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Sample records for antibody responses induced

  1. Vaccine-induced antibody responses in relation to season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termorshuizen F; Sleijffers A; Hof S van den; Melker H de; Garssen J; Boland GJ; Hattum J van; Gruijl FR de; Loveren H van; LPI

    2001-01-01

    The effect of season on the antibody response after Hepatitis B (HB), Measles and Rubella vaccination in humans was investigated. In view of the immunosuppressive effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), especially the B-waveband (UVB), it was hypothesised that a lower antibody response after

  2. Vaccination of horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs induces short-lasting antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra; Asbie, Sanda; Rohde, Jennifer; Glaser, Amy; Wagner, Bettina

    2017-07-24

    Borrelia burgdorferi can induce Lyme disease. Approved Lyme vaccines for horses are currently not available. In an effort to protect horses, veterinarians are using Lyme vaccines licensed for dogs. However, data to assess the response of horses to, or determine the efficacy of this off-label vaccine use are missing. Here, antibodies against outer surface protein A (OspA), OspC, and OspF were quantified in diagnostic serum submissions from horses with a history of vaccination with canine Lyme vaccines. The results suggested that many horses respond with low and often short-lasting antibody responses. Subsequently, four experimental vaccination trials were performed. First, we investigated antibody responses to three canine vaccines in B. burgdorferi-naïve horses. One killed bacterin vaccine induced antibodies against OspC. OspA antibodies were low for all three vaccines and lasted less than 16weeks. The second trial tested the impact of the vaccine dose using the OspA/OspC inducing bacterin vaccine in horses. A 2mL dose produced higher OspA and OspC antibody values than a 1mL dose. However, the antibody response again quickly declined, independent of dose. Third, the horses were vaccinated with 2 doses of a recombinant OspA vaccine. Previous vaccination and/or environmental exposure enhanced the magnitude and longevity of the OspA antibody response to about 20weeks. Last, the influence of intramuscular versus subcutaneous vaccine administration was investigated for the recombinant OspA vaccine. OspA antibody responses were not influenced by injection route. The current work highlights that commercial Lyme vaccines for dogs induce only transient antibody responses in horses which can also be of low magnitude. Protection from infection with B. burgdorferi should not be automatically assumed after vaccinating horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. A VAR2CSA:CSP conjugate capable of inducing dual specificity antibody responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matondo, Sungwa; Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Catcher peptide. The covalent interaction between SpyTag/SpyCatcher enables the formation of DBL1x-DBL2x-ID2a:CSP conjugate vaccine. Immunogenicity and quality of antibody responses induced by the conjugate vaccine, as well as a control CSP-SpyCatcher vaccine, was tested in BALB/c mice.  Results: Serum samples...

  4. Antibody response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection in vaccinated pigs with or without maternal antibodies induced by sow vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, P; Terreni, M; Guazzetti, S; Cavirani, S

    2006-06-01

    Vaccination with bacterins is an important tool for the control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection of pigs. Because such vaccination often involves piglets that have suckled M. hyopneumoniae antibody-positive dams it is important to understand the effect of pre-existing (passively acquired) antibody on vaccine-induced immunity. To investigate this issue experimentally, 20 sows that were seronegative for M. hyopneumoniae were selected from a M. hyopneumoniae-infected herd and then randomly allocated to one of four treatment groups (five sows/group): Group A, vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group B, vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets; Group C, non-vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group D, non-vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets. Sows (Groups A and B) were vaccinated 14 days before farrowing and seroconverted within the next 14 days. Conversely, none of the non-vaccinated sows was seropositive at farrowing. Piglets (Groups A and C) were vaccinated when they were 7 days of age. Regardless of treatments none of the piglets had any evidence of an active immune response until many of those of Groups A and C and a few of those of Groups B and D seroconverted after it had been shown that at least some pigs of all groups had been naturally infected with a field strain of M. hyopneumoniae. This pattern of immune responsiveness (i.e. the collective results of Groups A, B, C and D) suggested that vaccination of pigs had primed their immune system for subsequent exposure to M. hyopneumoniae, and that passively acquired antibody had little or no effect on either a vaccine-induced priming or a subsequent anamnestic response. According to the statistical analysis sow serological status did not interfere with the antibody response in early vaccinated piglets. In conclusion, the results pointed out that early vaccination of piglets may assist M. hyopneumoniae control independently from the serological status of sows.

  5. Delivering HIV Gagp24 to DCIR Induces Strong Antibody Responses In Vivo.

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    Anne-Laure Flamar

    Full Text Available Targeting dendritic cell-specific endocytic receptors using monoclonal antibodies fused to desired antigens is an approach widely used in vaccine development to enhance the poor immunogenicity of protein-based vaccines and to induce immune responses. Here, we engineered an anti-human DCIR recombinant antibody, which cross-reacts with the homologous cynomolgous macaque receptor and was fused via the heavy chain C-terminus to HIV Gagp24 protein (αDCIR.Gagp24. In vitro, αDCIR.Gagp24 expanded multifunctional antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells recognizing multiple Gagp24 peptides from HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In non human primates, priming with αDCIR.Gagp24 without adjuvant elicited a strong anti-Gagp24 antibody response after the second immunization, while in the non-targeted HIV Gagp24 protein control groups the titers were weak. The presence of the double-stranded RNA poly(I:C adjuvant significantly enhanced the anti-Gagp24 antibody response in all the groups and reduced the discrimination between the different vaccine groups. The avidity of the anti-Gagp24 antibody responses was similar with either αDCIR.Gagp24 or Gagp24 immunization, but increased from medium to high avidity in both groups when poly(I:C was co-administered. This data provides a comparative analysis of DC-targeted and non-targeted proteins for their capacity to induce antigen-specific antibody responses in vivo. This study supports the further development of DCIR-based DC-targeting vaccines for protective durable antibody induction, especially in the absence of adjuvant.

  6. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy...

  7. Long-Term Antibody and Immune Memory Response Induced by Pulmonary Delivery of the Influenza Iscomatrix Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Vujanic, Ana; Snibson, Kenneth J.; Wee, Janet L. K.; Edwards, Stirling J.; Pearse, Martin J.; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y.; Sutton, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary delivery of an influenza Iscomatrix adjuvant vaccine induces a strong systemic and mucosal antibody response. Since an influenza vaccine needs to induce immunological memory that lasts at least 1 year for utility in humans, we examined the longevity of the immune response induced by such a pulmonary vaccination, with and without antigen challenge. Sheep were vaccinated in the deep lung with an influenza Iscomatrix vaccine, and serum and lung antibody levels were quantified for up to...

  8. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Alam, Jahangir; Afsar, Nure Alam; Huda, Nazmul; Kabir, Yearul; Qadri, Firdausi; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B

    2016-04-02

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy. Infants received tetanus and pertussis vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. TT and PT anti-IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes was measured at 15 wk. Plasma antibodies were measured at 6 wk (pre-vaccination), 15 wk and 1 y of age. Prior to vaccination, TT and PT antibody were detected in 94.6% and 15.2% of infants. At 15 wk anti-TT-IgG and anti-PT-IgG in plasma was increased by 7-9 fold over pre-vaccination levels, while at 1 y plasma anti-TT-IgG was decreased by approximately 5-fold from the peak and had returned to near the pre-vaccination level. At 1 y plasma anti-PT-IgG was decreased by 2-fold 1 yfrom the 15 wk level. However, 89.5% and 82.3% of infants at 1 y had protective levels of anti-TT and anti-PT IgG, respectively. Pre-vaccination plasma IgG levels were associated with lower vaccine-specific IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes at 15 wk (p < 0.10). This apparent inhibition was seen for anti-TT-IgG at both 15 wk (p < 0.05) and t 1 y (p < 0.10) of age. In summary, we report an apparent inhibitory effect of passively derived maternal antibody on an infants' own antibody response to the same vaccine. However, since the cut-off values for protective titers are low, infants had protective antibody levels throughout infancy.

  9. Protective immunization with B16 melanoma induces antibody response and not cytotoxic T cell response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarzotti, M.; Sriyuktasuth, P.; Klimpel, G.R.; Cerny, J.

    1986-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice immunized with three intraperitoneal injections of syngeneic, irradiated B16 melanoma cells, became resistant to B16 tumor challenge. Immunized mice had high levels of serum antibody against a membrane antigen of B16 cells. The B16 antigen recognized by the anti-B16 sera formed a major band of 90 KD in gel electrophoresis. The anti-B16 antibody was partially protective when mixed with B16 cells and injected into normal recipient mice. Surprisingly, B16 resistance mice were incapable of generating cytotoxic T cells (CTL) specific for the B16 tumor. Both spleen and lymph node cell populations from immunized mice did not generate B16-specific CTL. Allogeneic mice (DBA/2 or C3H) were also unable to generate B16-specific CTL: however, alloreactive CTL produced in these strains of mice by immunization with C57BL/6 lymphocytes, did kill B16 target cells. Interestingly, spleen cells from syngeneic mice immunized with B16 tumor produced 6-fold more interleukin-2 (IL-2) than normal spleen cells, in vitro. These data suggest that immunization with B16 tumor activates a helper subset of T cells (for antibody and IL-2 production) but not the effector CTL response

  10. Evaluation of Vaccine-induced Antibody Responses: Impact of New Technologies

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    Zaccaro, Daniel J.; Wagener, Diane K.; Whisnant, Carol C.; Staats, Herman F.

    2013-01-01

    Host response to vaccination has historically been evaluated based on a change in antibody titer that compares the post-vaccination titer to the pre-vaccination titer. A four-fold or greater increase in antigen-specific antibody has been interpreted to indicate an increase in antibody production in response to vaccination. New technologies, such as the bead-based assays, provide investigators and clinicians with precise antibody levels (reported as concentration per mL) in ranges below and above those previously available through standard assays such as ELISA. Evaluations of bead assay data to determine host response to vaccination using fold change and absolute change, witha general linear models used to calculate adjusted statistics, present very different pictures of the antibody response when pre-vaccination antibody levels are low. Absolute changes in bead assay values, although not a standard computation, appears to more accurately reflect the host response to vaccination for those individuals with extremely low pre-vaccination antibody levels. Conversely, for these same individuals, fold change may be very high while post-vaccination antibodies do not achieve seroprotective levels. Absolute change provides an alternate method to characterize host response to vaccination, especially when pre-vaccination levels are very low, and may be useful in studies designed to determine associations between host genotypes and response to vaccination. PMID:23583812

  11. Squalene-containing licensed adjuvants enhance strain-specific antibody responses against the influenza hemagglutinin and induce subtype-specific antibodies against the neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rebecca; Holznagel, Edgar; Neumann, Britta; Alex, Nina; Sawatsky, Bevan; Enkirch, Theresa; Pfeffermann, Kristin; Kruip, Carina; von Messling, Veronika; Wagner, Ralf

    2016-10-17

    While seasonal influenza vaccines are usually non-adjuvanted, H1N1pdm09 vaccines were formulated with different squalene-containing adjuvants, to enable the reduction of antigen content thus increasing the number of doses available. To comparatively assess the effects of these adjuvants on antibody responses against matched and mismatched strains, and to correlate antibody levels with protection from disease, ferrets were immunized with 2μg of commercial H1N1pdm09 vaccine antigen alone or formulated with different licensed adjuvants. The use of squalene-containing adjuvants increased neutralizing antibody responses around 100-fold, and resulted in a significantly reduced viral load after challenge with a matched strain. While all animals mounted strong total antibody responses against the homologous H1N1 hemagglutinin (HA) protein, which correlated with the respective neutralizing antibody titers, no reactivity with the divergent H3, H5, H7, and H9 proteins were detected. Only the adjuvanted vaccines also induced antibodies against the neuraminidase (NA) protein, which were able to also recognize NA proteins from other N1 carrying strains. These findings not only support the use of squalene-containing adjuvants in dose-sparing strategies but also support speculations that the induction of NA-specific responses associated with the use of these adjuvants may confer partial protection to heterologous strains carrying the same NA subtype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human anti-mouse antibody response induced by anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Horneff, G; Winkler, T; Kalden, J R; Emmrich, F; Burmester, G R

    1991-04-01

    The development of human anti-mouse monoclonal antibodies (HAMAs) was investigated in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had undergone an experimental therapeutic trial with an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. In this patient group, the antibody 16H5 of the IgG1 isotype had been administered in a median total dosage of 140 mg per treatment cycle. Four patients took part in a second treatment regimen 6-8 weeks later. After the first treatment cycle, detectable HAMAs developed in 5 out of 10 patients. In 4 individuals undergoing a second course of therapy, increases of HAMAs were evident only in the 3 patients with previous HAMA responses. HAMAs were primarily of the IgG isotype, while the presence of rheumatoid factors usually interfered with the detectability of IgM HAMAs. However, using isolated F(ab)2 fragments of the monoclonal reagent used for therapy, HAMAs of the IgM isotype were also detectable. HAMAs of the IgG isotype did not exceed levels of 2.0 mg/liter after a single treatment cycle and 2.2 mg/liter after a repeated cycle. No IgE responses were detectable. Absorption experiments indicated that approximately 25% of the HAMA activity was directed against specific determinants of the 16H5 monoclonal antibody, presumably including anti-idiotypic reactivities. These data demonstrate that HAMAs developed only in a proportion of RA patients treated with the anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody 16H5. However, the amounts were rather low compared to other monoclonal reagents used in cancer patients and were therefore allowed for repeated applications without an apparent loss of efficacy.

  13. Neutralizing antibodies obtained in a persistent immune response are effective against deleterious effects induced by the Thalassophryne nattereri fish venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran-Soares, Ana Amélia; Komegae, Evilin Naname; Souza, Valdênia Maria Oliveira; Fonseca, Luiz Alberto; Lima, Carla; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica

    2007-06-01

    Thalassophryne nattereri envenoming represents a great cost to North and Northeast Brazilian communities in terms of public healths, leisure and tourism. Victims rapidally develop symptoms as pain, local swelling, erythema followed by intense necrosis that persist for long days. The aim of this work was tested the immune competence of neutralizing antibodies in pre-immunized mice against principal toxic activities induced by venom. During the primary antibody response in mice, an elevation of IgG antibody levels was only observed on day 28. After boosting, high antibody levels were detected between days 49 and 70, with a 12-fold increase in IgG level over control values at day 49. We confirmed the in vitro neutralizing capacity of T. nattereri anti-venom against toxic effects and thereafter we show that neutralizing antibodies obtained in a persistent immune response are more effective, inclusive against edematous reaction. After boosting during the secondary response mice with high antibody levels do not present any alterations in venule or arteriole after topical application of venom on cremaster muscle. In addition, CK activity diminished in these mice with high neutralizing antibody levels corroborating the attenuation of the myonecrotic effect by venom. In addition, we determined the presence of high IgG antibodies levels in patients 6 months after injury by T. nattereri. In conclusion, the presence of neutralizing antibodies against to T. nattereri venom in the serum of pre-immunized mice could change the outcome of lesion at site of posterior envenoming. Antigen-specific antibodies of high affinity in consequence to specific immune response, dependent of T lymphocyte activation, could minimize the symptoms of intense and immediate inflammatory reaction caused by T. nattereri venom. These finding prompt us to the possibility of development of immune therapeutic strategies using specific anti-venom as an efficient intervention for protecting human victims.

  14. Precisely Molded Nanoparticle Displaying DENV-E Proteins Induces Robust Serotype-Specific Neutralizing Antibody Responses.

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    Stefan W Metz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is the causative agent of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. The virus is endemic in over 120 countries, causing over 350 million infections per year. Dengue vaccine development is challenging because of the need to induce simultaneous protection against four antigenically distinct DENV serotypes and evidence that, under some conditions, vaccination can enhance disease due to specific immunity to the virus. While several live-attenuated tetravalent dengue virus vaccines display partial efficacy, it has been challenging to induce balanced protective immunity to all 4 serotypes. Instead of using whole-virus formulations, we are exploring the potentials for a particulate subunit vaccine, based on DENV E-protein displayed on nanoparticles that have been precisely molded using Particle Replication in Non-wetting Template (PRINT technology. Here we describe immunization studies with a DENV2-nanoparticle vaccine candidate. The ectodomain of DENV2-E protein was expressed as a secreted recombinant protein (sRecE, purified and adsorbed to poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles of different sizes and shape. We show that PRINT nanoparticle adsorbed sRecE without any adjuvant induces higher IgG titers and a more potent DENV2-specific neutralizing antibody response compared to the soluble sRecE protein alone. Antigen trafficking indicate that PRINT nanoparticle display of sRecE prolongs the bio-availability of the antigen in the draining lymph nodes by creating an antigen depot. Our results demonstrate that PRINT nanoparticles are a promising platform for delivering subunit vaccines against flaviviruses such as dengue and Zika.

  15. Kinetic and HPV infection effects on cross-type neutralizing antibody and avidity responses induced by Cervarix®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Troy J.; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Hildesheim, Allan; Pan, Yuanji; Penrose, Kerri J.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that Cervarix® elicits antibody responses against vaccine-related types for which clinical efficacy was demonstrated (HPV-31 and -45). Here, we evaluated the kinetics of neutralization titers and avidity of Cervarix®-induced antibodies up to 36 months of follow-up in unexposed and HPV infected women. Methods A subset of women who participated in the Cost Rica HPV-16/18 Vaccine Trial had pre- and post-vaccination sera tested for antibody responses to HPV-16, -18, -31, -45, and -58 using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay, and HPV-16 antibody avidity using an HPV-16 L1 VLP (virus-like particle)-based ELISA developed in our laboratory. Results In uninfected women, neutralizing antibody titers did not reach significance until after the 3rd dose for HPV-31 (month 12, p=0.009) and HPV-45 (month 12, p=0.003), but then persisted up to month 36 (HPV-31, p=0.01; HPV-45, p=0.002). Individuals infected with HPV-16 or HPV-31 at enrollment developed a significantly higher median antibody response to the corresponding HPV type after one dose, but there was not a difference between median titers after three doses compared to the HPV negative group. Median HPV-16 antibody avidity and titer increased over time up to month 12; however, the HPV-16 avidity did not correlate well with HPV-16 neutralizing antibody titers at each time point examined, except for month 6. The median avidity levels were higher in HPV-16 infected women at month 1 (p=0.04) and lower in HPV-16 infected women at month 12 (p=0.006) compared to the HPV negative women. Conclusions The persistence of cross-neutralization titers at month 36 suggests cross-reactive antibody responses are likely to persist long-term and are not influenced by infection status at enrollment. However, the weak correlation between avidity and neutralization titers emphasizes the need for examining avidity in efficacy studies to determine if high avidity antibodies play a critical role in

  16. Novel adenoviral vector induces T-cell responses despite anti-adenoviral neutralizing antibodies in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Chaudhry, Arvind; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S; Hobeika, Amy C; Osada, Takuya; Clay, Timothy M; Amalfitano, Andrea; Burnett, Bruce K; Devi, Gayathri R; Hsu, David S; Xu, Younong; Balcaitis, Stephanie; Dua, Rajesh; Nguyen, Susan; Balint, Joseph P; Jones, Frank R; Lyerly, H Kim

    2013-08-01

    First-generation, E1-deleted adenovirus subtype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors, although promising platforms for use as cancer vaccines, are impeded in activity by naturally occurring or induced Ad-specific neutralizing antibodies. Ad5-based vectors with deletions of the E1 and the E2b regions (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]), the latter encoding the DNA polymerase and the pre-terminal protein, by virtue of diminished late phase viral protein expression, were hypothesized to avoid immunological clearance and induce more potent immune responses against the encoded tumor antigen transgene in Ad-immune hosts. Indeed, multiple homologous immunizations with Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D), encoding the tumor antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), induced CEA-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses with antitumor activity in mice despite the presence of preexisting or induced Ad5-neutralizing antibody. In the present phase I/II study, cohorts of patients with advanced colorectal cancer were immunized with escalating doses of Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D). CEA-specific CMI responses were observed despite the presence of preexisting Ad5 immunity in a majority (61.3 %) of patients. Importantly, there was minimal toxicity, and overall patient survival (48 % at 12 months) was similar regardless of preexisting Ad5 neutralizing antibody titers. The results demonstrate that, in cancer patients, the novel Ad5 [E1-, E2b-] gene delivery platform generates significant CMI responses to the tumor antigen CEA in the setting of both naturally acquired and immunization-induced Ad5-specific immunity.

  17. Murine CR1/2 targeted antigenized single-chain antibody fragments induce transient low affinity antibodies and negatively influence an ongoing immune response.

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    Prechl, József; Molnár, Eszter; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Isaák, Andrea; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Péter; Erdei, Anna

    2007-01-01

    We have generated a single-chain antibody which recognizes murine CR1/2 and carries a genetically fused influenza hemagglutinin derived peptide. Theoretically such a construct is able to crosslink the B cell antigen receptor and CR1/2 on peptide specific B cells. The construct was able to reach its CR1/2 positive target cells, yet intraperitoneal delivery of the construct elicited an IgM response only slightly exceeding that induced by the free peptide. Providing T cell help by the injection of peptide specific lymphocytes did not alter the response in essence, that is anti-peptide IgG was not detectable even after booster immunizations. When used as a booster vaccine following injection of the peptide in adjuvant, the construct even inhibited the development of IgG1 and IgG3 anti-peptide antibodies. These data indicate that although targeting of antigen to CR1/2 on B cells can enhance transient proliferation or differentiation of antigen specific B cells it cannot induce strong, longlasting humoral immune responses. Furthermore, CR1/2 targeting constructs may negatively influence an ongoing immune reaction.

  18. Synthetic Three-Component HIV-1 V3 Glycopeptide Immunogens Induce Glycan-Dependent Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hui; Orwenyo, Jared; Giddens, John P; Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Roushu; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2017-12-21

    Eliciting broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) responses against HIV-1 is a major goal for a prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine. One approach is to design immunogens based on known broadly neutralizing epitopes. Here we report the design and synthesis of an HIV-1 glycopeptide immunogen derived from the V3 domain. We performed glycopeptide epitope mapping to determine the minimal glycopeptide sequence as the epitope of V3-glycan-specific bNAbs PGT128 and 10-1074. We further constructed a self-adjuvant three-component immunogen that consists of a 33-mer V3 glycopeptide epitope, a universal T helper epitope P30, and a lipopeptide (Pam 3 CSK 4 ) that serves as a ligand of Toll-like receptor 2. Rabbit immunization revealed that the synthetic self-adjuvant glycopeptide could elicit substantial glycan-dependent antibodies that exhibited broader recognition of HIV-1 gp120s than the non-glycosylated V3 peptide. These results suggest that the self-adjuvant synthetic glycopeptides can serve as an important component to elicit glycan-specific antibodies in HIV vaccine design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibody responses in pregnancy-induced transmammary transmission of Ancylostoma caninum hookworm larvae.

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    Arasu, P; Heller, A

    1999-09-20

    Third stage larvae of the Ancylostoma caninum hookworm nematode have the capacity to infect a dog, abort the normal maturation pathway to become blood-feeding intestinal worms, and instead distribute throughout the body in a developmentally arrested state that is relatively resilient to most chemotherapeutic agents. During pregnancy, a percentage of the arrested larvae reactivate and transmit via the mammary glands to infect the nursing puppies with resulting iron-deficiency anemia and potential mortality. To determine if the suppression of parasite-specific antibody responses during pregnancy facilitates the reactivation and transmammary transfer of hookworm larvae, a murine model of A. caninum infection was used to compare the infected versus uninfected animals that were either bred or not bred. Initial comparisons of genetically divergent BALB/c versus C57BL/6 mice showed that both the strains mounted strong Th2 biased IgG1 and IgE antibody responses to A. caninum infection. Using the BALB/c strain for the breeding analyses, it was confirmed that larval transfer to the mouse pups only occurred during the post-partum lactational period. In the dams, levels of total and antigen-specific IgG1 and total IgE were highly correlated with parasite burden. During most phases of pregnancy and lactation, infected dams had lower total IgG1, IgG2a and IgE levels as compared to unbred mice at comparable times post-infection; this downward modulation of antibody responses supports the established dogma of a generalized immunosuppression associated with pregnancy. However, at parturition and post-partum lactation, antigen-specific IgG1 levels measured at 1:5000 serum dilutions were comparable between bred and unbred mice, and antigen-specific IgG2a levels at 1:100 serum dilutions were also not significantly different except for a marginal reduction in the bred mice at the lactational timepoint. The comparable anti-A. caninum IgG1 levels between bred and unbred mice, and low

  20. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Poggianella

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well.

  1. Effects of inhaled fine dust on lung tissue changes and antibody response induced by spores of opportunistic fungi in goats.

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    Purdy, Charles W; Layton, Robert C; Straus, David C; Ayers, J R

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the effects of sterile fine dust aerosol inhalation on antibody responses and lung tissue changes induced by Mucor ramosissimus or Trichoderma viride spores following intratracheal inoculation in goats. 36 weanling Boer-Spanish goats. 6 goats were allocated to each of 2 M ramosissimus-inoculated groups, 2 T viride-inoculated groups, and 2 control (tent or pen) groups. One of each pair of sporetreated groups and the tent control group were exposed 7 times to sterilized fine feedyard dust (mean+/-SD particle diameter, dust. Goats received an IV challenge with equine RBCs to assess antibody responses to foreign antigens. Postmortem examinations were performed at study completion (day 68) to evaluate lung tissue lesions. 5 of 7 deaths occurred between days 18 and 45 and were attributed to fine dust exposures prior to fungal treatments. Fine dust inhalation induced similar lung lesions and precipitating antibodies among spore-treated goats. Following spore inoculations, dust-exposed goats had significantly more spores per gram of consolidated lung tissue than did their nonexposed counterparts. Fine dust inhalation appeared to decrease the ability of goats to successfully clear fungal spores from the lungs following intratracheal inoculation.

  2. Stringently Defined Otitis Prone Children Demonstrate Deficient Naturally Induced Mucosal Antibody Response to Moraxella catarrhalis Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabin Ren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Moraxella catarrhalis (Mcat is a prominent mucosal pathogen causing acute otitis media (AOM. We studied Mcat nasopharyngeal (NP colonization, AOM frequency and mucosal antibody responses to four vaccine candidate Mcat proteins: outer membrane protein (OMP CD, oligopeptide permease (Opp A, hemagglutinin (Hag, and Pilin A clade 2 (PilA2 from stringently defined otitis prone (sOP children, who experience the greatest burden of disease, compared to non-otitis prone (NOP children. sOP children had higher NP colonization of Mcat (30 vs. 22%, P = 0.0003 and Mcat-caused AOM rates (49 vs. 24%, P < 0.0001 than NOP children. Natural acquisition of mucosal antibodies to Mcat proteins OMP CD (IgG, P < 0.0001, OppA (IgG, P = 0.018, Hag (IgG and IgA, both P < 0.0001, and PilA2 (IgA, P < 0.0001 was lower in sOP than NOP children. Higher levels of mucosal IgG to Hag (P = 0.039 and PilA2 (P = 0.0076, and IgA to OMP CD (P = 0.010, OppA (P = 0.030, and PilA2 (P = 0.043 were associated with lower carriage of Mcat in NOP but not sOP children. Higher levels of mucosal IgG to OMP CD (P = 0.0070 and Hag (P = 0.0003, and IgA to Hag (P = 0.0067 at asymptomatic colonization than those at onset of AOM were associated with significantly lower rate of Mcat NP colonization progressing to AOM in NOP compared to sOP children (3 vs. 26%, P < 0.0001. In conclusion, sOP children had a diminished mucosal antibody response to Mcat proteins, which was associated with higher frequencies of asymptomatic NP colonization and NP colonization progressing to Mcat-caused AOM. Enhancing Mcat antigen-specific mucosal immune responses to levels higher than achieved by natural exposure will be necessary to prevent AOM in sOP children.

  3. Previous 60-Co radiation from Paratrygon aiereba mucus induces the production of highly responsive antibodies and a better immune response in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Turíbio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, André Moreira; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Jácome, Larissa Barros Silvestre; Spencer, Patrick Jack

    2017-01-01

    Wounds from stinging freshwater stingrays are painful, difficult to heal and cause extensive necrosis and systemic phenomena. The treatment is symptomatic, of low efficiency and there is no therapy, which causes more suffering to the injured. This study aimed to evaluate the immune response induced by the native or irradiated by 60-Co gamma from Paratrygon aiereba mucus. IPEN’s Committee on Ethics in the Use of Animals (n.º126/2013) and lanes captured under license from the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (n.º6781-1/2014) approved this research. For the assays, sera from Swiss mice previously immunized against native or irradiated mucus were used. The proliferation of splenic B cells in response to mucus was evaluated by the In Vitro Induced Antibody Production method and serum and splenic cytokines were also quantified. Our data demonstrate that the irradiated mucus of P. aiereba induces greater production of antibodies and more immunological memory in the mice. Spleen cells from animals immunized against irradiated mucus produced IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10, and serum TNF-α (immunized group against irradiated mucus) and IL-6 and IL-17 (immunized group against native mucus). The results corroborate the use of ionizing radiation, with production of highly responsive antibodies and better immune response, besides proving that Paratrygon aiereba mucus is capable of stimulating cellular and humoral adaptive immune response, contributing to the continuity of associated investigations. (author)

  4. Previous 60-Co radiation from Paratrygon aiereba mucus induces the production of highly responsive antibodies and a better immune response in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Turíbio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, André Moreira; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Jácome, Larissa Barros Silvestre; Spencer, Patrick Jack, E-mail: gabiortegacoelho@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Costa, Andrea da; Rodrigues, Jaqueline Pollizeli; Galisteo Júnior, Andrés Jimenez; Andrade Júnior, Heitor Franco de, E-mail: hfandrad@usp.br, E-mail: raquelaires@itpacporto.com.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratório de Protozoologia; Seibert, Carla Simone, E-mail: seibertcs@uft.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Porto Nacional, TO (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Wounds from stinging freshwater stingrays are painful, difficult to heal and cause extensive necrosis and systemic phenomena. The treatment is symptomatic, of low efficiency and there is no therapy, which causes more suffering to the injured. This study aimed to evaluate the immune response induced by the native or irradiated by 60-Co gamma from Paratrygon aiereba mucus. IPEN’s Committee on Ethics in the Use of Animals (n.º126/2013) and lanes captured under license from the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (n.º6781-1/2014) approved this research. For the assays, sera from Swiss mice previously immunized against native or irradiated mucus were used. The proliferation of splenic B cells in response to mucus was evaluated by the In Vitro Induced Antibody Production method and serum and splenic cytokines were also quantified. Our data demonstrate that the irradiated mucus of P. aiereba induces greater production of antibodies and more immunological memory in the mice. Spleen cells from animals immunized against irradiated mucus produced IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10, and serum TNF-α (immunized group against irradiated mucus) and IL-6 and IL-17 (immunized group against native mucus). The results corroborate the use of ionizing radiation, with production of highly responsive antibodies and better immune response, besides proving that Paratrygon aiereba mucus is capable of stimulating cellular and humoral adaptive immune response, contributing to the continuity of associated investigations. (author)

  5. Trypanosomiasis-induced B cell apoptosis results in loss of protective anti-parasite antibody responses and abolishment of vaccine-induced memory responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Radwanska

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extra-cellular parasites that cause human African trypanosomiasis (HAT as well as infections in game animals and livestock. Trypanosomes are known to evade the immune response of their mammalian host by continuous antigenic variation of their surface coat. Here, we aim to demonstrate that in addition, trypanosomes (i cause the loss of various B cell populations, (ii disable the hosts' capacity to raise a long-lasting specific protective anti-parasite antibody response, and (iii abrogate vaccine-induced protective response to a non-related human pathogen such as Bordetella pertussis. Using a mouse model for T. brucei, various B cell populations were analyzed by FACS at different time points of infection. The results show that during early onset of a T. brucei infection, spleen remodeling results in the rapid loss of the IgM(+ marginal zone (IgM(+MZ B cell population characterized as B220(+IgM(HighIgD(Int CD21(HighCD23(LowCD1d(+CD138(-. These cells, when isolated during the first peak of infection, stained positive for Annexin V and had increased caspase-3 enzyme activity. Elevated caspase-3 mRNA levels coincided with decreased mRNA levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R, indicating the onset of apoptosis. Moreover, affected B cells became unresponsive to stimulation by BCR cross-linking with anti-IgM Fab fragments. In vivo, infection-induced loss of IgM(+ B cells coincided with the disappearance of protective variant-specific T-independent IgM responses, rendering the host rapidly susceptible to re-challenge with previously encountered parasites. Finally, using the well-established human diphtheria, tetanus, and B. pertussis (DTPa vaccination model in mice, we show that T. brucei infections abrogate vaccine-induced protective responses to a non-related pathogen such as B. pertussis. Infections with T. brucei parasites result in the rapid loss of T

  6. Trypanosomiasis-induced B cell apoptosis results in loss of protective anti-parasite antibody responses and abolishment of vaccine-induced memory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanska, Magdalena; Guirnalda, Patrick; De Trez, Carl; Ryffel, Bernard; Black, Samuel; Magez, Stefan

    2008-05-30

    African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extra-cellular parasites that cause human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) as well as infections in game animals and livestock. Trypanosomes are known to evade the immune response of their mammalian host by continuous antigenic variation of their surface coat. Here, we aim to demonstrate that in addition, trypanosomes (i) cause the loss of various B cell populations, (ii) disable the hosts' capacity to raise a long-lasting specific protective anti-parasite antibody response, and (iii) abrogate vaccine-induced protective response to a non-related human pathogen such as Bordetella pertussis. Using a mouse model for T. brucei, various B cell populations were analyzed by FACS at different time points of infection. The results show that during early onset of a T. brucei infection, spleen remodeling results in the rapid loss of the IgM(+) marginal zone (IgM(+)MZ) B cell population characterized as B220(+)IgM(High)IgD(Int) CD21(High)CD23(Low)CD1d(+)CD138(-). These cells, when isolated during the first peak of infection, stained positive for Annexin V and had increased caspase-3 enzyme activity. Elevated caspase-3 mRNA levels coincided with decreased mRNA levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R), indicating the onset of apoptosis. Moreover, affected B cells became unresponsive to stimulation by BCR cross-linking with anti-IgM Fab fragments. In vivo, infection-induced loss of IgM(+) B cells coincided with the disappearance of protective variant-specific T-independent IgM responses, rendering the host rapidly susceptible to re-challenge with previously encountered parasites. Finally, using the well-established human diphtheria, tetanus, and B. pertussis (DTPa) vaccination model in mice, we show that T. brucei infections abrogate vaccine-induced protective responses to a non-related pathogen such as B. pertussis. Infections with T. brucei parasites result in the rapid loss of T

  7. Trypanosomiasis-Induced B Cell Apoptosis Results in Loss of Protective Anti-Parasite Antibody Responses and Abolishment of Vaccine-Induced Memory Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanska, Magdalena; Guirnalda, Patrick; De Trez, Carl; Ryffel, Bernard; Black, Samuel; Magez, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    African trypanosomes of the Trypanosoma brucei species are extra-cellular parasites that cause human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) as well as infections in game animals and livestock. Trypanosomes are known to evade the immune response of their mammalian host by continuous antigenic variation of their surface coat. Here, we aim to demonstrate that in addition, trypanosomes (i) cause the loss of various B cell populations, (ii) disable the hosts' capacity to raise a long-lasting specific protective anti-parasite antibody response, and (iii) abrogate vaccine-induced protective response to a non-related human pathogen such as Bordetella pertussis. Using a mouse model for T. brucei, various B cell populations were analyzed by FACS at different time points of infection. The results show that during early onset of a T. brucei infection, spleen remodeling results in the rapid loss of the IgM+ marginal zone (IgM+MZ) B cell population characterized as B220+IgMHighIgDInt CD21HighCD23LowCD1d+CD138−. These cells, when isolated during the first peak of infection, stained positive for Annexin V and had increased caspase-3 enzyme activity. Elevated caspase-3 mRNA levels coincided with decreased mRNA levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R), indicating the onset of apoptosis. Moreover, affected B cells became unresponsive to stimulation by BCR cross-linking with anti-IgM Fab fragments. In vivo, infection-induced loss of IgM+ B cells coincided with the disappearance of protective variant-specific T-independent IgM responses, rendering the host rapidly susceptible to re-challenge with previously encountered parasites. Finally, using the well-established human diphtheria, tetanus, and B. pertussis (DTPa) vaccination model in mice, we show that T. brucei infections abrogate vaccine-induced protective responses to a non-related pathogen such as B. pertussis. Infections with T. brucei parasites result in the rapid loss of T–cell independent IgM+MZ B

  8. Cellular mechanism of primary anti-Thy-1 antibody responses in vitro induced by uniquely immunogenic thymocyte antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, K I; Nakashima, I; Nagase, F; Kato, N; Mizoguchi, K; Kawashima, K; Lake, P

    1984-03-01

    Thy-1 antigens are the only cell membrane antigens known to be able to induce primary antibody responses in vitro. We have shown that antigens from the thymocytes of mice and rats were highly immunogenic in cultures of murine spleen cells for the induction of Thy-1.1-specific plaque-forming cell responses, whereas antigens from other tissues, including brains and bone marrow, were poorly immunogenic, if at all. The thymocyte-specific Thy-1 immunogenicity was carried by disrupted cell membranes, and the specific activity for inducing responses was closely linked to Thy-1. We then tried to determine the mechanism of anti-Thy-1 antibody responses in vitro that were induced by the uniquely immunogenic thymocyte antigens. The thymocyte Thy-1 antigens behaved as T cell-independent class 2 (TI-2) antigens: they induced responses in athymic nude mice but not in CBA/N mice with a B cell defect. The apparent TI-2 responses to thymocyte Thy-1 did, however, require Thy-1+ cells in the responder, similar to anti-DNP-Ficoll responses. The full development of the anti-Thy-1 responses required the participation of splenic adherent cells (SAC). Nevertheless, the mechanism of the SAC dependency of anti-Thy-1 responses did not involve antigen presentation to lymphocytes by antigen-pulsed SAC, which contrasted with the finding that the presentation of antigen by live SAC to lymphocytes was indispensable for responses to DNP-Ficoll. The poor Thy-1 responsiveness of SAC-depleted spleen cells was fully restored by the addition of soluble factors (IL 1-like molecules) released from SAC into the culture, which did not replace the SAC-requirement of responses to DNP-Ficoll. It was concluded from these results that Thy-1 or Thy-1-linked structures on thymocyte membranes have an intrinsic activity to directly signal either TI-2 B cells or immature T cells, or both, for activation in the presence of soluble factors released from adherent accessory cells. This conclusion is discussed in

  9. Protective antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses to the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induced by a nanoparticle vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Kaba

    Full Text Available The worldwide burden of malaria remains a major public health problem due, in part, to the lack of an effective vaccine against the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. An effective vaccine will most likely require the induction of antigen specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells as well as long-lasting antibody responses all working in concert to eliminate the infection. We report here the effective modification of a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN vaccine previously proven effective in control of a P. berghei infection in a rodent model to now present B- and T-cell epitopes of the human malaria parasite P. falciparum in a platform capable of being used in human subjects.To establish the basis for a SAPN-based vaccine, B- and CD8(+ T-cell epitopes from the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and the universal CD4 T-helper epitope PADRE were engineered into a versatile small protein (∼125 amino acids that self-assembles into a spherical nanoparticle repetitively displaying the selected epitopes. P. falciparum epitope specific immune responses were evaluated in mice using a transgenic P. berghei malaria parasite of mice expressing the human malaria full-length P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (Tg-Pb/PfCSP. We show that SAPN constructs, delivered in saline, can induce high-titer, long-lasting (1 year protective antibody and poly-functional (IFNγ(+, IL-2(+ long-lived central memory CD8(+ T-cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these Ab or CD8(+ T-cells can independently provide sterile protection against a lethal challenge of the transgenic parasites.The SAPN construct induces long-lasting antibody and cellular immune responses to epitope specific sequences of the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and prevents infection in mice by a transgenic P. berghei parasite displaying the full length PfCSP.

  10. Heat shock proteins 70 and 90 from Clonorchis sinensis induce Th1 response and stimulate antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Joo; Jeong, Young-Il; Lee, Myoung-Ro; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Sang-Eun; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Park, Mi-Yeoun; Ju, Jung-Won

    2017-03-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are found in all prokaryotes and most compartments of eukaryotic cells. Members of the HSP family mediate immune responses to tissue damage or cellular stress. However, little is known about the immune response induced by the oriental liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis, even though this organism is carcinogenic to humans. We address this issue in the present study in mouse bone marrow dendritic cells (mBMDCs), using recombinant HSP70 and 90 from C. sinensis (rCsHSP70 and rCsHSP90). rCsHSP70 and rCsHSP90 were produced in an E. coli system. Purified recombinant proteins were treated in BMDCs isolated from C57BL/6 mice. T cells were isolated from Balb/c mice and co-cultured with activated mBMDCs. Expression of surface molecules was measured by flow cytometry and cytokine secretion was quantified using ELISA. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups, including peptide alone, peptide/Freund's adjuvant, peptide/CsHSP70, peptide/CsHSP90, and were immunized intraperitoneally three times. Two weeks after final immunization, antibodies against peptide were measured using ELISA. Both proteins induced a dose-dependent upregulation in major histocompatibility complex and co-stimulatory molecule expression and increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, -6, and -12p70 and tumor necrosis factor-α in mBMDCs. Furthermore, when allogenic T cells were incubated with mBMDCs activated by rCsHSP70 and rCsHSP90, the helper T cell (Th)1 cytokine interferon-γ was up-regulated whereas the level of the Th2 cytokine IL-4 was unchanged. These results indicate that rCsHSPs predominantly induce a Th1 response. Over and above these results, we also demonstrated that the production of peptide-specific antibodies can be activated after immunization via in vitro peptide binding with rCsHSP70 or rCsHSP90. This study showed for the first time that the HSP or HSP/peptide complexes of C. sinensis could be considered as a more effective

  11. Zika Virus-Induced Antibody Response Enhances Dengue Virus Serotype 2 Replication In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawiecki, Anna B; Christofferson, Rebecca C

    2016-11-01

    Zika virus has emerged in the Americas, where dengue virus is endemic. Among the 4 serotypes of dengue virus, antibody-dependent enhancement is thought to enhance viral replication and disease severity. Reports suggest that anti-dengue virus antibody may enhance Zika virus replication. We investigated whether Zika virus antibodies enhance dengue virus replication, by exposing C57Bl/6 mice to Zika virus. Polyclonal serum was verified for strong Zika virus-neutralizing, dengue virus-subneutralizing capacity. Then we determined the enhancement capabilities of Zika virus-immune serum for dengue virus in vitro. We showed that Zika virus antibodies have the ability to enhance dengue virus infections, which is important, because in many Zika virus-affected areas, dengue virus is expected to remain endemic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Neutralizing antibody responses in macaques induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 monovalent or trivalent envelope glycoproteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald V Quinnan

    Full Text Available A major goal of efforts to develop a vaccine to prevent HIV-1 infection is induction of broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bcnAb. In previous studies we have demonstrated induction of neutralizing antibodies that did cross-react among multiple primary and laboratory strains of HIV-1, but neutralized with limited potency. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that immunization with multiple HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs would result in a more potent and cross-reactive neutralizing response. One Env, CM243(N610Q, was selected on the basis of studies of the effects of single and multiple mutations of the four gp41 glycosylation sites. The other two Envs included R2 (subtype B and 14/00/4 (subtype F, both of which were obtained from donors with bcnAb. Rhesus monkeys were immunized using a prime boost regimen as in previous studies. Individual groups of monkeys were immunized with either one of the three Envs or all three. The single N610Q and N615Q mutations of CM243 Env did not disrupt protein secretion, processing into, or reactivity with mAbs, unlike other single or multiple deglycosylation mutations. In rabbit studies the N610Q mutation alone or in combination was associated with an enhanced neutralizing response against homologous and heterologous subtype E viruses. In the subsequent monkey study the response induced by the R2 Env regimen was equivalent to the trivalent regimen and superior to the other monovalent regimens against the virus panel used for testing. The 14/00/4 Env induced responses superior to CM243(N610Q. The results indicate that elimination of the glycosylation site near the gp41 loop results in enhanced immunogenicity, but that immunization of monkeys with these three distinct Envs was not more immunogenic than with one.

  13. An alphavirus vector overcomes the presence of neutralizing antibodies and elevated numbers of Tregs to induce immune responses in humans with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Hobeika, Amy C; Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Hubby, Bolyn; Negri, Sarah; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Devi, Gayathri R; Burnett, Bruce K; Clay, Timothy M; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H Kim

    2010-09-01

    Therapeutic anticancer vaccines are designed to boost patients' immune responses to tumors. One approach is to use a viral vector to deliver antigen to in situ DCs, which then activate tumor-specific T cell and antibody responses. However, vector-specific neutralizing antibodies and suppressive cell populations such as Tregs remain great challenges to the efficacy of this approach. We report here that an alphavirus vector, packaged in virus-like replicon particles (VRP) and capable of efficiently infecting DCs, could be repeatedly administered to patients with metastatic cancer expressing the tumor antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and that it overcame high titers of neutralizing antibodies and elevated Treg levels to induce clinically relevant CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses. The CEA-specific antibodies mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against tumor cells from human colorectal cancer metastases. In addition, patients with CEA-specific T cell responses exhibited longer overall survival. These data suggest that VRP-based vectors can overcome the presence of neutralizing antibodies to break tolerance to self antigen and may be clinically useful for immunotherapy in the setting of tumor-induced immunosuppression.

  14. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50 nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sublingual injection of microparticles containing glycolipid ligands for NKT cells and subunit vaccines induces antibody responses in oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLyria, Elizabeth S; Zhou, Dapeng; Lee, Jun Soo; Singh, Shailbala; Song, Wei; Li, Fenge; Sun, Qing; Lu, Hongzhou; Wu, Jinhui; Qiao, Qian; Hu, Yiqiao; Zhang, Guodong; Li, Chun; Sastry, K Jagannadha; Shen, Haifa

    2015-03-20

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a unique type of innate immune cells which exert paradoxical roles in animal models through producing either Th1 or Th2 cytokines and activating dendritic cells. Alpha-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), a synthetic antigen for NKT cells, was found to be safe and immune stimulatory in cancer and hepatitis patients. We recently developed microparticle-formulated αGalCer, which is selectively presented by dendritic cells and macrophages, but not B cells, and thus can avoid the anergy of NKT cells. In this study, we have examined the immunogenicity of microparticles containing αGalCer and protein vaccine components through sublingual injection in mice. The results showed that sublingual injection of microparticles containing αGalCer and ovalbumin triggered IgG responses in serum (titer >1:100,000), which persisted for more than 3months. Microparticles containing ovalbumin alone also induced comparable level of IgG responses. However, immunoglobulin subclass analysis showed that sublingually injected microparticles containing αGalCer and ovalbumin induced 20 fold higher Th1 biased antibody (IgG2c) than microparticles containing OVA alone (1:20,000 as compared to 1:1000 titer). Sublingual injection of microparticles containing αGalCer and ovalbumin induced secretion of both IgG (titer >1:1000) and IgA (titer=1:80) in saliva secretion, while microparticles containing ovalbumin alone only induced secretion of IgG in saliva. Our results suggest that sublingual injection of microparticles and their subsequent trafficking to draining lymph nodes may induce adaptive immune responses in mucosal compartments. Ongoing studies are focused on the mechanism of antigen presentation and lymphocyte biology in the oral cavity, as well as the toxicity and efficacy of these candidate microparticles for future applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The respiratory syncytial virus G protein conserved domain induces a persistent and protective antibody response in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien N Nguyen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important cause of severe upper and lower respiratory disease in infants and in the elderly. There are 2 main RSV subtypes A and B. A recombinant vaccine was designed based on the central domain of the RSV-A attachment G protein which we had previously named G2Na (aa130-230. Here we evaluated immunogenicity, persistence of antibody (Ab response and protective efficacy induced in rodents by: (i G2Na fused to DT (Diphtheria toxin fragments in cotton rats. DT fusion did not potentiate neutralizing Ab responses against RSV-A or cross-reactivity to RSV-B. (ii G2Nb (aa130-230 of the RSV-B G protein either fused to, or admixed with G2Na. G2Nb did not induce RSV-B-reactive Ab responses. (iii G2Na at low doses. Two injections of 3 µg G2Na in Alum were sufficient to induce protective immune responses in mouse lungs, preventing RSV-A and greatly reducing RSV-B infections. In cotton rats, G2Na-induced RSV-reactive Ab and protective immunity against RSV-A challenge that persisted for at least 24 weeks. (iv injecting RSV primed mice with a single dose of G2Na/Alum or G2Na/PLGA [poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide]. Despite the presence of pre-existing RSV-specific Abs, these formulations effectively boosted anti-RSV Ab titres and increased Ab titres persisted for at least 21 weeks. Affinity maturation of these Abs increased from day 28 to day 148. These data indicate that G2Na has potential as a component of an RSV vaccine formulation.

  17. A Live Vector Expressing HPV16 L1 Generates an Adjuvant-Induced Antibody Response In-vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirbaghaee, Zeinab; Bolhassani, Azam; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Zohrei, Negar

    2015-12-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and cervical cancer has suggested the design of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against genital warts. The HPV capsid has made of two L1 and L2 coat proteins that have produced late in viral infections. Regarding to the recent studies, two commercial prophylactic vaccines have based on L1 viral like particles (VLPs) could strongly induce antibody responses, and protect human body from HPV infections. However, the use of these HPV vaccines has hindered due to their high cost and some limitations. Currently, among various vaccination strategies, live vector-based vaccines have attracted a great attention. Herein, a non-pathogenic strain of the protozoan organism known as Leishmania tarentolae has utilized to induce potent humoral immunity in mice model. At first, cloning of HPV16 L1 gene into Leishmania expression vector has performed and confirmed by PCR and digestion with restriction enzymes. The promastigotes of Leishmania tarentolae (L.tar) have transfected with linearized DNA construct by electroporation. Protein expression has analyzed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. Then, the immunogenicity of leishmania expressing L1 protein (L.tar-L1) has assessed in mice model. Our data has indicated that subcutaneous immunization of mice with the recombinant L.tar-L1 has led to enhance the levels of IgG1 and lgG2a in comparison with control groups. Furthermore, there was no significant increase in antibody levels between two and three times of immunizations. The recombinant live vector was able to induce humoral immunity in mice without need of any adjuvant. However, further studies have required to increase its efficiency.

  18. A multi-subunit Chlamydia vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies and strong IFN-γ(+) CMI responses protects against a genital infection in minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Sarah; Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Erneholm, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia is the most widespread sexually transmitted bacterial disease and a prophylactic vaccine is highly needed. Ideally, this vaccine is required to induce a combined response of Th1 cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in concert with neutralizing antibodies. Using a novel Göttingen minipig...... animal model, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a multi-subunit vaccine formulated in the strong Th1-inducing adjuvant CAF01. We evaluated a mixture of two fusion proteins (Hirep1 and CTH93) designed to promote either neutralizing antibodies or cell-mediated immunity, respectively. Hirep1...

  19. HAHA--nothing to laugh about. Measuring the immunogenicity (human anti-human antibody response) induced by humanized monoclonal antibodies applying ELISA and SPR technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechansky, Andreas

    2010-01-05

    Immunogenicity induced by passively applied proteins is a serious issue because it is directly related to the patient's safety. The out-come of an immune reaction to a therapeutic protein can range from transient appearance of antibodies without any clinical significance to severe life threatening conditions. Within this article, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methodology to measure immunogenicity are compared and the pros and cons are discussed.

  20. Nanoporous Microneedle Arrays Effectively Induce Antibody Responses against Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Anne Marit; Platteel, Anouk C. M.; Kuijt, Nico; van Kooten, Peter J. S.; Vos, Pieter Jan; Sijts, Alice J. A. M.; van der Maaden, Koen

    2017-01-01

    The skin is immunologically very potent because of the high number of antigen-presenting cells in the dermis and epidermis, and is therefore considered to be very suitable for vaccination. However, the skin’s physical barrier, the stratum corneum, prevents foreign substances, including vaccines, from entering the skin. Microneedles, which are needle-like structures with dimensions in the micrometer range, form a relatively new approach to circumvent the stratum corneum, allowing for minimally invasive and pain-free vaccination. In this study, we tested ceramic nanoporous microneedle arrays (npMNAs), representing a novel microneedle-based drug delivery technology, for their ability to deliver the subunit vaccines diphtheria toxoid (DT) and tetanus toxoid (TT) intradermally. First, the piercing ability of the ceramic (alumina) npMNAs, which contained over 100 microneedles per array, a length of 475 µm, and an average pore size of 80 nm, was evaluated in mouse skin. Then, the hydrodynamic diameters of DT and TT and the loading of DT, TT, and imiquimod into, and subsequent release from the npMNAs were assessed in vitro. It was shown that DT and TT were successfully loaded into the tips of the ceramic nanoporous microneedles, and by using near-infrared fluorescently labeled antigens, we found that DT and TT were released following piercing of the antigen-loaded npMNAs into ex vivo murine skin. Finally, the application of DT- and TT-loaded npMNAs onto mouse skin in vivo led to the induction of antigen-specific antibodies, with titers similar to those obtained upon subcutaneous immunization with a similar dose. In conclusion, we show for the first time, the potential of npMNAs for intradermal (ID) immunization with subunit vaccines, which opens possibilities for future ID vaccination designs. PMID:29375544

  1. Nanoporous Microneedle Arrays Effectively Induce Antibody Responses against Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Anne Marit; Platteel, Anouk C M; Kuijt, Nico; van Kooten, Peter J S; Vos, Pieter Jan; Sijts, Alice J A M; van der Maaden, Koen

    2017-01-01

    The skin is immunologically very potent because of the high number of antigen-presenting cells in the dermis and epidermis, and is therefore considered to be very suitable for vaccination. However, the skin's physical barrier, the stratum corneum, prevents foreign substances, including vaccines, from entering the skin. Microneedles, which are needle-like structures with dimensions in the micrometer range, form a relatively new approach to circumvent the stratum corneum, allowing for minimally invasive and pain-free vaccination. In this study, we tested ceramic nanoporous microneedle arrays (npMNAs), representing a novel microneedle-based drug delivery technology, for their ability to deliver the subunit vaccines diphtheria toxoid (DT) and tetanus toxoid (TT) intradermally. First, the piercing ability of the ceramic (alumina) npMNAs, which contained over 100 microneedles per array, a length of 475 µm, and an average pore size of 80 nm, was evaluated in mouse skin. Then, the hydrodynamic diameters of DT and TT and the loading of DT, TT, and imiquimod into, and subsequent release from the npMNAs were assessed in vitro . It was shown that DT and TT were successfully loaded into the tips of the ceramic nanoporous microneedles, and by using near-infrared fluorescently labeled antigens, we found that DT and TT were released following piercing of the antigen-loaded npMNAs into ex vivo murine skin. Finally, the application of DT- and TT-loaded npMNAs onto mouse skin in vivo led to the induction of antigen-specific antibodies, with titers similar to those obtained upon subcutaneous immunization with a similar dose. In conclusion, we show for the first time, the potential of npMNAs for intradermal (ID) immunization with subunit vaccines, which opens possibilities for future ID vaccination designs.

