After the reaction, the nanotubes are dispersed in various solvents in preparation for end use, which typically involves blending into a plastic, ceramic, or other matrix to form a composite material. Notwithstanding the batch nature of the unmodified prior fluidized-bed process, the fluidized-bed reactor operates in a continuous mode during the process. The operation is almost entirely automated, utilizing mass flow controllers, a control computer running software specific to the process, and other equipment. Moreover, an important inherent advantage of fluidized- bed reactors in general is that solid particles can be added to and removed from fluidized beds during operation. For these reasons, the process and equipment were amenable to

  5. Photophysics of polymer-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, J.; Loi, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are successfully dispersed in two conjugated polymer poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2’-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV) solutions. Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in the near-infrared and visible spectral regions are used to study the interaction of the dispersed carbon nanotube and the wrapped polymer in the nano-hybrids. The SWNTs infrared emission is the signatures of the s...

  6. Photoinduced Absorption within Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Glanzmann, Livia Noëmi; Mowbray, Duncan John; del Valle, Diana Gisell Figueroa; Scotognella, Francesco; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Rubio, Angel

    2016-01-01

    We study the photoabsorption properties of photoactive bulk polymer/ fullerene/nanotube heterojunctions in the near-infrared region. By combining pump-probe spectroscopy and linear response time-dependent density functional theory within the random phase approximation (TDDFT-RPA) we elucidate the excited state dynamics of the $E_{11}$ transition within (6,5) and (7,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and combined with poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C$_{61}$-buty...

  7. Neon adsorption on oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Migone, Aldo; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio

    2012-02-01

    We will present the results of a study of neon adsorption on oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns. Our adsorption isotherm measurements were conducted at temperatures below 24.5 K, the triple point for Ne. Results for the effective specific surface area and for the effective pore volume of the nanohorn aggregates will be presented. We will also report on the sorbent-loading dependence of the isosteric heat of neon on the nanohorns, and on the binding energy. Our results for this system will be compared with those obtained for Ne on a sample of dahlia-like nanohorns annealed at 520 K.

  8. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/PMMA Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fangming; Fisher, John; Winey, Karen

    2003-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have demonstrated unique mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Similar properties are expected for polymer/SWNT nanocomposites. A new processing method has been used to produce PMMA/SWNT composites, which provides better dispersion of SWNT in the polymer matrix. Optical microscopy of the samples show improved dispersion of SWNT in the PMMA matrix, which is the key factor of the composite performance. Aligned and unaligned composite samples have been made for both purified SWNT and functionalized SWNT with different SWNT loadings. The tensile, thermal conductivity, and electroconductivity measurements of these samples will be performed.

  9. Zinc oxide catalyzed growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate that zinc oxide can catalyze the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with high efficiency by a chemical vapor deposition process. The zinc oxide nanocatalysts, prepared using a diblock copolymer templating method and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), were uniformly spaced over a large deposition area with an average diameter of 1.7 nm and narrow size distribution. Dense and uniform SWNTs films with high quality were obtained by using a zinc oxide catalyst, as characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, AFM, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

  10. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  11. Ultra-short suspended single-wall carbon nanotube transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Island, J. O.; Tayari, V.; Yigen, S.; McRae, A. C.; Champagne, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method to fabricate clean suspended single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transistors hosting a single quantum dot ranging in length from a few 10s of nm down to $\\approx$ 3 nm. We first align narrow gold bow-tie junctions on top of individual SWCNTs and suspend the devices. We then use a feedback-controlled electromigration to break the gold junctions and expose nm-sized sections of SWCNTs. We measure electron transport in these devices at low temperature and show that they form ...

  12. Biodegradation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Eosinophil Peroxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Andõn, F. T.; Kapralov, A A; Yanamala, N.; Feng, W.; Baygan, Arjang; Chambers, B.J.; Hultenby, K.; Ye, Fei; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Brandner, B. D.; Fornara, Andrea; Klein-Seetharaman, J.; Kotchey, G. P.; Star, A.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is one of the major oxidant-producing enzymes during inflammatory states in the human lung. The degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) upon incubation with human EPO and H2O 2 is reported. Biodegradation of SWCNTs is higher in the presence of NaBr, but neither EPO alone nor H2O2 alone caused the degradation of nanotubes. Molecular modeling reveals two binding sites for SWCNTs on EPO, one located at the proximal side (same side as the catalytic site)...

  13. Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes as Electrode Materials for Supercapacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bina; WU Feng; WANG Fang; CHEN Shi; CAO Gao-Ping; YANG Yu-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) prepared by electric arc discharge method and a mixture of NiO and Y2O3 as catalyst have been used as electrode materials for supercapacitors. N2 adsorption/desorption measurement shows that the SWNT is a microporous and mesoporous material with specific surface area 435 m2g1.Thespecific capacitance of the nitric acid treated SWNT in aqueous electrolyte reaches as high as 105 F/g, which is a combination of electric double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. The SWNT-based capacitors also have good charge/discharge reversibility and cycling perdurability.

  14. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S11, S22 and M11 transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ0 of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes

  15. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battie, Y., E-mail: yann.battie@univ-lorraine.fr [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Jamon, D. [Université de Lyon, Université Jean Monnet, EA 3523, Laboratoire Télécom Claude Chappe, 25 rue du Dr Rémy Annino, 42000 Saint Etienne (France); Lauret, J.S. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, UPR 3321, ENS Cachan, 94245 Cachan (France); Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M. [FOTON, UMR 6082, INSA, Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, 35043 Rennes (France); En Naciri, A. [LCP-A2MC, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, 1 Bd Arago, 57070 Metz (France); Loiseau, A. [Laboratoire d' étude des microstructures, ONERA-CNRS UMR 104, 29 Av. de la Division Leclerc, 92322 Chatillon (France)

    2014-11-28

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S{sub 11}, S{sub 22} and M{sub 11} transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ{sub 0} of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes.

  16. Elastic Properties of the Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.B. Protsenko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the elastic properties of two main types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (armchair and zigzag were simulated by analytical molecular mechanics models. The aim of this work is investigation and comparison of Young’s modulus, shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio variations of different types of tubes as functions of diameter. We obtained a set of closed-form expressions for the size-dependent elastic properties of armchair (n, n and zigzag (n, 0 tubes, which are basic for constructing mathematical models. Using those models elastic properties of single-walled nanotubes were evaluated. It was predicted that zigzag tube is more sensitive to chirality then armchair. Young’s and shear modules of both tubes were decreasing with diameter increasing. Poisson’s ratio was ranging from 0.16 to 0.29 and from 0.32 to 0.42 for an armchair and zigzag tubes respectively, but it was independent on chirality. It can be seen that predicted values of elastic characteristics for zigzag tube are larger then that for armchair tube, especially for smaller tubes. Results of this research can be used for design, analysis and evaluating of functioning and creating new materials based on carbon nanotubes.

  17. Center for Applications of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel E

    2008-02-21

    This report describes the activities conducted under a Congressional Direction project whose goal was to develop applications for Single-walled carbon nanotubes, under the Carbon Nanotube Technology Center (CANTEC), a multi-investigator program that capitalizes on OU’s advantageous position of having available high quality carbon nanotubes. During the first phase of CANTEC, 11 faculty members and their students from the College of Engineering developed applications for carbon nanotubes by applying their expertise in a number of areas: Catalysis, Reaction Engineering, Nanotube synthesis, Surfactants, Colloid Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Tissue Engineering, Biosensors, Biochemical Engineering, Cell Biology, Thermal Transport, Composite Materials, Protein synthesis and purification, Molecular Modeling, Computational Simulations. In particular, during this phase, the different research groups involved in CANTEC made advances in the tailoring of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) of controlled diameter and chirality by Modifying Reaction Conditions and the Nature of the catalyst; developed kinetic models that quantitatively describe the SWNT growth, created vertically oriented forests of SWNT by varying the density of metal nanoparticles catalyst particles, and developed novel nanostructured SWNT towers that exhibit superhydrophobic behavior. They also developed molecular simulations of the growth of Metal Nanoparticles on the surface of SWNT, which may have applications in the field of fuell cells. In the area of biomedical applications, CANTEC researchers fabricated SWNT Biosensors by a novel electrostatic layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition method, which may have an impact in the control of diabetes. They also functionalized SWNT with proteins that retained the protein’s biological activity and also retained the near-infrared light absorbance, which finds applications in the treatment of cancer.

  18. Single wall carbon nanotubes and their electrical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛增泉; 刘惟敏; 侯士敏; 施祖进; 顾镇南; 刘虹雯; 赵兴钰; 张兆祥; 吴绵雷; 彭练矛; 吴全德

    2000-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized and purified. A water colloid of SWCNTs was prepared and used to assemble SWCNTs onto a gold film surface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images showed that short SWCNTs stood on gold film surfaces. Using STM tips made of SWCNTs, a crystal grain image of a gold thin film and an atomic resolution image of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were successfully obtained. The electrical properties of short SWCNTs, which stood on the surface of gold film, were measured using STM. That SWCNTs stand on gold thin films is a promising technique for studying structures and properties of carbon nanotubes, as well as assembling and fabricating high-intensity coherent electron sources, field emission flat panel display, tips for scanning probe microscopes, new nanoelectronic devices, etc.

  19. On the vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arghavan, S.; Singh, A. V.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a detailed numerical study on the free and forced vibrations of single walled carbon nanotubes is presented. A simple and straightforward method developed such that the proximity of the mathematical model to the actual atomic structure of the nanotube is significantly retained, is used for this purpose. Both zigzag and armchair chiralities of the carbon nanotubes for clamped-free and clamped-clamped boundary conditions are analyzed and their natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are obtained. Results pertaining to axial, bending, and torsional modes of vibration are reported with discussions. These modes of vibration appear in the eigen-values and eigen-vectors without any distinction. The direct integration method by Newmark is used extensively along with the fast Fourier transform to identify different types of vibrational modes. In the case of zigzag nanotubes, the axial, bending, and torsional modes appear to be decoupled, whereas the armchair nanotubes show coupling between such modes.

  20. Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the growth of the global economy and population, the demand for energy is increasing sharply. The development of environmentally a benign and reliable energy supply is very important and urgent. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs, which have a horn-shaped tip at the top of single-walled nanotube, have emerged as exceptionally promising nanomaterials due to their unique physical and chemical properties since 1999. The high purity and thermal stability, combined with microporosity and mesoporosity, high surface area, internal pore accessibility, and multiform functionalization make SWCNHs promising candidates in many applications, such as environment restoration, gas storage, catalyst support or catalyst, electrochemical biosensors, drug carrier systems, magnetic resonance analysis and so on. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of SWCNHs in energy applications, including energy conversion and storage. The commonly adopted method to access SWCNHs, their structural modifications, and their basic properties are included, and the emphasis is on their application in different devices such as fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors, Li-ion batteries, Li-S batteries, hydrogen storage, biofuel cells and so forth. Finally, a perspective on SWCNHs’ application in energy is presented.

  1. Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Landi, Brian J.; Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer solar cells has been conducted towards developing alternative lightweight, flexible devices for space power applications. Photovoltaic devices were constructed with regioregular poly(3-octylthiophene)-(P3OT) and purified, >95% w/w, laser-generated SWNTs. The P3OT composites were deposited on ITO-coated polyethylene terapthalate (PET) and I-V characterization was performed under simulated AM0 illumination. Fabricated devices for the 1.0% w/w SWNT-P3OT composites showed a photoresponse with an open-circuit voltage (V(sub oc)) of 0.98 V and a short-circuit current density (I(sub sc)) of 0.12 mA/sq cm. Optimization of carrier transport within these novel photovoltaic systems is proposed, specifically development of nanostructure-SWNT complexes to enhance exciton dissociation.

  2. Vertical semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube Schottky diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sunghwan [Dankook University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    This paper presents a vertical semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (s-SWCNT)-based Schottky device. For the first time, the author successfully demonstrated a vertical s-SWCNT Schottky diode on an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template. In the vertical pores of an AAO template s-SWCNTs were vertically grown and aligned. The vertical growth of s-SWCNTs inside the pores was achieved by successfully isolating the catalyst at the bottom of the pores by using redeposition enabled angled ion milling. The ends of the grown s-SWCNTs were coated with palladium and titanium to form Schottky and Ohmic contacts, respectively. The I-V characteristics of the vertical s-SWCNT paths engaging the Schottky and Ohmic contacts well demonstrated Schottky diode rectification.

  3. Laser ablation process for single-walled carbon nanotube production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    Different types of lasers are now routinely used to prepare single-walled carbon nanotubes. The original method developed by researchers at Rice University used a "double-pulse laser oven" process. Several researchers have used variations of the lasers to include one-laser pulse (green or infrared), different pulse widths (ns to micros as well as continuous wave), and different laser wavelengths (e.g., CO2, or free electron lasers in the near to far infrared). Some of these variations are tried with different combinations and concentrations of metal catalysts, buffer gases (e.g., helium), oven temperatures, flow conditions, and even different porosities of the graphite targets. This article is an attempt to cover all these variations and their relative merits. Possible growth mechanisms under these different conditions will also be discussed.

  4. Synthesis and Hydrogen Storage in Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by a hydrogen arc discharge method. A high yield of gram quantity of SWNTs per hour was achieved. Tow kinds of SWNT products: web-like substance and thin films in large slices were obtained. Results of resonant Raman scattering measurements indicate that the SWNTs prepared have a wider diameter distribution and a larger mean diameter. Hydrogen uptake measurements of the two kinds of SWNT samples (both as prepared and pretreated) were carried out using a high pressure volumetric method,respectively. And a hydrogen storage capacity of 4 wt pct could be repeatedly achieved for the suitably pretreated SWNTs, which indicates that SWNTs may be a promising hydrogen storage material.

  5. Pressure effects on single wall carbon nanotube bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teredesai, P.V. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Physics; Sood, A.K. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Physics; Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur Campus, Jakkur (India); Sharma, S.M.; Karmakar, S.; Sikka, S.K. [High Pressure Physics Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India); Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C.N.R. [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur Campus, Jakkur (India)

    2001-01-01

    We report high pressure Raman studies on single wall carbon nanotube bundles under hydrostatic conditions using two different pressure transmitting media, alcohol mixture and pure water. The radial and tangential modes show a blue shift when SWNT bundle is immersed in the liquids at ambient pressures. The pressure dependence of the radial modes is the same in both liquids. However, the pressure derivatives d{omega}/dP of the tangential modes are slightly higher for the water medium. Raman results are compared with studies under non-hydrostatic conditions and with recent high-pressure X-ray studies. It is seen that the mode frequencies of the recovered sample after pressure cycling from 26 GPa are downshifted by {proportional_to}7-10 cm{sup -1} as compared to the starting sample. (orig.)

  6. The synthesis and filling of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrichs, S

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the synthesis, properties and application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The two main objectives of the work were the development of a continuous-flow synthesis of SWNTs, using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques, and the application of the hollow SWNTs as moulds for the study of the crystallisation behaviour of inorganic materials in the confined space of their inner cavity. The latter study was mainly performed by interpreting high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images of the filled SWNTs. A so-called focal series restoration approach, which enhances the resolution of the images and thereby increases the information content, was employed where possible. Chapter I reviews the previous work in the field of SWNTs and introduces their basic structure, symmetry, physical and mechanical properties and the common methods of SWNT synthesis. The chapter ends with an overview of the techniques used in the present work for the characterisation of c...

  7. Radiation Protection Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M.; Lu, Meng; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca; Leonard, Ashley; Doyle, Condell Dewayne; Kosynkin, Dimitry V.; Price, Brandi Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This invention is a means of radiation protection, or cellular oxidative stress mitigation, via a sequence of quenching radical species using nano-engineered scaffolds, specifically single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their derivatives. The material can be used as a means of radiation protection by reducing the number of free radicals within, or nearby, organelles, cells, tissue, organs, or living organisms, thereby reducing the risk of damage to DNA and other cellular components (i.e., RNA, mitochondria, membranes, etc.) that can lead to chronic and/or acute pathologies, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular disease, immuno-suppression, and disorders of the central nervous system. In addition, this innovation could be used as a prophylactic or antidote for accidental radiation exposure, during high-altitude or space travel where exposure to radiation is anticipated, or to protect from exposure from deliberate terrorist or wartime use of radiation- containing weapons.

  8. Printable Thin Film Supercapacitors Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kaempgen, Martti

    2009-05-13

    Thin film supercapacitors were fabricated using printable materials to make flexible devices on plastic. The active electrodes were made from sprayed networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) serving as both electrodes and charge collectors. Using a printable aqueous gel electrolyte as well as an organic liquid electrolyte, the performances of the devices show very high energy and power densities (6 W h/kg for both electrolytes and 23 and 70 kW/kg for aqueous gel electrolyte and organic electrolyte, respectively) which is comparable to performance in other SWCNT-based supercapacitor devices fabricated using different methods. The results underline the potential of printable thin film supercapacitors. The simplified architecture and the sole use of printable materials may lead to a new class of entirely printable charge storage devices allowing for full integration with the emerging field of printed electronics. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  9. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Kumta, Prashant; Maranchi, Jeff; Heben, Mike

    2006-01-01

    In recent experiments, highly purified batches of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have shown promise as superior alternatives to the graphitic carbon-black anode materials heretofore used in rechargeable thin-film lithium power cells. The basic idea underlying the experiments is that relative to a given mass of graphitic carbon-black anode material, an equal mass of SWCNTs can be expected to have greater lithium-storage and charge/discharge capacities. The reason for this expectation is that whereas the microstructure and nanostructure of a graphitic carbon black is such as to make most of the interior of the material inaccessible for intercalation of lithium, a batch of SWCNTs can be made to have a much more open microstructure and nanostructure, such that most of the interior of the material is accessible for intercalation of lithium. Moreover, the greater accessibility of SWCNT structures can be expected to translate to greater mobilities for ion-exchange processes and, hence, an ability to sustain greater charge and discharge current densities.

  10. Purification Procedures for Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Olga P.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the comparison of a variety of procedures used to purify carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotube material is produced by the arc process and laser oven process. Most of the procedures are tested using laser-grown, single-wall nanotube (SWNT) material. The material is characterized at each step of the purification procedures by using different techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The identified impurities are amorphous and graphitic carbon, catalyst particle aggregates, fullerenes, and hydrocarbons. Solvent extraction and low-temperature annealing are used to reduce the amount of volatile hydrocarbons and dissolve fullerenes. Metal catalysts and amorphous as well as graphitic carbon are oxidized by reflux in acids including HCl, HNO3 and HF and other oxidizers such as H2O2. High-temperature annealing in vacuum and in inert atmosphere helps to improve the quality of SWNTs by increasing crystallinity and reducing intercalation.

  11. Amorphous carbon contamination monitoring and process optimization for single-walled carbon nanotube integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We detail the monitoring of amorphous carbon deposition during thermal chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes and propose a contamination-less process to integrate high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes into micro-electromechanical systems. The amorphous content is evaluated by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and by scanning/transmission electron microscopy. We show how properly chosen process parameters can lead to successful integration of single-walled nanotubes, enabling nano-electromechanical system synthesis

  12. Effect of chemical potential on the computer simulation of hydrogen storage in single walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hong; WANG Shaoqing; CHENG Huiming

    2004-01-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo molecular simulations were carried out for hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes. It was found that variations in chemical potential may result in a great change in the hydrogen storage capacity of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms of single-walled carbon nanotubes at 298.15 K were calculated using a modified chemical potential, and the result obtained is closer to the experimental results. By comparing the experimental and simulation results, it is proposed that chemical adsorption may exist for hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  13. Single-wall carbon nanotube chemical attachment at platinum electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Contés-de-Jesús, Enid J.; Lebrón-Colón, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Scibioh, M. Aulice; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2010-11-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) techniques were used to adsorb 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on platinum electrodes in order to obtain an amino-terminated SAM as the base for the chemical attachment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A physico-chemical, morphological and electrochemical characterizations of SWCNTs attached onto the modified Pt electrodes was done by using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The SWNTs/4-ATP/Pt surface had regions of small, medium, and large thickness of carbon nanotubes with heights of 100-200 nm, 700 nm to 1.5 μm, and 1.0-3.0 μm, respectively. Cyclic voltammetries (CVs) in sulfuric acid demonstrated that attachment of SWNTs on 4-ATP/Pt is markedly stable, even after 30 potential cycles. CV in ruthenium hexamine was similar to bare Pt electrodes, suggesting that SWNTs assembly is similar to a closely packed microelectrode array.

  14. Third Harmonic Generation from Aligned Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Darius T., Jr.

    Optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been extensively studied during the last decade, and much basic knowledge has been accumulated on how light emission, scattering, and absorption occur in the realm of linear optics. However, their nonlinear optical properties remain largely unexplored. Here, we have observed strong third harmonic generation from highly aligned SWCNTs with intense mid-infrared radiation. Through power dependent experiments, we have determined the absolute value of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, chi(3), of our SWCNT film to be 6.92 x 10--12 esu, which is three orders of magnitude larger than that of the fused silica reference sample we used. Furthermore, through polarization-dependent third harmonic generation experiments, all the nonzero tensor elements of chi(3) have also been extracted. The contribution of the weaker tensor elements to the overall chi (3) signal has been calculated to be approximately 1/6 of that of the dominant c3z zzz component. These results open up new possibilities for application of carbon nanotubes in optoelectronics.

  15. Single-wall carbon nanotube chemical attachment at platinum electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Contes-de-Jesus, Enid J. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, PO Box 23346, San Juan 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A. [NASA John H. Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States); Scibioh, M. Aulice [Department of Chemistry and Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, PO Box 23346, San Juan 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico); Cabrera, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.cabrera2@uprrp.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Advanced Nanoscale Materials, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, PO Box 23346, San Juan 00931-3346 (Puerto Rico)

    2010-11-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) techniques were used to adsorb 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on platinum electrodes in order to obtain an amino-terminated SAM as the base for the chemical attachment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A physico-chemical, morphological and electrochemical characterizations of SWCNTs attached onto the modified Pt electrodes was done by using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. The SWNTs/4-ATP/Pt surface had regions of small, medium, and large thickness of carbon nanotubes with heights of 100-200 nm, 700 nm to 1.5 {mu}m, and 1.0-3.0 {mu}m, respectively. Cyclic voltammetries (CVs) in sulfuric acid demonstrated that attachment of SWNTs on 4-ATP/Pt is markedly stable, even after 30 potential cycles. CV in ruthenium hexamine was similar to bare Pt electrodes, suggesting that SWNTs assembly is similar to a closely packed microelectrode array.

  16. Broadband Spectroscopic Thermoacoustic Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Bauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes have attracted interest as contrast agents for biomedical imaging because they strongly absorb electromagnetic radiation in the optical and microwave regions. This study applies thermoacoustic (TA imaging and spectroscopy to measure the frequency-dependent absorption profile of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT in the ranges of 2.7–3.1 GHz and 7–9 GHz using two tunable microwave sources. Between 7 and 9 GHz, the peak TA signal for solutions containing semiconducting and metallic SWNTs increased monotonically with a slope of 1.75 AU/GHz (R2=0.95 and 2.8 AU/GHz (R2=0.93, respectively, relative to a water baseline. However, after compensating for the background signal from water, it was revealed that the TA signal from metallic SWNTs increased exponentially within this frequency band. Results suggest that TA imaging and spectroscopy could be a powerful tool for quantifying the absorption properties of SWNTs and optimizing their performance as contrast agents for imaging or heat sources for thermal therapy.

  17. Synthesis, assembly, and applications of single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Koungmin

    This dissertation presents the synthesis and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, and their applications in both nano-electronics such as transistor and integrated circuits and macro-electronics in energy conversion devices as transparent conducting electrodes. Also, the high performance chemical sensor using metal oxide nanowire has been demonstrated. Chapter 1 presents a brief introduction of carbon nanotube, followed by discussion of a new synthesis technique using nanosphere lithography to grow highly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes atop quartz and sapphire substrates. This method offers great potential to produce carbon nanotube arrays with simultaneous control over the nanotube orientation, position, density, diameter and even chirality. Chapter 3 introduces the wafer-scale integration and assembly of aligned carbon nanotubes, including full-wafer scale synthesis and transfer of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays, and nanotube device fabrication on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors with high on-current density ˜ 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratio and CMOS integrated circuits. In addition, various chemical doping methods for n-type nanotube transistors are studied to fabricate CMOS integrated nanotube circuits such as inverter, NAND and NOR logic devices. Furthermore, defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR is proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes. Carbon nanotube flexible electronics and smart textiles for ubiquitous computing and sensing are demonstrated in chapter 4. A facile transfer printing technique has been introduced to transfer massively aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes from the original sapphire/quartz substrates to virtually any other substrates, including glass, silicon, polymer sheets, and even fabrics. The characterization of transferred nanotubes reveals that the transferred

  18. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states. PMID:27598112

  19. Sorting centimetre-long single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Woo Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Vu, Quoc An; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-08-01

    While several approaches have been developed for sorting metallic (m) or semiconducting (s) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the length of SWCNTs is limited within a micrometer, which restricts excellent electrical performances of SWCNTs for macro-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate a simple sorting method of centimetre-long aligned m- and s-SWCNTs. Ni particles were selectively and uniformly coated along the 1-cm-long m-SWCNTs by applying positive gate bias during electrochemical deposition with continuous electrolyte injection. To sort s-SWCNTs, the Ni coating was oxidized to form insulator outer for blocking of current flow through inner m-SWCNTs. Sorting of m-SWCNTs were demonstrated by selective etching of s-SWCNTs via oxygen plasma, while the protected m-SWCNTs by Ni coating remained intact. The series of source-drain pairs were patterned along the 1-cm-long sorted SWCNTs, which confirmed high on/off ratio of 104–108 for s-SWCNTs and nearly 1 for m-SWCNTs.

  20. Tuning Thermoelectric Properties of Chirality Selected Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Oshima, Yuki; Kitamura, Yoshimasa; Maniwa, Yutaka

    Thermoelectrics are a very important technology for efficiently converting waste heat into electric power. Hicks and Dresselhaus proposed an important approach to innovate the performance of thermoelectric devices, which involves using one-dimensional materials and properly tuning their Fermi level (PRB 1993). Therefore, understanding the relationship between the thermoelectric performance and the Fermi level of one-dimensional materials is of great importance to maximize their thermoelectric performance. Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is an ideal model for one-dimensional materials. Previously we reported continuous p-type and n-type control over the Seebeck coefficients of semiconducting SWCNT networks with diameter of 1.4 nm through an electric double layer transistor setup using an ionic liquid as the electrolyte (Yanagi et al., Nano Lett. 14, 6437 2014). We clarified the thermoelectric properties of semiconducting SWCNTs with diameter of 1.4 nm as a function of Fermi level. In this study, we investigated how the chiralities or electronic structures of SWCNTs influence on the thermoelectric properties. We found the significant difference in the line-shape of Seebeck coefficient as a function of gate voltage between the different electronic structures of SWCNTs.

  1. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  2. Hypergolic fuel detection using individual single walled carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate and reliable detection of hypergolic fuels such as hydrazine (N2H4) and its derivatives is vital to missile defense, aviation, homeland security, and the chemical industry. More importantly these sensors need to be capable of operation at low temperatures (below room temperature) as most of the widely used chemical sensors operate at high temperatures (above 300 deg. C). In this research a simple and highly sensitive single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network sensor was developed for real time monitoring of hydrazine leaks to concentrations at parts per million levels. Upon exposure to hydrazine vapor, the resistance of the air exposed nanotubes (p-type) is observed to increase rapidly while that of the vacuum-degassed nanotubes (n-type) is observed to decrease. It was found that the resistance of the sample can be recovered through vacuum pumping and exposure to ultraviolet light. The experimental results support the electrochemical charge transfer mechanism between the oxygen redox couple of the ambient and the Fermi level of the SWNT. Theoretical results of the hydrazine-SWNT interaction are compared with the experimental observations. It was found that a monolayer of water molecules on the SWNT is necessary to induce strong interactions between hydrazine and the SWNT by way of introducing new occupied states near the bottom of the conduction band of the SWNT.

  3. Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy of Unbundled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojic, G.; Zaric, S.; Kono, J.; Strano, M. S.; Moore, V. C.; Hauge, R. H.; Smalley, R. E.

    2004-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are currently under intensive investigation due to both interesting physical properties and possible applications. Owing to the recently developed method for separating bundled tubes [1], it is now possible to explore the true one-dimensional (1D) properties of SWNTs. We have used degenerate and nondegerenerate pump-probe measurements to probe the relaxation of photogenerated carriers in micelle suspended nanotubes prepared by this method. Degenerate pump-probe experiments in a wide range of the two lowest transition energies of semiconducting SWNTs show two distinct relaxation regimes. A fast relaxation component (0.3-1.2 ps) is always present whereas a slow component (5-20 ps) is resonantly enhanced whenever the pump photon energy coincides with an interband absorption peak. We attributed the fast relaxation to intraband carrier relaxation towards the band edge and the slow one to interband relaxation. Nondegenerate pump-probe experiments were performed to elucidate the details of these processes. [1] M. J. O'Connell et al., Science 297, 593 (2002). This work was supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation (through Grant No. C-1509), the Texas Advanced Technology Program (through Project No. 003604-0001-2001), and the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (through Grant No. DMR-0134058).

  4. Resonance Raman Optical Activity of Single Walled Chiral Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Péter R; Koltai, János; Surján, Péter R; Kürti, Jenő; Szabados, Ágnes

    2016-07-21

    Resonance (vibrational) Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of six chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied by theoretical means. Calculations are performed imposing line group symmetry. Polarizability tensors, computed at the π-electron level, are differentiated with respect to DFT normal modes to generate spectral intensities. This computational protocol yields a ROA spectrum in good agreement with the only experiment on SWCNT, available at present. In addition to the conventional periodic electric dipole operator we introduce magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole operators, suitable for conventional k-space calculations. Consequences of the complex nature of the wave function on the scattering cross section are discussed in detail. The resonance phenomenon is accounted for by the short time approximation. Involvement of fundamental vibrations in the region of the intermediate frequency modes is found to be more notable in ROA than in Raman spectra. Calculations indicate exceptionally strong resonance enhancement of SWCNT ROA signals. Resonance ROA profile of the (6,5) tube shows an interesting sign change that may be exploited experimentally for SWCNT identification. PMID:27315548

  5. Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyimide with Dispersed Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Gaier, James R.; Sola, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4- N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the Tg of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(exp -4) Scm(exp -1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed.

  6. Selective coherent phonon mode generation in single wall carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-01-01

    The ultrafast pulse-train technique is theoretically investigated to enhance a specific coherent phonon mode while suppressing the other phonon modes generated in single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). In particular, we focus on the selectivity of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and the G-band for a given SWNT. We find that if the repetition period matches with integer multiple of the RBM phonon period, the RBM amplitude could be enhanced while the amplitudes of the other modes are suppressed. As for the G-band, when we apply a repetition rate of half-integer multiple of the RBM period, the RBM could be suppressed because of destructive interference, while the G-band still survives. It is also possible to keep the G-band and suppress the RBM by applying a repetition rate that matches with integer multiple of the G-band phonon period. However, in this case we have to use a large number of laser pulses.

  7. Phonon and thermal properties of achiral single wall carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prapti Saxena; Sankar P Sanyal

    2006-08-01

    A detailed theoretical study of the phonon and thermal properties of achiral single wall carbon nanotubes has been carried out using force constant model considering up to third nearest-neighbor interactions. We have calculated the phonon dispersions, density of states, radial breathing modes (RBM) and the specific heats for various zigzag and armchair nanotubes, with radii ranging from 2.8 Å to 11.0 Å. A comparative study of phonon spectrum with measured Raman data reveals that the number of Raman active modes for a tube does not depend on the number of atoms present in the unit cell but on its chirality. Calculated phonon modes at the zone center more or less accurately predicted the Raman active modes. The radial breathing mode is of particular interest as for a specific radius of a nanotube it is found to be independent of its chirality. We have also calculated the variation of RBM and G-band modes for tubes of different radii. RBM shows an inverse dependence on the radius of the tube. Finally, the values of specific heat are calculated for various nanotubes at room temperature and it was found that the specific heat shows an exponential dependence on the diameter of the tube.

  8. Endohedral Volume Control for Improved Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Jochen; Fagan, Jeffrey

    Liquid-phase processing of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) generally results in the exposure of their core volumes to the environment (opening) due to energy input necessary for purification and solubilization. For aqueous processing this results in SWCNTs routinely getting filled with water, which is detrimental to several properties. Importantly, water filling leads to significant redshifts to, and inhomogeneous broadening of, the electronic transitions of the SWCNTs, as well as a substantial decrease to their fluorescence quantum efficiency. Selection of (remaining) empty (end-capped) SWCNTs to avoid these adverse effects is possible by means of ultracentrifugation, but is a natively low yield process. In this work, SWCNTs are prefilled with linear alkanes or similar organic compounds, serving as a passive, highly homogeneous spacer, blocking the ingestion of water and hence preventing the detrimental consequences. Moreover, the low dielectric nature of the alkane core only weakly affects the local electronic wavefunction of the SWCNTs, effectively simulating empty core conditions and hence yielding much more resolved optical spectra with blue shifted peak positions compared to water filled SWCNTs. It is demonstrated that a wide variety of linear as well as cyclic alkanes can be applied for this purpose, in combination with various SWCNT materials.

  9. Elastomer Filled With Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Bradley S.; Forest, Craig R.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that composites of a silicone elastomer with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are significantly stronger and stiffer than is the unfilled elastomer. The large strengthening and stiffening effect observed in these experiments stands in contrast to the much smaller strengthening effect observed in related prior efforts to reinforce epoxies with SWNTs and to reinforce a variety of polymers with multiple-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The relative largeness of the effect in the case of the silicone-elastomer/SWNT composites appears to be attributable to (1) a better match between the ductility of the fibers and the elasticity of the matrix and (2) the greater tensile strengths of SWNTs, relative to MWNTs. For the experiments, several composites were formulated by mixing various proportions of SWNTs and other filling materials into uncured RTV-560, which is a silicone adhesive commonly used in aerospace applications. Specimens of a standard "dog-bone" size and shape for tensile testing were made by casting the uncured elastomer/filler mixtures into molds, curing the elastomer, then pressing the specimens from a "cookie-cutter" die. The results of tensile tests of the specimens showed that small percentages of SWNT filler led to large increases in stiffness and tensile strength, and that these increases were greater than those afforded by other fillers. For example, the incorporation of SWNTs in a proportion of 1 percent increased the tensile strength by 44 percent and the modulus of elasticity (see figure) by 75 percent. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases decreased with increasing nanotube percentages because more nanotubes made the elastomer/nanotube composites more brittle. At an SWNT content of 10 percent, the tensile strength and modulus of elasticity were 125 percent and 562 percent, respectively, greater than the corresponding values for the unfilled elastomer.

  10. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  11. Study on the Microwave Permittivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolai; Zhao, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we studied the microwave permittivity of the complex of the single-walled carbon nanotube and paraffin in 2-18GHz. In the range, the dielectric loss of single-walled carbon nanotube is higher, and the real part and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant decrease with the increase of frequency, and the dielectric constant…

  12. Superemission in vertically-aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Presently we used two samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes (VA SWCNTs) with parallelepiped geometry, sized 0.02 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm and 0.2 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm. We report absorption and emission properties of the VA SWCNTs, including strong anisotropy in both their absorption and emission spectra. We found that the emission spectra extend from the middle-IR range to the near-IR range, with such extended spectra being reported for the first time. Pumping the VA SWCNTs in the direction normal to their axis, superemission (SE) was observed in the direction along their axis. The SE band maximum is located at 7206 ± 0.4 cm-1. The energy and the power density of the superemission were estimated, along with the diffraction-limited divergence. At the pumping energy of 3 mJ/pulse, the SE energy measured by the detector was 0.74 mJ/pulse, corresponding to the total SE energy of 1.48 mJ/pulse, with the energy density of 18.5 mJ cm-2/pulse and the SE power density of 1.2 × 105 W cm-2/pulse. We report that a bundle of VA SWCNTs is an emitter with a relatively small divergence, not exceeding 3.9 × 10-3 rad. We developed a theoretical approach to explain such absorption and emission spectra. The developed theory is based on the earlier proposed SSH theory, which we extended to include the exchange interactions between the closest SWCNT neighbors. The developed theoretical ideas were implemented in a homemade FORTRAN code. This code was successfully used to calculate and reproduce the experimental spectra and to determine the SWCNT species that originate the respective absorption bands, with acceptable agreement between theory and experiment.

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks in conductive composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leo G J; de With, G Bert

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conductive composite materials can be used for a wide range of applications because they combine the advantages of a specific polymeric material (e.g., thermal and mechanical properties) with the electrical properties of conductive filler particles. However, the overall electrical behaviour of these composite materials is usually much below the potential of the conductive fillers, mainly because by mixing two different components, new interfaces and interphases are created, changing the properties and behaviours of both. Our goal is to characterize and understand the nature and influence of these interfaces on the electrical properties of composite materials. We have improved a technique based on the use of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in water, followed by coating glass substrates, and drying and removing the CMC with a nitric acid treatment. We used electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques to characterize the SWCNT films, and developed an in situ resistance measurement technique to analyse the influence of both the individual components and the mixture of an epoxy/amine system on the electrical behaviour of the SWCNTs. The results showed that impregnating a SWCNT network with a polymer is not the only factor that affects the film resistance; air exposure, temperature, physical and chemical properties of the individual polymer components, and also the formation of a polymeric network, can all have an influence on the macroscopic electrical properties of the initial SWCNT network. These results emphasize the importance of understanding the effects that each of the components can have on each other before trying to prepare an efficient polymer composite material. PMID:25430670

  14. Noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with porphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassiouk, María; Basiuk, Vladimir A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, Elena V., E-mail: elenagd@unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Martínez-Herrera, Melchor [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Rojas-Aguilar, Aaron [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 México D.F. (Mexico); Puente-Lee, Iván [Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-06-15

    The covalent and noncovalent interactions of porphyrins and related tetraazamacrocyclic compounds with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a subject of increasing research effort, directed toward the design of novel hybrid nanomaterials combining unique electronic and optical properties of both molecular species. In this report, we used different experimental techniques as well as molecular mechanics (MM) calculations to analyze the adsorption of meso-tetraphenylporphine (or 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine, H{sub 2}TPP) and its complexes with Ni(II) and Co(II) (NiTPP and CoTPP, respectively), as well as hemin (a natural porphyrin), onto the surface of SWNTs. Altogether, the results suggested that all four porphyrin species noncovalently interact with SWNTs, forming hybrid nanomaterials. Nevertheless, of all four porphyrin species, the strongest interaction with SWNTs occurs in the case of CoTPP, which is able to intercalate and considerably disperse SWNT bundles, and therefore absorb onto the surface of individual SWNTs. In contrast, NiTPP, CoTPP and hemin, due to a weaker interaction, are unable to do so and therefore are only capable to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles. According to the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging and MM results, the adsorption of CoTPP onto SWNT sidewalls results in the formation of porphyrin arrays in the shape of long-period interacting helixes with variable periodicity, possibly due to different diameters and chiralities of SWNTs present in the samples. Since the remaining porphyrin species were found to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles, the precise geometry of the corresponding porphyrin/SWNT complexes is difficult to characterize.

  15. Flame Synthesis Of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes And Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wal, Randy L. Vander; Berger, Gordon M.; Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are widely sought for a variety of applications including gas storage, intercalation media, catalyst support and composite reinforcing material [1]. Each of these applications will require large scale quantities of CNTs. A second consideration is that some of these applications may require redispersal of the collected CNTs and attachment to a support structure. If the CNTs could be synthesized directly upon the support to be used in the end application, a tremendous savings in post-synthesis processing could be realized. Therein we have pursued both aerosol and supported catalyst synthesis of CNTs. Given space limitations, only the aerosol portion of the work is outlined here though results from both thrusts will be presented during the talk. Aerosol methods of SWNT, MWNT or nanofiber synthesis hold promise of large-scale production to supply the tonnage quantities these applications will require. Aerosol methods may potentially permit control of the catalyst particle size, offer continuous processing, provide highest product purity and most importantly, are scaleable. Only via economy of scale will the cost of CNTs be sufficient to realize the large-scale structural and power applications on both earth and in space. Present aerosol methods for SWNT synthesis include laser ablation of composite metalgraphite targets or thermal decomposition/pyrolysis of a sublimed or vaporized organometallic [2]. Both approaches, conducted within a high temperature furnace, have produced single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). The former method requires sophisticated hardware and is inherently limited by the energy deposition that can be realized using pulsed laser light. The latter method, using expensive organometallics is difficult to control for SWNT synthesis given a range of gasparticle mixing conditions along variable temperature gradients; multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) are a far more likely end products. Both approaches require large energy expenditures and

  16. Preparation of Nickel-Copper Bilayers Coated on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to oxidizability of copper coating on carbon nanotubes, the interfacial bond strength between copper coating and its matrix is weak, which leads to the reduction of the macroscopic properties of copper matrix composite. The electroless coating technics was applied to prepare nickel-copper bilayers coated on single-walled carbon nanotubes. The coated single-walled carbon nanotubes were characterized through transmission electron microscope spectroscopy, field-emission electron microscope spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and thermogravimetric analysis. The results demonstrated that the nickel-copper bilayers coated on single-walled carbon nanotubes possessed higher purity of unoxidized copper fine-grains than copper monolayers.

  17. Antimicrobial Biomaterials based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Seyma

    Biomaterials that inactivate bacteria are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) incorporated within biomedical polymers. In the first part, we focus on SWNT dispersed in the common biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as a potential antimicrobial biomaterial. We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration. Up to 98 % of bacteria die within one hour of SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNT are found to be more toxic, possibly due to an increased density of open tube ends. In the second part, we investigate the antimicrobial activity of SWNT layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with the polyelectrolytes poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA). The dispersibility of SWNT in aqueous solution is significantly improved via the biocompatible nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) and the amphiphilic polymer phospholipid-poly(ethylene glycol) (PL-PEG). Absorbance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show SWNT with either Tween 20 or PL-PEG in aqueous solution to be well dispersed. Quartz crystal microgravimetry with dissipation (QCMD) measurements show both SWNT-Tween and SWNT-PL-PEG to LbL assemble with PLL and PGA into multilayer films, with the PL-PEG system yielding the greater final SWNT content. Bacterial inactivation rates are significantly higher (up to 90%) upon 24 hour incubation with SWNT containing films, compared to control films (ca. 20%). In the third part, we study the influence of bundling on the LbL assembly of SWNT with charged polymers, and on the antimicrobial properties of the assembled film. QCMD measurements show the bundled SWNT system to adsorb in an unusually strong fashion—to an extent three times greater than that

  18. Controlling exciton photophysics in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpkaya, Ibrahim

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been studied extensively by scientists and engineers due to their unique mechanical, optical, electronic and thermal properties that make them attractive for both fundamental research and device applications. Specifically, important optical properties of SWCNTs such as formation of strongly bound excitons (electron-hole pairs), being stable at room temperature, and bandgap-tunable light emission from visible to telecom wavelengths make them a promising material for optoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. However, the photophysics of excitons in SWCNTs is not yet fully understood and is largely affected by detrimental extrinsic effects, which give rise to strongly reduced device performance. This dissertation demonstrates novel methods and techniques to better understand and to control the photophysics of excitons in SWCNTs. The first part presents novel ways to completely remove detrimental spectral diffusion and blinking in the optical emission of surfactant dispersed SWCNTs on millisecond time scales and also demonstrates 50-fold enhanced exciton emission. Furthermore, pronounced photon antibunching is observed for the first time under resonant excitation. The demonstrated single photon emission is promising for applications in quantum cryptography, while the achieved stable long term emission is important for optoelectronic devices. The second part demonstrates a new regime of intrinsic exciton photophysics in ultra-clean SWCNTs that is characterized by ultra-narrow exciton linewidth and prolonged emission times up to 18 ns. These lifetimes are two orders of magnitude better than prior measurements and in agreement with values predicted by theorists a decade ago. Moreover, I measure for the first time exciton decoherence times of individual nanotubes in the time-domain and demonstrate fourfold prolonged values up to 2 ps compared to previous ensemble studies. Finally, I demonstrate a novel method which controls

  19. High-speed countercurrent chromatography for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Cai; Zhi Hong Yan; Ying Chun Lv; Min Zi; Li Ming Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A new chromatographic purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes using high-speed countercurrent chromatography is reported.The purification was accomplished on the basis of experiment that dispersed the single-walled carbon nanotubes with sodium dodecyl sulfate,and the result mixture was separated using the two phase system composed of n-butanol/water=1/1 (v/v).The sizes of SWNTs separated were observed by scanning electron microscopy.The results demonstrated that the high-speed countercurrent chromatography possessed a good efficency for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  20. Preparation of Nickel-Copper Bilayers Coated on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong Zheng; Shan Zhao; Shijie Dong; Lianjie Li; Anchun Xiao; Sinian Li

    2015-01-01

    Due to oxidizability of copper coating on carbon nanotubes, the interfacial bond strength between copper coating and its matrix is weak, which leads to the reduction of the macroscopic properties of copper matrix composite. The electroless coating technics was applied to prepare nickel-copper bilayers coated on single-walled carbon nanotubes. The coated single-walled carbon nanotubes were characterized through transmission electron microscope spectroscopy, field-emission electron microscope s...

  1. Coupled thermo-mechanics of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Scarpa, Fabrizio; Peng, Hua-Xin; Remillat, Chrystel; Adhikari, Sondipon

    2010-01-01

    The temperature-dependent transverse mechanical properties of single-walled nanotubes are studied using a molecular mechanics approach. The stretching and bond angle force constants describing the mechanical behaviour of the sp^{2} bonds are resolved in the temperature range between 0 K and 1600 K, allowing to identify a temperature dependence of the nanotubes wall thickness. We observe a decrease of the stiffness properties (axial and shear Young's modulus) with increasing temperatures, and an augmentation of the transverse Poisson's ratio, with magnitudes depending on the chirality of the nanotube. Our closed-form predictions compare well with existing Molecular Dynamics simulations.