  2. Nanoporous Microneedle Arrays Effectively Induce Antibody Responses against Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marit de Groot

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The skin is immunologically very potent because of the high number of antigen-presenting cells in the dermis and epidermis, and is therefore considered to be very suitable for vaccination. However, the skin’s physical barrier, the stratum corneum, prevents foreign substances, including vaccines, from entering the skin. Microneedles, which are needle-like structures with dimensions in the micrometer range, form a relatively new approach to circumvent the stratum corneum, allowing for minimally invasive and pain-free vaccination. In this study, we tested ceramic nanoporous microneedle arrays (npMNAs, representing a novel microneedle-based drug delivery technology, for their ability to deliver the subunit vaccines diphtheria toxoid (DT and tetanus toxoid (TT intradermally. First, the piercing ability of the ceramic (alumina npMNAs, which contained over 100 microneedles per array, a length of 475 µm, and an average pore size of 80 nm, was evaluated in mouse skin. Then, the hydrodynamic diameters of DT and TT and the loading of DT, TT, and imiquimod into, and subsequent release from the npMNAs were assessed in vitro. It was shown that DT and TT were successfully loaded into the tips of the ceramic nanoporous microneedles, and by using near-infrared fluorescently labeled antigens, we found that DT and TT were released following piercing of the antigen-loaded npMNAs into ex vivo murine skin. Finally, the application of DT- and TT-loaded npMNAs onto mouse skin in vivo led to the induction of antigen-specific antibodies, with titers similar to those obtained upon subcutaneous immunization with a similar dose. In conclusion, we show for the first time, the potential of npMNAs for intradermal (ID immunization with subunit vaccines, which opens possibilities for future ID vaccination designs.

  3. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  4. A heterologous prime-boost Ebola virus vaccine regimen induces durable neutralizing antibody response and prevents Ebola virus-like particle entry in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tan; Li, Dapeng; Song, Yufeng; Yang, Xi; Liu, Qingwei; Jin, Xia; Zhou, Dongming; Huang, Zhong

    2017-09-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is one of the most virulent pathogens known to humans. Neutralizing antibodies play a major role in the protection against EBOV infections. Thus, an EBOV vaccine capable of inducing a long-lasting neutralizing antibody response is highly desirable. We report here that a heterologous prime-boost vaccine regimen can elicit durable EBOV-neutralizing antibody response in mice. A chimpanzee serotype 7 adenovirus expressing EBOV GP (denoted AdC7-GP) was generated and used for priming. A truncated version of EBOV GP1 protein (denoted GP1t) was produced at high levels in Drosophila S2 cells and used for boosting. Mouse immunization studies showed that the AdC7-GP prime/GP1t boost vaccine regimen was more potent in eliciting neutralizing antibodies than either the AdC7-GP or GP1t alone. Neutralizing antibodies induced by the heterologous prime-boost regimen sustained at high titers for at least 18 weeks after immunization. Significantly, in vivo challenge studies revealed that the entry of reporter EBOV-like particles was efficiently blocked in mice receiving the heterologous prime-boost regimen even at 18 weeks after the final dose of immunization. These results suggest that this novel AdC7-GP prime/GP1t boost regimen represents an EBOV vaccine approach capable of establishing long-term protection, and therefore warrants further development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of the cross-antibody response induced in sheep by inactivated bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 and Hobi-like pestivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Mari, Viviana; Sciarretta, Rossana; Lucente, Maria Stella; Camero, Michele; Losurdo, Michele; Larocca, Vittorio; Colao, Valeriana; Cavaliere, Nicola; Lovero, Angela; Lorusso, Eleonora; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2013-06-01

    Hobi-like pestivirus, a new tentative species within genus Pestivirus, was firstly detected in foetal bovine serum batches and later associated to respiratory distress and reproductive failures in cattle. In the present study, the cross-antibody response between bovine viral diarrhoea virus 1 (BVDV-1) and the emerging pestivirus was evaluated in the sheep model. Ten sheep were immunised against BVDV-1 or Hobi-like pestivirus using inactivated preparations and the induced antibody responses were evaluated against the homologous and heterologous viruses. The results showed that heterologous antibody titres were significantly lower than the homologous ones, thus suggesting the need to develop specific vaccines against the emerging pestiviral species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Rationally Designed TNF-α Epitope-Scaffold Immunogen Induces Sustained Antibody Response and Alleviates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available The TNF-α biological inhibitors have significantly improved the clinical outcomes of many autoimmune diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. However, the practical uses are limited due to high costs and the risk of anti-drug antibody responses. Attempts to develop anti-TNF-α vaccines have generated encouraging data in animal models, however, data from clinical trials have not met expectations. In present study, we designed a TNF-α epitope-scaffold immunogen DTNF7 using the transmembrane domain of diphtheria toxin, named DTT as a scaffold. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that the grafted TNF-α epitope is entirely surface-exposed and presented in a native-like conformation while the rigid helical structure of DTT is minimally perturbed, thereby rendering the immunogen highly stable. Immunization of mice with alum formulated DTNF7 induced humoral responses against native TNF-α, and the antibody titer was sustained for more than 6 months, which supports a role of the universal CD4 T cell epitopes of DTT in breaking self-immune tolerance. In a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, DTNF7-alum vaccination markedly delayed the onset of collagen-induced arthritis, and reduced incidence as well as clinical score. DTT is presumed safe as an epitope carrier because a catalytic inactive mutant of diphtheria toxin, CRM197 has good clinical safety records as an active vaccine component. Taken all together, we show that DTT-based epitope vaccine is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  7. Subversion of early innate antiviral responses during antibody-dependent enhancement of Dengue virus infection induces severe disease in immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vivian V; Fagundes, Caio T; Valadão, Deborah F; Ávila, Thiago V; Cisalpino, Daniel; Rocha, Rebeca F; Ribeiro, Lucas S; Ascenção, Fernando R; Kangussu, Lucas M; Celso, M Q; Astigarraga, Ruiz G; Gouveia, Frederico L; Silva, Tarcília A; Bonaventura, Daniela; Sampaio, Divaldo de Almeida; Leite, Ana Cristina L; Teixeira, Mauro M; Souza, Danielle G

    2014-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by one of four serotypes of Dengue virus (DENV-1-4). Epidemiologic and observational studies demonstrate that the majority of severe dengue cases, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), occurs predominantly in either individuals with cross-reactive immunity following a secondary heterologous infection or in infants with primary DENV infections born from dengue-immune mothers, suggesting that B-cell-mediated and antibody responses impact on disease evolution. We demonstrate here that B cells play a pivotal role in host responses against primary DENV infection in mice. After infection, μMT(-/-) mice showed increased viral loads followed by severe disease manifestation characterized by intense thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration, cytokine production and massive liver damage that culminated in death. In addition, we show that poly and monoclonal anti-DENV-specific antibodies can sufficiently increase viral replication through a suppression of early innate antiviral responses and enhance disease manifestation, so that a mostly non-lethal illness becomes a fatal disease resembling human DHF/DSS. Finally, treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin containing anti-DENV antibodies confirmed the potential enhancing capacity of subneutralizing antibodies to mediate virus infection and replication and induce severe disease manifestation of DENV-infected mice. Thus, our results show that humoral responses unleashed during DENV infections can exert protective or pathological outcomes and provide insight into the pathogenesis of this important human pathogen.

  8. A cross-reacting material CRM197 conjugate vaccine induces diphtheria toxin neutralizing antibody response in children and adolescents infected or not with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Giselle P; Santos, Rafaela S; Pereira-Manfro, Wânia F; Ferreira, Bianca; Barreto, Daniella M; Frota, Ana Cristina C; Hofer, Cristina B; Milagres, Lucimar G

    2017-07-05

    Anti-diphtheria antibody levels decrease with aging, and frequent booster vaccinations are required to maintain herd immunity. We analyzed the diphtheria toxin neutralizing antibody (DT-Nab) response induced by a conjugate vaccine (meningococcal C polysaccharide-CRM 197 ) in HIV-vertically infected (HI) children and adolescents and healthy controls (HC) with matched age. We report the association of DT-Nab with the bactericidal antibodies to serogroup C meningococcus (MenC). Before vaccination, 21 HI patients (50%) had no protection against diphtheria (≤0.01IU/ml of antibody) and only 8 (19%) showed complete protection (≥0.1IU/ml). About half of the HC (56%) had complete protection before immunization and 6 subjects (12%) had no protection against diphtheria. After one and two vaccine injections, 96% of HC and 64% of HI vaccinees, respectively, showed full protection against diphtheria. These data indicate that CRM 197 was able to induce primary and/or booster response in both groups of individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Broader HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses induced by envelope glycoprotein mutants based on the EIAV attenuated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lianxing

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to induce a potent and cross-reactive neutralizing antibody (nAb, an effective envelope immunogen is crucial for many viral vaccines, including the vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV attenuated vaccine has controlled the epidemic of this virus after its vaccination in over 70 million equine animals during the last 3 decades in China. Data from our past studies demonstrate that the Env protein of this vaccine plays a pivotal role in protecting horses from both homologous and heterogeneous EIAV challenges. Therefore, the amino acid sequence information from the Chinese EIAV attenuated vaccine, in comparison with the parental wild-type EIAV strains, was applied to modify the corresponding region of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 CN54. The direction of the mutations was made towards the amino acids conserved in the two EIAV vaccine strains, distinguishing them from the two wild-type strains. The purpose of the modification was to enhance the immunogenicity of the HIV Env. Results The induced nAb by the modified HIV Env neutralized HIV-1 B and B'/C viruses at the highest titer of 1:270. Further studies showed that a single amino acid change in the C1 region accounts for the substantial enhancement in induction of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions This study shows that an HIV envelope modified by the information of another lentivirus vaccine induces effective broadly neutralizing antibodies. A single amino acid mutation was found to increase the immunogenicity of the HIV Env.

  10. Intratypic heterologous vaccination of calves can induce an antibody response in presence of maternal antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.; Eble, P.L.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Chenard, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Maternal antibodies can interfere with foot-and-mouth disease vaccination. In this study we determined whether intratypic heterologous vaccination could help to improve herd immunity. Results - In unvaccinated calves, a half-life of maternal antibodies of 21 days was determined. At two

  11. Vaccination of dogs with canine parvovirus type 2b (CPV-2b) induces neutralising antibody responses to CPV-2a and CPV-2c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Illambas, Joanna; Siedek, Elisabeth; Stirling, Catrina; Thomas, Anne; Plevová, Edita; Sture, Gordon; Salt, Jeremy

    2014-09-22

    Since the identification of canine parvovirus type 2, three variants have subsequently been observed differing from the historical CPV-2 and each other by 1-2 amino acids only. As a result there has been considerable research into differential diagnostics, with some researchers indicating there is a need for new vaccines containing different strains of CPV-2. In this study we investigated whether vaccination with a CPV-2b containing vaccine would induce cross-reactive antibody responses to the other CPV-2 variants. Two studies where dogs were vaccinated with a multivalent vaccine, subsequently challenged with CPV-2b and sera samples analysed are presented. Six week old pups with defined serological status were vaccinated twice, three weeks apart and challenged either 5 weeks (MDA override study) or one year after vaccination (duration of immunity study). Sera samples were collected before each vaccination and at periods throughout each study. In each study the antibody profiles were very similar; serological responses against CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c were higher than those for CPV-2. Nevertheless, responses against CPV-2 were well above levels considered clinically protective. In each study dogs also showed a rapid increase in antibody titres following vaccination, reached a plateau following second vaccination with a slight decline to challenge after which rapid anamnestic responses were seen. Evaluation of the serological responses suggests vaccination with CPV-2b would cross-protect against CPV-2a and CPV-2c, as well as against CPV-2 which is now extinct in the field. In conclusion we have demonstrated that vaccination of minimum aged dogs with a multivalent vaccine containing the CPV-2b variant strain will induce serological responses which are cross-reactive against all currently circulating field strains, CPV-2a and CPV-2c, and the now extinct field strain CPV-2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasmodium falciparum Infection during Suppressive Prophylaxis with Mefloquine Does Not Induce an Antibody Response to Merozoite Surface Protein-1(42)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James E.; Deye, Gregory A.; Miller, Lori; Fracisco, Susan; Miller, R. Scott; Tosh, Donna; Cummings, James F.; Ohrt, Colin; Magill, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive biomarker of malaria infection would obviate the need for placebo control arms in clinical trials of malaria prophylactic drugs. Antibodies to the 42-kDa fragment of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP142) have been identified as a potential marker of malaria exposure in individuals receiving prophylaxis with mefloquine. We conducted an open-label trial to determine the sensitivity of seroconversion to MSP142, defined as a fourfold rise in enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) titer, among 23 malaria naïve volunteers receiving mefloquine prophylaxis and 6 controls after Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite challenge. All members of the control cohort but none of the mefloquine cohort developed patent parasitemia. Four of six controls but zero of the mefloquine cohort seroconverted to MSP142. We conclude that malaria infection during suppressive prophylaxis does not induce antibody response to the blood-stage antigen MSP142 in a malaria-naïve study population. PMID:21540397

  13. Antibody and T cell responses induced in chickens immunized with avian influenza virus N1 and NP DNA vaccine with chicken IL-15 and IL-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kian-Lam; Jazayeri, Seyed Davoud; Yeap, Swee Keong; Mohamed Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Ideris, Aini; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2013-12-01

    We had examined the immunogenicity of a series of plasmid DNAs which include neuraminidase (NA) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes from avian influenza virus (AIV). The interleukin-15 (IL-15) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) as genetic adjuvants were used for immunization in combination with the N1 and NP AIV genes. In the first trial, 8 groups of chickens were established with 10 specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens per group while, in the second trial 7 SPF chickens per group were used. The overall N1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titer in chickens immunized with the pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 was higher compared to the chickens immunized with the pDis/N1 and this suggesting that chicken IL-15 could play a role in enhancing the humoral immune response. Besides that, the chickens that were immunized at 14-day-old (Trial 2) showed a higher N1 antibody titer compared to the chickens that were immunized at 1-day-old (Trial 1). Despite the delayed in NP antibody responses, the chickens co-administrated with IL-15 were able to induce earlier and higher antibody response compared to the pDis/NP and pDis/NP+pDis/IL-18 inoculated groups. The pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 inoculated chickens also induced higher CD8+ T cells increase than the pDis/N1 group in both trials (P0.05) in inducing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells when co-administered with the pDis/IL-18 in both trials in comparison to the pDis/NP. Our data suggest that the pDis/N1+pDis/IL-15 combination has the potential to be used as a DNA vaccine against AIV in chickens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial superglue generates a full-length circumsporozoite protein virus-like particle vaccine capable of inducing high and durable antibody responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janitzek, Christoph M; Matondo, Sungwa; Thrane, Susan

    2016-01-01

    modified to display one SpyTag per VLP subunit. To evaluate the VLP-display effect, the immunogenicity of the VLP vaccine was tested in mice and compared to a control vaccine containing AP205 VLPs plus unconjugated CSP. RESULTS: Full-length CSP was conjugated at high density (an average of 112 CSP...... production of IgG2a antibodies, which has been linked with a more efficient clearing of intracellular parasite infection. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that the high-density display of CSP on SpyTag-VLPs, significantly increases the level and quality of the vaccine-induced humoral response, compared...

  15. Persistent Low-Level Replication of SIVΔnef Drives Maturation of Antibody and CD8 T Cell Responses to Induce Protective Immunity against Vaginal SIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sama Adnan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Defining the correlates of immune protection conferred by SIVΔnef, the most effective vaccine against SIV challenge, could enable the design of a protective vaccine against HIV infection. Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of immune responses that protect against SIV infection through detailed analyses of cellular and humoral immune responses in the blood and tissues of rhesus macaques vaccinated with SIVΔnef and then vaginally challenged with wild-type SIV. Despite the presence of robust cellular immune responses, animals at 5 weeks after vaccination displayed only transient viral suppression of challenge virus, whereas all macaques challenged at weeks 20 and 40 post-SIVΔnef vaccination were protected, as defined by either apparent sterile protection or significant suppression of viremia in infected animals. Multiple parameters of CD8 T cell function temporally correlated with maturation of protection, including polyfunctionality, phenotypic differentiation, and redistribution to gut and lymphoid tissues. Importantly, we also demonstrate the induction of a tissue-resident memory population of SIV-specific CD8 T cells in the vaginal mucosa, which was dependent on ongoing low-level antigenic stimulation. Moreover, we show that vaginal and serum antibody titers inversely correlated with post-challenge peak viral load, and we correlate the accumulation and affinity maturation of the antibody response to the duration of the vaccination period as well as to the SIVΔnef antigenic load. In conclusion, maturation of SIVΔnef-induced CD8 T cell and antibody responses, both propelled by viral persistence in the gut mucosa and secondary lymphoid tissues, results in protective immune responses that are able to interrupt viral transmission at mucosal portals of entry as well as potential sites of viral dissemination.

  16. Intranasally administered Endocine formulated 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine induces broad specific antibody responses and confers protection in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, Anna-Karin; Stittelaar, Koert J; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J B; van Amerongen, Geert; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L; Krestin, Gabriel P; Hinkula, Jorma; Arwidsson, Hans; Lindberg, Alf; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2014-05-30

    Influenza is a contagious respiratory disease caused by an influenza virus. Due to continuous antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses, influenza vaccines need to be adjusted before every influenza season. This allows annual vaccination with multivalent seasonal influenza vaccines, recommended especially for high-risk groups. There is a need for a seasonal influenza vaccine that induces broader and longer lasting protection upon easy administration. Endocine is a lipid-based mucosal adjuvant composed of endogenous lipids found ubiquitously in the human body. Intranasal administration of influenza antigens mixed with this adjuvant has been shown to induce local and systemic immunity as well as protective efficacy against homologous influenza virus challenge in mice. Here we used ferrets, an established animal model for human influenza virus infections, to further investigate the potential of Endocine as an adjuvant. Intranasal administration of inactivated pandemic H1N1/California/2009 split antigen or whole virus antigen mixed with Endocine induced high levels of serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and virus neutralization (VN) antibody titers that were also cross reactive against distant swine viruses of the same subtype. HI and VN antibody titers were already demonstrated after a single nasal immunization. Upon intratracheal challenge with a homologous challenge virus (influenza virus H1N1/The Netherlands/602/2009) immunized ferrets were fully protected from virus replication in the lungs and largely protected against body weight loss, virus replication in the upper respiratory tract and pathological changes in the respiratory tract. Endocine formulated vaccines containing split antigen induced higher HI and VN antibody responses and better protection from body weight loss and virus shedding in the upper respiratory tract than the Endocine formulated vaccine containing whole virus antigen. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All

  17. Trivalent influenza vaccine-induced antibody response to circulating influenza a (H3N2) viruses in 2010/11 and 2011/12 seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Satoshi; Morikawa, Saeko; Nakata, Keiko; Maeda, Akiko; Kanno, Tsuneji; Irie, Shin; Ohfuji, Satoko; Hirota, Yoshio; Kase, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate antibody response induced by trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) against circulating influenza A (H3N2) strains in healthy adults during the 2010/11 and 2011/12 seasons, a hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay was utilized to calculate geometric mean antibody titer (GMT), seroprotection rate (post vaccination HI titers of ≥1 :40), and seroresponse rate (4-fold increase in antibody level). In the 2010/11 season, GMT increased 1.8- to 2.0-fold following the first dose of TIV against 3 circulating strains and 2.2-fold following the second compared to before vaccination. The seroresponse rate ranged from 22% to 26% following the first dose of TIV and from 31% to 33% following the second (n = 54 ). The seroprotection rate increased from a range of 6% to 13% to a range of 26% to 33% following the first dose of TIV and to a range of 37% to 42% following the second (n = 54 ). In the 2011/12 season, GMT increased 1.4-fold against A/Osaka/110/2011 and 1.8-fold against A/Osaka/5/2012. For A/Osaka/110/2011, the seroresponse rate was 29%, and the seroprotection rate increased from 26% to 55% following vaccination (n = 31 ). For A/Osaka/5/2012, the seroresponse rate was 26%, and the seroprotection rate increased from 68% to 84% following vaccination (n = 31 ). HI assays with reference antisera demonstrated that the strains in the 2011/12 season were antigenically distinct from vaccine strain (A/Victoria/210/2009). In conclusion, the vaccination increased the seroprotection rate against circulating H3N2 strains in the 2010/11 and 2011/12 seasons. Vaccination of TIV might have potential to induce reactive antibodies against antigenically distinct circulating H3N2 viruses.

  18. Stringently Defined Otitis Prone Children Demonstrate Deficient Naturally Induced Mucosal Antibody Response toMoraxella catarrhalisProteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dabin; Murphy, Timothy F; Lafontaine, Eric R; Pichichero, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis ( Mcat ) is a prominent mucosal pathogen causing acute otitis media (AOM). We studied Mcat nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization, AOM frequency and mucosal antibody responses to four vaccine candidate Mcat proteins: outer membrane protein (OMP) CD, oligopeptide permease (Opp) A, hemagglutinin (Hag), and Pilin A clade 2 (PilA2) from stringently defined otitis prone (sOP) children, who experience the greatest burden of disease, compared to non-otitis prone (NOP) children. sOP children had higher NP colonization of Mcat (30 vs. 22%, P  = 0.0003) and Mcat -caused AOM rates (49 vs. 24%, P  P  P  = 0.018), Hag (IgG and IgA, both P  P  P  = 0.039) and PilA2 ( P  = 0.0076), and IgA to OMP CD ( P  = 0.010), OppA ( P  = 0.030), and PilA2 ( P  = 0.043) were associated with lower carriage of Mcat in NOP but not sOP children. Higher levels of mucosal IgG to OMP CD ( P  = 0.0070) and Hag ( P  = 0.0003), and IgA to Hag ( P  = 0.0067) at asymptomatic colonization than those at onset of AOM were associated with significantly lower rate of Mcat NP colonization progressing to AOM in NOP compared to sOP children (3 vs. 26%, P  NP colonization and NP colonization progressing to Mcat -caused AOM. Enhancing Mcat antigen-specific mucosal immune responses to levels higher than achieved by natural exposure will be necessary to prevent AOM in sOP children.

  19. Antibody responses induced by Leish-Tec®, an A2-based vaccine for visceral leishmaniasis, in a heterogeneous canine population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testasicca, Miriam C de Souza; dos Santos, Mariana Silva; Machado, Leopoldo Marques; Serufo, Angela Vieira; Doro, Daniel; Avelar, Daniel; Tibúrcio, Ana Maria Leonardi; Abrantes, Christiane de Freitas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Grimaldi, Gabriel; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2014-08-29

    Zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a widespread disease, and dogs are the main reservoirs for human parasite transmission. Hence, development of an effective vaccine that prevents disease and reduces the transmission of VL is required. As euthanasia of seropositive dogs is recommended in Brazil for VL epidemiological control, to include anti-VL canine vaccines as a mass control measure it is necessary to characterize the humoral responses induced by vaccination and if they interfere with the reactivity of vaccinated dogs in serological diagnostic tests. Leish-Tec(®) is an amastigote-specific A2 recombinant protein vaccine against canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) that is commercially available in Brazil. Here, we tested the immunogenicity of Leish-Tec(®) in a heterogeneous dog population by measuring A2-specific antibody responses. Healthy dogs (n=140) of various breeds were allocated to two groups: one group received Leish-Tec(®) (n=70), and the other group received a placebo (n=70). Anti-A2 or anti-Leishmania promastigote antigen (LPA) antibody levels were measured by ELISA in serum samples collected before and after vaccination. An immunochromatographic test (DPP) based on the recombinant K28 antigen was also used for serodiagnosis of CVL. Vaccinated animals, except one, remained seronegative for anti-LPA total IgG and anti-K28 antibodies. Conversely, seropositivity for anti-A2 total IgG antibodies was found in 98% of animals after vaccination. This value decreased to 81.13% at 6 months before rising again (98%), after the vaccination boost. Anti-A2 IgG2 and IgG1 titers were also increased in vaccinated animals relative to control animals. These data indicate that Leish-Tec(®) is immunogenic for dogs of different genetic backgrounds and that humoral responses induced by vaccination can be detected by A2-ELISA, but do not interfere with the LPA-ELISA and DPP diagnostic tests for CVL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A mimotope peptide of Aβ42 fibril-specific antibodies with Aβ42 fibrillation inhibitory activity induces anti-Aβ42 conformer antibody response by a displayed form on an M13 phage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koichi; Nishimura, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Yuya; Hashiguchi, Shuhei; Takiguchi, Sho; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Tahara, Haruna; Gotanda, Takuma; Abe, Risa; Ito, Yuji; Sugimura, Kazuhisa

    2011-07-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides accumulate in the brain in different forms, including fibrils and oligomers. Recently, we established three distinct conformation-dependent human single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies, including B6 scFv, which bound to Aβ42 fibril but not to soluble-form Aβ, inhibiting Aβ42 fibril formation. In this study, we determined the mimotopes of these antibodies and found a common mimotope sequence, B6-C15, using the Ph.D.-C7C phage library. The B6-C15 showed weak homology to the C-terminus of Aβ42 containing GXXXG dimerization motifs. We synthesized the peptide of B6-C15 fused with biotinylated TAT at the N-terminus (TAT-B6-C15) and characterized its biochemical features on an Aβ42-fibrillation reaction in vitro. We demonstrated that, first, TAT-B6-C15 inhibited Aβ42 fibril formation; secondly, TAT-B6-C15 bound to prefibril Aβ42 oligomers but not to monomers, trimers, tetramers, fibrils, or ultrasonicated fragments; thirdly, TAT-B6-C15 inhibited Aβ42-induced cytotoxicity against human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells; and, fourthly, when mice were administered B6-C15-phages dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline, the anti-Aβ42 conformer IgG antibody response was induced. These results suggested that the B6-C15 peptide might provide unique opportunities to analyze the Aβ42 fibrillation pathway and develop a vaccine vehicle for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bovine Herpesvirus-4-Based Vector Delivering Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus Hemagglutinin ORF Induces both Neutralizing Antibodies and Cytotoxic T Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Macchi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus (PPRV is an extremely infective morbillivirus that primarily affects goats and sheep. In underdeveloped countries where livestock are the main economical resource, PPRV causes considerable economic losses. Protective live attenuated vaccines are currently available but they induce antibody responses similar to those produced in PPRV naturally infected animals. Effective vaccines able to distinguish between vaccinated and naturally infected animals are required to PPRV control and eradication programs. Hemagglutinin (H is a highly immunogenic PPRV envelope glycoprotein displaying both hemagglutinin and neuraminidase activities, playing a crucial role in virus attachment and penetration. In this study, a recombinant Bovine Herpesvirus-4 (BoHV-4-based vector delivering an optimized PPRV-Hemagglutinin expression cassette, BoHV-4-A-PPRV-H-ΔTK, was assessed in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. BoHV-4-A-PPRV-H-ΔTK-immunization elicited both cellular and humoral immune responses with specific T cell, cytotoxic T lymphocyte, and sero-neutralizing antibody against PPRV. These data suggest recombinant BoHV-4-A-PPRV-H-ΔTK as an effective vaccine candidate to protect against PPRV herd infection and potentially applicable for eradication programs.

  2. Qualification and application of a surface plasmon resonance-based assay for monitoring potential HAHA responses induced after passive administration of a humanized anti Lewis-Y antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolar, O H J; Stranner, S; Zinoecker, I; Mudde, G C; Himmler, G; Waxenecker, G; Nechansky, A

    2006-06-16

    A sensitive, surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based assay monitoring potential human-anti-human antibody (HAHA) reactions against the monoclonal antibody (mAb) IGN311 is presented. The latter is a fully humanized Lewis-Y carbohydrate specific mAb that is currently tested in a passive immune therapy approach in a clinical phase I trial. For the SPR experiments a BIACORE 3000 analyzer was used. The ligand IGN311 was covalently coupled to the carboxy-methylated dextran matrix of a CM5 research grade chip (BIACORE). In the course of a fully nested experimental design, a four parameter logistic equation was identified as appropriate calibration model ranging from 0.3 microg/mL (lower limit of quantitation, LLOQ) to 200 microg/mL (upper limit of quantitation, ULOQ) using an anti-idiotypic mAb ('HAHA mimic') as calibrator. The bias ranged from -2.4% to 5.5% and the intermediate precision expressed as 95% CI revealed values from 5.6% to 8.3%. Specificity was evaluated using six human serum matrices from healthy donors spiked with calibrator at the limit of quantitation (LOQ) with >80% of values being recovered with less than 25% relative error. The qualified assay was applied to monitor potentially induced HAHA reactivity in 11 patients from a clinical phase I trial with passively administered IGN311. Of the 11 patients, one high HAHA responder and several low responders were identified. Protein-G depletion experiments with human serum samples revealed that the observed response is predominantly caused by IgG binding to the ligand. The characteristics of these HAHA responses were all of the so-called 'Type I' which is defined by a peak response around day 15 that decreases from this point steadily suggesting that some kind of tolerance is established. Therefore, this type of HAHA response is regarded as non critical for the patient's safety.

  3. Plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibody response after influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Song; Sasaki, Sanae; Narvaez, Carlos F; Zhang, Caiqiu; Liu, Hui; Woo, Jennifer C; Kemble, George W; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Greenberg, Harry B

    2011-02-28

    Conventional measurement of antibody responses to vaccines largely relies on serum antibodies, which are primarily produced by bone marrow plasma cells and may not represent the entire vaccine-induced B cell repertoire, including important functional components such as those targeted to mucosal sites. After immunization or infection, activated B cells differentiate into plasmablasts in local lymphoid organs, then traffic through circulation to the target sites where they further develop into plasma cells. On day 7 after influenza vaccination, a burst of plasmablasts, highly enriched for vaccine-specific antibody secreting cells, appears in the peripheral blood. This provides a unique window to the overall B cell response to the vaccine, without interference of pre-existing cross-reactive serum antibody. In this study we isolated B cells from volunteers on day 7 after immunization with the inactivated influenza vaccine and cultured them ex vivo to collect plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies (PPAb). The PPAb contained secreted IgG and IgA, which was approximately 0.2ng per antibody secreting cell. Influenza-specific IgG and IgA binding activity was detected in PPAb at dilutions up to 10(5) by ELISA. The ratio of the titers of influenza-specific IgA to IgG by ELISA was 4-fold higher in PPAb than in day 28 post-vaccination sera, suggesting that vaccine-induced IgA is enriched in PPAb compared to sera. Functional activity was also detected in PPAb as determined by microneutralization and hemagglutination inhibition assays. In addition to bulk B cell cultures, we also cultured plasmablast subsets sorted by cell surface markers to generate PPAb. These results suggest that PPAb better reflects the mucosal IgA response than serum samples. Since PPAb are exclusively produced by recently activated B cells, it allows assessing vaccine-induced antibody response without interference from pre-existing cross-reactive serum antibodies and permits an assessment of antibody

  4. Antibody Production and Th1-biased Response Induced by an Epitope Vaccine Composed of Cholera Toxin B Unit and Helicobacter pylori Lpp20 Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Chen, Zhongbiao; Ye, Jianbin; Ning, Lijun; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Yin; Xi, Yue; Ning, Yunshan

    2016-06-01

    The epitope vaccine is an attractive potential for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Lpp20 is one of major protective antigens which trigger immune response after H. pylori invades host and has been considered as an excellent vaccine candidate for the control of H. pylori infection. In our previous study, one B-cell epitope and two CD4(+) T-cell epitopes of Lpp20 were identified. In this study, an epitope vaccine composed of mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and these three identified Lpp20 epitopes were constructed to investigate the efficacy of this epitope vaccine in mice. The epitope vaccine including CTB, one B-cell, and two CD4(+) T-cell epitopes of Lpp20 was constructed and named CTB-Lpp20, which was then expressed in Escherichia coli and used for intraperitoneal immunization in BALB/c mice. The immunogenicity, specificity, and ability to induce antibodies against Lpp20 and cytokine secretion were evaluated. After that, CTB-Lpp20 was intragastrically immunized to investigate the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy in infected mice. The results indicated that the epitope vaccine CTB-Lpp20 possessed good immunogenicity and immunoreactivity and could elicit specific high level of antibodies against Lpp20 and the cytokine of IFN-γ and IL-17. Additionally, CTB-Lpp20 significantly decreased H. pylori colonization in H. pylori challenging mice, and the protection was correlated with IgG, IgA, and sIgA antibody and Th1-type cytokines. This study will be better for understanding the protective immunity of epitope vaccine, and CTB-Lpp20 may be an alternative strategy for combating H. pylori invasion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Ovalbumin-coated pH-sensitive microneedle arrays effectively induce ovalbumin-specific antibody and T-cell responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Maaden, Koen; Varypataki, Eleni Maria; Romeijn, Stefan; Ossendorp, Ferry; Jiskoot, Wim; Bouwstra, Joke

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the applicability of antigen-coated pH-sensitive microneedle arrays for effective vaccination strategies. Therefore, a model antigen (ovalbumin) was coated onto pH-sensitive (pyridine-modified) microneedle arrays to test pH-triggered antigen release by applying the coated arrays onto ex vivo human skin, and by conducting a dermal immunization study in mice. The release of antigen into ex vivo human skin from the coated microneedles was determined by using radioactively labeled ovalbumin. To investigate the induction of antigen-specific IgG, and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses, BALB/c mice were immunized with antigen-coated pH-sensitive microneedles by the 'coat and poke' approach. These responses were compared to responses induced by the 'poke and patch' approach, and subcutaneous and intradermal vaccination with classic hypodermic needles. The pH-sensitive microneedle arrays were efficiently coated with ovalbumin (95% coating efficiency) and upon application of six microneedle arrays 4.27 of 7 μg ovalbumin was delivered into the skin, showing a release efficiency of 70%. In contrast, the 'poke and patch' approach led to a delivery of only 6.91 of 100 μg ovalbumin (7% delivery efficiency). Immunization by means of ovalbumin-coated microneedles resulted in robust CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses comparable to those obtained after subcutaneous or intradermal immunization with conventional needles. Moreover, it effectively induced IgG responses; however, it required prime-boost immunizations before antibodies were produced. In conclusion, antigen delivery into ex vivo human skin by antigen-coated pH-sensitive microneedle arrays is more efficient than the 'poke-and-patch' approach and in vivo vaccination studies show the applicability of pH-sensitive microneedles for the induction of both T cell and B cell responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Egg yolk IgY: protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, C; Bok, M; Chacana, P; Saif, L; Fernandez, F; Parreño, V

    2011-08-15

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. All calves in groups Gp 1, 2 and 3 received control colostrum (CC; BRV virus neutralization Ab titer - VN=65,536; ELISA BRV IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure. After gut closure, calves received milk supplemented with 6% BRV-immune egg yolk [(Gp 1) VN=2048; ELISA IgY Ab titer=4096] or non-immune control egg yolk [(Gp 2) VNcontrols (Gp 3 and 4, respectively). Calves were inoculated with 10(5.85)focus forming units (FFU) of virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Control calves (Gp 3 and 4) and calves fed control IgY (Gp 2) were infected and developed severe diarrhea. Around 80% calves in Gp 1 (IgY 4096) were infected, but they showed 80% (4/5) protection against BRV diarrhea. Bovine RV-specific IgY Ab were detected in the feces of calves in Gp 1, indicating that avian antibodies (Abs) remained intact after passage through the gastrointestinal tract. At post infection day 21, the duodenum was the major site of BRV specific antibody secreting cells (ASC) in all experimental groups. Mucosal ASC responses of all isotypes were significantly higher in the IgY treated groups, independently of the specificity of the treatment, indicating that egg yolk components modulated the immune response against BRV infection at the mucosal level. These results indicate that supplementing newborn calves' diets for the first 14 days of life with egg yolk enriched in BRV-specific IgY represents a promising strategy to prevent BRV diarrhea. Moreover a strong active ASC immune response is induced in the

  7. Multi-response model for rheumatoid arthritis based on delay differential equations in collagen-induced arthritic mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Gilbert; Wagner, Thomas; Plater-Zyberk, Christine; Lahu, Gezim; Schropp, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis, a human chronic inflammatory destructive disease. The therapeutic effect of neutralizing the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by an antibody was examined in the mouse disease in a view of deriving a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model. In CIA mice the development of disease is measured by a total arthritic score (TAS) and an ankylosis score (AKS). We present a multi-response PKPD model which describes the time course of the unperturbed and perturbed TAS and AKS. The antibody acts directly on GM-CSF by binding to it. Therefore, a compartment for the cytokine GM-CSF is an essential component of the mathematical model. This compartment drives the disease development in the PKPD model. Different known properties of arthritis development in the CIA model are included in the PKPD model. Firstly, the inflammation, driven by GM-CSF, dominates at the beginning of the disease and decreases after some time. Secondly, a destructive (ankylosis) part evolves in the TAS that is delayed in time. In order to model these two properties a delay differential equation was used. The PKPD model was applied to different experiments with doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg/kg. The influence of the drug was modeled by a non-linear approach. The final mathematical model consists of three differential equations representing the compartments for GM-CSF, inflammation and destruction. Our mathematical model described well all available dosing schedules by a simultaneous fit. We also present an equivalent and easy reformulation as ordinary differential equation which grants the use of standard PKPD software.

  8. Bacterium-like particles supplemented with inactivated influenza antigen induce cross-protective influenza-specific antibody responses through intranasal administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Aalzen; Haijema, Bert Jan; Voorn, Petra; Meijerhof, Tjarko; van Roosmalen, Maarten L.; Leenhouts, Kees

    2012-01-01

    Administration of influenza vaccines through the intranasal (IN) route forms an attractive alternative to conventional intramuscular (IM) injection. It is not only a better accepted form of vaccine administration but it also has the potential to induce, in addition to systemic antibodies, local

  9. Sperm Cells Induce Distinct Cytokine Response in Peripheral Mononuclear Cells from Infertile Women with Serum Anti-Sperm Antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kverka, Miloslav; Ulčová-Gallová, Z.; Bártová, J.; Cibulka, J.; Bibková, K.; Mičanová, Z.; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2012), e44172 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : IMMUNE-RESPONSES * GROWTH-FACTOR * ENDOMETRIOSIS Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  10. Antibody and B cell responses to Plasmodium sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna N Dups

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are capable of blocking infection of the liver by Plasmodium sporozoites. Accordingly the induction of anti-sporozoite antibodies is a major aim of various vaccine approaches to malaria. In recent years our knowledge of the specificity and quantities of antibodies required for protection has been greatly expanded by clinical trials of various whole sporozoite and subunit vaccines. Moreover, the development of humanized mouse models and transgenic parasites have also aided our ability to assess the specificity of antibodies and their ability to block infection. Nonetheless, considerable gaps remain in our knowledge - in particular in understanding what antigens are recognized by infection blocking antibodies and in knowing how we can induce robust, long-lived antibody responses. Maintaining high levels of circulating antibodies is likely to be of primary importance, as antibodies must block infection in the short time it takes for sporozoites to reach the liver from the skin. It is clear that a better understanding of the development of protective B cell-mediated immunity will aid the development and refinement of malaria vaccines.

  11. Motavizumab, A Neutralizing Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Rsv Monoclonal Antibody Significantly Modifies The Local And Systemic Cytokine Responses Induced By Rsv In The Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafri Hasan S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motavizumab (MEDI-524 is a monoclonal antibody with enhanced neutralizing activity against RSV. In mice, motavizumab suppressed RSV replication which resulted in significant reduction of clinical parameters of disease severity. We evaluated the effect of motavizumab on the local and systemic immune response induced by RSV in the mouse model. Balb/c mice were intranasally inoculated with 106.5 PFU RSV A2 or medium. Motavizumab was given once intraperitoneally (1.25 mg/mouse as prophylaxis, 24 h before virus inoculation. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and serum samples were obtained at days 1, 5 (acute and 28 (long-term post inoculation and analyzed with a multiplex assay (Beadlyte Upstate, NY for simultaneous quantitation of 18 cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, KC (similar to human IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, RANTES, IFN-γ and GM-CSF. Overall, cytokine concentrations were lower in serum than in BAL samples. By day 28, only KC was detected in BAL specimens at low concentrations in all groups. Administration of motavizumab significantly reduced (p

  12. An amino-terminal segment of hantavirus nucleocapsid protein presented on hepatitis B virus core particles induces a strong and highly cross-reactive antibody response in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geldmacher, Astrid; Skrastina, Dace; Petrovskis, Ivars; Borisova, Galina; Berriman, John A.; Roseman, Alan M.; Crowther, R. Anthony; Fischer, Jan; Musema, Shamil; Gelderblom, Hans R.; Lundkvist, Aake; Renhofa, Regina; Ose, Velta; Krueger, Detlev H.; Pumpens, Paul; Ulrich, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that hepatitis B virus (HBV) core particles tolerate the insertion of the amino-terminal 120 amino acids (aa) of the Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein. Here, we demonstrate that the insertion of 120 amino-terminal aa of N proteins from highly virulent Dobrava and Hantaan hantaviruses allows the formation of chimeric core particles. These particles expose the inserted foreign protein segments, at least in part, on their surface. Analysis by electron cryomicroscopy of chimeric particles harbouring the Puumala virus (PUUV) N segment revealed 90% T = 3 and 10% T = 4 shells. A map computed from T = 3 shells shows additional density splaying out from the tips of the spikes producing the effect of an extra shell of density at an outer radius compared with wild-type shells. The inserted Puumala virus N protein segment is flexibly linked to the core spikes and only partially icosahedrally ordered. Immunisation of mice of two different haplotypes (BALB/c and C57BL/6) with chimeric core particles induces a high-titered and highly cross-reactive N-specific antibody response in both mice strains

  13. Systemic antibody responses induced by a two-component Clostridium difficile toxoid vaccine protect against C. difficile-associated disease in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosova, Natalie G; Brown, Anna M; Li, Lu; Liu, Nana; Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Mehta, Hersh; Kleanthous, Harry

    2013-09-01

    measurements of pre-challenge sera showed that the median anti-toxin A and anti-toxin B IgG titres in the group of surviving animals were significantly higher than the median values in the group of animals that did not survive challenge. Assessment of the neutralizing activity of these sera revealed a statistically significant difference between the levels of both toxin A and toxin B neutralizing titres in protected versus unprotected animals as the median anti-toxin A and anti-toxin B neutralizing titres from surviving animals were higher than the median values from animals that succumbed to challenge. Statistically significant correlations between the toxin-specific binding titres and toxin neutralizing titres were seen for both toxin A and toxin B responses. The role of circulating anti-toxin antibodies in immunity against disease was evaluated by passive transfer of immune sera against C. difficile toxoids to naïve hamsters. Passively immunized animals were protected against morbidity and mortality associated with C. difficile challenge. Taken together, these results indicate the ability of i.m. immunization with inactivated toxins A and B to induce robust dose-dependent anti-toxin A and anti-toxin B IgG responses, the principal role of circulating anti-toxin antibody in immunity against disease and that antibody toxin binding and neutralization titres can serve as correlates of protection in the hamster challenge model of C. difficile.

  14. Contrasting antibody responses to intrasubtype superinfection with CRF02_AG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen R Courtney

    Full Text Available HIV superinfection describes the sequential infection of an individual with two or more unrelated HIV strains. Intersubtype superinfection has been shown to cause a broader and more potent heterologous neutralizing antibody response when compared to singly infected controls, yet the effects of intrasubtype superinfection remain controversial. Longitudinal samples were analyzed phylogenetically for pol and env regions using Next-Generation Sequencing and envelope cloning. The impact of CRF02_AG intrasubtype superinfection was assessed for heterologous neutralization and antibody binding responses. We compared two cases of CRF02_AG intrasubtype superinfection that revealed complete replacement of the initial virus by superinfecting CRF02_AG variants with signs of recombination. NYU6564, who became superinfected at an early time point, exhibited greater changes in antibody binding profiles and generated a more potent neutralizing antibody response post-superinfection compared to NYU6501. In contrast, superinfection occurred at a later time point in NYU6501 with strains harboring significantly longer V1V2 regions with no observable changes in neutralization patterns. Here we show that CRF02_AG intrasubtype superinfection can induce a cross-subtype neutralizing antibody response, and our data suggest timing and/or superinfecting viral envelope characteristics as contributing factors. These results highlight differential outcomes in intrasubtype superinfection and provide the first insight into cases with CRF02_AG, the fourth most prevalent HIV-1 strain worldwide.

  15. Porcine humoral immune responses to multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren

    2005-01-01

    In humans and cattle, multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies (m-mAbs) induce anti-mouse antibody responses. The objectives of the present. study were to investigate whether a similar response could be seen when pigs were subjected to m-mAb therapy, and to study the kinetics of such a...

  16. B cell and antibody responses in mice induced by a putative cell surface peptidase of Pneumocystis murina protect against experimental infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Sanbao; Cai, Yang; Ramsay, Alistair J; Welsh, David A; Norris, Karen; Shellito, Judd E

    2017-01-23

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected subjects, cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and solid organ transplant recipients. No vaccine is currently available. By chemical labeling coupled with proteomic approach, we have identified a putative surface protein (SPD1, Broad Institute gene accession number PNEG_01848) derived from single suspended P. murina cysts. SPD1 was expressed in an insect cell line and tested for vaccine development. Mice were immunized with SPD1 plus adjuvant MF-59 by subcutaneous injection. Three weeks after the last immunization, CD4+ cells were depleted with anti-CD4 antibody GK1.5. The mice were then challenged with 2×10 5 Pneumocystis organisms. Mice were sacrificed at 4 and 6weeks after PC challenge. Spleen/lung cells and serum were harvested. B cells and memory B cells were assessed via flow cytometry. Specific Pneumocystis IgG antibody was measured by ELISA before and after challenge. Infection burden was measured as real-time PCR for P. murina rRNA. Normal mice infected with Pneumocystis mounted a serum IgG antibody response to SPD1. Serum from rhesus macaques exposed to Pneumocystis showed a similar serum IgG response to purified SPD1. SPD1 immunization increased B cell and memory B cell absolute cell counts in CD4-depleted Balb/c mice post Pneumocystis challenge in spleen and lung. Immunization with SPD1 significantly increased specific Pneumocystis IgG antibody production before and after challenge. Mice immunized with SPD1 showed significantly decreased P. murina copy number compared with mice that did not receive SPD1 at 6weeks after challenge. Immunization with SPD1 provides protective efficacy against P. murina infection. SPD1 protection against Pneumocystis challenge is associated with enhanced memory B cell production and higher anti-Pneumocystis IgG antibody production. SPD1 is a potential vaccine candidate to prevent or treat pulmonary infection with Pneumocystis. Copyright

  17. A 12-Month-Interval Dosing Study in Adults Indicates That a Single Dose of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Induces a Robust Neutralizing Antibody Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Anna P; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Pierce, Kristen K; Carmolli, Marya P; Tibery, Cecilia M; Grier, Palmtama L; Hynes, Noreen; Opert, Kari; Jarvis, Adrienne P; Sabundayo, Beulah P; McElvany, Benjamin D; Sendra, Eli A; Larsson, Catherine J; Jo, Matthew; Lovchik, Janece M; Luke, Catherine J; Walsh, Mary C; Fraser, Ellen A; Subbarao, Kanta; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2016-09-15

    The ideal dengue vaccine will provide protection against all serotypes of dengue virus and will be economical and uncomplicated in its administration. To determine the ability of a single dose of the live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine TV003 to induce a suitable neutralizing antibody response, a placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in 48 healthy adults who received 2 doses of vaccine or placebo administered 12 months apart. Evaluation of safety, vaccine viremia, and neutralizing antibody response after each dose indicated that the first dose of vaccine was capable of preventing infection with the second dose, thus indicating that multiple doses are unnecessary. NCT01782300. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Immunization with Clinical HIV-1 Env Proteins Induces Broad Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies in a Rabbit Vaccination Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov

    2018-01-01

    The induction of both neutralizing antibodies and non-neutralizing antibodies with effector functions, for example, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is desired in the search for effective vaccines against HIV-1. In the pursuit of novel immunogens capable of inducing an efficient...... of inducing antibodies with ADCC activity did not necessarily induce neutralizing activity and vice versa. Nevertheless, we identified vaccine candidates that were able to concurrently induce both types of responses and that had ADCC activity that was cross-reactive between different subtypes. When searching...

  19. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    by ELISA, and to the presence of oral tolerance detected as a suppressed antibody and cell-proliferation response upon immunisation with soya protein. F0 mice generated soya-specific antibodies, while oral tolerance to the same soya proteins was also clearly induced. When F0 dams were transferred to soya...... antibody response in the offspring, bat in this case in the absence of oral tolerance. This indicates that, under certain conditions, factors involved in spontaneous antibody production can be transmitted from mother to offspring. Understanding the immune response to soya protein ingested under healthy...

  20. Radiosensitivity of antibody responses and radioresistant secondary tetanus antitoxin responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, R.; Terres, G.; Cottier, H.; Hess, M.

    1976-01-01

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were increasingly repressed in mice when gamma radiation doses of 100 to 400 rads were delivered by whole-body exposure prior to immunization with fluid tetanus toxoid (FTT). Nearly normal secondary antitoxin responses were obtained in mice exposed to 600 rads of gamma radiation 4 days after secondary antigenic stimulation with FTT. A rapid transition from radiosensitivity of the antibody-forming system on days 1 to 3 was followed by relative radioresistance on day 4 after the booster injection of toxoid. Studies on lymphoid cellular kinetics in popliteal lymph nodes after injection of 3 H--thymidine ( 3 H--TdR) and incorporation of 3 H--L-histidine into circulating antitoxin were carried out. Analysis of tritium radioactivity in antigen--antibody precipitates of serums 2 hr after injection of the labeled amino acid revealed maximum incorporation into antibody around day 7 after the booster in nonirradiated controls and about day 12, i.e., 8 days after irradiation, in experimental mice. The shift from radiosensitivity to relative radioresistance was attributed to a marked peak of plasma-cell proliferation in the medulla of lymph nodes on day 3. Many medullary plasma cells survived and continued to proliferate after exposure to radiation. Germinal centers were destroyed by radiation within 1 day. Since antibody formation continued after exposure to radiation and after the loss of germinal centers, this supports the view that germinal-center cells were involved more in the generation of memory cells than in antibody synthesis

  1. Immunization of chickens with an agonistic monoclonal anti-chicken CD40 antibody-hapten complex: rapid and robust IgG response induced by a single subcutaneous injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Hsin; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Waghela, Suryakant D; Chou, Wen-Ko; Farnell, Morgan B; Mwangi, Waithaka; Berghman, Luc R

    2012-04-30

    Producing diagnostic antibodies in chicken egg yolk represents an alternate animal system that offers many advantages including high productivity at low cost. Despite being an excellent counterpart to mammalian antibodies, chicken IgG from yolk still represents an underused resource. The potential of agonistic monoclonal anti-CD40 antibodies (mAb) as a powerful immunological adjuvant has been demonstrated in mammals, but not in chickens. We recently reported an agonistic anti-chicken CD40 mAb (designated mAb 2C5) and showed that it may have potential as an immunological adjuvant. In this study, we examined the efficacy of targeting a short peptide to chicken CD40 [expressed by the antigen-presenting cells (APCs)] in enhancing an effective IgG response in chickens. For this purpose, an immune complex consisting of one streptavidin molecule, two directionally biotinylated mAb 2C5 molecules, and two biotinylated peptide molecules was produced. Chickens were immunized subcutaneously with doses of this complex ranging from 10 to 90 μg per injection once, and relative quantification of the peptide-specific IgG response showed that the mAb 2C5-based complex was able to elicit a strong IgG response as early as four days post-immunization. This demonstrates that CD40-targeting antigen to chicken APCs can significantly enhance antibody responses and induce immunoglobulin isotype-switching. This immunization strategy holds promise for rapid production of hapten-specific IgG in chickens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An HIV-1 envelope immunogen with W427S mutation in CD4 binding site induced more T follicular helper memory cells and reduced non-specific antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Tong Yu

    Full Text Available The CD4 binding site (CD4BS of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env contains epitopes for broadly neutralizing antibody (nAb and is the target for the vaccine development. However, the CD4BS core including residues 425-430 overlaps the B cell superantigen site and may be related to B cell exhaustion in HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, production of nAb and high-affinity plasma cells needs germinal center reaction and the help of T follicular helper (Tfh cells. We believe that strengthening the ability of Env CD4BS in inducing Tfh response and decreasing the effects of the superantigen are the strategies for eliciting nAb and development of HIV-1 vaccine. We constructed a gp120 mutant W427S of an HIV-1 primary R5 strain and examined its ability in the elicitation of Ab and the production of Tfh by immunization of BALB/c mice. We found that the trimeric wild-type gp120 can induce more non-specific antibody-secreting plasma cells, higher serum IgG secretion, and more Tfh cells by splenocyte. The modified W427S gp120 elicits higher levels of specific binding antibodies as well as nAbs though it produces less Tfh cells. Furthermore, higher Tfh cell frequency does not correlate to the specific binding Abs or nAbs indicating that the wild-type gp120 induced some non-specific Tfh that did not contribute to the production of specific Abs. This gp120 mutant led to more memory Tfh production, especially, the effector memory Tfh cells. Taken together, W427S gp120 could induce higher level of specific binding and neutralizing Ab production that may be associated with the reduction of non-specific Tfh but strengthening of the memory Tfh.

  3. Prevalence and gene characteristics of antibodies with cofactor-induced HIV-1 specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecerf, Maxime; Scheel, Tobias; Pashov, Anastas D; Jarossay, Annaelle; Ohayon, Delphine; Planchais, Cyril; Mesnage, Stephane; Berek, Claudia; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D

    2015-02-20

    The healthy immune repertoire contains a fraction of antibodies that bind to various biologically relevant cofactors, including heme. Interaction of heme with some antibodies results in induction of new antigen binding specificities and acquisition of binding polyreactivity. In vivo, extracellular heme is released as a result of hemolysis or tissue damage; hence the post-translational acquisition of novel antigen specificities might play an important role in the diversification of the immunoglobulin repertoire and host defense. Here, we demonstrate that seronegative immune repertoires contain antibodies that gain reactivity to HIV-1 gp120 upon exposure to heme. Furthermore, a panel of human recombinant antibodies was cloned from different B cell subpopulations, and the prevalence of antibodies with cofactor-induced specificity for gp120 was determined. Our data reveal that upon exposure to heme, ∼24% of antibodies acquired binding specificity for divergent strains of HIV-1 gp120. Sequence analyses reveal that heme-sensitive antibodies do not differ in their repertoire of variable region genes and in most of the molecular features of their antigen-binding sites from antibodies that do not change their antigen binding specificity. However, antibodies with cofactor-induced gp120 specificity possess significantly lower numbers of somatic mutations in their variable region genes. This study contributes to the understanding of the significance of cofactor-binding antibodies in immunoglobulin repertoires and of the influence that the tissue microenvironment might have in shaping adaptive immune responses. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. A novel trivalent HPV 16/18/58 vaccine with anti-HPV 16 and 18 neutralizing antibody responses comparable to those induced by the Gardasil quadrivalent vaccine in rhesus macaque model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV is a key factor in the development of precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer. Prophylactic vaccines to immunize against HPV are an effective approach to reducing HPV related disease burden. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and dosage effect of a trivalent HPV 16/18/58 vaccine (3vHPV produced in Escherichia coli (E.coli, with Gardasil quadrivalent vaccine (4vHPV, Merck & Co. as a positive control. Sera collected from rhesus macaques vaccinated with three dosage formulations of 3vHPV (termed low-, mid-, and high-dosage formulations, respectively, and the 4vHPV vaccine were analyzed by both Pseudovirus-Based Neutralization Assay (PBNA and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Strong immune responses against HPV 16/18/58 were successfully elicited, and dosage-dependence was observed, with likely occurrence of immune interference between different L1-VLP antigens. HPV 16/18 specific neutralizing antibody (nAb and total immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody responses in rhesus macaques receiving 3vHPV at the three dosages tested were generally non-inferior to those observed in rhesus macaques receiving 4vHPV throughout the study period. Particularly, HPV 18 nAb titers induced by the mid-dosage formulation that contained the same amounts of HPV 16/18 L1-VLPs as Gardasil 4vHPV were between 7.3 to 12.7-fold higher compared to the positive control arm from weeks 24–64. The durability of antibody responses specific to HPV 16/18 elicited by 3vHPV vaccines was also shown to be non-inferior to that associated with Gardasil 4vHPV. Keywords: Human papillomavirus, HPV 16/18/58, GMTs, Trivalent, Immunogenicity

  5. MF59- and Al(OH)3-Adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph) Vaccines Induce Sustained Protective Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses, with a Critical Role for Effector CD4 T Cells at Low Antibody Titers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaci, Elisabetta; Mancini, Francesca; Lofano, Giuseppe; Bacconi, Marta; Tavarini, Simona; Sammicheli, Chiara; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Giraldi, Monica; Galletti, Bruno; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Grandi, Guido; de Gregorio, Ennio; Bensi, Giuliano; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nuti, Sandra; Bagnoli, Fabio; Soldaini, Elisabetta; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections, like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to the increasing antibiotic resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph) with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T-cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell-deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B-cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low-antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen. PMID:26441955

  6. MF59- and Al(OH3-adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph vaccines induce sustained protective humoral and cellular immune responses, with a critical role for effector CD4 T cells at low antibody titers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta eMonaci

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to increasing antibiotic-resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen.

  7. Biocompatible chitosan nanoparticles as an efficient delivery vehicle for Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipids to induce potent cytokines and antibody response through activation of γδ T cells in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ishani; Padhi, Avinash; Mukherjee, Sitabja; Dash, Debi P.; Kar, Santosh; Sonawane, Avinash

    2017-04-01

    The activation of cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is critical for protection against the pathogen and nanoparticle-mediated delivery of antigens is a more potent way to induce different immune responses. Herein, we show that mice immunized with Mtb lipid-bound chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) induce secretion of prominent type-1 T-helper (Th-1) and type-2 T-helper (Th-2) cytokines in lymph node and spleen cells, and also induces significantly higher levels of IgG, IgG1, IgG2 and IgM in comparison to control mice. Furthermore, significantly enhanced γδ-T-cell activation was observed in lymph node cells isolated from mice immunized with Mtb lipid-coated chitosan NPs as compared to mice immunized with chitosan NPs alone or Mtb lipid liposomes. In comparison to CD8+ cells, significantly higher numbers of CD4+ cells were present in both the lymph node and spleen cells isolated from mice immunized with Mtb lipid-coated chitosan NPs. In conclusion, this study represents a promising new strategy for the efficient delivery of Mtb lipids using chitosan NPs to trigger an enhanced cell-mediated and antibody response against Mtb lipids.

  8. Antibody response of sandhill and whooping cranes to an eastern equine encephalitis virus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G.G.; Dein, F.J.; Crabbs, C.L.; Carpenter, J.W.; Watts, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    As a possible strategy to protect whooping cranes (Grus americana) from fatal eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viral infection, studies were conducted to determine the immune response of this species and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) to a formalin-inactivated EEE viral vaccine. Viral-specific neutralizing antibody was elicited in both species after intramuscular (IM) vaccination. Subcutaneous and intravenous routes of vaccination failed to elicit detectable antibody in sandhill cranes. Among the IM vaccinated cranes, the immune response was characterized by nondetectable or low antibody titers that waned rapidly following primary exposure to the vaccine. However, one or more booster doses consistently elicited detectable antibody and/or increased antibody titers in the whooping cranes. In contrast, cranes with pre-existing EEE viral antibody, apparently induced by natural infection, exhibited a rapid increase and sustained high-antibody titers. Even though EEE virus vaccine induced neutralizing antibody and produced no adverse side effects, further studies will be required to determine the protective efficacy of the antibody.

  9. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Birk, Nina Marie; Smits, Gaby

    2017-01-01

    Introduction BCG vaccination has been associated with beneficial non-specific effects on child health. Some immunological studies have reported heterologous effects of vaccines on antibody responses to heterologous vaccines. Within a randomised clinical trial of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG......) vaccination at birth, The Danish Calmette Study, we investigated the effect of BCG at birth on the antibody response to the three routine vaccines against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 in a subgroup of participants. Methods Within 7 days after birth, children were randomised 1:1 to BCG vaccination...... included children (178 BCG; 122 controls), almost all children (>96%) had antibody responses above the protective levels. Overall BCG vaccination at birth did not affect the antibody level. When stratifying by ‘age at randomisation’ we found a possible inducing effect of BCG on antibodies against B...

  10. Antibody Responses to Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine in Health Care Personnel Previously Vaccinated and Vaccinated for The First Time

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan-Ying A. Huang; Shih-Cheng Chang; Yhu-Chering Huang; Cheng-Hsun Chiu; Tzou-Yien Lin

    2017-01-01

    Inactivated influenza vaccination induces a hemagglutinin-specific antibody response to the strain used for immunization. Annual vaccination is strongly recommended for health care personnel. However, it is debatable if repeated vaccination would affect the antibody response to inactivated influenza vaccine through the time. We enrolled health care personnel who had repeated and first trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in 2005?2008. Serological antibody responses were measured by hem...

  11. Antibody response to equine coronavirus in horses inoculated with a bovine coronavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Manabu; Kanno, Toru; Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kokado, Hiroshi

    2017-11-17

    A vaccine for equine coronavirus (ECoV) is so far unavailable. Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is antigenically related to ECoV; it is therefore possible that BCoV vaccine will induce antibodies against ECoV in horses. This study investigated antibody response to ECoV in horses inoculated with BCoV vaccine. Virus neutralization tests showed that antibody titers against ECoV increased in all six horses tested at 14 days post inoculation, although the antibody titers were lower against ECoV than against BCoV. This study showed that BCoV vaccine provides horses with antibodies against ECoV to some extent. It is unclear whether antibodies provided by BCoV vaccine are effective against ECoV, and therefore ECoV challenge studies are needed to evaluate efficacy of the vaccine in the future.

  12. Cocoa Diet and Antibody Immune Response in Preclinical Studies

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    Mariona Camps-Bossacoma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of cocoa to interact with the immune system in vitro and in vivo has been described. In the latter context, a cocoa-enriched diet in healthy rats was able to modify the immune system’s functionality. This fact could be observed in the composition and functionality of lymphoid tissues, such as the thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes. Consequently, immune effector mechanisms, such as antibody synthesis, were modified. A cocoa-enriched diet in young rats was able to attenuate the serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig G, IgM, and IgA and also the intestinal IgM and IgA secretion. Moreover, in immunized rats, the intake of cocoa decreased specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2c, and IgM concentrations in serum. This immune-regulator potential was then tested in disease models in which antibodies play a pathogenic role. A cocoa-enriched diet was able to partially prevent the synthesis of autoantibodies in a model of autoimmune arthritis in rats and was also able to protect against IgE and T helper 2-related antibody synthesis in two rat models of allergy. Likewise, a cocoa-enriched diet prevented an oral sensitization process in young rats. In this review, we will focus on the influence of cocoa on the acquired branch of the immune function. Therefore, we will focus on how a cocoa diet influences lymphocyte function both in the systemic and intestinal immune system. Likewise, its potential role in preventing some antibody-induced immune diseases is also included. Although further studies must characterize the particular cocoa components responsible for such effects and nutritional studies in humans need to be carried out, cocoa has potential as a nutraceutical agent in some hypersensitivity status.

  13. Assessment of the quality and quantity of naturally induced antibody responses to EBA175RIII-V in Ghanaian children living in two communities with varying malaria transmission patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abagna, Hamza B; Acquah, Festus K; Okonu, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent global reports on malaria suggest significant decrease in disease severity and an increase in control interventions in many malaria endemic countries, including Ghana. However, a major driving force sustaining malaria transmission in recent times is the asymptomatic carriage...... of malaria parasites, which can enhance immune responses against parasite antigens. This study determined the prevalence and relative avidities of naturally induced antibodies to EBA175RIII-VLl in asymptomatic children living in two communities with varying malaria transmission patterns. METHODS: An asexual...... with perennial and seasonal malaria transmission, respectively. Venous blood samples were collected in July and October 2015 and again in January 2016. The multiplicity of infection and the genetic diversity of EBA175RIII circulating in both sites were also assessed using polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS...

  14. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-02-16

    Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx.

  15. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. Methods: We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. Results: HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. Conclusions: We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx. PMID:26867163

  16. The Human Antibody Response to Dengue Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravinda M. de Silva

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are the causative agents of dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Here we review the current state of knowledge about the human antibody response to dengue and identify important knowledge gaps. A large body of work has demonstrated that antibodies can neutralize or enhance DENV infection. Investigators have mainly used mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs to study interactions between DENV and antibodies. These studies indicate that antibody neutralization of DENVs is a “multi-hit” phenomenon that requires the binding of multiple antibodies to neutralize a virion. The most potently neutralizing mouse MAbs bind to surface exposed epitopes on domain III of the dengue envelope (E protein. One challenge facing the dengue field now is to extend these studies with mouse MAbs to better understand the human antibody response. The human antibody response is complex as it involves a polyclonal response to primary and secondary infections with 4 different DENV serotypes. Here we review studies conducted with immune sera and MAbs isolated from people exposed to dengue infections. Most dengue-specific antibodies in human immune sera are weakly neutralizing and bind to multiple DENV serotypes. The human antibodies that potently and type specifically neutralize DENV represent a small fraction of the total DENV-specific antibody response. Moreover, these neutralizing antibodies appear to bind to novel epitopes including complex, quaternary epitopes that are only preserved on the intact virion. These studies establish that human and mouse antibodies recognize distinct epitopes on the dengue virion. The leading theory proposed to explain the increased risk of severe disease in secondary cases is antibody dependent enhancement (ADE, which postulates that weakly neutralizing antibodies from the first infection bind to the second serotype and enhance infection of FcγR bearing myeloid cells such as monocytes and macrophages. Here

  17. Protective immunity against mouse upper genital tract pathology correlates with high IFNγ but low IL-17 T cell and anti-secretion protein antibody responses induced by replicating chlamydial organisms in the airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunxue; Zeng, Hao; Li, Zhihong; Lei, Lei; Yeh, I-Tien; Wu, Yimou; Zhong, Guangming

    2011-01-01

    To search for optimal immunization conditions for inducing protective immunity against upper genital tract pathologies caused by chlamydial intravaginal infection, we compared protection efficacy in mice immunized intranasally or intramuscularly with live or inactivated C. muridarum organisms. Mice immunized intranasally with live organisms developed strong protection against both vaginal shedding of infectious organisms and upper genital tract pathologies. The protection correlated with a robust antigen-specific T cell response with high IFNγ but low IL-17. Although a significant level of IL-5 was also detected, these mice maintained an overall Th1-dorminant immunity following immunization and challenge infection. On the contrary, mice immunized intranasally with inactivated organisms or intramuscularly with live or inactivated organisms produced high levels of IL-17 and still developed significant upper genital tract pathologies. High titers of antibodies against chlamydial secretion antigens were detected only in mice immunized intranasally with live organisms but not mice in other groups, suggesting that the intranasally inoculated live organisms were able to undergo replication and immune responses to the chlamydial secretion proteins may contribute to protective immunity. These observations have provided important information on how to develop subunit vaccines for inducing protective immunity against urogenital infection with C. trachomatis organisms. PMID:22079265

  18. Protective immunity against mouse upper genital tract pathology correlates with high IFNγ but low IL-17 T cell and anti-secretion protein antibody responses induced by replicating chlamydial organisms in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunxue; Zeng, Hao; Li, Zhihong; Lei, Lei; Yeh, I-Tien; Wu, Yimou; Zhong, Guangming

    2012-01-05

    To search for optimal immunization conditions for inducing protective immunity against upper genital tract pathologies caused by chlamydial intravaginal infection, we compared protection efficacy in mice immunized intranasally or intramuscularly with live or inactivated Chlamydia muridarum organisms. Mice immunized intranasally with live organisms developed strong protection against both vaginal shedding of infectious organisms and upper genital tract pathologies. The protection correlated with a robust antigen-specific T cell response with high IFNγ but low IL-17. Although a significant level of IL-5 was also detected, these mice maintained an overall Th1-dorminant immunity following immunization and challenge infection. On the contrary, mice immunized intranasally with inactivated organisms or intramuscularly with live or inactivated organisms produced high levels of IL-17 and still developed significant upper genital tract pathologies. High titers of antibodies against chlamydial secretion antigens were detected only in mice immunized intranasally with live organisms but not mice in other groups, suggesting that the intranasally inoculated live organisms were able to undergo replication and immune responses to the chlamydial secretion proteins may contribute to protective immunity. These observations have provided important information on how to develop subunit vaccines for inducing protective immunity against urogenital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis organisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-idiotypic antibody-induced protection against Clostridium perfringens type D.

    OpenAIRE

    Percival, D A; Shuttleworth, A D; Williamson, E D; Kelly, D C

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (BALB/c mouse) with specificity for a neutralizing epitope on the epsilon-toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens type D was used to raise anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id) in different strains of mice and rabbits. These were purified and used in cross-immunization studies to induce anti-(anti-idiotype). All strains of mice and rabbits immunized with BALB/c-derived anti-Id showed a high-titer antibody response directed towards the active site of the toxin. This prote...

  20. Broadly protective influenza vaccines: Redirecting the antibody response through adjuvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and current vaccines have limited coverage, therefore it remains a high priority to develop broadly protective vaccines. With the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against influenza these vaccines

  1. Addition of αGal HyperAcute™ technology to recombinant avian influenza vaccines induces strong low-dose antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenlan Alex; Zhang, Jinjin; Hall, Katie M; Martin, Carol B; Kisselev, Serguei; Dasen, Emily J; Vahanian, Nicholas N; Link, Charles J; Martin, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza represents a severe public health threat. Over the last decade, the demand for highly efficacious vaccines against avian influenza viruses has grown, especially after the 2013 H7N9 outbreak in China that resulted in over 600 human cases with over 200 deaths. Currently, there are several H5N1 and H7N9 influenza vaccines in clinical trials, all of which employ traditional oil-in-water adjuvants due to the poor immunogenicity of avian influenza virus antigens. In this study, we developed potent recombinant avian influenza vaccine candidates using HyperAcute™ Technology, which takes advantage of naturally-acquired anti-αGal immunity in humans. We successfully generated αGal-positive recombinant protein and virus-like particle vaccine candidates of H5N1 and H7N9 influenza strains using either biological or our novel CarboLink chemical αGal modification techniques. Strikingly, two doses of 100 ng αGal-modified vaccine, with no traditional adjuvant, was able to induce a much stronger humoral response in αGT BALB/c knockout mice (the only experimental system readily available for testing αGal in vivo) than unmodified vaccines even at 10-fold higher dose (1000 ng/dose). Our data strongly suggest that αGal modification significantly enhances the humoral immunogenicity of the recombinant influenza vaccine candidates. Use of αGal HyperAcute™ technology allows significant dose-sparing while retaining desired immunogenicity. Our success in the development of highly potent H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine candidates demonstrated the potential of αGal HyperAcute™ technology for the development of vaccines against other infectious diseases.

  2. Addition of αGal HyperAcute™ technology to recombinant avian influenza vaccines induces strong low-dose antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlan Alex Chen

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza represents a severe public health threat. Over the last decade, the demand for highly efficacious vaccines against avian influenza viruses has grown, especially after the 2013 H7N9 outbreak in China that resulted in over 600 human cases with over 200 deaths. Currently, there are several H5N1 and H7N9 influenza vaccines in clinical trials, all of which employ traditional oil-in-water adjuvants due to the poor immunogenicity of avian influenza virus antigens. In this study, we developed potent recombinant avian influenza vaccine candidates using HyperAcute™ Technology, which takes advantage of naturally-acquired anti-αGal immunity in humans. We successfully generated αGal-positive recombinant protein and virus-like particle vaccine candidates of H5N1 and H7N9 influenza strains using either biological or our novel CarboLink chemical αGal modification techniques. Strikingly, two doses of 100 ng αGal-modified vaccine, with no traditional adjuvant, was able to induce a much stronger humoral response in αGT BALB/c knockout mice (the only experimental system readily available for testing αGal in vivo than unmodified vaccines even at 10-fold higher dose (1000 ng/dose. Our data strongly suggest that αGal modification significantly enhances the humoral immunogenicity of the recombinant influenza vaccine candidates. Use of αGal HyperAcute™ technology allows significant dose-sparing while retaining desired immunogenicity. Our success in the development of highly potent H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine candidates demonstrated the potential of αGal HyperAcute™ technology for the development of vaccines against other infectious diseases.

  3. Natural and cross-inducible anti-SIV antibodies in Mauritian cynomolgus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhao Li

    Full Text Available Cynomolgus macaques are an increasingly important nonhuman primate model for HIV vaccine research. SIV-free animals without pre-existing anti-SIV immune responses are generally needed to evaluate the effect of vaccine-induced immune responses against the vaccine epitopes. Here, in order to select such animals for vaccine studies, we screened 108 naïve female Mauritian cynomolgus macaques for natural (baseline antibodies to SIV antigens using a Bio-Plex multiplex system. The antigens included twelve 20mer peptides overlapping the twelve SIV protease cleavage sites (-10/+10, respectively (PCS peptides, and three non-PCS Gag or Env peptides. Natural antibodies to SIV antigens were detected in subsets of monkeys. The antibody reactivity to SIV was further confirmed by Western blot using purified recombinant SIV Gag and Env proteins. As expected, the immunization of monkeys with PCS antigens elicited anti-PCS antibodies. However, unexpectedly, antibodies to non-PCS peptides were also induced, as shown by both Bio-Plex and Western blot analyses, while the non-PCS peptides do not share sequence homology with PCS peptides. The presence of natural and vaccine cross-inducible SIV antibodies in Mauritian cynomolgus macaques should be considered in animal selection, experimental design and result interpretation, for their best use in HIV vaccine research.

  4. B cells and functional antibody responses to combat influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eLofano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination against influenza (Flu is the most effective way to protect the population. Current vaccines provide protection by stimulating functional B- and T-cell responses, however, they are poorly immunogenic in particular segments of the population and need to be reformulated almost every year due to the genetic instability of the virus. Next generation Flu vaccines should be designed to induce cross-reactivity, confer protection against pandemic outbreaks, and promote long-lasting immune responses among individuals at higher risk of infection. Multiple strategies are being developed for the induction of broad functional humoral immunity, including the use of adjuvants, heterologous prime-boost strategies, and epitope-based antigen design. The basic approach is to mimic natural responses to influenza virus infection by promoting cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies that directly prevent the infection. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms underlying humoral responses to influenza vaccination or natural infection, and discusses promising strategies to control influenza virus.

  5. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizao, E-mail: chenw3@mail.nih.gov [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Feng, Yang [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Wang, Yanping [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); The Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S. [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  6. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. ► We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. ► CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. ► CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  7. An adjuvanted, tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine candidate induces long-lasting and protective antibody responses against dengue challenge in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  8. Antibody-Induced Internalization of the Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemans, A; De Schryver, M; Van der Gucht, W; Heykers, A; Pintelon, I; Hotard, A L; Moore, M L; Melero, J A; McLellan, J S; Graham, B S; Broadbent, L; Power, U F; Caljon, G; Cos, P; Maes, L; Delputte, P

    2017-07-15

    able to protect infants from severe disease, if administered prophylactically. However, antibody responses established after natural RSV infections are poorly protective against reinfection, and high levels of antibodies do not always correlate with protection. Therefore, RSV might be capable of interfering, at least partially, with antibody-induced neutralization. In this study, a process through which surface-expressed RSV F proteins are internalized after interaction with RSV-specific antibodies is described. One the one hand, this antigen-antibody complex internalization could result in an antiviral effect, since it may interfere with virus particle formation and virus production. On the other hand, this mechanism may also reduce the efficacy of antibody-mediated effector mechanisms toward infected cells. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Salivary antibody levels in adolescents in response to a meningococcal serogroup C conjugate booster vaccination nine years after priming : systemically induced local immunity and saliva as potential surveillance tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, Susanne P; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834; Trzcinski, Krzysztof|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323349609; Sanders, Elisabeth A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126771960; Berbers, Guy A M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In several countries large-scale immunization of children and young adults with Meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) conjugate vaccines has induced long-standing herd protection. Salivary antibodies may play an important role in mucosal protection against meningococcal acquisition and

  10. Antibody responses against epitopes on the F protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus differ in infected or vaccinated cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, R.S.; Hensen, E.J.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Daus, F.; Middel, W.G.J.; Kramps, J.A.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1997-01-01

    The fusion protein F of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important target for humoral and cellular immune responses, and antibodies against the F protein have been associated with protection. However, the F protein can induce antibodies with different biological activity, possibly

  11. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L. DeFranco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1.

  12. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against radiation-induced protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, R.; Tanaka, A.; Watanabe, H.; Kitayama, S.

    1992-01-01

    We obtained the 6 monoclonal antibodies against gamma-induced proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans, and these antibodies were designated as Mab-3F, 4B, 4D, 4F, 4G and 12G. Using these antibodies, we investigated the relations between gamma-induced proteins and other stress protein in strain R1, and the induction of proteins were compared among strain R1, resistant mutant (rec1) and radiosensitive mutant (rec30). We found new 6 proteins recognized by these monoclonal antibodies which were induced after gamma-irradiation especially in strain R1 and rec 1, but not induced in strain rec30. We suppose that these proteins participate in repair of DNA damages including double strand breaks caused by gamma-irradiation. One of them was around 46kDa protein band recognized by Mab-12G, and this protein was so induced in a large quantity after irradiation that the protein could detect by gold staining. In addition to this observation, we found some proteins which were induced in R1 and rec 1 by gamma-irradiation and other stress, but not in strain rec30, such as 31kDa protein band recognized by Mab-3F, 4B and 4G, and other 11 proteins which were especially induced in irradiated strain R1. The latter proteins might be reinforcement factor to radioresistance such as GroE and DnaK, or participant in repair of damage by gamma-irradiation in strain R1. (author)

  13. Serum antibody response to human and bovine IRBP in uveitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, R.; Hwan, S. B.; Rothova, A.; van Haren, M. A.; Donoso, L. A.; Kijlstra, A.

    1990-01-01

    Interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) is a 136,000 molecular weight photoreceptor cell protein capable of inducing an experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) in susceptible animal strains. The occurrence of serum antibodies against human (Hu) or bovine (Bo) IRBP was investigated in

  14. Focusing antibody responses against distraction and loss in diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    Pathogens are complex and evolving fast. They have developed full ranges of disguises to divert immune responses and often manage to escape recognition and thereby outpace natural immunity. A prominent example is the scarce and staggered development of broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly mutable viruses. It remains unclear under what evolutionary conditions these exceptional antibodies could emerge and dominate the response. To address this challenge, we construct an individual-based stochastic model of the Darwinian evolution of antibody-producing immune cells. We consider complexity of viral epitopes, vary seeding diversity of the immune cell population, and allow a time varying population size and extinction - new aspects essential for designing a realistic vaccine. We show that various temporal statistics of antigenic environments would select distinct evolutionary paths that lead to predominantly non-neutralizing, strain-specific or broadly neutralizing antibody responses. We suggest strategies to focus antibody responses on the targeted vulnerability of the virus and confer selective advantage to cross-reactive lineages. This implies a new step toward an effective vaccine against rapidly mutating complex pathogens. This work is supported by NIH.

  15. Boosting antibody responses by targeting antigens to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminschi, Irina; Shortman, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Delivering antigens directly to dendritic cells (DCs) in situ, by injecting antigens coupled to antibodies specific for DC surface molecules, is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. Enhanced cytotoxic T cell responses are obtained if an adjuvant is co-administered to activate the DC. Such DC targeting is also effective at enhancing humoral immunity, via the generation of T follicular helper cells. Depending on the DC surface molecule targeted, antibody production can be enhanced even in the absence of adjuvants. In the case of Clec9A as the DC surface target, enhanced antibody production is a consequence of the DC-restricted expression of the target molecule. Few other cells absorb the antigen-antibody construct, therefore, it persists in the bloodstream, allowing sustained antigen presentation, even by non-activated DCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Severe antiphospholipid antibody syndrome - response to plasmapheresis and rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkogkolou, Paraskevi; Ehrchen, Jan; Goerge, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis, recurrent abortions and detection of antiphospholipid antibodies. In fulminant cases, involvement of multiple organs can lead to significant morbidity and even fatal outcomes, so that a rapid, interdisciplinary treatment is needed. Here, we describe the case of a 39-year-old woman with a severe hard-to-treat APS with arterial occlusion and progressive skin necrosis, who was successfully treated with a combination therapy with plasmapheresis and rituximab. The treatment led to complete remission of the skin lesions for over a year. Clinical response correlated with a long-lasting reduction of antiphospholipid antibodies and B-cell depletion. This case demonstrates the use of antiphospholipid antibodies for monitoring APS-activity and shows that this severe vascular disease requires rigorous therapeutic approaches.

  17. Antibody Response to Lyme Disease Spirochetes in the Context of VlsE-Mediated Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogovskyy, Artem S; Gillis, David C; Ionov, Yurij; Gerasimov, Ekaterina; Zelikovsky, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD), the most prevalent tick-borne illness in North America, is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi The long-term survival of B. burgdorferi spirochetes in the mammalian host is achieved though VlsE-mediated antigenic variation. It is mathematically predicted that a highly variable surface antigen prolongs bacterial infection sufficiently to exhaust the immune response directed toward invariant surface antigens. If the prediction is correct, it is expected that the antibody response to B. burgdorferi invariant antigens will become nonprotective as B. burgdorferi infection progresses. To test this assumption, changes in the protective efficacy of the immune response to B. burgdorferi surface antigens were monitored via a superinfection model over the course of 70 days. B. burgdorferi-infected mice were subjected to secondary challenge by heterologous B. burgdorferi at different time points postinfection (p.i.). When the infected mice were superinfected with a VlsE-deficient clone (ΔVlsE) at day 28 p.i., the active anti-B. burgdorferi immune response did not prevent ΔVlsE-induced spirochetemia. In contrast, most mice blocked culture-detectable spirochetemia induced by wild-type B. burgdorferi (WT), indicating that VlsE was likely the primary target of the antibody response. As the B. burgdorferi infection further progressed, however, reversed outcomes were observed. At day 70 p.i. the host immune response to non-VlsE antigens became sufficiently potent to clear spirochetemia induced by ΔVlsE and yet failed to prevent WT-induced spirochetemia. To test if any significant changes in the anti-B. burgdorferi antibody repertoire accounted for the observed outcomes, global profiles of antibody specificities were determined. However, comparison of mimotopes revealed no major difference between day 28 and day 70 antibody repertoires. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. An unexpected antibody response to an engineered influenza virus modifies CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul G; Brown, Scott A; Yue, Wen; So, Jenny; Webby, Richard J; Doherty, Peter C

    2006-02-21

    The ovalbumin(323-339) peptide that binds H2I-A(b) was engineered into the globular heads of hemagglutinin (H) molecules from serologically non-cross-reactive H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A viruses, the aim being to analyze recall CD4+ T cell responses in a virus-induced respiratory disease. Prime/challenge experiments with these H1ova and H3ova viruses in H2(b) mice gave the predicted, ovalbumin-specific CD4+ T cell response but showed an unexpectedly enhanced, early expansion of viral epitope-specific CD8+ T cells in spleen and a greatly diminished inflammatory process in the virus-infected respiratory tract. At the same time, the primary antibody response to the H3N2 challenge virus was significantly reduced, an effect that has been associated with preexisting neutralizing antibody in other experimental systems. Analysis of serum from the H1ova-primed mice showed low-level binding to H3ova but not to the wild-type H3N2 virus. Experiments with CD4+ T cell-depleted and Ig-/- mice indicated that this cross-reactive Ig is indeed responsible for the modified pathogenesis after respiratory challenge. Furthermore, the effect does not seem to be virus-dose related, although it does require infection. These findings suggest intriguing possibilities for vaccination and, at the same time, emphasize that engineered modifications in viruses may have unintended immunological consequences.

  19. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the histamine-2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (100 mg intravenously every 12 hours for 72 hours) on postoperative serum antibody responses to preoperative immunization with six limit of flocculation tetanus toxoid and six limit of flocculation diphtheria toxoid was assessed...... and antidiphtheria toxoid were drawn before skin incision and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28. Ranitidine significantly increased the postoperative antibody response to tetanus toxoid, (p less than 0.01) and insignificantly increased that to diphtheria toxoid vaccination (p less than 0...

  20. Recombinant influenza H7 hemagglutinins induce lower neutralizing antibody titers in mice than do seasonal hemagglutinins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchfield, Kristy; Kamal, Ram P; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Music, Nedzad; Wilson, Jason R; Stevens, James; Lipatov, Aleksander S; Katz, Jacqueline M; York, Ian A

    2014-11-01

    Vaccines against avian influenza viruses often require high hemagglutinin (HA) doses or adjuvants to achieve serological titers associated with protection against disease. In particular, viruses of the H7 subtype frequently do not induce strong antibody responses following immunization. To evaluate whether poor immunogenicity of H7 viruses is an intrinsic property of the H7 hemagglutinin. We compared the immunogenicity, in naïve mice, of purified recombinant HA from two H7 viruses [A/Netherlands/219/2003(H7N7) and A/New York/107/2003(H7N2)] to that of HA from human pandemic [A/California/07/2009(H1N1pdm09)] and seasonal [A/Perth16/2009(H3N2)] viruses. After two intramuscular injections with purified hemagglutinin, mice produced antibodies to all HAs, but the response to the human virus HAs was greater than to H7 HAs. The difference was relatively minor when measured by ELISA, greater when measured by hemagglutination inhibition assays, and more marked still by microneutralization assays. H7 HAs induced little or no neutralizing antibody response in mice at either dose tested. Antibodies induced by H7 were of significantly lower avidity than for H3 or H1N1pdm09. We conclude that H7 HAs may be intrinsically less immunogenic than HA from seasonal human influenza viruses. © 2014 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ontogeny of adaptive antibody response to a model antigen in captive altricial zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess L Killpack

    Full Text Available Based on studies from the poultry literature, all birds are hypothesized to require at least 4 weeks to develop circulating mature B-cell lineages that express functionally different immunoglobulin specificities. However, many altricial passerines fledge at adult size less than four weeks after the start of embryonic development, and therefore may experience a period of susceptibility during the nestling and post-fledging periods. We present the first study, to our knowledge, to detail the age-related changes in adaptive antibody response in an altricial passerine. Using repeated vaccinations with non-infectious keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH antigen, we studied the ontogeny of specific adaptive immune response in altricial zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata. Nestling zebra finches were first injected at 7 days (7d, 14 days (14d, or 21 days post-hatch (21d with KLH-adjuvant emulsions, and boosted 7 days later. Adults were vaccinated in the same manner. Induced KLH-specific IgY antibodies were measured using ELISA. Comparisons within age groups revealed no significant increase in KLH-specific antibody levels between vaccination and boost in 7d birds, yet significant increases between vaccination and boost were observed in 14d, 21d, and adult groups. There was no significant difference among age groups in KLH antibody response to priming vaccination, yet KLH antibody response post-boost significantly increased with age among groups. Post-boost antibody response in all nestling age groups was significantly lower than in adults, indicating that mature adult secondary antibody response level was not achieved in zebra finches prior to fledging (21 days post-hatch in zebra finches. Findings from this study contribute fundamental knowledge to the fields of developmental immunology and ecological immunology and strengthen the utility of zebra finches as a model organism for future studies of immune ontogeny.

  2. Humoral antibody response to glutaraldehyde-treated antigens of Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, A A; Molokwu, J U; Ezeh, A O

    1986-04-01

    Glutaraldehyde-treated whole cell antigens (GA.WcA) of Dermatophilus congolensis induced in guinea pigs immunological memory in contrast to cell wall antigens treated similarly (GA.CwA). However, GA.WcA could not induce a secondary response in animals primed with untreated WcA while GA.CwA on the other hand did stimulate a secondary response in animals primed with untreated CwA. Primary antibody production was induced by both GA.CwA and untreated CwA to a similar level in their respective hosts but it was the secondary response that was found similar in response to GA.WcA and untreated WcA. However, both untreated WcA and CwA induced primary and secondary antibody production in their respective hosts though these responses were considerably higher in guinea pigs given untreated CwA. This study showed that both untreated and GA-treated antigens of D. congolensis are capable of stimulating antibody production in guinea pigs but they differ in their levels of stimulation.

  3. Human antibody and antigen response to IncA antibody of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, P Y; Hsu, M C; Huang, C T; Li, S Y

    2007-01-01

    The high prevalence of C. trachomatis worldwide has underscored the importance of identifying specific immunogenic antigens in facilitating diagnosis as well as vaccine development. The aim of this study is to evaluate IncA antibody and antigen production in natural human infections. Our temporal expression study showed that IncA transcription and protein expression could be detected as early as 4 hours after the start of infection. Antibody responses could be detected in urine and genital swab samples from C. trachomatis-positive patients. It is especially interesting to note that the IncA antigen could be detected in urine. In conclusion, we have identified IncA as an important antigen in human. The potential applicability of the IncA antibody or antigen in the diagnosis as well as to vaccine development for C. trachomatis is also discussed.

  4. Maternal and infant antibody response to meningococcal vaccination in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade Carvalho, A; Giampaglia, C M; Kimura, H; de Pereira, O A; Farhat, C K; Neves, J C; Prandini, R; da Silva Carvalho, E; Zarvos, A M

    1977-10-15

    The antigenic capacity of a mixed vaccine prepared with polysaccharides of meningococcus groups A and C, the placental transfer of antibodies, and the persistence of positive titres in the infant were evaluated in 21 pregnant women and their offspring during an epidemic of meningitis in São Paulo, Brazil; and antibody response was assessed in 29 infants vaccinated at less than 6 months of age. Antibodies were detected by passive haemagglutination; the high titres found and the high frequency of positive results are thought to be due to the use of a more sensitive technique. Increased antibody titres were found in most women, and there was evidence for passive transfer to the newborn, especially with regard to antibody type C. However, passive transfer was irregular, and the presence of antibodies in the mother did not guarantee their presence in the child. Passive transfer lasted for only 2-5 months. Vaccination in children under 6 months of age had poor results; only 1 child seroconverted.

  5. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mimitopes for Characterization of CRF01_AE HIV-1 Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse V. Schoen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mapping humoral immune responses to HIV-1 over the course of natural infection is important in understanding epitope exposure in relation to elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, which is considered imperative for effective vaccine design. When analyzing HIV-specific immune responses, the antibody binding profiles may be a correlate for functional antibody activity. In this study, we utilized phage display technology to identify novel mimitopes that may represent Env epitope structures bound by bNAbs directed at V1V2 and V3 domains, CD4 binding site (CD4bs and the membrane proximal external region (MPER of Env. Mimitope sequence motifs were determined for each bNAb epitope. Given the ongoing vaccine development efforts in Thailand, these mimitopes that represent CD4bs and MPER epitopes were used to map immune responses of HIV-1 CRF01_AE-infected individuals with known neutralizing responses from two distinct time periods, 1996-98 and 2012-15. The more contemporary cohort showed an increase in binding breadth with binding observed for all MPER and CD4bs mimitopes, while the older cohort showed only 75% recognition of the CD4bs mimitopes and no MPER mimotope binding. Furthermore, mimitope binding profiles correlated significantly with magnitude (p=0.0036 and breadth (p=0.0358 of neutralization of a multi-subtype Tier 1 panel of pseudoviruses. These results highlight the utility of this mimitope mapping approach for detecting human plasma IgG-specificities that target known neutralizing antibody epitopes, and may also provide an indication of the plasticity of antibody binding within HIV-1 Env neutralization determinants.

  6. Radiation Induced Immune Response in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    dependent cell- mediated phagocytosis ( ADCP ). This research will allow us to characterize antigens and antibodies intended for clinical trials in patients...Moreover, TIP1 is inducible in nearly all mouse models of cancer resulting in opsonization and activation of ADCC and ADCP . Antibodies that we...antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis ( ADCP ). ScFv antibodies Overall Project Summary Subtask 1.1 Binding of antibodies to irradiated

  7. Evaluation of antibody response in mice against avian influenza A

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 39; Issue 3. Evaluation of antibody response in mice against avian influenza A (H5N1) strain neuraminidase expressed in yeast Pichia pastoris. Murugan Subathra Ponsekaran Santhakumar Mangamoori Lakshmi Narasu Syed Sultan Beevi Sunil K Lal. Articles Volume 39 ...

  8. Antibody response to routine measles vaccination among a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite a global decline in mortality and morbidity from measles in the last decade, outbreaks continue to occur in some parts of the world including Nigeria. Objective: To determine antibody response to routine measles vaccination in Nigerian children and evaluate vaccine potency. Methods: A prospective ...

  9. Antibody response to routine measles vaccination among a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-02-08

    Feb 8, 2013 ... Abstract Background: Despite a global decline in mortality and morbidity from measles in the last decade, outbreaks continue to occur in some parts of the world including Nigeria. Objective: To determine antibody response to routine measles vacci- nation in Nigerian children and evaluate vaccine potency.

  10. Systemic and Mucosal Antibody Responses to Soluble and Nanoparticle-Conjugated Antigens Administered Intranasally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E. Howe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are increasingly being used for drug delivery, as well as antigen carriers and immunostimulants for the purpose of developing vaccines. In this work, we examined how intranasal (i.n. priming followed by i.n. or subcutaneous (s.c. boosting immunization affects the humoral immune response to chicken ovalbumin (Ova and Ova conjugated to 20 nm NPs (NP-Ova. We show that i.n. priming with 20 mg of soluble Ova, a dose known to trigger oral tolerance when administered via gastric gavage, induced substantial systemic IgG1 and IgG2c, as well as mucosal antibodies. These responses were further boosted following a s.c. immunization with Ova and complete Freund’s adjuvant (Ova+CFA. In contrast, 100 µg of Ova delivered via NPs induced an IgG1-dominated systemic response, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. Following a secondary s.c. or i.n. immunization with Ova+CFA or NP-Ova, systemic IgG1 titers significantly increased, and serum IgG2c and intestinal antibodies were induced in mice primed nasally with NP-Ova. Only Ova- and NP-Ova-primed mice that were s.c.-boosted exhibited substantial systemic and mucosal titers for up to 6 months after priming, whereas the antibodies of i.n.-boosted mice declined over time. Our results indicate that although the amount of Ova delivered by NPs was 1000-fold less than Ova delivered in soluble form, the antigen-specific antibody responses, both systemic and mucosal, are essentially identical by 6 months following the initial priming immunization. Additionally, both i.n.- and s.c.-boosting strategies for NP-Ova-primed mice were capable of inducing a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal antibodies; however, it is only by using a heterogeneous prime-boost strategy that long-lasting antibody responses were initiated. These results provide valuable insight for future mucosal vaccine development, as well as furthering our understanding of mucosal antibody responses.

  11. Duration of antibody response following vaccination against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Mark E; Malik, Richard; Hall, Evelyn; Harris, Matthew; Hosie, Margaret J; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2017-10-01

    Objectives Recently, two point-of-care (PoC) feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibody test kits (Witness and Anigen Rapid) were reported as being able to differentiate FIV-vaccinated from FIV-infected cats at a single time point, irrespective of the gap between testing and last vaccination (0-7 years). The aim of the current study was to investigate systematically anti-FIV antibody production over time in response to the recommended primary FIV vaccination series. Methods First, residual plasma from the original study was tested using a laboratory-based ELISA to determine whether negative results with PoC testing were due to reduced as opposed to absent antibodies to gp40. Second, a prospective study was performed using immunologically naive client-owned kittens and cats given a primary FIV vaccination series using a commercially available inactivated whole cell/inactivated whole virus vaccine (Fel-O-Vax FIV, three subcutaneous injections at 4 week intervals) and tested systematically (up to 11 times) over 6 months, using four commercially available PoC FIV antibody kits (SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo [detects antibodies to p15/p24], Witness FeLV/FIV [gp40], Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV [p24/gp40] and VetScan FeLV/FIV Rapid [p24]). Results The laboratory-based ELISA showed cats from the original study vaccinated within the previous 0-15 months had detectable levels of antibodies to gp40, despite testing negative with two kits that use gp40 as a capture antigen (Witness and Anigen Rapid kits). The prospective study showed that antibody testing with SNAP Combo and VetScan Rapid was positive in all cats 2 weeks after the second primary FIV vaccination, and remained positive for the duration of the study (12/12 and 10/12 cats positive, respectively). Antibody testing with Witness and Anigen Rapid was also positive in a high proportion of cats 2 weeks after the second primary FIV vaccination (8/12 and 7/12, respectively), but antibody levels declined below the level of detection in

  12. Enhancement of anamnestic immunospecific antibody response in orally immunized chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayo, Susan; Carlsson, Hans-Erik; Zagon, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Production of immunospecific egg yolk antibodies (IgY antibodies) in egg laying hens through oral immunization is an attractive alternative to conventional antibody production in mammals for economic reasons as well as for animal welfare reasons. Oral immunization results in a systemic humoral...... response, but oral booster immunizations lack efficiency. The aim of the present study was to develop immunization schemes in which the concentration of immunospecific IgY would increase following oral booster immunizations. Two groups of egg laying hens (5 in each group) were immunized orally (each...... and one oral dose with BSA+RV. The eggs of the chickens in this group had a significantly higher immunospecific anti BSA IgY-concentration than did any of the eggs from the orally immunized chickens. One of the immunization regimes (immunizations in weeks 1, 7 and 18) clearly included a booster effect...

  13. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

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    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  14. High Affinity Antibodies against Influenza Characterize the Plasmablast Response in SLE Patients After Vaccination.

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    Kaval Kaur

    Full Text Available Breakdown of B cell tolerance is a cardinal feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Increased numbers of autoreactive mature naïve B cells have been described in SLE patients and autoantibodies have been shown to arise from autoreactive and non-autoreactive precursors. How these defects, in the regulation of B cell tolerance and selection, influence germinal center (GC reactions that are directed towards foreign antigens has yet to be investigated. Here, we examined the characteristics of post-GC foreign antigen-specific B cells from SLE patients and healthy controls by analyzing monoclonal antibodies generated from plasmablasts induced specifically by influenza vaccination. We report that many of the SLE patients had anti-influenza antibodies with higher binding affinity and neutralization capacity than those from controls. Although overall frequencies of autoreactivity in the influenza-specific plasmablasts were similar for SLE patients and controls, the variable gene repertoire of influenza-specific plasmablasts from SLE patients was altered, with increased usage of JH6 and long heavy chain CDR3 segments. We found that high affinity anti-influenza antibodies generally characterize the plasmablast responses of SLE patients with low levels of autoreactivity; however, certain exceptions were noted. The high-avidity antibody responses in SLE patients may also be correlated with cytokines that are abnormally expressed in lupus. These findings provide insights into the effects of dysregulated immunity on the quality of antibody responses following influenza vaccination and further our understanding of the underlying abnormalities of lupus.

  15. Human vaccination against Plasmodium vivax Duffy-binding protein induces strain-transcending antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Ruth O.; Silk, Sarah E.; Elias, Sean C.; Milne, Kathryn H.; Rawlinson, Thomas A.; Llewellyn, David; Shakri, A. Rushdi; Jin, Jing; Labb?, Genevi?ve M.; Edwards, Nick J.; Poulton, Ian D.; Roberts, Rachel; Farid, Ryan; J?rgensen, Thomas; Alanine, Daniel G.W.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax is the most widespread human malaria geographically; however, no effective vaccine exists. Red blood cell invasion by the P. vivax merozoite depends on an interaction between the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) and region II of the parasite's Duffy-binding protein (PvDBP_RII). Naturally acquired binding-inhibitory antibodies against this interaction associate with clinical immunity, but it is unknown whether these responses can be induced by human vac...

  16. Effect of maternal antibodies and pig age on the antibody response after vaccination against Glässers disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Rachubik, Jarosław; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2011-08-01

    The influence of age and maternal antibodies on the development and duration of postvaccinal antibody response against Glässer's disease were investigated. Pigs born to immune (MDA-positive) and non-immune (MDA-negative) sows were vaccinated with inactivated vaccine. Vaccination was done according to three different protocols: at 1 and 4, at 2 and 5 or at 4 and 7 weeks of age. There were also two control groups for MDA-negative and MDA-positive pigs. The level of Haemophilus parasuis (Hps) specific antibodies were determined using commercial ELISA test. No serological responses were seen in any of the groups after the first vaccination. Maternally derived antibodies (MDA) against Hps were above the positive level until approximately 3 weeks of life in MDA-positive pigs. In those pigs the strongest postvaccinal humoral response was observed in piglets vaccinated at 4 and 7 weeks of age. In the remaining MDA-positive piglets only slight seroconversion was noted but levels of antibodies never exceeded values considered as positive. All MDA-negative pigs produced Hps-specific antibodies after the second vaccination. The results of the present study indicated that MDA may alter the development and duration of active postvaccinal antibody response. Age of pigs at the moment of vaccination was not associated with the significant differences in the magnitude of antibody response, however influenced the kinetics of decline of Hps-specific antibodies.

  17. Antibody B cell responses in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouquet, Hugo

    2014-11-01

    In rare cases, B cells can supply HIV-1-infected individuals with unconventional antibodies equipped to neutralize the wide diversity of viral variants. Innovations in single-cell cloning, high-throughput sequencing, and structural biology methods have enabled the capture and thorough characterization of these exceptionally potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Here, I review the recent findings in humoral responses to HIV-1, focusing on the interplay between naturally occurring bNAbs and the virus both at systemic and mucosal levels. In this context, I discuss how an improved understanding of bNAb generation may provide invaluable insight into the fundamental mechanisms governing adaptive B cell responses to viruses, and how this knowledge is currently contributing to the development of vaccine and therapeutic strategies against HIV-1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunization of cows with novel core glycolipid vaccine induces anti-endotoxin antibodies in bovine colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Alan S; Karreman, Hubert J; Zhang, Lei; Rosenberg, Zeil; Opal, Steven M; Lees, Andrew

    2014-10-21

    Translocation of gut-derived Gram-negative bacterial (GNB) lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or endotoxin) is a source of systemic inflammation that exacerbates HIV, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal diseases and malnutrition. The oral administration of bovine colostrum (BC) reduces endotoxemia in patients with impaired gut barrier function. Consequently, BC enriched in antibodies to LPS may ameliorate endotoxemia-related morbidities. We developed a detoxified J5 LPS/group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (J5dLPS/OMP) vaccine that induces antibodies against a highly conserved core region of LPS and protects against heterologous GNB infection. We now examine the ability of this vaccine to elicit anti-core endotoxin antibodies in BC. Two cohorts of pregnant cows were immunized with this vaccine in combination with FICA (Cohort 1) or Emulsigen-D (Cohort 2) adjuvants. Antibody responses to the J5 core LPS antigen were measured in both serum and colostrum and compared to antibody levels elicited by a commercially available veterinary vaccine (J5 Bacterin) comprised of heat-killed Escherichia coli O111, J5 mutant bacteria, from which the J5 LPS was purified. The J5dLPS/OMP vaccine induced high titers of serum IgG antibody to J5 LPS in all seven cows. Both IgG and to a lesser extent IgA anti-J5 LPS antibodies were generated in the colostrum. The J5dLPS/OMP vaccine was significantly more immunogenic in mice than was the J5 Bacterin. BC enriched in anti-J5 LPS antibody reduced circulating endotoxin levels in neutropenic rats, a model of "leaky gut". The J5dLPS/OMP vaccine elicits high titers of serum anti-endotoxin antibodies in cows that is passed to the colostrum. This BC enriched in anti-core LPS antibodies has the potential to reduce endotoxemia and ameliorate endotoxin-related systemic inflammation in patients with impaired gut barrier function. Since this vaccine is significantly more immunogenic than the J5 Bacterin vaccine, this J5dLPS/OMP vaccine might prove to be

  19. Antibody response against gastrointestinal antigens in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banati, M; Csecsei, P; Koszegi, E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies against gastrointestinal antigens may indicate altered microbiota and immune responses in the gut. Recent experimental data suggest a connection between gastrointestinal immune responses and CNS autoimmunity. METHODS: Antibodies against gliadin, tissue transglutaminase (tTG...

  20. Correlation of pharmacodynamic activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses to anti-IL-21R antibody therapeutics following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaulding Vikki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-IL-21R antibodies are potential therapeutics for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This study evaluated correlations between the pharmacodynamic (PD activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses of human anti-IL-21R antibodies Ab-01 and Ab-02 following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys. Methods The PD assay was based on the ability of recombinant human IL-21 (rhuIL-21 to induce expression of the IL-2RA gene in cynomolgus monkey whole blood samples ex vivo. Monkeys screened for responsiveness to rhuIL-21 stimulation using the PD assay, were given a single 10 mg/kg IV dosage of Ab-01, Ab-02, or a control antibody (3/group, and blood samples were evaluated for PD activity (inhibition of IL-2RA expression for up to 148 days. Anti-IL-21R antibody concentrations and anti-product antibody responses were measured in serum using immunoassays and flow cytometry. Results Following IV administration of Ab-01 and Ab-02 to cynomolgus monkeys, PD activity was observed as early as 5 minutes (first time point sampled. This PD activity had good correlation with the serum concentrations and anti-product antibody responses throughout the study. The mean terminal half-life (t1/2 was ~10.6 and 2.3 days for Ab-01 and Ab-02, respectively. PD activity was lost at ~5-13 weeks for Ab-01 and at ~2 weeks for Ab-02, when serum concentrations were relatively low. The estimated minimum concentrations needed to maintain PD activity were ~4-6 nM for Ab-01 and ~2.5 nM for Ab-02, and were consistent with the respective KD values for binding to human IL-21R. For Ab-01, there was noticeable inter-animal variability in t1/2 values (~6-14 days and the resulting PD profiles, which correlated with the onset of anti-product antibody formation. While all three Ab-01-dosed animals were positive for anti-Ab-01 antibodies, only one monkey (with the shortest t1/2 and the earliest loss of PD activity had evidence of neutralizing anti-Ab-01

  1. Human antibody responses to Schistosoma mansoni: does antigen directed, isotype restriction result in the production of blocking antibodies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Dunne

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available After treatment young Kenyan schoolchildren are highly susceptible to reinfection with Schistosoma mansoni. Older children and adults are resistant to reinfection. There is no evidence that this age related resistance is due to a slow development of protective immunological mechanisms, rather, it appears that young children are susceptible because of the presence of blocking antibodies which decline with age, thus allowing the expression of protective responses. Correlations between antibody responses to different stages of the parasite life-cycle suggest that, in young children, antigen directed, isotype restriction of the response against cross-reactive polysaccharide egg antigens results in an ineffectual, or even blocking antibody response to the schistosomulum.