  2. Effect of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes on Cellulose Phenylcarbamate Chiral Stationary Phases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Yin-xia; REN Chao-xing; RUAN Qiong; YUAN Li-ming

    2007-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) have a high adsorption ability and nanoscale interactions. Cellulose trisphenylcarbamates possess high enantioseparation ability in high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC). Single-walled carbon nanotubes mixed with cellulose trisphenylcarbamate are coated on the silica gel as chiral stationary phases and higher enantioseparation factors are obtained. After a single-walled carbon nanotube is linked to the 6-position of cellulose 2,3-bisphenylcarbamate, its enantioseparation resolution increases compared to that of the cellulose trisphenylcarbamate. It is the first time that SWNTs have been applied to enantioseparation. The results indicate that the single-walled carbon nanotubes are good promoters of chiral recognition. This method can be used to improve the enantioseparation efficiency of the polysaccharide chiral stationary phases.

  3. A study of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified by organics of the phthalocyanine category

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Organics of the phthalocyanine category have very good nonlinear optical properties. The single-walled carbon nanotubes were modified by using the phenoxy phthalocyanine. Characterization analysis was made by means of the transmission electron microscope (TEM), ultraviolet visible absorptive spectra, fluorescent spectra and Raman spectra. Under the TEM, it was observed that the composite looked like sugarcoated haws. By comparing the ultraviolet visible absorptive spectra before and after absorption, it was disclosed that the spectral intensity and the intensity of the peaks in the fluorescent spectra dropped remarkably. This shows that the single-walled carbon nanotubes have absorbed a large number of phenoxy phthalocyanines. Raman analysis revealed that in the Raman spectra, the position of the main peaks of the single-walled carbon nanotubes after absorption moved in the direction of long waves. The analysis suggests that the movement of the Raman spectra results from the change in the state of the single-walled carbon nanotubes before and after absorption.

  4. Effect of oxygen adsorption on the electrochemical oxidative corrosion of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Tominaga, Masato; Yatsugi, Yuto; Togami, Makoto; トミナガ, マサト; ヤツギ, ユウト; トガミ, マコト; 冨永, 昌人; 矢次, 祐人; 戸上, 純

    2014-01-01

    The effect of adsorbed molecular oxygen on the oxidative corrosion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. Adsorbed molecular oxygen affected nucleation and growth in the electrochemical oxidative corrosion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous electrolyte. Nucleation and growth began at defect sites in the presence of adsorbed oxygen, but occurred randomly in the absence of adsorbed oxygen. This insight furthers our understanding o...

  5. Synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes from a lamellar type aluminophosphate (AlPO4-L)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Venkatathri

    2008-08-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes are synthesized from a lamellar type aluminophosphate, AlPO4-L. The lamellar aluminophosphate was synthesized from hexamethyleneimine template. The latter was calcined at argon atmosphere for 12 h at 600°C. The resulting carbonaceous material was treated with 1 N H2SO4 to remove the aluminophosphate skeleton. Characterization of the resulting carbon revealed to contain single walled nanotubes. These nanotubes are applicable to store more hydrogen.

  6. Metal coating effect on thermal diffusivity of single-walled carbon nanotube

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Shuhei; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2010-01-01

    Recently a functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) that is modified by metal atoms was experimentally developed. Single-walled carbon nanotube is known to exhibit exceptional thermal conductivity; however, there is no report about a functionalized SWCNT. In this study, thermal diffusivity of metal-coated SWCNT was derived using molecular dynamics. Consequently, thermal diffusivity exhibited 10 times smaller than uncoated SWCNT. On the other hand, the heat conduction on the metal ...

  7. The preparation of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes as high efficiency DNA carriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The positively charged single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs+) were prepared by conjugating with -CONH-C6H12-NH3+.The double strand DNA (dsDNA) chains were loaded onto SWNTs+ via the electrostatic interactions. SWNTs+ shows improved loading efficiency (353.5 μg/mg) toward dsDNA compared with that of charged free single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)(82.9 μg/mg).

  8. ANALYSIS OF MATERIAL MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FOR SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yiming; Xu Xiaoxian

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The carbon-carbon bond between two nearest-neighboring atoms is modeled as a beam and the single-walled carbon nanotubes are treated as the space frame structures in order to analyze the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes. Based on the theory of TersoffBrenner force field, the energy relationships between the carbon-carbon bond and the beam model are obtained, and the stiffness parameters of the beam are determined. By applying the present model, the Young's moduli of the single-walled carbon nanotubes with different tube diameters are determined. And the present results are compared with available data.

  9. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak, FL; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, CNR

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Y-junction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallic-thiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures yields single-walled nanotubes, as well as relatively narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes with Y-junctions. Pyrolysis-of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures, in the absence of water vapour, only gives ...

  10. Improved synthesis of carbon nanotubes with junctions and of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F L Deepak; A Govindaraj; C N R Rao

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis of thiophene over nickel nanoparticles dispersed on silica is shown to yield Yjunction carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters than those obtained by the pyrolysis of organometallicthiophene mixtures. In the presence of water vapour, the pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures yields single-walled nanotubes, as well as relatively narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes with Y-junctions. Pyrolysis of organometallic-hydrocarbon mixtures, in the absence of water vapour, only gives nanotubes with T- and Y-junctions.

  11. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Ajai, E-mail: ajai.iyer@aalto.fi; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Aalto University, POB 15100, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16400, 00076 Espoo (Finland)

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  12. Collision-induced fusion of two single-walled carbon nanotubes: A quantitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Fei; Meng, Xiang-Rui; Wang, Dong-Qi; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-07-01

    The coalescence processes of two (6, 0) single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated via coaxial collision based on the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding molecular dynamics method. According to the structure characteristics of the nanotubes, five impact cases are studied to explore the coalescence processes of the nanotubes. The simulation shows that various kinds of carbon nanomaterials, such as graphene sheets, graphene nanoribbons, and single-walled carbon nanotubes with larger diameters, are created after collision. Moreover, some defects formed in the carbon nanomaterials can be eliminated, and even the final configurations which are originally fragmented can almost become intact structures by properly quenching and annealing.

  13. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Growth from Graphite Layers-a Tight Binding Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuntuan FANG; Min ZHU; Yongshun WANG

    2003-01-01

    The growth of single-wall carbon nanotube from graphite layers is studied by tight binding molecular dynamics simulation. Given temperature of 2500 K or 3500 K and an interval of 0.25 nm for the two layers of graphite, a single-wall carbon nanotube with a zigzag shell will be produced. On the other conditions the carbon nanotube cannot grow or grows with too many defects. All carbon nanotube ends have pentagons which play an important role during the tube ends closing.

  14. Direct observation of spin-injection in tyrosinate-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoufis, Theodoros; Ampoumogli, Asem; Gournis, Dimitrios; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Jankovic, Lubos; Christoforidis, Konstantinos C.; Deligiannakis, Yiannis; Mavrandonakis, Andreas; Froudakis, George E.; Maccallini, Enrico; Rudolf, Petra; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report on the interaction of a tyrosinate radical with single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT). The tyrosinate radical was formed from tyrosine (ester) by Fenton's reagent and, reacted in situ with carbon nanotubes resulting in novel tyrosinated carbon nanotube derivatives. The covalent

  15. Single-walled carbon nanotube incorporated novel three phase carbon/epoxy composite with enhanced properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Sohel; Alagirusamy, Ramasamy; Joshi, Mangala

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, single-walled carbon nanotubes were dispersed within the matrix of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites in order to develop novel three phase carbon/epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube composites. A combination of ultrasonication and high speed mechanical stirring at 2000 rpm was used to uniformly disperse carbon nanotubes in the epoxy resin. The state of carbon nanotube dispersion in the epoxy resin and within the nanocomposites was characterized with the help of optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Pure carbon/epoxy and three phase composites were characterized for mechanical properties (tensile and compressive) as well as for thermal and electrical conductivity. Fracture surfaces of composites after tensile test were also studied in order to investigate the effect of dispersed carbon nanotubes on the failure behavior of composites. Dispersion of only 0.1 wt% nanotubes in the matrix led to improvements of 95% in Young's modulus, 31% in tensile strength, 76% in compressive modulus and 41% in compressive strength of carbon/epoxy composites. In addition to that, electrical and thermal conductivity also improved significantly with addition of carbon nanotubes. PMID:22103118

  16. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Fluorescence Biosensors for Pathogen Recognition in Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata K. K. Upadhyayula

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs aggregates as fluorescence sensors for pathogen recognition in drinking water treatment applications has been studied. Batch adsorption study is conducted to adsorb large concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus aureus SH 1000 and Escherichia coli pKV-11 on single-walled carbon nanotubes. Subsequently the immobilized bacteria are detected with confocal microscopy by coating the nanotubes with fluorescence emitting antibodies. The Freundlich adsorption equilibrium constant (k for S.aureus and E.coli determined from batch adsorption study was found to be 9×108 and 2×108 ml/g, respectively. The visualization of bacterial cells adsorbed on fluorescently modified carbon nanotubes is also clearly seen. The results indicate that hydrophobic single-walled carbon nanotubes have excellent bacterial adsorption capacity and fluorescent detection capability. This is an important advancement in designing fluorescence biosensors for pathogen recognition in water systems.

  17. Vibrational Analysis of Curved Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube on a Pasternak Elastic Foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehdipour, I.; Barari, Amin; Kimiaeifar, Amin;

    2012-01-01

    Continuum mechanics and an elastic beam model were employed in the nonlinear force vibrational analysis of an embedded, curved, single-walled carbon nanotube. The analysis considered the effects of the curvature or waviness and midplane stretching of the nanotube on the nonlinear frequency....... By utilizing He’s Energy Balance Method (HEBM), the relationships of the nonlinear amplitude and frequency were expressed for a curved, single-walled carbon nanotube. The amplitude frequency response curves of the nonlinear free vibration were obtained for a curved, single-walled carbon nanotube embedded...... in a Pasternak elastic foundation. Finally, the influence of the amplitude of the waviness, midplane stretching nonlinearity, shear foundation modulus, surrounding elastic medium, radius, and length of the curved carbon nanotube on the amplitude frequency response characteristics are discussed. As a result...

  18. Properties of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Finite Lengths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Di-Li; PAN Bi-Cai

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes with finite lengths should be natural components of future "nano devices". Based on orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations, we report on our study of formation energies, optimal geometrical structures and active sites of carbon nanotubes with finite lengths. This should be useful to understand the properties of such natural components.

  19. Conjugated Polymer-Assisted Dispersion of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes : The Power of Polymer Wrapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samanta, Suman Kalyan; Fritsch, Martin; Scherf, Ullrich; Gomulya, Widianta; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    CONSPECTUS: The future application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in electronic (nano)devices is closely coupled to the availability of pure, semiconducting SWNTs and preferably, their defined positioning on suited substrates. Commercial carbon nanotube raw mixtures contain metallic as we

  20. Efficient organometallic spin filter between single-wall carbon nanotube or graphene electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koleini, Mohammad; Paulsson, Magnus; Brandbyge, Mads

    2007-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of spin transport in a class of molecular systems consisting of an organometallic benzene-vanadium cluster placed in between graphene or single-wall carbon-nanotube-model contacts. Ab initio modeling is performed by combining spin density functional theory and noneq......We present a theoretical study of spin transport in a class of molecular systems consisting of an organometallic benzene-vanadium cluster placed in between graphene or single-wall carbon-nanotube-model contacts. Ab initio modeling is performed by combining spin density functional theory...

  1. Process for separating metallic from semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for separating semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes is disclosed. The method utilizes separation agents that preferentially associate with semiconducting nanotubes due to the electrical nature of the nanotubes. The separation agents are those that have a planar orientation, .pi.-electrons available for association with the surface of the nanotubes, and also include a soluble portion of the molecule. Following preferential association of the separation agent with the semiconducting nanotubes, the agent/nanotubes complex is soluble and can be solubilized with the solution enriched in semiconducting nanotubes while the residual solid is enriched in metallic nanotubes.

  2. Investigation on vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes by variational iteration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Asoor, A. A.; Valipour, P.; Ghasemi, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the variational iteration method (VIM) has been used to investigate the non-linear vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) based on the nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory. The accuracy of results is examined by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical method. Comparison between VIM solutions with numerical results leads to highly accurate solutions. Also, the behavior of deflection and frequency in vibrations of SWCNTs are studied. The results show that frequency of single walled carbon nanotube versus amplitude increases by increasing the values of B.

  3. Direct Electrochemistry of Catalase on Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang ZHAO; Lun Hui GUAN; Zhen Nan GU; Qian Kun ZHUANG

    2005-01-01

    Direct electrochemistry of catalase (Ct) has been studied on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. A pair of well-defined nearly reversible redox peaks is given at --0.48 V (vs. SCE) in 0.1 mol/L phosphate solution (pH 7.0).The peak current in cyclic voltammogram is proportional to the scan rate. The peak potential of catalase is shifted to more negative value when the pH increases. Catalase can adsorb on the SWNTs modified electrode.

  4. Effects of Two Purification Pretreatments on Electroless Copper Coating over Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong Zheng; Lianjie Li; Shijie Dong; Anchun Xiao; Shixuan Sun; Sinian Li

    2014-01-01

    To achieve the reinforcement of copper matrix composite by single-walled carbon nanotubes, a three-step-refluxing purification of carbon nanotubes sample with HNO3-NaOH-HCl was proposed and demonstrated. A previously reported purification process using an electromagnetic stirring with H2O2/HCl mixture was also repeated. Then, the purified carbon nanotubes were coated with copper by the same electroless plating process. At the end, the effects of the method on carbon nanotubes themselves and o...

  5. Electronic transport properties of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹觉先; 颜晓红; 肖杨; 丁建文

    2003-01-01

    We have calculated the differential conductance of metallic carbon nanotubes by the scatter matrix method. It is found that the differential conductance of metallic nanotube-based devices oscillates as a function of the bias voltage between the two leads and the gate voltage. Oscillation period T is directly proportional to the reciprocal of nanotube length. In addition, we found that electronic transport properties are sensitive to variation of the length of the nanotube.

  6. Excitonic nonlinearities in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, D.T.; Voisin, C.; Roussignol, P. [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Superieure, UPMC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS UMR8551, Paris (France); Roquelet, C.; Lauret, J.S. [Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moleculaire de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan (France); Cassabois, G. [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Superieure, UPMC, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS UMR8551, Paris (France); Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR5221, Universite Montpellier 2, Montpellier (France); CNRS, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR5221, Montpellier (France)

    2012-05-15

    Excitons are composite bosons that allow a fair description of the optical properties in solid state systems. The quantum confinement in nanostructures enhances the excitonic effects and impacts the exciton-exciton interactions, which tailor the performances of classical and quantum optoelectronic devices, such as lasers or single-photon emitters. The excitonic nonlinearities exhibit significant differences between organic and inorganic compounds. Tightly bound Frenkel excitons in molecular crystals are for instance affected by an efficient exciton-exciton annihilation (EEA). This Auger process also governs the population relaxation dynamics in carbon nanotubes that share many physical properties with organic materials. Here, we show that this similarity breaks down for the excitonic decoherence in carbon nanotubes. Original nonlinear spectral-hole burning experiments bring evidence of pure dephasing induced by exciton-exciton scattering (EES) in the k-space. This mechanism controls the exciton collision-induced broadening, as for Wannier excitons in inorganic semiconductors. We demonstrate that this singular behavior originates from the intrinsic one-dimensionality of excitons in carbon nanotubes, which display unique hybrid features of organic and inorganic systems. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Electron Transport and Tunneling in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Travis; Mason, Nadya

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes remain a fertile ground for the exploration of interacting one-dimensional (1D) physics and Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory. Much is still unknown about the factors that influence the transport and tunneling properties of interacting 1D systems such as nanotubes. We report on experiments that use techniques such as multiple contacts on long nanotubes and tunable tunnel barriers to determine how the manifestations of electron-electron interactions, such as the zero-bias anomaly, depend on the length and defect strength in nanotubes.

  8. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farokhi, Mehdi [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanoechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidvar, Ramin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghizadeh, Majid, E-mail: sadeghma@modares.ac.ir [Department Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Formaldehyde Adsorption and Diffusion in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pin Lv; Zhenan Tang; Jun Yu; Yanbing Xue

    2006-01-01

    For gas sensor application, adsorption and diffusion of formaldehyde gas in single-wall carbon nanotube were investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation. The conformations of formaldehyde molecule adsorbed in carbon nanotube were optimized according to principle of minimum energy. The axis of conformatiot is parallel to the axis of carbon nanotube and about 0.3 nm~0.4 nm away from carbon nanotube wall. The conformation, which is different from that of the formaldehyde molecule in the gas-phase, rotates around carbon nanotube axis. The adsorption energy and diffusivity of formaldehyde molecule in single-wall carbon nanotube is of-56.2 kJ/mol and of 0.2× 10-4 cm2/s, respectively.

  10. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Junyoung; Jalali, Maryam; Campbell, Stephen A., E-mail: campb001@umn.edu

    2015-08-31

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10{sup −3} Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm{sup 3}, and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators.

  11. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Acting as Controllable Transport Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Bo-Da; XIA Yue-Yuan; ZHAO Ming-Wen; LI Feng; LIU Xiang-Dong; JI Yan-Ju; SONG Chen; TAN Zhen-Yu; LIU Hui

    2004-01-01

    @@ The motion and equilibrium distribution of water molecules adsorbed inside neutral and negatively charged singlewalled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations (MDSs) at room temperature based on CHARMM (Chemistry at HARvard Molecular Mechanics) potential parameters. We find that water molecules have a conspicuous electropism phenomenon and regular tubule patterns inside and outside the charged tube wall. The analyses of the motion behaviour of water molecules in the radial and axial directions show that by charging the SWNT, the adsorption efficiency is greatly enhanced, and the electric field produced by the charged SWNTs prevents water molecules from flowing out of the nanotube. However, water molecules can travel through the neutral SWNT in a fluctuating manner. This indicates that by electrically charging and uncharging the SWNTs, one can control the adsorption and transport behaviour of polar molecules in SWNTs for using as a stable storage medium or long transport channels. The transport velocity can be tailored by changing the charge on the SWNTs, which may have a further application as modulatable transport channels.

  12. Effectiveness of sorting single-walled carbon nanotubes by diameter using polyfluorene derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J.; Kwak, M.; Wildeman, J.; Hermann, A.; Loi, M. A.; Herrmann, A.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) sorted by conjugated polymers are of great interest for electronic and optoelectronic applications Here we demonstrate by optical methods that the selectivity of conjugated polymers for semiconducting SWCNTs is influenced by the structure of the

  13. Tuning the physical parameters towards optimal polymer-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J.; Annema, R.; Loi, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Solubilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been essential for the understanding of their physical properties. Ultrasonication followed by centrifugation has been generally used for the preparation of SWNT dispersion in presence of different surfactants or conjugated polymers. Howev

  14. Effect of medium dielectric constant on the physical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, J.; Gomulya, W.; Loi, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    The photophysical properties of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in different environments are analyzed by steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The PL emission of SWNTs shows a red shift with the increase of the dielectric constant of the environme

  15. Polyazines and Polyazomethines with Didodecylthiophene Units for Selective Dispersion of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomulya, Widianta; Derenskyi, Vladimir; Kozma, Erika; Pasini, Mariacecilia; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Polymer wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been demonstrated to be a very effi cient technique to obtain high purity semiconducting SWNT solutions. However, the extraction yield of this technique is low compared to other techniques. Poly-alkyl-thiophenes have been reported to show h

  16. Plasma excitations in a single-walled carbon nanotube with an external transverse magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K A Vijayalakshmi; T P Nafeesa Baby

    2013-02-01

    The effect of different uniform transverse external magnetic fields in plasma frequency when propagated parallel to the surface of the single-walled metallic carbon nanotubes is studied. The classical electrodynamics as well as Maxwell’s equations are used in the calculations. Equations are developed for both short- and long-wavelength limits and the variations are studied graphically.

  17. Structural profiling and biological performance of phospholipid-hyaluronan functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvash, Ram; Khatchatouriants, Artium; Solmesky, Leonardo J;

    2013-01-01

    In spite of significant insolubility and toxicity, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) erupt into the biomedical research, and create an increasing interest in the field of nanomedicine. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are highly hydrophobic and have been shown to be toxic while systemically administrated. Thus,...

  18. A triple quantum dot in a single-wall carbon nanotube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Jørgensen, Henrik Ingerslev; Hayashi, T.;

    2008-01-01

    A top-gated single-wall carbon nanotube is used to define three coupled quantum dots in series between two electrodes. The additional electron number on each quantum dot is controlled by top-gate voltages allowing for current measurements of single, double, and triple quantum dot stability diagrams...

  19. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime;

    2013-01-01

    This work involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple “one pot” synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N...

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of hydrogen physisorption in K-doped single walled carbon nanotube array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of hydrogen physisorption in K-doped single walled carbon nanotube array (SWCNTA) are investigated in detail by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. The optimization of hydrogen storage capacity at 293 K and 10 MPa as a function of K-doping schemes, K atoms' doped-sites, and SWCNTA configuration is discussed.

  1. Separating spin and charge transport in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, N; van der Molen, SJ; van Wees, BJ

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate spin injection and detection in single wall carbon nanotubes using a four-terminal nonlocal geometry. This measurement geometry completely separates the charge and spin circuits. Hence all spurious magnetoresistance effects are eliminated and the measured signal is due to spin accumul

  2. Analytic Solution of Charge Density of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube under Conditions of Field Electron Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-Bing; WANG Wei-Liang

    2006-01-01

    We derive the analytic solution of induced electrostatic potential along single wall carbon nanotubes. Under the hypothesis of constant density of states in the charge-neutral level, we are able to obtain the linear density of excess charge in an external Geld parallel to the tube axis.

  3. Analytic solution of charge density of single wall carbon nanotube in conditions of field electron emission

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhibing; Wang, Weiliang

    2006-01-01

    We derived the analytic solution of induced electrostatic potential along single wall carbon nanotubes. Under the hypothesis of constant density of states in the charge-neutral level, we are able to obtain the linear density of excess charge in an external field parallel to the tube axis.

  4. Increasing amperometric biosensor sensitivity by length fractionated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Federico; Gorton, Lo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal;

    2008-01-01

    In this work the sensitivity-increasing effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in amperometric biosensors, depending on their average length distribution, was studied. For this purpose the SWCNTs were oxidatively shortened and subsequently length separated by size exclusion...

  5. Carbon dioxide adsorption on H2 O 2 treated single-walled carbon nanohorns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migone, Aldo; Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Banjara, Shree; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio

    2011-03-01

    Carbon nanohorns are closed single-wall structures with a hollow interior. Unlike SWNTs, which assemble into cylindrical bundles, nanohorns form spherical aggregates. In our experiments we used dahlia-like carbon nanohorn aggregates. Our sample underwent treatment with H2 O2 which opened access to the interior spaces of the individual nanohorns. We measured carbon dioxide adsorption at several temperatures between 167 and 195 K. We calculated the isosteric heat as a function of loading, and the binding energy values for CO2 on the nanohorn aggregates from the isotherm data. Results on the H2 O2 -treated nanohorns will be compared with those obtained on other carbon substrates. We have also determined detailed equilibration profiles for CO2 adsorption on the nanohorn aggregates; these results will also be presented. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-1006428 and DMR-0705077.

  6. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Svendsen, Winnie E.; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Boisen, Anja; Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    This Letter involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple 'one pot' synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N-layered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6-31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid conjugate presented herein is believed to lead the way to new potential applications as carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems.

  7. Spectroscopy of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and their Synthesis via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kiowski, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor was designed, built and used to grow vertically and horizontally aligned carbon nanotube arrays. The as-grown nanotubes were investigated on a single tube level using nearinfrared photoluminescence (PL) microscopy as well as Raman, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy of individual, semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a specialized PL set-up was constructed.

  8. Bio-defunctionalization of Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Sheng-Tao; Wang, Haifang; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Chemically modified carbon nanotubes with hydrophilic functionalities such as polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are widely pursued for potential biological and biomedical applications. In this study, PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (PEG-SWNT) were intravenously administrated into mice to study their bio-defunctionalization in vivo by using complementary Raman and photoluminescence measurements. There was meaningful defunctionalization of PEG-SWNT in liver over time, but not in spleen under...

  9. A Facile Route to Metal Oxides/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilm Nanocomposites for Energy Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zeyuan; Wei, Bingqing

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of transition-metal oxides and carbon nanomaterials with a desired size and structure are highly demanded for high-performance energy storage devices. Here, a facile two-step and cost-efficient approach relying on directly thermal treatment of chemical vapor deposition products is developed as a general synthetic method to prepare a family of metal oxides [MxOy (M = Fe, Co, Ni)]/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) macrofilm nanocomposites. The MxOy nanoparticles obt...

  10. Small Diameter Few- Walled Carbon Nanotubes: An Alternative for Single Walled nanotubes in Bulk Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Liu

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Although Single walled carbon nanotubes have shown tremendous potential in many applications due to their unique electrical and mechanical properties, the lack of a large scale synthesis method at low cost is still the main limiting factor for the realization of the full potential of this unique materials. On the other hand, multiwalled carbon nanotubes are being made in tons per year quantity and found their application in conducting plastic and other bulk applications.

  11. Fabrication of spintronics device by direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes from ferromagnetic electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ambri Mohamed, Nobuhito Inami, Eiji Shikoh, Yoshiyuki Yamamoto, Hidenobu Hori and Akihiko Fujiwara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an alternative method for realizing a carbon nanotube spin field-effect transistor device by the direct synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs on substrates by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition. We observed hysteretic magnetoresistance (MR at low temperatures due to spin-dependent transport. In these devices, the maximum ratio in resistance variation of MR was found to be 1.8%.

  12. Purification of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon monooxide has been developed. Based on the result from TGA/DTA of as-prepared sample, the oxidation temperature was determined. The process included sonication, oxidation and acid washing steps. The purity and yield after purification were determined and estimated by TEM. Moreover, for the first time, a loop structure for CVD SWNTs has been observed.

  13. Evaluation of single-walled carbon nanohorns as sorbent in dispersive micro solid-phase extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Soto, Juan Manuel; Cardenas, Soledad [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Fine Chemistry and Nanochemistry, Marie Curie Building, Campus de Rabanales, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba (Spain); Valcarcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1meobj@uco.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Fine Chemistry and Nanochemistry, Marie Curie Building, Campus de Rabanales, University of Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potential of single walled carbon nanohorns in dispersive solid phase microextraction has been evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was characterized for the extraction of PAHs from waters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single walled carbon nanohorns were better extractant than carbon nanotubes and carbon nanocones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The limits of detection were adequate for the target analytes in environmental waters. - Abstract: A new dispersive micro solid-phase extraction method which uses single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as sorbent is proposed. The procedure combines the excellent sorbent properties of the nanoparticles with the efficiency of the dispersion of the material in the sample matrix. Under these conditions, the interaction with the analytes is maximized. The determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was selected as model analytical problem. Two dispersion strategies were evaluated, being the functionalization via microwave irradiation better than the use of a surfactant. The extraction was accomplished by adding 1 mL of oxidized SWHNs (o-SWNHs) dispersion to 10 mL of water sample. After extraction, the mixture was passed through a disposable Nylon filter were the nanoparticles enriched with the PAHs were retained. The elution was carried out with 100 {mu}L of hexane. The limits of detection achieved were between 30 and 60 ng L{sup -1} with a precision (as repeatability) better than 12.5%. The recoveries obtained for the analytes in three different water samples were acceptable in all instances. The performance of o-SWNHs was favourably compared with that provided by carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and thermally treated carbon nanocones.

  14. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed. PMID:26729220

  15. Preparation of Isolated Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes with High Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艾飞; 刘吉平; 吕广庶; 刘华

    2006-01-01

    Isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes with high proportion of opening tips were synthesized by using alcohol as carbon source. The mechanism of cutting action of oxygen was proposed to explain its growth. Compared with carbon nanotubes synthesized with benzene as carbon source, their specific surface area was heightened by approximately 2.2 times (from 200.5 to 648 m2/g) and the hydrogen storage capacity was increased by approximately 6.5 times (from 0.95 to 7.17%, ω)which had exceeded DOE energy standard of vehicular hydrogen storage.

  16. Photoluminescence imaging of electronic-impurity-induced exciton quenching in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochet, Jared J; Duque, Juan G; Werner, James H; Doorn, Stephen K

    2012-02-01

    The electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes can be altered by surface adsorption of electronic impurities or dopants. However, fully understanding the influence of these impurities is difficult because of the inherent complexity of the solution-based colloidal chemistry of nanotubes, and because of a lack of techniques for directly imaging dynamic processes involving these impurities. Here, we show that photoluminescence microscopy can be used to image exciton quenching in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes during the early stages of chemical doping with two different species. The addition of AuCl(3) leads to localized exciton-quenching sites, which are attributed to a mid-gap electronic impurity level, and the adsorbed species are also found sometimes to be mobile on the surface of the nanotubes. The addition of H(2)O(2) leads to delocalized exciton-quenching hole states, which are responsible for long-range photoluminescence blinking, and are also mobile.

  17. Self-Assembly of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes into Dense, Aligned Rafts

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Justin; Antaris, Alexander; Choi, Charina L; Xie, Liming; Wu, Yingpeng; Diao, Shuo; Chen, Changxin; Chen, Yongsheng; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes are promising nanoelectronic materials but face long-standing challenges including production of pure semiconducting SWNTs and integration into ordered structures. Here, highly pure semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are separated from bulk materials and self-assembled into densely aligned rafts driven by depletion attraction forces. Microscopy and spectroscopy revealed a high degree of alignment and a high packing density of ~100 tubes/micron within SWNT rafts. Field-effect transistors made from aligned SWNT rafts afforded short channel (~150 nm long) devices comprised of tens of purely semiconducting SWNTs derived from chemical separation within a < 1 micron channel width, achieving unprecedented high on-currents (up to ~120 microamperes per device) with high on/off ratios. The average on-current was ~ 3-4 microamperes per tube. The results demonstrated densely aligned high quality semiconducting SWNTs for integration into high performance nanoelectronics.

  18. Structural modeling of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates by molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawelek, L; Brodka, A; Dore, John C; Hannon, Alex C; Iijima, S; Yudasaka, M; Ohba, T; Kaneko, K; Burian, A

    2013-09-19

    The structure of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates has been modeled by classical molecular dynamics simulations, and the validity of the model has been verified by neutron diffraction. Computer-generated models consisted of an outer part formed from single-walled carbon nanohorns with diameters of 20-50 Å and a length of 400 Å and an inner turbostratic graphite-like core with a diameter of 130 Å. The diffracted intensity and the pair correlation function computed for such a constructed model are in good agreement with the neutron diffraction experimental data. The proposed turbostratic inner core explains the occurrence of the additional (002) and (004) graphitic peaks in the diffraction pattern of the studied sample and provides information about the interior structure of the dahlia-type aggregates. PMID:23978218

  19. Evaluation of the performance of single-walled carbon nanohorns in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Soto, Juan Manuel; Moliner-Martínez, Yolanda; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes for the first time the use of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as pseudostationary and stationary phases for EKC and CEC, respectively, taking advantage of their characteristic features, such as conical-end termination, formation of spherical assemblies dahlia-flower like superstructure and easy functionalization. The use of SWNHs as pseudostationary phase for EKC required the study of their dispersion in different surfactants as well as their compatibility with the electrophoretic system. The carboxylation and subsequent immobilization of carboxylated SWNHs in fused-silica capillary to obtain useful, reproducible and stable stationary phases for CEC has also been investigated, with promising results. The electrophoretic separations obtained for water-soluble vitamins in both modalities (EKC and CEC) have been systematically compared with those obtained with single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:20419702

  20. G-quartet type self-assembly of guanine functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Venkatesh, V.; Nagapradeep, N.; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy.The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the synthesis and characterization of the precursors and MWCNT conjugates. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11849a

  1. Experimental determination of excitonic band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes using circular dichroism spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yomogida, Yohei; Sato, Naomichi; Saito, Riichiro; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2016-10-01

    Experimental band structure analyses of single-walled carbon nanotubes have not yet been reported, to the best of our knowledge, except for a limited number of reports using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate the experimental determination of the excitonic band structures of single-chirality single-walled carbon nanotubes using their circular dichroism spectra. In this analysis, we use gel column chromatography combining overloading selective adsorption with stepwise elution to separate 12 different single-chirality enantiomers. Our samples show higher circular dichroism intensities than the highest values reported in previous works, indicating their high enantiomeric purity. Excitonic band structure analysis is performed by assigning all observed Eii and Eij optical transitions in the circular dichroism spectra. The results reproduce the asymmetric structures of the valence and conduction bands predicted by density functional theory. Finally, we demonstrate that an extended empirical formula can estimate Eij optical transition energies for any (n,m) species.

  2. Covalently attached multilayer self-assemblies of single-walled carbon nanotubols and diazoresins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Jiahua [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China); Qin, Yujun [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China); Luo Hongxia [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China); Guo, Zhi-Xin [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China); Woo, Hyung-Suk [Center for Organic Devices and Advanced Materials, Kyungsung University, Busan 608736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong-Kyu [Center for Organic Devices and Advanced Materials, Kyungsung University, Busan 608736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-12

    Layer-by-layer (LBL) multilayer films have been constructed from multiple hydroxyl group directly modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (single-walled carbon nanotubols, SWNTols) and light-sensitive diazoresin (DR). Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorbance spectra confirm that the alternate assemblies of SWNTols and DR result in uniform film growth. Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectra of the films show that the main driving force for DR/SWNTol assembly is attributed to hydrogen bond attractions rather than electrostatic interactions. Upon UV irradiation, the hydrogen bonds of the multilayer films transform into covalent bonds, which significantly improves the stability of the DR/SWNTol multilayer films towards etching by polar solvent. Atomic force and scanning electron microscopies (AFM and SEM) indicate high structural homogeneity of the assembled composite films.

  3. Diameter and Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Rui-Qin

    2011-01-01

    Temperature and diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of several armchair single-walled carbon nan-otubes (SWNTs) are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with Brenner II potential. The thermal conductivities are calculated at temperatures from WOK to 600K. It is found that the thermal conductivity decreases as the temperature increases and increases as the diameter of SWNT increases. The results demonstrate that these two phenomena are due to the onset of the Umklapp process.%@@ Temperature and diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of several armchair single-walled carbon nan- otubes (SWNTs) are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with Brenner Ⅱ potential.The thermal conductivities are calculated at temperatures from 100K to 600K.It is found that the thermal con- ductivity decreases as the temperature increases and increases as the diameter of SWNT increases.The results demonstrate that these two phenomena are due to the onset of the Umklapp process.

  4. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  5. Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes/polypyrrole composites for amperometric glucose biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Raicopol, Matei; Prună, Alina; Damian, Celina; Pilan, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an amperometric glucose biosensor based on a new type of nanocomposite of polypyrrole (PPY) with p-phenyl sulfonate-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-PhSO3 −). An environmentally friendly functionalization procedure of the SWCNTs in the presence of substituted aniline and an oxidative species was adopted. The nanocomposite-modified electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activities towards the reduction or oxidation of H2O2. This feature allowed...

  6. Gate-induced blueshift and quenching of photoluminescence in suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yasukochi, S.; Murai, T.; Moritsubo, S.; Shimada, T; Chiashi, S.; Maruyama, S.; Kato, Y. K.

    2011-01-01

    Gate-voltage effects on photoluminescence spectra of suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated. Photoluminescence microscopy and excitation spectroscopy are used to identify individual nanotubes and to determine their chiralities. Under an application of gate voltage, we observe slight blueshifts in the emission energy. In addition, we find that the photoluminescence intensity decreases exponentially with gate voltage. Quenching of the K-momentum exciton emission is also obser...

  7. Radiative lifetimes and coherence lengths of one-dimensional excitons in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hirori, Hideki; Matsuda, Kazunari; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the radiative lifetimes and the one-dimensional exciton coherence lengths in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The radiative lifetimes determined from simultaneous measurements of photoluminescence (PL) lifetimes and PL quantum yields range from ~3 to 10 ns, and slightly increase with the tube diameter. The exciton coherence lengths in SWNTs are of the order of 10 nm, as deduced from the experimentally obtained radiative lifetimes, and they are about ten times larger than t...

  8. Nonlinear Photoluminescence Properties of Trions in Hole-doped Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Akizuki, Naoto; Iwamura, Munechiyo; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Kawasaki, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Watanabe, Kouta; Asano, Kenichi; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2014-01-01

    We studied the excitation density dependence of photoluminescence (PL) spectra of excitons and trions (charged excitons) in hole-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the PL intensity of trions exhibited a strong nonlinear saturation behavior as the excitation density increased, whereas that of excitons exhibited a weak sublinear behavior. The strong PL saturation of trions is attributed to depletion of doped holes that are captured by excitons in the formation processes. Moreov...

  9. Exciton diffusion in air-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Moritsubo, S.; Murai, T.; Shimada, T; Murakami, Y.; Chiashi, S.; Maruyama, S.; Kato, Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurements of the diffusion length of excitons in air-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes are reported. Photoluminescence microscopy is used to identify individual nanotubes and to determine their lengths and chiral indices. Exciton diffusion length is obtained by comparing the dependence of photoluminescence intensity on the nanotube length to numerical solutions of diffusion equations. We find that the diffusion length in these clean, as-grown nanotubes is significantly longer...

  10. Exciton Diffusion in Air-Suspended Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Moritsubo, S.; Murai, T.; Shimada, T; Murakami, Y.; Chiashi, S.; Maruyama, S.; Kato, Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurements of the diffusion length of excitons in air-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes are reported. Photoluminescence microscopy is used to identify individual nanotubes and to determine their lengths and chiral indices. Exciton diffusion length is obtained by comparing the dependence of photoluminescence intensity on the nanotube length to numerical solutions of diffusion equations. We find that the diffusion length in these clean, as-grown nanotubes is significantly longer...

  11. Photoluminescence from single walled carbon nanotubes: a comparison between suspended and micelle-encapsulated nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Lefebvre, J.; Fraser, J. M.; Homma, Y; Finnie, P.

    2003-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are luminescent. Up to now, two preparation methods, both of which isolate individual SWNTs, have enabled the detection of nanotube bandgap photoluminescence (PL): encapsulation of individual SWNTs into surfactant micelles, and direct growth of individual SWNTs suspended in air between pillars. This paper compares the PL obtained from suspended SWNTs to published PL data obtained from encapsulated SWNTs. We find that emission peaks are blue-shifted by 28...

  12. Photoluminescence intermittency in an individual single-walled carbon nanotube at room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, K; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Irie, K.; Saiki, T.; Someya, T; Miyauchi, Y.; Maruyama, S.

    2005-01-01

    We described the photoluminescence (PL) properties of individual micelle-encapsulated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at room temperature. Single PL peak from isolated individual SWNT with a chiral index of (6, 5) showed a linear increase and saturation behavior of the PL intensity. Unusual PL intensity fluctuation in the temporal evolutions of the PL intensity, referred to as PL intermittency, was seen with some SWNTs, while the PL intensity with most SWNTs remained at a constant ampl...

  13. Gate-induced blueshift and quenching of photoluminescence in suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Yasukochi, S.; Murai, T.; Moritsubo, S.; Shimada, T; Chiashi, S.; Maruyama, S.; Kato, Y. K.

    2011-01-01

    Gate-voltage effects on photoluminescence spectra of suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated. Photoluminescence microscopy and excitation spectroscopy are used to identify individual nanotubes and to determine their chiralities. Under an application of gate voltage, we observe slight blueshifts in the emission energy and strong quenching of photoluminescence. The blueshifts are similar for different chiralities investigated, suggesting extrinsic mechanisms. In addition, we f...

  14. EPR investigation of N@C$_{70}$ in polycrystalline C$_{70}$ and single wall carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Dinse, Klaus-Peter; Corzilius, Björn; Jakes, Peter; Weiden, Norbert; Agarwal, Suman

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Using multi frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) it was possible to determine the inherent fine structure (FS) interaction of nitrogen encapsulated in a C$_{70}$ cage. Confinement of N@C$_{70}$ in single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) of rather wide diameter does not significantly influence this value. The transition between isotropic molecular tumbling and immobilisation was found to occur at about 170~K in both matrices, indicating that the hindra...

  15. Design and Fabrication of Single-Walled Carbon Nanonet Flexible Strain Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Trung Kien Vu; Ru-Min Chao; Ya-Ting Huang; Chih-Chao Hsu; Shyh-Chour Huang

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a novel flexible strain sensor for real-time strain sensing. The material for strain sensing is single-walled carbon nanonets, grown using the alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition method, that were encapsulated between two layers of Parylene-C, with a polyimide layer as the sensing surface. All of the micro-fabrication was compatible with the standard IC process. Experimental results indicated that the gauge factor of the proposed strain sensor was larger than 4.5, ...

  16. Microbiosensors based on DNA modified single-walled carbon nanotube and Pt black nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    SHI, JIN; Cha, Tae-Gon; Claussen, Jonathan; Diggs, Alfred R.; Choi, Jong Hyun; Porterfield, D. Marshall

    2011-01-01

    Glucose and ATP biosensors have important applications in diagnostics and research. Biosensors based on conventional materials suffer from low sensitivity and low spatial resolution. Our previous work has shown that combining single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with Pt nanoparticles can significantly enhance the performance of electrochemical biosensors. The immobilization of SWCNTs on biosensors remains challenging due to the aqueous insolubility originating from van der Waals forces. In...

  17. Chirality dependence of the radial breathing phonon mode density in single wall carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Vamivakas, A. N.; Yin, Y.; Walsh, A. G.; Unlu, M. S.; Goldberg, B. B.; Swan, A. K.

    2006-01-01

    A mass and spring model is used to calculate the phonon mode dispersion for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) of arbitrary chirality. The calculated dispersions are used to determine the chirality dependence of the radial breathing phonon mode (RBM) density. Van Hove singularities, usually discussed in the context of the single particle electronic excitation spectrum, are found in the RBM density of states with distinct qualitative differences for zig zag, armchair and chiral SWNTs. The in...

  18. Electromagnetic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes investigated by microwave absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Corzilius, Björn

    2008-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are very interesting candidates for the development of new electronic devices. Some of these properties, e.g., a possible transition to a superconducting phase or the existence of ordered magnetic states, are still under investigation and intensively discussed. Macroscopic amounts of SWNT can hitherto only be obtained as mixtures of tubes of different electronic properties. Therefore researchers have always been interested ...

  19. The Effects of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear Piezoelectricity of Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Conrad; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Shear piezoelectricity was investigated in a series of composites consisting of increased loadings of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in poly (gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate), or PBLG. The effects of the SWCNTs on this material property in PBLG will be discussed. Their influence on the morphology of the polymer (degree of orientation and crystallinity), and electrical and dielectric properties of the composite will be reported

  20. Grafting of Chitosan and Chitosantrimethoxylsilylpropyl Methacrylate on Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes-Synthesis and Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Carson, Laura; Kelly-Brown, Cordella; Stewart, Melisa; Oki, Aderemi; Regisford, Gloria; Stone, Julia; Traisawatwong, Pasakorn; Durand-Rougely, Clarissa; Luo, Zhiping

    2010-01-01

    Acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grafted to chitosan by first reacting the oxidized CNTs with thionyl chloride to form acyl-chlorinated CNTs. This product was subsequently dispersed in chitosan and covalently grafted to form CNT-chitosan. CNT-chitosan was further grafted onto 3-trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate by free radical polymerization conditions, to yield CNT-g-chitosan-g-3-trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (TMSPM), hereafter referred to as CNT-chitosan-...

  1. A study of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified by organics of the phthalocyanine category

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Organics of the phthalocyanine category have very good nonlinear optical properties. The single-walled carbon nanotubes were modified by using the phenoxy phthalocyanine. Characterization analysis was made by means of the transmission electron microscope (TEM), ultraviolet visible absorptive spectra, fluorescent spectra and Raman spectra. Under the TEM, it was observed that the composite looked like sugarcoated haws. By comparing the ultraviolet visible absorptive spectra before and after absorption, it was...

  2. Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube networks using monodisperse metallic nanocatalysts encapsulated in reverse micelles

    OpenAIRE

    Gayduchenko Igor A.; Fedorov Georgy E.; Ibragimov Ramil A.; Stepanova Tatiana S.; Gazaliev Arsen S.; Vysochanskiy Nikolay A.; Bobrov Yuri A.; Malovichko Anton M.; Sosnin Ilya M.; Bobrinetskiy Ivan I.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a method of synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes percolated networks on silicon dioxide substrates using monodisperse Co and Ni catalyst. The catalytic nanoparticles were obtained by modified method of reverse micelles of bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate sodium in isooctane solution that provides the nanoparticle size control in range of 1 to 5 nm. The metallic nanoparticles of Ni and Co were characterized using transmission electron mi...

  3. Bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based atomic-scale mass sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Akbari, H. R.; Shaat, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2016-08-01

    The potentials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as mechanical resonators for atomic-scale mass sensing are presented. To this aim, a nonlocal continuum-based model is proposed to study the dynamic behavior of bridged single-walled carbon nanotube-based mass nanosensors. The carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered as an elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam with von Kármán type geometric nonlinearity. Eringen's nonlocal elastic field theory is utilized to model the interatomic long-range interactions within the structure of the CNT. This developed model accounts for the arbitrary position of the deposited atomic-mass. The natural frequencies and associated mode shapes are determined based on an eigenvalue problem analysis. An atom of xenon (Xe) is first considered as a specific case where the results show that the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the CNT are strongly dependent on the location of the deposited Xe and the nonlocal parameter of the CNT. It is also indicated that the first vibrational mode is the most sensitive when the mass is deposited at the middle of a single-walled carbon nanotube. However, when deposited in other locations, it is demonstrated that the second or third vibrational modes may be more sensitive. To investigate the sensitivity of bridged single-walled CNTs as mass sensors, different noble gases are considered, namely Xe, argon (Ar), and helium (He). It is shown that the sensitivity of the single-walled CNT to the Ar and He gases is much lower than the Xe gas due to the significant decrease in their masses. The derived model and performed analysis are so needed for mass sensing applications and particularly when the detected mass is randomly deposited.

  4. Molecular Simulation of Hydrogen Adsorption Density in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Multilayer Adsorption Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianquan GUO; Changxiang MA; Shuai WANG; He MA; Xin LI

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was studied by molecular dynamics (MD)sim.lation. It was found that the hydrogen molecules distribute regularly inside and outside of the tube. Density distribution was computed for H2 molecule. Theoretical analysis of the result showed the multilayer adsorption mechanism of SWCNTs. The storage of H2 in SWCNTs is computed, which provides essential theoretical reference for further study of hydrogen adsorption in SWCNTs.

  5. Atomistic Failure Mechanism of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes with Small Diameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Dong; GAO Xiang; KONG Xiang-Yang; LI Jia-Ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Single wall carbon nanotubes with small diameters (< 5.0 (A)) subjected to bending deformation are simulated by orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics approach. Based on the calculations of C-C bond stretching and breaking in the bending nanotubes, we elucidate the atomistic failure mechanisms of nanotube with small diameters. In the folding zone of bending nanotube, a large elongation of C-C bonds occurs, accounting for the superelastic behaviour.

  6. Dielectrophoresis Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as pH Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Xue; Kan Kan Yeung; Martin, Caleb M.; Pengfei Li

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the fabrication and characterization of pH sensors using aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The SWNTs are dispersed in deionized (DI) water after chemical functionalization and filtration. They are deposited and organized on silicon substrates with the dielectrophoresis process. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns—fabricated with photolithography and wet etching—are used to generate concentrated electric fields and strong dielectrophoretic forces for the SWNTs to...

  7. Large Deflections Mechanical Analysis of a Suspended Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube under Thermoelectrical Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Assaf Ya'akobovitz; Slava Krylov; Yael Hanein

    2011-01-01

    Following the recent progress in integrating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into silicon-based micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), new modeling tools are needed to predict their behavior under different loads, including thermal, electrical and mechanical. In the present study, the mechanical behavior of SWCNTs under thermoelectrical loading is analyzed using a large deflection geometrically nonlinear string model. The effect of the resistive heating was found to have a substantial ...

  8. Large magnetoresistance in single-walled carbon nanotubes contacted different ferromagnetic metal electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetoresistance (MR) in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different ferromagnetic source and drain electrodes (iron and cobalt) which have different coercivity was studied. Large MR ratio of 20% could be obtained at 8 K, while 1∼2% small MR ratio could be observed for the sample with the same ferromagnetic source and drain electrodes of Co. The MR ratio of 20% is very close to the theoretically predicted value of 26% for Co-Fe system

  9. Gold Nanoparticles as the Catalyst of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikazu Homma

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been proven to act as efficient catalysts for chemical reactions, such as oxidation and hydrogen production. In this review we focus on a different aspect of the catalysis of gold nanoparticles; single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) synthesis. This is not a traditional meaning of catalytic reaction, but SWCNTs cannot be synthesized without nanoparticles. Previously, gold was considered as unsuitable metal species as the catalyst of SWCNT synthesis. However, gold nanopa...

  10. Single-wall carbon nanotube dispersions stabilised with N-trimethyl-chitosan

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, A; Smith, James; Bouropoulos, N.; Yannopoulos, S.; Van der Merwe, Marisa; Fatouros, D.

    2008-01-01

    We report the noncovalent complexation of a biocompatible low substituted N-trimethyl chitosan (TMC), a cationic chitosan derivative, onto the graphitic surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). TMC was synthesized and characterized by 1H-NMR. A yield between the range of 34% and 56% was obtained with a degree of substitution of 19.7%. SWCNTs dispersed in TMC resulted in stable dispersions, which were further characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) Raman Spectroscopy and ζ-po...

  11. Strain Induced Insulator-Metal Transition in Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁建文; 颜晓红; 刘超平; 唐娜斯

    2004-01-01

    In terms of a single-π orbital model, an analytical expression of the lowest-lying conduction-band and the highestlying valence-band is derived for single wall carbon nanotubes under both the uniaxial and torsional strains. We observe not only semiconductor-metal transitions in primary metallic tubes, but also insulator-metal transitions in semiconducting tubes. Additionally, an indirect transition of electrons and a quantized electron-resonance have been expected in optical spectrum experiments of the nanotubes.

  12. Carbon nanotube-nucleobase hybrids: nanorings from uracil-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Toma, Francesca Maria; Kumar, Jitendra; Venkatesh, V; Raya, Jesus; Prato, Maurizio; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been covalently functionalized with uracil nucleobase. The hybrids have been characterized by using complementary spectroscopic and microscopic techniques including solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The uracil-functionalized SWCNTs are able to self-assemble into regular nanorings with a diameter of 50-70 nm, as observed by AFM and TEM. AFM shows that the rings do not have a consistent height and thickness, which indicates that they may be formed by separate bundles of CNTs. The simplest model for the nanoring formation likely involves two bundles of CNTs interacting with each other via uracil-uracil base-pairing at both CNT ends. These nanorings can be envisaged for the development of advanced electronic circuits.

  13. Fabrication and electrochemical behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube/graphite-based electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, Abdolmajid Bayandori [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Medical Nanotechnology Research Centre, Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6451, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Ganjali@khayam.ut.ac.ir; Dinarvand, Rassoul [Medical Nanotechnology Research Centre, Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6451, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razavi, Taherehsadat [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riahi, Siavash [Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed [Department of Biology, Payam-e-Noor University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Norouzi, Parviz [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran P.O. Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical method for determining the dihydroxybenzene derivatives on glassy carbon (GC) has been developed. In this method, the performance of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/graphite-based electrode, prepared by mixing SWCNTs and graphite powder, was described. The resulting electrode shows an excellent behavior for redox of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DBA). SWCNT/graphite-based electrode presents a significant decrease in the overvoltage for DBA oxidation as well as a dramatic improvement in the reversibility of DBA redox behavior in comparison with graphite-based and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) procedures performed for used SWCNTs.

  14. Identification of nitrogen dopants in single-walled carbon nanotubes by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison, Yann; Lin, Hong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie; Henrard, Luc; Zheng, Bing; Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ducastelle, François; Loiseau, Annick

    2013-08-27

    Using scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, we investigated the atomic and electronic structure of nitrogen-doped single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. The insertion of nitrogen in the carbon lattice induces several types of point defects involving different atomic configurations. Spectroscopic measurements on semiconducting nanotubes reveal that these local structures can induce either extended shallow levels or more localized deep levels. In a metallic tube, a single doping site associated with a donor state was observed in the gap at an energy close to that of the first van Hove singularity. Density functional theory calculations reveal that this feature corresponds to a substitutional nitrogen atom in the carbon network.

  15. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai;

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution...

  16. Mechanical Properties of Single-Walled (5,5) Carbon Nanotubes with Vacancy Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Shi-Jun; KONG Yong; LI Fa-Shen

    2007-01-01

    First-principles simulation is used to investigate the structural and mechanical properties of vacancy defective single-walled (5,5) carbon nanotubes. The relations of the defect concentration, distribution and characteristic of defects to Young's modulus of nanotubes are quantitatively studied. It is found that each dangling-bond structure (per supercell) decreases Young's modulus of nanotube by 6.1% for symmetrical distribution cases. However the concentrative vacancy structure with saturated atoms has less influence on carbon nanotubes. It is suggested that the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes depend strongly upon the structure and relative position of vacancies in a certain defect concentration.

  17. Synthesis of dark brown single-walled carbon nanotubes and their characterization by HSQC-NMR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rahebeh Amiri; Hamidreza Rafiee; Ashkan Golshani; Firoozeh Chalabian

    2013-03-01

    We report here a simple and effective approach to the covalent attachment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and azo compounds. The functionalized SWCNTs prepared (through a radical mechanism) have been used for a diazonium coupling reaction. The results showed that the chemical method used has improved the processability and solubility of the carbon nanotubes. The dark brown SWCNTs obtained which can produce a yellow colour in organic solvents were characterized by different spectroscopic analyses. Heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectra (13C-1H HSQC) have been used to detect the carbon nanotube allylic protons. The morphology of the main product has been shown by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  18. New Method Developed To Purify Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable attention because of their remarkable mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivities. Use of these materials as primary or secondary reinforcements in polymers or ceramics could lead to new materials with significantly enhanced mechanical strength and electrical and thermal conductivity. Use of carbon-nanotube-reinforced materials in aerospace components will enable substantial reductions in component weight and improvements in durability and safety. Potential applications for single wall carbon nanotubes include lightweight components for vehicle structures and propulsion systems, fuel cell components (bipolar plates and electrodes) and battery electrodes, and ultra-lightweight materials for use in solar sails. A major barrier to the successful use of carbon nanotubes in these components is the need for methods to economically produce pure carbon nanotubes in large enough quantities to not only evaluate their suitability for certain applications but also produce actual components. Most carbon nanotube synthesis methods, including the HiPCO (high pressure carbon monoxide) method developed by Smalley and others, employ metal catalysts that remain trapped in the final product. These catalyst impurities can affect nanotube properties and accelerate their decomposition. The development of techniques to remove most, if not all, of these impurities is essential to their successful use in practical applications. A new method has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to purify gram-scale quantities of single wall carbon nanotubes. This method, a modification of a gas phase purification technique previously reported by Smalley and others, uses a combination of high-temperature oxidations and repeated extractions with nitric and hydrochloric acid. This improved procedure significantly reduces the amount of impurities (catalyst and nonnanotube forms of carbon) within the nanotubes, increasing

  19. The Infinite Possible Growth Ambients that Support Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Forest Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroe; Goto, Jundai; Yasuda, Satoshi; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Yumura, Motoo; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    We report the virtually infinite possible carbon feedstocks which support the highly efficient growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using on the water-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. Our results demonstrate that diverse varieties of carbon feedstocks, in the form of hydrocarbons, spanning saturated rings (e.g. trans-deca-hydronaphthalene), saturated chains (e.g. propane), unsaturated rings (e.g. dicyclopentadiene), and unsaturated chains (e.g. ethylene) could be used as a carbon feedstocks with SWCNT forests with heights exceeding 100 ums. Further, we found that all the resultant SWCNTs possessed similar average diameter indicating that the diameter was mainly determined by the catalyst rather than the carbon feedstock within this synthetic system. A demonstration of the generality was the synthesis of a carbon nanotube forest from a highly unorthodox combination of gases where trans-decahydronaphthalene acted as the carbon feedstock and benzaldehyde acted as the growth enhancer.

  20. Identification of excitonic phonon sideband by photoluminescence spectroscopy of single-walled carbon-13 nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Miyauchi, Yuhei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2005-01-01

    We have studied photoluminescence (PL) and resonant Raman scatterings of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) consisting of carbon-13 (SW13CNTs) synthesized from a small amount of isotopically modified ethanol. There was almost no change in the Raman spectra shape for SW13CNTs except for a downshift of the Raman shift frequency by the square-root of the mass ratio 12/13. By comparing photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of SW13CNTs and normal SWNTs, the excitonic phonon sideband due t...

  1. Field-ion microscopy observation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆祥; 张耿民; 杜民; 金新喜; 侯士敏; 孙建平; 顾镇南; 赵兴钰; 刘惟敏; 吴锦雷; 薛增泉

    2002-01-01

    Field-ion microscopy (FIM), a tool for surface analysis with atomic resolution, has been employed to observethe end structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). FIM images revealed the existence of open SWCNTends. Amorphous carbon atoms were also observed to occur around SWCNTs and traditional field evaporation failedto remove them. Heat treatment was found to be efficacious in altering the end structures of SWCNT bundles. Carbonand oxygen atoms released from heated tungsten filament are believed to be responsible for the decoration imposed onthe SWCNT ends.

  2. Dependence of Thermal Conductivity on Thickness in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Min; Shrestha, Ramesh; Dangol, Ashesh; Chang, Won Seok; Coker, Zachary; Choi, Tae-Youl

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report experimentally dependence of thermal conductivity on thickness of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) thin films; the measurements are based on the micropipette thermal sensor technique. Accurate and well resolved measurements of thermal conductivity made by the micropipette sensor showed a correlated behavior of thickness and thermal conductivity of CNT films that thermal conductivity decreased as thickness increased. The thickness dependence is explained by reduction of mean free path (MFP), which is induced by more intertubular junctions in more dense-packed carbon nanotube (CNT) networks; the thicker SWCNT films were revealed to have higher density. PMID:27398564

  3. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zangeneh, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Firoozeh Karimi [Department of Photonics, Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes.

  4. Immobilization of Lipase on Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Ionic Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lipase from Pseudomonas cepacia was immobilized onto single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in two different ways in each of two solvent systems (buffer and ionic liquid). The most efficient immobilization was achieved in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, BMIM-BF4). In this procedure, carbon nanotubes were first functionalized noncovalently with 1-pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester and then subject to the coupling reaction with the lipase in ionic liquid. The resulting immobilized enzyme displayed the highest activity in the transesterification of 1-phenylethyl alcohol in the presence of vinyl acetate in toluene

  5. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Yun, H.; McAllister, K.; Lee, S. W., E-mail: leesw@konkuk.ac.kr [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Na, J.; Kim, G. T. [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B. J.; Kim, J. J.; Jeong, G. H. [Department of Nano Applied Engineering, Kangwon National University, Kangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, I.; Kim, K. S. [Department of Physics and Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-20

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode patterns on top of the aligned SWNT along one direction. Both single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials; typical p-type transistor and Schottky diode behavior were observed, respectively. Based on our fabrication method and device performances, several issues are suggested and discussed to improve the device reliability and finally to realize all carbon based future electronic systems.

  6. Theoretical studies of C36 encapsulated in zigzag single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The one-dimensional hybrid structures of C36 encapsulated in zigzag single-wall carbon nanotubes (C36@(n,0)) have been investigated using ab initio self-consistent-field crystal orbital method based on the density functional theory. The research focuses on the change of geometric and band structures for the nanotubes upon C36 encapsulation. The obtained results show that the introduction of C36 can modify the electronic properties of CNT. The diameter of carbon nanotube plays an important role in the geometric and electronic properties of the peapod structures.

  7. Electrochemical Characterization of Films of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Possible Application in Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chong-yang; Bard, Allen J.; Wudl, Fred; Weitz, Iris; Heath, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Films of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were cast from suspensions in several solvents on the surface of a Pt or Au electrode. Cyclic voltammetry of the films in MeCN did not show well-resolved waves (as distinct from films of C_(60) prepared in a similar manner). However, the increase in the effective capacitance of the electrode with a SWCNT film at 0.5 V vs. an AgQRE was 283 F/g, which is about twice that of carbon electrodes in nonaqueous solvents.

  8. Growth of forest of single-walled carbon nanotubes at inhomogeneous fluxes from plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of forest of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is studied using a deposition model. The inhomogeneity in deposition of neutrals from plasma on the SWCNTs, which is typical for growth of the nano structures in PECVD, is accounted for. It is investigated how the growth rate and the residence time of carbon atoms on SWCNT surfaces depend on the SWCNT length and the decay length characterizing deposition of neutral fluxes on the SWCNTs. The obtained results can be used for optimizing the synthesis of related nano assembles in low-temperature plasma-assisted nano fabrication

  9. Fabrication and electrical properties of single wall carbon nanotube channel and graphene electrode based transistors arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transistor structure composed of an individual single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) channel with a graphene electrode was demonstrated. The integrated arrays of transistor devices were prepared by transferring patterned graphene electrode patterns on top of the aligned SWNT along one direction. Both single and multi layer graphene were used for the electrode materials; typical p-type transistor and Schottky diode behavior were observed, respectively. Based on our fabrication method and device performances, several issues are suggested and discussed to improve the device reliability and finally to realize all carbon based future electronic systems

  10. Effective permittivity of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: Two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop an effective medium theory to obtain effective permittivity of a composite of two-dimensional (2D) aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Electronic excitations on each nanotube surface are modeled by an infinitesimally thin layer of a 2D electron gas represented by two interacting fluids, which takes into account different nature of the σ and π electrons. Calculations of both real and imaginary parts of the effective dielectric function of the system are presented, for different values of the filling factor and radius of carbon nanotubes

  11. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes purified and cut using polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Yudasaka, M.; Koshio, A.; Jabs, C.; Ichihashi, T.; Iijima, S.

    2002-01-01

    Following on from our previous report that a monochlorobenzene solution of polymethylmethacrylate is useful for purifying and cutting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and thinning SWNT bundles, we show in this report that polymer and residual amorphous carbon can be removed by burning in oxygen gas. The SWNTs thus obtained had many holes (giving them a worm-eaten look) and were thermally unstable. Such severe damage caused by oxidation is unusual for SWNTs; we think that they were chemically damaged during ultrasonication in the monochlorobenzene solution of polymethylmethacrylate.

  12. Double Layer Charging for Conductivity Enhancement of Pure Metallic and Semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Nathanael; Kuznetsov, Alexander; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2011-03-01

    Injecting high electronic charge densities can profoundly change the optical, electrical, and magnetic properties of materials. Evidence suggests a possibility of significantly improving conductivity of carbon nanotubes through double layer charge injection. Double layer charge injection can prove to be a powerful method when applied to carbon nanotubes because of theirs high surface area and chemical stability. Investigation has commenced on the effect of charging on various types of carbon nanotubes, specifically 99% purified single wall semiconducting and single wall metallic tubes. An electrical double layer is electrochemically introduced upon a sheet of carbon nanotubes via application of potential (up to +/- 5 volts) to a sample immersed in ionic-liquid-based electrolyte. Resistance of carbon nanotube as a function of applied charging voltage is recorded to determine the effects of charge injection. Results show that the electrical double layer considerably reduces the resistance across both samples. ESR/LFMA studies combined with low temperature magnetic and transport measurements are conducted to search for charge injection induced superconductivity in carbon nanotubes. Supported by AFOSR grant FA 9550-09-1-0384.

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotubes modified carbon ionic liquid electrode for sensitive electrochemical detection of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Zhihong [Institute of Nano-Science and Technology Center, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Sun Xiaoying; Zhuang Xiaoming [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Zeng Yan [Institute of Nano-Science and Technology Center, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Sun Wei, E-mail: sunwei@qust.edu.c [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Huang Xintang [Institute of Nano-Science and Technology Center, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2010-11-01

    The single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) modified carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE) was designed and further used for the voltammetric detection of rutin in this paper. CILE was prepared by mixing graphite powder with ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and liquid paraffin together. Based on the interaction of SWCNTs with IL present on the electrode surface, a stable SWCNTs film was formed on the CILE to get a modified electrode denoted as SWCNTs/CILE. The characteristics of SWCNTs/CILE were recorded by different methods including cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of rutin on the SWCNTs/CILE were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Due to the specific interface provided by the SWCNTs-IL film, the electrochemical response of rutin was greatly enhanced with a pair of well-defined redox peaks appeared in pH 2.5 phosphate buffer solution. The oxidation peak currents showed good linear relationship with the rutin concentration in the range from 1.0 x 10{sup -7} to 8.0 x 10{sup -4} mol/L with the detection limit as 7.0 x 10{sup -8} mol/L (3{sigma}). The SWCNTs/CILE showed the advantages such as excellent selectivity, improved performance, good stability and it was further applied to the rutin tablets sample detection with satisfactory results.

  14. Effects of phosphorus-doping upon the electronic structures of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN AQing; SHAO QingYi; LIN ZhiCheng

    2009-01-01

    The phosphorus-doped single wall carbon nanotube (PSWCNT) is studied by using First-Principle methods based on Density Function Theory (DFT). The formation energy, total energy, band structure, geometry structure and density of states are calculated. It is found that the formation energy of the P-doped single carbon nanotubes increases with diameters; the total energy of carbon nanotubes with the same diameter decreases as the doping rate increases. The effects of impurity position on the im-purity level are discussed. It illustrates that the position of the impurity level may depend on the C-P-C bond angle. According to the above results, it is feasible to substitute a carbon atom with a phosphorus atom in SWCNT. It is also found that P-doped carbon nanotubes are N type semiconductor.

  15. Effects of phosphorus-doping upon the electronic structures of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The phosphorus-doped single wall carbon nanotube(PSWCNT) is studied by using First-Principle methods based on Density Function Theory(DFT).The formation energy,total energy,band structure,geometry structure and density of states are calculated.It is found that the formation energy of the P-doped single carbon nanotubes increases with diameters;the total energy of carbon nanotubes with the same diameter decreases as the doping rate increases.The effects of impurity position on the impurity level are discussed.It illustrates that the position of the impurity level may depend on the C-P-C bond angle.According to the above results,it is feasible to substitute a carbon atom with a phosphorus atom in SWCNT.It is also found that P-doped carbon nanotubes are N type semiconductor.

  16. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M; Mutter, George L; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1-25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure. PMID:27538480

  17. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R.; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-08-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1–25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure.

  18. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  19. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Probe of Luttinger Liquid Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudow, Joel D; Santavicca, Daniel F; Prober, Daniel E

    2016-08-10

    Luttinger liquid theory predicts that collective electron excitations due to strong electron-electron interactions in a one-dimensional (1D) system will result in a modification of the collective charge-propagation velocity. By utilizing a circuit model for an individual metallic single-walled carbon nanotube as a nanotransmission line, it has been shown that the frequency-dependent terahertz impedance of a carbon nanotube can probe this expected 1D Luttinger liquid behavior. We excite terahertz standing-wave resonances on individual antenna-coupled metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. The terahertz signal is rectified using the nanotube contact nonlinearity, allowing for a low-frequency readout of the coupled terahertz current. The charge velocity on the nanotube is determined from the terahertz spectral response. Our measurements show that a carbon nanotube can behave as a Luttinger liquid system with charge-propagation velocities that are faster than the Fermi velocity. Understanding what determines the charge velocity in low-dimensional conductors is important for the development of next generation nanodevices. PMID:27439013

  20. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.;

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type...... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution....

  1. Defect-Induced Photoluminescence from Dark Excitonic States in Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Harutyunyan, Hayk; Gokus, Tobias; Green, Alexander A.; Hersam, Mark C.; Allegrini, Maria; Hartschuh, Achim

    2009-01-01

    We show that new low-energy photoluminescence (PL) bands can be created in the spectra of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by intense pulsed excitation. The new bands are attributed to PL from different nominally dark excitons that are “brightened” because of a defect-induced mixing of states with different parity and/or spin. Time-resolved PL studies on single nanotubes reveal a significant reduction of the bright exciton lifetime upon brightening of the dark excitons. The lowes...

  2. Diameter-dependent bending dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Nikta; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A.; Cognet, Laurent; Weisman, R. Bruce; Pasquali, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    By relating nanotechnology to soft condensed matter, understanding the mechanics and dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in fluids is crucial for both fundamental and applied science. Here, we study the Brownian bending dynamics of individual chirality-assigned SWCNTs in water by fluorescence microscopy. The bending stiffness scales as the cube of the nanotube diameter and the shape relaxation times agree with the semiflexible chain model. This suggests that SWCNTs may be the archetypal semiflexible filaments, highly suited to act as nanoprobes in complex fluids or biological systems. PMID:19706503

  3. Universal empirical formula for optical transition energies of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Ahmed Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A general empirical relation for calculating first seven optical transition energies of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs is proposed here for the first time. The proposed formula effectively relates first seven optical transition energies of semiconducting SWCNTs with their chiral indices (n, m through exponential form containing two specific terms (n+2m and (2n-m. Both mod 1 and mod 2 types of semiconducting tubes are considered here over a wide diameter range from 0.4 nm to 4.75 nm. It was observed that the proposed empirical relations can predict the recent experimental data of those optical transitions with high accuracy.

  4. Gold Nanoparticles as the Catalyst of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Homma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have been proven to act as efficient catalysts for chemical reactions, such as oxidation and hydrogen production. In this review we focus on a different aspect of the catalysis of gold nanoparticles; single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT synthesis. This is not a traditional meaning of catalytic reaction, but SWCNTs cannot be synthesized without nanoparticles. Previously, gold was considered as unsuitable metal species as the catalyst of SWCNT synthesis. However, gold nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 5 nm were found to effectively produce SWCNTs. We discuss the catalysis of gold and related metals for SWCNT synthesis in comparison with conventional catalysts, such as iron, cobalt, and nickel.

  5. Explicit solution of the radial breathing mode frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tienchong Chang

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of a molecular mechanics model, an analytical solution of the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is obtained. The effects of tube chirality and tube diameter on the RBM frequency are investigated and good agreement between the present results and existing data is found. The present analytical formula indicates that the chirality and size dependent elastic properties are responsible for the effects of the chirality and small size on the RBM frequency of an SWCNT.

  6. The lowest optical phonon mode of small single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Yan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that the lowest optical phonon mode (LOM of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs is not always a E2g mode for achiral tube or E2 mode for chiral tube.For some small SWCNTs of which the periodic unit length along tube axis is larger than its circumference,the LOM is the standing wave along the tube axis.By the present numerical calculation based on empirical potential,we confirm that the energy of such an optical phonon mode is inversely proportional to the tube radius.

  7. Tailoring of Single Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Hydrogen Storage and Catalyst Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hui [ORNL; Zhao, Bin [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Styers-Barnett, David J [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Brown, Craig M. [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN; Liu, Yun [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN; Zhou, Wei [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Kabbour, Houria [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Neumann, Dan [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    2007-01-01

    We report the post-processing chemical treatments of single walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) as a medium with tunable porosity to optimize hydrogen adsorption. Laser synthesized SWNHs are oxidized in air to achieve surface areas up to 1900 m2/g. Chemistry methods are described for the decoration of SWNHs with 1-3 nm Pt nanoparticles to probe spillover and metal-assisted hydrogen storage mechanisms. Hydrogen storage of opened SWNHs is 2.6 wt% at 77K, which is 3 times as that of as-prepared SWNHs.

  8. Stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhen; Liu, Chun-Jian; Lv, Hang; Liu, Bing-Bing

    2016-08-01

    The helicity of stable double helical iodine chains inside single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied by calculating the systematic interaction energy. Our results present clear images of stable double helical structures inside SWCNTs. The optimum helical radius and helical angle increase and decrease with increasing diameter, respectively. The tube's diameter plays a leading role in the helicity of encapsulated structures, while the tube's chirality may induce different metastable structures. This study indicates that the observed double helical iodine chains in experiments are not necessarily the optimum structures, but may also be metastable structures.

  9. Tunable Adsorption and Desorption of Hydrogen Atoms on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵明文; 夏日源; 马玉臣; 英敏菊; 刘向东; 梅良模

    2002-01-01

    Chemical adsorption and desorption of hydrogen atoms on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are investi-gated by using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the adsorption and desorption energy of hydrogenatoms depend on the hydrogen coverage and the diameter of the SWNTs. Hydrogen-adsorption geometry at thecoverage of 1.0 is more energetically stable. The adsorption energy decreases with the increasing diameter ofthe armchair tubes. The adsorption and desorption energy of hydrogen atoms can be modified reversibly byexternally radial deformation. The averaged C-H bond energy on the high curvature sites of the deformed tubeincreases with increasing radial deformation, while that on the low curvature sites decreases.

  10. Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.A. [Kyoto Univ., Katsura (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Quaid-i-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). National Centre for Physics; Iqbal, Z. [University of Management and Technology, Sialkot (Pakistan); Wazir, Z. [Riphah International Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Basic Sciences; Rehman, Aman ur [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-08-01

    Quantum ion-acoustic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes are studied by employing a quantum hydrodynamics model. The dispersion equation is obtained by Fourier transformation, which exhibits the existence of quantum ion-acoustic wave affected by change of density balance due to presence of positive or negative heavy species as stationary ion clusters and wave potential at equilibrium. The numerical results are presented, and the role of quantum degeneracy, nanotube geometry, electron exchange-correlation effects, and concentration and polarity of heavy species on wave dispersion is pointed out for typical systems of interest.

  11. Interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and chromatography gel during size separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigate the underlying mechanism by which chromatography can be used for the separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the basis of their diameter or length, with a view to optimizing this popular process. Using the knowledge gained through diffusion ordered spectroscopy nuclear magnetic resonance (DOSY NMR) analysis and chromatographic experiments, we demonstrate the feasibility of separating SWNTs on the basis of diameter and length simultaneously within the one chromatography column. These findings are of relevance not just to the understanding of SWNT separation processes, but also to the industrial use of size-separated SWNTs. (paper)

  12. Effect of Topological Defects on Buckling Behavior of Single-walled Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guoxiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular dynamic simulation method has been employed to consider the critical buckling force, pressure, and strain of pristine and defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT under axial compression. Effects of length, radius, chirality, Stone–Wales (SW defect, and single vacancy (SV defect on buckling behavior of SWCNTs have been studied. Obtained results indicate that axial stability of SWCNT reduces significantly due to topological defects. Critical buckling strain is more susceptible to defects than critical buckling force. Both SW and SV defects decrease the buckling mode of SWCNT. Comparative approach of this study leads to more reliable design of nanostructures.

  13. Transparent and flexible high-performance supercapacitors based on single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanninen, Petri; Dang Luong, Nguyen; Hoang Sinh, Le; Anoshkin, Ilya V.; Tsapenko, Alexey; Seppälä, Jukka; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Kallio, Tanja

    2016-06-01

    Transparent and flexible energy storage devices have garnered great interest due to their suitability for display, sensor and photovoltaic applications. In this paper, we report the application of aerosol synthesized and dry deposited single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films as electrodes for an electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC). SWCNT films exhibit extremely large specific capacitance (178 F g‑1 or 552 μF cm‑2), high optical transparency (92%) and stability for 10 000 charge/discharge cycles. A transparent and flexible EDLC prototype is constructed with a polyethylene casing and a gel electrolyte.

  14. Fabrication of Dense Horizontally Aligned Arrays of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Vertically Aligned Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xueshen; Li, Qunqing; Xie, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Zou, Yuan; Liu, Junku; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2011-01-01

    The as-grown vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) arrays are transferred from the original silicon substrate to a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate, which acts as a stamp. Thin SWNT films can be applied from the stamp to the target substrate and subsequently treated by an ultrasonic process to reduce their thickness to 6.6 nm. The transferred SWNT thin film retains the advantageous super-alignment and high-density properties of the vertical SWNT arrays. The linear density, transmittance, and square resistance of the thin film are as high as 15 tubes per micrometer, 99% at 550 nm, and 16 kΩ, respectively.

  15. Midgap luminescence centers in single-wall carbon nanotubes created by ultraviolet illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakoubovskii, Konstantin; Minami, Nobutsugu; Kim, Yeji; Miyashita, Kanae; Kazaoui, Said; Nalini, Balakrishnan

    2006-10-01

    The authors report the effect of ultraviolet (UV) illumination on optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) isolated using various dispersants. It is demonstrated that even weak UV light (˜1mW/cm2) can irreversibly alter the SWCNT structure, thus resulting in the emergence of hitherto unknown, redshifted photoluminescence (PL) peaks with concomitant reduction in some of the original PL peaks. These UV-induced changes are characterized in detail and attributed to the creation of midgap PL centers.

  16. Record Endurance for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Based Memory Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We study memory devices consisting of single-walled carbon nanotube transistors with charge storage at the SiO2/nanotube interface. We show that this type of memory device is robust, withstanding over 105 operating cycles, with a current drive capability up to 10−6 A at 20 mV drain bias, thus competing with state-of-the-art Si-devices. We find that the device performance depends on temperature and pressure, while both endurance and data retention are improved in vacuum.

  17. Electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes filled with manganese halogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamova, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were filled with manganese chloride and manganese bromide by a capillary filling method. The electronic properties of the filled SWCNTs were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the encapsulated manganese halogenides led to hole doping of the SWCNTs due to the charge transfer from the nanotubes to the encapsulated compounds. The embedded MnCl2 had stronger doping effect on the SWCNTs than MnBr2.

  18. Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes by the vertical floating catalyst method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The vertical floating catalyst method is first used to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)continuously on a large scale by a newly developed technique and pyrolysis of n-hexane. Diameter distributions, microstructure and purity of the SWNTs film, rope and web are measured by Raman spectroscopy and electron microscope.The results show that SWNTs product has a high degree of orientation, a wide distribution of diameters (0.7-2.0 nm)and high purity of > 80%.``

  19. Quasi-One-Dimensional Solid Lattice and Liquid hydrogen in Single-Walled carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    英敏菊; 夏曰源; 赵明文; 刘向东; 李峰; 黄博达; 谭震宇

    2003-01-01

    We study the H2 molecules confined in single-walled carbon nanotubes by using molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations. It is found that the H2 molecules at zero-temperature with low density tend to condense. When the linear density of the H2 molecules in the tube increases, various quasi-one-dimensional solid lattices can be observed at Iow temperature. When the lattices are heated above room temperature, molecular H2 liquids with different density can be observed. The quenching behaviour of the H2 fluids is also examined.

  20. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with uracil, guanine, thymine and L-alanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silambarasan, D.; Iyakutti, K.; Vasu, V.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental investigation of functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (OSWCNTs) with three nucleic acid bases such as uracil, guanine, thymine and one amino acid, L-alanine is carried out. Initially, the SWCNTs are oxidized by acid treatment. Further, the oxidized SWCNTs are effectively functionalized with aforementioned biological compounds by ultrasonication. The diameter of OSWCNTs has increased after the adsorption of biological compounds. The cumulative Π-Π stacking, hydrogen bond and polar interaction are the key factors to realize the adsorption. The amount of adsorption of each biological compound is estimated. The adsorption of guanine is more among all the four biological compounds.

  1. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  2. Near-infrared fluorescent single walled carbon nanotube-chitosan composite: Interfacial strain transfer efficiency assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol Menamparambath, Mini; Arabale, Girish; Nikolaev, Pavel; Baik, Seunghyun; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2013-04-01

    Effective load transfer at the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-polymer interface is most desirable for mechanically reinforced polymer composites. Versatile layer-by-layer assembly technique achieved dispersion and uniform distribution of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)-solubilized SWCNTs within the polymer matrix. Electrostatic interaction between positively charged chitosan and negatively charged CMC facilitates design of an optically active biocompatible nanocomposite. Interfacial strain transfer efficiency of SWCNT-chitosan nanocomposite was assessed via SWCNT Raman and photoluminescence band shifts under uniaxial strain. Photoluminescence peak shift rates of individual semiconducting SWCNTs were investigated and compared with tight binding model calculations.

  3. Multi-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor cell targeting biological transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared and applied as tumor cell targeting biological transporters. A positive charge was introduced on SWNTs to get high loading efficiency of fluorescein (FAM) labeled short double strands DNA (20 base pairs). The SWNTs were encapsulated with the folic acid modified phospholipids for active targeting into tumor cell. The tumor cell-targeting properties of these multi-functionalized SWNTs were investigated by active targeting into mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells. The experimental results show that these multi-functionalized SWNTs have good tumor cell targeting property

  4. Reinforcement of semicrystalline polymers with collagen-modified single walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Salvetat, Jean-Paul; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2006-06-01

    We report on the enhancement of the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites through functionalization of SWNTs with denatured collagen. In addition to improving compatibility with the matrix, the denatured collagen layer was found to increase the PVA matrix crystallinity, which results in a dramatic enhancement of the Young's modulus (260%), tensile strength (300%), and toughness (700%) well above what can be expected with the classical rule of mixture. A supramolecular organization at the interface is associated with an increase of PVA crystallinity as shown by the x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry.

  5. Polarized resonance Raman spectroscopy of single-wall carbon nanotubes within a polymer under strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frogley, M. D.; Zhao, Q.; Wagner, H. D.

    2002-03-01

    The D* Raman band of single-wall carbon nanotubes aligned by shear flow in a polymer matrix has been measured as a function of tensile strain. The Raman intensity varies with the optical polarization direction, an effect which is used here to assess the degree of tube alignment. The strain dependence of the Raman shift depends strongly on the nanotube orientation and the polarization direction. We show that, using polarized light, unoriented nanotubes can be used as strain sensors so that no tube alignment is necessary and the strain can be measured in all directions in a single sample.

  6. Fatigue failure mechanisms of single-walled carbon nanotube ropes embedded in epoxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, fatigue failure mechanisms of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles embedded in epoxy matrix under repeated tensile load were studied. Observed damage and failure modes include: (1) splitting of SWCNT bundles, (2) kink formation and subsequent failure in SWCNTs, and (3) fracture of SWCNT bundles. Patterns of crack propagation under tension in SWCNTs were studied by molecular mechanics simulations, where defect-free SWCNTs and SWCNTs with two different modes of Stone-Wales defects were studied. It is demonstrated by the results of molecular mechanics simulation that the observed fracture surfaces of SWCNT can be reproduced reasonably well, suggesting possible fatigue failure mechanisms of SWCNT in the composite

  7. Transmission electron microscopy observations of fracture of single-wall carbon nanotubes under axial tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourie, O.; Wagner, H. D.

    1998-12-01

    Well-aligned bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes under tensile stresses were observed to fracture in real-time by transmission electron microscopy. The expansion of elliptical holes in the polymer matrix results in a tensile force in bridging nanotubes. The polymer matrix at both ends of the bundles deforms extensively under the tension force, and fracture of the nanotubes occurs in tension within the polymer hole region rather than in shear within the gripping polymer region at the ends of the bundles. This provides evidence of significant polymer-nanotube wetting and interfacial adhesion.

  8. Fatigue failure mechanisms of single-walled carbon nanotube ropes embedded in epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y.; Fu, Y. Q.; Liao, K.; Li, F.; Cheng, H. M.

    2004-04-01

    In this work, fatigue failure mechanisms of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles embedded in epoxy matrix under repeated tensile load were studied. Observed damage and failure modes include: (1) splitting of SWCNT bundles, (2) kink formation and subsequent failure in SWCNTs, and (3) fracture of SWCNT bundles. Patterns of crack propagation under tension in SWCNTs were studied by molecular mechanics simulations, where defect-free SWCNTs and SWCNTs with two different modes of Stone-Wales defects were studied. It is demonstrated by the results of molecular mechanics simulation that the observed fracture surfaces of SWCNT can be reproduced reasonably well, suggesting possible fatigue failure mechanisms of SWCNT in the composite.

  9. [Surface modification and microstructure of single-walled carbon nanotubes for dental composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Zhang, Feimin; Xu, Li'na; Gu, Ning

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve its dispersion condition in dental composite resin and enhance its interaction with the matrix, single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) were refluxed and oxidized, then treated by APTE. Their outer surface were coated by nano-SiO2 particles using sol-gel process, then further treated by organosilanes ATES. IR and TEM were used to analyze modification results. TEM pictures showed nano-particles were on the surface of SWNTs; IR showed characteristic adsorbing bands of SiO2. Composite resin specimen with modified SWNTs was prepared and examined by TEM. SWNTs were detected in composite resin matrix among other inorganic fillers.

  10. Femtosecond Dynamics in Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Poly(3-Hexylthiophene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrou Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFemtosecond transient absorption measurements on single wall carbon nanotube/poly(3-hexylthiophene composites are used to investigate the relaxation dynamics of this blended material. The influence of the addition of nanotubes in polymer matrix on the ultrashort relaxation dynamics is examined in detail. The introduction of nanotube/polymer heterojunctions enhances the exciton dissociation and quenches the radiative recombination of composites. The relaxation dynamics of these composites are compared with the fullerene derivative-polymer composites with the same matrix. These results provide explanation to the observed photovoltaic performance of two types of composites.

  11. Single-walled carbon nanotube buckypapers as electrocatalyst supports for methanol oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Sieben, J.M.; Ansón Casaos, Alejandro; Martínez, M.Teresa; E. Morallón

    2013-01-01

    This work studies the use of various single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) buckypapers as catalyst supports for methanol electro-oxidation in acid media. Buckypapers were obtained by vacuum filtration from pristine and oxidized SWCNT suspensions in different liquid media. Pt-Ru catalysts supported on the buckypapers were prepared by multiple potentiostatic pulses using a diluted solution of Pt and Ru salts (2 mM H2PtCl6 + 2 mM RuCl3) in acid media. The resulting materials were characterized v...

  12. Observation and Characterization of Fragile Organometallic Molecules Encapsulated in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ogawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermally fragile tris(η5-cyclopentadienylerbium (ErCp3 molecules are encapsulated in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with high yield. We realized the encapsulation of ErCp3 with high filling ratio by using high quality SWCNTs at an optimized temperature under higher vacuum. Structure determination based on high-resolution transmission electron microscope observations together with the image simulations reveals the presence of almost free rotation of each ErCp3 molecule in SWCNTs. The encapsulation is also confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Trivalent character of Er ions (i.e., Er3+ is confirmed by X-ray absorption spectrum.

  13. Characterizations of Enriched Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Li, Jing; Lu, Yijiang; Cinke, Martin; Au, Dyng; Harmon, Julie P.; Muisener, Patricia Anne O.; Clayton, LaNetra; D'Angelo, John

    2003-01-01

    Using different processing conditions, we disperse the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) into the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) to form composites. In the melt-blended sample, the SWNTs originally semiconducting - became predominantly metallic after dispersion into the melt-blended composite. The interaction of the PMMA and SWNT is investigated by the polarized Raman studies. The structure changes in the PMMA and SWNT shows that the anisotropic interactions are responsible for SWNT electronic density of states (DOS) changes. The increased metallic SWNT percentage is confirmed by the conductivity and dielectric constant measurements .

  14. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Yong-Bing; Song Li; Zhang Chun-Yu; Wang Li; Fu Pan-Ming; Zhang Zhi-Guo; Xie Si-Shen; Wang Guo-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved optical transmissions in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films are measured at a temperature of 200K. The signal of the purified sample shows a crossover from photobleaching to photoabsorption. The former and the latter are interpreted as the state filling and the red shift of the π-plasmon,respectively. The signal of the as-grown sample can be perfectly fitted by a single-exponential with a time constant of 232fs. The disappearance of the negative component in the as-grown sample is attributed to the charge transfer between the semiconducting nanotubes and the impurities.

  15. A molecular mechanics approach for analyzing tensile nonlinear deformation behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Daining Fang; Ai Kah Soh; Bin Liu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, by capturing the atomic informa-tion and reflecting the behaviour governed by the nonlin-ear potential function, an analytical molecular mechanics approach is proposed. A constitutive relation for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT's) is established to describe the nonlinear stress-strain curve of SWCNT's and to predict both the elastic properties and breaking strain of SWCNT's during tensile deformation. An analysis based on the virtual internal bond (VIB) model proposed by P. Zhang et al. is also presented for comparison. The results indicate that the proposed molecular mechanics approach is indeed an acceptable analytical method for analyzing the mechanical behavior of SWCNT's.

  16. Robust cyclohexanone selective chemiresistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Kelvin M; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-08-01

    Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based chemiresistors are reported for a highly robust and sensitive gas sensor to selectively detect cyclohexanone, a target analyte for explosive detection. The trifunctional selector has three important properties: it noncovalently functionalizes SWCNTs with cofacial π-π interactions, it binds to cyclohexanone via hydrogen bond (mechanistic studies were investigated), and it improves the overall robustness of SWCNT-based chemiresistors (e.g., humidity and heat). Our sensors produced reversible and reproducible responses in less than 30 s to 10 ppm of cyclohexanone and displayed an average theoretical limit of detection (LOD) of 5 ppm.

  17. Synthesis of Large Quantity Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Arc Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振华; 王淼; 王新庆; 朱海滨; 卢焕明; 安藤义则

    2002-01-01

    We report on a new method to prepare large quantity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with high purity.Using a Y-Ni powder composite graphite rod as an anode, at a given angle with the high-purity graphite cathode rod, a cloth-like deposit can be obtained by dc arc discharge in helium at high temperature, which contains about 60% SWCNTs. In this way, we can obtain a deposit of more than one gram in ten minutes. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering have been used to observe the structure and morphology of the SWCNTs.

  18. Ab Initio Calculation on Self-Assembled Base-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Chen; XIA Yue-Yuan; ZHAO Ming-Wen; LIU Xiang-Dong; LI Ji-Ling; LI Li-Juan; LI Feng; HUANG Bo-Da

    2006-01-01

    @@ We perform ab initio calculations on the self-assembled base-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) which exhibit the quasi-1D ‘ladder’ structure. The optimized configuration in the ab initio calculation is very similar to that obtainedfrom molecular dynamics simulation. We also calculate the electronic structures of the self-assembled base-functionalized SWNTs that exhibit distinct difference from the single-branch base-functionalized SWNT with a localized state lying just below the Fermi level, which may result from the coupling interaction between the bases accompanied by the self-assembly behaviour.

  19. Purification and Functionalization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes through Different Treatment Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peir-An Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were purified by the combined use of ultrasonic- and microwave-assisted acid digestion. The results show that the method efficiently eliminates impurities, reduces solvent consumption, and prevents damage to the structure of the SWCNTs. The purified SWCNTs were given functionalization treatments with a nitric acid/sulfuric acid mixture. These acid-treated SWCNTs (A-SWCNTs were then grafted with 3-isocyanatopropyl triethoxysilane (A-SWCNTs-Si. The A-SWCNTs and A-SWCNTs-Si were used to improve interfacial interactions with polymers and to produce a well-dispersed SWCNT composite.

  20. Solution-phase synthesis of chromium-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Kalinina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    The solution phase reactions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with Cr(CO)6 and benzene-Cr(CO)3 can lead to the formation of small chromium clusters. The cluster size can be varied from less than 1 nm to about 4 nm by increasing the reaction time. TEM images suggest that the clusters are deposited predominantly on the exterior walls of the nanotubes. TGA analysis was used to obtain the Cr content and carbon to chromium ratio in the Cr-complexed SWNTs. It is suggested that the carbon nanotube benzenoid structure templates the condensation of chromium atoms and facilitates the loss of carbon monoxide leading to well defined metal clusters.

  1. Estimation of mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes using molecular mechanics approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Subba Rao; Sunil Anandatheertha; G Narayana Naik; G Gopalakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    Molecular mechanics based finite element analysis is adopted in the current work to evaluate the mechanical properties of Zigzag, Armchair and Chiral Single wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) of different diameters and chiralities. Three different types of atomic bonds, that is Carbon–Carbon covalent bond and two types of Carbon–Carbon van der Waals bonds are considered in the carbon nanotube system. The stiffness values of these bonds are calculated using the molecular potentials, namely Morse potential function and Lennard-Jones interaction potential function respectively and these stiffness’s are assigned to spring elements in the finite element model of the CNT. The geometry of CNT is built using a macro that is developed for the finite element analysis software. The finite element model of the CNT is constructed, appropriate boundary conditions are applied and the behavior of mechanical properties of CNT is studied.