  2. Mapping the Human Memory B Cell and Serum Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Infection and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivarthi, Usha K; Kose, Nurgun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Widman, Douglas; Gallichotte, Emily; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Doranz, Benjamin J; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sette, Alessandro; Durbin, Anna P; Whitehead, Steve S; Baric, Ralph; Crowe, James E; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2017-03-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes are mosquito-borne flaviviruses responsible for dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to DENV develop antibodies (Abs) that strongly neutralize the serotype responsible for infection. Historically, infection with DENV serotype 4 (DENV4) has been less common and less studied than infections with the other three serotypes. However, DENV4 has been responsible for recent large and sustained epidemics in Asia and Latin America. The neutralizing antibody responses and the epitopes targeted against DENV4 have not been characterized in human infection. In this study, we mapped and characterized epitopes on DENV4 recognized by neutralizing antibodies in people previously exposed to DENV4 infections or to a live attenuated DENV4 vaccine. To study the fine specificity of DENV4 neutralizing human antibodies, B cells from two people exposed to DENV4 were immortalized and screened to identify DENV-specific clones. Two human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that neutralized DENV4 were isolated, and their epitopes were finely mapped using recombinant viruses and alanine scan mutation array techniques. Both antibodies bound to quaternary structure epitopes near the hinge region between envelope protein domain I (EDI) and EDII. In parallel, to characterize the serum neutralizing antibody responses, convalescence-phase serum samples from people previously exposed to primary DENV4 natural infections or a monovalent DENV4 vaccine were analyzed. Natural infection and vaccination also induced serum-neutralizing antibodies that targeted similar epitope domains at the EDI/II hinge region. These studies defined a target of neutralizing antigenic site on DENV4 targeted by human antibodies following natural infection or vaccination. IMPORTANCE The four serotypes of dengue virus are the causative agents of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to primary DENV infections develop long-term neutralizing antibody responses

  3. Clonal analysis of a human antimouse antibody (HAMA) response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, S J; Turner, C; Heath, A; Feavers, I; Vatn, I; Natvig, J B; Thompson, K M

    2003-01-01

    Circulating human antimouse antibodies (HAMAs) directed to mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) are clinically significant, compromising mouse antibody therapy and imaging, and interfering in immunological assays. To investigate the HAMA response, 20 stable cell lines secreting human monoclonal antibodies reactive with mouse IgG were established from a donor with a history of exposure to mice. Their subclass and domain specificities were established by solid-phase binding, indirect haemagglutination assays and immunoblotting, using Igs of known subclass and Ig fragments. The heavy-chain variable region gene usage was determined for 12 HAMAs. Eight HAMAs were IgM, 11 HAMAs were IgG4 and one HAMA was IgG1, indicating an IgG4-dominated response. All of the IgG HAMAs reacted with epitopes present on the Fc portion; one was subclass-specific, nine were subclass-restricted and two were pan-IgG-reactive. Measurement of their affinities gave dissociation constants typically in the nanomolar range. Seven and five HAMAs were derived from variable heavy-chain 3 (VH3) and VH1 gene segments, respectively. The IgG HAMAs used different VH segments to the IgM HAMAs. JH regions were coded by JH4 in eight HAMAs. DH segment usage appeared to be restricted in the IgM HAMAs. Two IgG HAMAs were clonally related. These monoclonal HAMAs are potentially useful as reagents for detecting mouse IgG and as reference reagents for the investigation of the HAMA response in patients undergoing mouse monoclonal antibody therapy and for the investigation of the influence of HAMAs on immunodiagnostic tests.

  4. A large population-based association study between HLA and KIR genotypes and measles vaccine antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Schaid, Daniel J; Larrabee, Beth R; Haralambieva, Iana H; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Human antibody response to measles vaccine is highly variable in the population. Host genes contribute to inter-individual antibody response variation. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are recognized to interact with HLA molecules and possibly influence humoral immune response to viral antigens. To expand on and improve our previous work with HLA genes, and to explore the genetic contribution of KIR genes to the inter-individual variability in measles vaccine-induced antibody responses, we performed a large population-based study in 2,506 healthy immunized subjects (ages 11 to 41 years) to identify HLA and KIR associations with measles vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. After correcting for the large number of statistical tests of allele effects on measles-specific neutralizing antibody titers, no statistically significant associations were found for either HLA or KIR loci. However, suggestive associations worthy of follow-up in other cohorts include B*57:01, DQB1*06:02, and DRB1*15:05 alleles. Specifically, the B*57:01 allele (1,040 mIU/mL; p = 0.0002) was suggestive of an association with lower measles antibody titer. In contrast, the DQB1*06:02 (1,349 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) and DRB1*15:05 (2,547 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) alleles were suggestive of an association with higher measles antibodies. Notably, the associations with KIR genotypes were strongly nonsignificant, suggesting that KIR loci in terms of copy number and haplotypes are not likely to play a major role in antibody response to measles vaccination. These findings refine our knowledge of the role of HLA and KIR alleles in measles vaccine-induced immunity.

  5. The antibody response against human and chimeric anti-TNF therapeutic antibodies primarily targets the TNF binding region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, K. A.; Hart, M. H.; de Groot, E. R.; Kruithof, S.; Aarden, L. A.; Wolbink, G. J.; Rispens, T.

    2015-01-01

    In a subset of patients, anti tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapeutic antibodies are immunogenic, resulting in the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). Neutralising ADAs compete with TNF for its binding site and reduces the effective serum concentration, causing clinical non-response. It is

  6. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    Interactions between host and pathogen, as in the case of fish pathogenic viruses, represent interesting models for analyses of the relationships between structure and function of the teleost immune system. Two salmonid rhabdoviruses, IHNV and VHSV, have received special attention due......, have demonstrated that rainbow trout can produce specific and highly functional antibodies that are able to neutralise virus pathogenicity in vitro as well as in vivo. The apparently more restricted antibody response to IHNV and VHSV antigens in fish compared to mammals could possibly be explained...... by different kinds of epitopes being differently immunogenic in fish and in mammals. Also, it may be assumed that the requirements for the assay-antigens in terms of antigenicity, may differ for mammals and fish. The present text includes an initial presentation of the pathogens, followed by basic and applied...

  7. Both Neutralizing and Non-Neutralizing Human H7N9 Influenza Vaccine-Induced Monoclonal Antibodies Confer Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry Dunand, Carole J; Leon, Paul E; Huang, Min; Choi, Angela; Chromikova, Veronika; Ho, Irvin Y; Tan, Gene S; Cruz, John; Hirsh, Ariana; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Ennis, Francis A; Terajima, Masanori; Treanor, John J; Topham, David J; Subbarao, Kanta; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian; Wilson, Patrick C

    2016-06-08

    Pathogenic H7N9 avian influenza viruses continue to represent a public health concern, and several candidate vaccines are currently being developed. It is vital to assess if protective antibodies are induced following vaccination and to characterize the diversity of epitopes targeted. Here we characterized the binding and functional properties of twelve H7-reactive human antibodies induced by a candidate A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) vaccine. Both neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies protected mice in vivo during passive transfer challenge experiments. Mapping the H7 hemagglutinin antigenic sites by generating escape mutant variants against the neutralizing antibodies identified unique epitopes on the head and stalk domains. Further, the broadly cross-reactive non-neutralizing antibodies generated in this study were protective through Fc-mediated effector cell recruitment. These findings reveal important properties of vaccine-induced antibodies and provide a better understanding of the human monoclonal antibody response to influenza in the context of vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HIV-1 vaccine-induced C1 and V2 Env-specific antibodies synergize for increased antiviral activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M Anthony; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S Munir; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kozink, Daniel M; Armand, Lawrence C; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L; O'Connell, Robert J; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Montefiori, David C; Tomaras, Georgia D; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Ferrari, Guido

    2014-07-01

    The RV144 ALVAC/AIDSVax HIV-1 vaccine clinical trial showed an estimated vaccine efficacy of 31.2%. Viral genetic analysis identified a vaccine-induced site of immune pressure in the HIV-1 envelope (Env) variable region 2 (V2) focused on residue 169, which is included in the epitope recognized by vaccinee-derived V2 monoclonal antibodies. The ALVAC/AIDSVax vaccine induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against the Env V2 and constant 1 (C1) regions. In the presence of low IgA Env antibody levels, plasma levels of ADCC activity correlated with lower risk of infection. In this study, we demonstrate that C1 and V2 monoclonal antibodies isolated from RV144 vaccinees synergized for neutralization, infectious virus capture, and ADCC. Importantly, synergy increased the HIV-1 ADCC activity of V2 monoclonal antibody CH58 at concentrations similar to that observed in plasma of RV144 vaccinees. These findings raise the hypothesis that synergy among vaccine-induced antibodies with different epitope specificities contributes to HIV-1 antiviral antibody responses and is important to induce for reduction in the risk of HIV-1 transmission. Importance: The Thai RV144 ALVAC/AIDSVax prime-boost vaccine efficacy trial represents the only example of HIV-1 vaccine efficacy in humans to date. Studies aimed at identifying immune correlates involved in the modest vaccine-mediated protection identified HIV-1 envelope (Env) variable region 2-binding antibodies as inversely correlated with infection risk, and genetic analysis identified a site of immune pressure within the region recognized by these antibodies. Despite this evidence, the antiviral mechanisms by which variable region 2-specific antibodies may have contributed to lower rates of infection remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that vaccine-induced HIV-1 envelope variable region 2 and constant region 1 antibodies synergize for recognition of virus-infected cells, infectious virion capture, virus

  9. Novel Epstein-Barr virus-like particles incorporating gH/gL-EBNA1 or gB-LMP2 induce high neutralizing antibody titers and EBV-specific T-cell responses in immunized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Elizabeth M; Foley, Joslyn; Tison, Timelia; Silva, Rute; Ogembo, Javier Gordon

    2017-03-21

    Previous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) prophylactic vaccines based on the major surface glycoprotein gp350/220 as an immunogen have failed to block viral infection in humans, suggesting a need to target other viral envelope glycoproteins. In this study, we reasoned that incorporating gH/gL or gB, critical glycoproteins for viral fusion and entry, on the surface of a virus-like particle (VLP) would be more immunogenic than gp350/220 for generating effective neutralizing antibodies to prevent viral infection of both epithelial and B cell lines. To boost the humoral response and trigger cell-mediated immunity, EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) and latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2), intracellular latency proteins expressed in all EBV-infected cells, were also included as critical components of the polyvalent EBV VLP. gH/gL-EBNA1 and gB-LMP2 VLPs were efficiently produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells, an FDA-approved vehicle for mass-production of biologics. Immunization with gH/gL-EBNA1 and gB-LMP2 VLPs without adjuvant generated both high neutralizing antibody titers in vitro and EBV-specific T-cell responses in BALB/c mice. These data demonstrate that will be invaluable not only in preventing EBV infection, but importantly, in preventing and treating the 200,000 cases of EBV-associated cancers that occur globally every year.

  10. Immunomodulatory activity of andrographolide on macrophage activation and specific antibody response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Dong, Sheng-fu; Liu, Chun-hong; Italiani, Paola; Sun, Shu-hui; Xu, Jing; Boraschi, Diana; Ma, Shi-ping; Qu, Di

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the immunomodulatory effects of andrographolide on both innate and adaptive immune responses. Methods: Andrographolide (10 μg/mL in vitro or 1 mg/kg in vivo) was used to modulate LPS-induced classical activated (M1) or IL-4-induced alternative activated (M2) macrophages in vitro and humor immune response to HBsAg in vivo. Cytokine gene expression profile (M1 vs M2) was measured by real-time PCR, IL-12/IL-10 level was detected by ELISA, and surface antigen expression was evaluated by flow cytometry, whereas phosphorylation level of ERK 1/2 and AKT was determined by Western blot. The level of anti-HBs antibodies in HBsAg immunized mice was detected by ELISA, and the number of HBsAg specific IL-4-producing splenocyte was enumerated by ELISPOT. Results: Andrographolide treatment in vitro attenuated either LPS or IL-4 induced macrophage activation, inhibited both M1 and M2 cytokines expression and decreased IL-12/IL-10 ratio (the ratio of M1/M2 polarization). Andrographolide down-regulated the expression of mannose receptor (CD206) in IL-4 induced macrophages and major histocompability complex/costimulatory molecules (MHC I, CD40, CD80, CD86) in LPS-induced macrophages. Correspondingly, anti-HBs antibody production and the number of IL-4-producing splenocytes were reduced by in vivo administration of andrographolide. Reduced phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and AKT were observed in macrophages treated with andrographolide. Conclusion: Andrographolide can modulate the innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating macrophage phenotypic polarization and Ag-specific antibody production. MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways may participate in the mechanisms of andrographolide regulating macrophage activation and polarization. PMID:20139902

  11. Mixed adjuvant formulations reveal a new combination that elicit antibody response comparable to Freund's adjuvants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel P J Lai

    Full Text Available Adjuvant formulations capable of inducing high titer and high affinity antibody responses would provide a major advance in the development of vaccines to viral infections such as HIV-1. Although oil-in-water emulsions, such as Freund's adjuvant (FCA/FIA, are known to be potent, their toxicity and reactogenicity make them unacceptable for human use. Here, we explored different adjuvants and compared their ability to elicit antibody responses to FCA/FIA. Recombinant soluble trimeric HIV-1 gp140 antigen was formulated in different adjuvants, including FCA/FIA, Carbopol-971P, Carbopol-974P and the licensed adjuvant MF59, or combinations of MF59 and Carbopol. The antigen-adjuvant formulation was administered in a prime-boost regimen into rabbits, and elicitation of antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs was evaluated. When used individually, only FCA/FIA elicited significantly higher titer of nAbs than the control group (gp140 in PBS (p<0.05. Sequential prime-boost immunizations with different adjuvants did not offer improvements over the use of FCA/FIA or MF59. Remarkably however, the concurrent use of the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 induced potent adjuvant activity with significantly higher titer nAbs than FCA/FIA (p<0.05. This combination was not associated with any obvious local or systemic adverse effects. Antibody competition indicated that the majority of the neutralizing activities were directed to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs. Increased antibody titers to the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER and gp120 V3 were detected when the more potent adjuvants were used. These data reveal that the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 is unusually potent for eliciting nAbs to a variety of HIV-1 nAb epitopes.

  12. Formulation of a killed whole cell pneumococcus vaccine - effect of aluminum adjuvants on the antibody and IL-17 response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenesch, Harm; Dunham, Anisa; Hansen, Bethany; Anderson, Kathleen; Maisonneuve, Jean-Francois; Hem, Stanley L

    2011-07-29

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes widespread morbidity and mortality. Current vaccines contain free polysaccharides or protein-polysaccharide conjugates, and do not induce protection against serotypes that are not included in the vaccines. An affordable and broadly protective vaccine is very desirable. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal formulation of a killed whole cell pneumococcal vaccine with aluminum-containing adjuvants for intramuscular injection. Four aluminium-containing adjuvants were prepared with different levels of surface phosphate groups resulting in different adsorptive capacities and affinities for the vaccine antigens. Mice were immunized three times and the antigen-specific antibody titers and IL-17 responses in blood were analyzed. Although all adjuvants induced significantly higher antibody titers than antigen without adjuvant, the vaccine containing aluminum phosphate adjuvant (AP) produced the highest antibody response when low doses of antigen were used. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant (AH) induced an equal or better antibody response at high doses compared with AP. Vaccines formulated with AH, but not with AP, induced an IL-17 response. The vaccine formulated with AH was stable and retained full immunogenicity when stored at 4°C for 4 months. Antibodies are important for protection against systemic streptococcal disease and IL-17 is critical in the prevention of nasopharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae in the mouse model. The formulation of the whole killed bacterial cells with AH resulted in a stable vaccine that induced both antibodies and an IL-17 response. These experiments underscore the importance of formulation studies with aluminium containing adjuvants for the development of stable and effective vaccines.

  13. Assessment of pulmonary antibodies with induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage induced by nasal vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a clinical phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freihorst Joachim

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a desirable albeit challenging strategy for prevention of airway infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We assessed the immunogenicity of a nasal vaccine based on the outer membrane proteins F and I from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lower airways in a phase I/II clinical trial. Methods N = 12 healthy volunteers received 2 nasal vaccinations with an OprF-OprI gel as a primary and a systemic (n = 6 or a nasal booster vaccination (n = 6. Antibodies were assessed in induced sputum (IS, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, and in serum. Results OprF-OprI-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were found in both BAL and IS at comparable rates, but differed in the predominant isotype. IgA antibodies in IS did not correlate to the respective serum levels. Pulmonary antibodies were detectable in all vaccinees even 1 year after the vaccination. The systemic booster group had higher IgG levels in serum. However, the nasal booster group had the better long-term response with bronchial antibodies of both isotypes. Conclusion The nasal OprF-OprI-vaccine induces a lasting antibody response at both, systemic and airway mucosal site. IS is a feasible method to non-invasively assess bronchial antibodies. A further optimization of the vaccination schedule is warranted.

  14. Dissecting the hemagglutinin head and stalk-specific IgG antibody response in healthcare workers following pandemic H1N1 vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tete, Sarah M; Krammer, Florian; Lartey, Sarah; Bredholt, Geir; Wood, John; Skrede, Steinar; Cox, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, neutralising antibodies that are directed to the major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) head domain are measured as surrogate correlates of protection against influenza. In addition to neutralization, hemagglutinin-specific antibodies may provide protection by mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). During the 2009 pandemic, vaccination induced HA-specific antibodies that were mostly directed to the conserved HA stalk domain. However, the protective role of these antibodies has not been investigated in detail. We quantified the HA head and stalk-specific antibodies, their avidity, ability to neutralise virus and activate natural killer cells in an ADCC assay. We analyzed sera obtained from 14 healthcare workers who had low hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titres at 3 months after pandemic H1N1 vaccination as well as from 22 controls. Vaccination resulted in a HA stalk dominant antibody response in both low responders and controls. Revaccination of low responders, 5 months later, resulted in a boost in antibodies, with HA head-specific antibodies dominating the response. Comparative analysis of head and stalk antibody avidities revealed that stalk-specific antibodies were qualitatively superior. Furthermore, stalk-specific antibodies mediated virus neutralization and had significantly higher ADCC activity than head-specific antibodies. Despite the head and stalk-specific antibodies being lower in low responders, they had comparable antibody avidity, ADCC functionality and neutralising capacity to those of controls who had high HI titres post-vaccination. Thus, our study has demonstrated that HA stalk-specific antibodies may have an important role in protection through neutralization and ADCC in low responders who do not maintain seroprotective HI antibodies.

  15. Serum and intestinal isotype antibody responses to Wa human rotavirus in gnotobiotic pigs are modulated by maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreño, V; Hodgins, D C; de Arriba, L; Kang, S Y; Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Tô, T L; Saif, L J

    1999-06-01

    The effects of passive antibodies on protection and active immune responses to human rotavirus were studied in gnotobiotic pigs. Pigs were injected at birth with saline or sow serum of high (immunized) or low (control) antibody titre and subsets of pigs were fed colostrum and milk from immunized or control sows. Pigs were inoculated at 3-5 days of age and challenged at 21 days post-inoculation (p.i.) with virulent Wa human rotavirus. Pigs receiving immune serum with or without immune colostrum/milk were partially protected against diarrhoea and virus shedding after inoculation, but had significantly lower IgA antibody titres in serum and small intestinal contents at 21 days p.i. and lower protection rates after challenge compared with pigs given control or no maternal antibodies. IgG antibody titres were consistently higher in small than in large intestinal contents. Pigs given control serum with control colostrum/milk had lower rates of virus shedding after inoculation than those given control serum alone. In summary, high titres of circulating maternal antibodies with or without local (milk) antibodies provided passive protection after inoculation but suppressed active mucosal antibody responses. These findings may have implications for the use of live, oral rotavirus vaccines in breast-fed infants.

  16. Genomic copy number variants: evidence for association with antibody response to anthrax vaccine adsorbed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Falola

    Full Text Available Anthrax and its etiologic agent remain a biological threat. Anthrax vaccine is highly effective, but vaccine-induced IgG antibody responses vary widely following required doses of vaccinations. Such variation can be related to genetic factors, especially genomic copy number variants (CNVs that are known to be enriched among genes with immunologic function. We have tested this hypothesis in two study populations from a clinical trial of anthrax vaccination.We performed CNV-based genome-wide association analyses separately on 794 European Americans and 200 African-Americans. Antibodies to protective antigen were measured at week 8 (early response and week 30 (peak response using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We used DNA microarray data (Affymetrix 6.0 and two CNV detection algorithms, hidden markov model (PennCNV and circular binary segmentation (GeneSpring to determine CNVs in all individuals. Multivariable regression analyses were used to identify CNV-specific associations after adjusting for relevant non-genetic covariates.Within the 22 autosomal chromosomes, 2,943 non-overlapping CNV regions were detected by both algorithms. Genomic insertions containing HLA-DRB5, DRB1 and DQA1/DRA genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region (chromosome 6p21.3 were moderately associated with elevated early antibody response (β = 0.14, p = 1.78×10(-3 among European Americans, and the strongest association was observed between peak antibody response and a segmental insertion on chromosome 1, containing NBPF4, NBPF5, STXMP3, CLCC1, and GPSM2 genes (β = 1.66, p = 6.06×10(-5. For African-Americans, segmental deletions spanning PRR20, PCDH17 and PCH68 genes on chromosome 13 were associated with elevated early antibody production (β = 0.18, p = 4.47×10(-5. Population-specific findings aside, one genomic insertion on chromosome 17 (containing NSF, ARL17 and LRRC37A genes was associated with elevated peak antibody

  17. Characterization of epitope-specific anti-RSV antibody responses after natural infection and after vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widjaja, Ivy; Wicht, Oliver; Luytjes, Willem; Leenhouts, Kees; Rottier, Peter J M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Haijema, Bert Jan; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against the fusion (F) protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) play an important role in the protective immune response against this important respiratory virus. Little is known, however, about antibody levels against multiple F-specific epitopes induced by infection or after

  18. HIV-1 Cross-Reactive Primary Virus Neutralizing Antibody Response Elicited by Immunization in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimeng; O'Dell, Sijy; Turner, Hannah L; Chiang, Chi-I; Lei, Lin; Guenaga, Javier; Wilson, Richard; Martinez-Murillo, Paola; Doria-Rose, Nicole; Ward, Andrew B; Mascola, John R; Wyatt, Richard T; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Li, Yuxing

    2017-11-01

    of individuals. To achieve this goal, an improved understanding of vaccine-elicited responses, including at the monoclonal Ab level, is essential. Here, we isolated and characterized a panel of vaccine-elicited cross-reactive neutralizing MAbs targeting the Env V3 loop that moderately neutralized several primary viruses and recapitulated the serum neutralizing antibody response. Striking similarities between the cross-reactive V3 NAbs elicited by vaccination in macaques and natural infections in humans illustrate commonalities between the vaccine- and infection-induced responses to V3 and support the feasibility of exploring the V3 epitope as a HIV-1 vaccine target in nonhuman primates. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Drug-induced hepatitis superimposed on the presence of anti-SLA antibody: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etxagibel Aitziber

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autoimmune hepatitis is a necroinflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of circulating antibodies, hypergammaglobulinemia, and response to immunosuppression. It has the histological features of chronic hepatitis. The onset is usually insidious, but in some patients the presentation may be acute and occasionally severe. Certain drugs can induce chronic hepatitis mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Different autoantibodies have been associated with this process but they are not detectable after drug withdrawal and clinical resolution. Case presentation We describe a case of drug-induced acute hepatitis associated with antinuclear, antisoluble liver-pancreas and anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies in a 66-year-old woman. Abnormal clinical and biochemical parameters resolved after drug withdrawal, but six months later anti-soluble liver-pancreas antibodies remained positive and liver biopsy showed chronic hepatitis and septal fibrosis. Furthermore, our patient has a HLA genotype associated with autoimmune hepatitis. Conclusion Patient follow-up will disclose whether our patient suffers from an autoimmune disease and if the presence of anti-soluble liver antigens could precede the development of an autoimmune hepatitis, as the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies can precede primary biliary cirrhosis.

  20. LOCAL ANTIBODY AND CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES TO INFLUENZA INFECTION AND VACCINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Petukhova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Local immune responses of mucous membranes of an organism are the first and most significant barriers preventing many virus infections, including influenza. The barrier against influenza infection is the mucosalassociated lymphoid tissue of the upper airways. It is considered, that nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT in rodents is an equivalent of lymphoid tissue in human Waldeyer’s ring. Present work is the first attempt to analyze and compare the development of cellular and antibody immune responses in NALT in a mouse model of experimental influenza infection using a pathogenic influenza A (H1N1 virus and an attenuated reassorted (2/6 genetic formula live influenza A (H1N1 vaccine.It was shown, that the vaccine strain inherits the ability to induce high-grade local antibody responses like as the virulent parental strain. However, the vaccine strain is inferior to virulent parental strain in capacity to stimulate production of circulating antibodies. Both parental and Р 2/6 strains are equally able to induce lymphoproliferative immune response in NALT lymphocytes. The attenuated reassortant virus is able to stimulate proliferation of Th (CD4+, B-cells (CD19+ and CTL (CD8+ in NALT. As shown by the cytokine activity testing (IFN-γ, IL-6, the attenuated reassortant virus activates both Th1- and Th2-lymphocytes in NALT.This data suggest that intranasal immunization with live attenuated reassortant viruses (genetic formula 2/6 results into active and balanced stimulation of both Th1-and Th2-immune responses at the primary site of infection (NALT.

  1. Specific antibodies induce apoptosis in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Presas, Ana María; Tato, Patricia; Becker, Ingeborg; Solano, Sandra; Copitin, Natalia; Kopitin, Natalia; Berzunza, Miriam; Willms, Kaethe; Hernández, Joselin; Molinari, José Luis

    2010-05-01

    The susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes to lysis by normal or immune sera in a complement-dependent reaction has been reported. Mouse immune sera depleted complement-induced damage in epimastigotes characterized by morphological changes and death. The purpose of this work was to study the mechanism of death in epimastigotes exposed to decomplemented mouse immune serum. Epimastigotes were maintained in RPMI medium. Immune sera were prepared in mice by immunization with whole crude epimastigote extracts. Viable epimastigotes were incubated with decomplemented normal or immune sera at 37 degrees C. By electron microscopy, agglutinated parasites showed characteristic patterns of membrane fusion between two or more parasites; this fusion also produced interdigitation of the subpellicular microtubules. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and annexin V assays. Nuclear features were examined by 4'-,6-diamidino-2'-phenylindole diHCI cytochemistry that demonstrated apoptotic nuclear condensation. Caspase activity was also measured. TUNEL results showed that parasites incubated with decomplemented immune sera took up 26% of specific fluorescence as compared to 1.3% in parasites incubated with decomplemented normal sera. The Annexin-V-Fluos staining kit revealed that epimastigotes incubated with decomplemented immune sera exposed phosphatidylserine on the external leaflet of the plasma membrane. The incubation of parasites with immune sera showed caspase 3 activity. We conclude that specific antibodies are able to induce agglutination and apoptosis in epimastigotes, although the pathway is not elucidated.

  2. MERS-CoV Antibody Responses 1 Year after Symptom Onset, South Korea, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Perera, R A P M; Park, Wan Beom; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Bang, Ji Hwan; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Ko, Long Wei Ronald; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Nam-Joong; Lau, Eric H Y; Poon, Leo L M; Peiris, Malik; Oh, Myoung-Don

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the kinetics of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) neutralizing and spike protein antibody titers over the course of 1 year in 11 patients who were confirmed by reverse transcription PCR to have been infected during the outbreak in South Korea in 2015. Robust antibody responses were detected in all survivors who had severe disease; responses remained detectable, albeit with some waning, for <1 year. The duration of viral RNA detection (but not viral load) in sputum significantly correlated with the antibody response magnitude. The MERS S1 ELISA antibody titers correlated well with the neutralizing antibody response. Antibody titers in 4 of 6 patients who had mild illness were undetectable even though most had evidence of pneumonia. This finding implies that MERS-CoV seroepidemiologic studies markedly underestimate the extent of mild and asymptomatic infection. Obtaining convalescent-phase plasma with high antibody titers to treat MERS will be challenging.

  3. Antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental human malaria infection or vaccination show limited relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen M; Okitsu, Shinji; Porter, David W; Duncan, Christopher; Amacker, Mario; Pluschke, Gerd; Cavanagh, David R; Hill, Adrian V S; Todryk, Stephen M

    2015-05-01

    This study examined specific antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental malaria infection or malaria vaccination, in malaria-naive human volunteers within phase I/IIa vaccine trials, with a view to investigating inter-relationships between these types of response. Malaria infection was via five bites of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes, with individuals reaching patent infection by 11-12 days, having harboured four or five blood-stage cycles before drug clearance. Infection elicited a robust antibody response against merozoite surface protein-119 , correlating with parasite load. Classical class switching was seen from an early IgM to an IgG1-dominant response of increasing affinity. Malaria-specific T-cell responses were detected in the form of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4) ELIspot, but their magnitude did not correlate with the magnitude of antibody or its avidity, or with parasite load. Different individuals who were immunized with a virosome vaccine comprising influenza antigens combined with P. falciparum antigens, demonstrated pre-existing interferon-γ, IL-2 and IL-5 ELIspot responses against the influenza antigens, and showed boosting of anti-influenza T-cell responses only for IL-5. The large IgG1-dominated anti-parasite responses showed limited correlation with T-cell responses for magnitude or avidity, both parameters being only negatively correlated for IL-5 secretion versus anti-apical membrane antigen-1 antibody titres. Overall, these findings suggest that cognate T-cell responses across a range of magnitudes contribute towards driving potentially effective antibody responses in infection-induced and vaccine-induced immunity against malaria, and their existence during immunization is beneficial, but magnitudes are mostly not inter-related. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies induce microvascular cardiac endothelial proinflammatory phenotype in rheumatic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delunardo, F; Scalzi, V; Capozzi, A; Camerini, S; Misasi, R; Pierdominici, M; Pendolino, M; Crescenzi, M; Sorice, M; Valesini, G; Ortona, E; Alessandri, C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is characterized by the presence of anti-streptococcal group A antibodies and anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA). Molecular mimicry between streptococcal antigens and self proteins is a hallmark of the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever. We aimed to identify, in RHD patients, autoantibodies specific to endothelial autoantigens cross-reactive with streptococcal proteins and to evaluate their role in inducing endothelial damage. We used an immunoproteomic approach with endothelial cell-surface membrane proteins in order to identify autoantigens recognized by AECA of 140 RHD patients. Cross-reactivity of purified antibodies with streptococcal proteins was analysed. Homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies were found through comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal antigens with human antigens. To investigate interleukin (IL)-1R-associated kinase (IRAK1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, we performed a Western blot analysis of whole extracts proteins from unstimulated or stimulated human microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (HMVEC-C). Adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors were studied by multiplex bead based immunoassay kits. We observed anti-vimentin antibodies in sera from 49% RHD AECA-positive patients. Cross-reactivity of purified anti-vimentin antibodies with heat shock protein (HSP)70 and streptopain streptococcal proteins was shown. Comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal HSP70 and streptopain with human vimentin, we found two homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies. These antibodies were able to stimulate HMVEC-C inducing IRAK and NF-κB activation, adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. In conclusion, streptococcal–vimentin cross-reactive antibodies were able to activate microvascular cardiac endothelium by amplifying the inflammatory

  5. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    in detail so far. Analysis of the specificity of anti-virus trout antibodies has been complicated by a generally insufficient ability of the antibodies to bind the viral proteins in assays such as immunoblotting. However, other assays, specifically designed for detection of fish anti IHNV/VHSV antibodies...

  6. Antibody responses to allergen Lol pIV are suppressed following adoptive transfer of B lymphocytes from the internal image anti-idiotypic antibody-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-10-01

    An internal image anti-idiotypic antibody, designated B1/1, was generated against an idiotope (Id91) of the monoclonal antibody (mAb91) specific for Lol pIV. The administration of B1/1 in PBS, at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms/mouse, to syngeneic Balb/c mice resulted in the suppression of the formation of anti-Lol pIV antibodies that possessed the Id91. Spleen cells obtained from the mice 2 weeks after the treatment with B1/1 (25 micrograms/mouse) were adoptively transferred intravenously into the syngeneic recipients which were challenged intraperitoneally with Lol pIV in alum 2 hr after the transfer. The recipients were boosted with Lol pIV 14 days later. It was demonstrated that the transfer of splenic B cells (but not of T cells) from B1/1-treated donors induced a significant suppression of not only the level of IgE and IgG antibodies to Lol pIV, but also the level of antibodies possessing the Id91. Treatment of the B cells with mAb91 plus complement abrogated their ability to transfer the suppression. This study indicates that the treatment with the anti-Id B1/1 generated B cells that were characterized, serologically, as possessing the anti-Id-like antibodies on their surface and were responsible for transferring the suppression of the formation of antibodies to allergen Lol pIV and the expression of Id91.

  7. Regulation of Polysaccharide- and Protein- Specific Antibody Responses to Intact Extracellular Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    1 | P a g e “Regulation of polysaccharide- and protein- specific antibody responses to intact extracellular bacteria ” By Swagata Kar...the thesis manuscript entitled: “Regulation of polysaccharide- and protein- specific antibody responses to intact extracellular bacteria ” Is...polysaccharide- and protein- specific antibody responses to intact extracellular bacteria ” Author: Swagata Kar, Ph.D., 2016. Uniformed Services University

  8. Pichia pastoris-Expressed Bivalent Virus-Like Particulate Vaccine Induces Domain III-Focused Bivalent Neutralizing Antibodies without Antibody-Dependent Enhancement in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Shukla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue, a significant public health problem in several countries around the world, is caused by four different serotypes of mosquito-borne dengue viruses (DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4. Antibodies to any one DENV serotype which can protect against homotypic re-infection, do not offer heterotypic cross-protection. In fact, cross-reactive antibodies may augment heterotypic DENV infection through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE. A recently launched live attenuated vaccine (LAV for dengue, which consists of a mixture of four chimeric yellow-fever/dengue vaccine viruses, may be linked to the induction of disease-enhancing antibodies. This is likely related to viral interference among the replicating viral strains, resulting in an unbalanced immune response, as well as to the fact that the LAV encodes prM, a DENV protein documented to elicit ADE-mediating antibodies. This makes it imperative to explore the feasibility of alternate ADE risk-free vaccine candidates. Our quest for a non-replicating vaccine centered on the DENV envelope (E protein which mediates virus entry into the host cell and serves as an important target of the immune response. Serotype-specific neutralizing epitopes and the host receptor recognition function map to E domain III (EDIII. Recently, we found that Pichia pastoris-expressed DENV E protein, of all four serotypes, self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs in the absence of prM. Significantly, these VLPs displayed EDIII and elicited EDIII-focused DENV-neutralizing antibodies in mice. We now report the creation and characterization of a novel non-replicating recombinant particulate vaccine candidate, produced by co-expressing the E proteins of DENV-1 and DENV-2 in P. pastoris. The two E proteins co-assembled into bivalent mosaic VLPs (mVLPs designated as mE1E2bv VLPs. The mVLP, which preserved the serotype-specific antigenic integrity of its two component proteins, elicited predominantly EDIII-focused homotypic virus

  9. Ability of vaccine strain induced antibodies to neutralize field isolates of caliciviruses from Swedish cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensman, Jonas Johansson; Samman, Ayman; Lindhe, Anna; Thibault, Jean-Christophe; Berndtsson, Louise Treiberg; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-12-12

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a common cause of upper respiratory tract disease in cats worldwide. Its characteristically high mutation rate leads to escape from the humoral immune response induced by natural infection and/or vaccination and consequently vaccines are not always effective against field isolates. Thus, there is a need to continuously investigate the ability of FCV vaccine strain-induced antibodies to neutralize field isolates. Seventy-eight field isolates of FCV isolated during the years 2008-2012 from Swedish cats displaying clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease were examined in this study. The field isolates were tested for cross-neutralization using a panel of eight anti-sera raised in four pairs of cats following infection with four vaccine strains (F9, 255, G1 and 431). The anti-sera raised against F9 and 255 neutralised 20.5 and 11.5 %, and 47.4 and 64.1 % of field isolates tested, respectively. The anti-sera against the more recently introduced vaccine strains G1 and 431 neutralized 33.3 and 55.1 % (strain G1) or 69.2 and 89.7 % (strain 431) of the field isolates with titres ≥5. [corrected]. Dual vaccine strains displayed a higher cross-neutralization. This study confirms previous observations that more recently introduced vaccine strains induce antibodies with a higher neutralizing capacity compared to vaccine strains that have been used extensively over a long period of time. This study also suggests that dual FCV vaccine strains might neutralize more field isolates compared to single vaccine strains. Vaccine strains should ideally be selected based on updated knowledge on the antigenic properties of field isolates in the local setting, and there is thus a need for continuously studying the evolution of FCV together with the neutralizing capacity of vaccine strain induced antibodies against field isolates at a national and/or regional level.

  10. Vault nanocapsules as adjuvants favor cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immune responses following immunization of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra K Kar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modifications of adjuvants that induce cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immunity is desired for development of vaccines. Nanocapsules have been found to be viable adjuvants and are amenable to engineering for desired immune responses. We previously showed that natural nanocapsules called vaults can be genetically engineered to elicit Th1 immunity and protection from a mucosal bacterial infection. The purpose of our study was to characterize immunity produced in response to OVA within vault nanoparticles and compare it to another nanocarrier. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized immunity resulting from immunization with the model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA encased in vault nanocapsules and liposomes. We measured OVA responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ memory T cell responses, cytokine production and antibody titers in vitro and in vivo. We found that immunization with OVA contain in vaults induced a greater number of anti-OVA CD8(+ memory T cells and production of IFNγ plus CD4(+ memory T cells. Also, modification of the vault body could change the immune response compared to OVA encased in liposomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments show that vault nanocapsules induced strong anti-OVA CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell memory responses and modest antibody production, which markedly differed from the immune response induced by liposomes. We also found that the vault nanocapsule could be modified to change antibody isotypes in vivo. Thus it is possible to create a vault nanocapsule vaccine that can result in the unique combination of immunogen-responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell immunity coupled with an IgG1 response for future development of vault nanocapsule-based vaccines against antigens for human pathogens and cancer.

  11. Dual antibody therapy to harness the innate anti-tumor immune response to enhance antibody targeting of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Cariad; Marabelle, Aurelien; Houot, Roch; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field that offers a novel paradigm for cancer treatment: therapies focus on enhancing the immune system's innate and adaptive anti-tumor response. Early immunotherapeutics have achieved impressive clinical outcomes and monoclonal antibodies are now integral to therapeutic strategies in a variety of cancers. However, only recently have antibodies targeting innate immune cells entered clinical development. Innate immune effector cells play important roles in generating and maintaining antitumor immunity. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) are important innate immune mechanisms for tumor eradication. These cytolytic processes are initiated by the detection of a tumor-targeting antibody and can be augmented by activating co-stimulatory pathways or blocking inhibitory signals on innate immune cells. The combination of FDA-approved monoclonal antibodies with innate effector-targeting antibodies has demonstrated potent preclinical therapeutic synergy and early-phase combinatorial clinical trials are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Wildtype p53-specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses in Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune

    2011-01-01

    Mutation in the p53 gene based on single amino acid substitutions is a frequent event in human cancer. Accumulated mutant p53 protein is released to antigen presenting cells of the immune system and anti-p53 immune responses even against wt p53 is induced and observed in a number of human cancer...... patients. Detection of antibodies against wt p53 protein has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker and discovery of new T-cell epitopes has enabled design of cancer vaccination protocols with promising results. Here, we identified wt p53-specific antibodies in various cancer patients......(264-272) in breast cancer patients and against HLA-A*01:01 binding peptide wt p53(226-234) and HLA-B*07:02 binding peptide wt p53(74-82) in renal cell cancer and breast cancer patients, respectively. Finally, we analyzed antibody and T-cell responses against wt p53 15-mer peptides in patients with metastatic renal...

  13. Oral antibiotics enhance antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin in orally but not muscularly immunized chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kazuki; Okumura, Shouta; Kobayashi, Misato; Horio, Fumihiko

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the crucial role of gut microbiota in triggering and modulating immune response. We aimed to determine whether the modification of gut microbiota by oral co-administration of two antibiotics, ampicillin and neomycin, would lead to changes in the antibody response to antigens in chickens. Neonatal chickens were given or not given ampicillin and neomycin (0.25 and 0.5 g/L, respectively) in drinking water. At 2 weeks of age, the chicks were muscularly or orally immunized with antigenic keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), and then serum anti-KLH antibody levels were examined by ELISA. In orally immunized chicks, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced antibody responses (IgM, IgA, IgY) by 2-3-fold compared with the antibiotics-free control, while the antibiotics did not enhance antibody responses in the muscularly immunized chicks. Concomitant with their enhancement of antibody responses, the oral antibiotics also lowered the Lactobacillus species in feces. Low doses of antibiotics (10-fold and 100-fold lower than the initial trial), which failed to change the fecal Lactobacillus population, did not modify any antibody responses when chicks were orally immunized with KLH. In conclusion, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced the antibody response to orally exposed antigens in chickens. This enhancement of antibody response was associated with a modification of the fecal Lactobacillus content, suggesting a possible link between gut microbiota and antibody response in chickens. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. A Dual-Modality Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Vaccine for Preventing Genital Herpes by Using Glycoprotein C and D Subunit Antigens To Induce Potent Antibody Responses and Adenovirus Vectors Containing Capsid and Tegument Proteins as T Cell Immunogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita; Mahairas, Gregory G; Shaw, Carolyn E; Huang, Meei-Li; Koelle, David M; Posavad, Christine; Corey, Lawrence; Friedman, Harvey M

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated a genital herpes prophylactic vaccine containing herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoproteins C (gC2) and D (gD2) to stimulate humoral immunity and UL19 (capsid protein VP5) and UL47 (tegument protein VP13/14) as T cell immunogens. The HSV-2 gC2 and gD2 proteins were expressed in baculovirus, while the UL19 and UL47 genes were expressed from replication-defective adenovirus vectors. Adenovirus vectors containing UL19 and UL47 stimulated human and murine CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. Guinea pigs were either (i) mock immunized; (ii) immunized with gC2/gD2, with CpG and alum as adjuvants; (iii) immunized with the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors; or (iv) immunized with the combination of gC2/gD2-CpG/alum and the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors. Immunization with gC2/gD2 produced potent neutralizing antibodies, while UL19 and UL47 also stimulated antibody responses. After intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, the mock and UL19/UL47 adenovirus groups developed severe acute disease, while 2/8 animals in the gC2/gD2-only group and none in the combined group developed acute disease. No animals in the gC2/gD2 or combined group developed recurrent disease; however, 5/8 animals in each group had subclinical shedding of HSV-2 DNA, on 15/168 days for the gC2/gD2 group and 13/168 days for the combined group. Lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia were positive for HSV-2 DNA and latency-associated transcripts for 5/8 animals in the gC2/gD2 group and 2/8 animals in the combined group. None of the differences comparing the gC2/gD2-only group and the combined group were statistically significant. Therefore, adding the T cell immunogens UL19 and UL47 to the gC2/gD2 vaccine did not significantly reduce genital disease and vaginal HSV-2 DNA shedding compared with the excellent protection provided by gC2/gD2 in the guinea pig model. HSV-2 infection is a common cause of genital ulcer disease and a significant public health concern. Genital herpes increases the risk of transmission and

  15. Longitudinal study of interferon-gamma, serum antibody and milk antibody responses in cattle infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, A.; Jungersen, Gregers; Lind, Peter

    2004-01-01

    -blood lymphocytes (IFN-gamma test), and measurement of antibody responses against M. paratuberculosis in serum and milk by an in-house absorbed ELISA. The IFN-gamma test diagnosed higher proportions of infected and exposed animals than the antibody ELISAs. The highest sensitivity of IFN-gamma test was in infected...... cattle of 2+ years of age. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses supported the assumption that the IFN-gamma test had a better performance than antibody tests of animals of 1+ and 2+ years of age. However, for animals of 3+ years all tests performed equally well. Application of single sampling...... compared with repeated samplings showed better performance of the IFN-gamma test by repeated samplings, and the milk antibody ELISA in animals of 3+ years of age performed significantly better with repeated sampling compared with single sampling. In conclusion, the IFN-gamma test may be applied...

  16. Age affects quantity but not quality of antibody responses after vaccination with an inactivated flavivirus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Stiasny

    Full Text Available The impairment of immune functions in the elderly (immunosenescence results in post-vaccination antibody titers that are significantly lower than in young individuals. It is, however, a controversial question whether also the quality of antibodies declines with age. In this study, we have therefore investigated the age-dependence of functional characteristics of antibody responses induced by vaccination with an inactivated flavivirus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE. For this purpose, we quantified TBE virus-specific IgG and neutralizing antibody titers in post-vaccination sera from groups of young and elderly healthy adults and determined antibody avidities and NT/ELISA titer ratios (functional activity. In contrast to the quantitative impairment of antibody production in the elderly, we found no age-related differences in the avidity and functional activity of antibodies induced by vaccination, which also appeared to be independent of the age at primary immunization. There was no correlation between antibody avidity and NT/ELISA ratios suggesting that additional factors affect the quality of polyclonal responses, independent of age. Our work indicates that healthy elderly people are able to produce antibodies in response to vaccination with similar avidity and functional activity as young individuals, albeit at lower titers.

  17. Study of the immune response by antibodies against the Bothrops asper venom for the elaboration of a antiophidic vaccine for bovines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Rojas, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Active immunization has determined against Bothrops asper snake venom (tested in murine and bovine models) a induced response by antibody able to prevent in immunized animals. A coagulopathy or death is developed after of be administered with adequate doses of poison. The amount of B. asper venom has defined the poisoning induced in bovine and murine models. The plasmatic concentration of equine antibodies against B. asper venom is specified to prevent coagulopathy and lethality induced by this venom in murine and bovine models. Murine and bovine models have verified the active immunization reached in a concentration of antibodies against B. asper venom equal or greater to the maximum concentration achieved by intravenous administration of antivenoms from equine origin. The concentration of antibodies induced by the active immunization is evaluated against B. asper venom to prevent the development of coagulopathy and lethality induced by the venom in murine and bovine models [es

  18. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV.Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations.Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  19. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines. A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Birk, Nina Marie; Smits, Gaby; Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Stensballe, Lone Graff; Netea, Mihai G; van der Klis, Fiona; Benn, Christine Stabell; Pryds, Ole

    2017-04-11

    BCG vaccination has been associated with beneficial non-specific effects on child health. Some immunological studies have reported heterologous effects of vaccines on antibody responses to heterologous vaccines. Within a randomised clinical trial of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth, The Danish Calmette Study, we investigated the effect of BCG at birth on the antibody response to the three routine vaccines against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 in a subgroup of participants. Within 7days after birth, children were randomised 1:1 to BCG vaccination or to the control group (no intervention). After three routine vaccinations given at age 3, 5 and 12months, antibodies against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 (Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype type 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F) were measured 4weeks after the third vaccine dose. Among the 300 included children (178 BCG; 122 controls), almost all children (>96%) had antibody responses above the protective levels. Overall BCG vaccination at birth did not affect the antibody level. When stratifying by 'age at randomisation' we found a possible inducing effect of BCG on antibodies against B. pertussis and all pneumococcal serotypes, when BCG was given after the first day of life. Girls had significantly higher antibody levels for Haemophilus influenza type b and pneumococcus than boys. Three routine vaccinations with DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 induced sero-protective levels in almost all children. No overall effect of neonatal BCG vaccination was observed. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Phenotypes and functions of persistent Sendai virus-induced antibody forming cells and CD8+ T cells in diffuse nasal-associated lymphoid tissue typify lymphocyte responses of the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraraju, Rajeev; Surman, Sherri; Jones, Bart; Sealy, Robert; Woodland, David L; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2011-02-20

    Lymphocytes of the diffuse nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (d-NALT) are uniquely positioned to tackle respiratory pathogens at their point-of-entry, yet are rarely examined after intranasal (i.n.) vaccinations or infections. Here we evaluate an i.n. inoculation with Sendai virus (SeV) for elicitation of virus-specific antibody forming cells (AFCs) and CD8(+) T cells in the d-NALT. Virus-specific AFCs and CD8(+) T cells each appeared by day 7 after SeV inoculation and persisted for 8 months, explaining the long-sustained protection against respiratory virus challenge conferred by this vaccine. AFCs produced IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgA, while CD8+ T cells were cytolytic and produced low levels of cytokines. Phenotypic analyses of virus-specific T cells revealed striking similarities with pathogen-specific immune responses in the intestine, highlighting some key features of adaptive immunity at a mucosal site. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in antimyelin antibody-induced oligodendrocyte damage in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griot-Wenk, M; Griot, C; Pfister, H; Vandevelde, M

    1991-08-01

    Treatment of dissociated murine brain cell cultures with an antibody recognizing galactocerebroside (GalC) led to degeneration of oligodendrocytes with loss of their cell processes. F(ab')2 fragments prepared from this antibody showed no effect. The anti-GalC antibody--but not its F(ab')2 fragments b2 was able to stimulate macrophages in these cultures as seen in a chemiluminescence assay. Therefore, antibodies bound to oligodendrocytes stimulated nearby macrophages by interacting with their Fc receptors. The oligodendroglial damage coincided with the release of toxic compounds by the stimulated macrophages, since treatment of the cultures with the anti-GalC antibody and a variety of other macrophage stimulating agents led to secretion of reactive oxygen species and--in some experiments--tumor necrosis factor, both known to be toxic for oligodendrocytes. These in vitro experiments show evidence that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity may be an important mechanism of tissue destruction in inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

  2. Antibody and T cell responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in health and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Shin

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9. The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3(+CD4(+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  3. Specificity of Subcapsular Antibody Responses in Ethiopian Patients following Disease Caused by Serogroup A Meningococci▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norheim, Gunnstein; Aseffa, Abraham; Yassin, Mohammed Ahmed; Mengistu, Getahun; Kassu, Afework; Fikremariam, Dereje; Tamire, Wegene; Merid, Yared; Høiby, E. Arne; Caugant, Dominique A.; Fritzsønn, Elisabeth; Tangen, Torill; Melak, Berhanu; Berhanu, Degu; Harboe, Morten; Kolberg, Jan; Rosenqvist, Einar

    2008-01-01

    Dissecting the specificities of human antibody responses following disease caused by serogroup A meningococci may be important for the development of improved vaccines. We performed a study of Ethiopian patients during outbreaks in 2002 and 2003. Sera were obtained from 71 patients with meningitis caused by bacteria of sequence type 7, as confirmed by PCR or culture, and from 113 Ethiopian controls. Antibody specificities were analyzed by immunoblotting (IB) against outer membrane antigen extracts of a reference strain and of the patients' own isolates and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels against lipooligosaccharide (LOS) L11 and the proteins NadA and NspA. IB revealed that the main antigens targeted were the proteins PorA, PorB, RmpM, and Opa/OpcA, as well as LOS. MenA disease induced significant increases in IgG against LOS L11 and NadA. The IgG levels against LOS remained elevated following disease, whereas the IgG anti-NadA levels returned to acute-phase levels in the late convalescent phase. Among adults, the anti-LOS IgG levels were similar in acute-phase patient sera as in control sera, whereas anti-NadA IgG levels were significantly higher in acute-phase sera than in controls. The IgG antibody levels against LOS and NadA correlated moderately but significantly with serum bactericidal activity against MenA strains. Future studies on immune response during MenA disease should take into account the high levels of anti-MenA polysaccharide IgG commonly found in the population and seek to clarify the role of antibodies against subcapsular antigens in protection against MenA disease. PMID:18337382

  4. Comprehensive Profiling of Immune Responses in MARV Survivors Demonstrates Robust Th1-Skewing with Short Lived Neutralizing Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    infection would be highly valuable for the evaluation of candidate vaccines that would seek to be broadly protective. Results and Discussion T...survivors (Sobarzo et al., 2015). Neutralizing antibody responses have been achieved through vaccination against MARV GP in mouse, guinea pig and...neutralizing antibodies elicited by vaccination against filoviruses is a coveted immune response, functions of non-neutralizing antibodies have been

  5. Anti-RAGE antibody selectively blocks acute systemic inflammatory responses to LPS in serum, liver, CSF and striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparotto, Juciano; Ribeiro, Camila Tiefensee; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; Somensi, Nauana; Fernandes, Henrique Schaan; Teixeira, Alexsander Alves; Guasselli, Marcelo Otavio Rodrigues; Agani, Crepin Aziz Jose O; Souza, Natália Cabral; Grings, Mateus; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Gomes, Henrique Mautone; de Bittencourt Pasquali, Matheus Augusto; Dunkley, Peter R; Dickson, Phillip W; Moreira, José Claudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens

    2017-05-01

    Systemic inflammation induces transient or permanent dysfunction in the brain by exposing it to soluble inflammatory mediators. The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) binds to distinct ligands mediating and increasing inflammatory processes. In this study we used an LPS-induced systemic inflammation model in rats to investigate the effect of blocking RAGE in serum, liver, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain (striatum, prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra). Intraperitoneal injection of RAGE antibody (50μg/kg) was followed after 1h by a single LPS (5mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection. Twenty-four hours later, tissues were isolated for analysis. RAGE antibody reduced LPS-induced inflammatory effects in both serum and liver; the levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) were decreased and the phosphorylation/activation of RAGE downstream targets (ERK1/2, IκB and p65) in liver were significantly attenuated. RAGE antibody prevented LPS-induced effects on TNF-α and IL-1β in CSF. In striatum, RAGE antibody inhibited increases in IL-1β, Iba-1, GFAP, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-tau (ser202), as well as the decrease in synaptophysin levels. These effects were caused by systemic RAGE inhibition, as RAGE antibody did not cross the blood-brain barrier. RAGE antibody also prevented striatal lipoperoxidation and activation of mitochondrial complex II. In conclusion, blockade of RAGE is able to inhibit inflammatory responses induced by LPS in serum, liver, CSF and brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An HIV-1 Env-Antibody Complex Focuses Antibody Responses to Conserved Neutralizing Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yajing; Wilson, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Guenaga, Javier; Feng, Yu; Tran, Karen; Chiang, Chi-I; Arendt, Heather E; DeStefano, Joanne; Mascola, John R; Wyatt, Richard T; Li, Yuxing

    2016-11-15

    Elicitation of broadly neutralizing Ab (bNAb) responses to the conserved elements of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), including the primary receptor CD4 binding site (CD4bs), is a major focus of vaccine development yet to be accomplished. However, a large number of CD4bs-directed bNAbs have been isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals. Comparison of the routes of binding used by the CD4bs-directed bNAbs from patients and the vaccine-elicited CD4bs-directed mAbs indicates that the latter fail to neutralize primary virus isolates because they approach the Env spike with a vertical angle and contact the specific surface residues occluded in the native spike, including the bridging sheet on gp120. To preferentially expose the CD4bs and direct the immune response away from the bridging sheet, resulting in an altered angle of approach, we engineered an immunogen consisting of gp120 core in complex with the prototypic CD4-induced Ab, 17b. This mAb directly contacts the bridging sheet but not the CD4bs. The complex was further stabilized by chemical crosslinking to prevent dissociation. Rabbits immunized with the crosslinked complex displayed earlier affinity maturation, achieving tier 1 virus neutralization compared with animals immunized with gp120 core alone. Immunization with the crosslinked complex induced transient Ab responses with binding specificity similar to the CD4bs-directed bNAbs. mAbs derived from complex-immunized rabbits displayed footprints on gp120 more distal from the bridging sheet as compared with previous vaccine-elicited CD4bs Abs, indicating that Env-Ab complexes effectively dampen immune responses to undesired immunodominant bridging sheet determinants. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  8. Screening response to hepatitis c virus antibodies among diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... is a debilitating disease condition, especially in individuals above 30 years of age, these results highlight the need for screening to determine the presence of HCV among diabetic patients. Keywords: Hepatitis C virus, antibodies, type 2 diabetics, antibodies, Nigeria International Journal of Natural and Applied Sciences, ...