  2. Length-dependent optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumov, Anton V. [Department of Chemistry and Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Ensysce Biosciences, Inc., 7000 Fannin St., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Tsyboulski, Dmitri A.; Bachilo, Sergei M. [Department of Chemistry and Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Weisman, R. Bruce, E-mail: weisman@rice.edu [Department of Chemistry and Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► Length-independent absorption per atom in single-walled carbon nanotubes. ► Reduced fluorescence quantum yield for short nanotubes. ► Exciton quenching at nanotube ends, sidewall defects probably limits quantum yield. - Abstract: Contradictory findings have been reported on the length dependence of optical absorption cross sections and fluorescence quantum yields in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). To clarify these points, studies have been made on bulk SWCNT dispersions subjected to length fractionation by electrophoretic separation or by ultrasonication-induced scission. Fractions ranged from ca. 120 to 760 nm in mean length. Samples prepared by shear-assisted dispersion were subsequently shortened by ultrasonic processing. After accounting for processing-induced changes in the surfactant absorption background, SWCNT absorption was found constant within ±11% as average nanotube length changed by a factor of 3.8. This indicates that the absorption cross-section per carbon atom is not length dependent. By contrast, in length fractions prepared by both methods, the bulk fluorescence efficiency or average quantum yield increased with SWCNT average length and approached an apparent asymptotic limit near 1 μm. This result is interpreted as reflecting the combined contributions of exciton quenching by sidewall defects and by the ends of shorter nanotubes.

  3. Excitonic signatures in the optical response of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisin, Christophe; Berger, Sebastien; Cassabois, Guillaume; Roussignol, Philippe [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS UMR8551, UPMC, Universite Paris Diderot, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Berciaud, Stephane [IPCMS, UMR 7504, CNRS Universite de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); Yan, Hugen; Hone, James; Heinz, Tony F. [Physics, Mechanical Engineering and Electrical Engineering Departments, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Lauret, Jean-Sebastien [Laboratoire de Photonique Quantique et Moleculaire, Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan, CNRS UMR 8537, Institut Dalembert, 61 Avenue Wilson, Cachan (France)

    2012-05-15

    The optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are dominated by the excitonic character of the transitions even at room temperature. The very peculiar properties of these excitons arise from both the one-dimensional (1D) nature of carbon nanotubes and from the electronic properties of graphene from which nanotubes are made. We first propose a brief qualitative review of the structure of the excitonic manifold and emphasize the role of dark states. We describe recent experimental investigations of this excitonic structure by means of temperature dependent PL measurements. We investigate the case of upper sub-bands and show that high-order optical transitions remain excitonic for large diameter nanotubes. A careful investigation of Rayleigh scattering spectra at the single nanotube level reveals clear exciton-phonon side-bands and Lorentzian line profiles for all semi-conducting nanotubes. In contrast, metallic nanotubes show an ambivalent behavior which is related to the reduced excitonic binding energy. Schematic of the exciton manifold in single-wall carbon nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Theoretical calculations of thermophysical properties of single-wall carbon nanotube bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Ting-Ting; Song Meng-Xuan; Ma Wei-Gang; Zhang Xing

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube bundles are promising thermal interfacial materials due to their excellent thermal and mechanical characteristics. In this study, the phonon dispersion relations and density of states of the single-wall carbon nanotube bundles are calculated by using the force constant model. The calculation results show that the inter-tube interaction leads to a significant frequency raise of the low frequency modes. To verify the applied calculation method, the specific heat of a single single-wall carbon nanotube is calculated first based on the obtained phonon dispersion relations and the results coincide well with the experimental data. Moreover, the specific heat of the bundles is calculated and exhibits a slight reduction at low temperatures in comparison with that of the single tube. The thermal conductivity of the bundles at low temperatures is calculated by using the ballistic transport model. The calculation results indicate that the inter-tube interaction, i.e. van der Waals interaction, hinders heat transfer and cannot be neglected at extremely low temperatures. For (5, 5) bundles, the relative difference of the thermal conductivity caused by ignoring inter-tube effect reaches the maximum value of 26% around 17 K, which indicates the significant inter-tube interaction effect on the thermal conductivity at low temperatures.

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance investigation of purified catalyst-free single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaka, Mujtaba; Ito, Yasuhiro; Wang, Huiliang; Yan, Wenjing; Robertson, Alex; Wu, Yimin A; Rümmeli, Mark H; Staunton, David; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Morton, John J L; Ardavan, Arzhang; Briggs, G Andrew D; Warner, Jamie H

    2010-12-28

    Electron paramagnetic resonance of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been bedevilled by the presence of paramagnetic impurities. To address this, SWCNTs produced by laser ablation with a nonmagnetic PtRhRe catalyst were purified through a multiple step centrifugation process in order to remove amorphous carbon and catalyst impurities. Centrifugation of a SWCNT solution resulted in sedimentation of carbon nanotube bundles containing clusters of catalyst particles, while isolated nanotubes with reduced catalyst particle content remained in the supernatant. Further ultracentrifugation resulted in highly purified SWCNT samples with a narrow diameter distribution and almost no detectable catalyst particles. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals were detected only for samples which contained catalyst particles, with the ultracentrifuged SWCNTs showing no EPR signal at X-band (9.4 GHz) and fields < 0.4 T. PMID:21082779

  6. Ab-initio calculation of n-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margine, Elena R.; Crespi, Vincent H.

    2004-03-01

    We study charge-induced changes in shape and electronic structure for n-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes within density functional theory. A certain nearly free electron state is downshifted in the presence of extra electrons. A similar effect has been seen in potassium-doped carbon nanotubes [1], where the downshift was attributed to the hybridization of the nearly free electron state with the K 4s state. In the present calculation the negative charge is neutralized by a uniform positive background, so the downshift must arise from a different effect. The state crosses the Fermi level at a charge per carbon atom of 0.04 for all the tubes studied. Connections are made to recent experiments in the group of P. Eklund.[1]Yoshiyuki Miyamoto, Angel Rubio, X. Blase, Marvin L. Cohen, and Steven G. Louie PRL 74, 2993 (1995)

  7. Comparative Study of Adsorption Isotherms of Vitamin C on Multi wall and single wall Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azin Dehmolaei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the interaction of Vitamin C solution on multi-wall and single-wall carbon nanotubeAfter investigated comparative study and assigned to Vitamin C adsorption isotherm. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms were fitted by Freundlich, Langmuir, and Temkin models. It was found that the Langmuirmodel described the adsorption process better than other two isotherm models. The amount of Antioxidant drug(Vitamin C adsorbed on Multi wallcarbon nanotube surface increased with the increase of the initial Antioxidant concentration. Based on the results, under similar conditions the efficiency of adsorption of Vitamin C by Multi-wall carbon nanotube(MWCNTs was more thansingle-wall carbon nanotube.

  8. Selective adsorption of proteins on single-wall carbon nanotubes by using a protective surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Anton; Louise, Loïc; Veber, Michèle; Langevin, Dominique; Filoramo, Arianna; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Campidelli, Stéphane

    2011-12-16

    The dispersion of highly hydrophobic carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes in biological media is a challenging issue. Indeed, the nonspecific adsorption of proteins occurs readily when the nanotubes are introduced in biological media; therefore, a methodology to control adsorption is in high demand. To address this issue, we developed a bifunctional linker derived from pyrene that selectively enables or prevents the adsorption of proteins on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). We demonstrated that it is possible to decrease or completely suppress the adsorption of proteins on the nanotube sidewall by using proper functionalization (either covalent or noncovalent). By subsequently activating the functional groups on the nanotube derivatives, protein adsorption can be recovered and, therefore, controlled. Our approach is simple, straightforward, and potentially suitable for other biomolecules that contain thio or amino groups available for coupling. PMID:22095560

  9. Electronic Characterization of the Single-wall CarbonNanotubes:A XANES Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Z.Y.; Davoli Ⅰ.; Hu T.D.; Terranova M.L.; Orlanducci S.; Sessa V.; Abbas M.; Ibrahim K.; Zhong J.; Botti S.

    2004-01-01

    @@ The single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) were discovered in '93 [1] and are made of pure carbon atoms just like a single sheet of graphite wrapped around a cylindrical axis. The same material with slight variations in the geometrical arrangement yields different electronic properties, which could range from metallic to semiconducting behavior. They have fascinating chemical, mechanical and electrical properties which result remarkably different from those of any other carbon-based materials and which suggest enormous potential application in many technological areas, as catalysis, energy and gas storage, electron emitters, sensors,fast acting switches, molecular electronics, etc. [2-6]. In this contest it is very important to know and to control the electronical and chemical characteristics of the SWCNs.

  10. Electronic Characterization of the Single-wall CarbonNanotubes: A XANES Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu; Z.Y.; Hu; T.D.; Terranova; M.L.; Orlanducci; S.; Sessa; V.; Abbas; M.; Ibrahim; K.; Zhong; J.; Botti; S.; Davoli; Ⅰ.

    2004-01-01

      The single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) were discovered in '93 [1] and are made of pure carbon atoms just like a single sheet of graphite wrapped around a cylindrical axis. The same material with slight variations in the geometrical arrangement yields different electronic properties, which could range from metallic to semiconducting behavior. They have fascinating chemical, mechanical and electrical properties which result remarkably different from those of any other carbon-based materials and which suggest enormous potential application in many technological areas, as catalysis, energy and gas storage, electron emitters, sensors,fast acting switches, molecular electronics, etc. [2-6]. In this contest it is very important to know and to control the electronical and chemical characteristics of the SWCNs.……

  11. Interaction between fullerene halves Cn (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amrish; Kaur, Sandeep; Mudahar, Isha

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves Cn (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  12. XPS Protocol for the Characterization of Pristine and Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, E. D.; Allada, R.; Huffman, C. B.; Arepalli, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent interest in developing new applications for carbon nanotubes (CNT) has fueled the need to use accurate macroscopic and nanoscopic techniques to characterize and understand their chemistry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has proved to be a useful analytical tool for nanoscale surface characterization of materials including carbon nanotubes. Recent nanotechnology research at NASA Johnson Space Center (NASA-JSC) helped to establish a characterization protocol for quality assessment for single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Here, a review of some of the major factors of the XPS technique that can influence the quality of analytical data, suggestions for methods to maximize the quality of data obtained by XPS, and the development of a protocol for XPS characterization as a complementary technique for analyzing the purity and surface characteristics of SWCNTs is presented. The XPS protocol is then applied to a number of experiments including impurity analysis and the study of chemical modifications for SWCNTs.

  13. Raman study on single-walled carbon nanotubes with different laser excitation energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Islam; Khurshed Ahmad Shah; H S Mavi; A K Shaukla; S Rath; Harsh

    2007-06-01

    The industrial use of carbon nanotubes is increasing day by day; therefore, it is very important to identify the nature of carbon nanotubes in a bundle. In this study, we have used the Raman spectroscopic analysis on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique. The grown sample is excited with two laser excitation wavelengths, 633 nm from He–Ne laser and 514.5 nm from Ar+ laser. Raman spectrum in the backscattering geometry provides the characteristic spectra of SWCNTs with its radial breathing mode (RBM), defect-induced disorder mode (D band), and highenergy modes (G and M bands). The Raman signal positions of the spectra in RBM, G and M bands confirm the grown sample to be of semiconducting type in nature.

  14. Electrochemical impedance-based DNA sensor using a modified single walled carbon nanotube electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Jessica E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Pillai, Shreekumar [Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL (United States); Ram, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: mkram@usf.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Kumar, Ashok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Singh, Shree R. [Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    2011-07-20

    Carbon nanotubes have become promising functional materials for the development of advanced electrochemical biosensors with novel features which could promote electron-transfer with various redox active biomolecules. This paper presents the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium using chemically modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with single stranded DNA (ssDNA) on a polished glassy carbon electrode. Hybridization with the corresponding complementary ssDNA has shown a shift in the impedance studies due to a higher charge transfer in ssDNA. The developed biosensor has revealed an excellent specificity for the appropriate targeted DNA strand. The methodologies to prepare and functionalize the electrode could be adopted in the development of DNA hybridization biosensor.

  15. Electronic structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes inside helical DNA wraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Stacy; Rotkin, Slava

    2007-03-01

    Single stranded DNA can helically wrap a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) leading to changes in electronic structure, which is the subject of our study. Other charged polymers may produce band gap modulation similar to that observed for DNA-SWNT complexes. For these hybrids we assume a regular helical wrap, the potential of which breaks the symmetry of the pristine SWNT. Band structure changes are modeled quantum mechanically using the tight binding method together with self-consistent electrostatics. Gap modulation and band structure symmetry-lowering effects may result in variation of the optical spectra, especially for (slightly forbidden) transverse optical transitions. The effect of environmental screening of charges is investigated. Self-consistent electrostatic calculations yield cohesion energy between a charged, regular wrap and a SWNT of the order of tenths of eV per DNA base [1]. [1] Snyder, S. E., and Rotkin, S. V., Polarization Component of Cohesion Energy in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube-DNA Complexes, JETP Letters 84, 348 (2006).

  16. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M; Hároz, Erik H; Doorn, Stephen K; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Adams, W Wade; Hauge, Robert H; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm(2)) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 10(6) nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm(2). The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios. PMID:27043199

  17. Decolorisation of Reactive Red 120 Dye by Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edris Bazrafshan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyes are one of the most hazardous chemical compound classes found in industrial effluents and need to be treated since their presence in water bodies reduces light penetration, precluding the photosynthesis of aqueous flora. In the present study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs was used as an adsorbent for the successful removal of Reactive Red 120 (RR-120 textile dye from aqueous solutions. The effect of various operating parameters such as initial concentration of dye, contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial pH was investigated in order to find the optimum adsorption conditions. Equilibrium isotherms were used to identify the possible mechanism of the adsorption process. The optimum pH for removing of RR-120 dye from aqueous solutions was found to be 5 and for this condition maximum predicted adsorption capacity for RR-120 dye was obtained as 426.49 mg/g. Also, the equilibrium data were also fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and BET equilibrium isotherm models. It was found that the data fitted to BET (R2=0.9897 better than Langmuir (R2=0.9190 and Freundlich (R2=0.8819 model. Finally it was concluded that the single-walled carbon nanotubes can be used for dye removal from aqueous solutions.

  18. Removal of Reactive Blue 29 Dye from Water by Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jahangiri rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Anthraquinone dyes such as reactive blue29 in water resources and industrial wastewater effluents are one of the most environmental setbacks in many countries. Various methods have been considered to remove these dyes One of which is adsorption."nMaterials and Methods: All adsorption experiments were conducted in different pHs and various concentrations of adsorbents. The initial concentration of reactive blue 29 chosen in this study was 30mg/L.Adsorption isotherms were determined and correlated with Longmuir, Freundlich and BET models."nResults: The maximum adsorption capacity of reactive blue 29 onto single wall carbon nanotubes was 496mg/g.Results showed that the best pH for adsorption was 5 followed by pH3 and 8. Kinetic study showed that the equilibrium time for adsorption of RB 29 to SWCNT is 4 hr."nConclusion:According to the results obtained BET isotherm fitted well the experiment. It shows the adsorption of reactive blue 29 onto single wall carbon nanotubes is multilayers and the mechanism of SWCNTs adsorption toward RB29 is based on weak van der waals forces.

  19. Composite of single walled carbon nanotube and sulfosalicylic acid doped polyaniline: a thermoelectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana Chatterjee, Mukulika; Banerjee, Dipali; Chatterjee, Krishanu

    2016-08-01

    Nanocomposites containing single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and highly ordered polyaniline (PANI) have been synthesized employing an in situ polymerization using different weight percentages of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as template and aniline as a reactant. The composites show homogeneously dispersed SWCNTs which are uniformly coated with PANI through a strong interface interaction. Structural characterization shows that the PANI cultivated along the surface of the SWCNTs in an ordered manner during the SWCNT-directed polymerization process. Measurements at room temperature displayed a significant enhancement in both the electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power which could be attributed to the more ordered chain structures of the PANI on SWCNT. As a result, the power factor of the composite is improved which increases with temperature. At the same time, the measured value of thermal conductivity at room temperature being lowest among the reported values, has resulted in best ZT at room temperature. The lowest value of thermal conductivity is attributed to the large phonon scattering due to the introduction of nanointerfaces.

  20. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hengguang; Hu, Shanglian; Huang, Peng; Song, Hua; Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; He, Rong; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-12-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  1. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Peng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  2. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M.; Hároz, Erik H.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Adams, W. Wade; Hauge, Robert H.; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm2) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 106 nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm2. The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios.

  3. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  4. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, A V; Aseychev, A V; Kostevich, V A; Gusev, A A; Gusev, S A; Vlasova, I I, E-mail: irina.vlasova@yahoo.com [Research Institute for Physico-Chemical Medicine, FMBA, M. Pirogovskaya Str. 1a, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  5. Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes regulates their effect on hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, A. V.; Aseychev, A. V.; Kostevich, V. A.; Gusev, A. A.; Gusev, S. A.; Vlasova, I. I.

    2011-04-01

    Applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in medical field imply the use of drug-coupled carbon nanotubes as well as carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups that change nanotube surface properties and interactions between nanotubes and cells. Covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNT) is known to prevent the nanotubes from interaction with macrophages. Here we characterized nanotube's ability to stimulate coagulation processes in platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and evaluated the effect of SWNTs on platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Our study showed that PEG-SWNT did not affect the rate of clotting in PPP, while c-SWNT shortened the clot formation time five times compared to the control PPP. Since c-SWNT failed to accelerate coagulation in plasma lacking coagulation factor XI, it may be suggested that c-SWNT affects the contact activation pathway. In PRP, platelets responded to both SWNT types with irreversible aggregation, as evidenced by changes in the aggregate mean radius. However, the rate of aggregation induced by c-SWNT was two times higher than it was with PEG-SWNT. Cytological analysis also showed that c-SWNT was two times more efficient when compared to PEG-SWNT in aggregating platelets in PRP. Taken together, our results show that functionalization of nanoparticles can diminish their negative influence on blood cells. As seen from our data, modification of c-SWNT with PEG, when only a one percent of carbon atoms is bound to polymer (70 wt %), decreased the nanotube-induced coagulation in PRP and repelled the accelerating effect on the coagulation in PPP. Thus, when functionalized SWNTs are used for administration into bloodstream of laboratory animals, their possible pro-coagulant and pro-aggregating properties must be taken into account.

  6. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.H., E-mail: chwong@ntu.edu.sg; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-24

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  7. Growth dynamics of inner tubes inside cobaltocene-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamova, M. V.; Kramberger, Christian; Saito, Takeshi; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Pichler, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We have synthesized cobaltocene-filled 1.7-nm-mean diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and transformed them into double-walled carbon nanotubes by annealing at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C for 2 h in vacuum. We analyze the temperature-dependent inner tube growth inside the filled SWCNTs by Raman spectroscopy. The changes in intensity of the Raman peaks of inner tubes with the diameters ranging from 0.832 to 1.321 nm with increasing annealing temperature are traced. It is revealed that the growth temperatures of larger diameter inner tubes are higher than the ones of smaller diameter tubes. A decrease in the diameter of the inner tubes by ~0.4 nm leads to a decrease in the growth temperature by ~200 °C.

  8. Specific Properties of Single-Wall Carbon Nanohorns Due to Unique Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudasaka, M.; Nisha, J. A.; Kauya, D.; Kokai, F.; Takahashi, K.; Hirahara, K.; Iijima, S.

    2001-03-01

    Single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs), 30-50 nm long and 2-3 nm thick, form aggregates that resemble dahlia flowers (DF-SWNHs) (diameter: 80 nm). CO2 laser vaporization of graphite at room temperature produced a high yield (about 75several interesting electromagnetic phenomena. The large surface area and micropores are useful for adsorbing other materials. For instance, DF-SWNHs adsorbed ethanol about three times more efficiently than conventional activated carbon. For further applications, we modified their structure by oxidation in oxygen gas. The structural change was obvious in TGA and the Raman spectrum, and TEM showed the holes that were created. This structural change varied the gas adsorption properties [3]. [1] S. Iijima et al., Chem. Phys. Lett., 309 (1999) 165. [2] J. A. Nisha et al., Chem. Phys. Lett., 328 (2000) 381. [3] K. Murata et al. this conference.

  9. DFT studies of COOH tip-functionalized zigzag and armchair single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chełmecka, Elżbieta; Pasterny, Karol; Kupka, Teobald; Stobiński, Leszek

    2012-05-01

    Structure and energy calculations of pristine and COOH-modified model single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of different length were performed at B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. From 1 to 9 COOH groups were added at the end of the nanotube. The differences in structure and energetics of partially and fully functionalized SWCNTs at one end of the nanotube are observed. Up to nine COOH groups could be added at one end of (9,0) zigzag SWCNT in case of full functionalization. However, for (5,5) armchair SWCNT, the full functionalization was impossible due to steric crowding and rim deformation. The dependence of substituent attachment energy on the number of substituents at the carbon nanotube rim was observed.

  10. Revealing properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Tang Jie; Sasaki, T; Yudasaka, M; Matsushita, A; Iijima, S

    2002-01-01

    It was found by the x-ray diffraction experiment under hydrostatic pressure that the carbon nanotubes are compressed easily with a high volume compressibility of 0.024 GPa sup - sup 1. The single-walled carbon nanotubes are polygonized when they form bundles of hexagonal close-packed structure and the inter-tubular gap is smaller than the equilibrium spacing of graphite. Under high pressure, further polygonization occurs to accommodate the extra amount of volume reduction. The ratio of the short and the long diagonals in the hexagonalized cross section is found to have changed from 0.991 at zero pressure to 0.982 at 1.5 GPa pressure, when the Bragg reflection from the nanotube lattice diminished. Accompanying polygonization, a discontinuous change in electrical resistivity was observed at 1.5 GPa pressure, suggesting a phase transition had occurred.

  11. Interfacial Surfactant Ordering in Thin Films of SDS-Encapsulated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sushanta K; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Velarde, Luis

    2016-01-21

    The molecular self-assembly of surfactants on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) is currently a common strategy for the tuning of nanotube properties and the stabilization of carbon nanotube dispersions. Here, we report direct measurements of the degree of interfacial ordering for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants adsorbed on colloidal, single-chirality enriched, SWCNTs within a solid film and investigate the dependence of surface alkyl chain order on the surfactant concentration in the precursor solution. The degree of order for the SWCNT-bound SDS molecules, is probed by vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. We find concrete evidence for the presence of highly ordered surface structures at sufficiently high SDS concentrations, attributed here to cylindrical-like micelle assemblies with the SWCNT at the core. As the SDS concentration decreases, the interfacial order is found to decrease as well, generating a more disordered or random adsorption of surfactants on the nanotube surfaces. PMID:26730991

  12. Photon antibunching in single-walled carbon nanotubes at telecommunication wavelengths and room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the photoluminescence of individual air-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from 6 to 300 K. Time-resolved and antibunching measurements over the telecommunication wavelength range were performed using a superconducting single-photon detector. We detected moderate temperature independent antibunching behavior over the whole temperature range studied. To investigate the exciton dynamics, which is responsible for the antibunching behavior, we measured excitation-power and temperature dependence of the photoluminescence spectra and lifetime decay curves. These measurements suggested an exciton confinement effect that is likely caused by high-dielectric amorphous carbon surrounding the SWNTs. These results indicate that SWNTs are good candidates for light sources in quantum communication technologies operating in the telecommunication wavelength range and at room temperature

  13. Tailored single-walled carbon nanotube--CdS nanoparticle hybrids for tunable optoelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglong; Jia, Yi; Cao, Anyuan

    2010-01-26

    The integration of organic and inorganic building blocks into novel nanohybrids is an important tool to exploit innovative materials with desirable functionalities. For this purpose, carbon nanotube--nanoparticle nanoarchitectures are intensively studied. We report here an efficient noncovalent chemical route to density-controllably and uniformly assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes with CdS nanoparticles. The methodology not only promises the resulting hybrids will be solution-processable but also endows the hybrids with distinct optoelectronic properties including tunable photoresponse mediated by amine molecules. On the basis of these merits, reliable thin-film photoswitches and light-driven chemical sensors are demonstrated, which highlights the potential of tailored hybrids in the development of new tunable optoelectronic devices and sensors.

  14. Single-walled carbon nanotube networks for flexible and printed electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be processed from solution and have excellent mechanical properties. They are highly flexible and stretchable. Depending on the type of nanotubes (semiconducting or metallic) they can be used as replacements for metal or transparent conductive oxide electrodes or as semiconducting layers for field-effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities. They are thus competitive alternatives to other solution-processable materials for flexible and printed electronics. This review introduces the basic properties of SWNTs, current methods for dispersion and separation of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs and techniques to deposit and pattern dense networks from dispersion. Recent examples of applications of carbon nanotubes as conductors and semiconductors in (opto-)electronic devices and integrated circuits will be discussed. (paper)

  15. Mechanism of the initial stages of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Lanzani, Giorgio; Nasibulin, Albert G; Ayala, Paola; Jiang, Tao; Bligaard, Thomas; Laasonen, Kari; Kauppinen, Esko I

    2011-06-21

    We have studied the mechanism of the initial stages of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotube growth illustrated for the case of a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition system, which uses carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH(3)) as precursors and iron as a catalyst. We performed first-principles electronic-structure calculations, fully incorporating the effects of spin polarization and magnetic moments, to investigate the bonding and chemistry of CO, NH(3), and their fragments on a model Fe(55) icosahedral cluster. A possible dissociation path for NH(3) to atomic nitrogen and hydrogen was identified, with a reaction barrier consistent with an experimentally determined value we measured by tandem infrared and mass spectrometry. Both C-C and C-N bond formation reactions were found to be barrierless and exothermic, while a parasitic reaction of HCN formation had a barrier of over 1 eV.

  16. Energy Band Gap Study of Semiconducting Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkadi, Asmaa; Decrossas, Emmanuel; El-Ghazaly, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of multiple semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) considering various distribution inside a bundle are studied. The model derived from the proposed analytical potential function of the electron density for an individual s-SWCNT is general and can be easily applied to multiple nanotubes. This work demonstrates that regardless the number of carbon nanotubes, the strong coupling occurring between the closest neighbours reduces the energy band gap of the bundle by 10%. As expected, the coupling is strongly dependent on the distance separating the s-SWCNTs. In addition, based on the developed model, it is proposed to enhance this coupling effect by applying an electric field across the bundle to significantly reduce the energy band gap of the bundle by 20%.

  17. STUDY OF SINGLE WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE REINFORCED POLYMER COMPOSITES BY HANSEN SOLUBILITY PARAMETERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Jing

    Single Walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. The use of SWNTs as a reinforcement in polymer matrix is a hot research topic. However, the poor dispersion of SWNTs in polymers and the weak interface between the nanotubes and polymers are two...... the chemical compatibility between polymer and SWNTs, and correlate the parameters with the dispersion of SWNTs and interfacial properties between SWNTs and polymers. Several different surface modifications on carbon nanotubes and different polymers are considered. The dispersion of SWNTs in solvents...... is evaluated by Dynamic Light scattering (DLS). The functional groups attached to SWNTs and degree of functionalization, and also the size of the nanotubes affect the HSP of the SWNTs. The extent by which functionalization take place is affected by the amount of defects on the nanotube surface. The strain...

  18. Torsional characteristics of graphene nanoribbons encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Te-Hua; Chang, Win-Jin; Feng, Yu-Lun; Lu, Deng-Maw

    2016-09-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study the torsional characteristics of a graphene nanoribbon encapsulated in a single-walled carbon nanotube (GNR@SWCNT) with different chiralities at different temperatures. Based on the simulations, the relationship between the shear stress and the twist angle was obtained. The maximum shear stress increases with an increase in chirality. However, the corresponding twist angle decreases with increasing chirality. GNR@SWCNT withstands a smaller twist angle compared with a single SWCNT. In addition, the interaction force between the GNR and the SWCNT increases with increasing temperature. GNR@SWCNT at an elevated temperature is easier to break during torsion with a lower twist angle. The results are valuable for the design of nanocomposites composed of carbon nanotubes and graphene materials.

  19. Enzymatic formation of carbohydrate rings catalyzed by single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Moon Seop; Park, Jong Pil; Seo, Dongkyun; Chang, Sung-Jin; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Sang Yup; Kwak, Kyungwon; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-05-01

    Macrocyclic carbohydrate rings were formed via enzymatic reactions around single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a catalyst. Cyclodextrin glucanotransferase, starch substrate and SWNTs were reacted in buffer solution to yield cyclodextrin (CD) rings wrapped around individual SWNTs. Atomic force microscopy showed the resulting complexes to be rings of 12-50 nm in diameter, which were highly soluble and dispersed in aqueous solution. They were further characterized by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular simulation using density functional theory calculation. In the absence of SWNT, hydrogen bonding between glucose units determines the structure of maltose (the precursor of CD) and produces the curvature along the glucose chain. Wrapping SWNT along the short axis was preferred with curvature in the presence of SWNTs and with the hydrophobic interactions between the SWNTs and CD molecules. This synthetic approach may be useful for the functionalization of carbon nanotubes for development of nanostructures. PMID:26946491

  20. Photon antibunching in single-walled carbon nanotubes at telecommunication wavelengths and room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Takumi, E-mail: endou@az.appi.keio.ac.jp; Ishi-Hayase, Junko; Maki, Hideyuki, E-mail: maki@appi.keio.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2015-03-16

    We investigated the photoluminescence of individual air-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from 6 to 300 K. Time-resolved and antibunching measurements over the telecommunication wavelength range were performed using a superconducting single-photon detector. We detected moderate temperature independent antibunching behavior over the whole temperature range studied. To investigate the exciton dynamics, which is responsible for the antibunching behavior, we measured excitation-power and temperature dependence of the photoluminescence spectra and lifetime decay curves. These measurements suggested an exciton confinement effect that is likely caused by high-dielectric amorphous carbon surrounding the SWNTs. These results indicate that SWNTs are good candidates for light sources in quantum communication technologies operating in the telecommunication wavelength range and at room temperature.

  1. A theoretical study on the interaction of amphetamine and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizi, Hamid; Najafi Chermahini, Alireza; Mohammadnezhad, Gholamhossein; Teimouri, Abbas

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane (amphetamine) on the (4,4), (5,5), (6,6), and (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been theoretically investigated. The molecule has been located in different modes including parallel, perpendicular, and oblique on the outer surface of carbon nanotubes. The physisorption of amphetamine onto SWCNT sidewall is thermodynamically favored; as a consequence, it modulates the electronic properties of pristine nanotube in the vicinity of Fermi region. The adsorption energies for the parallel and oblique modes found in the range of -1.13 to -1.88 and -1.27 to -2.01 kcal/mol, respectively. Projected density of states (PDOS) and frontier orbital analysis in the vicinity of Fermi level region suggest the electronic states to be contributed from SWCNT rather than amphetamine molecule.

  2. Controlling the growth of vertically aligned single walled carbon nanotubes from ethanol for electrochemical supercapacitor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, M.A.; Mohamed, M.A.; Shikoh, E.; Fujiwara, A.; Shimoda, T. [Japan Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been proven suitable for use as electrodes in electrochemical capacitors (EC). In this study, alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition (ACCVD) was used to grow vertically-aligned SWCNTs (VASWCNTs). An aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-supported cobalt (Co) catalyst and high purity ethanol carbon feedstock was used for the growth process. The Al layer and Co thin films were deposited using an electron beam evaporator. CNT growth was optimized using Si/SiO{sub 2} substrates. An atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to characterize the synthesis of the catalyst nanoparticles and their subsequent growth. Raman spectrum of the samples demonstrated peaks of radial breathing mode (RBM) from 100 to 250 per cm. Results demonstrated that the CNTs were successfully grown on the conducting metal substrate using the ACCVD process. 4 refs.

  3. Role of the catalyst in the growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbuena, Perla B; Zhao, Jin; Huang, Shiping; Wang, Yixuan; Sakulchaicharoen, Nataphan; Resasco, Daniel E

    2006-05-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to analyze the physical state of the catalyst, and the growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes under typical temperature and pressure conditions of their experimental synthesis, emphasizing the role of the catalyst/substrate interactions. It is found that a strong cluster/substrate interaction increases the cluster melting point, modifying the initial stages of carbon dissolution and precipitation on the cluster surface. Experiments performed on model Co-Mo catalysts clearly illustrate the existence of an initial period where the catalyst is formed and no nanotube growth is observed. To quantify the nature of the Co-Mo2C interaction, quantum density functional theory is applied to characterize structural and energetic features of small Co clusters deposited on a (001) Mo2C surface, revealing a strong attachment of Co-clusters to the Mo2C surface, which may increase the melting point of the cluster and prevent cluster sintering.

  4. Functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes as template for water storage device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sanjib; Taraphder, Srabani

    2016-11-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes, endohedrally functionalized with a protonated/unprotonated carboxylic acid group, are examined as potential templates for water storage using classical molecular dynamics simulation studies. Following a spontaneous entry of water molecules into the core of model functionalized carbon nanotubes (FCNTs), a large fraction of water molecules are found to be trapped inside FCNTs of lengths 50 and 100 Å. Only water molecules near the two open ends of the nanotube are exchanged with the bulk solvent. The residence times of water molecules inside FCNTs are investigated by varying the length of the tube, the length of suspended functional group and the protonation state of the carboxylic acid group. Favorable energetic interactions between the functional group and water, assisted by a substantial gain in rotational entropy, are found to compensate for the entropy loss resulting from restricted translational diffusion of trapped water molecules.

  5. Effect of charge on the stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ji; WU Jinlei

    2004-01-01

    By using density-functional-theory based DMol3 code, the structure optimizations are performed on a short charged single-walled carbon nanotube. Results show that the total energy of the nanotube exhibits a parabolic variation with respect to the amount of extra charge, and one negatively charged nanotube has the lowest total energy; thus the carbon nanotube has a positive electron affinity. When the charge is small, the variation of the atomic structure of the nanotube is also small, and neglecting the atomic structure variation leads to the qualitatively correct properties of the total energy and the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital. When the extra charge is large, the end structure of the nanotube will be first affected and form into a trumpet shape. With the increasing of the extra charge, the nanotube end gradually becomes unstable, and this may lead to the ultimate destruction of the nanotube.

  6. Hybrid Graphene and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Enhanced Phase-Change Heat Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Han; Yun, Hyung Duk; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Bang, In Cheol

    2016-02-10

    Nucleate boiling is an effective heat transfer method in power generation systems and cooling devices. In this letter, hybrid graphene/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), graphene, and SWCNT films deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces were fabricated to investigate the enhancement of nucleate boiling phenomena described by the critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. The graphene films were grown on Cu foils and transferred to ITO surfaces. Furthermore, SWCNTs were deposited on the graphene layer to fabricate hybrid graphene/SWCNT films. We determined that the hybrid graphene/SWCNT film deposited on an ITO surface is the most effective heat transfer surface in pool boiling because of the interconnected network of carbon structures.

  7. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2013-12-17

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies--from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems--whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties.

  8. Electrochemical investigation of NO at single-wall carbon nanotubes modified electrodes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tingliang Xia; Hongmei Bi; Keying Shi

    2010-05-01

    The NO electro-oxidation was investigated at various single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) modified electrodes by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Compared with the glassy carbon electrode, the SWCNTs modified electrodes possess higher electro-catalytic activity to NO electro-oxidation. CV results indicate that the peak current density of NO electro-oxidation at the SWCNT-COOH (SWCNTs with carboxyl groups) modified electrode is the highest and the peak potential is the most negative among the four kinds of electrodes. EIS indicates that the charge transfer resistance of NO electro-oxidation at the SWCNT-COOH modified electrode is the least. The determined factors (charge transfer and mass transfer of diffusion) of NO electro-oxidation are different in varied potential region. The mechanism of NO electro-oxidation reaction at the SWCNTs modified electrodes is also discussed.

  9. Self-assembly of single walled carbon nanotubes onto cotton to make conductive yarn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Yee Yuan Tan; Chengwei Wu; S. Ravi P. Silva

    2012-01-01

    A simple,economical and scalable technique is demonstrated to make conductive yarn.Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are non-covalently functionalized with dye (Acid Red 91) and dispersed in water; while cotton yarn is treated with poly (ethylene imine).When the resulting yarn is immersed in the SWCNT dispersion,SWCNTs self-assemble onto the yarn due to electrostatic forces between the functionalized nanotubes and yarn.Scanning electron microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate the assembly of carbon nanotubes.The SWCNT functionalized yarn exhibits reasonable electrical conduction behaviour and are then used to make chemiresistors.The electrical resistance of the chemiresistors used as sensors increases on exposure to ammonia gas,which can be explained in terms of electron transfer between gas molecules and SWCNTs.

  10. Highly selective sorting of semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes exhibiting light emission at telecom wavelengths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Sarti; Francesco Biccari; Federica Fioravanti; Ughetta Torrini; Anna Vinattieri; Vincent Derycke; Massimo Gurioli

    2016-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are known for their exceptional electronic properties.However,most of the synthesis methods lead to the production of a mixture of carbon nanotubes having different chiralities associated with metallic (m-SWNTs) and semiconducting (s-SWNTs) characteristics.For application purposes,effective methods for separating these species are highly desired.Here,we report a protocol for achieving a highly selective separation of s-SWNTs that exhibit a fundamental optical transition centered at 1,550 nm.We employ a polymer assisted sorting approach,and the influence of preparation methods on the optical and transport performances of the separated nanotubes is analyzed.As even traces of m-SWNTs can critically affect performances,we aim to produce samples that do not contain any detectable fraction of residual m-SWNTs.

  11. Effects of Two Purification Pretreatments on Electroless Copper Coating over Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve the reinforcement of copper matrix composite by single-walled carbon nanotubes, a three-step-refluxing purification of carbon nanotubes sample with HNO3-NaOH-HCl was proposed and demonstrated. A previously reported purification process using an electromagnetic stirring with H2O2/HCl mixture was also repeated. Then, the purified carbon nanotubes were coated with copper by the same electroless plating process. At the end, the effects of the method on carbon nanotubes themselves and on copper coating were determined by transmission electron microscope spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry. It was clearly confirmed that both of the two processes could remove most of iron catalyst particles and carbonaceous impurities without significant damage to carbon nanotubes. The thermal stability of the sample purified by H2O2/HCl treatment was slightly higher than that purified by HNO3-NaOH-HCl treatment. Nevertheless, the purification by HNO3-NaOH-HCl treatment was more effective for carboxyl functionalization on nanotubes than that by H2O2/HCl treatment. The Cu-coating on carbon nanotubes purified by both purification processes was complete, homogenous, and continuous. However, the Cu-coating on carbon nanotubes purified by H2O2/HCl was oxidized more seriously than those on carbon nanotubes purified by HNO3-NaOH-HCl treatment.

  12. Initial stage of growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes: modeling and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, I; Yu, Ming; Jayanthi, C S; Wu, S Y

    2014-03-19

    Because there are different pathways to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a common mechanism for the synthesis of CNTs does not likely exist. However, after carbon atoms are liberated from carbon-containing precursors by catalysts or from pure carbon systems, a common feature, the nucleation of CNTs by electron mediation, does appear. We studied this feature using the initial stage of growth of single wall CNTs (SWCNTs) by transition metal nano-particle catalysts as the working example. To circumvent the bottleneck due to the size and simulation time, we used a model in which the metal droplet is represented by a jellium, and the effect of collisions between the carbon atoms and atoms of the catalyst is captured by charge transfers between the jellium and the carbon. The simulations were performed using a transferable semi-empirical Hamiltonian to model the interactions between carbon atoms in jellium. We annealed different initial configurations of carbon clusters in jellium as well as in a vacuum. We found that in jellium, elongated open tubular structures, precursors to the growth of SWCNTs, are formed. Our model was also shown to be capable of mimicking the continued growth when more atoms were placed near the open end of the tubular structure.

  13. Growth of single-walled gold nanotubes confined in carbon nanotubes, studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Hu, Ting; Dong, Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Growth of the single-walled gold nanotube (SWGNT), confined in the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has been studied by using the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in which two different empirical potentials (the glue and EAM potentials) are used for the interaction between gold atoms. It is found that under the glue potential, three new SWGNTs, (3, 2), (4, 2) and (6, 3) gold tubes can be formed, in addition to the previously found (3, 3), (4, 3) and (5, 3) ones, among which two achiral ones, (4, 2) and (6, 3) gold tubes are particularly interesting because they were thought to be not the tube-like structures, or to have large enough diameter, permitting an extra gold atom chain in it. However, when the EAM potential is used, only four SWGNTs, i.e., (3, 2), (4, 2), (4, 3) and (5, 3) gold tubes could be formed in our MD simulations. After comparing all the MD simulation results with those of the first principles calculations, it is found that the EAM potential is better to describe the interaction between gold atoms than the glue potential for the MD simulation on the growth of gold tubular structure in confined CNT.

  14. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the bioavailability of PCBs in field-contaminated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) to black carbon is a well studied phenomenon. One emerging class of engineered black carbon materials are single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Little research has investigated the potential of SWNT to adsorb and sequester HO...

  15. Single-walled carbon nanotube-based polymer monoliths for the enantioselective nano-liquid chromatographic separation of racemic pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marwa; Yajadda, Mir Massoud Aghili; Han, Zhao Jun; Su, Dawei; Wang, Guoxiu; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2014-09-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes were encapsulated into different polymer-based monolithic backbones. The polymer monoliths were prepared via the copolymerization of 20% monomers, glycidyl methacrylate, 20% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) or 16.4% monomers (16% butyl methacrylate, 0.4% sulfopropyl methacrylate), 23.6% ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 60% porogens (36% 1-propanol, 18% 1,4-butanediol) along with 6% single-walled carbon nanotubes aqueous suspension. The effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the chiral separation of twelve classes of pharmaceutical racemates namely; α- and β-blockers, antiinflammatory drugs, antifungal drugs, dopamine antagonists, norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors, catecholamines, sedative hypnotics, diuretics, antihistaminics, anticancer drugs and antiarrhythmic drugs was investigated. The enantioselective separation was carried out under multimodal elution to explore the chiral recognition capabilities of single-walled carbon nanotubes using reversed phase, polar organic and normal phase chromatographic conditions using nano-liquid chromatography. Baseline separation was achieved for celiprolol, chlorpheniramine, etozoline, nomifensine and sulconazole under multimodal elution conditions. Satisfactory repeatability was achieved through run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch investigations. Our findings demonstrate that single-walled carbon nanotubes represent a promising stationary phase for the chiral separation and may open the field for a new class of chiral selectors.

  16. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device.

  17. Reptation dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a permanent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Nikta; Mackintosh, Fred; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Pasquali, Matteo

    2010-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are an ideal system of semiflexible filaments with tunable bending stiffness. By exploiting their near-infrared fluorescence, we image directly the motion of SWCNTs in a network (agarose gel). We determine the SWCNT diameter (and bending stiffness) spectroscopically, and we control the network pore size by changing the agarose concentration. Image analysis shows clearly that SWCNTs move by reptation through the pore network. We quantify the dependence of SWCNTs mobility on SWCNT bending stiffness, length and pore sizes. Our results show conclusively that, even when the SWCNT length is much smaller than the persistence length, the flexibility of filaments enhances rotational diffusion. These results confirm earlier predictions of Odijk (1983), and show that the Doi-Edwards scaling fails to capture the filaments' motion. This study provides a fundamental understanding of reptation dynamics of semiflexible filaments.

  18. Attachment of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to silicon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Liling; Pattyn, Nancy; Barron, Andrew R

    2008-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were functionalized by direct fluorination and subsequent reaction with 6-aminohexanoic acid for water-soluble carboxylic acid functionalized SWNTs (AHA-SWNTs). Both of the compounds were used as precursors to attach SWNTs to APTES coated silicon surfaces. AHA-SWNTs in aqueous solution were reacted with APTES self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with coupling reagents N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The surface coverage is a function of concentration of AHA-SWNTs, solvent and coupling method. While for the fluorinated SWNTs (F-SWNTs), direct addition of F-SWNTs to preformed APTES SAMs at 90 degrees C shows essentially no reaction, in contrast to the one-pot reaction of F-SWNTs with APTES molecules in the presence of SWNTs on a silicon substrate. This reaction route provides a convenient method to attach SWNTs to silicon surfaces. PMID:18468188

  19. Interaction of hydrogen molecules on Ni-doped single-walled carbon nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni Mei-Yan; Wang Xian-Long; Zeng Zhi

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption of hydrogen molecules on an Ni-doped (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is investigated by using first-principles density functional calculations. The result shows that a single Ni atom adsorbed on the bridge site of the tube could cannot dissociate the H2, however it can chemisorb three H2 at most, with the average binding energy per H2 suitable for the hydrogen storage at the room temperature. More H2 would physisorb around an Ni atom weakly. As for the SWNT with an Ni dimer adsorbed, we find that when the H2approaches the Ni-Ni bond, it dissociates without overcoming any barrier and makes bonds with Ni atom.

  20. Capture of unstable protein complex on the streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zunfeng, E-mail: liuz2@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Voskamp, Patrick [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Zhang Yue; Chu Fuqiang [Changzhou University, School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Science (China); Abrahams, Jan Pieter, E-mail: abrahams@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Cell Observatory, Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    Purification of unstable protein complexes is a bottleneck for investigation of their 3D structure and in protein-protein interaction studies. In this paper, we demonstrate that streptavidin-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes (Strep Bullet SWNT) can be used to capture the biotinylated DNA-EcoRI complexes on a 2D surface and in solution using atomic force microscopy and electrophoresis analysis, respectively. The restriction enzyme EcoRI forms unstable complexes with DNA in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}. Capturing the EcoRI-DNA complexes on the Strep Bullet SWNT succeeded in the absence of Mg{sup 2+}, demonstrating that the Strep Bullet SWNT can be used for purifying unstable protein complexes.