  9. Antibody-induced generation of reactive oxygen radicals by brain macrophages in canine distemper encephalitis: a mechanism for bystander demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griot, C; Bürge, T; Vandevelde, M; Peterhans, E

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of inflammatory demyelination in canine distemper encephalitis (CDE) is uncertain but macrophages are thought to play an important effector role in this lesion. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), containing anti-canine distemper virus and anti-myelin antibodies from dogs with CDE were tested for their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in macrophages in primary dog brain cell cultures using a chemiluminescence (CL) assay. The majority of serum samples and several CSF samples from animals with inflammatory demyelination elicited a CL signal in infected dog brain cell cultures. In contrast, none of these samples induced a positive response in uninfected cultures which contained large numbers of myelin antigen-presenting cells, although defined anti-myelin antibodies lead to a marked secretion of ROS in this system. It was concluded that antiviral antibody-induced secretion of ROS, known to be highly toxic for brain tissue, may play an important role in white matter damage in inflammatory lesions supporting a previous hypothesis of bystander demyelination in CDE. No evidence was found for a similar antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-like mechanism mediated by anti-myelin antibodies in CDE, which does not support the concept of autoimmunity in this disease.

  10. Characterization of isotypes of antibody response against leishmania parasite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elassad, Asma M.S.; Ghalib, Hashim W.; Younis, Saddia A.

    1994-01-01

    In this study an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELIZA) was developed to detect IgG,IgM and IgA response in visceral leishmaniasis patients (VL) against L.donovain and L. major antigens compared to control groups; cutaneous leishmaniasis patients (CL), mucosal leishmaniasis patients (ML), patients with other tropical diseases and healthy controls.Highly specific IgG were found in VL patients with test specificity (93.7%) and sensitivity(93.4%). A moderate IgG were found in VL patients but non-specific while no IgA were detected in all studied groups. Also VL patients showed high specificity and sensitivity (95.2 and 96.6% respectively) against L.major antigen.The distribution of IgG subclasses (IgG1,IgG2,IgG3 and IgG4) antibodies in VL patients were assayed.IgG3 showed the highest specificity and sensitivity and titers followed by IgG1.Also the diagnostic value of ELIZA test for different leishmaniasis forms were discussed. (Author)

  11. Exacerbation of collagen antibody-induced arthritis in transgenic mice overexpressing peroxiredoxin 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Dong Hun; Jo, Mi Ran; Son, Dong Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Chul Ju; Park, Ju Ho; Yuk, Dong Yeon; Yoon, Do Young; Jung, Young-Suk; Kim, Youngsoo; Jeong, Jae Hwang; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-11-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 plays important and complex roles in the process of inflammation, but its role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. We undertook this study to investigate the roles and mechanisms of peroxiredoxin 6 in the development of collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) and antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice, in peroxiredoxin 6-transfected RAW 264.7 cells, in macrophages isolated from peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice, and in synoviocytes from arthritis patients. CAIA and AIA were induced using standard methods. Peroxiredoxin 6-transfected RAW 264.7 cells, macrophages isolated from peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice, and synoviocytes from arthritis patients were used to study proinflammatory responses and mechanisms. Clinical scores and histopathologic changes were determined in peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice and wild-type (WT) mice with CAIA or AIA. Generation of nitric oxide (NO), expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase 2, and activity of NF-κB and activator protein 1 (AP-1) were determined in cultured macrophages and synoviocytes as well as in joint tissue from mice by Western blotting, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. Development of CAIA and AIA and proinflammatory responses were more exacerbated in peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice than in WT mice. Overexpression of peroxiredoxin 6 increased lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 cells, in macrophages isolated from peroxiredoxin 6-overexpressing transgenic mice, and in synoviocytes from arthritis patients, and this was accompanied by up-regulation of the JNK pathway. Moreover, a JNK inhibitor completely blocked RA development and proinflammatory responses. Our findings suggest that overexpression of peroxiredoxin 6 might promote development of RA through NF-κB and AP-1 activity via the JNK

  12. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of pro...

  13. Human immunological response to mouse monoclonal antibodies in the treatment or diagnosis of malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kroonenburgh, M J; Pauwels, E K

    1988-11-01

    An overview of the literature is presented concerning the formation, detection, incidence and effect of the human immunoglobulin response on immunoscintigraphy. The following conclusions are drawn. The production of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) is associated with a diminished therapeutic response; adequate prevention of HAMA production is not yet possible; high HAMA titres give rise to rapid clearance of MoAb into the liver and marked reduction of tumour uptake which results in reduced image quality on immunoscintigraphy; alteration of antibody biodistribution is likely to be related to the in vivo formation of antibody-antibody complexes which could interfere with image quality when sequential imaging is carried out.

  14. Newborn infant with maternal anti-SSA antibody-induced complete heart block accompanying cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Midori; Inamura, Noboru; Takeuchi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    Newborn case of maternal anti-SSA antibody-induced congenital complete heart block (CCHB) accompanying cardiomyopathy is presented. Unexpectedly, she died of ventricular tachycardia, not bradycardia, 6 days after birth. Autopsy revealed left ventricular cardiomyopathy with endocardial fibroelastosis. Thus, when evaluating fetal cardiac performance in cases of maternal anti-SSA antibody-induced CCHB, it is necessary to pay attention to myocardial attributes such as endocardial hyperplasia.

  15. Antibodies in human serum and milk induced by enterobacteria and food proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlstedt, S; Carlsson, B; Fällström, S P; Hanson, L A; Holmgren, J; Lidin-Janson, G; Lindblad, B S; Jodal, U; Kaijser, B; Solh-Akerlund, A; Wadsworth, C

    Ingestion of Escherichia coli O83 bacteria by adults resulted in a transient irregular colonization leading to a serum antibody response in only four out of 14 cases examined. In all of three pregnant women, however, IgA antibodies against E. coli O83 antigen were released from colostral cells after similar bacterial ingestion although no serum antibody response was noted. The findings indicate a link between the antigenic exposure to the gut and secretory antibodies of the IgA class, presumably locally formed in the mammary gland. Antibodies of the secretory IgA class registered in colostrum may, at least partly, reflect the antigenic exposure of the gut. These antibodies are probably important in protecting against E. coli infections in the neonate, as suggested by the findings of antibodies in human milk against O and K antigens of non-enteropathogenic as well as enteropathogenic serotypes of E. coli. Furthermore, in milk of women from low socio-economic groups in Pakistan, neutralizing antibodies were present against enterotoxins of E. coli bacteria and occasionally against Vibrio cholerae enterotoxins. In addition, secretory IgA antibodies against food proteins were detected in human milk. This suggests that intestinal exposure to such antigens could stimulate a local immune response in the gut resulting in triggered lymphoid cells homing to the mammary gland. These human milk secretory IgA antibodies against bovine milk proteins may help to prevent cow's milk allergy in infants on mixed feeding, since these infants tend to have a lower serum antibody response to cow's milk proteins than infants fed mostly artificially. Furthermore, children suffering from cow's milk protein intolerance and gluten enteropathy may have higher serum levels of antibody to cow's milk protein antigens than normal children, possibly reflecting increased permeability of the intestinal mucosa for various antigens.

  16. Phase I clinical and pharmacological study of suppression of human antimouse antibody response to monoclonal antibody L6 by deoxyspergualin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, K; Fritsche, H; Murray, J L; LoBuglio, A F; Khazaeli, M B; Kelley, S; Tepper, M A; Grasela, D; Buzdar, A; Valero, V

    1995-07-15

    Development of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) is a major limiting factor in the application of murine mAb for clinical use. A novel immunomodulatory drug, deoxyspergualin (DSG), has shown potential to suppress antimouse antibody response in preclinical model systems. We conducted a Phase I trial to determine the effect of DSG on HAMA response to murine mAb L6 administered to patients with advanced cancers (in previous trials, this antibody elicited HAMA in two-thirds of the treated patients). L6 mAb was administered at a fixed dose of 200 mg/m2 on days 1-5. DSG was administered at doses of 50 mg/m2 [dose level (dl) 1] or 150 mg/m2 (dls II and III) on days 1-7. Treatment courses were repeated every 6 weeks (dls I and II) or every 3 weeks (dl III). HAMAs were quantitated by a commercially available ELISA assay (ImmuSTRIP; anti-isotypic antibodies) and a radiometric assay (antiisotypic and anti-idiotypic antibodies). Pharmacokinetics of L6 and DSG was also studied in all consenting patients. Among 24 evaluable patients, 2 patients developed detectable HAMAs using the ELISA (one each at dls I and II) after a median follow-up of 122 days (P = 0.0001 as compared to historical controls). Even in the two patients who developed HAMA, the HAMA levels were quite low (160 and 181 ng/ml; historical experience, 70-38,744 ng/ml). The radiometric assay detected anti-L6 antibodies in 13 patients (4, 6, and 3 at dls I-III, respectively) after a median of 82 days. The median highest anti-L6 antibody level was 129 ng/ml (range, 21-2150). The highest anti-L6 antibody level at dl III was only 44 ng/ml. The results suggest suppression of anti-idiotypic response also. No clinical antitumor activity was observed, and no significant changes in T4/T8 subsets or immunoglobulins occurred (suggesting a lack of generalized immunosuppression). We conclude that DSG can suppress HAMA response to L6. A starting dose of 150 mg/m2/day is recommended for Phase II trials to confirm this observation.

  17. Identification of cellular responses to low-dose radiation by antibody array in human B-lymphoblasts IM-9 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. LTD., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The low-dose radiation (LDR)-induced various responses can reduce genetic mutation, enhance cell survival, and increase infection resistance (1). The antibody array for global analysis of phosphorylated proteins might be very useful to study signaling networks of LDR-induced cellular responses (2). Therefore, global analysis of phospho- proteins in cells exposed to radiation is important to understand the signaling mechanisms induced by changes of protein phosphorylation which lead to various biological effects by radiation. The aim is to explore the possibility of LDR-specific signaling for various beneficial effects and elucidate the potential signaling pathways representing LDR responses. Our results suggest that LDR did not affect cell death and that the increased proteins phosphorylation by LDR might be involved in various cellular responses for cell homeostasis. These results might be useful to further studies aimed at investigating potential regulatory markers that represent responses to LDR.

  18. IL-15 enhances cross-reactive antibody recall responses to seasonal H3 influenza viruses in vitro [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqiong Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, several human monoclonal antibodies that target conserved epitopes on the stalk region of influenza hemagglutinin (HA have shown broad reactivity to influenza A subtypes. Also, vaccination with recombinant chimeric HA or stem fragments from H3 influenza viruses induce broad immune protection in mice and humans. However, it is unclear whether stalk-binding antibodies can be induced in human memory B cells by seasonal H3N2 viruses. Methods: In this study, we recruited 13 donors previously exposed to H3 viruses, the majority (12 of 13 of which had been immunized with seasonal influenza vaccines. We evaluated plasma baseline strain-specific and stalk-reactive anti-HA antibodies and B cell recall responses to inactivated H3N2 A/Victoria/361/2011 virus in vitro using a high throughput multiplex (mPlex-Flu assay. Results: Stalk-reactive IgG was detected in the plasma of 7 of the subjects. Inactivated H3 viral particles rapidly induced clade cross-reactive antibodies in B cell cultures derived from all 13 donors. In addition, H3 stalk-reactive antibodies were detected in culture supernatants from 7 of the 13 donors (53.8%.  H3 stalk-reactive antibodies were also induced by H1 and H7 subtypes. Interestingly, broadly cross-reactive antibody recall responses to H3 strains were also enhanced by stimulating B cells in vitro with CpG2006 ODN in the presence of IL-15. H3 stalk-reactive antibodies were detected in  CpG2006 ODN + IL-15 stimulated B cell cultures derived from 12 of the 13 donors (92.3%, with high levels detected in cultures from 7 of the 13 donors. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that stalk-reactive antibody recall responses induced by seasonal H3 viruses and CpG2006 ODN can be enhanced by IL-15.

  19. Optimal Sequential Immunization Can Focus Antibody Responses against Diversity Loss and Distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen

    2017-01-01

    Affinity maturation is a Darwinian process in which B lymphocytes evolve potent antibodies to encountered antigens and generate immune memory. Highly mutable complex pathogens present an immense antigenic diversity that continues to challenge natural immunity and vaccine design. Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against this diversity by vaccination likely requires multiple exposures to distinct but related antigen variants, and yet how affinity maturation advances under such complex stimulation remains poorly understood. To fill the gap, we present an in silico model of affinity maturation to examine two realistic new aspects pertinent to vaccine development: loss in B cell diversity across successive immunization periods against different variants, and the presence of distracting epitopes that entropically disfavor the evolution of bnAbs. We find these new factors, which introduce additional selection pressures and constraints, significantly influence antibody breadth development, in a way that depends crucially on the temporal pattern of immunization (or selection forces). Curiously, a less diverse B cell seed may even favor the expansion and dominance of cross-reactive clones, but only when conflicting selection forces are presented in series rather than in a mixture. Moreover, the level of frustration due to evolutionary conflict dictates the degree of distraction. We further describe how antigenic histories select evolutionary paths of B cell lineages and determine the predominant mode of antibody responses. Sequential immunization with mutationally distant variants is shown to robustly induce bnAbs that focus on conserved elements of the target epitope, by thwarting strain-specific and distracted lineages. An optimal range of antigen dose underlies a fine balance between efficient adaptation and persistent reaction. These findings provide mechanistic guides to aid in design of vaccine strategies against fast mutating pathogens.

  20. Complexity of Human Antibody Response to Dengue Virus: Implication for Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yang Tsai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV are the leading cause of arboviral diseases in humans. Decades of efforts have made remarkable progress in dengue vaccine development. Despite the first dengue vaccine (dengvaxia from Sanofi Pasteur, a live-attenuated tetravalent chimeric yellow fever-dengue vaccine, has been licensed by several countries since 2016, its overall moderate efficacy (56.5–60.8% in the presence of neutralizing antibodies during the Phase 2b and 3 trials, lower efficacy among dengue naïve compared with dengue experienced individuals, and increased risk of hospitalization among young children during the follow-up highlight the need for a better understanding of humoral responses after natural DENV infection. Recent studies of more than 300 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against DENV have led to the discovery of several novel epitopes on the envelope protein recognized by potent neutralizing mAbs. This information together with in-depth studies on polyclonal sera and B-cells following natural DENV infection has tremendous implications for better immunogen design for a safe and effective dengue vaccine. This review outlines the progress in our understanding of mouse mAbs, human mAbs, and polyclonal sera against DENV envelope and precursor membrane proteins, two surface proteins involved in vaccine development, following natural infection; analyses of these discoveries have provided valuable insight into new strategies involving molecular technology to induce more potent neutralizing antibodies and less enhancing antibodies for next-generation dengue vaccine development.

  1. Cross-reactive antibodies induced by xenogeneic IgA can cause selective IgA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klartag, Ayelet; Chen, Chiann-Chyi; Dougherty, Joseph P; Ron, Yacov

    2010-03-01

    Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common immunodeficiency in humans. Auto-reactive antibodies to human immunoglobulin A (IgA) are found in the serum of 20-40% of individuals with sIgAD. It is unknown whether these antibodies play a role in the pathogenesis of this immunodeficiency and although the prevailing thought is that they are secondary to the onset of sIgAD, there is very little, if any, support for this notion. Here, we propose that anti-IgA antibodies are in fact responsible for the removal of IgA from serum, and that the inducing antigen is most probably a xenogeneic IgA. This hypothesis is based on data obtained from an sIgAD patient in whom changes in dietary consumption of beef and/or bovine dairy products resulted in changes in anti-IgA levels in the serum. To test the hypothesis, the presence of anti-bovine IgA antibodies was tested by a highly specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in serum samples from IgA-deficient and control individuals. All 13 sIgAD individuals with anti-IgA antibodies had a higher titer against bovine IgA than against human IgA. Of 23 control individuals, a surprisingly high proportion (65%) was also found to have IgG anti-bovine IgA antibodies. These results support the hypothesis that the anti-human IgA antibodies found in IgA-deficient individuals are originally produced against bovine IgA. These antibodies are found in many normal individuals, but only in cases where they cross react with endogenous human IgA, sIgAD may develop.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies for the measurement of class-specific antibody responses in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, L H; Klein, P A

    1995-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were developed against the known immunoglobulin classes of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas. Plasma protein fractions enriched for 5.7S IgY, 7S IgY, and IgM turtle immunoglobulins were used to immunize Balb/c mice for hybridoma production and for hybridoma screening. Fifteen hybridomas produced Mabs with specificity for turtle immunoglobulins and for affinity purified dinitrophenol (DNP) specific turtle antibodies. Three Mabs specific for either turtle 5.7S IgY heavy chain (HL814), 7S IgY heavy chain (HL857), or IgM heavy chain (HL846) were purified and used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure antibody responses in two turtles immunized with 2,4-dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) over a 10 month period. In both turtles the 7S IgY antibody response developed within 5 weeks of the first inoculation and remained high over the following 9 months. The 5.7S IgY antibody response was detected in one turtle at 3-4 months and in the other at 8 months, and reached high levels in both individuals by 10 months. The IgM responses were difficult to interpret. One turtle had pre-inoculation anti-DNP IgM antibody in its plasma and the other developed only a weak, transient response at about 4 months. The class-specific antibody activity in immune turtle plasma could be strongly inhibited by soluble DNP or by rabbit anti-DNP specific antiserum, showing that these antibody responses were directed predominantly to the DNP hapten on the DNP-BSA antigen. Antibody responses to the BSA carrier could not be detected in either turtle over the course of the immunization. Mab HL814, specific for an epitope on the 5.7S green turtle immunoglobulin heavy chain, will be useful for characterizing the molecular relationships of 5.7S, 7S and IgM heavy chains and the role of 5.7S antibody in humoral immunity in this species. All anti-turtle Ig Mabs were screened against the plasma globulins of Loggerhead (Caretta caretta), Olive

  3. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Ling; Lin Jianguo; Sun Yuliang; Bennouna, Soumaya; Lo, Michael; Wu Qingyang; Bu Zhigao; Pulendran, Bali; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection

  4. Immunoglobulin E Antileishmanial Antibody Response in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Atta, Maria L. B.; Salamé, Gregório S.; D’Oliveira, Argemiro; Almeida, Roque P.; Atta, Ajax M.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2002-01-01

    High levels of antileishmanial immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are associated with disease activity in visceral leishmaniasis. Herein, we report our observations about the relationship between antileishmanial IgE antibodies and clinical aspects of cutaneous leishmaniasis. This study was carried out with 45 patients (29 male and 16 female), with ages ranging from 11 to 48 years. All subjects were from an area to which leishmaniasis is endemic, Corte de Pedra (Bahia, Brazil), and the duration of the illness was ≤30 days. The patients were classified as positive or negative for IgE serology in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with leishmanial antigens. IgE antibodies were detected in 18 patients (optical density, 0.421 ± 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.27 to 0.57), and only 3 (17%) had more than one ulcer. In this group the diameter of Montenegro’s reaction was 18 ± 12.2 mm. In the group with negative IgE serology, 11 of 27 patients (48%) presented two or more cutaneous ulcers, and the mean of the skin test result was 9 ± 6.9 mm. There was a positive correlation between IgE antibody levels and Montenegro’s reaction size and an inverse correlation between IgE antileishmanial antibodies and the number of skin ulcers. The presence of antileishmanial IgE antibodies in cutaneous leishmaniasis may be a result of immunoregulatory events with clinical implications. PMID:11777837

  5. Delayed BCG immunization does not alter antibody responses to EPI vaccines in HIV-exposed and -unexposed South African infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesseling, Anneke C; Blakney, Anna K; Jones, Christine E; Esser, Monika M; de Beer, Corena; Kuhn, Louise; Cotton, Mark F; Jaspan, Heather B

    2016-07-12

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is routinely given at birth in tuberculosis-endemic settings due to its protective effect against disseminated tuberculosis in infants. BCG is however contraindicated in HIV-infected infants. We investigated whether delaying BCG vaccination to 14 weeks of age affected vaccine-induced antibody responses to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)-conjugate, pertussis, tetanus and Hepatitis B (HBV) vaccines, in HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) and -unexposed uninfected (HUU) infants. Infants were randomized to receive BCG at birth or at 14 weeks of age. Blood was taken at 14, 24, and 52 weeks of age and analyzed for Hib, pertussis, tetanus and HBV specific antibodies. BCG was given either at birth (106 infants, 51 HEU) or at 14 weeks of age (74 infants, 50 HEU). The timing of BCG vaccination did not influence the antibody response to any antigen studied. However, in a non-randomized comparison, HEU infants had higher Hib antibody concentrations at weeks 14 and 24 (p=0.001 and BCG vaccination, was associated with antibody concentrations to Hib, pertussis, HBV and tetanus primary immunization. DOH-27-1106-1520. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Different levels of natural antibodies in chickens divergently selected for specific antibody responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H.K.; Lammers, A.; Hoekman, J.J.; Vries Reilingh, de G.; Zaanen, I.T.A.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the presence of Natural antibodies in plasma samples from individual birds from selected chicken lines at young and old age. Binding, specificity, and relative affinity to various antigens were determined in plasma from non-immunized female chickens at 5 weeks of age, and in plasma

  7. Broadly Neutralizing Hemagglutinin Stalk-Specific Antibodies Induce Potent Phagocytosis of Immune Complexes by Neutrophils in an Fc-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Bailey, Mark J; Golubeva, Diana A; Tan, Gene S; Nachbagauer, Raffael; He, Wenqian; Novakowski, Kyle E; Bowdish, Dawn M; Miller, Matthew S; Palese, Peter

    2016-10-04

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stalk have emerged as exciting new biotherapeutic tools to combat seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses. Our general understanding of the mechanisms by which stalk-specific antibodies achieve protection is rapidly evolving. It has recently been demonstrated that broadly neutralizing HA stalk-specific IgG antibodies require Fc-Fcγ receptor (FcγR) interactions for optimal protection in vivo Here we examine the neutrophil effector functions induced by stalk-specific antibodies. As the most abundant subset of blood leukocytes, neutrophils represent a critical innate effector cell population and serve an instrumental role in orchestrating downstream adaptive responses to influenza virus infection. Yet, the interplay of HA stalk-specific IgG, Fc-FcγR engagement, and neutrophils has remained largely uncharacterized. Using an in vitro assay to detect the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we show that human and mouse monoclonal HA stalk-specific IgG antibodies are able to induce the production of ROS by neutrophils, while HA head-specific antibodies do not. Furthermore, our results indicate that the production of ROS is dependent on Fc receptor (FcR) engagement and phagocytosis. We went on to assess the ability of monoclonal HA stalk-specific IgA antibodies to induce ROS. Consistent with our findings for monoclonal IgGs, only HA stalk-specific IgA antibodies elicited ROS production by neutrophils. This induction is dependent on the engagement of FcαR1. Taken together, our findings describe a novel FcR-dependent effector function induced by HA stalk-specific IgG and IgA antibodies, and importantly, our studies shed light on the mechanisms by which HA stalk-specific antibodies achieve protection. The present study provides evidence that broadly neutralizing HA stalk-specific antibodies induce downstream Fc-mediated neutrophil effector functions. In addition to their ability to

  8. In-Depth Analysis of the Antibody Response of Individuals Exposed to Primary Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Beltramello, Martina; Messer, William B.; Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Wahala, Wahala M. P. B.; Kraus, Annette; Olivarez, Nicholas P.; Pham, Quang; Brian, James; Tsai, Wen-Yang; Wang, Wei-Kung; Halstead, Scott; Kliks, Srisakul; Diamond, Michael S.; Baric, Ralph; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sallusto, Federica; de Silva, Aravinda M.

    2011-01-01

    Humans who experience a primary dengue virus (DENV) infection develop antibodies that preferentially neutralize the homologous serotype responsible for infection. Affected individuals also generate cross-reactive antibodies against heterologous DENV serotypes, which are non-neutralizing. Dengue cross-reactive, non-neutralizing antibodies can enhance infection of Fc receptor bearing cells and, potentially, exacerbate disease. The actual binding sites of human antibody on the DENV particle are not well defined. We characterized the specificity and neutralization potency of polyclonal serum antibodies and memory B-cell derived monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) from 2 individuals exposed to primary DENV infections. Most DENV-specific hMAbs were serotype cross-reactive and weakly neutralizing. Moreover, many hMAbs bound to the viral pre-membrane protein and other sites on the virus that were not preserved when the viral envelope protein was produced as a soluble, recombinant antigen (rE protein). Nonetheless, by modifying the screening procedure to detect rare antibodies that bound to rE, we were able to isolate and map human antibodies that strongly neutralized the homologous serotype of DENV. Our MAbs results indicate that, in these two individuals exposed to primary DENV infections, a small fraction of the total antibody response was responsible for virus neutralization. PMID:21713020

  9. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP......60)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Proliferative reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was studied in vitro against Chlamydia elementary body (EB) and recombinant CHSP60 antigens. RESULTS: C. trachomatis......-specific IgG antibodies were found more frequently (43.2 versus 13.5%), and the antibody levels were higher in the TFI cases than in the controls (P cases and 58.9% of the controls (P

  10. Antibody targeting of Cathepsin S induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Hang Fai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic enzymes have been implicated in driving tumor progression by means of their cancer cell microenvironment activity where they promote proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Therapeutic strategies have focused on attenuating their activity using small molecule inhibitors, but the association of proteases with the cell surface during cancer progression opens up the possibility of targeting these using antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Cathepsin S is a lysosomal cysteine protease that promotes the growth and invasion of tumour and endothelial cells during cancer progression. Our analysis of colorectal cancer patient biopsies shows that cathepsin S associates with the cell membrane indicating a potential for ADCC targeting. Results Here we report the cell surface characterization of cathepsin S and the development of a humanized antibody (Fsn0503h with immune effector function and a stable in vivo half-life of 274 hours. Cathepsin S is expressed on the surface of tumor cells representative of colorectal and pancreatic cancer (23%-79% positive expression. Furthermore the binding of Fsn0503h to surface associated cathepsin S results in natural killer (NK cell targeted tumor killing. In a colorectal cancer model Fsn0503h elicits a 22% cytotoxic effect. Conclusions This data highlights the potential to target cell surface associated enzymes, such as cathepsin S, as therapeutic targets using antibodies capable of elicitingADCC in tumor cells.

  11. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response towards Bothrops asper snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Hidekel; Herrera, María; Rojas, Leonardo; Villalta, Mauren; Vargas, Mariángela; Leiguez, Elbio; Teixeira, Catarina; Estrada, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo; Montero, Mavis L

    2014-01-01

    The adjuvanticity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response in mice towards the venom of the snake Bothrops asper was studied. It was found that, in vitro, most of the venom proteins are similarly adsorbed by both mineral salts, with the exception of some basic phospholipases A2, which are better adsorbed by calcium phosphate. After injection, the adjuvants promoted a slow release of the venom, as judged by the lack of acute toxicity when lethal doses of venom were administered to mice. Leukocyte recruitment induced by the venom was enhanced when it was adsorbed on both mineral salts; however, venom adsorbed on calcium phosphate induced a higher antibody response towards all tested HPLC fractions of the venom. On the other hand, co-precipitation of venom with calcium phosphate was the best strategy for increasing: (1) the capacity of the salt to couple venom proteins in vitro; (2) the venom ability to induce leukocyte recruitment; (3) phagocytosis by macrophages; and (4) a host antibody response. These findings suggest that the chemical nature is not the only one determining factor of the adjuvant activity of mineral salts.

  12. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...... in antibody response was compared to the findings in 12 healthy volunteers with the aim of establishing the optimal time for vaccination. Serum antibodies against 6 of the pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens (types 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C and 23F) contained in the vaccine were determined by an ELISA. Antibody...

  13. Human vaccination against RH5 induces neutralizing antimalarial antibodies that inhibit RH5 invasion complex interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Ruth O; Silk, Sarah E; Elias, Sean C

    2017-01-01

    The development of a highly effective vaccine remains a key strategic goal to aid the control and eventual eradication of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In recent years, the reticulocyte-binding protein homolog 5 (RH5) has emerged as the most promising blood-stage P. falciparum candidate antigen......-deficient chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 63 (ChAd63), and the attenuated orthopoxvirus modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), encoding RH5 from the 3D7 clone of P. falciparum. Vaccines were administered i.m. in a heterologous prime-boost regimen using an 8-week interval and were well tolerated. Vaccine-induced anti-RH5...... serum antibodies exhibited cross-strain functional growth inhibition activity (GIA) in vitro, targeted linear and conformational epitopes within RH5, and inhibited key interactions within the RH5 invasion complex. This is the first time to our knowledge that substantial RH5-specific responses have been...

  14. Protective Capacity of the Human Anamnestic Antibody Response during Acute Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meihui; Züst, Roland; Toh, Ying Xiu; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Kahle, Kristen M; Davidson, Edgar; Doranz, Benjamin J; Velumani, Sumathy; Tukijan, Farhana; Wang, Cheng-I; Fink, Katja

    2016-12-15

    Half of the world's population is exposed to the risk of dengue virus infection. Although a vaccine for dengue virus is now available in a few countries, its reported overall efficacy of about 60% is not ideal. Protective immune correlates following natural dengue virus infection remain undefined, which makes it difficult to predict the efficacy of new vaccines. In this study, we address the protective capacity of dengue virus-specific antibodies that are produced by plasmablasts a few days after natural secondary infection. Among a panel of 18 dengue virus-reactive human monoclonal antibodies, four groups of antibodies were identified based on their binding properties. While antibodies targeting the fusion loop of the glycoprotein of dengue virus dominated the antibody response, two smaller groups of antibodies bound to previously undescribed epitopes in domain II of the E protein. The latter, largely serotype-cross-reactive antibodies, demonstrated increased stability of binding at pH 5. These antibodies possessed weak to moderate neutralization capacity in vitro but were the most efficacious in promoting the survival of infected mice. Our data suggest that the cross-reactive anamnestic antibody response has a protective capacity despite moderate neutralization in vitro and a moderate decrease of viremia in vivo IMPORTANCE: Antibodies can protect from symptomatic dengue virus infection. However, it is not easy to assess which classes of antibodies provide protection because in vitro assays are not always predictive of in vivo protection. During a repeat infection, dengue virus-specific immune memory cells are reactivated and large amounts of antibodies are produced. By studying antibodies cloned from patients with heterologous secondary infection, we tested the protective value of the serotype-cross-reactive "recall" or "anamnestic" response. We found that results from in vitro neutralization assays did not always correlate with the ability of the antibodies to

  15. Immunization with recombinantly expressed glycan antigens from Schistosoma mansoni induces glycan-specific antibodies against the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Luyai, Anthony E; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Mandalasi, Msano; Mickum, Megan; Smith, David F; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-07-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by infection with parasitic helminths of Schistosoma spp. is a major global health problem due to inadequate treatment and lack of a vaccine. The immune response to schistosomes includes glycan antigens, which could be valuable diagnostic markers and vaccine targets. However, no precedent exists for how to design vaccines targeting eukaryotic glycoconjugates. The di- and tri-saccharide motifs LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4GlcNAc; LDN) and fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc; LDNF) are the basis for several important schistosome glycan antigens. They occur in monomeric form or as repeating units (poly-LDNF) and as part of a variety of different glycoconjugates. Because chemical synthesis and conjugation of such antigens is exceedingly difficult, we sought to develop a recombinant expression system for parasite glycans. We hypothesized that presentation of parasite glycans on the cell surface would induce glycan-specific antibodies. We generated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) Lec8 cell lines expressing poly-LDN (L8-GT) and poly-LDNF (L8-GTFT) abundantly on their membrane glycoproteins. Sera from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were highly cross-reactive with the cells and with cell-surface N-glycans. Immunizing mice with L8-GT and L8-GTFT cells induced glycan-specific antibodies. The L8-GTFT cells induced a sustained booster response, with antibodies that bound to S. mansoni lysates and recapitulated the exquisite specificity of the anti-parasite response for particular presentations of LDNF antigen. In summary, this recombinant expression system promotes successful generation of antibodies to the glycans of S. mansoni, and it can be adapted to study the role of glycan antigens and anti-glycan immune responses in many other infections and pathologies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein immunogens to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliepen, Kwinten; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2016-01-01

    The long pursuit for a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) has recently been boosted by a number of exciting developments. An HIV-1 subunit vaccine ideally should elicit potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), but raising bNAbs by vaccination has proved extremely difficult

  17. Suppression of the immune response to ovalbumin in vivo by anti-idiotypic antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinevich, A.S.; Pinegin, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    Conditions of suppression of the immune response to a food allergin (ovalbumin) were studied with the aid of anti-idiotypic (AID) antibodies. Hen ovalbumin was used and the experiments were performed on mice. Antibodies were isolated from the resulting protein fractions and tested for inhibitor activity by the method of direct radioimmunologic analysis. The test system consisted of the reaction of binding the globulin fraction to the total preparation of antibodies to ovalbumin from mice and a 125 I-labeled total preparation of antibodies to ovalbumin of the same animals

  18. Broadly Neutralizing Hemagglutinin Stalk-Specific Antibodies Induce Potent Phagocytosis of Immune Complexes by Neutrophils in an Fc-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin E. Mullarkey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize the conserved hemagglutinin (HA stalk have emerged as exciting new biotherapeutic tools to combat seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses. Our general understanding of the mechanisms by which stalk-specific antibodies achieve protection is rapidly evolving. It has recently been demonstrated that broadly neutralizing HA stalk-specific IgG antibodies require Fc-Fcγ receptor (FcγR interactions for optimal protection in vivo. Here we examine the neutrophil effector functions induced by stalk-specific antibodies. As the most abundant subset of blood leukocytes, neutrophils represent a critical innate effector cell population and serve an instrumental role in orchestrating downstream adaptive responses to influenza virus infection. Yet, the interplay of HA stalk-specific IgG, Fc-FcγR engagement, and neutrophils has remained largely uncharacterized. Using an in vitro assay to detect the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, we show that human and mouse monoclonal HA stalk-specific IgG antibodies are able to induce the production of ROS by neutrophils, while HA head-specific antibodies do not. Furthermore, our results indicate that the production of ROS is dependent on Fc receptor (FcR engagement and phagocytosis. We went on to assess the ability of monoclonal HA stalk-specific IgA antibodies to induce ROS. Consistent with our findings for monoclonal IgGs, only HA stalk-specific IgA antibodies elicited ROS production by neutrophils. This induction is dependent on the engagement of FcαR1. Taken together, our findings describe a novel FcR-dependent effector function induced by HA stalk-specific IgG and IgA antibodies, and importantly, our studies shed light on the mechanisms by which HA stalk-specific antibodies achieve protection.

  19. Structure-Based Design of Hepatitis C Virus Vaccines That Elicit Neutralizing Antibody Responses to a Conserved Epitope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Brian G.; Boucher, Elisabeth N.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Ejemel, Monir; Rapp, Chelsea A.; Thomas, William D.; Sundberg, Eric J.; Weng, Zhiping; Wang, Yang; Diamond, Michael S.

    2017-08-09

    Despite recent advances in therapeutic options, hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a severe global disease burden, and a vaccine can substantially reduce its incidence. Due to its extremely high sequence variability, HCV can readily escape the immune response; thus, an effective vaccine must target conserved, functionally important epitopes. Using the structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody in complex with a conserved linear epitope from the HCV E2 envelope glycoprotein (residues 412 to 423; epitope I), we performed structure-based design of immunogens to induce antibody responses to this epitope. This resulted in epitope-based immunogens based on a cyclic defensin protein, as well as a bivalent immunogen with two copies of the epitope on the E2 surface. We solved the X-ray structure of a cyclic immunogen in complex with the HCV1 antibody and confirmed preservation of the epitope conformation and the HCV1 interface. Mice vaccinated with our designed immunogens produced robust antibody responses to epitope I, and their serum could neutralize HCV. Notably, the cyclic designs induced greater epitope-specific responses and neutralization than the native peptide epitope. Beyond successfully designing several novel HCV immunogens, this study demonstrates the principle that neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies can be induced by epitope-based, engineered vaccines and provides the basis for further efforts in structure-based design of HCV vaccines.

    IMPORTANCEHepatitis C virus is a leading cause of liver disease and liver cancer, with approximately 3% of the world's population infected. To combat this virus, an effective vaccine would have distinct advantages over current therapeutic options, yet experimental vaccines have not been successful to date, due in part to the virus's high sequence variability leading to immune escape. In this study, we rationally designed several vaccine immunogens based on the structure of a conserved epitope that

  20. Serum and skin surface antibody responses in merino sheep given three successive inoculations with Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, S S; Ellis, T M; Robertson, G M; Gregory, A R

    1987-11-01

    Three antigens prepared from different phases of the life cycle of Dermatophilus congolensis were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum and skin surface antibody responses in sheep after a first, second and third inoculation with D. congolensis. After the first inoculation, a strong antibody response to the flagella, filament and soluble antigens was detected after 7-21 days in the sera from sheep that were regularly biopsied; the antibody response at the skin surface was detected 28-42 days after inoculation, when the lesions were resolving. Strong anamnestic responses were detected in the serum of sheep that were biopsied and some of the nonbiopsied sheep after the second and third inoculations, but the skin surface antibody response at these times was variable.

  1. Antibody response to the lipopolysaccharide and protein antigens of Salmonella typhi during typhoid infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, R.S.W.; Chau, P.Y.; Lam, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    Serum antibody responses to the lipopolysaccharide and protein antigens of S. typhi in typhoid patients were studied using a solid-phase radioimmunoassay technique with 125 I labelled anti-immunoglobulin antibody. Sera from 24 adult typhoid patients and 20 non-typhoid adult controls were compared. As a group, sera from typhoid patients showed increased IgA, IgG and IgM immunoglobulin levels and gave significantly higher anti-LPS and anti-protein antibody titres in all three major immunoglobulin classes than did non-typhoid controls. Levels of antibodies against LPS or protein in sera of typhoid patients were highly variable with a skew distribution. A good correlation was found between antibody titres to the LPS antigen and those to a protein antigen. No correlation, however, was found between the anti-LPS antibody titres measured by radioimmunoassay and the anti-O antibody titres measured by the Widal agglutination test. Titration of anti-LPS or anti-protein antibodies by radioimmunoassay was found to be more sensitive and specific than Widal test for the serological diagnosis of typhoid fever. The advantages of measuring antibody response by radioimmunoassay over conventional Widal test are discussed. (author)

  2. Immunoglobulin G1 Allotype Influences Antibody Subclass Distribution in Response to HIV gp140 Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kratochvil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibody subclasses exhibit extensive polymorphisms (allotypes that could potentially impact the quality of HIV-vaccine induced B cell responses. Allotypes of immunoglobulin (Ig G1, the most abundant serum antibody, have been shown to display altered functional properties in regard to serum half-life, Fc-receptor binding and FcRn-mediated mucosal transcytosis. To investigate the potential link between allotypic IgG1-variants and vaccine-generated humoral responses in a cohort of 14 HIV vaccine recipients, we developed a novel protocol for rapid IgG1-allotyping. We combined PCR and ELISA assays in a dual approach to determine the IgG1 allotype identity (G1m3 and/or G1m1 of trial participants, using human plasma and RNA isolated from PBMC. The IgG1-allotype distribution of our participants mirrored previously reported results for caucasoid populations. We observed elevated levels of HIV gp140-specific IgG1 and decreased IgG2 levels associated with the G1m1-allele, in contrast to G1m3 carriers. These data suggest that vaccinees homozygous for G1m1 are predisposed to develop elevated Ag-specific IgG1:IgG2 ratios compared to G1m3-carriers. This elevated IgG1:IgG2 ratio was further associated with higher FcγR-dimer engagement, a surrogate for potential antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP function. Although preliminary, these results suggest that IgG1 allotype may have a significant impact on IgG subclass distribution in response to vaccination and associated Fc-mediated effector functions. These results have important implications for ongoing HIV vaccine efficacy studies predicated on engagement of FcγR-mediated cellular functions including ADCC and ADCP, and warrant further investigation. Our novel allotyping protocol provides new tools to determine the potential impact of IgG1 allotypes on vaccine efficacy.

  3. Treatment of patients with a history of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and anti-lepirudin antibodies with argatroban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harenberg, Job; Job, Harenberg; Jörg, Ingrid; Ingrid, Jörg; Fenyvesi, Tivadar; Tivadar, Fenyvesi; Piazolo, Lukas; Lukas, Piazolo

    2005-02-01

    Patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) type II require anticoagulation with non-heparin immediate acting anticoagulants. Danaparoid may cross react with HIT-antibodies and lepirudin may generate anti-lepirudin antibodies influencing anticoagulation. We hypothesised, that the synthetic small molecular thrombin inhibitor argatroban does not induce immunoglobulins reacting towards lepirudin in patients with anti-lepirudin antibodies in the history and that titration of the anticoagulation may be easier with argatroban. We report on the treatment of four patients of a study, which was terminated prematurely due to official warnings for a repeated use of lepirudin. Two patients each received argatroban and lepirudin intravenously. A blinded assessor adjusted the doses of the anticoagulants to 1.5-3.0 fold prolongation of the aPTT. Ecarin clotting time (ECT), concentrations of lepirudin (ELISA) and of argatroban (gas-chromatography with mass spectrometry), and the generation of lepirudin antibodies (ELISA) were measured. APTT-adjusted dosages for argatroban was 2.0-2.6 microg/kg.min and for lepirudin 48-149 microg/kg.h. ECT was prolonged 2.1 to 4.5-fold with lepirudin and 4 to 7-fold with argatroban. The concentration of lepirudin ranged between 750 and 1500 ng/ml and of argatroban between 400 and 1100 ng/ml. Patients on argatroban did not generate immunoglobulin IgG reacting towards lepirudin in contrast to both patients on lepirudin who developed anti-lepirudin antibodies. Both treatments were well tolerated. Despite the low number of patients argatroban seems to lead to a more stable anticoagulant response than lepirudin resulting in a lower variability of the dosage for prophylaxis or treatment of thromboembolism of patients with a history of HIT and lepirudin antibodies.

  4. Comparison of infection-neutralizing and -enhancing antibody balance induced by two distinct genotype strains of dengue virus type 1 or 3 DNA vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjatha, Fithriyah; Takizawa, Yamato; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Konishi, Eiji

    2013-11-01

    Dengue viruses have spread throughout tropical and subtropical countries, and vaccine development is urgently needed. However, one concern is that induction of insufficient levels of neutralizing antibodies in vaccines may increase disease severity because of a hypothetical mechanism termed antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study used two distinct genotype strains of dengue virus types 1 and 3 (DENV1 and DENV3, respectively) to compare antibody responses in a mouse-DNA vaccine model. As expected, a conventional neutralization test using Vero cells showed higher antibody titers in homologous rather than heterologous combinations of genotype strains used for mouse immunization and the neutralization test, for each of DENV1 and DENV3. However, our assay system using K562 cells to measure the balance of neutralizing and enhancing antibodies indicated that Vero cell-neutralizing antibody titers did not always correlate with enhancing activities observed at subneutralizing doses. Rather, induction of enhancing activities depended on the genotype strain used for mouse immunization. The genotype/strain difference also affected IgG subclass profiles and potentially the composition of antibody species induced in mice. This study suggests that enhancing activities of dengue virus-induced neutralizing antibodies may vary according to the genotype and has implications for vaccine antigen development. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  6. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ( 9 0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ( 1 31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades

  7. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  8. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    OpenAIRE

    Minozzi, Giulietta; Parmentier, Henk K; Mignon-Grasteau, Sandrine; Nieuwland, Mike GB; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Gourichon, David; Minvielle, Francis; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background - The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab) to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three different general immune criteria; high antibody response to Newcastle disease virus 3 weeks after vaccination (ND3), high cell-mediated immune response, using the wing web response to phytohemglu...

  9. Are anticardiolipin antibodies responsible for some of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. What were first called simply false-positive Wassermann reactions and then lupus anticoagulant are now known as antiphospholipid or anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA). These are known to cause a tendency to thrombosis and are frequently present in many neurological conditions and infections. The pathological ...

  10. Evaluation of antibody response by dogs vaccinated with low egg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelve dogs were immunized with live attenuated flury strain antirabies vaccine using single, double and triple inoculation sites of the recommended dose, but in divided doses for the double and triple sites. All the dogs were screened for neutralizing antibodies against rabies before immunization, while sera were collected ...

  11. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  12. Cell death induced by a 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in ovarian cancer multicell spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippovich, I.V.; Sorokina, N.; Robillard, N.; Faivre-Chauvet, A.; Bardies, M.; Chatal, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of OVCAR-3 spheroids with 131 I-OC125 monoclonal antibody produced a decrease in spheroid volume and a concomitant rise in necrotic cell number. No increase in apoptotic cell number was observed during incubation of spheroids with the labeled antibody. Necrosis began early, reaching a maximum after 3 Gy of accumulated dose delivered at a dose rate of 1.8 cGy/h. Higher accumulated doses induced necrosis for longer incubation times. Thus, dose rate and time are both determinants of ultimate radiation effects when spheroids are incubated with labeled antibodies, although dose rate is the most important factor

  13. Cell death induced by a 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in ovarian cancer multicell spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippovich, I V; Sorokina, N; Robillard, N; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Bardies, M; Chatal, J F

    1996-07-01

    Treatment of OVCAR-3 spheroids with 131I-OC125 monoclonal antibody produced a decrease in spheroid volume and a concomitant rise in necrotic cell number. No increase in apoptotic cell number was observed during incubation of spheroids with the labeled antibody. Necrosis began early, reaching a maximum after 3 Gy of accumulated dose delivered at a dose rate of 1.8 cGy/h. Higher accumulated doses induced necrosis for longer incubation times. Thus, dose rate and time are both determinants of ultimate radiation effects when spheroids are incubated with labeled antibodies, although dose rate is the most important factor.

  14. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  15. LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE INDUCES THE PRODUCTION OF DIAGNOSTIC MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY BY HYBRIDOMA CELLS AGAINST CONGENITAL ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEK KEE CHUA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to screen and identify the potential inducers in maximizing the production of monoclonal antibody by hybridoma 192 cell line for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia diagnostic. There are nine inducers used in this research, namely lysozyme, aldolase, sodium butyrate, sodium phosphate, potassium phosphate, dimethyl sulfoxide, lipopolysaccharide, essential amino acids, and nonessential amino acids. Hybridoma 192 cell was cultured in 5% CO2 incubator at 37°C and ˃80% humidity in the medium with different concentrations of inducer agents. The inducers were added at the beginning of the culture and the samples were taken after 72 h of culture. The performance of these inducer agents was assessed based on the maximum monoclonal antibody titer achieved using Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay. Lipopolysaccharide was found to increase the maximum monoclonal antibody titer when supplemented at 8 to 12 µg/mL. After optimization using one-factor central composite design at this range, the optimum point was determined to be 8 µg/mL. Verification experiments shows that lipopolysaccharide enhanced the average specific monoclonal antibody production rate by 56% relative to control. In conclusion, lipopolysaccharide at 8 µg/mL is able to increase the monoclonal antibody specific production of hybridoma 192 cell line.

  16. [The IgG antibody response in patients colonized by Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, G; Acuña, R; Jashés, M; Troncoso, M; Toledo, M S; Arellano, L

    1990-11-01

    The IgG antibody response specific to Helicobacter pylori was evaluated through ELISA in a group of 92 gastric patients colonized by this bacteria. 74 had gastritis and 19 gastroduodenal ulcer. Three control groups were studied in a similar way: normal adult volunteers (n = 17), adults with E coli or S typhi bacteremia (n = 30) and normal infants (n = 30). IgG antibody response to H pylori was demonstrated in 98% of colonized patients and 0% of infants. Asymptomatic individuals and those with bacteremia had high rates of antibody response (76 and 90% respectively), although this rate and also the titers of antibody response were significantly lower than that of colonized patients (p pylori in the majority of colonized gastric patients and asymptomatic adults suggests that this infection is very common in our population.

  17. Demonstration of the salmonid humoral response to Renibacterium salmoninarum using a monoclonal antibody against salmonid immunoglobulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Arkoosh , M.R.; Rohovec, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The specificity of the antibody response of salmonids to Renibacterium salmoninarum antigens was demonstrated by western blotting techniques that utilized a monoclonal antibody against salmonid immunoglobulin. In this study, the specificity of the response in immunized chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytschawas compared with the response in naturally infected chinook salmon and coho salmon O. kisutch, and immunized rabbits. The antibody response in immunized salmon and rabbits and the naturally infected fish was primarily against the 57–58kilodalton protein complex. In addition to recognizing these proteins in the extracellular fraction and whole-cell preparations, antibody from the immunized salmon and rabbits detected four proteins with lower molecular masses. Western blotting techniques allow identification of the specific antigens recognized and are a useful tool for comparing the immunogenicity of different R. salmoninarumpreparations. Immunofluorescent techniques with whole bacteria were less sensitive than western blotting in detecting salmonid anti-R. salmoninarumantibody.

  18. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-02-18

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Lack of antiviral antibody response in koalas infected with koala retroviruses (KoRV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Möller, Annekatrin; Timms, Peter; Denner, Joachim

    2015-02-16

    Many wild koalas are infected with the koala retrovirus, KoRV, some of which suffer from lymphoma and chlamydial disease. Three subgroups, KoRV-A, KoRV-B and KoRV-J, have so far been described. It is well known that other closely related gammaretroviruses can induce tumours and severe immunodeficiencies in their respective hosts and a possible role for KoRV infection in lymphoma and chlamydial disease in koalas has been suggested. In many wild koalas, KoRV-A has become endogenised, i.e., it is integrated in the germ-line and is passed on with normal cellular genes. In this study, sera from koalas in European zoos and from wild animals in Australia were screened for antibodies against KoRV-A. These naturally infected animals all carry endogenous KoRV-A and two zoo animals are also infected with KoRV-B. The antibody response is generally an important diagnostic tool for detecting retrovirus infections. However, when Western blot analyses were performed using purified virus or recombinant proteins corresponding to KoRV-A, none of the koalas tested positive for specific antibodies, suggesting a state of tolerance. These results have implications for koala vaccination, as they suggest that therapeutic immunisation of animals carrying and expressing endogenous KoRV-A will not be successful. However, it remains unclear whether these animals can be immunised against KoRV-B and immunisation of uninfected koalas could still be worthwhile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Malaria-induced acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ofori, Michael F; Dodoo, Daniel; Staalsoe, Trine

    2002-01-01

    In areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, protective immunity is acquired during childhood in parallel with acquisition of agglutinating antibodies to parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed on parasitized red blood cells. In a semi-immune child in such an area......, clinical disease is caused mainly by parasites expressing VSA not recognized by preexisting VSA-specific antibodies in that child. Such malaria episodes are known to cause an increase in agglutinating antibodies specifically recognizing VSA expressed by the parasite isolate causing the illness, whereas...... antibody responses to other parasite isolates are relatively unaffected. However, the detailed kinetics of this VSA antibody acquisition are unknown and hence were the aim of this study. We show that P. falciparum malaria in Ghanaian children generally caused a rapid and sustained increase in variant...