  1. Photoinduced charge transfer and acetone sensitivity of single-walled carbon nanotube-titanium dioxide hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mengning; Sorescu, Dan C; Star, Alexander

    2013-06-19

    The unique physical and chemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) make them ideal building blocks for the construction of hybrid nanostructures. In addition to increasing the material complexity and functionality, SWNTs can probe the interfacial processes in the hybrid system. In this work, SWNT-TiO2 core/shell hybrid nanostructures were found to exhibit unique electrical behavior in response to UV illumination and acetone vapors. By experimental and theoretical studies of UV and acetone sensitivities of different SWNT-TiO2 hybrid systems, we established a fundamental understanding on the interfacial charge transfer between photoexcited TiO2 and SWNTs as well as the mechanism of acetone sensing. We further demonstrated a practical application of photoinduced acetone sensitivity by fabricating a microsized room temperature acetone sensor that showed fast, linear, and reversible detection of acetone vapors with concentrations in few parts per million range. PMID:23734594

  2. Design and Fabrication of Single-Walled Carbon Nanonet Flexible Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Kien Vu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel flexible strain sensor for real-time strain sensing. The material for strain sensing is single-walled carbon nanonets, grown using the alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition method, that were encapsulated between two layers of Parylene-C, with a polyimide layer as the sensing surface. All of the micro-fabrication was compatible with the standard IC process. Experimental results indicated that the gauge factor of the proposed strain sensor was larger than 4.5, approximately 2.0 times greater than those of commercial gauges. The results also demonstrated that the gauge factor is small when the growth time of SWCNNs is lengthier, and the gauge factor is large when the line width of the serpentine pattern of SWCNNs is small.

  3. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-14

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm(-3). Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change. PMID:27595315

  4. Ionic liquid coated single-walled carbon nanotube buckypaper as supercapacitor electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zheng; Weizhong Qian; Yuntao Yu; Fei Wei

    2013-01-01

    Effect of stacking structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on its performance as electrode of supercapacitor was investigated in the present work.Considering SWCNTs easily formed bundles due to strong van de Waals attraction between tubes,we proposed first dispersion of SWCNTs by ionic liquids (ILs) of 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIMBF4),followed by fabrication of buckypaper by compression.The debundling effect of ILs on SWCNTs increased the interface between electrode and electrolyte,decreased electrical resistance,and,consequently,increased performance of the supercapacitor.Since ILs,used to disperse SWCNTs,also functioned as electrolyte in supercapacitor,our method is a simple way to prepare buckypaper electrode with high performance.

  5. Charge trapping in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays induced by ionizing radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esqueda, Ivan S., E-mail: isanchez@isi.edu [Information Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States); Cress, Cory D. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Che, Yuchi; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Chongwu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    The effects of near-interfacial trapping induced by ionizing radiation exposure of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) arrays are investigated via measurements of gate hysteresis in the transfer characteristics of aligned SWCNT field-effect transistors. Gate hysteresis is attributed to charge injection (i.e., trapping) from the SWCNTs into radiation-induced traps in regions near the SWCNT/dielectric interface. Self-consistent calculations of surface-potential, carrier density, and trapped charge are used to describe hysteresis as a function of ionizing radiation exposure. Hysteresis width (h) and its dependence on gate sweep range are investigated analytically. The effects of non-uniform trap energy distributions on the relationship between hysteresis, gate sweep range, and total ionizing dose are demonstrated with simulations and verified experimentally.

  6. Fabrication and electrochemical properties of free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube film electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Zhi-Qiang; Ma Wen-Jun; Dong Hai-Bo; Li Jin-Zhu; Zhou Wei-Ya

    2011-01-01

    An easily manipulative approach was presented to fabricate electrodes using free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films grown directly by chemical vapor deposition. Electrochemical properties of the electrodes were investigated. In comparison with the post-deposited SWCNT papers, the directly grown SWCNT film electrodes manifested enhanced electrochemical properties and sensitivity of sensors as well as excellent electrocatalytic activities. A transition from macroelectrode to nanoelectrode behaviours was observed with the increase of scan rate. The heat treatment of the SWCNT film electrodes increased the current signals of electrochemical analyser and background current, because the heat-treatment of the SWCNTs in air could create more oxide defects on the walls of the SWCNTs and make the surfaces of SWCNTs more hydrophilic. The excellent electrochemical properties of the directly grown and heat-treated free-standing SWCNT film electrodes show the potentials in biological and electrocatalytic applications.

  7. Torsional vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes using doublet mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatahi-Vajari, Alireza; Imam, Ali

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the torsional vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using a new approach based on doublet mechanics (DM) incorporating explicitly scale parameter and chiral effects. A fourth-order partial differential equation that governs the torsional vibration of nanotubes is derived. Using DM, an explicit equation for the natural frequency in terms of geometrical and mechanical property of CNTs is obtained for both the Zigzag and Armchair nanotube for the torsional vibration mode. It is shown that chiral effects along with the scale parameter play a significant role in the vibration behavior of SWCNTs in torsional vibration mode. Such effects decrease the natural frequency obtained by DM compared to the classical continuum mechanics and nonlocal theory predictions. However, with increase in the length and/or the radius of the tube, the effect of the chiral and scale parameter on the natural frequency decreases.

  8. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M; Geday, Morten A

    2016-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  9. Porosity Development of Single-Wall Carbon Nanohorn @Assemblies by High Pressure Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, E.; Murata, K.; Kaneko, K.; Yudasaka, M.; Kasuya, D.; Iijima, S.

    2002-03-01

    Pore structure modification of single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) after compression at high pressure was studied by physical adsorption and TEM. Dahlia-SWNHs were dispersed in ethanol, dried and compressed at high pressure. The adsorption studies show a remarkable development of porosity after compression. Thus, the surface area and micropore volume of compressed SWNHs double those of as-grown SWNHs. The changes in the pore size distribution, dramatic in the range 20-50 nm, will be discussed. It will be shown that dispersion of SWNHs in solvents, heat treatment in vacuum and oxygen before and after compression, alter the porosity development. Particular attention is focused on the compressed SWNHs as an efficient adsorbent for methane.

  10. X-ray Absorption Improvement of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube through Gadolinium Encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimin; Narsito, I.; Kartini; Santosa, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray absorption improvement of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) through gadolinium (Gd) encapsulation has been studied. The liquid phase adsorption using ethanol has been performed for the doping treatment. The Gd-doped SWCNT (Gd@SWCNT) was characterized by nitrogen adsorption isotherms, Raman spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. A relatively high residual weight of Gd@SWCNT compared to non-doped SWCNT (n-SWCNT) indicated that Gd has been doped in the nanotube. Even though Gd nanoparticles could not be observed clearly by TEM image, however, a significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes at low pressure and RBM (Radial Breathing Mode) upshift of Raman spectra of Gd@SWCNT specimen suggest that the metal nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. It was found that Gd-doped in the SWCNT increased significantly mass attenuation coefficient of the nanotube.

  11. Exciton Radiative Lifetimes and Their Temperature Dependence in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, Yuhei; Matsunaga, Ryusuke; Hirori, Hideki; Matsuda, Kazunari; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2009-03-01

    We have investigated the radiative lifetimes of excitons in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from simultaneous measurements of the photoluminescence (PL) lifetimes [1] and the PL quantum yields. A high-quality sample of PFO dispersed-SWNTs was used for the PL measurements. The evaluated radiative lifetimes were ˜5-15 ns for SWNTs with diameters ˜0.8-1.1 nm at room temperature. The radiative lifetimes increased with the tube diameter. The exciton spatial coherence volume (length) was of the order 10 ^2 nm along the tube axis, as deduced from the radiative lifetimes. Furthermore, we discuss the dynamics of bright and dark excitons [2] from the temperature dependence of the radiative lifetime (10 to 300 K).[3pt] [1] H. Hirori, K. Matsuda, Y. Miyauchi, S. Maruyama, and Y. Kanemitsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 257401 (2006). [0pt] [2] R. Matsunaga, K. Matsuda, and Y. Kanemitsu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 147404 (2008).

  12. Nonlinear free vibration of single walled Carbone NanoTubes conveying fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrar A.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs conveying fluid are modeled and numerically simulated based on von Kármán geometric nonlinearity and Eringen’s nonlocal elasticity theory. The CNTs are modelled as nanobeams where the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia are considered within the framework of Timoshenko beam theory. The governing equations and boundary conditions are derived using the Hamilton’s principle and the nonlinear equation of motion is solved by the Galerkin’s method. The small scale parameter and the fluid-tube interaction effects on the dynamic behaviours of the CNT-fluid system as well as the instabilities induced by the fluid-velocity can be investigated. The critical fluid-velocity and frequency-amplitude relationships as well as the flutter and divergence instability types and the associated time responses are obtained based on the presented methodological approach.

  13. Amperometric Low-Potential Detection of Malic Acid Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Bala

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytical property of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNTmodified electrode toward NADH detection was explored by cyclic voltammetry andamperometry techniques. The experimental results show that SWNT decrease theovervoltage required for oxidation of NADH (to 300 mV vs. Ag/AgCl and this propertymake them suitable for dehydrogenases based biosensors. The behavior of the SWNTmodified biosensor for L-malic acid was studied as an example for dehydrogenasesbiosensor. The amperometric measurements indicate that malate dehydrogenase (MDHcan be strongly adsorbed on the surface of the SWNT-modified electrode to form anapproximate monolayer film. Enzyme immobilization in Nafion membrane can increasethe biosensor stability. A linear calibration curve was obtained for L-malic acidconcentrations between 0.2 and 1mM.

  14. Tuning the driving force for exciton dissociation in single-walled carbon nanotube heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihly, Rachelle; Mistry, Kevin S.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Larson, Bryon W.; Reid, Obadiah; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Rumbles, Garry; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2016-04-25

    Understanding the kinetics and energetics of interfacial electron transfer in molecular systems is crucial for the development of a broad array of technologies, including photovoltaics, solar fuel systems and energy storage. The Marcus formulation for electron transfer relates the thermodynamic driving force and reorganization energy for charge transfer between a given donor/acceptor pair to the kinetics and yield of electron transfer. Here we investigated the influence of the thermodynamic driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and fullerene derivatives by employing time-resolved microwave conductivity as a sensitive probe of interfacial exciton dissociation. For the first time, we observed the Marcus inverted region (in which driving force exceeds reorganization energy) and quantified the reorganization energy for PET for a model SWCNT/acceptor system. The small reorganization energies (about 130 meV, most of which probably arises from the fullerene acceptors) are beneficial in minimizing energy loss in photoconversion schemes.

  15. Molecular scale buckling mechanics in individual aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes on elastomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Dahl-Young; Xiao, Jianliang; Kocabas, Coskun; MacLaren, Scott; Banks, Tony; Jiang, Hanqing; Huang, Yonggang Y; Rogers, John A

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the scaling of controlled nonlinear buckling processes in materials with dimensions in the molecular range (i.e., approximately 1 nm) through experimental and theoretical studies of buckling in individual single-wall carbon nanotubes on substrates of poly(dimethylsiloxane). The results show not only the ability to create and manipulate patterns of buckling at these molecular scales, but also, that analytical continuum mechanics theory can explain, quantitatively, all measurable aspects of this system. Inverse calculation applied to measurements of diameter-dependent buckling wavelengths yields accurate values of the Young's moduli of individual SWNTs. As an example of the value of this system beyond its use in this type of molecular scale metrology, we implement parallel arrays of buckled SWNTs as a class of mechanically stretchable conductor.

  16. Near-complete phase transfer of single-wall carbon nanotubes by covalent functionalization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhalchandra Kakade; Sanjay Patil; Bhaskar Sathe; Suresh Gokhale; Vijayamohanan Pillai

    2008-11-01

    We describe here an efficient phase transfer of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from aqueous to non-aqueous media using a unique amide functionalization route, where water soluble SWNTs (2.6 mg/mL) are effectively transferred to solvents like chloroform, toluene and CS2. A maximum of 30 wt% of oxygenated groups have been generated on the side walls by rapid microwave treatment, leading to a solubility of more than 2.6 mg/mL in water. Approximate surface amine coverage of 50% has been accomplished after oxalyl chloride treatment as inferred from thermogravimetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy by controlling several key parameters associated with the extent of functionalization including purity of the sample, temperature and time.

  17. Adhesion energy of single wall carbon nanotube loops on various substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianjun [Université de Lyon, Laboratoire de Physique, ENS de Lyon, CNRS-46, Allée d' Italie, Lyon 69364 (France); Department of Physics, Shaoxing University, 508 Huancheng West Rd., Shaoxing 312000 (China); Ayari, Anthony [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bellon, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.bellon@ens-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, Laboratoire de Physique, ENS de Lyon, CNRS-46, Allée d' Italie, Lyon 69364 (France)

    2015-04-28

    The physics of adhesion of one-dimensional nano structures such as nanotubes, nano wires, and biopolymers on different substrates is of great interest for the study of biological adhesion and the development of nano electronics and nano mechanics. In this paper, we present force spectroscopy experiments of individual single wall carbon nanotube loops using a home-made interferometric atomic force microscope. Characteristic force plateaus during the peeling process allow the quantitative measurement of the adhesion energy per unit length on various substrates: graphite, mica, platinum, gold, and silicon. Moreover, using a time-frequency analysis of the deflection of the cantilever, we estimate the dynamic stiffness of the contact, providing more information on the nanotube configurations and its intrinsic mechanical properties.

  18. A dislocation model for the pentagon-heptagon pair in zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao Feng; Zhang, Hui Li; Zhi Wu, Xiao

    2010-06-01

    The pentagon-heptagon (5/7) pair in a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is described as a dislocation by the modified Peierls-Nabarro (P-N) theory. The theory takes discrete effects, size effects and curvature effects into account. The bonds variation and shape distortion caused by 5/7 pair have been evaluated. It is found that the neck bond (shared bond) becomes longer while the shoulder bonds become shorter comparing with the one of the hexagons. The results show that the zigzag chain across the center of the 5/7 pair will bend slightly in the axis direction towards the heptagon, and the tube will be flattened where the 5/7 pair is located because of the appearance of the internal stress and nonzero curvature.

  19. Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Regularly Aligned in Channels of Zeolite Single Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi Kang Tang; Handong Sun; Jiannong Wang

    2000-01-01

    @@ We report the synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) formed in 1-nm-sized channels of zeolite crystal by pyrolysis of tripropylamine molecules. The SWCNs are mono-sized and parallelly aligned along the crystal direction. In the present paper, we report the polarized Raman spectra measured for the wellaligned SWCNs, which gives us information about structural symmetry. Electrical transport properties of the SWNTs are measured in the temperature range of 0.3 K ~ 300 K. The conductivity of the SWCNs is monotonically decreased with decreasing temperature. The observed temperature dependence of zero-field conductance, In(σ) ~ 1/√T, could be explained well in terms of electron localization caused by imperfections and impurities in the nanotubes.

  20. Mechanism of electrolyte-induced brightening in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Juan G; Oudjedi, Laura; Crochet, Jared J; Tretiak, Sergei; Lounis, Brahim; Doorn, Stephen K; Cognet, Laurent

    2013-03-01

    While addition of electrolyte to sodium dodecyl sulfate suspensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been demonstrated to result in significant brightening of the nanotube photoluminescence (PL), the brightening mechanism has remained unresolved. Here, we probe this mechanism using time-resolved PL decay measurements. We find that PL decay times increase by a factor of 2 on addition of CsCl as the electrolyte. Such an increase directly parallels an observed near-doubling of PL intensity, indicating the brightening results primarily from changes in nonradiative decay rates associated with exciton diffusion to quenching sites. Our findings indicate that a reduced number of these sites results from electrolyte-induced reorientation of the surfactant surface structure that partially removes pockets of water from the tube surface where excitons can dissociate, and thus underscores the contribution of interfacial water in exciton recombination processes.

  1. Tuning the driving force for exciton dissociation in single-walled carbon nanotube heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihly, Rachelle; Mistry, Kevin S.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Larson, Bryon W.; Reid, Obadiah; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Rumbles, Garry; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the kinetics and energetics of interfacial electron transfer in molecular systems is crucial for the development of a broad array of technologies, including photovoltaics, solar fuel systems and energy storage. The Marcus formulation for electron transfer relates the thermodynamic driving force and reorganization energy for charge transfer between a given donor/acceptor pair to the kinetics and yield of electron transfer. Here we investigated the influence of the thermodynamic driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and fullerene derivatives by employing time-resolved microwave conductivity as a sensitive probe of interfacial exciton dissociation. For the first time, we observed the Marcus inverted region (in which driving force exceeds reorganization energy) and quantified the reorganization energy for PET for a model SWCNT/acceptor system. The small reorganization energies (about 130 meV, most of which probably arises from the fullerene acceptors) are beneficial in minimizing energy loss in photoconversion schemes.

  2. Transverse electric field–induced deformation of armchair single-walled carbon nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Ningyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The deformation of armchair single-walled carbon nanotube under transverse electric field has been investigated using density functional theory. The results show that the circular cross-sections of the nanotubes are deformed to elliptic ones, in which the tube diameter along the field direction is increased, whereas the diameter perpendicular to the field direction is reduced. The electronic structures of the deformed nanotubes were also studied. The ratio of the major diameter to the minor diameter of the elliptic cross-section was used to estimate the degree of the deformation. It is found that this ratio depends on the field strength and the tube diameter. However, the field direction has little role in the deformation. (See supplementary material 1 Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11671-010-9617-y contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. Click here for file

  3. Interaction of [FeFe]-hydrogenases with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedruzic Chang, Drazenka; McDonald, Timothy J.; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Heben, Michael J.; King, Paul W.

    2007-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are promising candidates for use in energy conversion devices as an active photo-collecting elements, for dissociation of bound excitons and charge-transfer from photo-excited chromophores, or as molecular wires to transport charge. Hydrogenases are enzymes that efficiently catalyze the reduction of protons from a variety of electron donors to produce molecular hydrogen. Hydrogenases together with SWNT suggest a novel biohybrid material for direct conversion of sunlight into H II. Here, we report changes in SWNT optical properties upon addition of recombinant [FeFe] hydrogenases from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We find evidence that novel and stable charge-transfer complexes are formed under conditions of the hydrogenase catalytic turnover, providing spectroscopic handles for further study and application of this hybrid system.

  4. Diameter Tuning of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Diffusion Plasma CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have realized a diameter tuning of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs by adjusting process gas pressures with plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD. Detailed photoluminescence measurements reveal that the diameter distribution of SWNTs clearly shifts to a large-diameter region with an increase in the pressure during plasma CVD, which is also confirmed by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Based on the systematical investigation, it is found that the main diameter of SWNTs is determined by the pressure during the heating in an atmosphere of hydrogen and the diameter distribution is narrowed by adjusting the pressure during the plasma generation. Our results could contribute to an application of SWNTs to high-performance thin-film transistors, which requires the diameter-controlled semiconductor-rich SWNTs.

  5. Controlled nanostructure and high loading of single-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced polycarbonate composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an effective technique to fabricate thermoplastic nanocomposites with high loading of well-dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNT membranes were made from a multi-step dispersion and filtration method, and then impregnated with polycarbonate solution to make thermoplastic nanocomposites. High loading of nanotubes was achieved by controlling the viscosity of polycarbonate solution. SEM and AFM characterization results revealed the controlled nanostructure in the resultant nanocomposites. Dynamic mechanical property tests indicated that the storage modulus of the resulting nanocomposites at 20 wt% nanotubes loading was improved by a factor of 3.4 compared with neat polycarbonate material. These results suggest the developed approach is an effective way to fabricate thermoplastic nanocomposites with good dispersion and high SWNT loading

  6. Microfabrication and characterization of spray-coated single-wall carbon nanotube film strain gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization results of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film strain gauges for potential applications as highly sensitive strain, weight, or pressure sensors on the macro-scale. A batch microfabrication process was developed for practical device construction and packaging using spray-coated SWCNTs and a conventional semiconductor process. The prototype was characterized using a commercial metal foil gauge with tensile and compressive testing on a binocular load cell. Our test results demonstrated that the proposed SWCNT film gauges have a linear relationship between resistance changes and externally applied strain. The gauge factor ranged from 7.0 to 16.4 for four different micro-grid configurations, indicating that the maximum strain sensitivity of the prototype was approximately eight times greater than that of commercial gauges.

  7. One-Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposite Synthesized with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT as templates for the preparation of 1D porous organic-inorganic hybrid composites. The in situ deposited SWCNT were sputter coated with Sn metal and thermally oxidized in air to form a SnO2/SWCNT nanowire framework on SiO2/Si substrate. Poly(acrylic acid (PAA was coated onto this scaffold through UV light-induced radical polymerization, which resulted in the final formation of hybrid composites. The structures of hybrid composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that PAA was successfully coated and the structural advantage of nanowire was fairly maintained, which indicates that this framework is very stable for organic functionalization in solution. The simplicity of this method for the formation of porous organic-inorganic hybrid composites provides a potential application for nanoelectronic devices.

  8. A Comprehensive Review on Separation Methods and Techniques for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Komatsu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Structural control of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs is attracting enormous interest in view of their applications to nanoelectronics and nanooptics. Actually, more than 200 papers regarding separation of SWNTs have been published since 1998. In this review, they are classified into the following five sections according to the separation methods; electrophoresis, centrifugation, chromatography, selective solubilization and selective reaction. In each method, all literature is summarized in tables showing the separated objects (metallic/semiconducting (M/S, length, diameter, (n, m structure and/or handedness, the production process of the used SWNTs (CoMoCAT, HiPco, arc discharge and/or laser vaporization and the employed chemicals, such as detergents and polymers. Changes in annual number of publications related to this subject are also discussed.

  9. Near-infrared electroluminescent devices using single-wall carbon nanotubes thin flms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazaoui, S.; Minami, N.; Nalini, B.; Kim, Y.; Takada, N.; Hara, K.

    2005-11-01

    We have fabricated near-infrared electroluminescent (EL) devices utilizing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) finely dispersed in a polymer, such as poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy]-1,4-phenylenevinylene (MEHPPV). Al/SWNT-MEHPPV/indium tin oxide thin-film devices exhibit a very promising EL response over a broad spectrum, including the range of 900-1600nm. From the analysis of the optical absorption, photoluminescence and EL spectra, as well as the current-voltage characteristics, we demonstrate that those devices exploit the intrinsic near-infrared light-emitting properties of semiconducting SWNTs and the electronic transport properties of SWNT-doped MEHPPV. Those achievements are essential for the future development of thin-film SWNT optoelectronic devices.

  10. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Field Effect Transistor as a Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasantha R. Mudimela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotube network field effect transistors were fabricated and studied as humidity sensors. Sensing responses were altered by changing the gate voltage. At the open channel state (negative gate voltage, humidity pulse resulted in the decrease of the source-drain current, and, vice versa, the increase in the source-drain current was observed at the positive gate voltage. This effect was explained by the electron-donating nature of water molecules. The operation speed and signal intensity was found to be dependent on the gate voltage polarity. The positive or negative change in current with humidity pulse at zero-gate voltage was found to depend on the previous state of the gate electrode (positive or negative voltage, respectively. Those characteristics were explained by the charge traps in the gate dielectric altering the effective gate voltage, which influenced the operation of field effect transistor.

  11. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range

  12. Purity and Defect Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasumitsu Miyata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the purity and defects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs produced by various synthetic methods including chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge, and laser ablation. The SWCNT samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Raman spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of SEM images suggested that the G-band Raman intensity serves as an index for the purity. By contrast, the intensity ratio of G-band to D-band (G/D ratio reflects both the purity and the defect density of SWCNTs. The combination of G-band intensity and G/D ratio is useful for a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the purity and defect density of a SWCNT sample.

  13. Theoretical analysis on nonlinear vibration of fluid flow in single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valipour, P.; Ghasemi, S. E.; Khosravani, Mohammad Reza; Ganji, D. D.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the concept of nonlocal continuum theory is used to characterize the nonlinear vibration of an embedded single-walled carbon nanotube. The Pasternak-type model is employed to simulate the interaction of the SWNTs. The parameterized perturbation method is used to solve the corresponding nonlinear differential equation. The effects of the vibration amplitude, flow velocity, nonlocal parameter, and stiffness of the medium on the nonlinear frequency variation are presented. The result shows that by increasing the Winkler constant, the nonlinear frequency decreases, especially for low vibration amplitudes. In addition, it is resulted that influence of the nonlocal parameter is greater at higher flow velocities in comparison with lower flow velocities.

  14. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng, E-mail: walfe@nuaa.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 210016 Nanjing (China)

    2015-12-15

    The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  15. CO2 adsorption on single-walled dahlia-like carbon nanohorns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohorquez, Jaime; Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Migone, Aldo; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio

    2010-03-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on spherical aggregates of as-produced (i.e., closed) dahlia-like single-walled carbon nanohorns was investigated. We conducted volumetric adsorption measurements at five temperatures between 147 and 180 K. The shape of the isotherms for CO2 is very different from those measured with neon and CF4. For CO2 there is a single, smeared step in the adsorption data between the lowest coverages and saturation. By contrast, Ne and CF4 show two distinct substeps on the same substrate. The isosteric heat was also obtained and its dependence on coverage also showed an usual behavior: it increased with increasing coverage. The isosteric heat decreases with coverage both for Ne and CF4. The stronger intermolecular interactions present for CO2 probably are responsible for this adsorbate's unusual behavior. Comparisons with the behavior reported in the literature for CO2 on SWNTs, which shows similar unusual characteristics, will also be made.

  16. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding of single-walled carbon nanotube epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Huang, Yi; Du, Feng; He, Xiaobo; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Hongjun; Ma, Yanfeng; Li, Feifei; Chen, Yongsheng; Eklund, Peter C

    2006-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composites have been fabricated to evaluate the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of SWNTs. Our results indicate that SWNTs can be used as effective lightweight EMI shielding materials. Composites with greater than 20 dB shielding efficiency were obtained easily. EMI SE was tested in the frequency range of 10 MHz to 1.5 GHz, and the highest EMI shielding efficiency (SE) was obtained for 15 wt % SWNT, reaching 49 dB at 10 MHz and exhibiting 15-20 dB in the 500 MHz to 1.5 GHz range. The EMI SE was found to correlate with the dc conductivity, and this frequency range is found to be dominated by reflection. The effects of SWNT wall defects and aspect ratio on the EMI SE were also studied. PMID:16771569

  17. Selective fabrication of quasi-parallel single-walled carbon nanotubes on silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fabricated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) arrays, about 85% of which are semiconducting. Fe nanoparticles, which were used as a catalyst, were produced simply and cheaply from Wistar rat blood. The SWNT arrays generally grow parallel to the gas flow. Hundreds of devices with varying SWNT density in the channel were measured and we found that the on-off ratio for such devices with the quasi-parallel, semiconducting-rich SWNTs in the channel can be easily increased via an electrical breakdown method. Thus, large-scale fabrication of FET devices is possible simply by controlling the width of the channel. Finally, we determined that the mobility of the devices reached 3900 cm2 V-1 s-1.

  18. Detection of Sugar-Lectin Interactions by Multivalent Dendritic Sugar Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Vasu, K S; Bagul, R S; Jayaraman, N; Sood, A K; 10.1063/1.4739793

    2012-01-01

    We show that single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) decorated with sugar functionalized poly (propyl ether imine) (PETIM) dendrimer is a very sensitive platform to quantitatively detect carbohydrate recognizing proteins, namely, lectins. The changes in electrical conductivity of SWNT in field effect transistor device due to carbohydrate - protein interactions form the basis of present study. The mannose sugar attached PETIM dendrimers undergo charge - transfer interactions with the SWNT. The changes in the conductance of the dendritic sugar functionalized SWNT after addition of lectins in varying concentrations were found to follow the Langmuir type isotherm, giving the concanavalin A (Con A) - mannose affinity constant to be 8.5 x 106 M-1. The increase in the device conductance observed after adding 10 nM of Con A is same as after adding 20 \\muM of a non - specific lectin peanut agglutinin, showing the high specificity of the Con A - mannose interactions. The specificity of sugar-lectin interactions was chara...

  19. Cu/single-walled carbon nanotube laminate composites fabricated by cold rolling and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The remarkable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attracted extensive research interest as structural and functional materials. In particular, SWCNTs have been used to reinforce polymers and ceramic composites and great progress has been made. For metal matrix composites, the limitation of the conventional manufacturing process and the difficulty in dispersing nanotubes within metal matrices hinder the development of metal matrix composites. In this paper, we demonstrate a successful fabrication of Cu/SWCNT laminate composites by combined techniques of cold rolling and annealing, using 19 layers of large-area SWCNT films sandwiched between 20 layers of Cu thin foils. The tensile strength and Young's modulus of the resultant laminate composites are 361 MPa and 132 GPa, respectively, exhibiting an improvement over the comparative pure Cu foils processed under identical conditions. These results suggest that good interfacial adhesions between nanotubes and the Cu matrix have been achieved after the rolling-annealing-rolling processes

  20. Cu/single-walled carbon nanotube laminate composites fabricated by cold rolling and annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Hui; Housten, William; Zhao, Yimin; Qiu Zhu, Yan

    2007-05-01

    The remarkable mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attracted extensive research interest as structural and functional materials. In particular, SWCNTs have been used to reinforce polymers and ceramic composites and great progress has been made. For metal matrix composites, the limitation of the conventional manufacturing process and the difficulty in dispersing nanotubes within metal matrices hinder the development of metal matrix composites. In this paper, we demonstrate a successful fabrication of Cu/SWCNT laminate composites by combined techniques of cold rolling and annealing, using 19 layers of large-area SWCNT films sandwiched between 20 layers of Cu thin foils. The tensile strength and Young's modulus of the resultant laminate composites are 361 MPa and 132 GPa, respectively, exhibiting an improvement over the comparative pure Cu foils processed under identical conditions. These results suggest that good interfacial adhesions between nanotubes and the Cu matrix have been achieved after the rolling-annealing-rolling processes.

  1. Molecular design of strong single-wall carbon nanotube/polyelectrolyte multilayer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedov, Arif A.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Prato, Maurizio; Guldi, Dirk M.; Wicksted, James P.; Hirsch, Andreas

    2002-11-01

    The mechanical failure of hybrid materials made from polymers and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is primarily attributed to poor matrix-SWNT connectivity and severe phase segregation. Both problems can be successfully mitigated when the SWNT composite is made following the protocol of layer-by-layer assembly. This deposition technique prevents phase segregation of the polymer/SWNT binary system, and after subsequent crosslinking, the nanometre-scale uniform composite with SWNT loading as high as 50 wt% can be obtained. The free-standing SWNT/polyelectrolyte membranes delaminated from the substrate were found to be exceptionally strong with a tensile strength approaching that of hard ceramics. Because of the lightweight nature of SWNT composites, the prepared free-standing membranes can serve as components for a variety of long-lifetime devices.

  2. Toughening of epoxy matrices with reduced single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Ashrafi, Behnam; Guan, Jingwen; Kingston, Christopher; Johnston, Andrew; Simard, Benoit; Mirjalili, Vahid; Hubert, Pascal; Deng, Libo; Young, Robert J

    2011-07-01

    Reduced single-walled carbon nanotubes (r-SWCNT) are shown to react readily at room temperature under inert atmosphere conditions with epoxide moieties, such as those in triglycidyl p-amino phenol (TGAP), to produce a soft covalently bonded interface around the SWCNT. The soft interface is compatible with the SWCNT-free cross-linked cured matrix and acts as a toughener for the composite. Incorporation of 0.2 wt % r-SWCNT enhances the ultimate tensile strength, toughness and fracture toughness by 32, 118, and 40%, respectively, without change in modulus. A toughening rate (dK(IC)/dwt(f)) of 200 MPa m(0.5) is obtained. The toughening mechanism is elucidated through dynamic mechanical analyses, Raman spectroscopy and imaging, and stress-strain curve analyses. The method is scalable and applicable to epoxy resins and systems used commercially. PMID:21612292

  3. Evaluation of nonlocal parameter in the vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes with initial strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, B.; Ansari, R.

    2010-06-01

    Based upon a nonlocal shell model accounting for the small-scale effects, the vibration characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different boundary conditions subjected to initial strain are studied in this paper. The set of governing equations of motion is numerically solved by a method that emerged from incorporating the radial point interpolation approximation within the framework of the generalized differential quadrature method. The effectiveness of the present nonlocal shell model is assessed by the molecular dynamics simulations as a benchmark of good accuracy. Accordingly, nonlocal parameters for clamped and cantilever SWCNTs with thicknesses of 0.066 and 0.34 nm are proposed due to the uncertainty that exists in defining nanotube wall thickness. The simulation results show that the resonant frequencies of SWCNTs are very sensitive to the initial strain, although small.

  4. Hydrogen Storage in Benzene Moiety Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bing-Yun; LIANG Qi-Min; SONG Chen; XIA Yue-Yuan; ZHAO Ming-wen; LIU Xiang-Dong; ZHANG Hong-Yu

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen storage capacity of(5,5)single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs)decorated chemically with benzene moieties is studied by using molecular dynamics simulations(MDSs)and density functional theory(DFT) calculations.It is found that benzene molecules colliding on (5,5) SWNTs at incident energy of 50 eV form very stable configurations of benzene moiety adsorption on the wall of SWNTs.The MDSs indicate that when the benzene moiety decorated(5,5)SWNTs and a pristine(5,5)SWNT are put in a box in which hydrogen molecules are filled to a pressure of~26 atm,the hydrogen storage capacity of the benzene moiety decorated(5,5)SWNT is about 4.7wt.% and that of the pristine (5,5) SwNT is nearly 3.9 wt.%.

  5. CVD-grown horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes: synthesis routes and growth mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Imad; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attractive electrical and physical properties, which make them very promising for use in various applications. For some applications however, in particular those involving electronics, SWCNTs need to be synthesized with a high degree of control with respect to yield, length, alignment, diameter, and chirality. With this in mind, a great deal of effort is being directed to the precision control of vertically and horizontally aligned nanotubes. In this review the focus is on the latter, horizontally aligned tubes grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The reader is provided with an in-depth review of the established vapor deposition orientation techniques. Detailed discussions on the characterization routes, growth parameters, and growth mechanisms are also provided. PMID:22619167

  6. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm-3. Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change.

  7. Viscoelastic wave propagation in the viscoelastic single walled carbon nanotubes based on nonlocal strain gradient theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yugang; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Dong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic wave propagation in an embedded viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is studied based on the nonlocal strain gradient theory. The characteristic equation for the viscoelastic wave in SWCNTs is derived. The emphasis is placed on the influence of the tube diameter on the viscoelastic wave dispersion. A blocking diameter is observed, above which the wave could not propagate in SWCNTs. The results show that the blocking diameter is greatly dependent on the damping coefficient, the nonlocal and the strain gradient length scale parameters, as well as the Winkler modulus of the surrounding elastic medium. These findings may provide a prospective application of SWCNTs in nanodevices and nanocomposites.

  8. Antenna-coupled terahertz radiation from joule-heated single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muthee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this letter an experimental method is introduced that allows detection of terahertz (THz radiation from arrays of joule-heated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs, by coupling this radiation through integrated antennas and a silicon lens. The radiation forms a diffraction-limited beam with a total maximum radiated power of 450 nW, significantly greater than the power estimated from Nyquist thermal noise (8 nW. The physical radiation process is unknown at this stage, but possible explanations for the high radiated power are discussed briefly. The emission has a typical bandwidth of 1.2 THz and can be tuned to different frequencies by changing the dimensions of the antennas. Arrays of the devices could be integrated in CMOS integrated circuits, and find application in THz systems, such as in near-range medical imaging.

  9. Aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes attenuate the behavioural and neurochemical effects of methamphetamine in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xue; Yang, Jing-Yu; He, Yi; Wang, Li-Rong; Liu, Ping; Yu, Li-Sha; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Ming-Ming; Liu, Yue-Yang; Xiang, Rong-Wu; Yang, Xiao-Ting; Fan, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Min; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Hong-Jie; Wei, Tuo; Cui, Wei; Ge, Guang-Lu; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a serious social and health problem worldwide. At present, there are no effective medications to treat METH addiction. Here, we report that aggregated single-walled carbon nanotubes (aSWNTs) significantly inhibited METH self-administration, METH-induced conditioned place preference and METH- or cue-induced relapse to drug-seeking behaviour in mice. The use of aSWNTs alone did not significantly alter the mesolimbic dopamine system, whereas pretreatment with aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in the ventral striatum. Electrochemical assays suggest that aSWNTs facilitated dopamine oxidation. In addition, aSWNTs attenuated METH-induced increases in tyrosine hydroxylase or synaptic protein expression. These findings suggest that aSWNTs may have therapeutic effects for treatment of METH addiction by oxidation of METH-enhanced extracellular dopamine in the striatum.

  10. Light radiation through a transparent cathode plate with single-walled carbon nanotube field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the conventional carbon nanotube backlight units (CNT-BLUs), light passes through the phosphor-coated anode glass plate, which thus faces closely the thin film transistor (TFT) backplate of a liquid crystal display panel. This configuration makes heat dissipation structurally difficult because light emission and heat generation occur simultaneously at the anode. We propose a novel configuration of a CNT-BLU where the cathode rather than the anode faces the TFT backplate by turning it upside down. In this design, light passes through the transparent cathode glass plate while heating occurs at the anode. We demonstrated a novel design of CNT-BLU by fabricating transparent single-walled CNT field emitters on the cathode and by coating a reflecting metal layer on the anode. This study hopefully provides a clue to solve the anode-heating problem which would be inevitably confronted for high-luminance and large-area CNT-BLUs.

  11. Investigation on optical absorption properties of ion irradiated single walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishalli,, E-mail: vishalli-2008@yahoo.com; Dharamvir, Keya, E-mail: keya@pu.ac.in [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K. [Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala (India); Avasthi, D. K. [Materials Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, ArunaAsaf Ali Marg, NewDelhi (India); Jeet, Kiran [Electron Microscopy and Nanoscience laboratory, Punjab Agriculture University, Ludhiana (India)

    2015-08-28

    In the present study change in the optical absorption properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under nickel ion (60 MeV) irradiation at various fluences has been investigated. Langmuir Blodgett technique is used to deposit SWCNT thin film of uniform thickness. AFM analysis shows a network of interconnected bundles of nanotubes. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra indicate that the sample mainly contain SWCNTs of semiconducting nature. It has been found in absorption spectra that there is decrease in the intensity of the characteristic SWCNT peaks with increase in fluence. At fluence value 1×10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} there is almost complete suppression of the characteristic SWCNTs peaks.The decrease in the optical absorption with increase in fluence is due to the increase in the disorder in the system which leads to the decrease in optically active states.

  12. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that a nonperturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single-walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. We test this theory explicitly on the data reported by Dukovic et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 2314 (2005), 10.1021/nl0518122] and Sfeir et al. [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.195424] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  13. Electrical and mechanical characterisation of single wall carbon nanotubes based composites for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whulanza, Yudan; Battini, Elena; Vannozzi, Lorenzo; Vomero, Maria; Ahluwalia, Arti; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the realisation of conductive matrices for application to tissue engineering research. We used poly(L-lactide (PLLA)), poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) as polymer matrix, because they are biocompatible and biodegradable. The conductive property was integrated to them by adding single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the polymer matrix. Several SWNTs concentrations were introduced aiming to understand how they influence and modulate mechanical properties, impedance features and electric percolation threshold of polymer matrix. It was observed that a concentration of 0.3% was able to transform insulating matrix into conductive one. Furthermore, a conductive model of the SWNT/polymer was developed by applying power law of percolation threshold.

  14. Large Deflections Mechanical Analysis of a Suspended Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube under Thermoelectrical Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf Ya'akobovitz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the recent progress in integrating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs into silicon-based micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS, new modeling tools are needed to predict their behavior under different loads, including thermal, electrical and mechanical. In the present study, the mechanical behavior of SWCNTs under thermoelectrical loading is analyzed using a large deflection geometrically nonlinear string model. The effect of the resistive heating was found to have a substantial influence on the SWCNTs behavior, including significant enhancement of the strain (up to the millistrains range and buckling due to the thermal expansion. The effect of local buckling sites was also studied and was found to enhance the local strain. The theoretical and numerical results obtained in the present study demonstrate the importance of resistive heating in the analysis of SWCNTs and provide an additional insight into the unique mechanics of suspended SWCNTs.

  15. Debundling of single-walled carbon nanotubes by using natural polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural polyelectrolytes (NPs), including sodium lignosulfonate, humic acid and so forth, are reported for the first time to solubilize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water through a noncovalent interaction. A variety of methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), visible-near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectra, Raman spectra and zeta potential measurements, were used to characterize the NP-dispersed SWNT solutions. It is found that the SWNTs can be exfoliated into thin bundles or individual tubes, even at NP concentrations as low as 0.15 mg ml-1. Their high performance is attributed to the abundance of aromatic groups and ionized groups in the NP molecules. This method of solubilization opens the way for exploiting new natural materials as SWNT solubilizers and may find applications in nanocomposites, self-assembly, and so forth

  16. Fabrication of single-walled carbon-nanotube-based pressure sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, C; Helbling, T; Obergfell, D; Schöberle, B; Tripp, M K; Jungen, A; Roth, S; Bright, V M; Hierold, C

    2006-02-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of bulk micromachined pressure sensors based on individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the active electromechanical transducer elements. The electromechanical sensor device consists of an individual electrically connected SWNT adsorbed on top of a 100-nm-thick atomic layer deposited (ALD) circular alumina (Al(2)O(3)) membrane with a radius in the range of 50-100 microm. A white light interferometer (WLI) was used to measure the deflection of the membrane due to differential pressure, and the mechanical properties of the device were characterized by bulge testing. Finally, we performed the first electromechanical measurements on strained metallic SWNTs adhering to a membrane and found a piezoresistive gauge factor of approximately 210 for metallic SWNTs.

  17. Tailoring polyacrylonitrile interfacial morphological structure by crystallization in the presence of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiying; Song, Kenan; Meng, Jiangsha; Minus, Marilyn L

    2013-02-01

    In order to improve stress transfer between polymer matrixes and nanofillers, controlling the structure development in the interphase region during composite processing is a necessity. For polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) composites, the formation of the PAN interphase in the presence of the SWNT as a function of processing conditions is studied. Under these conditions, three distinct interfacial coating morphologies of PAN are observed on SWNT. In the semidilute polymer concentration regime subjected to shearing, PAN extended-chain tubular coatings are formed on SWNT. Dilute PAN/SWNT quiescent solutions subjected to cooling yields hybrid periodic shish-kebab structures (first observation for PAN polymer), and dilute PAN/SWNT quiescent solutions subjected to rapid cooling results in the formation of an irregular PAN crystalline coating on the SWNT. PMID:23286387

  18. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jilili, Jiwuer

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  19. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  20. All-printed and transparent single walled carbon nanotube thin film transistor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajed, Farzam; Rutherglen, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    We present fully transparent single-walled all-carbon nanotube thin film transistors (SWCNT TFT) fabricated using low-cost inkjet printing methods. Such a demonstration provides a platform towards low cost fully printed transparent electronics. The SWCNT TFTs were printed with metallic and semiconducting SWCNT using a room temperature printing process, without the requirement of expensive cleanroom facilities. The unoptimized SWCNT TFTs fabricated exhibited an Ion/off ratio of 92 and mobility of 2.27 cm2V-1s-1 and transmissivity of 82%. The combination of both high electrical performance and high transparency make all-SWCNT TFTs desirable for next generation transparent display backplanes and products such as Google Glass.

  1. Molecular Dynamics for Elastic and Plastic Deformation of a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Under Nanoindentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Te-Hua; JIAN Sheng-Rui; CHUU Der-San

    2004-01-01

    @@ Mechanical characteristics of a suspended (10, 10) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) during atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation are investigated at different temperatures by molecular dynamics simulations.The results indicate that the Young modulus of the (10, 10) SWCNT under temperatures of 300-600K is 1.2-1.3 TPa. As the temperature increases, the Young modulus of the SWCNT increases, but the axial strain of the SWCNT decreases. The strain-induced spontaneous formation of the Stone-Wales defects and the rippled behaviour under inhomogeneous stress are studied. The rippled behaviour of the SWCNT is enhanced with the increasing axial strain. The adhesive phenomenon between the probe and the nanotube and the elastic recovery of the nanotube during the retraction are also investigated.

  2. Network single-walled carbon nanotube biosensors for fast and highly sensitive detection of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Pingan; Zhang Jia; Wen Zhenzhong [Research Centre for Micro/Nanotechnology, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 2 YiKuang Street, Harbin 150080 (China); Zhang Can, E-mail: hupa@hit.edu.cn [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-19

    Detection of proteins is powerfully assayed in the diagnosis of diseases. A strategy for the development of an ultrahigh sensitivity biosensor based on a network single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) has been demonstrated. Metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in the network nanotube FET were selectively removed or cut via a carefully controlled procedure of electrical break-down (BD), and left non-conducting m-SWNTs which magnified the Schottky barrier (SB) area. This nanotube FET exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity and fast response to biomolecules. The lowest detection limit of 0.5 pM was achieved by exploiting streptavidin (SA) or a biotin/SA pair as the research model, and BD-treated nanotube biosensors had a 2 x 10{sup 4}-fold lower minimum detectable concentration than the device without BD treatment. The response time is in the range of 0.3-3 min.

  3. Functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes with 4-benzo-9-crown-3 ether

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ardeshir Khazaei; Maryam Kiani Borazjani; Khadijeh Mansouri Moradian

    2012-09-01

    Functionalization of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by a zwitterionic interaction (COO−NH$^{+}_{3}$) between protonated amine on crown ether and an oxyanion from a carboxylic acid group on SWCNT has been described. This ionic interaction has led to a considerable increase in the solubility of SWCNTs in both organic and aqueous solvents such as ethanol, dimethyl sulphoxide, dimethylformamide, and H2O. The highest solubility was attained in DMF and DMSO. The ionic bonded 4-benzo-9-crown-3 ether allowed the hosting of Li+. The ionic bond of crown ether (4-(benzo-9-crown-3)) to SWCNT was identified and confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron-microscopy, atomic force microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis methods.

  4. Polymer photovoltaic cell embedded with p-type single walled carbon nanotubes fabricated by spray process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dal-Ho; Park, Jea-Gun

    2012-08-01

    In the current study, we fabricated polymer (poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric-acid methyl-ester (PCBM) blend) photovoltaic (PV) cells embedded with p-type single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with tangled hair morphology. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) rapidly increased with SWCNT concentration of up to 6.83% coverage, and then decreased and saturated with increasing SWCNT concentration; i.e., the PCE peaks at 5.379%. This tendency is mainly associated with hole transport efficiency toward the transparent electrode (indium-tin-oxide (ITO)) via SWCNTs, directly determining the series resistance and shunt resistance of the polymer PV cells embedded with SWCNTs: the PV cell is increasing shunt resistance and decreasing series resistance.