  1. Smoking and periodontal disease: discrimination of antibody responses to pathogenic and commensal oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, L; Steffen, M J; Stevens, J; Badger, E; Tempro, P; Fuller, B; McGuire, A; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Thomas, M V; Ebersole, J L

    2011-04-01

    Smoking is an independent risk factor for the initiation, extent and severity of periodontal disease. This study examined the ability of the host immune system to discriminate commensal oral bacteria from pathogens at mucosal surfaces, i.e. oral cavity. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody reactive with three pathogenic and five commensal oral bacteria in 301 current smokers (age range 21-66 years) were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Clinical features of periodontal health were used as measures of periodontitis. Antibody to the pathogens and salivary cotinine levels were related positively to disease severity; however, the antibody levels were best described by the clinical disease unrelated to the amount of smoking. The data showed a greater immune response to pathogens than commensals that was related specifically to disease extent, and most noted in black males. Significant correlations in individual patient responses to the pathogens and commensals were lost with an increasing extent of periodontitis and serum antibody to the pathogens. Antibody to Porphyromonas gingivalis was particularly distinct with respect to the discriminatory nature of the immune responses in recognizing the pathogens. Antibody responses to selected pathogenic and commensal oral microorganisms differed among racial groups and genders. The antibody response to the pathogens was related to disease severity. The level of antibody to the pathogens, and in particular P. gingivalis, was correlated with disease severity in black and male subsets of patients. The amount of smoking did not appear to impact directly serum antibody levels to these oral bacteria. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  2. Dapsone hydroxylamine induces premature removal of human erythrocytes by membrane reorganization and antibody binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Luciana; Fiore, Cristina; Zen, Francesco; Coleman, Michael D; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Clari, Giulio

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE N-hydroxylation of dapsone leads to the formation of the toxic hydroxylamines responsible for the clinical methaemoglobinaemia associated with dapsone therapy. Dapsone has been associated with decreased lifespan of erythrocytes, with consequences such as anaemia and morbidity in patients treated with dapsone for malaria. Here, we investigated how dapsone and/or its hydroxylamine derivative (DDS-NHOH) induced erythrocyte membrane alterations that could lead to premature cell removal. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Erythrocytes from healthy donors were subjected to incubation with dapsone and DDS-NHOH for varying times and the band 3 protein tyrosine-phosphorylation process, band 3 aggregation, membrane alteration and IgG binding were all examined and compared with erythrocytes from two patients receiving dapsone therapy. KEY RESULTS The hydroxylamine derivative, but not dapsone (the parent sulphone) altered membrane protein interactions, leading both to aggregation of band 3 protein and to circulating autologous antibody binding, shown in erythrocytes from patients receiving dapsone therapy. The band 3 tyrosine-phosphorylation process can be used as a diagnostic system to monitor membrane alterations both in vitro, assessing concentration and time-dependent effects of DDS-NHOH treatment, and in vivo, evaluating erythrocytes from dapsone-treated patients, in resting or oxidatively stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS DDS-NHOH-induced alterations of human erythrocytes can be directly monitored in vitro by tyrosine-phosphorylation level and formation of band 3 protein aggregates. The latter, together with antibody-mediated labelling of erythrocytes, also observed after clinical use of dapsone, may lead to shortening of erythrocyte lifespan. PMID:20662842

  3. Immunoproteomics analysis of the murine antibody response to vaccination with an improved Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Twine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. An attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS has been shown to be efficacious in humans, but safety concerns have prevented its licensure by the FDA. Recently, F. tularensis LVS has been produced under Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP guidelines. Little is known about the immunogenicity of this new vaccine preparation in comparison with extensive studies conducted with laboratory passaged strains of LVS. Thus, the aim of the current work was to evaluate the repertoire of antibodies produced in mouse strains vaccinated with the new LVS vaccine preparation.In the current study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to examine the repertoire of antibodies induced following successful immunization of BALB/c versus unsuccessful vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with the new preparation of F. tularensis LVS. Successful vaccination of BALB/c mice elicited antibodies to nine identified proteins that were not recognized by antisera from vaccinated but unprotected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, the CGMP formulation of LVS stimulated a greater repertoire of antibodies following vaccination compared to vaccination with laboratory passaged ATCC LVS strain. A total of 15 immunoreactive proteins were identified in both studies, however, 16 immunoreactive proteins were uniquely reactive with sera from the new formulation of LVS.This is the first report characterising the antibody based immune response of the new formulation of LVS in the widely used murine model of tularemia. Using two mouse strains, we show that successfully vaccinated mice can be distinguished from unsuccessfully vaccinated mice based upon the repertoire of antibodies generated. This opens the door towards downselection of antigens for incorporation into tularemia subunit vaccines. In addition, this work also highlights differences in the humoral immune response to

  4. Cytokine profiles and antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimated higher ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/IL-12 were also observed in the symptomatic children while the asymptomatic controls had higher IL-12/IL-10 ratio. The mean concentration levels of anti-P. falciparum IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 antibodies were statistically significantly higher in the individuals >5 years of age than <5 ...

  5. Immunologic and functional characterization of anti-HLA-DR rabbit antibodies induced by synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Schulz, G; Houghten, R A

    1984-10-01

    Three peptides selected from the amino acid sequence of the alpha- and beta-chains of DR2 histocompatibility antigens were chemically synthesized and coupled to carrier proteins to be used as immunogens in rabbits. This immunization resulted in the production of specific antibodies that readily recognized the antigen. However, only one of the four antibody preparations, antibody 6148, elicited by a short peptide from the beta-chain (residues 61-73), reacts with native membrane glycoproteins as well as intact human lymphoblastoid cells in enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays. This antibody was found to react also with membrane glycoproteins solubilized by nonionic detergents from cells bearing a different HLA-DR specificity: therefore it is likely that the peptide responsible for eliciting antibody 6148 represents a common framework determinant of DR alloantigens that is accessible on the surface of lymphoblastoid cells. The ability of antibody 6148 to bind to intact cells was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence and by fluorescein-activated cell sorter analysis. This antibody is also capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity as determined by a 51Cr-release assay.

  6. Adsorption of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Agonist to Alum-Based Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Dampens Pro-T Helper 2 Activities and Enhances Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolatto, Juliana; Mirotti, Luciana; Rodriguez, Dunia; Gomes, Eliane; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum salts gels (alum) are TLR-independent adjuvants and have been used to boost antibody responses in alum-based vaccines such as diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT) triple vaccine. However, the pro-Th2 activity of alum-based vaccine formulations has not been fully appreciated. Here we found that alum-based tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccine was biased toward a Th-2 profile as shown by TT-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production, and high levels of IgE anaphylactic antibodies. The adsorption into alum of prototypic TLR4 agonists such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli consistently dampened TT-induced Th2 activities without inducing IFNγ or Th1-like responses in the lung. Conversely, adsorption of monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) extracted from Salmonella minnesota, which is a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β- (TRIF-) biased TLR4 agonist, was less effective in decreasing Th-2 responses. Importantly, in a situation with antigenic competition (OVA plus TT), TT-specific IgG1 or IgG2a was decreased compared with TT sensitization. Notably, LPS increased the production of IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibodies. In conclusion, the addition of LPS induces a more robust IgG1 and IgG2a TT-specific antibody production and concomitantly decreases Th2-cellular and humoral responses, indicating a potential use of alum/TLR-based vaccines.

  7. Mechanisms of equine infectious anemia virus escape from neutralizing antibody responses define epitope specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, Brett A; Clark, Sandra K; Friedrich, Rachel A

    2012-08-01

    Determining mechanisms of viral escape to particular epitopes recognized by virus-neutralizing antibody can facilitate characterization of host-neutralizing antibody responses as type- versus group-specific, and provides necessary information for vaccine development. Our study reveals that a single N-glycan located in the 5' region of the Wyoming wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) principal neutralizing domain (PND) accounts for the differences in neutralization phenotype observed between PND variants, while variations in charged amino acids within the PND do not appear to play a key role in viral escape. Site-directed mutagenesis and peptide mapping of a conserved epitope to neutralizing antibody in the 3' region of the PND showed rapid selective pressure for acquisition of a 5' PND N-glycan responsible for defining the specificity of the neutralizing-antibody response.

  8. Recombinant outer membrane vesicles carrying Chlamydia muridarum HtrA induce antibodies that neutralize chlamydial infection in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Erika; Ianni, Elvira; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Petracca, Roberto; Galli, Giuliano; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Norais, Nathalie; Laera, Donatello; Giusti, Fabiola; Pierleoni, Andrea; Donati, Manuela; Cevenini, Roberto; Finco, Oretta; Grandi, Guido; Grifantini, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spheroid particles released by all Gram-negative bacteria as a result of the budding out of the outer membrane. Since they carry many of the bacterial surface-associated proteins and feature a potent built-in adjuvanticity, OMVs are being utilized as vaccines, some of which commercially available. Recently, methods for manipulating the protein content of OMVs have been proposed, thus making OMVs a promising platform for recombinant, multivalent vaccines development. Methods Chlamydia muridarum DO serine protease HtrA, an antigen which stimulates strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and humans, was expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the OmpA leader sequence to deliver it to the OMV compartment. Purified OMVs carrying HtrA (CM rHtrA-OMV) were analyzed for their capacity to induce antibodies capable of neutralizing Chlamydia infection of LLC-MK2 cells in vitro. Results CM rHtrA-OMV immunization in mice induced antibodies that neutralize Chlamydial invasion as judged by an in vitro infectivity assay. This was remarkably different from what observed with an enzymatically functional recombinant HtrA expressed in, and purified from the E. coli cytoplasm (CM rHtrA). The difference in functionality between anti-CM rHtrA and anti-CM rHtrA-OMV antibodies was associated to a different pattern of protein epitopes recognition. The epitope recognition profile of anti-CM HtrA-OMV antibodies was similar to that induced in mice during Chlamydial infection. Conclusions When expressed in OMVs HtrA appears to assume a conformation similar to the native one and this results in the elicitation of functional immune responses. These data further support the potentiality of OMVs as vaccine platform. PMID:24009891

  9. Formalin-inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate induced cross-neutralizing antibody against subgenotypes B1, B4, B5 and C4A in adult volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Hsiang Chou

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has caused several epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD in Asia. No effective EV71 vaccine is available. A randomized and open-label phase I clinical study registered with ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01268787, aims to evaluate the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a formalin-inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate (EV71vac at 5- and 10-µg doses. In this study we report the cross-neutralizing antibody responses from each volunteer against different subgenotypes of EV71 and CVA16.Sixty eligible healthy adults were recruited and vaccinated. Blood samples were obtained on day 0, 21 and 42 and tested against B1, B4, B5, C2, C4A, C4B and CVA16 for cross-neutralizing antibody responses.The immunogenicity of both 5- and 10- µg doses were found to be very similar. Approximately 45% of the participants had 4-fold increase in Nt, but there was no further increase in Nt after the second dose. EV71vac induced very strong cross-neutralizing antibody responses in >85% of volunteers without pre-existing Nt against subgenotype B1, B5 and C4A. EV71vac elicited weak cross-neutralizing antibody responses (∼20% of participants against a C4B and Coxsackie virus A16. Over 90% of vaccinated volunteers did not develop cross-neutralizing antibody responses (Nt<8 against a C2 strain. EV71vac can boost and significantly enhance the neutralizing antibody responses in volunteers who already had pre-vaccination antibodies against EV71 and/or CVA16.EV71vac is efficient in eliciting cross-neutralizing antibody responses against EV71 subgenotypes B1, B4, B5, and C4A, and provides the rationale for its evaluation in phase II clinical trials.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01268787.

  10. Longitudinal studies of neutralizing antibody responses to rotavirus in stools and sera of children following severe rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, B S

    1998-11-01

    Rotavirus-neutralizing antibody responses in sera and stools of children hospitalized with rotavirus gastroenteritis and then monitored longitudinally were optimally detected by using local rotavirus strains. Stool responses were highest on days 5 to 8 after the onset of diarrhea. Longitudinal monitoring suggested that serum neutralizing antibody responses were a more useful measure of severely symptomatic rotavirus infection than stool responses but that stool antibody responses may be a useful measure of rotavirus immunity.

  11. Longitudinal Studies of Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Rotavirus in Stools and Sera of Children following Severe Rotavirus Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Coulson, Barbara S.

    1998-01-01

    Rotavirus-neutralizing antibody responses in sera and stools of children hospitalized with rotavirus gastroenteritis and then monitored longitudinally were optimally detected by using local rotavirus strains. Stool responses were highest on days 5 to 8 after the onset of diarrhea. Longitudinal monitoring suggested that serum neutralizing antibody responses were a more useful measure of severely symptomatic rotavirus infection than stool responses but that stool antibody responses may be a use...

  12. Somatic Hypermutation-Induced Changes in the Structure and Dynamics of HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Thaddeus M; Gorman, Jason; Joyce, M Gordon; Zhou, Tongqing; Soto, Cinque; Guttman, Miklos; Moquin, Stephanie; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-08-02

    Antibody somatic hypermutation (SHM) and affinity maturation enhance antigen recognition by modifying antibody paratope structure to improve its complementarity with the target epitope. SHM-induced changes in paratope dynamics may also contribute to antibody maturation, but direct evidence of this is limited. Here, we examine two classes of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for SHM-induced changes in structure and dynamics, and delineate the effects of these changes on interactions with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). In combination with new and existing structures of unmutated and affinity matured antibody Fab fragments, we used hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to directly measure Fab structural dynamics. Changes in antibody structure and dynamics were positioned to improve complementarity with Env, with changes in dynamics primarily observed at the paratope peripheries. We conclude that SHM optimizes paratope complementarity to conserved HIV-1 epitopes and restricts the mobility of paratope-peripheral residues to minimize clashes with variable features on HIV-1 Env. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Maternal antibodies: clinical significance, mechanism of interference with immune responses, and possible vaccination strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eNiewiesk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonates have an immature immune system which cannot adequately protect against infectious diseases. Early in life, immune protection is accomplished by maternal antibodies transferred from mother to offspring. However, decaying maternal antibodies inhibit vaccination as is examplified by the inhibition of seroconversion after measles vaccination. This phenomenon has been described in both human and veterinary medicine and is independent of the type of vaccine being used. This review will discuss the use of animal models for vaccine research. I will review clinical solutions for inhibition of vaccination by maternal antibodies, and the testing and development of potentially effective vaccines. These are based on new mechanistic insight about the inhibitory mechanism of maternal antibodies. Maternal antibodies inhibit the generation of antibodies whereas the T cell response is usually unaffected. B cell inhibition is mediated through a cross-link between B-cell receptor (BCR with the Fcg receptor IIB (FcgRIIB by a vaccine-antibody complex. In animal experiments, this inhibition can be partially overcome by injection of a vaccine-specific monoclonal IgM antibody. IgM stimulates the B-cell directly through cross-linking the BCR via complement protein C3d and antigen to the complement receptor 2 (CR2 signaling complex. In addition, it was shown that interferon alpha binds to the CD21 chain of CR2 as well as the interferon receptor and that this dual receptor usage drives B cell responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. In lieu of immunizing the infant the concept of maternal immunization as a strategy to protect neonates has been proposed. This approach would still not solve the question of how to immunize in the presence of maternal antibodies but would defer the time of infection to an age where infection might not have such a detrimental outcome as in neonates. I will review successful examples and potential challenges of implementing

  14. Use of Antibody Responses against Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE)-Encoded Antigens To Monitor Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Infections on Cattle Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joris, Maria-Adelheid; Vanrompay, Daisy; Verstraete, Karen; De Reu, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a significant zoonotic pathogen causing severe disease associated with watery and bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. Infections are frequently associated with contact with EHEC-contaminated ruminant feces. Both natural and experimental infection of cattle induces serum antibodies against the LEE-encoded proteins intimin, EspA, EspB, and Tir and the Shiga toxins Stx1 and Stx2, although the latter are poorly immunogenic in cattle. We determined whether antibodies and/or the kinetics of antibody responses against intimin, Tir, EspA, and/or EspB can be used for monitoring EHEC infections in beef cattle herds in order to reduce carcass contamination at slaughter. We examined the presence of serum antibodies against recombinant O157:H7 E. coli intimin EspA, EspB, and Tir during a cross-sectional study on 12 cattle farms and during a longitudinal time course study on two EHEC-positive cattle farms. We searched for a possible correlation between intimin, Tir, EspA, and/or EspB antibodies and fecal excretion of EHEC O157, O145, O111, O103, or O26 seropathotypes. The results indicated that serum antibody responses to EspB and EspA might be useful for first-line screening at the herd level for EHEC O157, O26, and most likely also for EHEC O103 infections. However, antibody responses against EspB are of less use for monitoring individual animals, since some EHEC-shedding animals did not show antibody responses and since serum antibody responses against EspB could persist for several months even when shedding had ceased. PMID:23563950

  15. HIV-1-Specific Antibody Response and Function after DNA Prime and Recombinant Adenovirus 5 Boost HIV Vaccine in HIV-Infected Subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes S Gach

    Full Text Available Little is known about the humoral immune response against DNA prime-recombinant adenovirus 5 (rAd5 boost HIV vaccine among HIV-infected patients on long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART. Previous studies emphasized cellular immune responses; however, current research suggests both cellular and humoral responses are likely required for a successful therapeutic vaccine. Thus, we aimed to understand antibody response and function induced by vaccination of ART-treated HIV-1-infected patients with immune recovery. All subjects participated in EraMune 02, an open-label randomized clinical trial of ART intensification followed by a six plasmid DNA prime (envA, envB, envC, gagB, polB, nefB and rAd5 boost HIV vaccine with matching inserts. Antibody binding levels were determined with a recently developed microarray approach. We also analyzed neutralization efficiency and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. We found that the DNA prime-rAd5 boost vaccine induced a significant cross-clade HIV-specific antibody response, which correlated with antibody neutralization efficiency. However, despite the increase in antibody binding levels, the vaccine did not significantly stimulate neutralization or ADCC responses. This finding was also reflected by a lack of change in total CD4+ cell associated HIV DNA in those who received the vaccine. Our results have important implications for further therapeutic vaccine design and administration, especially in HIV-1 infected patients, as boosting of preexisting antibody responses are unlikely to lead to clearance of latent proviruses in the HIV reservoir.

  16. Vaccination with the Surface Proteins MUL_2232 and MUL_3720 of Mycobacterium ulcerans Induces Antibodies but Fails to Provide Protection against Buruli Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolz, Miriam; Bénard, Angèle; Dreyer, Anita M; Kerber, Sarah; Vettiger, Andrea; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Duthie, Malcolm S; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-02-01

    Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic ulcerative neglected tropical disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that is most prevalent in West African countries. M. ulcerans produces a cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin called mycolactone, which causes extensive necrosis of infected subcutaneous tissue and the development of characteristic ulcerative lesions with undermined edges. While cellular immune responses are expected to play a key role against early intracellular stages of M. ulcerans in macrophages, antibody mediated protection might be of major relevance against advanced stages, where bacilli are predominantly found as extracellular clusters. To assess whether vaccine induced antibodies against surface antigens of M. ulcerans can protect against Buruli ulcer we formulated two surface vaccine candidate antigens, MUL_2232 and MUL_3720, as recombinant proteins with the synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-stable emulsion. The candidate vaccines elicited strong antibody responses without a strong bias towards a TH1 type cellular response, as indicated by the IgG2a to IgG1 ratio. Despite the cross-reactivity of the induced antibodies with the native antigens, no significant protection was observed against progression of an experimental M. ulcerans infection in a mouse footpad challenge model. Even though vaccine-induced antibodies have the potential to opsonise the extracellular bacilli they do not have a protective effect since infiltrating phagocytes might be killed by mycolactone before reaching the bacteria, as indicated by lack of viable infiltrates in the necrotic infection foci.

  17. Propylthiouracil-Induced Vasculitis With Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Grizzo Peres Martins, Ana Claudia; Gaviolli, Camila Fatima; Alavi, Afsaneh

    2015-06-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU)-associated vasculitis is a potentially life-threatening disease with a recent increase in the reported cases in the medical literature. This increase may suggest that some earlier cases have been unrecognized or assigned to an alternative nosology category. Although the skin can be the only organ affected by PTU-associated vasculitis, there are many reports with multiple-system involvement. Classically, the symptoms appear under a tetrad of fever, sore throat, arthralgia, and skin lesions. Cutaneous lesions in reported cases of PTU vasculitis have most commonly consisted of retiform acral, purpuric plaques, or nodules. We report a case of perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis developed during treatment with PTU for Grave's disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. [Antibody response to Ascaris lumbricoides among the children population in the Ustí Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J; Stiborová, I; Pohorská, J; Dobiásová, L; Král, V

    2005-11-01

    A group of 156 children aged between 10 and 12 years were screened for IgG and IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides. The study subjects were 64 children of Romany origin and 92 children from the majority population. IgG antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides were detected in 112 (71.8%) children. No difference in the prevalence of IgG antibodies was found between Romany children and those from the majority population. As many as 34.1% of the study subjects had IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides, again with no difference between the two ethnic groups. Children with IgG antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides had significantly higher total IgE levels compared to those who had tested IgG negative. To demonstrate induction of a non-specific IgE response was one of the study objectives. The high prevalence rates of IgG and IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides are suggestive of a high frequency of cross- and non-specific reactions. Possible effect of cross-reactivity to other antigens on the specific IgG and IgE antibody response to Ascaris lumbricoides is discussed.

  19. Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) mutant lacking U(L)49.5 luminal domain residues 30-32 and cytoplasmic tail residues 80-96 induces more rapid onset of virus neutralizing antibody and cellular immune responses in calves than the wild-type strain Cooper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huiyong; He, Junyun; Paulsen, Daniel B; Chowdhury, Shafiqul I

    2012-06-30

    Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) envelope protein U(L)49.5 inhibits transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and down-regulates cell-surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to promote immune evasion. Earlier, we have constructed a BHV-1U(L)49.5Δ30-32 CT-null virus and determined that in the infected cells, TAP inhibition and MHC-I down regulation properties of the virus are abolished. In this study, we compared the pathogenicity and immune responses in calves infected with BHV-1U(L)49.5Δ30-32 CT-null and BHV-1 wt viruses. Following primary infection, both BHV-1 wt and BHV-1U(L)49.5Δ30-32 CT-null virus replicated in the nasal epithelium with very similar yields. BHV-1 antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation as well as CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity in calves infected with the BHV-1U(L)49.5Δ30-32 CT-null virus peaked by 7 dpi (P49.5 mutant virus-infected calves, also peaked 7 days (IFN-γ; P49.5 mutant virus-infected calves, primary neutralizing antibody and cellular immune responses were induced significantly more rapidly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in rheumatoid arthritis: antibody response to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Tabarya, D; Hoffman, W L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage and to compare antibody responses to two superantigens, staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), in rheumatoid arthritis patients and normal subjects. METHODS: 88 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 110 control subjects were cultured for nasal carriage of S aureus; 62 isolates were bacteriophage typed. Twenty five patients and 11 spouses were tested for antibodies t...

  1. Circulating CXCR5+PD-1+ response predicts influenza vaccine antibody responses in young adults but not elderly adults

    OpenAIRE

    Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Reuter, Morgan A.; Dolfi, Douglas V.; Mansfield, Kathleen D.; Aung, Htin; Badwan, Osama Z.; Kurupati, Raj K.; Kannan, Senthil; Ertl, Hildegund; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Betts, Michael R.; Canaday, David H.; Wherry, E. John

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recommended for all adults annually, the incidence of vaccine failure, defined as weak or absent increase in neutralizing antibody titers, is increased in the elderly compared to young adults. The T follicular helper subset of CD4 T cells (Tfh) provides B cell help in germinal centers and is necessary for class-switched antibody responses. Previous studies suggested a role for circulating T follicular helper cells (cTfh) following influenza vaccination in adu...

  2. Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Antigenically Drifted Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses among Children and Adolescents following 2014-2015 Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Judith M.; Gross, F. Liaini; Jefferson, Stacie; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Archibald, Crystal Ann; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Susick, Michael; Moehling, Krissy; Spencer, Sarah; Chung, Jessie R.; Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza A(H3N2) viruses that predominated during the moderately severe 2014-2015 influenza season differed antigenically from the vaccine component, resulting in reduced vaccine effectiveness (VE). To examine antibody responses to 2014-2015 inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) and live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) among children and adolescents, we collected sera before and after vaccination from 150 children aged 3 to 17 years enrolled at health care facilities. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were used to assess the antibody responses to vaccine strains. We evaluated cross-reactive antibody responses against two representative A(H3N2) viruses that had antigenically drifted from the A(H3N2) vaccine component using microneutralization (MN) assays. Postvaccination antibody titers to drifted A(H3N2) viruses were higher following receipt of IIV (MN geometric mean titers [GMTs], 63 to 68; 38 to 45% achieved seroconversion) versus LAIV (MN GMT, 22; only 3 to 5% achieved seroconversion). In 9- to 17-year-olds, the highest MN titers were observed among IIV-vaccinated individuals who had received LAIV in the previous season. Among all IIV recipients aged 3 to 17 years, the strongest predictor of antibody responses to the drifted viruses was the prevaccination titers to the vaccine strain. The results of our study suggest that in an antigenically drifted influenza season, vaccination still induced cross-reactive antibody responses to drifted circulating A(H3N2) viruses, although higher antibody titers may be required for protection. Antibody responses to drifted A(H3N2) viruses following vaccination were influenced by multiple factors, including vaccine type and preexisting immunity from prior exposure. PMID:27558294

  3. Potent functional antibody responses elicited by HIV-I DNA priming and boosting with heterologous HIV-1 recombinant MVA in healthy Tanzanian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agricola Joachim

    Full Text Available Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA virus boosting (HIVIS03. The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK cells from PBMC (p=0.006, indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development.Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080.

  4. A dual vaccine against influenza & Alzheimer's disease failed to enhance anti-β-amyloid antibody responses in mice with pre-existing virus specific memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, Hayk; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Arpine; Cadagan, Richard; Marleau, Annette M; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-12-15

    Novel dual vaccine, WSN-Aβ(1-10), based on the recombinant influenza virus, expressing immunodominant B-cell epitope of β-amyloid, simultaneously induced therapeutically potent anti-Aβ and anti-influenza antibodies. In this study we showed that boosting of WSN-WT primed mice with WSN-Aβ(1-10) enhances anti-viral, but fails to induce anti-Aβ antibody responses. This inhibition is associated with expression of Aβ(1-10) within the context of an inactivated influenza virus vaccine. These results demonstrate that the use of an inactivated influenza virus as a carrier for AD vaccine may not be applicable due to the possible inhibition of anti-Aβ antibody response in individuals previously vaccinated or infected with influenza. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of deceleration on the humoral antibody response in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, R. P.; Caren, L. D.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of hypergravity, simulated by chronic centrifugation, followed by a return to normal G (deceleration) on the immune system of rats were investigated. Two groups of male rats (28 days at 2.1 G, and 3.1 G) were compared to the control group (1.0 G). The animals were immunized by i.p. injections of sheep red blood cells on days 29, 42, and 57, and bled on days 36, 47, and 62. While the centrifuged rats ate and gainedsignificantly less than the control rats, the antibody titers and the organ/body mass ratios for the adrenal glands, kidneys, lungs, heart, and thymus were unaffected by gravity exposures, as were the values of the hematocrit and the white blood cell counts. It is concluded that deceleration does not adversely affect these particular aspects of the immune system.

  6. Activated human nasal epithelial cells modulate specific antibody response against bacterial or viral antigens.

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    Chiou-Yueh Yeh

    Full Text Available Nasal mucosa is an immune responsive organ evidenced by eliciting both specific local secretory IgA and systemic IgG antibody responses with intra-nasal administration of antigens. Nevertheless, the role of nasal epithelial cells in modulating such responses is unclear. Human nasal epithelial cells (hNECs obtained from sinus mucosa of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were cultured in vitro and firstly were stimulated by Lactococcus lactis bacterium-like particles (BLPs in order to examine their role on antibody production. Secondly, both antigens of immunodominant protein IDG60 from oral Streptococcus mutans and hemagglutinin (HA from influenza virus were tested to evaluate the specific antibody response. Stimulated hNECs by BLPs exhibited a significant increase in the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP. Conditioned medium of stimulated hNECs has effects on enhancing the proliferation of CD4+ T cells together with interferon-γ and IL-5 production, increasing the costimulatory molecules on dendritic cells and augmenting the production of IDG60 specific IgA, HA specific IgG, IgA by human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Such production of antigen specific IgG and IgA is significantly counteracted in the presence of IL-6 and TSLP neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, properly stimulated hNECs may impart immuno-modulatory effects on the antigen-specific antibody response at least through the production of IL-6 and TSLP.

  7. Hepatitis C Virus E1 and E2 Proteins Used as Separate Immunogens Induce Neutralizing Antibodies with Additive Properties.

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    Elodie Beaumont

    Full Text Available Various strategies involving the use of hepatitis C virus (HCV E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins as immunogens have been developed for prophylactic vaccination against HCV. However, the ideal mode of processing and presenting these immunogens for effective vaccination has yet to be determined. We used our recently described vaccine candidate based on full-length HCV E1 or E2 glycoproteins fused to the heterologous hepatitis B virus S envelope protein to compare the use of the E1 and E2 proteins as separate immunogens with their use as the E1E2 heterodimer, in terms of immunogenetic potential and the capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. The specific anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibody responses induced in animals immunized with vaccine particles harboring the heterodimer were profoundly impaired with respect to those in animals immunized with particles harboring E1 and E2 separately. Moreover, the anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies had additive neutralizing properties that increase the cross-neutralization of heterologous strains of various HCV genotypes, highlighting the importance of including both E1 and E2 in the vaccine for an effective vaccination strategy. Our study has important implications for the optimization of HCV vaccination strategies based on HCV envelope proteins, regardless of the platform used to present these proteins to the immune system.

  8. Persistence of yellow fever vaccine-induced antibodies after solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyplosz, B; Burdet, C; François, H; Durrbach, A; Duclos-Vallée, J C; Mamzer-Bruneel, M-F; Poujol, P; Launay, O; Samuel, D; Vittecoq, D; Consigny, P H

    2013-09-01

    Immunization using live attenuated vaccines represents a contra-indication after solid organ transplantation (SOT): consequently, transplant candidates planning to travel in countries where yellow fever is endemic should be vaccinated prior to transplantation. The persistence of yellow fever vaccine-induced antibodies after transplantation has not been studied yet. We measured yellow-fever neutralizing antibodies in 53 SOT recipients vaccinated prior to transplantation (including 29 kidney recipients and 18 liver recipients). All but one (98%) had protective titers of antibodies after a median duration of 3 years (min.: 0.8, max.: 21) after transplantation. The median antibody level was 40 U/L (interquartile range: 40-80). For the 46 patients with a known or estimated date of vaccination, yellow-fever antibodies were still detectable after a median time of 13 years (range: 2-32 years) post-immunization. Our data suggest there is long-term persistence of antibodies to yellow fever in SOT recipients who have been vaccinated prior to transplantation. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Anti-HERV-K (HML-2) capsid antibody responses in HIV elite controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mulder, Miguel; SenGupta, Devi; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sacha, Jonah B; Nixon, Douglas F; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre

    2017-08-22

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) comprise approximately 8% of the human genome and while the majority are transcriptionally silent, the most recently integrated HERV, HERV-K (HML-2), remains active. During HIV infection, HERV-K (HML-2) specific mRNA transcripts and viral proteins can be detected. In this study, we aimed to understand the antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag in the context of HIV-1 infection. We developed an ELISA assay using either recombinant protein or 164 redundant "15mer" HERV-K (HML-2) Gag peptides to test sera for antibody reactivity. We identified a total of eight potential HERV-K (HML-2) Gag immunogenic domains: two on the matrix (peptides 16 and 31), one on p15 (peptide 85), three on the capsid (peptides 81, 97 and 117), one on the nucleocapsid (peptide 137) and one on the QP1 protein (peptide 157). Four epitopes (peptides 16, 31, 85 and 137) were highly immunogenic. No significant differences in antibody responses were found between HIV infected participants (n = 40) and uninfected donors (n = 40) for 6 out of the 8 epitopes tested. The antibody response against nucleocapsid (peptide 137) was significantly lower (p K (HML-2) capsid recombinant peptide in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme immunospot (Elispot) assays. We found that the HERV-K (HML-2) Gag antibody and T cell response by Elispot were significantly correlated. HIV elite controllers had a strong cellular and antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag directed mainly against the Capsid region. Collectively, these data suggest that anti-HERV-K (HML-2) antibodies targeting capsid could have an immunoprotective effect in HIV infection.

  10. Direct Probing of Germinal Center Responses Reveals Immunological Features and Bottlenecks for Neutralizing Antibody Responses to HIV Env Trimer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Carnathan, Diane G.; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Pauthner, Matthias; Briney, Bryan; Reiss, Samantha M.; Wood, Jennifer S.; Kaushik, Kirti; van Gils, Marit J.; Rosales, Sandy L.; van der Woude, Patricia; Locci, Michela; Le, Khoa M.; de Taeye, Steven W.; Sok, Devin; Mohammed, Ata Ur Rasheed; Huang, Jessica; Gumber, Sanjeev; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Kasturi, Sudhir P.; Pulendran, Bali; Moore, John P.; Ahmed, Rafi; Seumois, Grégory; Burton, Dennis R.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Silvestri, Guido; Crotty, Shane

    2016-01-01

    Generating tier 2 HIV-neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses by immunization remains a challenging problem, and the immunological barriers to induction of such responses with Env immunogens remain unclear. Here, some rhesus monkeys developed autologous tier 2 nAbs upon HIV Env trimer immunization

  11. The bright and the dark side of human antibody responses to flaviviruses: lessons for vaccine design.

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    Rey, Félix A; Stiasny, Karin; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Dellarole, Mariano; Heinz, Franz X

    2018-02-01

    Zika and dengue viruses belong to the Flavivirus genus, a close group of antigenically related viruses that cause significant arthropod-transmitted diseases throughout the globe. Although infection by a given flavivirus is thought to confer lifelong protection, some of the patient's antibodies cross-react with other flaviviruses without cross-neutralizing. The original antigenic sin phenomenon may amplify such antibodies upon subsequent heterologous flavivirus infection, potentially aggravating disease by antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The most striking example is provided by the four different dengue viruses, where infection by one serotype appears to predispose to more severe disease upon infection by a second one. A similar effect was postulated for sequential infections with Zika and dengue viruses. In this review, we analyze the molecular determinants of the dual antibody response to flavivirus infection or vaccination in humans. We highlight the role of conserved partially cryptic epitopes giving rise to cross-reacting and poorly neutralizing, ADE-prone antibodies. We end by proposing a strategy for developing an epitope-focused vaccine approach to avoid eliciting undesirable antibodies while focusing the immune system on producing protective antibodies only. © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  12. Identification, production, and use of polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies for immunoaffinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nancy E; Foley, Katherine M; Stalder, Elizabeth S; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-01-01

    Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful tool for purification of proteins and protein complexes. The availability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized the field of immunoaffinity chromatography by providing a continuous supply of highly uniform antibody. Before the availability of mAbs, the recovery of the target protein from immobilized polyclonal antibodies usually required very harsh, often denaturing conditions. Although harsh conditions are often still used to disrupt the antigen-antibody interaction when using a mAb, various methods have been developed to exploit the uniformity of the antigen-antibody reaction in order to identify agents or conditions that gently disrupt this interaction and thus result in higher recovery of active protein from immunoaffinity chromatography. We discuss here the use of a specific type of monoclonal antibody that we have designated "polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies" (PR-mAbs). These are naturally occurring mAbs that have high affinity for the antigen under binding conditions, but have low affinity in the presence of a combination of low molecular weight hydroxylated compounds (polyols) and nonchaotropic salts. Therefore, these PR-mAbs can be used for gentle immunoaffinity chromatography. PR-mAbs can be easily identified and adapted to a powerful protein purification method for a target protein.

  13. Natural and Induced Humoral Responses to MUC1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensdorff-Pouilly, Silvia von; Moreno, Maria; Verheijen, René H. M.

    2011-01-01

    MUC1 is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the ductal cell surface of glandular epithelial cells. Loss of polarization, overexpression and aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 in mucosal inflammation and in adenocarcinomas induces humoral immune responses to the mucin. MUC1 IgG responses have been associated with a benefit in survival in patients with breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. Antibodies bound to the mucin may curb tumor progression by restoring cell-cell interactions altered by tumor-associated MUC1, thus preventing metastatic dissemination, as well as counteracting the immune suppression exerted by the molecule. Furthermore, anti-MUC1 antibodies are capable of effecting tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Although cytotoxic T cells are indispensable to achieve anti-tumor responses in advanced disease, abs to tumor-associated antigens are ideally suited to address minimal residual disease and may be sufficient to exert adequate immune surveillance in an adjuvant setting, destroying tumor cells as they arise or maintaining occult disease in an equilibrium state. Initial evaluation of MUC1 peptide/glycopeptide mono and polyvalent vaccines has shown them to be immunogenic and safe; anti-tumor responses are scarce. Progress in carbohydrate synthesis has yielded a number of sophisticated substrates that include MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes that are at present in preclinical testing. Adjuvant vaccination with MUC1 glycopeptide polyvalent vaccines that induce strong humoral responses may prevent recurrence of disease in patients with early stage carcinomas. Furthermore, prophylactic immunotherapy targeting MUC1 may be a strategy to strengthen immune surveillance and prevent disease in subjects at hereditary high risk of breast, ovarian and colon cancer

  14. Natural and Induced Humoral Responses to MUC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensdorff-Pouilly, Silvia von, E-mail: s.vonmensdorff@vumc.nl; Moreno, Maria [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands); Verheijen, René H. M. [Department of Woman & Baby, Division of Surgical & Oncological Gynaecology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands)

    2011-07-29

    MUC1 is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the ductal cell surface of glandular epithelial cells. Loss of polarization, overexpression and aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 in mucosal inflammation and in adenocarcinomas induces humoral immune responses to the mucin. MUC1 IgG responses have been associated with a benefit in survival in patients with breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. Antibodies bound to the mucin may curb tumor progression by restoring cell-cell interactions altered by tumor-associated MUC1, thus preventing metastatic dissemination, as well as counteracting the immune suppression exerted by the molecule. Furthermore, anti-MUC1 antibodies are capable of effecting tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Although cytotoxic T cells are indispensable to achieve anti-tumor responses in advanced disease, abs to tumor-associated antigens are ideally suited to address minimal residual disease and may be sufficient to exert adequate immune surveillance in an adjuvant setting, destroying tumor cells as they arise or maintaining occult disease in an equilibrium state. Initial evaluation of MUC1 peptide/glycopeptide mono and polyvalent vaccines has shown them to be immunogenic and safe; anti-tumor responses are scarce. Progress in carbohydrate synthesis has yielded a number of sophisticated substrates that include MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes that are at present in preclinical testing. Adjuvant vaccination with MUC1 glycopeptide polyvalent vaccines that induce strong humoral responses may prevent recurrence of disease in patients with early stage carcinomas. Furthermore, prophylactic immunotherapy targeting MUC1 may be a strategy to strengthen immune surveillance and prevent disease in subjects at hereditary high risk of breast, ovarian and colon cancer.

  15. Cross-reactive IgE antibody responses to tropomyosins from Ascaris lumbricoides and cockroach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Beatriz R; Rocha, Gutemberg M; Oliver, Constance; Ferriani, Virgínia P L; Lima, Rodrigo C; Palma, Mário S; Sales, Valéria S F; Aalberse, Rob C; Chapman, Martin D; Arruda, L Karla

    2008-04-01

    Evidence indicates that infection with Ascaris lumbricoides may promote development of allergy and asthma. To study the role of tropomyosin, a pan-allergen in invertebrates, in IgE responses to A lumbricoides. Recombinant A lumbricoides and Periplaneta americana tropomyosins were expressed in Pichia pastoris. Levels of IgE to tropomyosins from A lumbricoides and P americana were determined by chimeric ELISA in sera from 119 children living in a parasite-endemic area and 112 patients with cockroach allergy from the allergy clinics. Presence of tropomyosin in A lumbricoides larvae at L3 stage was evaluated by immunofluorescence using mAb 1A6, directed against mite tropomyosin. Molecular modeling of P americana and A lumbricoides tropomyosins was performed by using the MODELLER program. A lumbricoides tropomyosin showed 69% to 98% sequence identity to tropomyosins from other invertebrates. The predicted structure of A lumbricoides tropomyosin was similar to that of P americana tropomyosin and showed the characteristic coiled-coil structure. Strong correlation was found for IgE antibodies to tropomyosins from A lumbricoides and P americana in sera from children living in a parasite-endemic area and from patients with cockroach allergy. Larvae of A lumbricoides reacted strongly with mAb 1A6. Tropomyosin induces IgE responses in A lumbricoides-infected children and in patients allergic to cockroach.

  16. Monitoring UV-induced signalling pathways in an ex vivo skin organ culture model using phospho-antibody array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenain, Christelle; Gamboa, Bastien; Perrin, Agnes; Séraïdaris, Alexia; Bertino, Béatrice; Rival, Yves; Bernardi, Mathieu; Piwnica, David; Méhul, Bruno

    2017-09-08

    We investigated UV-induced signalling in an ex vivo skin organ culture model using phospho-antibody array. Phosphorylation modulations were analysed in time-course experiments following exposure to solar-simulated UV and validated by Western blot analyses. We found that UV induced P-p38 and its substrates, P-ERK1/2 and P-AKT, which were previously shown to be upregulated by UV in cultured keratinocytes and in vivo human skin. This indicates that phospho-antibody array applied to ex vivo skin organ culture is a relevant experimental system to investigate signalling events following perturbations. As the identified proteins are components of pathways implicated in skin tumorigenesis, UV-exposed skin organ culture model could be used to investigate the effect on these pathways of NMSC cancer drug candidates. In addition, we found that phospho-HCK is induced upon UV exposure, producing a new candidate for future studies investigating its role in the skin response to UV and UV-induced carcinogenesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Anti-thromboxane B2 antibodies protect against acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice

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    Ivan Ćavar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids are lipid compounds that mediate a variety of physiological and pathological functions in almost all body tissues and organs. Thromboxane (TX A2 is a powerful inducer of platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction and it has ulcerogenic activity in the gastrointestinal tract. Overdose or chronic use of a high dose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-paminophenol, APAP is a major cause of acute liver failure in the Western world. We investigated whether TXA2 plays a role in host response to toxic effect of APAP. CBA/H Zg mice of both sexes were intoxicated with a single lethal or high sublethal dose of APAP, which was administered to animals by oral gavage. The toxicity of APAP was determined by observing the survival of mice during 48 h, by measuring concentration of alanine-aminotransferase (ALT in plasma 20-22 h after APAP administration and by liver histology. The results have shown that anti-thromboxane (TX B2 antibodies (anti-TXB2 and a selective inhibitor of thromboxane (TX synthase, benzylimidazole (BZI, were significantly hepatoprotective, while a selective thromboxane receptor (TPR antagonist, daltroban, was slightly protective in this model of acute liver injury. A stabile metabolite of TXA2, TXB2, and a stabile agonist of TPR, U-46619, had no influence on APAP-induced liver damage. Our findings suggest that TXA2 has a pathogenic role in acute liver toxicity induced with APAP, which was highly abrogated by administration of anti-TXB2. According to our results, this protection is mediated, at least in part, through decreased production of TXB2 by liver fragments ex vivo.

  18. Anti-RAGE antibody attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengmei; Yi, Duan; Li, Zhengqian; Zhou, Yongde; Cao, Yiyun; Sun, Yan; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2017-03-30

    Several animal studies demonstrated that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane could influence the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which involved the cognitive impairment. Increasing evidence has also shown that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) played a major role in maintaining the integrity of BBB. The present study aimed to determine whether the RAGE-specific antibody protects against BBB disruption and cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane exposure in aged rats. 108 aged rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) control group (Control); (2) 4h of 2% isoflurane exposure group (ISO); (3) RAGE antibody (20μL, 2.5μg/μL) treated+4h of 2% isoflurane exposure group (anti-RAGE+ISO); (4) RAGE antibody (20μL, 2.5μg/μL) treated group (anti-RAGE). The isoflurane anesthesia resulted in the upregulation of hippocampal RAGE expression, disruption of BBB integrity, neuroinflammation, and beta-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in aged rats. In addition, significant cognitive deficits in the Morris water maze test was also observed. The antibody pretreatment resulted in significant improvements in BBB integrity. Furthermore, the expression of RAGE and proinflammatory mediators, as well as, Aβ accumulation were attenuated. Moreover, the antibody administration attenuated the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. These results demonstrate that RAGE signaling is involved in BBB damage after isoflurane exposure. Thus, the RAGE antibody represents a novel therapeutic intervention to prevent isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Irregular antibodies in no hemolytic autoimmune diseases are able to induce erythrophagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Díaz, Paola Ester; Ruiz-Olivera, María Del Rocío; Hernández-Osorio, Luis Alberto; Vargas-Arzola, Jaime; Valle-Jiménez, Xareni; Aguilar-Ruiz, Sergio Roberto; Torres-Aguilar, Honorio

    2017-02-01

    Irregular antibodies are produced by alloimmunization because of pregnancies or blood transfusions. They are called "irregular" due to target erythrocyte antigens from "rare blood systems," those different from the ABO system. Irregular antibodies have been widely investigated in immunohematology since their presence in blood donors may lead to difficulties in blood typing and in blood cross-matching, or to induce hemolytic transfusion reactions. Nevertheless, their incidence and participation in the physiopathology of autoimmune diseases have not been thoroughly studied. In this work, we analyzed the presence and pro-hemolytic capabilities of irregular antibodies in patients with different autoimmune diseases lacking signs of hemolytic anemia, in comparison with healthy multiparous women. Five of 141 autoimmune patients (3.5 %) and two of 77 multiparous women (2.6 %) were positive. Although frequency was relatively low and similar in both populations, the targeted antigens were Kell (k, Kp b , Js b ) and Luth (Lu b ) in multiparous women, and the same plus Duffy (Fy a ), Kidd (Jk a ) and MNS (M, s) in autoimmune patients. Irregular antibodies from autoimmune patients did not induce complement-mediated hemolysis (intravascular), but they were able to induce macrophages-mediated phagocytosis (extravascular hemolysis) in vitro. It is the first approach exploring the presence of irregular antibodies associated with the loss of immune tolerance and demonstrating their hemolytic potential in autoimmune patients without hemolytic manifestations. The presence of irregular antibodies targeted to Duffy (Fya), Kidd (Jka) and MNS (M, s) antigens only in autoimmune patients suggests a loss of immune tolerance to these erythrocyte antigens.

  20. Papillomavirus pseudovirions packaged with the L2 gene induce cross-neutralizing antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte-Forero Diego F

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current vaccines against HPVs are constituted of L1 protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs and they have been shown to protect against natural HPV16 and HPV18 infections and associated lesions. In addition, limited cross-protection has been observed against closely related types. Immunization with L2 protein in animal models has been shown to provide cross-protection against distant papillomavirus types, suggesting that the L2 protein contains cross-neutralizing epitopes. However, vaccination with L2 protein or L2 peptides does not induce high titers of anti-L2 antibodies. In order to develop a vaccine with the potential to protect against other high-risk HPV types, we have produced HPV58 pseudovirions encoding the HPV31 L2 protein and compared their capacity to induce cross-neutralizing antibodies with that of HPV L1 and HPV L1/L2 VLPs. Methods The titers of neutralizing antibodies against HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV58 induced in Balb/c mice were compared after immunization with L2-containing vaccines. Results Low titers of cross-neutralizing antibodies were detected in mice when immunized with L1/L2 VLPs, and the highest levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies were observed in mice immunized with HPV 58 L1/L2 pseudovirions encoding the HPV 31 L2 protein. Conclusions The results obtained indicate that high levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies are only observed after immunization with pseudovirions encoding the L2 protein. HPV pseudovirions thus represent a possible new strategy for the generation of a broad-spectrum vaccine to protect against high-risk HPVs and associated neoplasia.

  1. Persistence of the protective immunity and kinetics of the isotype specific antibody response against the viral nucleocapsid protein after experimental Schmallenberg virus infection of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskin, Antoine; Verite, Stephanie; Comtet, Loic; Van der Stede, Yves; Cay, Brigitte; De Regge, Nick

    2015-10-15

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an Orthobunyavirus that induces abortion, stillbirths and congenital malformations in ruminants. SBV infection induces a long lasting seroconversion under natural conditions. The persistence of the protective immunity and the isotype specific antibody response upon SBV infection of sheep has however not been studied in detail. Five sheep were kept in BSL3 facilities for more than 16 months and subjected to repeated SBV infections. Blood was regularly sampled and organs were collected at euthanasia. The presence of SBV RNA in serum and organs was measured with quantitative real-time PCR. The appearance and persistence of neutralizing and SBV nucleoprotein (N) isotype specific antibodies was determined with virus neutralization tests (VNT) and ELISAs. The primo SBV infection protected ewes against clinical signs, viraemia and virus replication in organs upon challenge infections more than 15 months later. Production of neutralizing SBV specific antibodies was first detected around 6 days post primo-inoculation with VNT and correlated with the appearance of SBV-N specific IgM antibodies. These IgM antibodies remained present for 2 weeks. SBV-N specific IgG antibodies were first detected between 10 and 21 dpi and reached a plateau at 28 dpi. This plateau remained consistently high and no significant decrease in titre was found over a period of more than 1 year. Similar results were found for the neutralising antibody response. In conclusion, the SBV specific IgM response probably eliminates SBV from the blood and the protective immunity induced by SBV infection protects sheep against reinfection for at least 16 months.

  2. Cyclosporin A is an adjuvant in murine IgE antibody responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.S.; Stanescu, G.; Magalski, A.E.; Qian, Y.Y.

    1989-06-15

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is an undecapeptide fungal metabolite and is generally regarded as a new generation of immunosuppressive drugs. We uncovered a novel immunomodulatory property of CsA as a potent immunologic stimulator in the murine IgE antibody system. The enhancement of IgE responses was observed in mice receiving as few as three daily i.m. injections before Ag priming. Our studies demonstrate the three points listed below. First, CsA potentiates murine IgE responses regardless of Ag specificities in inbred mice. A hierarchy of immunopotentiation by CsA follows the order of low, intermediate, and high IgE responder mice. Second, CsA, when administered along with Ag, exerts a thorough and long lasting impact on the Ag-specific IgE antibody response, and leads to an Ag-specific breakthrough of IgE antibody synthesis in mice rendered tolerant in the IgE antibody system by soluble Ag pretreatment or neonatal IgE treatment. Third, IgE enhancer cells become sensitive to a low dose of irradiation. Two enhancer cellular components are identified, those of the Th cells and B cells, which appear to favor the induction of IgE responses. Understanding the cellular basis of the immunopotentiating effect of CsA will provide further insight into the murine IgE antibody system.

  3. The host response to lesions induced by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, M; Coleman, N; Chambers, M

    1994-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are strictly intraepithelial pathogens: in the natural productive infection they induce benign epithelial proliferations of mucocutaneous surfaces, some of which may progress to malignancy. Benign HPV-induced lesions are chronic persistent growths; high levels of viral antigen are expressed in the apparent absence of a host immune response suggesting that these viruses have evolved efficient mechanisms of immune evasion. Cell-mediated responses are central in the pathogenesis of HPV and regression of both cutaneous and genital warts histologically resembles a delayed-type hypersensitivity response (DTH). The antigen(s) in the wart against which this response is initiated are not known but in an experimental murine model DTH responses to the E6 and E7 proteins of HPV-16 can be elicited when viral antigen is presented via the epithelial route. Priming with low levels of viral antigen in this model induces non-responsiveness and the loss of DTH. In HPV-associated cancers the E6/E7 genes are expressed and an antibody response to the proteins is found in at least 50% of cases indicating that these oncoproteins are potential targets for immunotherapy.

  4. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  5. The successful induction of T-cell and antibody responses by a recombinant measles virus-vectored tetravalent dengue vaccine provides partial protection against dengue-2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui-Mei; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ju; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chung, Han-Hsuan; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Pan, Chien-Hsiung

    2016-07-02

    Dengue has a major impact on global public health, and the use of dengue vaccine is very limited. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a dengue vaccine made from a recombinant measles virus (MV) that expresses envelope protein domain III (ED3) of dengue-1 to 4. Following immunization with the MV-vectored dengue vaccine, mice developed specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses against dengue virus and MV. Neutralizing antibodies against MV and dengue viruses were also induced, and protective levels of FRNT50 ≥ 10 to 4 serotypes of dengue viruses were detected in the MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice. In addition, specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses to dengue viruses were still induced by the MV-vectored dengue vaccine in mice that were pre-infected with MV. This finding suggests that the pre-existing immunity to MV did not block the initiation of immune responses. By contrast, mice that were pre-infected with dengue-3 exhibited no effect in terms of their antibody responses to MV and dengue viruses, but a dominant dengue-3-specific T-cell response was observed. After injection with dengue-2, a detectable but significantly lower viremia and a higher titer of anti-dengue-2 neutralizing antibodies were observed in MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice versus the vector control, suggesting that an anamnestic antibody response that provided partial protection against dengue-2 was elicited. Our results with regard to T-cell responses and the effect of pre-immunity to MV or dengue viruses provide clues for the future applications of an MV-vectored dengue vaccine.

  6. HER2 monoclonal antibodies that do not interfere with receptor heterodimerization-mediated signaling induce effective internalization and represent valuable components for rational antibody-drug conjugate design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goeij, Bart E C G; Peipp, Matthias; de Haij, Simone; van den Brink, Edward N; Kellner, Christian; Riedl, Thilo; de Jong, Rob; Vink, Tom; Strumane, Kristin; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I

    2014-01-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 provides an excellent target for selective delivery of cytotoxic drugs to tumor cells by antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) as has been clinically validated by ado-trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla(TM)). While selecting a suitable antibody for an ADC approach often takes specificity and efficient antibody-target complex internalization into account, the characteristics of the optimal antibody candidate remain poorly understood. We studied a large panel of human HER2 antibodies to identify the characteristics that make them most suitable for an ADC approach. As a model toxin, amenable to in vitro high-throughput screening, we employed Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') fused to an anti-kappa light chain domain antibody. Cytotoxicity induced by HER2 antibodies, which were thus non-covalently linked to ETA', was assessed for high and low HER2 expressing tumor cell lines and correlated with internalization and downmodulation of HER2 antibody-target complexes. Our results demonstrate that HER2 antibodies that do not inhibit heterodimerization of HER2 with related ErbB receptors internalize more efficiently and show greater ETA'-mediated cytotoxicity than antibodies that do inhibit such heterodimerization. Moreover, stimulation with ErbB ligand significantly enhanced ADC-mediated tumor kill by antibodies that do not inhibit HER2 heterodimerization. This suggests that the formation of HER2/ErbB-heterodimers enhances ADC internalization and subsequent killing of tumor cells. Our study indicates that selecting HER2 ADCs that allow piggybacking of HER2 onto other ErbB receptors provides an attractive strategy for increasing ADC delivery and tumor cell killing capacity to both high and low HER2 expressing tumor cells.

  7. [Study on antibody response to revaccination of hepatitis B vaccine among firstly low-response adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yi; Yan, Bing-yu; Zhang, Li; Lü, Jing-jing; Liu, Jia-ye; Gong, Xiao-hong; Cui, Fu-qiang; Liang, Xiao-feng; Chen, Shi-yu; Xu, Ai-qiang

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the antibody to hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (anti-HBs) response and the influent factors of revaccination of 4 kinds of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) among firstly low-response adults. A total of 11 590 adults who were 18 - 49 years old, never received HepB vaccination, without HBV infection history, HBs-Ag negative, and had been living at 3 towns of Zhangqiu county in Shandong province Ji'nan city for more than half a year, were selected in the study in July, 2009. Self-designed questionnaire was used to select the basic information of the subjects. The subjects were divided into 4 groups by cluster sampling, and were vaccinated according to the "0-1-6" immune procedure with 10 µg HepB made by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid techniques in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (HepB-SC), 10 µg HepB made by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid techniques in Hansenula Polymorpha (HepB-HP), 20 µg HepB-SC and 20 µg HepB made by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid techniques in Chinese hamster ovary cell (HepB-CHO), 3 doses respectively. The adults who were low-response to the primary hepatitis B vaccination (10 mU/ml ≤ anti-HBs Anti-HBs was detected by chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay and compared by the vaccine type. The influence factors about antibody response were also analyzed. Out of the 11 590 subjects, 8592 adults had accepted the primary vaccination of hepatitis B and been collected the blood samples; among whom, 1306 subjects showed low-response, at the rate of 15.20%. A total of 1034 low-response subjects accepted secondary strengthened vaccination and were collected blood samples; 55.13% of them showed anti-HBs seroconversion (anti-HBs ≥ 100 mU/ml); while the seroconversion rate in each group was 44.54% (106/238) in 10 µg HepB-SC group, 57.14% (156/273) in 10 µg HepB-HP group, 56.08% (143/255) in 20 µg HepB-SC group and 61.57% (165/268) in 20 µg HepB-CHO group, respectively. There was significant difference among the

  8. Protein dynamics and the diversity of an antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2012-08-03

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved.

  9. Protein Dynamics and the Diversity of an Antibody Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved. PMID:22685303

  10. Antibody responses of swine following infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, João Carlos; Strait, Erin L; Raymond, Matthew; Ramirez, Alejandro; Minion, F Chris

    2014-11-07

    Several mycoplasma species possessing a range of virulence have been described in swine. The most commonly described are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma flocculare. They are ubiquitious in many pig producing areas of the world, and except for M. hyopneumoniae, commercial antibody-based assays are lacking for most of these. Antibody cross-reactivity among these four mycoplasma species is not well characterized. Recently, the use of pen-based oral fluids for herd surveillance is of increasing interest. Thus, this study sought to measure pig antibody responses and the level of cross-reactivity in serum and pen-based oral fluids after challenge with four species of swine mycoplasmas. Four groups of four mycoplasma-free growing pigs were separately inoculated with the different mycoplasma species. Pen-based oral fluids and serum samples were collected weekly until necropsy. Species-specific Tween 20 ELISAs were used to measure antibody responses along with four other commercial M. hyopneumoniae ELISAs. Animals from all groups seroconverted to the challenge species of mycoplasma and no evidence of cross-contamination was observed. A delayed antibody response was seen with all but M. hyorhinis-infected pigs. Cross-reactive IgG responses were detected in M. hyopneumoniae- and M. flocculare-infected animals by the M. hyorhinis Tween 20 ELISA, while sera from M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare-infected pigs were positive in one commercial assay. In pen-based oral fluids, specific anti-M. hyopneumoniae IgA responses were detected earlier after infection than serum IgG responses. In summary, while some antibody-based assays may have the potential for false positives, evidence of this was observed in the current study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Global Stability of Delayed Viral Infection Models with Nonlinear Antibody and CTL Immune Responses and General Incidence Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Hui; Teng, Zhidong; Li, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical behaviors for a five-dimensional viral infection model with three delays which describes the interactions of antibody, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) immune responses, and nonlinear incidence rate are investigated. The threshold values for viral infection, antibody response, CTL immune response, CTL immune competition, and antibody competition, respectively, are established. Under certain assumptions, the threshold value conditions on the global stability of the infection-free, im...

  12. Antibodies against keratinocyte antigens other than desmogleins 1 and 3 can induce pemphigus vulgaris–like lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu Thuong; Ndoye, Assane; Shultz, Leonard D.; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2000-01-01

    Pemphigus is an autoimmune disease of skin adhesion associated with autoantibodies against a number of keratinocyte antigens, such as the adhesion molecules desmoglein (Dsg) 1 and 3 and acetylcholine receptors. The notion that anti-Dsg antibodies alone are responsible for blisters in patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) stems from the ability of rDsg1 and rDsg3 to absorb antibodies that cause PV-like skin blisters in neonatal mice. Here, we demonstrate that PV IgGs eluted from rDsg1-Ig-His and rDsg3-Ig-His show similar antigenic profiles, including the 38-, 43-, 115-, and 190-kDa keratinocyte proteins and a non–Dsg 3 130-kDa polypeptide present in keratinocytes from Dsg 3 knockout mouse. We injected into Dsg 3–lacking mice the PV IgGs that did not cross-react with the 160-kDa Dsg 1 or its 45-kDa immunoreactive fragment and that showed no reactivity with recombinant Dsg 1. We used both the Dsg3null mice with a targeted mutation of the Dsg3 gene and the “balding” Dsg3bal/Dsg3bal mice that carry a spontaneous null mutation in Dsg3. These PV IgGs caused gross skin blisters with PV-like suprabasal acantholysis and stained perilesional epidermis in a fishnet-like pattern, indicating that the PV phenotype can be induced without anti–Dsg 3 antibody. The anti–Dsg 1 antibody also was not required, as its presence in PV IgG does not alter the PV-like phenotype in skin organ cultures and because pemphigus foliaceus IgGs produce a distinct phenotype in Dsg3null mice. Therefore, mucocutaneous lesions in PV patients could be caused by non-Dsg antibodies. PMID:11120754

  13. OMOLOGICAL AND HETEROLOGICAL ANTIBODY AND T CELL IMMUNE RESPONSES TO LIVE ATTENUATED INFLUENZA VACCINE A (H5N2 AND A (H7N3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Naykhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available From the beginning of 21th century outbreaks of H5, H7 and H9 avian flu are registered from time to time. These viruses are considered as one of the possible causes of the next pandemia. The development of avian influenza vaccines is one of the WHO priorities. The aim of this work was to study antibody and cellular immune responses to avian A (H5N2 and A (H7N3 live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs. We examined serum antibodies (HAI assay, microneutralization assay, ELISA, local antibodies (ELISA and virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ central memory and effector memory T cells. Two doses vaccination of healthy volunteers with A (H5N2 and A (H7N3 LAIVs induced homological antibody and cellular immune responses (i. e. serum and local antibody conversions, virus-specific memory T cell growth. These vaccines also stimulated heterological immunity (heterological serum and local antibodies and T cells. Heterological immune response intensity depended on antigenic structure of vaccine strain and heterological virus, particularly on HA type. 

  14. [Hog cholera virus: influence of colostral passive antibody on immune response of pig following vaccination with the rabbit adapted Chinese strain (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewska, M; Tereszczuk, S; Corthier, G; Aynaud, J M

    1977-01-01

    Using the rabbit adapted chinese strain of Hog cholera, active immunization of piglets having passive colostral antibodies was studied. 65 piglets born from 11 sows were used. Concerning sows, vaccination was performed 5-6 months and 1 month before service (3 sows), 30 days (2 sows) and 60 days (3 sows) after service. Divided in 5 lots, piglets were vaccinated at 4 different periods after birth (15, 30, 60 and 90 days). Hog cholera immunity was determined for each animal by means of kinetic of serum neutralizing antibodies and resistance to virulent challenge performed 5 months after birth. High levels of neutralizing antibodies were observed in serum of each vaccinated sow at the time of farrowing. In piglets having ingested low quantities of colostrum, vaccination induces a good antigenic stimulation characterized by a normal humoral immune response and challenge resistance. But in piglets having ingested a normal quantities of colostrum, colostral passive antibodies have a partial or complete suppressive effect on primary immune response which is characterized by a delay in serum antibodies formation and by a low level at the time of challenge. According the conditions of sows vaccination, differences were observed in the properties of colostral passive antibodies (intensity of suppressive effect on active immune response, in vitro "avidity" for Hog cholera virus, mean value of half-life) present in piglets serum. On practical aspect, vaccination with the chinese strain becomes fully effective in piglets having passive immunity when they are 30-60 days old.

  15. A tetravalent virus-like particle vaccine designed to display domain III of dengue envelope proteins induces multi-serotype neutralizing antibodies in mice and macaques which confer protection against antibody dependent enhancement in AG129 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Ramasamy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is one of the fastest spreading vector-borne diseases, caused by four antigenically distinct dengue viruses (DENVs. Antibodies against DENVs are responsible for both protection as well as pathogenesis. A vaccine that is safe for and efficacious in all people irrespective of their age and domicile is still an unmet need. It is becoming increasingly apparent that vaccine design must eliminate epitopes implicated in the induction of infection-enhancing antibodies.We report a Pichia pastoris-expressed dengue immunogen, DSV4, based on DENV envelope protein domain III (EDIII, which contains well-characterized serotype-specific and cross-reactive epitopes. In natural infection, <10% of the total neutralizing antibody response is EDIII-directed. Yet, this is a functionally relevant domain which interacts with the host cell surface receptor. DSV4 was designed by in-frame fusion of EDIII of all four DENV serotypes and hepatitis B surface (S antigen and co-expressed with unfused S antigen to form mosaic virus-like particles (VLPs. These VLPs displayed EDIIIs of all four DENV serotypes based on probing with a battery of serotype-specific anti-EDIII monoclonal antibodies. The DSV4 VLPs were highly immunogenic, inducing potent and durable neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes encompassing multiple genotypes, in mice and macaques. DSV4-induced murine antibodies suppressed viremia in AG129 mice and conferred protection against lethal DENV-4 virus challenge. Further, neither murine nor macaque anti-DSV4 antibodies promoted mortality or inflammatory cytokine production when passively transferred and tested in an in vivo dengue disease enhancement model of AG129 mice.Directing the immune response to a non-immunodominant but functionally relevant serotype-specific dengue epitope of the four DENV serotypes, displayed on a VLP platform, can help minimize the risk of inducing disease-enhancing antibodies while eliciting effective tetravalent

  16. Subsets of memory CD4+ T cell and bactericidal antibody response to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C after immunization of HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milagres, Lucimar G; Costa, Priscilla R; Silva, Giselle P; Carvalho, Karina I; Pereira-Manfro, Wânia F; Ferreira, Bianca; Barreto, Daniella M; Frota, Ana Cristina C; Hofer, Cristina B; Kallas, Esper G

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is endemic in Brazil, with periodic outbreaks and case fatality rates reach as high as 18 to 20% of cases. Conjugate vaccines against meningococci are immunogenic in healthy children. However, we have previously shown a poor bactericidal antibody response to a Men C conjugate vaccine in Brazilian HIV-infected children and adolescents after a single vaccine administration. The goal of the present work was to investigate associations between bactericidal antibody response induced by MenC vaccine and the frequency and activation profile (expression of CD38, HLA-DR and CCR5 molecules) of total CD4+ memory T cell sub-populations in HIV-1-infected children and adolescents. Responders to vaccination against MenC had a predominance (about 44%) of CD4+ TINTERMEDIATE subset followed by TTRANSITIONAL memory subset (23 to 26%). Importantly, CD4+ TINT frequency was positively associated with bactericidal antibody response induced by vaccination. The positive correlation persisted despite the observation that the frequency TINT CD38+HLA-DR+ was higher in responders. In contrast, CD4+ TCENTRAL MEMORY (TCM) subset negatively correlated with bactericidal antibodies. In conclusion, these data indicate that less differentiated CD+ T cells, like TCM may be constantly differentiating into intermediate and later differentiated CD4+ T cell subsets. These include CD4 TINT subset which showed a positive association with bactericidal antibodies.

  17. Subsets of memory CD4+ T cell and bactericidal antibody response to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C after immunization of HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar G Milagres

    Full Text Available Meningococcal disease is endemic in Brazil, with periodic outbreaks and case fatality rates reach as high as 18 to 20% of cases. Conjugate vaccines against meningococci are immunogenic in healthy children. However, we have previously shown a poor bactericidal antibody response to a Men C conjugate vaccine in Brazilian HIV-infected children and adolescents after a single vaccine administration. The goal of the present work was to investigate associations between bactericidal antibody response induced by MenC vaccine and the frequency and activation profile (expression of CD38, HLA-DR and CCR5 molecules of total CD4+ memory T cell sub-populations in HIV-1-infected children and adolescents. Responders to vaccination against MenC had a predominance (about 44% of CD4+ TINTERMEDIATE subset followed by TTRANSITIONAL memory subset (23 to 26%. Importantly, CD4+ TINT frequency was positively associated with bactericidal antibody response induced by vaccination. The positive correlation persisted despite the observation that the frequency TINT CD38+HLA-DR+ was higher in responders. In contrast, CD4+ TCENTRAL MEMORY (TCM subset negatively correlated with bactericidal antibodies. In conclusion, these data indicate that less differentiated CD+ T cells, like TCM may be constantly differentiating into intermediate and later differentiated CD4+ T cell subsets. These include CD4 TINT subset which showed a positive association with bactericidal antibodies.

  18. Mannosylated mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion proteins enhance antigen-specific antibody and T lymphocyte responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustaf Ahlén

    Full Text Available Targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC improve their immunogenicity and capacity to induce Th1 responses and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL. We have generated a mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion protein (PSGL-1/mIgG(2b, which upon expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris became multivalently substituted with O-linked oligomannose structures and bound the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN with high affinity in vitro. Here, its effects on the humoral and cellular anti-ovalbumin (OVA responses in C57BL/6 mice are presented.OVA antibody class and subclass responses were determined by ELISA, the generation of anti-OVA CTLs was assessed in (51Cr release assays using in vitro-stimulated immune spleen cells from the different groups of mice as effector cells and OVA peptide-fed RMA-S cells as targets, and evaluation of the type of Th cell response was done by IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 ELISpot assays.Immunizations with the OVA - mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b conjugate, especially when combined with the AbISCO®-100 adjuvant, lead to faster, stronger and broader (with regard to IgG subclass OVA IgG responses, a stronger OVA-specific CTL response and stronger Th1 and Th2 responses than if OVA was used alone or together with AbISCO®-100. Also non-covalent mixing of mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b, OVA and AbISCO®-100 lead to relatively stronger humoral and cellular responses. The O-glycan oligomannoses were necessary because PSGL-1/mIgG(2b with mono- and disialyl core 1 structures did not have this effect.Mannosylated mucin-type fusion proteins can be used as versatile APC-targeting molecules for vaccines and as such enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses.

  19. Blocking antibodies induced by immunization with a hypoallergenic parvalbumin mutant reduce allergic symptoms in a mouse model of fish allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidl, Raphaela; Gstoettner, Antonia; Baranyi, Ulrike; Swoboda, Ines; Stolz, Frank; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Wekerle, Thomas; van Ree, Ronald; Valenta, Rudolf; Linhart, Birgit

    2017-06-01

    Fish is a frequent elicitor of severe IgE-mediated allergic reactions. Beside avoidance, there is currently no allergen-specific therapy available. Hypoallergenic variants of the major fish allergen, parvalbumin, for specific immunotherapy based on mutation of the 2 calcium-binding sites have been developed. This study sought to establish a mouse model of fish allergy resembling human disease and to investigate whether mouse and rabbit IgG antibodies induced by immunization with a hypoallergenic mutant of the major carp allergen protect against allergic symptoms in sensitized mice. C3H/HeJ mice were sensitized with recombinant wildtype Cyp c 1 or carp extract by intragastric gavage. Antibody, cellular immune responses, and epitope specificity in sensitized mice were investigated by ELISA, rat basophil leukemia assay, T-cell proliferation experiments using recombinant wildtype Cyp c 1, and overlapping peptides spanning the Cyp c 1 sequence. Anti-hypoallergenic Cyp c 1 mutant mouse and rabbit sera were tested for their ability to inhibit IgE recognition of Cyp c 1, Cyp c 1-specific basophil degranulation, and Cyp c 1-induced allergic symptoms in the mouse model. A mouse model of fish allergy mimicking human disease regarding IgE epitope recognition and symptoms as close as possible was established. Administration of antisera generated in mice and rabbits by immunization with a hypoallergenic Cyp c 1 mutant inhibited IgE binding to Cyp c 1, Cyp c 1-induced basophil degranulation, and allergic symptoms caused by allergen challenge in sensitized mice. Antibodies induced by immunization with a hypoallergenic Cyp c 1 mutant protect against allergic reactions in a murine model of fish allergy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...

  1. Inactivated H7 Influenza Virus Vaccines Protect Mice despite Inducing Only Low Levels of Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ram P; Blanchfield, Kristy; Belser, Jessica A; Music, Nedzad; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Holiday, Crystal; Burroughs, Ashley; Sun, Xiangjie; Maines, Taronna R; Levine, Min Z; York, Ian A

    2017-10-15

    Avian influenza viruses of the H7 hemagglutinin (HA) subtype present a significant public health threat, as evidenced by the ongoing outbreak of human A(H7N9) infections in China. When evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization (MN) assays, H7 viruses and vaccines are found to induce lower level of neutralizing antibodies (nAb) than do their seasonal counterparts, making it difficult to develop and evaluate prepandemic vaccines. We have previously shown that purified recombinant H7 HA appear to be poorly immunogenic in that they induce low levels of HI and MN antibodies. In this study, we immunized mice with whole inactivated reverse genetics reassortant (RG) viruses expressing HA and neuraminidase (NA) from 3 different H7 viruses [A/Shanghai/2/2013(H7N9), A/Netherlands/219/2003(H7N7), and A/New York/107/2003(H7N2)] or with human A(H1N1)pdm09 (A/California/07/2009-like) or A(H3N2) (A/Perth16/2009) viruses. Mice produced equivalent titers of antibodies to all viruses as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, the antibody titers induced by H7 viruses were significantly lower when measured by HI and MN assays. Despite inducing very low levels of nAb, H7 vaccines conferred complete protection against homologous virus challenge in mice, and the serum antibodies directed against the HA head region were capable of mediating protection. The apparently low immunogenicity associated with H7 viruses and vaccines may be at least partly related to measuring antibody titers with the traditional HI and MN assays, which may not provide a true measure of protective immunity associated with H7 immunization. This study underscores the need for development of additional correlates of protection for prepandemic vaccines. IMPORTANCE H7 avian influenza viruses present a serious risk to human health. Preparedness efforts include development of prepandemic vaccines. For seasonal influenza viruses, protection is correlated with antibody

  2. Filamentous phage as an immunogenic carrier to elicit focused antibody responses against a synthetic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houten, N.E.; Zwick, M.B.; Menendez, A.; Scott, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous bacteriophage are widely used as immunogenic carriers for “phage-displayed” recombinant peptides. Here we report that they are an effective immunogenic carrier for synthetic peptides. The f1.K phage was engineered to have an additional Lys residue near the N-terminus of the major coat protein, pVIII, so as to enhance access to chemical cross-linking agents. The dimeric synthetic peptide, B2.1, was conjugated to f1.K (f1.K/B2.1) in high copy number and compared as an immunogen to B2.1 conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA/B2.1) and to phage-displayed, recombinant B2.1 peptide. All immunogens were administered without adjuvant. The serum antibody titers were measured against: the peptide, the carrier, and, if appropriate, the cross-linker. All immunogens elicited anti-peptide antibody titers, with those elicited by OVA/B2.1 exceeding those by f1.K/B2.1; both titers were greater than that elicited by recombinant B2.1 phage. Comparison of the anti-peptide and anti-carrier antibody responses showed that f1.K/B2.1 elicited a more focused anti-peptide antibody response than OVA/B2.1. The anti-peptide antibody response against f1.K/B2.1 was optimized for the injection route, dose and adjuvant. Dose and adjuvant did not have a significant effect on anti-peptide antibody titers, but a change in injection route from intraperitoneal (IP) to subcutaneous (SC) enhanced anti-peptide antibody titers after seven immunizations. The optimized anti-peptide antibody response exceeded the anti-carrier one by 21-fold, compared to 0.07-fold elicited by OVA/B2.1. This indicates that phage as a carrier can focus the antibody response against the peptide. The results are discussed with respect to the advantages of phage as an alternative to traditional carrier proteins for synthetic peptides, carbohydrates and haptens, and to further improvements in phage as immunogenic carriers. PMID:16488517

  3. Differential effects of preirradiation on adoptive antibody responses in DBA/2 and BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonkosky, D.; Buffett, R.F.; Bennett, M.

    1978-01-01

    Mice were lethally irradiated on the same day or 3 days prior to the infusion of syngeneic thymus and marrow cells. Mice were immunized with sheep erythrocytes and direct plaque-forming cells per spleen were determined 8 days after cell transfer. Preirradiation of hosts 3 days before cell transfer had varying effects on the level of adoptive antibody responses in mice of different strains: Responses of DBA/2 and DBA/1 were deficient, responses of CD2F1, B10, B10;D2, C3H, C3BF1 and SJL were unaffected, and responses of BALB/c, CBA, and 129 mice were enhanced. The defect in the antibody responses of DBA/2 hosts was dependent on the combination of a DBA/2 host and a DBA/2 cell inoculum. Differentiation of both DBA/2 thymus and marrow cells was deficient in the preirradiated DBA/2 host. This defect did not appear to be the result of loss of adherent cells from the preirradiated DBA/2 host. The enhanced antibody response observed in BALB/c mice appeared to be due to altered activity of BALB/c thymus cells. Preirradiated BALB/c or DBA/2 recipients reconstituted with BALB/c thymus cells and BALB/c or DBA/2 marrow cells showed enhanced antibody responses, while preirradiated BALB/c or DBA/2 recipients reconstituted with BALB/c marrow cells and DBA/2 thymus cells showed no change in degree of antibody responses when compared to control recipients. The preirradiated host had altered its ability to control BALB/c thymus cell activity; this lack of control may be due to loss of regulator cells from the host

  4. Prevention of herpes simplex virus induced stromal keratitis by a glycoprotein B-specific monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalbert Krawczyk

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of acyclovir (ACV and multidrug-resistant strains in patients with corneal HSV-1 infections leading to Herpetic Stromal Keratitis (HSK is a major health problem in industrialized countries and often results in blindness. To overcome this obstacle, we have previously developed an HSV-gB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2c that proved to be highly protective in immunodeficient NOD/SCID-mice towards genital infections. In the present study, we examined the effectivity of mAb 2c in preventing the immunopathological disease HSK in the HSK BALB/c mouse model. Therefore, mice were inoculated with HSV-1 strain KOS on the scarified cornea to induce HSK and subsequently either systemically or topically treated with mAb 2c. Systemic treatment was performed by intravenous administration of mAb 2c 24 h prior to infection (pre-exposure prophylaxis or 24, 40, and 56 hours after infection (post-exposure immunotherapy. Topical treatment was performed by periodical inoculations (5 times per day of antibody-containing eye drops as control, starting at 24 h post infection. Systemic antibody treatment markedly reduced viral loads at the site of infection and completely protected mice from developing HSK. The administration of the antiviral antibody prior or post infection was equally effective. Topical treatment had no improving effect on the severity of HSK. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mAb 2c proved to be an excellent drug for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections and for prevention of HSK and blindness. Moreover, the humanized counterpart (mAb hu2c was equally effective in protecting mice from HSV-induced HSK when compared to the parental mouse antibody. These results warrant the future development of this antibody as a novel approach for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections in humans.

  5. A pilot study on an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Liang, Hua; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2011-08-01

    The attenuated Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine has successfully protected millions of equine animals from EIA disease in China. In this pilot study, to determine whether this attenuated vaccine can induce broadly neutralizing antibodies, we immunized four horses with the attenuated Chinese vaccine strain EIAVFDDV and then observed the evolution of neutralizing antibodies against different EIAV strains. During the vaccination phase, all vaccinees rapidly developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against the homologous vaccine strain (pLGFD3V), and 3 out of 4 horses showed a gradual increase in serum neutralizing activity against two relatively heterologous virulent variants of the challenge strain (pLGFD3Mu12V and DLV34). After challenge, the three horses that had developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against pLGFD3Mu12V and DLV34 did not show signs of infection, which was demonstrated by immune suppression, while the one horse producing serum that could only neutralize pLGFD3V developed a febrile episode during the 8-month observation period. To assess whether the broadly neutralizing activity is associated with immune protection, sera drawn on the day of challenge from these four vaccinees and an additional four EIAVFDDV-vaccinated horses were analyzed for neutralizing antibodies against pLGFD3V, pLGFD3Mu12V and DLV34. Although there was no significant correlation between protection from infection and serum neutralizing activity against any of these three viral strains, protection from infection was observed to correlate better with serum neutralizing activity against the two heterologous virulent strains than against the homologous vaccine strain. These data indicate that EIAVFDDV induced broadly neutralizing antibodies, which might confer enhanced protection of vaccinees from infection by the challenge virus.

  6. Modeling maternal fetal RSV F vaccine induced antibody transfer in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Gregory M; Fries, Louis F; Smith, Gale; Kpamegan, Eloi; Lu, Hanxin; Guebre-Xabier, Mimi; Hickman, Somia P; Flyer, David

    2015-11-25

    Protection of newborns and young infants against RSV disease via maternal immunization mediated by transplacental transfer of antibodies is under evaluation in third-trimester pregnant women with the RSV recombinant F nanoparticle vaccine (RSV F vaccine). Since the hemichorial placental architecture in guinea pigs and humans is similar, the guinea pig model was employed to assess RSV F vaccine immunogenicity in pregnant sows and to compare RSV-specific maternal antibody levels in their pups. Thirty (30) presumptive pregnant guinea pigs were immunized on gestational day 25 and 46 with placebo (PBS), 30μg RSV F, or 30μg RSV F+400μg aluminum phosphate. Sera at delivery/birth (sows/pups) and 15 and 30 days post-partum (pups) were analyzed for the presence of anti-F IgG, palivizumab-competitive antibody (PCA) and RSV/A microneutralization (MN). The rates of pregnancy and stillbirth were similar between controls and vaccinees. The vaccine induced high levels of anti-F IgG, PCA and MN in sows, with the highest levels observed in adjuvanted vaccinees. Placental transfer to pups was proportional to the maternal antibody levels, with concentration effects observed for all immune measures. The RSV F vaccine was safe and immunogenic in pregnant guinea pigs and supported robust transplacental antibody transfer to their pups. Relative concentration of antibodies in the pups was observed even in the presence of high levels of maternal antibody. Guinea pigs may be an important safety and immunogenicity model for preclinical assessment of candidate vaccines for maternal immunization. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. [Salmonella typhi vaccination response study reveals defective antibody production selective IgA deficiency patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleguezuelo, Daniel E; Gianelli, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most prevalent immunodeficiency worldwide, progressing to common variable immunodeficiency only in few reported cases. We report the case of a Spanish female aged 22 and diagnosed of selective IgA deficiency, a long history of bronchitis, several episodes of pneumonia, bilateral bronchiectasis, normal IgG, IgM, IgG subclasses, and detectable pre-vaccination IgG antibodies against tetanus toxoid and Streptococcus pneumoniae. She was evaluated in our clinic in order to rule out common variable immunodeficiency. We observed good antibody response to tetanus toxoid, absence of circulating switched memory B cells, decreased response to pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens and a lack of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine. Most SIgAD patients presents with upper respiratory tract infections or mild diarrhea. Those with lower tract infections, pneumonia or untreatable diarrhea should follow B-cell subpopulations' study and antibody response to vaccines. Absence of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine allowed us to expose the defective antibody production.

  8. High-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay for analysis of natural and vaccine-induced antibodies against human papillomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sehr

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, automated, purely add-on, high-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (HT-PBNA with excellent repeatability and run-to-run reproducibility was developed for human papillomavirus types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 45, 52, 58 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. Preparation of 384 well assay plates with serially diluted sera and the actual cell-based assay are separated in time, therefore batches of up to one hundred assay plates can be processed sequentially. A mean coefficient of variation (CV of 13% was obtained for anti-HPV 16 and HPV 18 titers for a standard serum tested in a total of 58 repeats on individual plates in seven independent runs. Natural antibody response was analyzed in 35 sera from patients with HPV 16 DNA positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ lesions. The new HT-PBNA is based on Gaussia luciferase with increased sensitivity compared to the previously described manual PBNA (manPBNA based on secreted alkaline phosphatase as reporter. Titers obtained with HT-PBNA were generally higher than titers obtained with the manPBNA. A good linear correlation (R(2 = 0.7 was found between HT-PBNA titers and anti-HPV 16 L1 antibody-levels determined by a Luminex bead-based GST-capture assay for these 35 sera and a Kappa-value of 0.72, with only 3 discordant sera in the low titer range. In addition to natural low titer antibody responses the high sensitivity of the HT-PBNA also allows detection of cross-neutralizing antibodies induced by commercial HPV L1-vaccines and experimental L2-vaccines. When analyzing the WHO international standards for HPV 16 and 18 we determined an analytical sensitivity of 0.864 and 1.105 mIU, respectively.

  9. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky Flipse

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

  10. Progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus: a syndrome with diverse clinical features and antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugaiv, Erkingül; Leite, Maria Isabel; Şehitoğlu, Elçin; Woodhall, Mark; Çavuş, Filiz; Waters, Patrick; İçöz, Sema; Birişik, Ömer; Uğurel, Elif; Ulusoy, Canan; Kürtüncü, Murat; Vural, Burçak; Vincent, Angela; Akman-Demir, Gulsen; Tüzün, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    To better characterize progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM) syndrome and identify novel PERM phenotypes. The clinical features and antibody status of PERM patients were investigated using immunoblots, cell-based assays, RIA, protein macroarray and ELISA. Two patients with supratentorial involvement showed abnormal PET or EEG findings. One patient was discovered to have renal cell carcinoma, and protein macroarray revealed Ma3-antibodies. Another patient with leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies showed a good response to immunotherapy. The heterogeneity of the immunological features suggests that PERM is caused by diverse pathogenic mechanisms. Seropositivity to well-characterized neuronal cell surface antigens might indicate a good treatment response. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Jacky; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection. PMID:26065421

  12. An antibody blocking activin type II receptors induces strong skeletal muscle hypertrophy and protects from atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach-Trifilieff, Estelle; Minetti, Giulia C; Sheppard, KellyAnn; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Feige, Jerome N; Hartmann, Steffen; Brachat, Sophie; Rivet, Helene; Koelbing, Claudia; Morvan, Frederic; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Glass, David J

    2014-02-01

    The myostatin/activin type II receptor (ActRII) pathway has been identified to be critical in regulating skeletal muscle size. Several other ligands, including GDF11 and the activins, signal through this pathway, suggesting that the ActRII receptors are major regulatory nodes in the regulation of muscle mass. We have developed a novel, human anti-ActRII antibody (bimagrumab, or BYM338) to prevent binding of ligands to the receptors and thus inhibit downstream signaling. BYM338 enhances differentiation of primary human skeletal myoblasts and counteracts the inhibition of differentiation induced by myostatin or activin A. BYM338 prevents myostatin- or activin A-induced atrophy through inhibition of Smad2/3 phosphorylation, thus sparing the myosin heavy chain from degradation. BYM338 dramatically increases skeletal muscle mass in mice, beyond sole inhibition of myostatin, detected by comparing the antibody with a myostatin inhibitor. A mouse version of the antibody induces enhanced muscle hypertrophy in myostatin mutant mice, further confirming a beneficial effect on muscle growth beyond myostatin inhibition alone through blockade of ActRII ligands. BYM338 protects muscles from glucocorticoid-induced atrophy and weakness via prevention of muscle and tetanic force losses. These data highlight the compelling therapeutic potential of BYM338 for the treatment of skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness in multiple settings.

  13. Antibodies with higher bactericidal activity induced by a Neisseria gonorrhoeae Rmp deletion mutant strain.

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    Guocai Li

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein reduction modifiable protein (Rmp has strong immunogenicity. However, anti-Rmp antibodies block rather than preserve the antibacterial effects of protective antibodies, which hampers the development of vaccines for gonococcal infections. We herein constructed an Rmp deletion mutant strain of N. gonorrhoeae by gene homologous recombination. The 261-460 nucleotide residues of Rmp gene amplified from N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain were replaced with a kanamycin-resistant Kan gene amplified from pET-28a. The resultant hybridized DNA was transformed into N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain. PCR was used to screen the colonies in which wild-type Rmp gene was replaced with a mutant gene fragment. Western blotting revealed that the Rmp deletion mutant strain did not express Rmp protein. Rmp deletion did not alter the morphological and Gram staining properties of the mutant strain that grew slightly more slowly than the wild-type one. Rmp gene mutated stably throughout 25 generations of passage. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay indicated that the antibodies induced by the mutant strain had evidently higher bactericidal activities than those induced by the wild-type strain. Further modification of the Rmp deletion mutant strain is still required in the development of novel live attenuated vaccines for gonorrhea by Opa genes deletion or screening of phenotypic variant strains that do not express Opa proteins.

  14. Variable Domain N-Linked Glycans Acquired During Antigen-Specific Immune Responses Can Contribute to Immunoglobulin G Antibody Stability

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    Fleur S. van de Bovenkamp

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G (IgG can contain N-linked glycans in the variable domains, the so-called Fab glycans, in addition to the Fc glycans in the CH2 domains. These Fab glycans are acquired following introduction of N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation and contribute to antibody diversification. We investigated whether Fab glycans may—in addition to affecting antigen binding—contribute to antibody stability. By analyzing thermal unfolding profiles of antibodies with or without Fab glycans, we demonstrate that introduction of Fab glycans can improve antibody stability. Strikingly, removal of Fab glycans naturally acquired during antigen-specific immune responses can deteriorate antibody stability, suggesting in vivo selection of stable, glycosylated antibodies. Collectively, our data show that variable domain N-linked glycans acquired during somatic hypermutation can contribute to IgG antibody stability. These findings indicate that introducing Fab glycans may represent a mechanism to improve therapeutic/diagnostic antibody stability.

  15. Antibody Responses with Fc-Mediated Functions after Vaccination of HIV-Infected Subjects with Trivalent Influenza Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anne B; Lay, William N; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to assess the ability of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) to induce nonneutralizing antibodies (Abs) with Fc-mediated functions in HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects. Functional influenza-specific Ab responses were studied in 30 HIV-negative and 27 HIV......-positive subjects immunized against seasonal influenza. All 57 subjects received the 2015 TIV. Fc-mediated antihemagglutinin (anti-HA) Ab activity was measured in plasma before and 4 weeks after vaccination using Fc-receptor-binding assays, NK cell activation assays, and phagocytosis assays. At baseline, the HIV......-positive group had detectable but reduced functional Ab responses to both vaccine and nonvaccine influenza antigens. TIV enhanced Fc-mediated Ab responses in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups. A larger rise was generally observed in the HIV-positive group, such that there was no difference in functional...

  16. Mucosal adjuvanticity of fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3: systemic and local antibody responses.

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    Zhisheng Dang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that a bacterial fibronectin attachment protein (FAP is able to stimulate strong systemic and mucosal antibody responses when it is used alone or co-administrated with other antigens (Ags. Thus, it has been suggested to be a promising adjuvant candidate for the development of efficient vaccines. However, the co-administered Ags and FAP were cloned, expressed and purified individually to date. In a recent study, we first evaluated the adjuvanticity of a fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP, 24 amino acids of Mycobacterium avium FAP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3 (Em-TSP3 by detecting systemic and local antibody responses in intranasally (i.n. immunized BALB/c mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Em-TSP3 and FBP fragments were linked with a GSGGSG linker and expressed as a single fusion protein (Em-TSP3-FBP using the pBAD/Thio-TOPO expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized i.n. with recombinant Em-TSP3-FBP (rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG and the systemic and local antibody responses were detected by ELISA. The results showed that both rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG evoked strong serum IgG (p<0.001 and IgG1 responses (p<0.001, whereas only the latter induced a high level IgG2α production (p<0.001, compared to that of rEm-TSP3 alone without any adjuvant. There were no significant differences in IgG and IgG1 production between the groups. Low level of serum IgA and IgM were detected in both groups. The tendency of Th1 and Th2 cell immune responses were assessed via detecting the IgG1/IgG2α ratio after the second and third immunizations. The results indicated that i.n. immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP resulted in an increased IgG1/IgG2α ratio (a Th2 tendency, while rEm-TSP3+CpG caused a rapid Th1 response that later shifted to a Th2 response. Immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP provoked significantly stronger IgA antibody responses in intestine (p<0.05, lung (p<0.001 and spleen (p<0.001 compared to those

  17. Follicular Helper T (Tfh) Cells Mediate IgE Antibody Response to Airborne Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Iijima, Koji; Dent, Alexander L.; Kita, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 helper T (Th2) cells have long been believed to play a pivotal role in allergic immune responses, including IgE antibody production and type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation and pathology. A new T cell subset, T follicular helper cells (Tfh) cells, is specialized in supporting B cell maturation and antibody production. Objective To investigate the roles of Tfh cells in allergic immune responses. Methods Naïve mice were exposed to cytokines or natural allergens through the airways. Development of allergic immune responses was analyzed by collecting draining lymph nodes (LNs) and sera and by challenging the animals. Cytokine reporter mice and gene-deficient mice were used to dissect the immunologic mechanisms. Results We observed the development of IL-4-producing Tfh cells and Th2 cells in draining LNs following airway exposure to IL-1 family cytokines or natural allergens. Tfh cells and Th2 cells demonstrated unique phenotypes, tissue localization, and cytokine responses. Tfh cells supported the sustained production of IgE antibody in vivo in the absence of other T cell subsets or even when Th2 cell functions were severely compromised. Conversely, conditional deficiency of the master regulator Bcl6 in CD4+ T cells resulted in a marked reduction in Tfh cells and IgE antibody levels, but type 2 cytokine responses and eosinophilic inflammation in the airways remained unaffected. Conclusion Tfh cells play critical roles in the regulation of IgE antibody production. Allergic immune responses to airborne allergens likely involve two distinct subsets of IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells, namely Tfh cells and Th2 cells. PMID:27325434

  18. Follicular helper T cells mediate IgE antibody response to airborne allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Iijima, Koji; Dent, Alexander L; Kita, Hirohito

    2017-01-01

    T H 2 cells have long been believed to play a pivotal role in allergic immune responses, including IgE antibody production and type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation and pathology. A new T-cell subset, follicular helper T (T FH ) cells, is specialized in supporting B-cell maturation and antibody production. We sought to investigate the roles of T FH cells in allergic immune responses. Naive mice were exposed to cytokines or natural allergens through the airways. Development of allergic immune responses was analyzed by collecting draining lymph nodes and sera and by challenging the animals. Cytokine reporter mice and gene-deficient mice were used to dissect the immunologic mechanisms. We observed the development of IL-4-producing T FH cells and T H 2 cells in draining lymph nodes after airway exposure to IL-1 family cytokines or natural allergens. T FH and T H 2 cells demonstrated unique phenotypes, tissue localization, and cytokine responses. T FH cells supported the sustained production of IgE antibody in vivo in the absence of other T-cell subsets or even when T H 2 cell functions were severely compromised. Conversely, conditional deficiency of the master regulator Bcl6 in CD4 + T cells resulted in a marked reduction in T FH cell numbers and IgE antibody levels, but type 2 cytokine responses and eosinophilic inflammation in the airways remained unaffected. T FH cells play critical roles in the regulation of IgE antibody production. Allergic immune responses to airborne allergens likely involve 2 distinct subsets of IL-4-producing CD4 + T cells, namely T FH and Th2 cells. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Gyhrs, A; Lausen, B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antibody response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine (HibCP-TT) in preterm infants. SUBJECTS: Thirty-five healthy preterm infants with gestational ages (GA) from 27 to 36 weeks and birth weights from...

  20. A life-style physical activity intervention and the antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, J.E.; Ring, C.; Bosch, J.A.; Eves, F.; Drayson, M.T.; Calver, R.; Say, V.; Allen, D.; Burns, V.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether a life-style physical activity intervention improved antibody response to a pneumococcal vaccination in sedentary middle-aged women. Methods: Eighty-nine sedentary women completed a 16-week exercise (physical activity consultation, pedometer, telephone/e-mail prompts; n

  1. Immunoglobulin M and G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Rowe, P; Bennett, S

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the age-related immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG response to part of a 220-kDa glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) from Plasmodium falciparum and to determine possible correlations of possession of these antibodies with malaria morbidity. IgM and IgG levels...

  2. Persistence of Serogroup C Antibody Responses Following Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccination in United States Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-14

    available at ScienceDirect Vaccine j our na l ho me page: www.elsev ier .com/ locate /vacc ine ersistence of serogroup C antibody responses following...22] Auckland C, Gray S, Borrow R, Andrews N, Goldblatt D, Ramsay M, et al. Clinical and immunologic risk factors for meningococcal C conjugate

  3. T cell responsiveness correlates differentially with antibody isotype levels in clinical and asymptomatic filariasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdanbakhsh, M.; Paxton, W. A.; Kruize, Y. C.; Sartono, E.; Kurniawan, A.; van het Wout, A.; Selkirk, M. E.; Partono, F.; Maizels, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    To establish the relationships among T and B cell responses, active infection, and clinical manifestations in lymphatic filariasis, filarial-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IgG antibody isotypes, and IgE levels were determined in an exposed population: 31 asymptomatic amicrofilaremics, 43

  4. Selection for antibody response against sheep red blood cells and layer age affect egg quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Parmentier, H.K.; Kemp, B.

    2004-01-01

    1. After 22 generations of divergent selection for antibody response against sheep red blood cells (SRBC), hatchability differed between the selected lines. Whether there is a relationship between hatchability and egg traits in these lines is not clear. 2. The aim of the present study was to

  5. A synthetic peptide derived from domain III envelope glycoprotein of Dengue virus induces neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, J Asnet; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Chattanadee, Siriporn; Leaungwutiwong, Pornsawan; Shenbagarathai, R

    2018-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an arthropod-borne human pathogen that represents a severe public health threat in both endemic and non-endemic regions. So far, there is no licensed vaccine or specific drugs available for dengue fever. A fifteen-amino-acid-long peptide that includes the NGR motif was chemically synthesized and conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin. A standard immunization protocol was followed for the production of polyclonal antibodies by immunizing rabbits against the synthetic peptide. The immune response elicited high-titer polyclonal antibodies with the reactivity of the anti-peptide antibody against both synthetic peptide and four serotypes of DENV confirmed by DOT-ELISA. Neutralizing activity of anti-peptide antibody was found to be cross-reactive and effective resulting in 60% reduction of infectivity at 1:200 dilution in all four serotypes of DENV. Our findings have the potential to further improve our understanding of virus-host interactions and provide new insights into neutralizing antibodies and could also be used as a drug target.

  6. Lack of association between mannose binding lectin and antibody responses after acellular pertussis vaccinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is one of the key molecules in innate immunity and its role in human vaccine responses is poorly known. This study aimed to investigate the possible association of MBL polymorphisms with antibody production after primary and booster vaccinations with acellular pertussis vaccines in infants and adolescents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five hundred and sixty eight subjects were included in this study. In the adolescent cohort 355 subjects received a dose of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (dTpa vaccine ten years previously. Follow-up was performed at 3, 5 and 10 years. Infant cohort consisted of 213 subjects, who had received three primary doses of DTaP vaccine at 3, 5, and 12 months of age according to Finnish immunization program. Blood samples were collected before the vaccinations at 2,5 months of age and after the vaccinations at 13 months and 2 years of age. Concentrations of IgG antibodies to pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin and antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids were measured by standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of MBL2 gene exon1 (codons 52, 54, 57 were examined. MBL serum concentration was also measured from the adolescent cohort. No association was found with MBL2 exon 1 polymorphisms and antibody responses against vaccine antigens, after primary and booster dTpa vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that MBL polymorphisms do not affect the production and persistence of antibodies after acellular pertussis vaccination. Our finding also suggests that MBL might not be involved in modulating antibody responses to the vaccines made of purified bacterial proteins.

  7. Mapping Polyclonal HIV-1 Antibody Responses via Next-Generation Neutralization Fingerprinting.

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    Nicole A Doria-Rose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational neutralization fingerprinting, NFP, is an efficient and accurate method for predicting the epitope specificities of polyclonal antibody responses to HIV-1 infection. Here, we present next-generation NFP algorithms that substantially improve prediction accuracy for individual donors and enable serologic analysis for entire cohorts. Specifically, we developed algorithms for: (a selection of optimized virus neutralization panels for NFP analysis, (b estimation of NFP prediction confidence for each serum sample, and (c identification of sera with potentially novel epitope specificities. At the individual donor level, the next-generation NFP algorithms particularly improved the ability to detect multiple epitope specificities in a sample, as confirmed both for computationally simulated polyclonal sera and for samples from HIV-infected donors. Specifically, the next-generation NFP algorithms detected multiple specificities in twice as many samples of simulated sera. Further, unlike the first-generation NFP, the new algorithms were able to detect both of the previously confirmed antibody specificities, VRC01-like and PG9-like, in donor CHAVI 0219. At the cohort level, analysis of ~150 broadly neutralizing HIV-infected donor samples suggested a potential connection between clade of infection and types of elicited epitope specificities. Most notably, while 10E8-like antibodies were observed in infections from different clades, an enrichment of such antibodies was predicted for clade B samples. Ultimately, such large-scale analyses of antibody responses to HIV-1 infection can help guide the design of epitope-specific vaccines that are tailored to take into account the prevalence of infecting clades within a specific geographic region. Overall, the next-generation NFP technology will be an important tool for the analysis of broadly neutralizing polyclonal antibody responses against HIV-1.

  8. Parasite Specific Antibody Increase Induced by an Episode of Acute P. falciparum Uncomplicated Malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Kaddumukasa

    Full Text Available There is no approved vaccine for malaria, and precisely how human antibody responses to malaria parasite components and potential vaccine molecules are developed and maintained remains poorly defined. In this study, antibody anamnestic or memory response elicited by a single episode of P. falciparum infection was investigated.This study involved 362 malaria patients aged between 6 months to 60 years, of whom 19% were early-diagnosed people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA. On the day malaria was diagnosed and 42 days later, blood specimens were collected. Parasite density, CD4+ cells, and antibodies specific to synthetic peptides representing antigenic regions of the P. falciparum proteins GLURP, MSP3 and HRPII were measured.On the day of malaria diagnosis, Immunoglobulin (IgG antibodies against GLURP, MSP3 and HRP II peptides were present in the blood of 75%, 41% and 60% of patients, respectively. 42 days later, the majority of patients had boosted their serum IgG antibody more than 1.2 fold. The increase in level of IgG antibody against the peptides was not affected by parasite density at diagnosis. The median CD4+ cell counts of PLWHAs and HIV negative individuals were not statistically different, and median post-infection increases in anti-peptide IgG were similar in both groups of patients.In the majority (70% of individuals, an infection of P. falciparum elicits at least 20% increase in level of anti-parasite IgG. This boost in anti-P. falciparum IgG is not affected by parasite density on the day of malaria diagnosis, or by HIV status.

  9. Anti-α-galactosidase A antibody response to agalsidase beta treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcox, William R; Linthorst, Gabor E; Germain, Dominique P

    2012-01-01

    Agalsidase beta, a form of recombinant human α-galactosidase A (αGAL), is approved for use as enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease. An immunogenic response against a therapeutic protein could potentially impact its efficacy or safety. The development of anti-αGAL IgG antibodies...... was evaluated in 571 men and 251 women from the Fabry Registry who were treated with agalsidase beta. Most men developed antibodies (416 of 571, 73%), whereas most women did not (31 of 251, 12%). Women were also significantly more likely to tolerize than men; whereas 18 of 31 women tolerized (58%, 95%CI: 52...

  10. Antibody response of five bird species after vaccination with a killed West Nile virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Llizo, Shirley Yeo; Miller, Christine L; Glaser, Amy L

    2007-06-01

    West Nile virus has been associated with numerous bird mortalities in the United States since 1999. Five avian species at three zoological parks were selected to assess the antibody response to vaccination for West Nile virus: black-footed penguins (Spheniscus demersus), little blue penguins (Eudyptula minor), American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), Chilean flamingos (Phoenicopterus chilensis), and Attwater's prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri). All birds were vaccinated intramuscularly at least twice with a commercially available inactivated whole virus vaccine (Innovator). Significant differences in antibody titer over time were detected for black-footed penguins and both flamingo species.

  11. The Complexity of Antibody Responses Elicited against the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoproteins in Hospitalized Children Younger than 2 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsina Trento

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of age and maternal antibodies on the antibody responses to human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV glycoproteins in very young children has been a matter of controversy. Both, immaturity of the immune system at very early age and suppression of the host immune response by high level of maternal antibodies have been claimed to limit the host antibody response to virus infection and to jeopardize the use of hRSV vaccines under development in that age group. Hence, the antibody responses to the two major hRSV glycoproteins (F and G were evaluated in children younger than 2 years, hospitalized with laboratory confirmed hRSV bronchiolitis. A strong negative correlation was found between the titre of circulating ELISA antibodies directed against either prefusion or postfusion F in the acute phase, but not age, and their fold change at convalescence. These changes correlated also with the level of circulating neutralizing antibodies in sera. As reported in adults, most neutralizing antibodies in a subset of tested sera could not be depleted with postfusion F, suggesting that they were mostly directed against prefusion-specific epitopes. In contrast, a weak negative association was found for group-specific anti-G antibodies in the acute phase and their fold change at convalescence only after correcting for the antigenic group of the infecting virus. In addition, large discrepancies were observed in some individuals between the antibody responses specific for F and G glycoproteins. These results illustrate the complexity of the anti-hRSV antibody responses in children experiencing a primary severe infection and the influence of preexisting maternal antibodies on the host response, factors that should influence hRSV serological studies as well as vaccine development.

  12. Intracellular Targeting of CEA Results in Th1-Type Antibody Responses Following Intradermal Genetic Vaccination by a Needle-Free Jet Injection Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Johansson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The route and method of immunization, as well as the cellular localization of the antigen, can influence the generation of an immune response. In general, intramuscular immunization results in Th1 responses, whereas intradermal delivery of DNA by gene gun immunization often results in more Th2 responses. Here we investigate how altering the cellular localization of the tumor antigen CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen affects the quality and amplitude of DNA vaccine-induced antibody responses in mice following intradermal delivery of DNA by a needle-free jet injection device (Biojector. CEA was expressed either in a membrane-bound form (wild-type CEA or in two truncated forms (CEA6 and CEA66 with cytoplasmic localization, where CEA66 was fused to a promiscuous T-helper epitope from tetanus toxin. Repeated intradermal immunization of BALB/c mice with DNA encoding wild-type CEA produced high antibody titers of a mixed IgG1/IgG2a ratio. In contrast, utilizing the DNA construct that resulted in intracellular targeting of CEA led to a reduced capacity to induce CEA-specific antibodies, but instead induced a Th1-biased immune response.