  5. Adatom complexes and self-healing mechanisms on graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsetseris, Leonidas [ORNL; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Point defects play a role in the functionalization, chemical activation, carrier transport, and nano-engineering of graphitic systems. Here, we use first-principles calculations to describe several processes that alter the properties of graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the presence of self-interstitials (SI's). We find that, while two or four SI's are stabilized in hillock-like structures that stay idle unless the system is heated to very high temperatures, clustering of three C adatoms leads to the formation of mobile protrusions on graphene and large enough SWCNTs. For different SI concentrations and SWCNT size, the interplay between mobile and immobile species may favor one of the two competing processes, self-healing or formation of adatom superstructures.

  6. Pulse gas alignment and AFM manipulation of single-wall carbon nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN XiaoJun; WANG YueChao; XI Ning; DONG ZaiLi; TUNG Steve

    2008-01-01

    In the fabrication process of nanoelectronic device arrays based on single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT), oriented alignment of SWCNTs and property modification of metallic SWCNTs in the array are the key problems to be solved. Pulse gas alignment with substrate downward tilt is proposed to realize the controllable alignment of SWCNTs. Experimental results demonstrate that 84% SWCNTs are aligned in -15°- 15° angular to the pulse gas direction. A modified nanomanipulation technology based on atomic force microscope (AFM) is utilized to perform various kinds of SWCNT manipulation, such as SWCNT separation from the "Y" CNT, catalyst removal from the SWCNT end, continual nano buckles fabrication on SWCNT and even stretching to break, which provides a feasible way to modify the size, shape and the electrical property of SWCNTs.

  7. Adsorption and properties of aromatic amino acids on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuihong; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Ruiqin; Lin, Zijing

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the adsorption of three aromatic amino acids--phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan--on the sidewalls of a number of representative single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using density-functional tight-binding calculations, complemented by an empirical dispersion correction. The armchair (n, n) SWNTs (n = 3-12) and zigzag (n, 0) SWNTs (n = 4-12) were thoroughly examined. We found that the most stable amino acid/SWNT complexes for different SWNTs have similar local structures, and that the distance between the amino acid and SWNT is about 3 Å. Owing to the π-π and H-π stacking interactions, the benzene and indole rings are not exactly parallel to the SWNTs but instead lie at a small angle. We also investigated the diameter and chirality dependences of binding energies and found that SWNT (5, 0) has an especially large binding energy that can be used for SWNT identification or selection.

  8. Small Scale Effect on Thermal Vibration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Nonlocal Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ming

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a single beam model has been developed to analyze the thermal vibration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT. The nonlocal elasticity takes into account the effect of small size into the formulation and the boundary condition. With exact solution of the dynamic governing equations, the thermal-vibrational characteristics of a cantilever SWCNT are obtained. Influence of nonlocal small scale effects, temperature change and vibration modes of the CNT on the frequency are investigated. The present study shows that the additional boundary conditions from small scale do not change natural frequencies at different temperature change. Thus for simplicity, one can apply the local boundary condition to replace the small scale boundary condition.

  9. Nanoscale finite element models for vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes:atomistic versus continuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R ANSARI; S ROUHI; M ARYAYI

    2013-01-01

    By the atomistic and continuum finite element models, the free vibration behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied. In the atomistic finite element model, the bonds and atoms are modeled by the beam and point mass elements, respectively. The molecular mechanics is linked to structural mechanics to determine the elastic properties of the mentioned beam elements. In the continuum finite element approach, by neglecting the discrete nature of the atomic structure of the nanotubes, they are modeled with shell elements. By both models, the natural frequencies of SWCNTs are computed, and the effects of the geometrical parameters, the atomic structure, and the boundary conditions are investigated. The accuracy of the utilized methods is verified in comparison with molecular dynamic simulations. The molecular structural model leads to more reliable results, especially for lower aspect ratios. The present analysis provides valuable information about application of continuum models in the investigation of the mechanical behaviors of nanotubes.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of the test of single-walled carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU ChenXin; CHEN YunFei; JIAO JiWei

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to do the test of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) under tensile loading with the use of Brenner potential to describe the interactions of atoms in SWCNTs. The Young's modulus and tensile strength for SWCNTs were calculated and the values found are 4.2 TPa and 1.40―1.77 TPa, respectively. During the simulation, it was found that if the SWCNTs are unloaded prior to the maximum stress, the stress-strain curve for unloading process overlaps with the loading one, showing that the SWCNT's deformation up to its fracture point is completely elastic. The MD simulation also demonstrates the fracture process for several types of SWCNT and the breaking mechanisms for SWCNTs were analyzed based on the energy and structure behavior.

  11. Coupling between flexural modes in free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumeng Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear thermal vibration behavior of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation and a nonlinear, nonplanar beam model. Whirling motion with energy transfer between flexural motions is found in the free vibration of the SWCNT excited by the thermal motion of atoms where the geometric nonlinearity is significant. A nonlinear, nonplanar beam model considering the coupling in two vertical vibrational directions is presented to explain the whirling motion of the SWCNT. Energy in different vibrational modes is not equal even over a time scale of tens of nanoseconds, which is much larger than the period of fundamental natural vibration of the SWCNT at equilibrium state. The energy of different modes becomes equal when the time scale increases to the microsecond range.

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized by a series of dichlorocarbenes: DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushenko, Igor K.; Petrushenko, Konstantin B.

    2016-02-01

    The structural and elastic properties of neutral and ionized dichlorocarbene (CCl2) functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were studied using density functional theory (DFT). The Young’s modulus of ionized pristine SWCNTs is found to decrease in comparison to that of neutral models. The interesting effect of increase in Young’s modulus values of ionized functionalized SWCNTs is observed. We ascribe this feature to the concurrent processes of the bond elongation on ionization and the local deformation on cycloaddition. The strong dependence of the elasticity modulus on the number of addends is also observed. However, the CCl2-attached SWCNTs in their neutral and ionized forms remain strong enough to be suitable for the reinforcement of composites. In contrast to the elastic properties, the binding energies do not change significantly, irrespective of CCl2 coverage.

  13. Purification of Single-Wall carbon nanotubes by heat treatment and supercritical extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Bertoncini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Arc discharge is the most practical method for the synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. However, the production of SWCNT by this technique has low selectivity and yield, requiring further purification steps. This work is a study of purification of SWCNT by heat treatment in an inert atmosphere followed by supercritical fluid extraction. The raw arc discharge material was first heat-treated at 1250 °C under argon. The nanotubes were further submitted to an extraction process using supercritical CO2 as solvent. A surfactant (tributylphosphate, TBP and a chelating agent (hexafluoroacetylacetone, HFA were used together to eliminate metallic impurities from the remaining arc discharge catalysts. Analysis of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES showed an efficient removal of iron and cobalt (>80%. The purified nanotubes were further analyzed by TGA and Raman spectroscopy.

  14. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Surface Control of Complement Recognition and Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Robinson, Joshua T.; Dai, Hongjie;

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are receiving considerable attention in site-specific drug and nucleic acid delivery, photodynamic therapy, and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Despite these advances, nanotubes may activate the complement system (an integral part of innate immunity), which can induce...... clinically significant anaphylaxis. We demonstrate that single-walled CNTs coated with human serum albumin activate the complement system through C1q-mediated classical and the alternative pathways. Surface coating with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-based amphiphiles, which confers solubility and prolongs...... circulation profiles of CNTs, activates the complement system differently, depending on the amphiphile structure. CNTs with linear poly(ethylene glycol) amphiphiles trigger the lectin pathway of the complement through both l-ficolin and mannan-binding lectin recognition. The lectin pathway activation, however...

  15. Photoluminescence enhancement of aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes by polymer transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Manuel; Zakharko, Yuriy; Gannott, Florentina; Grimm, Stefan B.; Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-10-01

    The photoluminescence of as-grown, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz is strongly quenched and barely detectable. Here we show that transferring these SWNTs to another substrate such as clean quartz or glass increases their emission efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. By statistical analysis of large nanotube arrays we show at what point of the transfer process the emission enhancement occurs and how it depends on the receiving substrate and the employed transfer polymer. We find that hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) as the transfer polymer results in higher photoluminescence enhancement than the more hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Possible mechanisms for this enhancement such as strain relief, disruption of the strong interaction of SWNTs with the substrate and localized emissive states are discussed.The photoluminescence of as-grown, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on quartz is strongly quenched and barely detectable. Here we show that transferring these SWNTs to another substrate such as clean quartz or glass increases their emission efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. By statistical analysis of large nanotube arrays we show at what point of the transfer process the emission enhancement occurs and how it depends on the receiving substrate and the employed transfer polymer. We find that hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) as the transfer polymer results in higher photoluminescence enhancement than the more hydrophilic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Possible mechanisms for this enhancement such as strain relief, disruption of the strong interaction of SWNTs with the substrate and localized emissive states are discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05163k

  16. Impact of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the embryo: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Moustafa AE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ala-Eddin Al Moustafa,1–4 Etienne Mfoumou,5 Dacian E Roman,3 Vahe Nerguizian,6 Anas Alazzam,7 Ion Stiharu,3 Amber Yasmeen8 1College of Medicine & Biomedical Research Centre, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 2Oncology Department, McGill University, 3Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 4Syrian Research Cancer Centre of the Syrian Society against Cancer, Aleppo, Syria; 5Nova Scotia Community College, Dartmouth, NS, 6École de Technologie Supérieure, Montreal, QC, Canada; 7Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi, UAE; 8Segal Cancer Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research of the Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered one of the most interesting materials in the 21st century due to their unique physiochemical characteristics and applicability to various industrial products and medical applications. However, in the last few years, questions have been raised regarding the potential toxicity of CNTs to humans and the environment; it is believed that the physiochemical characteristics of these materials are key determinants of CNT interaction with living cells and hence determine their toxicity in humans and other organisms as well as their embryos. Thus, several recent studies, including ours, pointed out that CNTs have cytotoxic effects on human and animal cells, which occur via the alteration of key regulator genes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, survival, cell–cell adhesion, and angiogenesis. Meanwhile, few investigations revealed that CNTs could also be harmful to the normal development of the embryo. In this review, we will discuss the toxic role of single-walled CNTs in the embryo, which was recently explored by several groups including ours. Keywords: single-walled carbon nanotubes, embryo, toxicity

  17. The separation and substrate independent organization of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Debjit D.

    Learning how to separate, purify and manipulate single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) presents a unique challenge in material science. The processing-related difficulties of these long nano-fibers stem from their high aspect ratio, rigidity and the profound hydrophobic attractions along their tubular walls. Shortening them into discrete segments, with lengths from tens to hundreds of nanometers, presents a viable methodology to alleviate the shape-induced intractability. The thesis presents a route for the length fractionation of shortened-S WNTs, and most importantly provides a venue by which substantial separation of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) according to type (metallic versus semiconducting) has been achieved for HiPco and laser-ablated SWNTs. Herein I argue that stable dispersions of SWNTs with octadecylamine (ODA) in tetrahydrofuran (THF) originate from the physisorption and organization of ODA along the SWNT sidewalls in addition to the originally proposed zwitterion model. Furthermore, the reported affinity of amine groups for semiconducting SWNTs, as opposed to their metallic counterparts contributes additional stability to the physisorbed ODA. This provides a venue for the selective precipitation of metallic SWNTs upon increasing dispersion concentration, as indicated by Raman investigations. In addition, the thesis provides a novel metal-assisted self-organization of these nanosized objects into nano-forest geometries with dense perpendicular surface grafting, and demonstrates that such nanosized objects hold significant promise for the development of nanoscale sensors. Additionally, this dissertation provides a method for the complete elimination of catalytic impurities from SWNTs. Electrochemical actuators using such purified SWNTs have been characterized.

  18. Interaction of amidated single-walled carbon nanotubes with protein by multiple spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to investigate the detailed interaction between BSA and amidated single walled carbon nanotubes (e-SWNTs) in vitro. Ethylenediamine (EDA) was successfully linked on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) via acylation to improve their dispersion and to introduce active groups. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as the template protein to inspect the interaction of e-SWNTs with protein. Decreases in fluorescence intensity of BSA induced by e-SWNTs demonstrated the occurrence of interaction between BSA and e-SWNTs. Quenching parameters and different absorption spectra for e-SWNTs–BSA show that the quenching effect of e-SWNTs was static quenching. Hydrophobic force had a leading contribution to the binding roles of BSA on e-SWNTs, which was confirmed by positive enthalpy change and entropy change. The interference of Na+ with the quenching effect of e-SWNTs authenticated that electrostatic force existed in the interactive process simultaneously. The hydrophobicity of amino acid residues markedly increased with the addition of e-SWNTs viewed from UV spectra of BSA. The content of α-helix structure in BSA decreased by 6.8% due to the addition of e-SWNTs, indicating that e-SWNTs have an effect on the secondary conformation of BSA. -- Highlights: • The interaction between e-SWNTs and BSA was investigated by multiple spectroscopic methods. • Quenching mechanism was static quenching. • Changes in structure of BSA were inspected by synchronous fluorescence, UV–vis and CD spectrum

  19. Interaction of amidated single-walled carbon nanotubes with protein by multiple spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lili [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); The Nursing College of Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Lin, Rui [Yancheng Health Vocational and Technical College, Yancheng 224005 (China); He, Hua, E-mail: dochehua@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Sun, Meiling, E-mail: sml-nir@sohu.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Jiang, Li; Gao, Mengmeng [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the detailed interaction between BSA and amidated single walled carbon nanotubes (e-SWNTs) in vitro. Ethylenediamine (EDA) was successfully linked on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) via acylation to improve their dispersion and to introduce active groups. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as the template protein to inspect the interaction of e-SWNTs with protein. Decreases in fluorescence intensity of BSA induced by e-SWNTs demonstrated the occurrence of interaction between BSA and e-SWNTs. Quenching parameters and different absorption spectra for e-SWNTs–BSA show that the quenching effect of e-SWNTs was static quenching. Hydrophobic force had a leading contribution to the binding roles of BSA on e-SWNTs, which was confirmed by positive enthalpy change and entropy change. The interference of Na{sup +} with the quenching effect of e-SWNTs authenticated that electrostatic force existed in the interactive process simultaneously. The hydrophobicity of amino acid residues markedly increased with the addition of e-SWNTs viewed from UV spectra of BSA. The content of α-helix structure in BSA decreased by 6.8% due to the addition of e-SWNTs, indicating that e-SWNTs have an effect on the secondary conformation of BSA. -- Highlights: • The interaction between e-SWNTs and BSA was investigated by multiple spectroscopic methods. • Quenching mechanism was static quenching. • Changes in structure of BSA were inspected by synchronous fluorescence, UV–vis and CD spectrum.

  20. Ab initio simulations of doped single-walled carbon nanotube sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Ab initio calculations used to study O-doped and N-doped SWNT within the framework of the DFT. We introduced new type of gas sensor that can detect the presence of H2, Cl2, NO, and CO molecules. Band-gap narrowing occurs when the nanotube is doped with oxygen or nitrogen atoms. We proposed a new methodology of designing reliable, sensitive, and selective nanotube sensors. Highlights: ►Ab initio calculations used to study O-doped and N-doped SWNT within the framework of the DFT. ► We introduced new type of gas sensor that can detect the presence of H2, Cl2, NO, and CO molecules. ►Band-gap narrowing occurs when the nanotube is doped with oxygen or nitrogen atoms. ► We proposed a new methodology of designing reliable, sensitive, and selective nanotube sensors. - Abstract: The interactions between oxygen and nitrogen atoms with single-walled carbon nanotubes were investigated for nanotubes with two different geometrical configurations using first-principle calculations within the framework of the density functional theory. We introduced a new type of toxic gas sensor that can detect the presence of H2, Cl2, CO, and NO molecules. We also demonstrated that the sensitivity of this device can be controlled by the concentration of the dopants on the surface of the nanotube. In addition, the transport properties of the doped nanotube were studied for different concentrations of oxygen or nitrogen atoms that were randomly distributed on the surface of the single-walled carbon nanotube. We observed that small amounts of dopants can modify the electronic and transport properties of the nanotube and can lend metallic properties to the nanotube. Band-gap narrowing occurs when the nanotube is doped with either oxygen or nitrogen atoms.

  1. Sodium insertion/extraction from single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes: The differences and similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonetilleke, Damian; Pramudita, James C.; Choucair, Mohammad; Rawal, Aditya; Sharma, Neeraj

    2016-05-01

    A comparative study on the sodium-ion insertion and extraction of commercially-available multi-wall and single-wall carbon nanotubes is reported. Single-wall carbon nanotubes exhibit charge/discharge capacities of 126 mA h g-1 and multi-wall carbon nanotubes produce a lower capacity of 28 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at 25 mA g-1. To understand these differences, a combination of X-ray diffraction and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements were performed at various states of sodium insertion and extraction.23Na nuclear magnetic resonance studies, a technique previously rarely used for characterising electrodes from sodium-ion batteries, shows differences in the sodium chemical environment near multi-wall compared to single-wall carbon nanotubes with distinct sodium sites found to be active during sodium insertion and extraction for the carbon nanotubes. Both types of carbon nanotubes show a similar amount of reversible sodium available for insertion/extraction reactions, but multi-wall carbon nanotubes feature half the initial insertion capacity relative to single-wall carbon nanotubes. The electrochemical performance of the carbon nanotube electrodes are discussed in relation to the observed mechanism of sodium insertion.

  2. Enhanced sidewall functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes using nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Gerard; Shao, Lidong; Ballesteros, Belin; Green, Malcolm L H

    2009-10-01

    When a sample of as-made single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is treated with nitric acid, oxidation debris are formed due to the functionalization (mainly carboxylation) of the amorphous carbon present in the sample and a continuous coating along the carbon nanotube walls is created preventing the sidewall functionalization of the SWNTs. This oxidation debris can be easily removed by an aqueous base wash leaving behind a sample with a low degree of functionality. After removal of the amorphous carbon (by steam purification) from a sample of as-made SWNTs, the resulting purified SWNTs are readily carboxylated on the walls by nitric acid treatment. The use of steam for the purification of SWNTs samples allows the removal of the amorphous carbon and graphitic layers coating the metal particles present in the sample without altering the tubular structure of the SWNTs. The exposed metal particles can then be easily removed by an acid wash. Comparison between the steam treatment and molten sodium hydroxide treatment is made.

  3. Attachment of Single-wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) on Platinum Surfaces by Self-Assembling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Cabrera, Carlos R.; Perez-Davis, Maria; Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are very interesting materials because of their morphology, electronic and mechanical properties. Its morphology (high length-to-diameter ratio) and electronic properties suggest potential application of SWNTs as anode material for lithium ion secondary batteries. The introduction of SWNTs on these types of sources systems will improve their performance, efficiency, and capacity to store energy. A purification method has been applied for the removal of iron and amorphous carbon from the nanotubes. Unpurified and purified SWNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In order to attach carbon nanotubes on platinum electrode surfaces, a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was deposited over the electrodes. The amino-terminated SAM obtained was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes were deposited over the amino-terminated SAM by an amide bond formed between SAM amino groups and carboxylic acid groups at the open ends of the carbon nanotubes.This deposition was characterized using Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM).

  4. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.;

    2013-01-01

    a low toxicity of the conjugates in the THP-1 cells. The low toxicity and the cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotube–folic acid by cancer cells suggest their potential use in carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems and in the diagnosis of cancer or tropical diseases such as leishmaniasis....

  5. Effect of chemical treatment on the thermoelectric properties of single walled carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piao, Mingxing; Alam, Mina Rastegar; Kim, Gyutae; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, Urszula; Roth, Siegmar [School of Electrical Engineering, WCU Flexible Nano-Systems, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Carbon nanotube networks showing superior electric properties, high chemical stability, strong mechanical properties, and flexibility are also known to exhibit thermoelectric effects. However, the experimental thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, of pristine carbon nanotubes is typically in the range of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}, which is still not attractive for thermal energy conversion applications. In this work, we show possible ways to improve the thermoelectric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by means of chemical treatments. In this study, we primarily investigated the effect of chemical treatment on the electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power (TEP) of the entangled network of nanotubes, also, known as ''buckypaper''. This chemical treatment increased the electrical conductivity due to p-type doping, thereby, showing a decrease in the TEP given by the Seebeck coefficient, whereas the n-type dopants changed the sign and value of the TEP from about 40 to -40 {mu}V K{sup -1}. Neutral polymers, in terms of doping, such as PVDF, PMMA, PVA, PS, and PC, were expected to hinder phonon transport through the nanotube network, increasing the Seebeck coefficient up to ca. 50 {mu}V K{sup -1}. Our results reveal the importance of chemical doping determining the sign and the magnitude of the TEP, and role of the polymer matrix in the development of more effective thermoelectric composites based on carbon nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Effect of chemical treatment on the thermoelectric properties of single walled carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotube networks showing superior electric properties, high chemical stability, strong mechanical properties, and flexibility are also known to exhibit thermoelectric effects. However, the experimental thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, of pristine carbon nanotubes is typically in the range of 10-3-10-2, which is still not attractive for thermal energy conversion applications. In this work, we show possible ways to improve the thermoelectric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by means of chemical treatments. In this study, we primarily investigated the effect of chemical treatment on the electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power (TEP) of the entangled network of nanotubes, also, known as ''buckypaper''. This chemical treatment increased the electrical conductivity due to p-type doping, thereby, showing a decrease in the TEP given by the Seebeck coefficient, whereas the n-type dopants changed the sign and value of the TEP from about 40 to -40 μV K-1. Neutral polymers, in terms of doping, such as PVDF, PMMA, PVA, PS, and PC, were expected to hinder phonon transport through the nanotube network, increasing the Seebeck coefficient up to ca. 50 μV K-1. Our results reveal the importance of chemical doping determining the sign and the magnitude of the TEP, and role of the polymer matrix in the development of more effective thermoelectric composites based on carbon nanotubes. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Properties of Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes investigated by 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance. We show that there are two types of Cs cations depending on the insertion level. Indeed, at low concentrations, Static spectra analysis shows that the Cs (α)+ species are fully ionized, i.e. α equal ca.1, while at higher concentrations a second paramagnetically shifted line appears, indicating the formation of Cs (β)+ ions with β < α ∼ +1. At low concentrations and low temperatures the Cs (α)+ ions exhibit a weak hyperfine coupling to the SWCNT conduction electrons, whereas, at higher temperatures, a thermally activated slow-motion diffusion process of the Cs (α)+ ions occurs along the interstitial channels present within the carbon nanotube bundles. At high concentrations, the Cs (β)+ ions seem to occupy well defined positions relative to the carbon lattice. As a matter of fact, the Korringa relaxation behavior suggests a strong hyperfine coupling between Cs nuclei and conduction electrons in the carbon nanotubes and a partial charge transfer, which suggest a plausible Cs(6s)-C(2p) hybridization. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Commensurate Phases of Kr Adsorbed on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Mamadou T.; Maiga, Sidi M.; Gatica, Silvina M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we show that Krypton atoms form a commensurate solid (CS) phase with a fractional coverage of one krypton atom per every four carbons on zigzag carbon nanotubes. This is a unique phase, different from the √{3} × √{3}R30° CS monolayer formed on graphite, which has a lower coverage of one krypton atom per every six carbons. Our prediction disagrees with experiments that observe in nanotubes the same solid structure found on graphite. In order to address this discrepancy, we simulated adsorption of Kr on zigzag and armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes with radii ranging from 4.7 to 28.83 Å. Our simulations confirm that the CS of coverage 1/4 forms on medium-sized zigzag nanotubes. We also found the 1/6-coverage solid on graphene, which represents the infinite-radius limit of a nanotube. Our findings are key to experiments of adsorption on nanotubes where the interpretation and justification of the results are based on the monolayer coverage, such as mass or conductance isotherms measurements.

  9. Mechanical properties of non-reconstructed defective single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpa, F [Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science, University of Bristol, BS8 1TR Bristol (United Kingdom); Adhikari, S; Wang, C Y, E-mail: f.scarpa@bris.ac.u, E-mail: scarpa.fabrizio@gmail.co [School of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-21

    This paper describes the equivalent homogeneous uniaxial mechanical properties of defective single-wall carbon nanotubes. In particular, non-reconstructed defects that can be produced by ion or electronic irradiation have been considered. A discrete nonlinear finite-element approach based on the mechanical properties of individual carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds has been used. The individual C-C bonds in turn were simulated as beam structural elements. Extensive Monte Carlo based numerical simulation has been reported in the paper. The results show that the homogeneous elastic properties of the defective nanotubes can be qualitatively and quantitatively different from the pristine configurations. The defective nanotubes show a slight reduction in axial stiffness (Young's modulus), but large variations of Poisson's ratio outside the elastic bounds for isotropic materials, depending on the locations of the vacancies. The large fluctuations of Poisson's ratio can lead to extreme positive transversal contractions or to auxetic behaviour when the nanotubes are subjected to tensile loading. (fast track communication)

  10. Theoretical Investigation on the Solubilization in Water of Functionalized Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mananghaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An important technique to increase the solubility and reactivity of carbon nanotube is through functionalization. In this study, the effects of functionalization of some single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were investigated with the aid of density functional theory. The SWCNT model used in the study consists of a finite, (5, 0 zigzag nanotube segment containing 60 C atoms with hydrogen atoms added to the dangling bonds of the perimeter carbons. There are three water-dispersible SWCNTs used in this study that were functionalized with (a formic acid, as a model of carboxylic acid, (b isophthalic acid, as a model aromatic dicarboxylic acid, and (c benzenesulfonic acid, as a model aromatic sulfonic acid. Binding energies of the organic radicals to the nanotubes are calculated, as well as the HOMO-LUMO gaps and dipole moments of both nanotubes and functionalized nanotubes. Binding was found out to be thermodynamically favorable. The functionalization increases the electrical dipole moments and results in an enhancement in the solubility of the nanotubes in water manifested through favorable changes in the free energies of solvation. This should lower the toxicity of nanotubes and improve their biocompatibility.

  11. Photo-induced absorption in the pump probe spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zi-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond pump probe spectroscopy is employed to study the photo-induced absorption feature in the singlewalled carbon nanotube transient spectrum.The two advantages of the experiment,a chirality enriched sample and tuning the pump wavelength to the resonance of a specific nanotube species,greatly facilitate the identification of the photoinduced absorption signal of one tube species.It is found that a photo-induced absorption feature is located at one radial breathing mode to the blue side of the Eii state.This finding prompts a new explanation for the origin of the photoinduced absorption:the transition from the ground state to a phonon coupled state near the Eii state.The explanation suggests a superposition mechanism of the photo-bleach and photo-induced absorption signals,which may serve as a key to the interpretation of the complex pump probe transient spectrum of carbon nanotubes.The finding sheds some light on the understanding of the complex non-radiative relaxation process and the electronic structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  12. Hydrothermally Oxidized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Networks for High Volumetric Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyuan; Davijani, Amir A Bakhtiary; Sun, Jingying; Chen, Shuo; Kumar, Satish; Lee, Seung Woo

    2016-07-01

    Improving volumetric energy density is one of the major challenges in nanostructured carbon electrodes for electrochemical energy storage device applications. Herein, a simple hydrothermal oxidation process of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks in dilute nitric acid is reported, enabling simultaneous physical densification and chemical functionalization of the as-assembled randomly-packed SWNT films. After the hydrothermal oxidation process, the density of the SWNT films increases from 0.63 to 1.02 g cm(-3) and a considerable amount of redox-active oxygen functional groups are introduced on the surface of the SWNTs. The functionalized SWNT films are used as positive electrodes against Li metal negative electrodes for potential Li-ion capacitors or Li-ion battery applications. The functionalized SWNT electrodes deliver high volumetric as well as gravimetric capacities, 154 Ah L(-1) and 152 mAh g(-1) , respectively, owing to the surface redox reactions between the introduced oxygen functional groups and Li ions. In addition, these electrodes exhibit a remarkable rate-capability by retaining its high capacity of 94 Ah L(-1) (92 mAh g(-1) ) at a high discharge rate of 10 A g(-1) . These results demonstrate the simple hydrothermal oxidation process as an attractive strategy for improving the volumetric performance of nanostructured carbon electrodes. PMID:27200509

  13. Phthalimide containing donor-acceptor polymers for effective dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Yilmaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been dispersed by novel phthalimide containing donor-acceptor type copolymers in organic media. Brominated phthalimide comonomer has been copolymerized with several electron rich structures using Suzuki and Stille coupling reactions. Carbon nanotube dispersion capability of the resultant polymers has been assessed by exploiting the non-covalent interaction of nanotube surface with the pi-system of conjugated backbone of polymers. Four polymers have been found to be good candidates for individually dispersing nanotubes in solution. In order to identify the dispersed nanotube species, 2D excitation-emission map and Raman spectroscopy have been performed. Molecular dynamics modelling has been utilized to reveal the binding energies of dispersants with the nanotube surface and the simulation results have been compared with the experimental findings. Both experimental and theoretical results imply the presence of a complex mechanism that governs the extent of dispersion capacity and selectivity of each conjugated polymeric dispersant in solubilizing carbon nanotubes.

  14. Nanoscale soldering of axially positioned single-walled carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianlei; Yang, Lijun; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Yang

    2014-02-12

    The miniaturization of electronics devices into the nanometer scale is indispensable for next-generation semi-conductor technology. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered to be the promising candidates for future interconnection wires. To study the carbon nanotubes interconnection during nanosoldering, the melting process of nanosolder and nanosoldering process between single-walled carbon nanotubes are simulated with molecular dynamics method. As the simulation results, the melting point of 2 nm silver solder is about 605 K because of high surface energy, which is below the melting temperature of Ag bulk material. In the nanosoldering process simulations, Ag atoms may be dragged into the nanotubes to form different connection configuration, which has no apparent relationship with chirality of SWNTs. The length of core filling nanowires structure has the relationship with the diameter, and it does not become longer with the increasing diameter of SWNT. Subsequently, the dominant mechanism of was analyzed. In addition, as the heating temperature and time, respectively, increases, more Ag atoms can enter the SWNTs with longer length of Ag nanowires. And because of the strong metal bonds, less Ag atoms can remain with the tight atomic structures in the gap between SWNT and SWNT. The preferred interconnection configurations can be achieved between SWNT and SWNT in this paper.

  15. The Adsorption Properties of Bacillus atrophaeus Spores on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cortes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An adsorption equilibrium and a kinetic study of Bacillus atrophaeus on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs were here performed to provide the basis for developing biosensor devices for detecting threatening micro-organisms in water supply systems. B. atrophaeus spores and carbon nanotubes were subjected to a batch adsorption process to document their equilibria and kinetics. Here, commercial nanotubes were either studied as received or were acid-purified before adsorption experiments. The Bacillus spores appear to show higher affinity towards the purified nanotubes than to the as-received nanomaterial. The effective diffusivity of the spores onto the purified nanotubes was found to be approximately 30 percent higher than onto the as-received nanotubes. It seems that the removal of amorphous carbon from the as-received nanotubes through a purification process yielded an intimate nantoubes-spore interaction as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Freundlich model successfully correlated the adsorption equilibrium data for the nanotubes-spore interaction. Transmission electron micrographs showed extensive contact between the Bacillus and the purified nanotubes, but the association appeared less intimate between the spores and the as-received nanotubes.

  16. NASA-JSC Protocol for the Characterization of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Material Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pasha; Gorelik, Olga; Hadjiev, Victor; Holmes, William; Devivar, Rodrigo; Files, Bradley; Yowell, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that the raw as well as purified single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material always contain certain amount of impurities of varying composition (mostly metal catalyst and non-tubular carbon). Particular purification method also creates defects and/or functional groups in the SWCNT material and therefore affects the its dispersability in solvents (important to subsequent application development). A number of analytical characterization tools have been used successfully in the past years to assess various properties of nanotube materials, but lack of standards makes it difficult to compare these measurements across the board. In this work we report the protocol developed at NASA-JSC which standardizes measurements using TEM, SEM, TGA, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR absorption techniques. Numerical measures are established for parameters such as metal content, homogeneity, thermal stability and dispersability, to allow easy comparison of SWCNT materials. We will also report on the recent progress in quantitative measurement of non-tubular carbon impurities and a possible purity standard for SWCNT materials.

  17. Carbon chains and the (5,5) single-walled nanotube: Structure and energetics versus length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R.; Williams, Shaun M.; Young, Matt A.; Teeters-Kennedy, Shannon; Heer, Joseph M.; Coe, James V.

    2006-11-01

    Reliable thermochemistry is computed for infinite stretches of pure-carbon materials including acetylenic and cumulenic carbon chains, graphene sheet, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by connection to the properties of finite size molecules that grow into the infinitely long systems. Using ab initio G3 theory, the infinite cumulenic chain (:CCCC:) is found to be 1.9±0.4kcal/mol per carbon less stable in free energy at room temperature than the acetylenic chain (C•C-CC•) which is 24.0kcal/mol less stable than graphite. The difference between carbon-carbon triple, double, and single bond lengths (1.257, 1.279, and 1.333Å, respectively) in infinite chains is evident but much less than with small hydrocarbon molecules. These results are used to evaluate the efficacy of similar calculations with the less rigorous PM3 semiempirical method on the (5,5) SWCNT, which is too large to be studied with high-level ab initio methods. The equilibrium electronic energy change for C(g )→C[infinite (5,5) SWCNT] is -166.7kcal/mol, while the corresponding free energy change at room temperature is -153.3kcal/mol (6.7kcal/mol less stable than graphite). A threefold alternation (6.866, 6.866, and 6.823Å) in the ring diameter of the equilibrium structure of infinitely long (5,5) SWCNT is apparent, although the stability of this structure over the constant diameter structure is small compared to the zero point energy of the nanotube. In general, different (n,m) SWCNTs have different infinite tube energetics, as well as very different energetic trends that vary significantly with length, diameter, and capping.

  18. Detecting Lyme disease using antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Jennifer; Lerner, Mitchell; Goldsmith, Brett; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We combine antibodies for Lyme flagellar protein with carbon nanotube transistors to create an electronic sensor capable of definitive detection of Lyme disease. Over 35,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported in the United States each year, of which more than 23 percent are originally misdiagnosed. Rational design of the coupling of the biological system to the electronic system gives us a flexible sensor platform which we can apply to several biological systems. By coupling these antibodies to carbon nanotubes in particular, we allow for fast, sensitive, highly selective, electronic detection. Unlike antibody or biomarker detection, bacterial protein detection leads to positive identification of both early and late stage bacterial infections, and is easily expandable to environmental monitoring.

  19. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azam, M.A., E-mail: asyadi@utem.edu.my [Carbon Research Technology Research Group, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Jantan, N.H.; Dorah, N.; Seman, R.N.A.R.; Manaf, N.S.A. [Carbon Research Technology Research Group, Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Kudin, T.I.T. [Ionics Materials & Devices Research Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, M.Z.A. [Ionics Materials & Devices Research Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); National Defence University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF{sub 6} non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g{sup −1} at a scan rate of 1 mV s{sup −1}.

  20. Activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotube based electrochemical capacitor in 1 M LiPF6 electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Activated carbon and single-walled CNT based electrochemical capacitor. • Electrochemical analysis by means of CV, charge/discharge and impedance. • 1 M LiPF6 non-aqueous solution as an electrolyte. • AC/SWCNT electrode exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g−1. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their wide range of potential application such as in nanoscale electric circuits, textiles, transportation, health, and the environment. Carbon nanotubes feature extraordinary properties, such as electrical conductivities higher than those of copper, hardness and thermal conductivity higher than those of diamond, and strength surpassing that of steel, among others. This research focuses on the fabrication of an energy storage device, namely, an electrochemical capacitor, by using carbon materials, i.e., activated carbon and single-walled carbon nanotubes, of a specific weight ratio as electrode materials. The electrolyte functioning as an ion carrier is 1 M lithium hexafluorophosphate. Variations in the electrochemical performance of the device, including its capacitance, charge/discharge characteristics, and impedance, are reported in this paper. The electrode proposed in this work exhibits a maximum capacitance of 60.97 F g−1 at a scan rate of 1 mV s−1

  1. Fiber Optic Chemical Nanosensors Based on Engineered Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Consales

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, a review of the development of high-performance optochemical nanosensors based on the integration of carbon nanotubes with the optical fiber technology is presented. The paper first provide an overview of the amazing features of carbon nanotubes and their exploitation as highly adsorbent nanoscale materials for gas sensing applications. Successively, the attention is focused on the operating principle, fabrication, and characterization of fiber optic chemosensors in the Fabry-Perot type reflectometric configuration, realized by means of the deposition of a thin layer of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs upon the distal end of standard silica optical fibers. This is followed by an extensive review of the excellent sensing capabilities of the realized SWCNTs-based chemical nanosensors against volatile organic compounds and other pollutants in different environments (air and water and operating conditions (room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. The experimental results reported here reveal that ppm and sub-ppm chemical detection limits, low response times, as well as fast and complete recovery of the sensor responses have been obtained in most of the investigated cases. This evidences the great potentialities of the proposed photonic nanosensors based on SWCNTs to be successfully employed for practical environmental monitoring applications both in liquid and vapor phase as well as for space. Furthermore, the use of novel SWCNTs-based composites as sensitive fiber coatings is proposed to enhance the sensing performance and to improve the adhesion of carbon nanotubes to the fiber surface. Finally, new advanced sensing configurations based on the use of hollow-core optical fibers coated and partially filled by carbon nanotubes are also presented.

  2. Separation of Biogas Components with Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes: a GCMC Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeganegi, Saeid; Gholampour, Fatemeh

    2012-12-01

    Biogas is a green energy source that mainly contains CH4, CO2 ,traces of H2S and fractions of H2O vapor. One of the effective methods in biogas treatment from its pollutants is adsorptive separation. Here, enrichment of methane using (10, 10) and (6, 6) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in modelled biogas consisting CH4, CO2 and H2S is studied. Simulations were carried out using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) method. Adsorption isotherms obtained at various temperatures and pressures for two single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). To quantify the separation ability of the nanotubes the adsorptive separation factors for H2S/CH4 and CO2/CH4 were calculated. For studding temperature effect, simulations at two (0.1 and 1 MPa) pressures and four temperatures: 288, 298, 318 and 338 K have been performed. In all studied conditions, CO2 is preferentially adsorbed by CNTs. Results have shown that the two separation factors are considerable, particularly for (10, 10) CNT. Additionally, the adsorption and selectivity behaviour of studied gases were considered in (6,6), (8,8) and (10,10) CNT hexagonal bundles for comparison. The results for single nanotubes were confirmed with the bundles. Hence, despite lower concentration of CO2 than CH4 and trace amount of H2S in biogas, they can be separated from methane effectively by CNTs as adsorbents. Our results showed that the CNTs can be remarkable tools in methane separation from biogas.

  3. Chiral Selection of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Murine Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddleston, John; Bhirde, Ashwin; Wang, Zhe; Khripin, Constantine; Fagan, Jeffrey; Zheng, Ming; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Hight Walker, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have garnered significant interest as innovative tools for biomedical applications. They are being used for a variety of purposes, e.g. to deliver drug payloads, monitor cellular activity, or as in vivo imaging tools. However our current understanding of how SWCNTs behave in biological systems is limited. In this work we use Raman spectroscopy to measure the radial breathing modes (RBMs) of SWCNTs in murine organs following intravenous administration. We identify RBMs in multiple homogenized organs and can additionally measure the less SWCNT-specific carbon Raman peaks in others. Further, we quantify significant changes in the relative contribution of different SWCNTs chiralities to the overall RBM distribution. We observe this change in SWCNTs with a smaller diameter (7.6 A) but not in larger diameter tubes (14 A). These data are among the first to measure RBMs in organs and suggest that chiral selection can occur in biological systems with susceptibility for selection dependent on SWCNT diameter.

  4. Spectroscopic studies on covalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah, M; Jawahar, A; Mathavan, T; Kumara Dhas, M; Benial, A Milton Franklin

    2014-10-22

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have a great potential in a wide range of applications, but faces limitation in terms of dispersion feasibility. The functionalization process of SWCNTs with the amino acid, glycine involves oxidation reaction using a mild aqueous acid mixture of HNO3 and H2SO4 (1:3), via ultrasonication technique and the resulted oxidized SWCNTs were again treated with the amino acid glycine suspension. The resulted glycine functionalized carbon nanotubes have been characterized by XRD, UV-Vis, FTIR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (002) intensity was observed for glycine functionalized SWCNTs compared with oxidized SWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. The red shift was observed in the UV-Vis spectra of glycine functionalized SWCNTs, which reveals that the covalent bond formation between glycine molecule and SWCNTs. The functional groups of oxidized SWCNTs and glycine functionalized SWCNTs were identified and assigned. EPR results indicate that the unpaired electron undergoes reduction process in glycine functionalized SWCNTs. SEM images show that the increase in the diameter of the SWCNTs was observed for glycine functionalized SWCNTs, which indicates that the adsorption of glycine molecule on the sidewalls of oxidized SWCNTs. EDX elemental micro analysis confirms that the nitrogen element exists in glycine functionalized SWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen due to CONH bioactive sites in glycine functionalized SWCNTs for future applications. PMID:25448929

  5. A Remote Sensor for Detecting Methane Based on Palladium-Decorated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guomin Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The remote detection of the concentration of methane at room temperature is performed by a sensor that is configured by the combination of radio frequency identification (RFID, and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The proposed sensor is schemed as a thin film RFID tag in a polyethylene substrate, on which a metal trace dipole, a metal trace T impedance matching networks, a 0.5 µm-CMOS RF/DC rectifier chipset and a sensor head of palladium-decorated single walled carbon nanotubes (Pd-SWCNTs are surface mounted in cascade. The performances of the sensor are examined and described by the defined parameters of the received signal strength index (RSSI and the comparative analog identifier (∆AID. Results validate the sensor’s ability to detect molecules of methane at room temperature, showing that the RSSI can increase 4 dB and the ∆AID can increase 3% in response to methane concentrations ranging from zero to 100 ppm.

  6. In situ filling of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes with ferrocene molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, Markus; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Ayala, Paola; Ruiz-Soria, Georgina; Pichler, Thomas [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, 1090 Wien (Austria); Kataura, Hiromichi [Nanotechnology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba 305-8562 (Japan); Yanagi, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachiouji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Krause, Stefan [BESSY II, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    We present a stepwise in situ filling of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a mean diameter of 1.4 nm with metallocenes and a concomitant characterisation of their electronic properties using photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) without breaking the ultra-high vacuum environment. The changes in the SWCNTs' electronic structure upon ferrocene (FeCp{sub 2}) filling are suggested by a broadening of the C 1s spectral line. Weak n-type charge transfer from the ferrocene to the SWCNT is evidenced by a reduction of the intensity of the first van Hove singularity (vHs) in the fine structure of the unoccupied density of states as well as an increase in the valency of Fe in the FeCp{sub 2} molecule. Additionally, we evidence the presence of clean ferrocene with a resonance photoemission study showing the appearance of electronic states of localised Fe 3d electrons. This gives further insight into the electrical properties of functionalised carbon nanotubes fabricated in a clean environment avoiding inclusion of impurities. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. A theoretical study on the interaction of amphetamine and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Interaction energy between several armchair CNTs and amphetamine is investigated. • The adsorption of amphetamine molecule is observed to be exothermic and physical in nature. • HOMO–LUMO for pure CNTs, amphetamine and their corresponded complexes are studied. • Density of states (DOS) near the Fermi level is calculated and presented. - Abstract: The adsorption of 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane (amphetamine) on the (4,4), (5,5), (6,6), and (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been theoretically investigated. The molecule has been located in different modes including parallel, perpendicular, and oblique on the outer surface of carbon nanotubes. The physisorption of amphetamine onto SWCNT sidewall is thermodynamically favored; as a consequence, it modulates the electronic properties of pristine nanotube in the vicinity of Fermi region. The adsorption energies for the parallel and oblique modes found in the range of −1.13 to −1.88 and −1.27 to −2.01 kcal/mol, respectively. Projected density of states (PDOS) and frontier orbital analysis in the vicinity of Fermi level region suggest the electronic states to be contributed from SWCNT rather than amphetamine molecule

  8. Functional long circulating single walled carbon nanotubes for fluorescent/photoacoustic imaging-guided enhanced phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lisi; Wang, Guohao; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Fan; Guo, Zhide; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Xianzhong; Zhu, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Nanotherapeutics have been investigated for years, but only modest survival benefits were observed clinic. This is partially attributed to the short and rapid elimination of nanodrug after intravenous administration. In this study, a long circulation single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) complex was successfully fabricated through a new SWCNT dispersion agent, evans blue (EB). The complex was endowed with fluorescent imaging and photodynamic therapy ability by self-assembly loading an albumin coupled fluorescent photosensitizer, Chlorin e6 (Ce6) via the high affinity between EB and albumin. The yielding multifunctional albumin/Ce6 loaded EB/carbon nanotube-based delivery system, named ACEC, is capable of providing fluorescent and photoacoustic imaging of tumors for optimizing therapeutic time window. Synergistic photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) were carried out as guided by imaging results at 24 h post-injection and achieved an efficient tumor ablation effect. Compared to PDT or PTT alone, the combined phototherapy managed to damage tumor and diminish tumor without recurrence. Overall, our study presents a SWCNT based theranostic system with great promising in dual modalities imaging guided PTT/PDT combined treatment of tumor. The applications of EB on SWCNT functionalization can be easily extended to the other nanomaterials for improving their in vivo stability and circulation time. PMID:27392290

  9. pH and electrical actuation of single walled carbon nanotube/chitosan composite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarkar, Sukrut; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2008-10-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to utilize the pH responsive nature of chitosan to produce fibers which can respond to an applied electric voltage. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been used for reinforcing the chitosan fibers. But the SWCNTs are associated with their own challenges of aggregation which have been solved in this study by suitable functionalization. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the dispersions. The functionalized SWCNTs showed improved dispersion in chitosan. The SWCNT/chitosan composite fibers were successfully solution spun and heat-set to give stable fibers of 50 ± 2 µm. The composite fibers exhibited a significant increase in the mechanical properties. The tenacity of the composite fibers reinforced with functionalized SWCNTs increased from 96 to 226 MPa with an increase in SWCNT content from 0 to 0.2 wt%. The strong interaction of carboxylic functional groups of functionalized SWCNTs with the chitosan matrix may be responsible for the improved dispersion and considerable enhancement of the mechanical properties. Further, the stability of the fibers towards the pH switching environment has also been investigated, along with the response to an applied electric voltage. Composite fibers prepared using 0.1 wt% of functionalized carbon nanotubes were observed to exhibit a stable response with high magnitude of strain and high strain rate.

  10. Silicon spectral response extension through single wall carbon nanotubes in hybrid solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Del Gobbo, S.

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and n-silicon multiple heterojunctions have been fabricated by a SWCNT film transferring process. We report on the ability of the carbon nanotubes to extend the Si spectral range towards the near ultraviolet (UV) and the near infrared regions. Semiconducting and about metallic SWCNT networks have been studied as a function of the film sheet resistance, Rsh. Optical absorbance and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assign nanotube chirality and electronic character. This gave us hints of evidence of the participation of the metal nanotubes in the photocurrent generation. Moreover, we provide evidence that the external quantum efficiency spectral range can be modulated as a function of the SWCNT network sheet resistance in a hybrid SWCNT/Si solar cell. This result will be very useful to further design/optimize devices with improved performance in spectral regions generally not covered by conventional Si p-n devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Dynamics of fragmentation and multiple vacancy generation in irradiated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results from mass spectrometry of clusters sputtered from Cs+ irradiated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a function of energy and dose identify the nature of the resulting damage in the form of multiple vacancy generation. For pristine SWCNTs at all Cs+ energies, C2 is the most dominant species, followed by C3, C4 and C1. The experiments were performed in three stages: in the first stage, Cs+ energy E(Cs+) was varied. During the second stage, the nanotubes were irradiated continuously at E(Cs+) = 5 keV for 1,800 s. Afterwards, the entire sequence of irradiation energies was repeated to differentiate between the fragmentation patterns of the pristine and of heavily irradiated SWCNTs. The sputtering and normalized yields identify the quantitative and relative extent of the ion-induced damage by creating double, triple and quadruple vacancies; the single vacancies are least favored. Sputtering from the heavily irradiated SWCNTs occurs not only from the damaged and fragmented nanotubes, but also from the inter-nanotube structures that are grown due to the accumulation of the sputtered clusters. Similar irradiation experiments were performed with the multi-walled carbon nanotubes; the results confirmed the dominant C2 followed by C3, C4 and C1

  12. Vascular targeted single-walled carbon nanotubes for near-infrared light therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prickett, Whitney M.; Van Rite, Brent D.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2011-11-01

    A new approach for targeting carbon nanotubes to the tumor vasculature was tested using human endothelial cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. Single-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with the F3 peptide using a polyethylene glycol linker to target nucleolin, a protein found on the surface of endothelial cells in the vasculature of solid tumors. Confocal microscopy and Raman analysis confirmed that the conjugate was internalized by actively dividing endothelial cells. Dividing endothelial cells were used to mimic these cells in the tumor vasculature. Incubation with the conjugate for 8 h or more caused significant cell death in both actively dividing endothelial cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells, an effect that is hypothesized to be due to the massive uptake of the conjugate. This targeted cell killing was further enhanced when coupled with near-infrared laser treatment. For confluent (non-dividing) endothelial cells, no cytotoxic effect was seen for incubation alone or incubation coupled with laser treatment. These results are promising and warrant further studies using this conjugate for cancer treatment in vivo.

  13. Effect of a Nerve Graft Substitute Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes on Rat Pheochromocytoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Qian; ZHANG Juan; HU Zheqin

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were extensively explored for their beneficial use in nervous system tissue engineering. However, an important concern regarding the use of CNTs is their toxicity during the interaction between cells and the nano particles. The rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) was co-cultured with three types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), purified raw SWNTs (C), hydroxyl purified SWNTs (C-OH) and carboxyl purified SWNTs (C-COOH) at 25 µg/mL and 100 µg/ml. The experimental results revealed that SWNTs at the concentration below 100 µg/mL did not affect the cell viability. Notably, powerful antioxidant system in nerous system tissue is able to counteract with the toxicity of CNTs, which is characterized by the prominently enhanced expression of main antioxidant enzymes (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)). Therefore, we believe that CNTs can be good candidates for the fabrication of biomedical scaffolds for the nerve tissue repair.

  14. Dynamic interactions between poly(3-hexylthiophene) and single-walled carbon nanotubes in marginal solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanqi; Santos, Franceska A; Wagner, Taylor W; Tsoi, Eric; Zhang, Shanju

    2014-06-01

    Interfacial interactions between conjugated polymers and carbon nanotubes are pivotal in determining the device performance of nanotube-based polymer electronic devices. Here, we report on interfacial structures and crystallization kinetics of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in the presence of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in anisole by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy. Confined on SWNT surfaces, the P3HT forms nanofibril crystals perpendicular to the long axis of SWNTs. The equilibrium dissolution temperature of the P3HT crystals in anisole is determined to be 381 ± 10 K according to the Hoffman-Weeks extrapolation approach. Upon cooling, the polymer solution spontaneously undergoes a time-dependent chromism. Various kinetics factors such as crystallization temperature, concentration, and SWNT loading have been investigated. It is found that the growth rate (G) of the crystals scales with concentration (C) as G ∝ C(1.70±0.16). The Avrami model is utilized to analyze the nucleation mechanism and the Avrami exponents vary between 1.0 and 1.3. The Lauritzen-Hoffman theory is applied to study the chain-folding process. The fold surface free energy is calculated to be (5.28-11.9) × 10(-2) J m(-2). It is evident that the addition of 0.30 wt % SWNTs reduces the fold surface free energy by 55.6%. PMID:24856901

  15. Single wall carbon nanotubes enter cells by endocytosis and not membrane penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lösche Mathias

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon nanotubes are increasingly being tested for use in cellular applications. Determining the mode of entry is essential to control and regulate specific interactions with cells, to understand toxicological effects of nanotubes, and to develop nanotube-based cellular technologies. We investigated cellular uptake of Pluronic copolymer-stabilized, purified ~145 nm long single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs through a series of complementary cellular, cell-mimetic, and in vitro model membrane experiments. Results SWCNTs localized within fluorescently labeled endosomes, and confocal Raman spectroscopy showed a dramatic reduction in SWCNT uptake into cells at 4°C compared with 37°C. These data suggest energy-dependent endocytosis, as shown previously. We also examined the possibility for non-specific physical penetration of SWCNTs through the plasma membrane. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Langmuir monolayer film balance measurements showed that Pluronic-stabilized SWCNTs associated with membranes but did not possess sufficient insertion energy to penetrate through the membrane. SWCNTs associated with vesicles made from plasma membranes but did not rupture the vesicles. Conclusions These measurements, combined, demonstrate that Pluronic-stabilized SWCNTs only enter cells via energy-dependent endocytosis, and association of SWCNTs to membrane likely increases uptake.

  16. Effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on primary immune cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as innovative tools in nanobiotechnology.However,their toxic effects on environment and health have become an issue of great concern.The effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on primary immune cells in vitro was studied in this paper.The results indicated that SWCNTs (25 and 50 pg/mL) could promote the proliferation of spleen cells.However,they had no significant effect on the proliferation of spleen cells at concentrations of 1 and 10 μg/mL.They also had no effect on T-lymphocyte proliferation stimulated by concanavalinA (ConA) at lower concentrations.Moreover,they turned to inhibit Tlymphocyte proliferation at higher concentrations.It was found that SWCNTs inhibited the B-lymphocyte proliferation stimulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) at concentrations of 1,10,25 and 50 μg/mL.What is more,they significantly decreased the Natural Killer (NK) cell activity compared with the control group at all tested concentrations.The results suggest that SWCNTs have possibly negative effects on immune cells in vitro.

  17. A theoretical study on the interaction of amphetamine and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, Hamid [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi Chermahini, Alireza, E-mail: anajafi@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadnezhad, Gholamhossein [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Teimouri, Abbas [Chemistry Department, Payame Noor University (PNU), Tehran 19395-4697 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Interaction energy between several armchair CNTs and amphetamine is investigated. • The adsorption of amphetamine molecule is observed to be exothermic and physical in nature. • HOMO–LUMO for pure CNTs, amphetamine and their corresponded complexes are studied. • Density of states (DOS) near the Fermi level is calculated and presented. - Abstract: The adsorption of 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane (amphetamine) on the (4,4), (5,5), (6,6), and (7,7) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been theoretically investigated. The molecule has been located in different modes including parallel, perpendicular, and oblique on the outer surface of carbon nanotubes. The physisorption of amphetamine onto SWCNT sidewall is thermodynamically favored; as a consequence, it modulates the electronic properties of pristine nanotube in the vicinity of Fermi region. The adsorption energies for the parallel and oblique modes found in the range of −1.13 to −1.88 and −1.27 to −2.01 kcal/mol, respectively. Projected density of states (PDOS) and frontier orbital analysis in the vicinity of Fermi level region suggest the electronic states to be contributed from SWCNT rather than amphetamine molecule.

  18. Functional single-walled carbon nanotubes/chitosan conjugate for tumor cells targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoyan; Ou, Zhongmin; Xing, Da

    2009-08-01

    The application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the field of biomedicine is becoming an exciting topic because of their flexible structure and propensity for chemical functionalization. In this assay, a novel noncovalently functional SWCNTs based on a natural biocompatible polymer chitosan has been developed for tumor cells targeting. First, SWCNTs were modified by chitosan (CHIT-SWCNT). Second, CHIT-SWCNT was coupled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), based on the reaction between the isothiocyanate group of FITC and the primary amino group of chitosan. Third, the FITC functionalized CHIT-SWCNT was conjugated with folic acid (FA) after activation with EDC/NHS, based on the reaction between the NHS group of FA and the primary free amino group of chitosan to construct the functional SWCNT/CHIT conjugate, CHIT-SWCNT-FA. The fluorescence CHIT-SWCNT-FA has been used to detect tumor cells with confocal microscopy imaging technology. Our experimental results indicate that the novel CHIT-SWCNT-FA is soluble and stable in PBS, and it can be readily transported inside tumor cells. Combining the intrinsic properties of carbon nanotubes and the versatility of chitosan, CHIT-SWCNT can be used as potential devices for targeted drug delivery and tumor cell sensing. The proposed assay could provide a feasible alternative to presently available functional SWCNTs in biological applications.

  19. A Facile Route to Metal Oxides/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Macrofilm Nanocomposites for Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyuan eCao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites consisting of transition-metal oxides and carbon nanomaterials with a desired size and structure are highly demanded for high performance energy storage devices. Here, a facile two-step and cost-efficient approach relying on directly thermal treatment of chemical-vapor-deposition products is developed as a general synthetic method to prepare a family of metal oxides (MxOy (M=Fe, Co, Ni/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT macrofilm nanocomposites. The MxOy nanoparticles obtained are of 3-17 nm in diameter and homogeneously anchor on the free-standing SWNT macrofilms. NiO/SWNT also exhibits a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 and fast charge-transfer Faradaic redox reactions to achieve asymmetric supercapacitors with a high power and energy density. All MxOy/SWNT nanocomposites could deliver a high capacity beyond 1000 mAh g-1 and show excellent cycling stability for lithium-ion batteries. The impressive results demonstrate the promise for energy storage devices and the general approach may pave the way to synthesize other functional nanocomposites.

  20. Vascular targeted single-walled carbon nanotubes for near-infrared light therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach for targeting carbon nanotubes to the tumor vasculature was tested using human endothelial cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. Single-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with the F3 peptide using a polyethylene glycol linker to target nucleolin, a protein found on the surface of endothelial cells in the vasculature of solid tumors. Confocal microscopy and Raman analysis confirmed that the conjugate was internalized by actively dividing endothelial cells. Dividing endothelial cells were used to mimic these cells in the tumor vasculature. Incubation with the conjugate for 8 h or more caused significant cell death in both actively dividing endothelial cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells, an effect that is hypothesized to be due to the massive uptake of the conjugate. This targeted cell killing was further enhanced when coupled with near-infrared laser treatment. For confluent (non-dividing) endothelial cells, no cytotoxic effect was seen for incubation alone or incubation coupled with laser treatment. These results are promising and warrant further studies using this conjugate for cancer treatment in vivo.

  1. Dispersion of dilatation wave propagation in single-wall carbon nanotubes using nonlocal scale effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlocal continuum mechanics allows one to account for the small length scale effect that becomes significant when dealing with micro- or nano-structures. This paper investigates a model of wave propagation in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with small scale effects are studied. The equation of motion of the dilatation wave is obtained using the nonlocal elastic theory. We show that a dispersive wave equation is obtained from a nonlocal elastic constitutive law, based on a mixture of a local and a nonlocal strain. The SWCNTs structures are treated within the multilayer thin shell approximation with the elastic properties taken to be those of the graphene sheet. The SWCNT was the (40,0) zigzag tube with an effective diameter of 3.13 nm. Nonlinear frequency equations of wave propagation in SWCNTs are described through the effect of small scale. The phase velocity and the group velocity are derived, respectively. The nonlinear dispersion relation is analyzed with different wave numbers versus scale coefficient. It can be observed from the results that the dispersion properties of the dilatation wave are induced by the small scale effects, which will disappear in local continuous models. The dispersion degree can be strengthened by increasing the scale coefficient and the wave number. Furthermore, the characteristics for the group velocity of the dilatation wave in carbon nanotubes can also be tuned by these factors.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Suspended in Different Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Dong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the antibacterial activity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs dispersed in surfactant solutions of sodium cholate, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Among the three surfactants, sodium cholate demonstrated the weakest antibacterial activity against Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus faecium and thereby was used to disperse bundled SWCNTs in order to study nanotube antibiotic activity. SWCNTs exhibited antibacterial characteristics for both S. enterica and E. coli. With the increase of nanotube concentrations from 0.3 mg/mL to 1.5 mg/mL, the growth curves had plateaus at lower absorbance values whereas the absorbance value was not obviously affected by the incubation ranging from 5 min to 2 h. Our findings indicate that carbon nanotubes could become an effective alternative to antibiotics in dealing with drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant bacterial strains because of the physical mode of bactericidal action that SWCNTs display.

  3. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Assy, M. K.; Soliman, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  4. Broad Microwave Dielectric Property of Single-walled Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhua WU

    2008-01-01

    Microwave dielectric measurements over the broad bandwith of 10 MHz to 20 GHz were conducted on composites comprising bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix, in comparison to the nano-graphite and MWNT. It is found that both relative real and imaginary permittivity of the nanocomposites are strong functions of the SWNT concentration, showing large, wide dielectric and electrical response. Distinct resonance around 1.5 GHz is observed at high SWNT concentrations, accompanied by the downshift of the resonance frequency with increasing concentration. Largely, the SWNT-epoxy composites share the behavior of the MWNT owing to structural similarity, much more effective than the nano-graphite. The remarkable, broadband dielectric and electrical properties of the nanotubes acquired in the work originate from their unique seamless graphene architectures, modeled by two major contributions, dielectric relaxation/resonance and electronic conduction, which is substantiated by the agreement between theoretical analysis and experimental results. The carbon nanotube composites are prospective for microwave applications and offer experimental evidence for fundamental studies in low-dimensional systems.

  5. Comparison of complex permittivities of isotonic colloids containing single-wall carbon nanotubes of varying chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Tejas; Symanowski, James T; Gach, H Michael

    2012-02-01

    The application of bio-compatible, conductive nanoparticles in combination with radiofrequency (RF) irradiation to raise tissue temperatures between 40 and 60 °C for hyperthermia and ablation spurred interest in the complex permittivities of isotonic nanoparticle-based colloids. Nanoparticles with large aspect ratios and high permittivities increase the bulk permittivity of the colloid and RF losses at the macroscopic scale. The complex permittivities of isotonic colloids with and without single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing either metallic, semiconducting, or mixed chiralities were measured from 20 MHz to 1 GHz at room temperature. The colloids were made with one of three different isotonic solvents: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and Dulbecco's modified eagle medium (DMEM) with and without 0.5% weight/volume bovine serum albumin to simulate cytosol and blood, respectively. The concentration of elemental carbon from the SWCNTs in the colloids ranged from 16 to 17 mM. The permittivities were corrected for electrode polarization effects by fitting the data to the Cole-Cole relaxation model with a constant phase angle element. The presence of SWCNTs increased both the real and imaginary components of the permittivities of the colloids. For all three solvents, the direct current (DC) components of the real and imaginary permittivities were greatest for the colloids containing the mixed chirality SWCNTs, followed by the colloids with semiconducting SWCNTs, and then metallic SWCNTs.

  6. Effect of gelatin on the water dispersion and centrifugal purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanium Maria, Kazi; Mieno, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    We report a convenient and effective procedure for the water dispersion and purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The purification procedure involves a combination of dispersion and centrifugation, in which gelatin; an environmentally friendly material is used as a dispersing agent. It has been found that an aqueous solution of gelatin effectively disperses SWNTs for more than a month. Another advantage of using gelatin as a dispersing agent is that it can be easily removed by washing with water and filtration. The centrifugation procedure employs a centrifugal force of about 2500 times the gravitational force to separate the particles. Although carbonaceous and metallic impurities usually have higher density than SWNTs in arc-produced carbon soot, the centrifugation can easily remove impurities leaving undamaged SWNTs in solution when appropriate centrifugal force and a centrifugation time are used. Centrifugation is carried out for three times to sufficiently remove impurities. Finally, the SWNTs are separated from the gelatin by heating in water and filtering.

  7. Effect of temperature on the selection of semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes using Poly(3-dodecylthiophene-2,5-diyl)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomulya, Widianta; Salazar Rios, Jorge; Derenskyi, Vladimir; Bisri, Satria Zulkarnaen; Jung, Stefan; Fritsch, Martin; Allard, Sybille; Scherf, Ullrich; dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report on the investigation of the temperature effect on the selective dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by Poly(3-dodecylthiophene-2,5-diy1) wrapping. The interaction mechanism between polymer chains and SWNTs is studied by controlling the polymer aggregation via variation of

  8. Tuning the photophysical properties of soluble single-wall carbon nanotube derivatives by co-functionalization with organic molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordella, Fabrizio; De Nardi, Marco; Menna, Enzo; Hebert, Cecile; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    The photophysical characterization of three soluble derivatives of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), co-functionalized with PEG and aminofluorene and co-functionalized with PEG and aminoanthracene is reported. The peculiar excellent solubility of

  9. Response of Fe powder, purified and as-produced HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes to flash exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exposure of as-produced HiPCo single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to a camera flash causes ignition, (oxidation) and subsequent coalescence of the Fe catalyst particles, while purified SWNTs do not respond to flashing. TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis attribute the phenomena to the pyrophoric oxidation of Fe nanoparticles

  10. Single walled carbon nanotube-based electrical biosensor for the label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, S. M.; Baek, Y. K.; Shin, S.;

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe the development of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based electrical biosensor consisting of a two-terminal resistor, and report its use for the specific, label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria via changes in conductance. The ability of this biosensor to recognize di...

  11. Nanomaterial release characteristics in a single-walled carbon nanotube manufacturing workplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Jun Ho [EcoPictures Co., Ltd (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Gwangjae; Bae, Gwi-Nam, E-mail: gnbae@kist.re.kr [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Center for Environment, Health and Welfare Research (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    As carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used in various applications, exposure assessment also increases in importance with other various toxicity tests for CNTs. We conducted 24-h continuous nanoaerosol measurements to identify possible nanomaterial release in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing workplace. Four real-time aerosol instruments were used to determine the nanosized and microsized particle numbers, particle surface area, and carbonaceous species. Task-based exposure assessment was carried out for SWCNT synthesis using the arc plasma and thermal decomposition processes to remove amorphous carbon components as impurities. During the SWCNT synthesis, the black carbon (BC) concentration was 2–12 μg/m{sup 3}. The maximum BC mass concentrations occurred when the synthesis chamber was opened for harvesting the SWCNTs. The number concentrations of particles with sizes 10–420 nm were 10,000–40,000 particles/cm{sup 3} during the tasks. The maximum number concentration existed when a vacuum pump was operated to remove exhaust air from the SWCNT synthesis chamber due to the penetration of highly concentrated oil mists through the window opened. We analyzed the particle mass size distribution and particle number size distribution for each peak episode. Using real-time aerosol detectors, we distinguished the SWCNT releases from background nanoaerosols such as oil mist and atmospheric photochemical smog particles. SWCNT aggregates with sizes of 1–10 μm were mainly released from the arc plasma synthesis. The harvesting process was the main release route of SWCNTs in the workplace.

  12. Optimization of single-walled carbon nanotube solubility by noncovalent PEGylation using experimental design methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadidi N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Naghmeh Hadidi1, Farzad Kobarfard2, Nastaran Nafissi-Varcheh3, Reza Aboofazeli11Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: In this study, noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with phospholipid-polyethylene glycols (Pl-PEGs was performed to improve the solubility of SWCNTs in aqueous solution. Two kinds of PEG derivatives, ie, Pl-PEG 2000 and Pl-PEG 5000, were used for the PEGylation process. An experimental design technique (D-optimal design and second-order polynomial equations was applied to investigate the effect of variables on PEGylation and the solubility of SWCNTs. The type of PEG derivative was selected as a qualitative parameter, and the PEG/SWCNT weight ratio and sonication time were applied as quantitative variables for the experimental design. Optimization was performed for two responses, aqueous solubility and loading efficiency. The grafting of PEG to the carbon nanostructure was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Aqueous solubility and loading efficiency were determined by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry and measurement of free amine groups, respectively. Results showed that Pl-PEGs were grafted onto SWCNTs. Aqueous solubility of 0.84 mg/mL and loading efficiency of nearly 98% were achieved for the prepared Pl-PEG 5000-SWCNT conjugates. Evaluation of functionalized SWCNTs showed that our noncovalent functionalization protocol could considerably increase aqueous solubility, which is an essential criterion in the design of a carbon nanotube-based drug delivery system and its biodistribution.Keywords: phospholipid-PEG, D-optimal design, loading efficiency, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, theromogravimetric analysis, carbon nanotubes

  13. Nanomaterial release characteristics in a single-walled carbon nanotube manufacturing workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used in various applications, exposure assessment also increases in importance with other various toxicity tests for CNTs. We conducted 24-h continuous nanoaerosol measurements to identify possible nanomaterial release in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing workplace. Four real-time aerosol instruments were used to determine the nanosized and microsized particle numbers, particle surface area, and carbonaceous species. Task-based exposure assessment was carried out for SWCNT synthesis using the arc plasma and thermal decomposition processes to remove amorphous carbon components as impurities. During the SWCNT synthesis, the black carbon (BC) concentration was 2–12 μg/m3. The maximum BC mass concentrations occurred when the synthesis chamber was opened for harvesting the SWCNTs. The number concentrations of particles with sizes 10–420 nm were 10,000–40,000 particles/cm3 during the tasks. The maximum number concentration existed when a vacuum pump was operated to remove exhaust air from the SWCNT synthesis chamber due to the penetration of highly concentrated oil mists through the window opened. We analyzed the particle mass size distribution and particle number size distribution for each peak episode. Using real-time aerosol detectors, we distinguished the SWCNT releases from background nanoaerosols such as oil mist and atmospheric photochemical smog particles. SWCNT aggregates with sizes of 1–10 μm were mainly released from the arc plasma synthesis. The harvesting process was the main release route of SWCNTs in the workplace

  14. Nanocatalyst structure as a template to define chirality of nascent single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Zhao, Jin; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Chirality is a crucial factor in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) because it determines its optical and electronic properties. A chiral angle spanning from 0° to 30° results from twisting of the graphene sheet conforming the nanotube wall and is equivalently expressed by chiral indexes (n,m). However, lack of chirality control during SWCNT synthesis is an obstacle for a widespread use of these materials. Here we use first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to propose and illustrate basic concepts supporting that the nanocatalyst structure may act as a template to control the chirality during nanotube synthesis. DFT optimizations of metal cluster (Co and Cu)∕cap systems for caps of various chiralities are used to show that an inverse template effect from the nascent carbon nanostructure over the catalyst may exist in floating catalysts; such effect determines a negligible chirality control. Classical MD simulations are used to investigate the influence of a strongly interacting substrate on the structure of a metal nanocatalyst and illustrate how such interaction may help preserve catalyst crystallinity. Finally, DFT optimizations of carbon structures on stepped (211) and (321) cobalt surfaces are used to demonstrate the template effect imparted by the nanocatalyst surface on the growing carbon structure at early stages of nucleation. It is found that depending on the step structure and type of building block (short chains, single atoms, or hexagonal rings), thermodynamics favor armchair or zigzag termination, which provides guidelines for a chirality controlled process based on tuning the catalyst structure and the type of precursor gas.

  15. Nanocatalyst structure as a template to define chirality of nascent single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Zhao, Jin; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Chirality is a crucial factor in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) because it determines its optical and electronic properties. A chiral angle spanning from 0° to 30° results from twisting of the graphene sheet conforming the nanotube wall and is equivalently expressed by chiral indexes (n,m). However, lack of chirality control during SWCNT synthesis is an obstacle for a widespread use of these materials. Here we use first-principles density functional theory (DFT) and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to propose and illustrate basic concepts supporting that the nanocatalyst structure may act as a template to control the chirality during nanotube synthesis. DFT optimizations of metal cluster (Co and Cu)∕cap systems for caps of various chiralities are used to show that an inverse template effect from the nascent carbon nanostructure over the catalyst may exist in floating catalysts; such effect determines a negligible chirality control. Classical MD simulations are used to investigate the influence of a strongly interacting substrate on the structure of a metal nanocatalyst and illustrate how such interaction may help preserve catalyst crystallinity. Finally, DFT optimizations of carbon structures on stepped (211) and (321) cobalt surfaces are used to demonstrate the template effect imparted by the nanocatalyst surface on the growing carbon structure at early stages of nucleation. It is found that depending on the step structure and type of building block (short chains, single atoms, or hexagonal rings), thermodynamics favor armchair or zigzag termination, which provides guidelines for a chirality controlled process based on tuning the catalyst structure and the type of precursor gas. PMID:21219018

  16. 14.7% efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells using single walled carbon nanotubes/carbon composite counter electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Cao, Kun; Cui, Jin; Liu, Shuangshuang; Qiao, Xianfeng; Shen, Yan; Wang, Mingkui

    2016-03-01

    A single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) possesses excellent hole conductivity. This work communicates an investigation of perovskite solar cells using a mesoscopic TiO2/Al2O3 structure as a framework in combination with a certain amount of SWCNT-doped graphite/carbon black counter electrode material. The CH3NH3PbI3-based device achieves a power conversion efficiency of 14.7% under AM 1.5G illumination. Detailed investigations show an increased charge collection in this device compared to that without the SWCNT additive.A single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) possesses excellent hole conductivity. This work communicates an investigation of perovskite solar cells using a mesoscopic TiO2/Al2O3 structure as a framework in combination with a certain amount of SWCNT-doped graphite/carbon black counter electrode material. The CH3NH3PbI3-based device achieves a power conversion efficiency of 14.7% under AM 1.5G illumination. Detailed investigations show an increased charge collection in this device compared to that without the SWCNT additive. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07347b

  17. Probing nuclear dynamics and architecture using single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon; Li, Junang; Fakhri, Nikta

    Chromatin is a multiscale dynamic architecture that acts as a template for many biochemical processes such as transcription and DNA replication. Recent developments such as Hi-C technology enable an identification of chromatin interactions across an entire genome. However, a single cell dynamic view of chromatin organization is far from understood. We discuss a new live cell imaging technique to probe the dynamics of the nucleus at a single cell level using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are non-perturbing rigid rods (diameter of 1 nm and length of roughly 100 nm) that fluoresce in the near infrared region. Due to their high aspect ratio, they can diffuse in tight spaces and report on the architecture and dynamics of the nucleoplasm. We develop 3D imaging and tracking of SWNTs in the volume of the nucleus using double helix point spread function microscopy (DH-PSF) and discuss the capabilities of the DH-PSF for inferring the 3D orientation of nanotubes based on vectorial diffraction theory.

  18. Capacitive Spring Softening in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectromechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung Chiang

    2011-03-01

    Due to their low mass density and high Young's modulus, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) offer great promise as nanoelectromechanical (NEM) resonators with applications in ultrasmall mass and force sensing. Nanotube resonators can be actuated and detected simultaneously through electrostatic gate coupling. This gate induced frequency tuning of NEM resonators is known to be governed by two mechanisms: the elastic hardening effect and the capacitive softening effect. Although elastic hardening effect has been widely reported in SWNT resonators, the field-induced capacitive spring softening has rarely been observed. Here we report the capacitive spring softening effect observed in SWNT resonators. The nanotube resonators adopt dual-gate configuration with both bottom-gate and side-gate capable of tuning the resonance frequency through capacitive coupling. Interestingly, downward resonance frequency shifting is observed with increasing side-gate voltage, which can be attributed to the capacitive softening of spring constant. Furthermore, in-plane vibrational modes exhibit much stronger spring softening effect than out-of-plan modes. Our dual-gate design should enable the differentiation between these two types of vibrational modes, and open up new possibility for nonlinear operation of nanotube resonators. Other nonlinear effects in SWNT resonators will also be discussed.

  19. Cytotoxicity Investigation on Cultured Human Blood Cells Treated with Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Scarfì

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are one of the new materials ofemerging technologies. They are becoming increasingly studied for the possibleapplications in electronics, optics and biology. In particular, very promising fields ofapplication are the development of optical biosensors and the intracellular drug delivery.Nevertheless, there is a paucity of information on their toxicological properties and onpotential human health risk. In the present study the SWCNTs were investigated for thepossible induction of toxicity in human blood cells. Cell growth, viability, apoptosis andmetabolic activity were evaluated in proliferating human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Inun-stimulated human leukocytes primary DNA damage was also evaluated. SWCNTsconcentrations ranging from 1 to 50 μg/ml were tested, and treatment duration varied from6 to 72 h, in accordance with the biological target investigated. A statistically significantdecrease in cell growth was found in cells treated with the highest concentrations (25 and50 μg/ml. Such decrease was not associated to cell death or apoptosis, but it wasdemonstrated to be related to a decrease in metabolic activity, as assessed by resazurinassay. Moreover, treatments of 6 h with SWCNTs concentrations of 1, 5 and 10 μg/mlfailed to induce primary DNA damage on the entire human leukocytes population.

  20. Mathematical Modelling of Rotating Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes used in Nanoscale Rotational Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saggam Narendar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a rotating single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT is modelled as an Euler-Bernoulli beam using the non-local/non-classical continuum mechanics. These rotating SWCNTs are used in nanoscale rotational actuators. The mathematical model has been used to study the wave behaviour in rotating SWCNTs. The governingpartial differential equation for a uniform rotating beam is derived incorporating the non-local scale effects. The spatial variation in centrifugal force has been modelled in an average sense. Even though this averaging seems to be a crude approximation, one can use this as a powerful model in analysing the wave dispersion characteristics ofthe rotating CNTs. Spectrum and dispersion curves as a function of rotating speed and non-local scaling parameter were obtained. It has been shown that the dispersive flexural wave tends to behave non-dispersively at very high rotation speeds. The numerical results have been simulated for a rotating SWCNT as a waveguide.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(4, pp.317-324, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.1091

  1. Influence of Electronic Type Purity on the Lithiation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Iddir, Hakim [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Curtiss, Larry A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2014-02-08

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have emerged as one of the leading additives for high-capacity nanocomposite lithium ion battery electrodes due to their ability to improve electrode conductivity, current collection efficiency, and charge/discharge rate for high power applications. However, since as-grown SWCNTs possess a distribution of physical and electronic structures, it is of high interest to determine which subpopulations of SWCNTs possess the highest lithiation capacity and to develop processing methods that can enhance the lithiation capacity of underperforming SWCNT species. Toward this end, SWCNT electronic type purity is controlled via density gradient ultracentrifugation, enabling a systematic study of the lithiation of SWCNTs as a function of metal versus semiconducting content. Experimentally, vacuum-filtered freestanding films of metallic SWCNTs are found to accommodate lithium with an order of magnitude higher capacity than their semiconducting counterparts, which is consistent with ab initio molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations in the limit of isolated SWCNTs. In contrast, SWCNT film densification leads to the enhancement of the lithiation capacity of semiconducting SWCNTs to levels comparable to metallic SWCNTs, which is corroborated by theoretical calculations that show increased lithiation of semiconducting SWCNTs in the limit of small SWCNT*SWCNT spacing. Overall, these results will inform ongoing efforts to utilize SWCNTs as conductive additives in nanocomposite lithium ion battery electrodes.

  2. The effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on Escherichia coli: multiple indicators of viability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Tu Thi Anh; McEvoy, John, E-mail: john.mcevoy@ndsu.edu; Khan, Eakalak [North Dakota State University, Environmental and Conservation Sciences Program (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The impact of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 was investigated using four indicators of viability: enzyme activity, membrane integrity, plate count, and total RNA. The study examined the effects of SWCNT concentration (5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1,000 μg/ml), SWCNT length (0.5–2 and 5–30 μm), and bacterial density (6.5 log{sub 10} CFU and 9 log{sub 10} CFU per treatment) on E. coli ATCC 8739 viability. Results show that anti-bacterial activity is dependent on both the length and concentration of SWCNTs. Long SWCNTs (5–30 µm) were more toxic for E. coli than short SWCNTs (0.5–2 µm). The susceptibility of E. coli to SWCNTs was dependent on the initial density of cells in the treatment, with cells at the higher density being more resistant. Estimates of viability reductions were generally similar for the four assays examined; however, the beta galactosidase and LIVE/DEAD assays were more conservative than the plate count as indicators of viability reductions.

  3. Metal-Assisted Hydrogen Storage on Pt-Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Brown, Craig [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Neumann, Dan [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Hu, Hui [ORNL; Styers-Barnett, David J [ORNL; Krasnov, Pavel O. [Rice University; Yakobson, Boris I. [Rice University

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic dissociation of hydrogen molecules by metal nanoparticles and spillover of atomic hydrogen onto various supports is a well-established phenomenon in catalysis. However, the mechanisms by which metal catalyst nanoparticles can assist in enhanced hydrogen storage on high-surface area supports are still under debate. Experimental measurements of metal-assisted hydrogen storage have been hampered by inaccurate estimation of atomically stored hydrogen deduced from comparative measurements between metal-decorated and undecorated samples. Here we report a temperature cycling technique combined with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements of quantum rotational transitions of molecular H2 to more accurately quantify adsorbed hydrogen aided by catalytic particles using single samples. Temperature cycling measurements on single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs) decorated with 2-3 nm Pt nanoparticles showed 0.17 % mass fraction of metal-assisted hydrogen storage (at 0.5 MPa) at room temperature. Temperature cycling of Pt-decorated SWCNHs using a Sievert s apparatus also indicated metal-assisted hydrogen adsorption of 0.08 % mass fraction at 5 MPa at room temperature. No additional metal-assisted hydrogen storage was observed in SWCNH samples without Pt nanoparticles cycled to room temperature, or in Pt-SWCNHs when the temperature was cycled to less than 150K. The possible formation of C-H bonds due to spilled-over atomic hydrogen was also investigated using both INS and density functional theory calculations.

  4. Interactions and effects of BSA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes on different cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo; Bonincontro, Adalberto; Bianco, Alberto; Risuleo, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise in several biomedical contexts, spanning from drug delivery to tissue regeneration. Thanks to their unique size-related properties, single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are particularly interesting in these fields. However, their use in nanomedicine requires a clear demonstration of their safety in terms of tissue damage, toxicity and pro-inflammatory response. Thus, a better understanding of the cytotoxicity mechanisms, the cellular interactions and the effects that these materials have on cell survival and on biological membranes is an important first step for an appropriate assessment of their biocompatibility. In this study we show how bovine serum albumin (BSA) is able to generate homogeneous and stable dispersions of SWCNTs (BSA-CNTs), suggesting their possible use in the biomedical field. On the other hand, this study wishes to shed more light on the impact and the interactions of protein-stabilized SWCNTs with two different cell types exploiting multidisciplinary techniques. We show that BSA-CNTs are efficiently taken up by cells. We also attempt to describe the effect that the interaction with cells has on the dielectric characteristics of the plasma membrane and ion flux using electrorotation. We then focus on the BSA-CNTs’ acute toxicity using different cellular models. The novel aspect of this work is the evaluation of the membrane alterations that have been poorly investigated to date.

  5. Quantitative Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Based Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârsan, Oana A; Hoffmann, Günter G; van der Ven, Leendert G J; de With, Gijsbertus

    2016-08-01

    Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) is a valuable technique for correlating the electrical properties of a material with its topographic features and for identifying and characterizing conductive pathways in polymer composites. However, aspects such as compatibility between tip material and sample, contact force and area between the tip and the sample, tip degradation and environmental conditions render quantifying the results quite challenging. This study aims at finding the suitable conditions for C-AFM to generate reliable, reproducible, and quantitative current maps that can be used to calculate the resistance in each point of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network, nonimpregnated as well as impregnated with a polymer. The results obtained emphasize the technique's limitation at the macroscale as the resistance of these highly conductive samples cannot be distinguished from the tip-sample contact resistance. Quantitative C-AFM measurements on thin composite sections of 150-350 nm enable the separation of sample and tip-sample contact resistance, but also indicate that these sections are not representative for the overall SWCNT network. Nevertheless, the technique was successfully used to characterize the local electrical properties of the composite material, such as sample homogeneity and resistance range of individual SWCNT clusters, at the nano- and microscale. PMID:27404764

  6. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  7. Plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes on monolayer graphene for sensing target protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangheon; Kim, Gi Gyu; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-05-01

    We developed plasmonic welded single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on monolayer graphene as a biosensor to detect target antigen molecules, fc fusion protein without any treatment to generate binder groups for linker and antibody. This plasmonic welding induces atomic networks between SWCNTs as junctions containing carboxylic groups and improves the electrical sensitivity of a SWCNTs and the graphene membrane to detect target protein. We investigated generation of the atomic networks between SWCNTs by field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy after plasmonic welding process. We compared the intensity ratios of D to G peaks from the Raman spectra and electrical sheet resistance of welded SWCNTs with the results of normal SWCNTs, which decreased from 0.115 to 0.086 and from 10.5 to 4.12, respectively. Additionally, we measured the drain current via source/drain voltage after binding of the antigen to the antibody molecules. This electrical sensitivity of the welded SWCNTs was 1.55 times larger than normal SWCNTs.

  8. Thermal conductivity of freestanding single wall carbon nanotube sheet by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satyaprakash; Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao; Agarwal, Radhe; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Katiyar, Ram S

    2014-11-26

    Thermal properties of single wall carbon nanotube sheets (SWCNT-sheets) are of significant importance in the area of thermal management, as an isolated SWCNT possesses high thermal conductivity of the value about 3000 W m(-1) K(-1). Here we report an indirect method of estimating the thermal conductivity of a nanometer thick suspended SWCNT-sheet by employing the Raman scattering technique. Tube diameter size is examined by the transmissions electron microscopy study. The Raman analysis of the radial breathing modes predicts narrow diameter size distribution with achiral (armchair) symmetry of the constituent SWCNTs. From the first order temperature coefficient of the A1g mode of the G band along with the laser power dependent frequency shifting of this mode, the thermal conductivity of the suspended SWCNT-sheet is estimated to be about ∼18.3 W m(-1) K(-1). Our theoretical study shows that the thermal conductivity of the SWCNT-sheet has contributions simultaneously from the intratube and intertube thermal transport. The intertube thermal conductivity (with contributions from the van der Waals interaction) is merely around 0.7 W m(-1) K(-1), which is three orders smaller than the intratube thermal conductivity, leading to an abrupt decrease in the thermal conductivity of the SWCNT-sheet as compared to the reported value for isolated SWCNT.

  9. Single-walled Carbon Nanotube Gas Sensor Used in Partial Discharge Detection of GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Ning; DING Wei-dong; ZHU Yi dong; SU Chun-qiang; Suehiro Junya

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a realizable fabrication method to manufacture chemical gas sensors by using single- walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The sensors were tested for the monitoring of SF6 decomposition gas produced by partial discharge (PD) in GIS tank. The results showed a superior sensitivity, favorable reliability and good repro dueibitity. For further clarifying the relativity between sensor response and partial discharge activity, the discharge in GIS tank was monitored simultaneously through conventional pulse current method and a SWCNTs gas sensor, and the measurement results were put together for comparative analysis in this paper. The sensor response showed a great dependence on partial discharge characteristics. The sensor response increased nearly linearly with limits when the energy of discharge was persistently accumulated. Partial discharge power had a great influence on the response rate and the time delay. With the increase of partial discharge power, the response rate augmented almost in proportion while the time delay gradually becomes shorter with limits. The results were quite favorable to assess the partial discharge intensity and duration to some extent. Compared with pulse current method, the sensor was predominant to detect partial discharge exposed to constantly high levels of noise. It was capable of detecting partial discharge which was too weak to be detected with pulse current method. However, the sensor response didn't show much dependency on the apparent discharge of partial discharge.

  10. Parallel and orthogonal E-field alignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes by ac dielectrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We designed planar electrodes, for dielectrophoretic manipulation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), built as metal-oxide-semiconductor nanogap capacitors with common substrate and oxide thicknesses of 17 and 150 nm. Such design generates high electric fields (109 V m-1) and also the fringing field is curved due to the conducting substrate, unlike fields generated by conventionally used planar electrodes. Scanning electron microscopy images showed SWNTs aligned parallel and perpendicular to the electrodes. Raman spectroscopic mapping was used to produce separate images of the metallic (m-SWNT) and semiconducting (s-SWNT) nanotube density distributions. As expected, parallel alignment of the m-SWNTs with the E-field was found; however, also a perpendicular alignment of s-SWNTs was observed. Such orthogonal alignment of s-SWNTs is a rare observation and has not been experimentally reported before in detail with Raman images. Due to the unique electrode design, we were able to obtain substantial separation of m-SWNTs and s-SWNTs. Numerical modeling of the electric field factor of the dielectrophoresis force was done, and it matched perfectly with the experimental results. The orthogonal alignment of s-SWNTs results from comparable values of parallel and perpendicular polarizability to the nanotube axis.

  11. Variability and Reliability of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ehteshamul Islam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Excellent electrical performance and extreme sensitivity to chemical species in semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon NanoTubes (s-SWCNTs motivated the study of using them to replace silicon as a next generation field effect transistor (FET for electronic, optoelectronic, and biological applications. In addition, use of SWCNTs in the recently studied flexible electronics appears more promising because of SWCNTs’ inherent flexibility and superior electrical performance over silicon-based materials. All these applications require SWCNT-FETs to have a wafer-scale uniform and reliable performance over time to a level that is at least comparable with the currently used silicon-based nanoscale FETs. Due to similarity in device configuration and its operation, SWCNT-FET inherits most of the variability and reliability concerns of silicon-based FETs, namely the ones originating from line edge roughness, metal work-function variation, oxide defects, etc. Additional challenges arise from the lack of chirality control in as-grown and post-processed SWCNTs and also from the presence of unstable hydroxyl (–OH groups near the interface of SWCNT and dielectric. In this review article, we discuss these variability and reliability origins in SWCNT-FETs. Proposed solutions for mitigating each of these sources are presented and a future perspective is provided in general, which are required for commercial use of SWCNT-FETs in future nanoelectronic applications.

  12. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Hamad, E; Goze-Bac, C; Aznar, R [nanoNMRI group, UMR5587, Universite Montpellier II, Place E Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Nitze, F; Waagberg, T [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, 90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Schmid, M; Mehring, M, E-mail: Thomas.wagberg@physics.umu.se [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the {sup 13}C and {sup 133}Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The 'metallization' of Cs{sub x}C materials where x=0-0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(E{sub F}) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin-lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called {alpha} and {beta} and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 ({alpha}-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05{<=}x{<=}0.143 at high intercalation levels ({beta}-phase). The new {beta}-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp{sup 2}) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(E{sub F}), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  13. Detection of NADH via electrocatalytic oxidation at single-walled carbon nanotubes modified with Variamine blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radoi, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: radoiantonio@yahoo.com; Compagnone, D. [Dipartimento di Scienze degli Alimenti, Universita di Teramo, via C. Lerici 1, Mosciano S. Angelo, Teramo (Italy); Valcarcel, M.A. [Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cs./08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Placidi, P.; Materazzi, S. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Moscone, D.; Palleschi, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita ' Tor Vergata' , via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2008-01-01

    Screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) modified with Variamine blue (VB), covalently attached to the oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH), were developed and used as chemical sensors for the detection of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The Variamine blue redox mediator was covalently linked to the SWCNTs-COOH by the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) chemistry. Infrared Fourier transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of the amide bands situated at 1623 cm{sup -1} (I band), 1577 cm{sup -1} (II band) and 1437 cm{sup -1} (III band) demonstrating the covalent linkage of Variamine blue to SWCNTs-COOH. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate, k{sub obs.}, was 13,850 M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and the k{sub s} and {alpha} were 0.8 s{sup -1} and 0.56, respectively. The pH dependence was also investigated. SPEs modified with Variamine blue by using the DCC/NHS conjugation method, showed a variation of -36 mV per pH unit. A successful application was the development of a lactate biosensor obtained by the immobilization of the L-lactate dehydrogenase on the NADH sensor.

  14. Probing Exciton Diffusion and Dissociation in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-C60 Heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Mistry, Kevin S.; Johnson, Justin C.; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2016-05-19

    The efficiency of thin-film organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices relies heavily upon the transport of excitons to type-II heterojunction interfaces, where there is sufficient driving force for exciton dissociation and ultimately the formation of charge carriers. Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are strong near-infrared absorbers that form type-II heterojunctions with fullerenes such as C60. Although the efficiencies of SWCNT-fullerene OPV devices have climbed over the past few years, questions remain regarding the fundamental factors that currently limit their performance. In this study, we determine the exciton diffusion length in the C60 layer of SWCNT-C60 bilayer active layers using femtosecond transient absorption measurements. We demonstrate that hole transfer from photoexcited C60 molecules to SWCNTs can be tracked by the growth of narrow spectroscopic signatures of holes in the SWCNT 'reporter layer'. In bilayers with thick C60 layers, the SWCNT charge-related signatures display a slow rise over hundreds of picoseconds, reflecting exciton diffusion through the C60 layer to the interface. A model based on exciton diffusion with a Beer-Lambert excitation profile, as well as Monte Carlo simulations, gives the best fit to the data as a function of C60 layer thickness using an exciton diffusion length of approximately 5 nm.

  15. Acute Toxicity Comparison of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Various Freshwater Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Kyung Sohn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While the commercialization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs is rapidly expanding, the environmental impact of this nanomaterial is not well understood. Therefore, the present study evaluates the acute aquatic toxicity of SWCNTs towards two freshwater microalgae (Raphidocelis subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris, a microcrustacean (Daphnia magna, and a fish (Oryzias latipes based on OECD test guidelines (201, 202, and 203. According to the results, the SWCNTs inhibited the growth of the algae R. subcapitata and C. vulgaris with a median effective concentration (EC50 of 29.99 and 30.96 mg/L, respectively, representing “acute category 3” in the Globally Harmonized System (GHS of classification and labeling of chemicals. Meanwhile, the acute toxicity test using O. latipes and D. magna did not show any mortality/immobilizing effects up to a concentration of 100.00 mg/L SWCNTs, indicating no hazard category in the GHS classification. In conclusion, SWCNTs were found to induce acute ecotoxicity in freshwater microalgae, yet not in D. magna and medaka fish.

  16. Flue gas adsorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hermida, M I; Romero-Enrique, J M; Morales-Flórez, V; Esquivias, L

    2016-08-21

    Adsorption of flue gases by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The flue gas is modeled as a ternary mixture of N2, CO2, and O2, emulating realistic compositions of the emissions from power plants. The adsorbed flue gas is in equilibrium with a bulk gas characterized by temperature T, pressure p, and mixture composition. We have considered different SWCNTs with different chiralities and diameters in a range between 7 and 20 Å. Our results show that the CO2 adsorption properties depend mainly on the bulk flue gas thermodynamic conditions and the SWCNT diameter. Narrow SWCNTs with diameter around 7 Å show high CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, but they decrease abruptly as the SWCNT diameter is increased. For wide SWCNT, CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, much smaller in value than for the narrow case, decrease mildly with the SWCNT diameter. In the intermediate range of SWCNT diameters, the CO2 adsorption properties may show a peculiar behavior, which depend strongly on the bulk flue gas conditions. Thus, for high bulk CO2 concentrations and low temperatures, the CO2 adsorption capacity remains high in a wide range of SWCNT diameters, although the corresponding selectivity is moderate. We correlate these findings with the microscopic structure of the adsorbed gas inside the SWCNTs. PMID:27544117

  17. Dynamics of functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes in solution studied by incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied, by incoherent neutron scattering experiments, the dynamics of a colloidal suspension of functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The nanotubes have been functionalized with pentyl ester groups attached at the ends and suspended in deuterated toluene with a concentration of 2.6 mg SWNT/1 ml of deuterated toluene. The experimental techniques were incoherent elastic neutron scattering (IENS) and incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering (IQNS). In the temperature range between 4 K and 300 K, three phases were observed by IENS measurements: a solid phase for Tg, an undercooled liquid phase for Tgm and a liquid phase for T>Tm. Furthermore, in the high temperature range of the undercooled liquid phase, hysteresis loops in the heating and cooling scans were observed. The lower limit of the hysteresis loop defines the critical crossover temperature Tc. IQNS measurements in the liquid phase and a cooling scan of the undercooled liquid phase were performed. Three different quasielastic peaks were identified, two in the liquid phase and another one in the undercooled liquid phase. The widths of the quasielastic peaks are discussed as a generalized diffusion function which can be factorized as a temperature dependent diffusion function and a Q dependent structure function. From the comparison of the diffusion function with the viscosity of toluene, we conclude that two components are in the long-time range Brownian motion and the other one in the short-time range Brownian motion

  18. Thermal rectification in a polymer-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Souvik; Puri, Ishwar K

    2014-08-29

    Thermal rectification occurs when heat current through a material is favored in one direction but not in the opposite direction. These materials, often called thermal diodes, have the potential to perform logic calculations with phonons. Rectification obtained with existing material systems is either too minor or too difficult to implement practically. Hence, we present a scheme to enable higher rectification using a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) that is covalently functionalized near one end with polyacetylene (PA) chains. This composite structure allows rectification R up to 204%, which is higher than the values reported for SWCNTs. Here, [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are the heat currents for forward and reverse bias, respectively. The interatomic interactions in the SWCNT-PA nanocomposite are nonlinear, i.e., they are anharmonic, which is a requirement for thermal rectification. Through atomistic simulations, we identify two additional conditions to accomplish thermal rectification at the nanoscale, namely, (1) structural asymmetry, and (2) that the influence of this asymmetry on thermal transport is temperature dependent. The optimum temperature difference to achieve the highest thermal rectification with the structure is 40-80 K.

  19. Single-walled carbon nanotube-conjugated chemotherapy exhibits increased therapeutic index in melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Padmaparna; Soni, Shivani; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing at an alarming rate globally. Poor prognosis and extraordinarily low survival rates of malignant melanoma necessitates the development of new chemotherapeutic strategies. An emerging approach is to harness nanotechnology to optimize the existing chemotherapies. In the present study we have demonstrated that the delivery of doxorubicin using a nanotechnology-based platform significantly reduces the systemic toxicity of the drug, keeping unchanged its therapeutic efficacy in a mouse melanoma tumor model. Specifically we modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to conjugate a doxorubicin prodrug via a carbamate linker that cleaves enzymatically to cause temporal release of the active drug. The CNT-doxorubicin conjugate (CNT-Dox) induced time-dependent cell death in B16-F10 melanoma cells in vitro. The nanoparticle was rapidly internalized into the lysosome of melanoma cells and was retained in the subcellular compartment for over 24 h. In an in vivo melanoma model, treatment with the nanotube-doxorubicin conjugate abrogated tumor growth without the systemic side-effects associated with free doxorubicin. Our studies demonstrate that a simple and versatile CNT-based nanovector can be harnessed for the delivery of chemotherapy to melanoma, with increased therapeutic index.

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotube-conjugated chemotherapy exhibits increased therapeutic index in melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, Padmaparna; Soni, Shivani; Sengupta, Shiladitya, E-mail: shiladit@mit.edu [BWH-HST Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Science and Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing at an alarming rate globally. Poor prognosis and extraordinarily low survival rates of malignant melanoma necessitates the development of new chemotherapeutic strategies. An emerging approach is to harness nanotechnology to optimize the existing chemotherapies. In the present study we have demonstrated that the delivery of doxorubicin using a nanotechnology-based platform significantly reduces the systemic toxicity of the drug, keeping unchanged its therapeutic efficacy in a mouse melanoma tumor model. Specifically we modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to conjugate a doxorubicin prodrug via a carbamate linker that cleaves enzymatically to cause temporal release of the active drug. The CNT-doxorubicin conjugate (CNT-Dox) induced time-dependent cell death in B16-F10 melanoma cells in vitro. The nanoparticle was rapidly internalized into the lysosome of melanoma cells and was retained in the subcellular compartment for over 24 h. In an in vivo melanoma model, treatment with the nanotube-doxorubicin conjugate abrogated tumor growth without the systemic side-effects associated with free doxorubicin. Our studies demonstrate that a simple and versatile CNT-based nanovector can be harnessed for the delivery of chemotherapy to melanoma, with increased therapeutic index.

  1. Assembly of Acid-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes at Oil/Water Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Hoagland, David; Russell, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The segregation of water-soluble acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at the oil/water interface was induced by dissolving low-molecular-weight amine-terminated polystyrene (PS-NH2) in the oil phase. Salt-bridge interactions between carboxylic acid groups of SWCNTs and amine groups of PS drove assembly of a mixed interfacial film, monitored by pendant drop tensiometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The influence of PS end-group functionality, PS and SWCNT concentrations, and degree of SWCNT acid modification on interfacial activity were assessed, and a sharp drop in interfacial tension was observed above a critical SWCNT concentration. Interfacial tensions were low enough to support stable oil/water emulsions. Further experiments, including potentiometric titrations and replacement of SWCNTs by other carboxyl-containing species, demonstrated that the interfacial tension drop reflects the loss of SWCNT charge as pH falls near/below the intrinsic carboxyl dissociation constant; species lacking multivalent carboxylic acid groups are inactive. The interfacial assemblies of SWCNTs appear neither ordered nor oriented. Research Advisor.

  2. Bimodal Latex Effect on Spin-Coated Thin Conductive Polymer-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mohammad-Amin; Larrakoetxea Angoitia, Katalin; van Berkel, Stefan; Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Friedrich, Heiner; Heuts, Johan P A; van der Schoot, Paul; van Herk, Alex M

    2015-11-10

    We synthesize two differently sized poly(methyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl acrylate) latexes by emulsion polymerization and mix these with a sonicated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion, in order to prepare 3% SWCNT composite mixtures. We spin-coat these mixtures at various spin-speed rates and spin times over a glass substrate, producing a thin, transparent, solid, conductive layer. Keeping the amount of SWCNTs constant, we vary the weight fraction of our smaller 30-nm latex particles relative to the larger 70-nm-sized ones. We find a maximum in the electrical conductivity up to 370 S/m as a function of the weight fraction of smaller particles, depending on the overall solid content, the spin speed, and the spin time. This maximum occurs at 3-5% of the smaller latex particles. We also find a more than 2-fold increase in conductivity parallel to the radius of spin-coating than perpendicular to it. Atomic force microscopy points at the existence of lanes of latex particles in the spin-coated thin layer, while large-area transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the SWCNTs are aligned over a grid fixed on the glass substrate during the spin-coating process. We extract the conductivity distribution on the surface of the thin film and translate this into the direction of the SWCNTs in it.

  3. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Polyamidoamine Dendrimer Hybrids for Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Francesco; Campisciano, Vincenzo; Calabrese, Carla; La Parola, Valeria; Syrgiannis, Zois; Prato, Maurizio; Gruttadauria, Michelangelo

    2016-04-26

    We report the synthesis and catalytic properties of single-walled carbon nanotube-polyamidoamine dendrimers hybrids (SWCNT-PAMAM), prepared via a convergent strategy. The direct reaction of cystamine-based PAMAM dendrimers (generations 2.5 and 3.0) with pristine SWCNTs in refluxing toluene, followed by immobilization and reduction of [PdCl4](2-), led to the formation of highly dispersed small palladium nanoparticles homogeneously confined throughout the nanotube length. One of these functional materials proved to be an efficient catalyst in Suzuki and Heck reactions, able to promote the above processes down to 0.002 mol % showing a turnover number (TON) of 48 000 and a turnover frequency (TOF) of 566 000 h(-1). In addition, the hybrid material could be recovered and recycled for up to 6 times. No leaching of the metal has been detected during the Suzuki coupling. Additional experiments carried out on the spent catalyst permitted to suggest that a "release and catch" mechanism is operative in both reactions, although during Heck reaction small catalytically active soluble Pd species are also present.

  4. Solution-processed zinc oxide nanoparticles/single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangmei; Sun, Jia; Qian, Chuan; Hu, Xiaotao; Wu, Han; Huang, Yulan; Yang, Junliang

    2016-09-01

    Solution-processed thin-film transistors (TFTs) are the essential building blocks for manufacturing the low-cost and large-area consumptive electronics. Herein, solution-processed TFTs based on the composites of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were fabricated by the methods of spin-coating and doctor-blading. Through controlling the weight of SWCNTs, the ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs fabricated by spin-coating demonstrated a field-effect mobility of 4.7 cm2/Vs and a low threshold voltage of 0.8 V, while the TFTs devices fabricated by doctor-blading technique showed reasonable electrical performance with a mobility of 0.22 cm2/Vs. Furthermore, the ion-gel was used as an efficient electrochemical gate dielectric because of its large electric double-layer capacitance. The operating voltage of all the TFTs devices is as low as 4.0 V. The research suggests that ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs have the potential applications in low-cost, large-area and flexible consumptive electronics, such as chemical-biological sensors and smart label.

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with sodium hyaluronate enhance bone mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sodium hyaluronate (HY, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and HY-functionalized SWCNTs (HY-SWCNTs on the behavior of primary osteoblasts, as well as to investigate the deposition of inorganic crystals on titanium surfaces coated with these biocomposites. Primary osteoblasts were obtained from the calvarial bones of male newborn Wistar rats (5 rats for each cell extraction. We assessed cell viability using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay and by double-staining with propidium iodide and Hoechst. We also assessed the formation of mineralized bone nodules by von Kossa staining, the mRNA expression of bone repair proteins, and the deposition of inorganic crystals on titanium surfaces coated with HY, SWCNTs, or HY-SWCNTs. The results showed that treatment with these biocomposites did not alter the viability of primary osteoblasts. Furthermore, deposition of mineralized bone nodules was significantly increased by cells treated with HY and HY-SWCNTs. This can be partly explained by an increase in the mRNA expression of type I and III collagen, osteocalcin, and bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4. Additionally, the titanium surface treated with HY-SWCNTs showed a significant increase in the deposition of inorganic crystals. Thus, our data indicate that HY, SWCNTs, and HY-SWCNTs are potentially useful for the development of new strategies for bone tissue engineering.

  6. All-Organic Actuator Fabricated with Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowther, Sharon E.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Kang, Jinho; Park, Cheol; Park, Chan Eon

    2008-01-01

    Compliant electrodes to replace conventional metal electrodes have been required for many actuators to relieve the constraint on the electroactive layer. Many conducting polymers have been proposed for the alternative electrodes, but they still have a problem of poor thermal stability. This article reports a novel all-organic actuator with single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films as the alternative electrode. The SWCNT film was obtained by filtering a SWCNT solution through an anodized alumina membrane. The conductivity of the SWCNT film was about 280 S/cm. The performance of the SWCNT film electrode was characterized by measuring the dielectric properties of NASA Langley Research Center - Electroactive Polymer (LaRC-EAP) sandwiched by the SWCNT electrodes over a broad range of temperature (from 25 C to 280 C) and frequency (from 1 KHz to 1 MHz). The all-organic actuator with the SWCNT electrodes showed a larger electric field-induced strain than that with metal electrodes, under identical measurement conditions.

  7. Advantages of flattened electrode in bottom contact single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setiadi, Agung; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi, E-mail: kasaya@prec.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji [Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 565-0871 Suita (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    We fabricated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) devices on flattened electrodes, in which there are no height difference between metal electrodes and the substrate. SWNT-FET fabricated using bottom contact technique have some advantages, such that the SWNTs are free from electron irradiation, have direct contact with the desired metal electrodes, and can be functionalized before or after deposition. However, the SWNTs can be bent at the contact point with the metal electrodes leading to a different electrical characteristic of the devices. The number of SWNT direct junctions in short channel length devices is drastically increased by the use of flattened electrodes due to strong attractive interaction between SWNT and the substrate. The flattened electrodes show a better balance between their hole and electron mobility compared to that of the non-flattened electrodes, that is, ambipolar FET characteristic. It is considered that bending of the SWNTs in the non-flattened electrode devices results in a higher Schottky barrier for the electrons.

  8. Diffusion limited photoluminescence quantum yields in 1-D semiconductors: single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Tobias; Himmelein, Sabine; Ackermann, Thomas; Stich, Dominik; Crochet, Jared

    2010-12-28

    Photoluminescence quantum yields and nonradiative decay of the excitonic S(1) state in length fractionated (6,5) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are studied by continuous wave and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental data are modeled by diffusion limited contact quenching of excitons at stationary quenching sites including tube ends. A combined analysis of the time-resolved photoluminescence decay and the length dependence of photoluminescence quantum yields (PL QYs) from SWNTs in sodium cholate suspensions allows to determine the exciton diffusion coefficient D = 10.7 ± 0.4 cm(2)s(-1) and lifetime τ(PL) for long tubes of 20 ± 1 ps. PL quantum yields Φ(PL) are found to scale with the inverse diffusion coefficient and the square of the mean quenching site distance, here l(d) = 120 ± 25 nm. The results suggest that low PL QYs of SWNTs are due to the combination of high-diffusive exciton mobility with the presence of only a few quenching sites.

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotube passively mode-locked O-band Raman fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, D.; Saito, L. A. M.; Rosa, H. G.; Thoroh de Souza, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed analysis of a nanosecond-pulse single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) passively mode-locked O-band Raman fiber lasers. As gain medium, single mode fiber (SMF) and highly nonlinear Raman gain were used at three different experimental setups. By incorporating 1.0 nm mean diameter SWCNT as saturable absorbers (SA) at 2.3 km SMF long-length gain medium setup, soliton-like spectrum followed by nanosecond high chirped pulse was observed at cavity fundamental repetition rate. In order to shorter the chirped pulse, intracavity anomalous dispersion was introduced with normal dispersion shift fiber (DSF) lengths and pulse duration decreased from 4.20 to 2.30 ns. By using highly nonlinear Raman gain medium in the O-band Raman laser configuration, the laser generated clean and well-defined nanosecond high chirped pulses, achieving pulse duration as short as 2.30 ns with 230 m gain medium length. Also, we could estimate the picosecond pulse duration region as a function of gain medium length of this laser and compared with SMF pulse shortening curve. As results, the lasers presented similar tendencies, indicating a strong influence of nonlinearities and dispersion in the pulse duration shortening.

  10. Growth, dispersion, and electronic devices of nitrogen-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikonomou, Antonios [School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Susi, Toma; Kauppinen, Esko I. [Nanomaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, PO Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Vijayaraghavan, Aravind [School of Computer Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes the complete processes from growth to electronic devices of nitrogen-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes (N-SWCNTs). The N-SWCNTs were synthesized using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method. The dry-deposited N-SWCNT films were dispersed in N-methylpyrolidone followed by sonication and centrifugation steps to yield a stable dispersion of N-SWCNTs in solution. The length and diameter distribution as well as concentration of N-SWCNTs in solution were measured by atomic force microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy, respectively. The N-SWCNTs were then assembled into electronic devices using bottom-up dielectrophoresis and characterized as field-effect transistors. Finally, the potential for application of N-SWCNTs in sensors is discussed. The three stages of N-doped SWCNT processing: (a) growth and collection on filter, (b) dispersion in NMP, and (c) dielectrophoretic assembly into transistor device. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Bimodal Latex Effect on Spin-Coated Thin Conductive Polymer-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mohammad-Amin; Larrakoetxea Angoitia, Katalin; van Berkel, Stefan; Gnanasekaran, Karthikeyan; Friedrich, Heiner; Heuts, Johan P A; van der Schoot, Paul; van Herk, Alex M

    2015-11-10

    We synthesize two differently sized poly(methyl methacrylate-co-tert-butyl acrylate) latexes by emulsion polymerization and mix these with a sonicated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion, in order to prepare 3% SWCNT composite mixtures. We spin-coat these mixtures at various spin-speed rates and spin times over a glass substrate, producing a thin, transparent, solid, conductive layer. Keeping the amount of SWCNTs constant, we vary the weight fraction of our smaller 30-nm latex particles relative to the larger 70-nm-sized ones. We find a maximum in the electrical conductivity up to 370 S/m as a function of the weight fraction of smaller particles, depending on the overall solid content, the spin speed, and the spin time. This maximum occurs at 3-5% of the smaller latex particles. We also find a more than 2-fold increase in conductivity parallel to the radius of spin-coating than perpendicular to it. Atomic force microscopy points at the existence of lanes of latex particles in the spin-coated thin layer, while large-area transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the SWCNTs are aligned over a grid fixed on the glass substrate during the spin-coating process. We extract the conductivity distribution on the surface of the thin film and translate this into the direction of the SWCNTs in it. PMID:26491888

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation on adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhu, Hong; Xu, Qun

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of the adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene (Py-PE) onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) was studied by using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We found that solvent polarity and pyrene group are two critical factors in the Py-PE decoration on ultrathin SWNT. Combined MD simulations with free energy calculations, our results indicate that larger solvent polarity can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy, but contributes little to the interaction energy, moreover, larger SWNT diameter can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy but lead to the increasing of the interaction energy. In polar organic solvent (N, N-Dimethylacetamide), the pyrene group plays a key role in the adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, not only facilitates the spontaneous adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, but also helps to form compact structure between themselves in the final adsorption states. While in aqueous solution, pyrene group no longer works as an anchor, but still affects a lot to the final adsorption conformation. Our present work provides detailed theoretical clue to understand the noncovalent interaction between aromatic segment appended polymer and ultrathin SWNT, and helps to explore the potential application of ultrathin SWNT in the fields of hybrid material, biomedical and electronic materials.

  13. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Electrical Transport and Magnetoresistance in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly KSENEVICH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrical transport properties and magnetoresistance of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT films were investigated within temperature range (2 – 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 T. A crossover between metallic (dR/dT > 0 and non-metallic (dR/dT < 0 temperature dependence of the resistance as well as low-temperature saturation of the resistance in high bias regime indicated on the diminishing of role of the contact barriers between individual nanotubes essential for the charge transport in SWCNT arrays. The magnetoresistance (MR data demonstrated influence of weak localization and electron-electron interactions on charge transport properties in SWCNT films. The low-field negative MR with positive upturn was observed at low temperatures. At T > 10 K only negative MR was observed in the whole range of available magnetic fields. The negative MR can be approximated using 1D weak localization (WL model. The low temperature positive MR is induced by contribution from electron-electron interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.6311

  15. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  16. Morphology of a columnar stack of coronene molecules encapsulated in a single-walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakane, Y.; Mouri, K.; Shintani, K., E-mail: shintani@mce.uec.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Intelligent Systems, University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1 Chofugaoka, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    The morphology of stacked coronene molecules encapsulated in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is investigated using atomistic simulation. First, the minimum energy configuration of coronene molecules in a SWCNT is sought by means of conjugate gradient (CG) minimization. Secondly, encapsulation of coronene molecules into a SWCNT existing in a coronene atmosphere is simulated by means of molecular dynamics (MD). In both of the simulations, the diameter of the SWCNT ranges from 1.35 to 1.69 nm, and the final configurations of coronene molecules within a SWCNT are examined. In a thin SWCNT, coronene molecules tilt against the radial direction of the SWCNT and slide relative to each other, whereas in a thick SWCNT, they do not tilt but rotate relative to each other. In a SWCNT of the intermediate diameter, they tilt, slide, and rotate. For the SWCNT diameter less than or equal to 1.52 nm, the mean tilt angle of the stacked coronene molecules almost linearly decreases with increasing the diameter, whereas for the diameter above 1.52 nm, it is approximately 0{sup ∘}. To check the validity of the results, the MD simulations are performed changing the density of the coronene atmosphere and the length of the SWCNT; the results prove to be valid. Finally, the effects of temperature on the mean tilt angle and mean intermolecular distance of stacked coronene molecules are examined by a rather simplified simulation, which shows that both of them increase with increasing temperature.

  17. Non-Contact Stiffness Measurement of a Suspended Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yun; Su, Chanmin; Getty, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    A new nanoscale electric field sensor was developed for studying triboelectric charging in terrestrial and Martian dust devils. This sensor is capable to measure the large electric fields for large dust devils without saturation. However, to quantify the electric charges and the field strength it is critical to calibrate the mechanical stiffness of the sensor devices. We performed a technical feasibility study of the Nano E-field Sensor stiffness by a non-contact stiffness measurement method. The measurement is based on laser Doppler vibrometer measurement of the thermal noise due to energy flunctuations in the devices. The experiment method provides a novel approach to acquire data that is essential in analyzing the quantitative performance of the E-field Nano Sensor. To carry out the non-contact stiffness measurement, we fabricated a new Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) E-field sensor with different SWCNTs suspension conditions. The power spectra of the thermal induced displacement in the nano E-field sensor were measured at the accuracy of picometer. The power spectra were then used to derive the mechanical stiffness of the sensors. Effect of suspension conditions on stiffness and sensor sensitivty was discussed. After combined deformation and resistivity measurement, we can compare with our laboratory testing and field testing results. This new non-contact measurement technology can also help to explore to other nano and MEMS devices in the future.

  18. Near-infrared exciton-polaritons in strongly coupled single-walled carbon nanotube microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Arko; Tropf, Laura; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-10-01

    Exciton-polaritons form upon strong coupling between electronic excitations of a material and photonic states of a surrounding microcavity. In organic semiconductors the special nature of excited states leads to particularly strong coupling and facilitates condensation of exciton-polaritons at room temperature, which may lead to electrically pumped organic polariton lasers. However, charge carrier mobility and photo-stability in currently used materials is limited and exciton-polariton emission so far has been restricted to visible wavelengths. Here, we demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in the near infrared using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a polymer matrix and a planar metal-clad cavity. By exploiting the exceptional oscillator strength and sharp excitonic transition of (6,5) SWCNTs, we achieve large Rabi splitting (>110 meV), efficient polariton relaxation and narrow band emission (<15 meV). Given their high charge carrier mobility and excellent photostability, SWCNTs represent a promising new avenue towards practical exciton-polariton devices operating at telecommunication wavelengths.

  19. Detection of sugar-lectin interactions by multivalent dendritic sugar functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, K. S.; Naresh, K.; Bagul, R. S.; Jayaraman, N.; Sood, A. K.

    2012-07-01

    We show that single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) decorated with sugar functionalized poly (propyl ether imine) (PETIM) dendrimer is a very sensitive platform to quantitatively detect carbohydrate recognizing proteins, namely, lectins. The changes in electrical conductivity of SWNT in field effect transistor device due to carbohydrate-protein interactions form the basis of present study. The mannose sugar attached PETIM dendrimers undergo charge-transfer interactions with the SWNTs. The changes in the conductance of the dendritic sugar functionalized SWNT after addition of lectins in varying concentrations were found to follow the Langmuir type isotherm, giving the concanavalin A (Con A)-mannose affinity constant to be 8.5 × 106 M-1. The increase in the device conductance observed after adding 10 nM of Con A is same as after adding 20 μM of a non-specific lectin peanut agglutinin, showing the high specificity of the Con A-mannose interactions. The specificity of sugar-lectin interactions was characterized further by observing significant shifts in Raman modes of the SWNTs.

  20. Phosphatidylserine targets single-walled carbon nanotubes to professional phagocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarjun V Konduru

    Full Text Available Broad applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT dictate the necessity to better understand their health effects. Poor recognition of non-functionalized SWCNT by phagocytes is prohibitive towards controlling their biological action. We report that SWCNT coating with a phospholipid "eat-me" signal, phosphatidylserine (PS, makes them recognizable in vitro by different phagocytic cells - murine RAW264.7 macrophages, primary monocyte-derived human macrophages, dendritic cells, and rat brain microglia. Macrophage uptake of PS-coated nanotubes was suppressed by the PS-binding protein, Annexin V, and endocytosis inhibitors, and changed the pattern of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Loading of PS-coated SWCNT with pro-apoptotic cargo (cytochrome c allowed for the targeted killing of RAW264.7 macrophages. In vivo aspiration of PS-coated SWCNT stimulated their uptake by lung alveolar macrophages in mice. Thus, PS-coating can be utilized for targeted delivery of SWCNT with specified cargoes into professional phagocytes, hence for therapeutic regulation of specific populations of immune-competent cells.

  1. Cytotoxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in various surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Lifeng [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO 65897 (United States); Joseph, Katherine L; Witkowski, Colette M; Craig, Michael M [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO 65897 (United States)], E-mail: LifengDong@MissouriState.edu

    2008-06-25

    The cytotoxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) suspended in various surfactants was investigated by phase contrast light microscopy characterization in combination with an absorbance spectroscopy cytotoxicity analysis. Our data indicate that individual SWCNTs suspended in the surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), were toxic to 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells due to the toxicity of SDS and SDBS on the nanotube surfaces. This toxicity was observed when cells were exposed to an SDS or SDBS solution having a concentration as low as 0.05 mg ml{sup -1} for 30 min. The proliferation and viability of the cells were not affected by SWCNTs alone or by conjugates of SWCNTs with various concentrations of sodium cholate (SC) or single-stranded DNA. The cells proliferated similarly to untreated cells when surrounded by SWCNTs as they grow, which indicated that the nanotubes did not affect cells adversely. The cytotoxicity of the nanotube-surfactant conjugates was controlled in these experiments by the toxicity of the surfactants. Consequently, when evaluating a surfactant to be used for the dispersion of nanoscale materials in applications such as nanoscale electronics or non-viral biomolecular transporters, the cytotoxicity needs to be evaluated. The methodology proposed in this study can be used to investigate the cytotoxicity of other nanoscale materials suspended in a variety of surfactants.

  2. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M; Bruce Weisman, R

    2016-05-21

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.

  3. Citrullination as early-stage indicator of cell response to single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Bashir Mustafa; Movia, Dania; Knyazev, Anton; Langevin, Dominique; Davies, Anthony Mitchell; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Volkov, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been widely explored as potential technologies for information systems and medical applications. The impact of SWCNTs on human health is of prime concern, if SWCNTs have a future in the manufacturing industry. This study proposes a novel, inflammation-independent paradigm of toxicity for SWCNTs, identifying the protein citrullination process as early-stage indicator of inflammatory responses of macrophages (THP-1) and of subtle phenotypic damages of lung epithelial (A549) cells following exposure to chemically-treated SWCNTs. Our results showed that, while most of the cellular responses of A549 cells exposed to SWCNTs are different to those of similarly treated THP-1 cells, the protein citrullination process is triggered in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both cell lines, with thresholds comparable between inflammatory (THP-1) and non-inflammatory (A549) cell types. The cellular mechanism proposed herein could have a high impact in predicting the current risk associated with environmental exposure to SWCNTs. PMID:23350031

  4. Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composites Using an Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Wiklinson, John; Banda, Sumanth; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wise, Kristopher E.; Sauti, Godfrey; Lillehei, Peter T.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2005-01-01

    While high shear alignment has been shown to improve the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT)-polymer composites, it is difficult to control and often results in degradation of the electrical and dielectric properties of the composite. Here, we report a novel method to actively align SWNTs in a polymer matrix, which allows for control over the degree of alignment of SWNTs without the side effects of shear alignment. In this process, SWNTs are aligned via field-induced dipolar interactions among the nanotubes under an AC electric field in a liquid matrix followed by immobilization by photopolymerization while maintaining the electric field. Alignment of SWNTs was controlled as a function of magnitude, frequency, and application time of the applied electric field. The degree of SWNT alignment was assessed using optical microscopy and polarized Raman spectroscopy and the morphology of the aligned nanocomposites was investigated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy. The structure of the field induced aligned SWNTs is intrinsically different from that of shear aligned SWNTs. In the present work, SWNTs are not only aligned along the field, but also migrate laterally to form thick, aligned SWNT percolative columns between the electrodes. The actively aligned SWNTs amplify the electrical and dielectric properties in addition to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. All of these properties of the aligned nanocomposites exhibited anisotropic characteristics, which were controllable by tuning the applied field conditions.

  5. Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalized Sn-Ag-Cu lead-free composite solders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu-based composite solders functionalized with single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with various weight proportions ranging from 0.01 to 1 wt% were successfully produced. The microstuctural, melting and mechanical properties of Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu-based composite solders were evaluated as a function of different wt% of SWCNT addition. The microstructures of the composite specimens were studied by means of field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). It was observed that SWCNTs were homogeneously distributed at the edges of Ag3Sn compounds that are distributed evenly in the β-Sn solder matrix. Energy dispersion X-ray (EDX) analysis method was employed to reveal the presence of the phases existed in the solder composites. The mechanical properties of the composite solders were evaluated by Vickers-microhardness measurements and tensile tests performed at room temperature. The different wt% and addition of SWCNTs to Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu produced a dramatic increase in tensile strength, hardness, and better melting characteristics. A slight decrease in elongation to failure was observed. FE-SEM observations of the fracture surface, revealed the overall failure mechanism as the ductile manner of failure

  6. Unusual thermal conduction characteristics of phase change composites with single-walled carbon nanotube inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Sivasankaran; Ishikawa, Kei; Chiashi, Shohei; Shiomi, Junichiro; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2013-03-01

    Thermal energy storage using phase transition materials is often employed in many engineering applications. However, the low thermal conductivity of such materials inhibits its use for large scale applications. Recently, Zheng et al. [Nature Comm. 2011] demonstrated an efficient technique using graphite suspensions to tune the thermal and electrical conductivity using temperature regulation. In this work, we report large contrasts in thermal conductivity enhancement of nano composites with single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) inclusions using first order phase transition process. SWCNTs synthesized by alcohol CVD were dispersed in n-octadecane by tip-sonication with sodium deoxycholate as the surfactant. Thermal conductivity measurements were carried out with transient hot-wire system [Mater. Express 2012]. Thermal conductivity enhancement in the liquid state was found to be nominal and is consistent with the predictions of Maxwell- Garnett type effective medium theory. However, in the frozen state nearly a 2.5 fold increase in thermal conductivity was observed. Similar temperature dependent thermal conductivity contrast was observed when exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets were used as the inclusions. Financial support from Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (22226006 and 19054003), Monbukagakusho Scholarship, Global Center of Excellence for Mechanical Systems Innovation

  7. Targeting single-walled carbon nanotubes for the treatment of breast cancer using photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Luís F. F.; Krais, John J.; Van Rite, Brent D.; Ramesh, Rajagopal; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2013-09-01

    This paper focuses on the targeting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for the treatment of breast cancer with minimal side effects using photothermal therapy. The human protein annexin V (AV) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids expressed externally on the surface of tumour cells and endothelial cells that line the tumour vasculature. A 2 h incubation of the SWNT-AV conjugate with proliferating endothelial cells followed by washing and near-infrared (NIR) irradiation at a wavelength of 980 nm was enough to induce significant cell death; there was no significant cell death with irradiation or the conjugate alone. Administration of the same conjugate i.v. in BALB/c female mice with implanted 4T1 murine mammary at a dose of 0.8 mg SWNT kg-1 and followed one day later by NIR irradiation of the tumour at a wavelength of 980 nm led to complete disappearance of implanted 4T1 mouse mammary tumours for the majority of the animals by 11 days since the irradiation. The combination of the photothermal therapy with the immunoadjuvant cyclophosphamide resulted in increased survival. The in vivo results suggest the SWNT-AV/NIR treatment is a promising approach to treat breast cancer.

  8. Microwave pumped high-efficient thermoacoustic tumor therapy with single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liewei; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-01-01

    The ultra-short pulse microwave could excite to the strong thermoacoustic (TA) shock wave and deeply penetrate in the biological tissues. Based on this, we developed a novel deep-seated tumor therapy modality with mitochondria-targeting single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as microwave absorbing agents, which act efficiently to convert ultra-short microwave energy into TA shock wave and selectively destroy the targeted mitochondria, thereby inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. After the treatment of SWNTs (40 μg/mL) and ultra-short microwave (40 Hz, 1 min), 77.5% of cancer cells were killed and the vast majority were caused by apoptosis that initiates from mitochondrial damage. The orthotopic liver cancer mice were established as deep-seated tumor model to investigate the anti-tumor effect of mitochondria-targeting TA therapy. The results suggested that TA therapy could effectively inhibit the tumor growth without any observable side effects, while it was difficult to achieve with photothermal or photoacoustic therapy. These discoveries implied the potential application of TA therapy in deep-seated tumor models and should be further tested for development into a promising therapeutic modality for cancer treatment.

  9. Nonlinear vibrations and energy exchange of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Circumferential flexural modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozzi, Matteo; Smirnov, Valeri V.; Manevitch, Leonid I.; Milani, Massimo; Pellicano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear vibrations and energy exchange of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are studied. The Sanders-Koiter theory is applied to model the nonlinear dynamics of the system in the case of finite amplitude of vibration. The SWNT deformation is described in terms of longitudinal, circumferential and radial displacement fields. Simply supported, clamped and free boundary conditions are considered. The circumferential flexural modes (CFMs) are investigated. Two different approaches based on numerical and analytical models are compared. In the numerical model, an energy method based on the Lagrange equations is used to reduce the nonlinear partial differential equations of motion to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which is solved by using the implicit Runge-Kutta numerical method. In the analytical model, a reduced form of the Sanders-Koiter theory assuming small circumferential and tangential shear deformations is used to get the nonlinear ordinary differential equations of motion, which are solved by using the multiple scales analytical method. The transition from energy beating to energy localization in the nonlinear field is studied. The effect of the aspect ratio on the analytical and numerical values of the nonlinear energy localization threshold for different boundary conditions is investigated. Time evolution of the total energy distribution along the axis of a simply supported SWNT

  10. Thermodynamics of adsorption of light alkanes and alkenes in single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, Fernando J A L

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamics of adsorption of light alkanes and alkenes (CH4, C2H6, C2H4, C3H8, and C3H6) in single-walled carbon nanotube bundles is studied by configurational-bias grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. The bundles consist of uniform nanotubes with diameters in the range 11.0 < D (A) < 18.1, arranged in the usual close-packed hexagonal lattice. The phase space is systematically analyzed with calculations for adsorption at room temperature and reduced pressure range of 8.7 x 10-9 < (p/p0) < 0.9. The simulation results are interpreted in terms of the molecular nature of the adsorbate and the corresponding solid-fluid interactions. It is shown that confinement in the internal volume of the bundle (interstitial and intratubular) is energetically more favorable than physisorption on the external surface (grooves and exposed surfaces of peripheral tubes), as indicated by the curves of isosteric heat as a function of reduced pressure. However, the zero-loading properties suggest a crossover poin...

  11. Low-energy electron irradiation of preheated and gas-exposed single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecton, P. A.; Beatty, J.; Verbeck, G.; Lakshantha, W.; Rout, B.; Perez, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the conditions under which electron irradiation at 2 keV of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles produces an increase in the Raman D peak. We find that irradiation of SWCNTs that are preheated in situ at 600 °C for 1 h in ultrahigh vacuum before irradiation does not result in an increase in the D peak. Irradiation of SWCNTs that are preheated in vacuum and then exposed to air or gases results in an increase in the D peak, suggesting that adsorbates play a role in the increase in the D peak. Small diameter SWCNTs that are not preheated or preheated and then exposed to air show a significant increase in the D and G bands after irradiation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows no chemical shifts in the C 1s peak of SWCNTs that have been irradiated versus SWCNTs that have not been irradiated, suggesting that chemisorption of adsorbates is not responsible for the increase in the D peak.

  12. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol

    2014-06-23

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca24Al28O64] 4+·4e- due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 1022 cm-3) and mobility (∼200 cm 2 V-1 s-1 at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46000 (14.8 mA cm-2) at 2 V μm-1 (3.5 wt% [Ca2N]+·e-) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm-1. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  13. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  14. Rod hydrodynamics and length distributions of single-wall carbon nanotubes using analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Carlos A Silvera; Zheng, Ming; Khripin, Constantine Y; Tu, Xiaomin; Fagan, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-01

    Because of their repetitive chemical structure, extreme rigidity, and the separability of populations with varying aspect ratio, SWCNTs are excellent candidates for use as model rodlike colloids. In this contribution, the sedimentation velocities of length and density sorted single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are compared to predictions from rod hydrodynamic theories of increasing complexity over a range of aspect ratios from 400. Independently measuring all contributions to the sedimentation velocity besides the shape factor, excellent agreement is found between the experimental findings and theoretical predictions for numerically calculated hydrodynamic radius values and for multiterm analytical expansion approximations; values for the hydrodynamic radii in these cases are additionally found to be consistent with the apparent hydrated particle radius determined independently by buoyancy measurements. Lastly, we utilize this equivalency to calculate the apparent distribution of nanotube lengths in each population from their sedimentation coefficient distribution without adjustable parameters, achieving excellent agreement with distributions from atomic force microscopy. The method developed herein provides an alternative for the ensemble measurement of SWCNT length distributions and others rodlike particles. PMID:24707888

  15. Conformational Mobility of GOx Coenzyme Complex on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Kang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in bioelectrochemical applications that use electrodes modified by Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs is to ensure high activity of the catalytic site of an immobilized enzyme protein interacting with nanomaterials. Since Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD, a coenzyme of glucose oxidase (GOx, is the active center of the catalytic site, conformation of which could determine the activity of enzyme, it is important to understand the dynamic mechanism of its conformational mobility while GOx is adsorbed on SWCNTs with multiple orientations. However, this dynamic mechanism still remains unclear at the atomic level due to the coenzyme being embedded in the apo-GOx and the limitations of appropriate experimental methods. In this study, a molecular dynamics (MD simulation was performed to investigate the conformational mobility mechanism of the coenzyme. The trajectory and the interaction energy clearly indicate that the adsorption of GOx onto SWCNTs plays an important role in the conformational mobility of the coenzyme, and its mobility is greatly affected by the distribution of water molecules due to it being hydrophobic.

  16. Microrheological Study of the Time Dependent Gelation of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D. T. N.; Hough, L. A.; Islam, M. F.; Yodh, A. G.

    2006-03-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed in water using an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) form reversible gels because of the bonding between the individual nanotubes (L.A. Hough, M.F. Islam, P.A. Janmey and A. G. Yodh Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 168102 (2004)). We study the time dependence of this reversible gelation using particle tracking microrheology. We empirically collapse the mean square displacement onto a single master curve that extends over several decades in time using a time-cure superposition. The frequency scaling exhibited by the viscoelastic moduli obtained from the master curve is remarkably similar to that of semiflexible polymer networks. By comparing the results from a range of initial SWNT concentrations below and above the rigidity percolation threshold, we gain insight into the evolution of structure during gelation. This work has been partially supported by the NSF through Grants DMR 05-20020 (MRSEC) and DMR-0505048, and by NASA grant NAG8-2172.

  17. Remarkable influence of slack on the vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhiyuan; Fu, Mengqi; Wu, Gongtao; Qiu, Chenguang; Shu, Jiapei; Guo, Yao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing

    2016-04-01

    We for the first time quantitatively investigate experimentally the remarkable influence of slack on the vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) resonator with a changeable channel length fabricated in situ inside a scanning electron microscope, compare the experimental results with the theoretical predictions calculated from the measured geometric and mechanical parameters of the same SWCNT, and find the following novel points. We demonstrate experimentally that as the slack s is increased from about zero to 1.8%, the detected vibration transforms from single-mode to multimode vibration, and the gate-tuning ability gradually attenuates for all the vibration modes. The quadratic tuning coefficient α decreases linearly with when the gate voltage Vdcg is small and the nanotube resonator operates in the beam regime. The linear tuning coefficient γ decreases linearly with when Vdcg has an intermediate value and the nanotube resonator operates in the catenary regime. The calculated α and γ fit the experimental values of the even in-plane mode reasonably well. As the slack is increased, the quality factor Q of the resonator linearly goes up, but the increase is far less steep than that predicted by the previous theoretical study. Our results are important to understand and design resonators based on CNT and other nanomaterials.

  18. Near-infrared fluorescent sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes for life sciences applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghossian, Ardemis A; Zhang, Jingqing; Barone, Paul W; Reuel, Nigel F; Kim, Jong-Ho; Heller, Daniel A; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Hilmer, Andrew J; Rwei, Alina; Arkalgud, Jyoti R; Zhang, Cathy T; Strano, Michael S

    2011-07-18

    Many properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) make them ideal candidates for sensors, particularly for biological systems. Both their fluorescence in the near-infrared range of 820-1600 nm, where absorption by biological tissues is often minimal, and their inherent photostability are desirable attributes for the design of in vitro and in vivo sensors. The mechanisms by which a target molecule can selectively alter the fluorescent emission include primarily changes in emission wavelength (i.e., solvatochromism) and intensity, including effects such as charge-transfer transition bleaching and exciton quenching. The central challenge lies in engineering the nanotube interface to be selective for the analyte of interest. In this work, we review the recent development in this area over the past few years, and describe the design rules that we have developed for detecting various analytes, ranging from stable small molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to macromolecules. Applications to in vivo sensor measurements using these sensors are also described. In addition, the emerging field of SWCNT-based single-molecule detection using band gap fluorescence and the recent efforts to accurately quantify and utilize this unique class of stochastic sensors are also described in this article. PMID:21751417

  19. Random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes promote mesenchymal stem cell's proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Shim, Wooyoung; Choolakadavil Khalid, Najeeb; Kang, Won-Seok; Lee, Minsu; Kim, Hyo-Sop; Choi, Je; Lee, Gwang; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-28

    Studies on the interaction of cells with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been receiving increasing attention owing to their potential for various cellular applications. In this report, we investigated the interactions between biological cells and nanostructured SWCNTs films and focused on how morphological structures of SWCNT films affected cellular behavior such as cell proliferation and differentiation. One directionally aligned SWCNT Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film and random network SWCNT film were fabricated by LB and vacuum filteration methods, respectively. We demonstrate that our SWCNT LB and network film based scaffolds do not show any cytotoxicity, while on the other hand, these scaffolds promote differentiation property of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) when compared with that on conventional tissue culture polystyrene substrates. Especially, the SWCNT network film with average thickness and roughness values of 95 ± 5 and 9.81 nm, respectively, demonstrated faster growth rate and higher cell thickness for rMSCs. These results suggest that systematic manipulation of the thickness, roughness, and directional alignment of SWCNT films would provide the convenient strategy for controlling the growth and maintenance of the differentiation property of stem cells. The SWCNT film could be an alternative culture substrate for various stem cells, which often require close control of the growth and differentiation properties.

  20. Z-scan measurements of single walled carbon nanotube doped acetylenedicarboxylic acid polymer under CW laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, M. D.; Allaf, A. W.; Allahham, A.; AL-Zier, A.

    2016-06-01

    Z-scan measurements of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) doped with acetylenedicarboxylic acid (ADC) polymer are performed using a CW diode laser at 635 nm wavelength with 17 mW power. The nonlinear absorption coefficient (β), nonlinear refractive index (n2), the real and imaginary parts of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility (Re χ3), (Im χ3) of the investigated samples are calculated. It was found that the β values decrease with increase in on-axis input intensity I0. Also, these values are found to be proportional with sample concentrations. The excited-state absorption cross sections were calculated to be at σex=5.08×10-14 cm2 for the (SWCNT) and at 15.1×10-14 cm2 for the ADC polymer. It was found that the σex is larger than ground-state absorption cross sections, indicating that the reverse saturable absorption mechanism (RSA) is the dominating mechanism for the observed absorption nonlinearities.