  13. Role of the Antigen Capture Pathway in the Induction of a Neutralizing Antibody Response to Anthrax Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Verma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxin neutralizing antibodies represent the major mode of protective immunity against a number of toxin-mediated bacterial diseases, including anthrax; however, the cellular mechanisms that lead to optimal neutralizing antibody responses remain ill defined. Here we show that the cellular binding pathway of anthrax protective antigen (PA, the binding component of anthrax toxin, determines the toxin neutralizing antibody response to this antigen. PA, which binds cellular receptors and efficiently enters antigen-presenting cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, was found to elicit robust anti-PA IgG and toxin neutralizing antibody responses. In contrast, a receptor binding-deficient mutant of PA, which does not bind receptors and only inefficiently enters antigen-presenting cells by macropinocytosis, elicited very poor antibody responses. A chimeric protein consisting of the receptor binding-deficient PA mutant tethered to the binding subunit of cholera toxin, which efficiently enters cells using the cholera toxin receptor rather than the PA receptor, elicited an anti-PA IgG antibody response similar to that elicited by wild-type PA; however, the chimeric protein elicited a poor toxin neutralizing antibody response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the antigen capture pathway can dictate the magnitudes of the total IgG and toxin neutralizing antibody responses to PA as well as the ratio of the two responses.

  14. Antibody response in cattle, sheep and rats to infection with. gamma. -irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.L.; Doy, T.G. (Agricultural Research Council, Compton (UK). Inst. for Research on Animal Diseases); Hanna, R.E.B. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (UK))

    1982-05-01

    Cattle, sheep and rats were infected orally with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica, or with normal metacercariae. The antibody response was monitored in each host to metacercarial tegument (T0), juvenile tegument (T1), adult tegument (T2) and gut antigens. The response was examined at weekly intervals for cattle and sheep throughout 15 weeks of infection and four weeks after infection in rats, using an indirect fluorescent antibody labelling technique. It was found that the irradiated metacercariae engendered a normal humoral response to T0, T1 and gut antigens in all three hosts although the antibody levels were somewhat reduced due to early death or stunting of the flukes. T0 and T1 appeared to be antigenically similar. Antibodies against T2 appeared late in the animals infected with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae and the titres attained were considerably lower than in the controls. The T2 antigen stimulus in the animals given ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae was probably provided by flukes which 'broke through' the developmental barrier imposed by irradiation and which were found alive at autopsy.

  15. Direct Probing of Germinal Center Responses Reveals Immunological Features and Bottlenecks for Neutralizing Antibody Responses to HIV Env Trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Carnathan, Diane G; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Pauthner, Matthias; Briney, Bryan; Reiss, Samantha M; Wood, Jennifer S; Kaushik, Kirti; van Gils, Marit J; Rosales, Sandy L; van der Woude, Patricia; Locci, Michela; Le, Khoa M; de Taeye, Steven W; Sok, Devin; Mohammed, Ata Ur Rasheed; Huang, Jessica; Gumber, Sanjeev; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Kasturi, Sudhir P; Pulendran, Bali; Moore, John P; Ahmed, Rafi; Seumois, Grégory; Burton, Dennis R; Sanders, Rogier W; Silvestri, Guido; Crotty, Shane

    2016-11-22

    Generating tier 2 HIV-neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses by immunization remains a challenging problem, and the immunological barriers to induction of such responses with Env immunogens remain unclear. Here, some rhesus monkeys developed autologous tier 2 nAbs upon HIV Env trimer immunization (SOSIP.v5.2) whereas others did not. This was not because HIV Env trimers were immunologically silent because all monkeys made similar ELISA-binding antibody responses; the key difference was nAb versus non-nAb responses. We explored the immunological barriers to HIV nAb responses by combining a suite of techniques, including longitudinal lymph node fine needle aspirates. Unexpectedly, nAb development best correlated with booster immunization GC B cell magnitude and Tfh characteristics of the Env-specific CD4 T cells. Notably, these factors distinguished between successful and unsuccessful antibody responses because GC B cell frequencies and stoichiometry to GC Tfh cells correlated with nAb development, but did not correlate with total Env Ab binding titers. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The antibody response to well-defined malaria antigens after acute malaria in individuals living under continuous malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E; Høgh, B; Dziegiel, M

    1992-01-01

    The IgG and IgM antibody responses to the C-terminal 783 amino acids of the P. falciparum glutamate-rich protein, GLURP489-1271, expressed as an E. coli fusion protein, the IgG response to a 18-mer synthetic peptide EDKNEKGQHEIVEVEEIL (GLURP899-916) representing the C-terminal repeats of GLURP...... the antigens, the responses were often short-lived. In adults, the antibody responses to the GLURP489-1271 fusion protein and the (EENV)6 peptide peaked after 2 weeks, and not all individuals responded to all antigens. The antibody response, even against large fragments of conserved antigens, is not uniformly...

  17. Opposite effects of total lymphoid irradiation on T cell-dependent and T cell-independent antibody responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanay, A.; Strober, S.

    1984-02-01

    The effect of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on the primary antibody response to the dinitrophenylated heterologous protein, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH), in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and to the trinitrophenylated polysaccharide antigen, Brucella abortus (TNP-BA), was studied in BALB/c mice. The antibody response to both antigens was diminished in comparison with nonirradiated mice when antigens were injected within 3 days after TLI. When the mice were immunized 30 days after completion of TLI the antibody response to DNP-KLH in CFA was still diminished, but the antibody response to TNP-BA was enhanced 5- to 10-fold as compared with that of control animals. The opposite effect of TLI on the two antibody responses was also observed in a syngeneic primary adoptive transfer system.

  18. Antibody Response is More Likely to Pneumococcal Proteins Than to Polysaccharide After HIV-associated Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Green, Nicola; Goldblatt, David

    2015-01-01

    to at least 1 protein compared to 51% of non-IPD controls. HIV IPD cases responded to more proteins than non-IPD controls (8.6 ± 8.4 vs 4.2 ± 7.6 proteins; P = .01), and had a significantly higher probability of yielding an antibody response to the proteins PiaA, PsaA, and PcpA. Twenty-two percent of HIV......-infected individuals with IPD had a serotype-specific antibody response. Younger age at the time of IPD was the only predictor of a serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody response, whereas we did not identify predictors of a protein-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: Antibody responses occurred more frequently...

  19. Antibody responses of cervids (Cervus elaphus) following experimental Mycobacterium bovis infection and the implications for immunodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Noel P; Surujballi, Om P; Prescott, John F; Duncan, J Robert; Waters, W Ray; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena

    2008-11-01

    Captive and free-ranging wildlife animals are implicated in the maintenance and transmission of bovine tuberculosis and therefore pose a significant obstacle to eradication of the disease from domestic livestock. The current antemortem diagnostic method, the intradermal tuberculin skin test, is impractical for routine use with many wild animals. Antibody-based assays are particularly attractive because the animals are handled only once and immediate processing of the sample is not required. This report characterizes the antibody responses of red deer-elk hybrids (Cervus elaphus) against Mycobacterium bovis and subsequently evaluates the diagnostic performance of select antigens in a rapid-test format. Sequential serum samples were collected from 10 animals experimentally infected with M. bovis and 5 noninfected animals over a 7-month period postinfection (p.i.). Samples were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunoblot analyses, and multiantigen print immunoassays for seroreactivity to mycobacterial antigens. Although all infected animals produced antibodies to M. bovis protein antigens, there was significant animal-to-animal variation in the kinetics and magnitudes of responses and the antigens recognized. The most frequently recognized antigens included MPB83, ESAT-6, CFP10, and MPB70. Responses to some antigens, such as MPB83, were consistently detected as early as 4 weeks after inoculation, whereas other antigens were detected only much later (>140 days p.i.). Antibody responses were boosted by injection of tuberculin for intradermal tuberculin skin testing. Comparison of single-antigen (fluorescence polarization assay) with multiantigen (CervidTB STAT-PAK) rapid tests demonstrated that a highly sensitive and specific serodiagnostic test for tuberculosis in cervids will require multiple and carefully selected seroreactive antigens covering a broad spectrum of antibody specificities.

  20. Prospective evaluation of antibody response to Streptococcus gallolyticus and risk of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Julia; Jenab, Mazda; Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Martina; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Carbonnel, Franck; Severi, Gianluca; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; la Vecchia, Carlo; Karakatsani, Anna; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Agnoli, Claudia; Palli, Domenico; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, Maria-José; Bonet Bonet, Catalina; Huerta, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Bradbury, Kathryn; Gunter, Marc; Murphy, Neil; Freisling, Heinz; Riboli, Elio; Tsilidis, Kostas; Aune, Dagfinn; Waterboer, Tim; Hughes, David J

    2018-01-29

    The gut microbiome is increasingly implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) development. A subgroup of patients diagnosed with CRC show high antibody responses to Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus (SGG). However, it is unclear whether the association is also present pre-diagnostically. We assessed the association of antibody responses to SGG proteins in pre-diagnostic serum samples with CRC risk in a case-control study nested within a prospective cohort. Pre-diagnostic serum samples from 485 first incident CRC cases (mean time between blood draw and diagnosis 3.4 years) and 485 matched controls in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) study were analyzed for antibody responses to 11 SGG proteins using multiplex serology. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models. Antibody positivity for any of the 11 SGG proteins was significantly associated with CRC risk with 56% positive controls compared to 63% positive cases (OR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.04-1.77). Positivity for two or more proteins of a previously identified SGG 6-marker panel with greater CRC-specificity was also observed among 9% of controls compared to 17% of CRC cases, corresponding to a significantly increased CRC risk (OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.44-3.27). In this prospective nested case-control study, we observed a positive association between antibody responses to SGG and CRC development in serum samples taken before evident disease onset. Further work is required to establish the possibly etiological significance of these observations and whether SGG serology may be applicable for CRC risk stratification. © 2018 UICC.

  1. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minozzi, G.; Parmentier, H.K.; Mignon-Grasteau, S.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Bed'hom, B.; Gourichon, D.; Minvielle, F.; Pinard-van der Laan, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background - The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab) to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three

  2. Development of a peptide conjugate vaccine for inducing therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Amelia; Castagnoli, Riccardo; De Sando, Elisabetta; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2017-04-01

    Given the multifaceted effector functions of IgE in immediate hypersensitivity, late-phase reactions, regulation of IgE receptor expression and immune modulation, IgE antibodies have long represented an attractive target for therapeutic agents in asthma and other allergic diseases. Effective pharmacologic blockade of the binding of IgE to its receptors has become one of most innovative therapeutic strategies in the field of allergic diseases in the last 10 years. Areas covered: The latest strategies targeting IgE include the development of a therapeutic vaccine, able to trigger our own immune systems to produce therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies, potentially providing a further step forward in the treatment of allergic diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the discovery strategy, preclinical and early clinical development of a peptide conjugate vaccine for inducing therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies. Expert opinion: Outside the area of development of humanized anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies, the research field of therapeutic IgE-targeted vaccines holds potential benefits for the treatment of allergic diseases. However, most of the experimental observations in animal models have not yet been translated into new treatments and evidence of human efficacy and safety of this new therapeutic strategy are still lacking.

  3. Native Mass Spectrometry, Ion mobility, and Collision-Induced Unfolding Categorize Malaria Antigen/Antibody Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Salinas, Nichole D.; Chen, Edwin; Tolia, Niraj H.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is a promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. Recently, we reported the epitopes on PvDBP region II (PvDBP-II) for three inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (2D10, 2H2, and 2C6). In this communication, we describe the combination of native mass spectrometry and ion mobility (IM) with collision induced unfolding (CIU) to study the conformation and stabilities of three malarial antigen-antibody complexes. These complexes, when collisionally activated, undergo conformational changes that depend on the location of the epitope. CIU patterns for PvDBP-II in complex with antibody 2D10 and 2H2 are highly similar, indicating comparable binding topology and stability. A different CIU fingerprint is observed for PvDBP-II/2C6, indicating that 2C6 binds to PvDBP-II on an epitope different from 2D10 and 2H2. This work supports the use of CIU as a means of classifying antigen-antibody complexes by their epitope maps in a high throughput screening workflow. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Anti-TNF-α antibody alleviates insulin resistance in rats with sepsis-induced stress hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, W; Han, C; Li, M; Zhang, J; Jiang, Z

    2017-10-13

    To explore the effects and mechanisms of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) antibody on insulin resistance (IR) in rats with sepsis-induced stress hyperglycemia. The sepsis-induced stress hyperglycemic rat model was constructed by cecal ligation and puncture combined with the intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide. The rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal control (NC) group, surgical rats (Cntl) group, high-dose anti-TNF-α antibody therapy (TNF, 6 mg/kg) group, low-dose anti-TNF-α antibody therapy (Tnf, 3 mg/kg) group, insulin therapy (INS) group, and INS + Tnf group. The blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations were detected, followed by analysis of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Finally, the expression levels of phospho-Akt (p-Akt), Akt, p-mTOR, mTOR, nuclear factor-κB (NFκB), I kappa beta kinase (IKKβ), and suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS-3) were detected by western blotting. There was no significant difference in blood glucose concentrations among these groups, while the serum insulin concentration in TNF and Tnf groups was lower than that in the Cntl group at postoperative 6 h (P TNF group than that in the Cntl group (P Tnf and TNF groups (P TNF-α antibody could reduce IR by inhibiting AKt/mTOR signaling pathway and the expression levels of NFκB, IKKβ, and SOCS-3 in rats with sepsis-induced stress hyperglycemia.

  5. The Effect of Induced Antibodies with Respect to Neutralization, Clearance Rate and Functional Activity in a Rabbit/Infliximab Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken Lumby; Søgaard Teisner, Ane; Kjeldsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic antibodies are a developing field for treatment of an expanding number of inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease. Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is frequently hampered by development of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) that may compromise the treatment. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: We addressed this issue in a rabbit model of treatment with the anti-tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antibody, infliximab (IFX). We developed an inhibition ELISA to selectively measure absolute concentrations of neutralizing antibodies and another ELISA for measuring the concentration...... of functional IFX in the circulation. RESULTS: We found that the concentration of functional IFX was inversely proportional to the concentration of neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSION: Administration of IFX to rabbits showed diversity in immune responses/tolerance toward IFX, corresponding to responses observed...

  6. The Effect of Induced Antibodies with Respect to Neutralization, Clearance Rate and Functional Activity in a Rabbit/Infliximab Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken Lumby; Teisner, Ane; Kjeldsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic antibodies are a developing field for treatment of an expanding number of inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease. Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is frequently hampered by development of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) that may compromise the treatment. Materials...... and Methods: We addressed this issue in a rabbit model of treatment with the anti-tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF) antibody, infliximab (IFX). We developed an inhibition ELISA to selectively measure absolute concentrations of neutralizing antibodies and another ELISA for measuring the concentration...... of functional IFX in the circulation. Results: We found that the concentration of functional IFX was inversely proportional to the concentration of neutralizing antibodies. Conclusion: Administration of IFX to rabbits showed diversity in immune responses/tolerance toward IFX, corresponding to responses observed...

  7. Effect of pre-existing anti-tick-borne encephalitis virus immunity on neutralising antibody response to the Vero cell-derived, inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine candidate IC51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Elisabeth; Klade, Christoph S; Heinz, Franz X; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Rendi-Wagner, Pamela; Jilma, Bernd; Tauber, Erich

    2008-11-11

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia with a case fatality rate up to 35% and long-term sequelae up to 75%. This active-controlled, randomized, multi-centre, observer-blind, phase III trial investigated the neutralising antibody response to the new Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine IC51 in subjects with (N=81) and without (N=339) pre-existing tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccine induced antibodies as determined by TBE enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay IgG (ELISA). Neutralising antibody response was statistically superior in TBE ELISA-positive subjects compared to TBE ELISA-negative subjects after the first (pvaccination with IC51. Thus, pre-existing vaccine-induced TBE immunity enhances the neutralising JEV-specific antibody response after a single IC51 vaccination.

  8. Antibody response to actinomyces antigen and dental caries experience: implications for caries susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Martin; Owen, Willis L; Avery, Kevin T

    2005-06-01

    Fluoridated dentifrices reduce dental caries in subjects who perform effective oral hygiene. Actinomyces naeslundii increases in teeth-adherent microbial biofilms (plaques) in these subjects, and a well-characterized serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response (Actinomyces antibody [A-Ab]) is also increased. Other studies suggest that a serum IgG antibody response to streptococcal d-alanyl poly(glycerophosphate) (S-Ab) may indicate caries experience associated strongly with gingival health and exposure to fluoridated water. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between A-Ab response, oral hygiene, S-Ab response, and caries experience. Measurements were made of A-Ab and S-Ab concentrations, caries experience (number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth [DMFT], number of teeth surfaces [DMFS], and number of decayed teeth needing treated [DT]), exposure to fluoridated water (Flu), mean clinical pocket depth (PD; in millimeters), and extent of plaque (PL) and gingival bleeding on probing (BOP). A-Ab concentration, the dependent variable in a multiple regression analysis, increased with S-Ab concentration and decreased with PL and DMFT adjusted for Flu (R(2) = 0.51, P caries in subjects performing effective oral hygiene using fluoridated dentifrices. Conversely, a low A-Ab response is suggestive of decreased A. naeslundii binding to saliva-coated apatite and greater caries experience, as reported by others.

  9. Vancomycin-induced Immune Thrombocytopenia Proven by the Detection of Vancomycin-dependent Anti-platelet Antibody with Flow Cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanouchi, Jun; Hato, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Sanshiro; Takeuchi, Kazuto; Yakushijin, Yoshihiro; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-induced thrombocytopenia is a rare adverse reaction that may be overlooked because no specific diagnostic test is currently available. We herein report a patient with vancomycin-induced immune thrombocytopenia who was diagnosed by the detection of vancomycin-dependent anti-platelet antibody with flow cytometry. An IgG antibody in the patient's serum reacted with platelets only in the presence of vancomycin. Severe thrombocytopenia gave rise to life-threatening gastrointestinal blee...

  10. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulggi A Lee

    Full Text Available A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the "reservoir". We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART.We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR; integrated DNA (Alu PCR; unspliced RNA (rtPCR, multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA, residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR, and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay. We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR. Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables.Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years, the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004 and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003. However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results.Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV during treatment.

  11. Vibrio cholerae O1 secretes an extracellular matrix in response to antibody-mediated agglutination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle E Baranova

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae O1 is one of two serogroups responsible for epidemic cholera, a severe watery diarrhea that occurs after the bacterium colonizes the human small intestine and secretes a potent ADP-ribosylating toxin. Immunity to cholera is associated with intestinal anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS antibodies, which are known to inhibit V. cholerae motility and promote bacterial cell-cell crosslinking and aggregation. Here we report that V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor biotypes produce an extracellular matrix (ECM when forcibly immobilized and agglutinated by ZAC-3 IgG, an intestinally-derived monoclonal antibody (MAb against the core/lipid A region of LPS. ECM secretion, as demonstrated by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy, occurred within 30 minutes of antibody exposure and peaked by 3 hours. Non-motile mutants of V. cholerae did not secrete ECM following ZAC-3 IgG exposure, even though they were susceptible to agglutination. The ECM was enriched in O-specific polysaccharide (OSP but not Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS. Finally, we demonstrate that ECM production by V. cholerae in response to ZAC-3 IgG was associated with bacterial resistant to a secondary complement-mediated attack. In summary, we propose that V. cholerae O1, upon encountering anti-LPS antibodies in the intestinal lumen, secretes an ECM (or O-antigen capsule possibly as a strategy to shield itself from additional host immune factors and to exit an otherwise inhospitable host environment.

  12. Adjuvants and immunization strategies to induce influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Goff

    Full Text Available The global population remains vulnerable in the face of the next pandemic influenza virus outbreak, and reformulated vaccinations are administered annually to manage seasonal epidemics. Therefore, development of a new generation of vaccines is needed to generate broad and persistent immunity to influenza viruses. Here, we describe three adjuvants that enhance the induction of stalk-directed antibodies against heterologous and heterosubtypic influenza viruses when administered with chimeric HA proteins. Addavax, an MF59-like nanoemulsion, poly(I:C, and an RNA hairpin derived from Sendai virus (SeV Cantell were efficacious intramuscularly. The SeV RNA and poly(I:C also proved to be effective respiratory mucosal adjuvants. Although the quantity and quality of antibodies induced by the adjuvants varied, immunized mice demonstrated comparable levels of protection against challenge with influenza A viruses on the basis of HA stalk reactivity. Finally, we present that intranasally, but not intramuscularly, administered chimeric HA proteins induce mucosal IgA antibodies directed at the HA stalk.

  13. A comparison of antibody responses to commercial equine influenza vaccines following primary vaccination of Thoroughbred weanlings--a randomised blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Sarah; Arkins, Sean; Walsh, Cathal; Cullinane, Ann

    2011-11-15

    Many racing authorities, sales companies and equestrian bodies have mandatory vaccination policies for equine influenza (EI). The consequences of lack of vaccine efficacy include clinical disease, disruption to training programmes, the cancellation of equestrian events and the introduction of virus to susceptible populations. The correlation between antibody against the virus haemagglutinin and protection against influenza has been well established. The objective of this study was to compare the antibody responses of 66 unvaccinated Thoroughbred weanlings on four different stud farms, following primary vaccination (V1, V2 and V3) with the five EI vaccines commercially available in Ireland (Duvaxyn IET Plus, Equilis Resequin, Equip FT, Equilis Prequenza Te, ProteqFlu Te). Antibody responses were monitored for 6 months post V3 by single radial haemolysis. The pattern of antibody response was similar for all vaccines and for all antigens tested. A rapid decline of antibody level was observed by 3 months post V2 for all vaccines. The antibody response of the horses vaccinated with the whole virus vaccine Duvaxyn IET Plus was significantly higher than that of the horses vaccinated with the other four products. Five weanlings had maternally derived antibodies (MDA) at the time of V1. The canary pox recombinant vaccine, subunit vaccine and whole virus inactivated vaccines administered to these weanlings did not induce a detectable antibody response against the background of MDA but effectively primed the animals as revaccination resulted in a strong antibody response. In this study 43% of the weanlings failed to seroconvert after V1. This high incidence of poor responders has not been reported in previous experimental studies relating to these products. The poor responders were observed in all vaccine groups except those vaccinated with Duvaxyn IET Plus. Post V2 the incidence of poor responders was reduced to 7% and all horses responded to V3. The study demonstrates that

  14. Prevalence of antibodies and humoral response after seasonal trivalent vaccination against influenza B lineages in an elderly population of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Ivan Sanz; Rello, Silvia Rojo; Lejarazu, Raúl Ortiz de

    2017-11-24

    The aim of this study was to analyze the presence of antibodies against both Yamagata and Victoria influenza B lineages and to check the response after seasonal trivalent vaccination. Haemagglutination inhibition assays were performed with pre-and post-vaccination serum samples from 174 individuals ≥65 years of age vaccinated with seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines during the 2006-2007, 2008-2009, 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 vaccine campaigns. 33.9% of individuals showed pre-vaccine protective antibodies (≥1/40) against B/Yamagata lineage and 41.4% against B/Victoria lineage. The annual trivalent vaccine induced significant homologous seroconversion in 14-35.6% of individuals in each vaccine campaign. The population ≥65 years has low-moderate seroprotection against B influenza lineages. Trivalent vaccination induced a slight increase of seroprotection. The trivalent vaccine should be administered to all individuals ≥65 years in all vaccine campaigns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunological mimicry of PrPC-PrPSc interactions: antibody-induced PrP misfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Guest, Will; Huang, Alan; Plotkin, Steven S; Cashman, Neil R

    2009-08-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to an abnormal protease-resistant conformational isoform (PrP(Sc)) by template-directed conversion. The interaction between PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) is mediated by specific sites which have been mapped to six putative 'binding and conversion domains' (PrP-BCD) through peptide and antibody competition studies. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the bityrosine motif Tyr-Tyr-Arg (YYR) specifically recognize PrP(Sc) and other misfolded PrP species. Here, we report that select bead-bound PrP-BCD mAbs induce exposure of bityrosine epitopes on mouse brain PrP. By competition immunoprecipitation, we show that PrP-BCD mAb-induced bityrosine exposure occurs at alpha-helices 1 and 3. However, PrP-BCD mAb-induced PrP(C) misfolding is not accompanied by beta-sheet dissociation, a key event in PrP(C) conversion to PrP(Sc), and is not associated with acquisition of protease resistance, or the capacity to recruit additional molecules of PrP. Our data suggest that mAb mimics of the physical interaction of PrP(C) with PrP(Sc) can induce unfolding of specific PrP domains, but that subsequent processes (including the energetically unfavorable beta-sheet dissociation) effect isoform conversion in prion disease.

  16. Respons Antibodi Sekunder Terhadap Penyakit Tetelo pada Ayam Petelur Pascavaksinasi Ulangan dengan Vaksin Tetelo Aktif (NEWCASTLE DISEASESECONDARY ANTIBODY RESPONSE AFTER REVACCINATION IN LAYER WITH THE ACTIVE ND VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andika Budi Kurnianto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Revaccination is required in order to preventNewcastle Disease (ND reccurence inlayers chickens. Oneof vaccine for ND revaccination is freeze-died ND active vaccine containing e” 106,5EID50. Revaccinationisdone to trigger a faster secondary antibody responses in layers and can achieve protective antibody titersagainst ND that can be monitored by a hemagglutinationinhibition (HI. The aim of this study was todetermine the ND secondary antibody responses in layers after revaccination with ND active vaccine.Antibody titer of 20 layers chickens of 20 week old were determined before revaccinations (week 0 andafter revaccinations (week 1 until week 9. The first vaccination was conducted using ND-IB (NewcastleDisease-Infectious Bronchitis at the age of 2 days through eye drops and subcutaneous injection at the ageof 5 days using a dose of 1 ampoule.Vaccination is repeated at the age of 20 weeks at a dose of 1 ½ ampoule through drinking water. Blood samples were collected on the wing vein (venous cutane ulnar and left for 5-10 minutes at room temperature.Sera were then collected and stored at -20oC until use. HI antibody titerwas determined by micro titeration system. The HI mean titers were analyzed by Duncan test. The studyresults showed that antibody titer before revaccination was3,47 HI log 2 and the HI titers after revaccinationwere 4,02; 5,22; 6,52; 7,85; 8,4; 8,6; 7,7; 5,92; dan 3,87 HI log 2 respectivelly at weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and9.The NDV revaccination with ND active vaccine significantly (P <0.01 increased in antibody titer inlayers starting from week 1 to week 6, but decreased following week 7 to week-9. It can be concluded thatrevaccinantion with ND active vaccine increases the antibody titers in layer chickens.

  17. Antibody against the insulin receptor causes disappearance of insulin receptors in 3T3-L1 cells: a possible explanation of antibody-induced insulin resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Grunfeld, C

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a rabbit antibody induced against the rat insulin receptor (RAR) was tested using cultured 3T3-L1 fat cells. As previously seen with antibodies against the insulin receptor from patients with the type B syndrome of insulin resistance and acanthosis nigricans, RAR acutely mimicked the action of insulin by stimulating deoxyglucose uptake. After prolonged exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to RAR, insulinomimetic activity was lost and the cells became resistant to the action of insulin. This...

  18. A noncognate interaction with anti-receptor antibody-activated helper T cells induces small resting murine B cells to proliferate and to secrete antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1988-01-01

    on resting B cells (even in the presence of intact F23.1 antibody), but could induce antibody secretion by anti-Ig-preactivated B cells. Both F23.1+ clones (E9.D4 and 4.35F2) and one F23.1- clone (D2.2) could synergize with supernatants from activated E9.D4 T cells to induce B cell activation. F(ab')2......Culture of small resting allogeneic B cells (of an irrelevant haplotype) with two clones of T helper (Th) cells that were activated by the F23.1 anti-T cell receptor antibody led to the activation of B cells to proliferate and to secrete antibody. Th cell supernatants by themselves had no effect...... fragments of F23.1 induced E9.D4 to activate B cells as efficiently as intact F23.1 and B cell populations that had been incubated with F23.1 were not activated when cultured with E9.D4, although T cells recognized cell-presented F23.1 and were weakly activated. Reduction of the density of F23.1 adsorbed...

  19. Serum antibody responses to periodontal microbiota in chronic and aggressive periodontitis: a postulate revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Andrew M; Stoupel, Janet; Celenti, Romanita; Demmer, Ryan T; Papapanou, Panos N

    2014-04-01

    The authors revisited the 1999 International Workshop postulate of robust serum antibody responses to infecting agents in localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) and weak responses in generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP). Antibody responses were further examined in localized and generalized chronic periodontitis (LCP and GCP). The study includes 119 patients (60 males and 59 females, aged 11 to 76 years), 18 with LAgP, 37 with GAgP, 37 with LCP, and 27 with GCP. Multiple subgingival plaque samples/patient (1,057 in total) were analyzed with respect to 11 bacterial species using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations, and serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels were measured against the same bacteria using checkerboard immunoblotting. Further, infection ratios (antibody level over the average bacterial colonization by the homologous species) were computed for each patient. Comparisons of bacterial colonization, serum IgG levels, and infection ratios were made across the diagnostic categories using multivariable linear regression models adjusting for age and race/ethnicity. There were no statistically significant differences in serum IgG levels to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among the four diagnostic categories. IgG levels to several species, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Campylobacter rectus, were highest in patients with GAgP and significantly different from LCP and GCP, but not from LAgP. Comparisons based on infection ratios showed no statistically significant differences for any species between GAgP and LAgP. This study provides evidence against the 1999 Workshop's postulate of weak serum antibody responses in patients with GAgP and shows that serum IgG responses in GAgP are comparable to those in LAgP, but higher than in GCP or LCP for several species.

  20. Immunological development in nestling American kestrels Falco sparverius: post-hatching ontogeny of the antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Judit E G; Bortolotti, Gary R

    2008-12-01

    Avian research involving examination of immune function or testing of immunocompetence in wild birds has been based upon information on Galliforms, (chicken and quail) even though they are precocial, whereas most wild species with which ecologists, biologists and toxicologists work are altricial; blind, naked and completely dependent at hatching. Here we begin to address this gap in knowledge, offering insight into the early, post-hatching, humoral immune response in an altricial bird, the American kestrel (Falco sparverius). Over two breeding seasons, nestling kestrels were immunized with a non-pathogenic antigen, dinitrophenol keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH), between 3 and 9 days post-hatching and boostered 6 days later. Background levels, primary and secondary immune responses were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The specificity of our laboratory produced rabbit, anti-kestrel antibody was determined using a double immunodiffusion assay. Results showed the rabbit antiserum to have specific anti-kestrel IgG activity. Birds as young as three days old could successfully mount an antibody response, the magnitude of which increased with age at first vaccination. Early immunization did not compromise growth rate, nor did it affect the maximum secondary response. Comparatively, adult kestrels immunized during the same season and following the same protocol, had antibody levels four times higher than those of the nestlings.

  1. Immune response to pneumococcal polysaccharides 4 and 14 in elderly and young adults. I Antibody concentrations, avidity and functional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlone George M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae is a serious worldwide pathogen and the focus of numerous vaccine development projects. Currently the most widely accepted surrogate marker for evaluating the efficacy of a given vaccine is to utilize ELISA. Measurement of antibody concentration by ELISA without reduction in cross-reactive antibodies causes an overestimation of antibody concentration and therefore protection, this is most notable in the aged, an at risk group for this infection. We compared the immune response to the pneumococcal polysaccharides (PPS 4 and 14 of 20 young to 20 elderly adults. Pre-and post-vaccination IgG antibody concentrations and antibody avidity against PPS4 and PPS14 were measured using two different enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA absorption protocols. All sera were pre-absorbed with either cell-wall polysaccharide (CPS, or CPS and serotype 22F polysaccharide. Pre- and post-vaccination IgG antibody concentrations for serotype 4, but not 14, were significantly lowered with the additional absorption with serotype 22F polysaccharide in both age groups. Young and elderly demonstrated a significant increase from pre- to post-immunization antibody concentration, using either absorption method; and opsonophagocytic antibody titers in response to both PPS4 and PPS14. The correlation coefficients between ELISA and opsonophagocytic assays were improved by additional absorption with serotype 22F in response to serotype 4, but not serotype 14 in all age groups. Opsonophagocytic antibody titers in a sub-group of elderly (>77 years of age were significantly lower than the opsonophagocytic antibody concentrations in young adults. These results suggest the importance of eliminating cross-reactive antibodies from ELISA measurements by absorption of serum and an age-related impairment in the antibody response to pneumococcal polysaccharides.

  2. Regulation of B cell differentiation by intracellular membrane associated proteins and microRNAs: role in the antibody response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eLou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available B cells are central to adaptive immunity and their functions in antibody responses are exquisitely regulated. As suggested by recent findings, B cell differentiation is mediated by intracellular membrane structures (including endosomes, lysosomes and autophagosomes and protein factors specifically associated with these membranes, including Rab7, Atg5 and Atg7. These factors participate in vesicle formation/trafficking, signal transduction and induction of gene expression to promote antigen presentation, CSR/SHM, and generation/maintenance of plasma cells and memory B cells. Their expression is induced in B cells activated to differentiate and further fine-tuned by immune-modulating microRNAs, which coordinates CSR/SHM, plasma cell differentiation and memory B cell differentiation. These short non-coding RNAs would individually target multiple factors associated with the same intracellular membrane compartments and collaboratively target a single factor in addition to regulate AID and Blimp-1. These, together with regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activities by endosomes and autophagosomes, show that intracellular membranes and microRNAs, two broadly relevant cell constituents, play important roles in balancing gene expression to specify B cell differentiation processes for optimal antibody responses.

  3. An unstable Th epitope of P. falciparum fosters central memory T cells and anti-CS antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Parra-López

    Full Text Available Malaria is transmitted by Plasmodium-infected anopheles mosquitoes. Widespread resistance of mosquitoes to insecticides and resistance of parasites to drugs highlight the urgent need for malaria vaccines. The most advanced malaria vaccines target sporozoites, the infective form of the parasite. A major target of the antibody response to sporozoites are the repeat epitopes of the circumsporozoite (CS protein, which span almost one half of the protein. Antibodies to these repeats can neutralize sporozoite infectivity. Generation of protective antibody responses to the CS protein (anti-CS Ab requires help by CD4 T cells. A CD4 T cell epitope from the CS protein designated T* was previously identified by screening T cells from volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites. The T* sequence spans twenty amino acids that contains multiple T cell epitopes restricted by various HLA alleles. Subunit malaria vaccines including T* are highly immunogenic in rodents, non-human primates and humans. In this study we characterized a highly conserved HLA-DRβ1*04:01 (DR4 restricted T cell epitope (QNT-5 located at the C-terminus of T*. We found that a peptide containing QNT-5 was able to elicit long-term anti-CS Ab responses and prime CD4 T cells in HLA-DR4 transgenic mice despite forming relatively unstable MHC-peptide complexes highly susceptible to HLA-DM editing. We attempted to improve the immunogenicity of QNT-5 by replacing the P1 anchor position with an optimal tyrosine residue. The modified peptide QNT-Y formed stable MHC-peptide complexes highly resistant to HLA-DM editing. Contrary to expectations, a linear peptide containing QNT-Y elicited almost 10-fold lower long-term antibody and IFN-γ responses compared to the linear peptide containing the wild type QNT-5 sequence. Some possibilities regarding why QNT-5 is more effective than QNT-Y in inducing long-term T cell and anti-CS Ab when used as vaccine are discussed.

  4. Microneedle-mediated immunization of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine enhances antigen-specific antibody immunity and reduces anti-vector responses compared to the intradermal route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John B.; Vrdoljak, Anto; O'Mahony, Conor; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Draper, Simon J.; Moore, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial effort has been placed in developing efficacious recombinant attenuated adenovirus-based vaccines. However induction of immunity to the vector is a significant obstacle to its repeated use. Here we demonstrate that skin-based delivery of an adenovirus-based malaria vaccine, HAdV5-PyMSP142, to mice using silicon microneedles induces equivalent or enhanced antibody responses to the encoded antigen, however it results in decreased anti-vector responses, compared to intradermal delivery. Microneedle-mediated vaccine priming and resultant induction of low anti-vector antibody titres permitted repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine vector. This resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific antibody responses in these mice compared to ID-treated mice. Boosting with a heterologous vaccine; MVA-PyMSP142 also resulted in significantly greater antibody responses in mice primed with HAdV5-PyMSP142 using MN compared to the ID route. The highest protection against blood-stage malaria challenge was observed when a heterologous route of immunization (MN/ID) was used. Therefore, microneedle-mediated immunization has potential to both overcome some of the logistic obstacles surrounding needle-and-syringe-based immunization as well as to facilitate the repeated use of the same adenovirus vaccine thereby potentially reducing manufacturing costs of multiple vaccines. This could have important benefits in the clinical ease of use of adenovirus-based immunization strategies. PMID:25142082

  5. Radiation-induced gene responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  6. Radiation-induced gene responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5' region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression

  7. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroki Masuda; Masahiro Mori; Shoichi Ito; Toshiyuki Yagishita; Satoshi Kuwabara

    2014-01-01

    Background: When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). Case Report: We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who ...

  8. Humoral antibody response after receipt of inactivated seasonal influenza vaccinations one year apart in children

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, VJ; Ip, DKM; Ng, S; Chiu, SS; Cowling, BJ; Leung, GM; Peiris, JSM

    2012-01-01

    Background: Annual vaccination against seasonal influenza viruses is recommended for school-age children in some countries. There are limited data on the immunogenicity and efficacy of repeated influenza vaccinations. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, we administered seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) or placebo to 64 children 6-15 years of age in two consecutive years and explored their humoral antibody responses. Results: Receipt of TIV in the first year was ass...

  9. Diclofenac hypersensitivity: antibody responses to the parent drug and relevant metabolites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Harrer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity reactions against nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs like diclofenac (DF can manifest as Type I-like allergic reactions including systemic anaphylaxis. However, except for isolated case studies experimental evidence for an IgE-mediated pathomechanism of DF hypersensitivity is lacking. In this study we aimed to investigate the possible involvement of drug- and/or metabolite-specific antibodies in selective DF hypersensitivity.DF, an organochemically synthesized linkage variant, and five major Phase I metabolites were covalently coupled to carrier proteins. Drug conjugates were analyzed for coupling degree and capacity to crosslink receptor-bound IgE antibodies from drug-sensitized mice. With these conjugates, the presence of hapten-specific IgE antibodies was investigated in patients' samples by ELISA, mediator release assay, and basophil activation test. Production of sulfidoleukotrienes by drug conjugates was determined in PBMCs from DF-hypersensitive patients. All conjugates were shown to carry more than two haptens per carrier molecule. Immunization of mice with drug conjugates induced drug-specific IgE antibodies capable of triggering mediator release. Therefore, the conjugates are suitable tools for detection of drug-specific antibodies and for determination of their anaphylactic activity. Fifty-nine patients were enrolled and categorized as hypersensitive either selectively to DF or to multiple NSAIDs. In none of the patients' samples evidence for drug/metabolite-specific IgE in serum or bound to allergic effector cells was found. In contrast, a small group of patients (8/59, 14% displayed drug/metabolite-specific IgG.We found no evidence for an IgE-mediated effector mechanism based on haptenation of protein carriers in DF-hypersensitive patients. Furthermore, a potential involvement of the most relevant metabolites in DF hypersensitivity reactions could be excluded.

  10. STUDIES ON THE ANTIBODIES IN RABBIT ANTISERA RESPONSIBLE FOR SENSITIZATION OF HUMAN SKIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, John H.; Kabat, Elvin A.

    1953-01-01

    The capacity of rabbit anti-egg albumin sera to sensitize human skin has been studied. It has been shown that passive transfer by these sera is completely unrelated to the egg albumin-anti-egg albumin system, as demonstrated by a failure of passive transfer by some antisera containing ample anti-egg albumin and persistence of passive transfer in other antisera from which all anti-egg albumin had been removed by precipitation with homologous antigen. Three preparations of non-precipitating anti-egg albumin have been shown to have sensitizing capacities which bear no relation to their non-precipitating anti-egg albumin contents. From a portion of one of these the non-precipitating anti-egg albumin was removed without impairing its sensitizing ability, while in another portion obliteration of the sensitizing capacity was accomplished without reducing the anti-egg albumin. Evidence is presented to show that there are at least two possible antibodies in anti-egg albumin sera which are capable of inducing skin sensitivity and that they are antibodies against egg white impurities in crystalline egg albumin other than anti-conalbumin, anti-ovomucoid, and anti-lysozyme. The usefulness of a suitable quantitative precipitin technic for the analysis for antibodies against antigen impurities and for their selective absorption from sera is illustrated. The principle governing the procedure is described. The technic allows for the determination of a given trace antibody by working with such small concentrations of its purified specific antigen that whatever other antigen-antibody compounds are formed simultaneously with that to be determined will be below their solubility levels and consequently will not contribute appreciably to the precipitate. PMID:13069639

  11. Conserved epitope on influenza-virus hemagglutinin head defined by a vaccine-induced antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Donald D.; Bajic, Goran; Ferdman, Jack; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Settembre, Ethan C.; Moody, M. Anthony; Schmidt, Aaron G.; Harrison, Stephen C. (Duke-MED); (CH-Boston); (Seqirus)

    2017-12-18

    Antigenic variation requires frequent revision of annual influenza vaccines. Next-generation vaccine design strategies aim to elicit a broader immunity by directing the human immune response toward conserved sites on the principal viral surface protein, the hemagglutinin (HA). We describe a group of antibodies that recognize a hitherto unappreciated, conserved site on the HA of H1 subtype influenza viruses. Mutations in that site, which required a change in the H1 component of the 2017 vaccine, had not previously “taken over” among circulating H1 viruses. Our results encourage vaccine design strategies that resurface a protein to focus the immune response on a specific region.

  12. Neutralizing antibody response in the patients with hand, foot and mouth disease to enterovirus 71 and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Liye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a significant pathogen causing large outbreaks in China for the past 3 years. Developing an EV71 vaccine is urgently needed to stop the spread of the disease; however, the adaptive immune response of humans to EV71 infection remains unclear. We examined the neutralizing antibody titers in HFMD patients and compared them to those of asymptomatic healthy children and young adults. We found that 80% of HFMD patients became positive for neutralizing antibodies against EV71 (GMT = 24.3 one day after the onset of illness. The antibody titers in the patients peaked two days (GMT = 79.5 after the illness appeared and were comparable to the level of adults (GMT = 45.2. Noticeably, the antibody response was not correlated with disease severity, suggesting that cellular immune response, besides neutralizing antibodies, could play critical role in controlling the outcome of EV71 infection in humans.

  13. Antibody response to vaccines for rhinotracheitis, caliciviral disease, panleukopenia, feline leukemia, and rabies in tigers (Panthera tigris) and lions (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risi, Emmanuel; Agoulon, Albert; Allaire, Franck; Le Dréan-Quénec'hdu, Sophie; Martin, Virginie; Mahl, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the results of a study of captive tigers (Panthera tigris) and lions (Panthera leo) vaccinated with a recombinant vaccine against feline leukemia virus; an inactivated adjuvanted vaccine against rabies virus; and a multivalent modified live vaccine against feline herpesvirus, calicivirus, and panleukopenia virus. The aim of the study was to assess the immune response and safety of the vaccines and to compare the effects of the administration of single (1 ml) and double (2 ml) doses. The animals were separated into two groups and received either single or double doses of vaccines, followed by blood collection for serologic response for 400 days. No serious adverse event was observed, with the exception of abortion in one lioness, potentially caused by the incorrect use of the feline panleukopenia virus modified live vaccine. There was no significant difference between single and double doses for all vaccines. The recombinant vaccine against feline leukemia virus did not induce any serologic response. The vaccines against rabies and feline herpesvirus induced a significant immune response in the tigers and lions. The vaccine against calicivirus did not induce a significant increase in antibody titers in either tigers or lions. The vaccine against feline panleukopenia virus induced a significant immune response in tigers but not in lions. This report demonstrates the value of antibody titer determination after vaccination of nondomestic felids.

  14. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGUES da SILVA Andréa de Cássia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared.

  15. Impaired antibody response causes persistence of prototypic T cell-contained virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bergthaler

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available CD8 T cells are recognized key players in control of persistent virus infections, but increasing evidence suggests that assistance from other immune mediators is also needed. Here, we investigated whether specific antibody responses contribute to control of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, a prototypic mouse model of systemic persistent infection. Mice expressing transgenic B cell receptors of LCMV-unrelated specificity, and mice unable to produce soluble immunoglobulin M (IgM exhibited protracted viremia or failed to resolve LCMV. Virus control depended on immunoglobulin class switch, but neither on complement cascades nor on Fc receptor gamma chain or Fc gamma receptor IIB. Cessation of viremia concurred with the emergence of viral envelope-specific antibodies, rather than with neutralizing serum activity, and even early nonneutralizing IgM impeded viral persistence. This important role for virus-specific antibodies may be similarly underappreciated in other primarily T cell-controlled infections such as HIV and hepatitis C virus, and we suggest this contribution of antibodies be given consideration in future strategies for vaccination and immunotherapy.

  16. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-05-01

    When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  17. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Masuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC. Case Report: We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions: A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  18. Observed parent-child relationship quality predicts antibody response to vaccination in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Thomas G; Wang, Hongyue; Moynihan, Jan A; Wyman, Peter A; Carnahan, Jennifer; Lofthus, Gerry; Quataert, Sally A; Bowman, Melissa; Burke, Anne S; Caserta, Mary T

    2015-08-01

    Quality of the parent-child relationship is a robust predictor of behavioral and emotional health for children and adolescents; the application to physical health is less clear. We investigated the links between observed parent-child relationship quality in an interaction task and antibody response to meningococcal conjugate vaccine in a longitudinal study of 164 ambulatory 10-11 year-old children; additional analyses examine associations with cortisol reactivity, BMI, and somatic illness. Observed Negative/Conflict behavior in the interaction task predicted a less robust antibody response to meningococcal serotype C vaccine in the child over a 6 month-period, after controlling for socio-economic and other covariates. Observer rated interaction conflict also predicted increased cortisol reactivity following the interaction task and higher BMI, but these factors did not account for the link between relationship quality and antibody response. The results begin to document the degree to which a major source of child stress exposure, parent-child relationship conflict, is associated with altered immune system development in children, and may constitute an important public health consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). Case Report We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion. PMID:24932178

  20. Antibody responses to Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein in a porcine model: relevance to immunodiagnosis of recent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampton, Melanie; Walton, Shelley F; Holt, Deborah C; Pasay, Cielo; Kelly, Andrew; Currie, Bart J; McCarthy, James S; Mounsey, Kate E

    2013-01-01

    No commercial immunodiagnostic tests for human scabies are currently available, and existing animal tests are not sufficiently sensitive. The recombinant Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein antigen Sar s 14.3 is a promising immunodiagnostic, eliciting high levels of IgE and IgG in infected people. Limited data are available regarding the temporal development of antibodies to Sar s 14.3, an issue of relevance in terms of immunodiagnosis. We utilised a porcine model to prospectively compare specific antibody responses to a primary infestation by ELISA, to Sar s 14.3 and to S. scabiei whole mite antigen extract (WMA). Differences in the antibody profile between antigens were apparent, with Sar s 14.3 responses detected earlier, and declining significantly after peak infestation compared to WMA. Both antigens resulted in >90% diagnostic sensitivity from weeks 8-16 post infestation. These data provide important information on the temporal development of humoral immune responses in scabies and further supports the development of recombinant antigen based immunodiagnostic tests for recent scabies infestations.

  1. Antibody responses to Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein in a porcine model: relevance to immunodiagnosis of recent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Rampton

    Full Text Available No commercial immunodiagnostic tests for human scabies are currently available, and existing animal tests are not sufficiently sensitive. The recombinant Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein antigen Sar s 14.3 is a promising immunodiagnostic, eliciting high levels of IgE and IgG in infected people. Limited data are available regarding the temporal development of antibodies to Sar s 14.3, an issue of relevance in terms of immunodiagnosis. We utilised a porcine model to prospectively compare specific antibody responses to a primary infestation by ELISA, to Sar s 14.3 and to S. scabiei whole mite antigen extract (WMA. Differences in the antibody profile between antigens were apparent, with Sar s 14.3 responses detected earlier, and declining significantly after peak infestation compared to WMA. Both antigens resulted in >90% diagnostic sensitivity from weeks 8-16 post infestation. These data provide important information on the temporal development of humoral immune responses in scabies and further supports the development of recombinant antigen based immunodiagnostic tests for recent scabies infestations.

  2. Effect of Complement Factor H on anti-FHbp Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses of Infant Rhesus Macaques Boosted with a Licensed Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2015-01-01

    FHbp is a major serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigen. Binding of complement Factor H (FH) to FHbp is specific for human and some non-human primate FH. In previous studies, FH binding to FHbp vaccines impaired protective anti-FHbp antibody responses. In this study we investigated anti-FHbp antibody responses to a third dose of a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) in infant macaques vaccinated in a previous study with MenB-4C. Six macaques with high binding of FH to FHbp (FHhigh), and six with FHlow baseline phenotypes, were immunized three months after dose 2. After dose 2, macaques with the FHlow baseline phenotype had serum anti-FHbp antibodies that enhanced FH binding to FHbp (functionally converting them to a FHhigh phenotype). In this group, activation of the classical complement pathway (C4b deposition) by serum anti-FHbp antibody, and anti-FHbp serum bactericidal titers were lower after dose 3 than after dose 2 (pbactericidal titers were similar after doses 2 and 3. Two macaques developed serum anti-FH autoantibodies after dose 2, which were not detected after dose 3. In conclusion, in macaques with the FHlow baseline phenotype whose post-dose 2 serum anti-FHbp antibodies had converted them to FHhigh, the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to dose 3 was skewed to less protective epitopes than after dose 2. Mutant FHbp vaccines that eliminate FH binding may avoid eliciting anti-FHbp antibodies that enhance FH binding, and confer greater protection with less risk of inducing anti-FH autoantibodies than FHbp vaccines that bind FH. PMID:26562320

  3. Effect of complement Factor H on anti-FHbp serum bactericidal antibody responses of infant rhesus macaques boosted with a licensed meningococcal serogroup B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-12-16

    FHbp is a major serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigen. Binding of complement Factor H (FH) to FHbp is specific for human and some non-human primate FH. In previous studies, FH binding to FHbp vaccines impaired protective anti-FHbp antibody responses. In this study we investigated anti-FHbp antibody responses to a third dose of a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) in infant macaques vaccinated in a previous study with MenB-4C. Six macaques with high binding of FH to FHbp (FH(high)), and six with FH(low) baseline phenotypes, were immunized three months after dose 2. After dose 2, macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype had serum anti-FHbp antibodies that enhanced FH binding to FHbp (functionally converting them to a FH(high) phenotype). In this group, activation of the classical complement pathway (C4b deposition) by serum anti-FHbp antibody, and anti-FHbp serum bactericidal titers were lower after dose 3 than after dose 2 (pb deposition and bactericidal titers were similar after doses 2 and 3. Two macaques developed serum anti-FH autoantibodies after dose 2, which were not detected after dose 3. In conclusion, in macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype whose post-dose 2 serum anti-FHbp antibodies had converted them to FH(high), the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to dose 3 was skewed to less protective epitopes than after dose 2. Mutant FHbp vaccines that eliminate FH binding may avoid eliciting anti-FHbp antibodies that enhance FH binding, and confer greater protection with less risk of inducing anti-FH autoantibodies than FHbp vaccines that bind FH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inducing cross-clade neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 by immunofocusing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Humbert

    Full Text Available Although vaccines are important in preventing viral infections by inducing neutralizing antibodies (nAbs, HIV-1 has proven to be a difficult target and escapes humoral immunity through various mechanisms. We sought to test whether HIV-1 Env mimics may serve as immunogens.Using random peptide phage display libraries, we identified the epitopes recognized by polyclonal antibodies of a rhesus monkey that had developed high-titer, broadly reactive nAbs after infection with a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV encoding env of a recently transmitted HIV-1 clade C (HIV-C. Phage peptide inserts were analyzed for conformational and linear homology using computational analysis; some peptides mimicked various domains of the original HIV-C Env, such as conformational V3 loop epitopes and the conserved linear region of the gp120 C-terminus. Next, we devised a novel prime/boost strategy to test the immunogenicity of such phage-displayed peptides and primed mice only once with HIV-C gp160 DNA followed by boosting with mixtures of recombinant phages.This strategy, which was designed to focus the immune system on a few Env epitopes (immunofocusing, not only induced HIV-C gp160 binding antibodies and cross-clade nAbs, but also linked a conserved HIV Env region for the first time to the induction of nAbs: the C-terminus of gp120. The identification of conserved antigen mimics may lead to novel immunogens capable of inducing broadly reactive nAbs.

  5. Development of a vaccine to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture: vaccination of sheep with methanogen fractions induces antibodies that block methane production in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlock, D N; Pedersen, G; Denis, M; Dey, D; Janssen, P H; Buddle, B M

    2010-02-01

    To develop an understanding of the immune responses of ruminants to methanogens, and to provide proof of a concept that harnessing the immune system of ruminants is a potentially viable approach to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. Four subcellular fractions, namely cytoplasmic, two cell-wall preparations, and cell wall-derived proteins were prepared from Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1. Twenty sheep (10 months of age) were vaccinated with these fractions or with whole cells (n=4 per group). Sheep were re-vaccinated once after 3 weeks, and antibody responses to M. ruminantium M1 antigens in sera and saliva measured using ELISA at 2 weeks after the second vaccination. Antigens recognised by the antisera were visualised using Western blotting. The antisera were tested in vitro for their impact on M. ruminantium M1, measuring the effect on cell growth, methane production, and ability to induce agglutination. Basal levels (pre-vaccination) of antibodies against M. ruminantium M1 antigens were low. Vaccination with the antigenic fractions induced strong antibody responses in serum. Both IgG and IgA responses to methanogen antigens were detected in saliva following vaccination. Western blot analysis of the antisera indicated reactivity of antibodies, and a wide range of proteins was present in the different methanogen fractions. Antisera against the various fractions agglutinated methanogens in an in-vitro assay. In addition, these antisera decreased the growth of a pure culture of a methanogen and production of methane in vitro. Antigens from methanogens are immunogenic in ruminants, and antisera from sheep vaccinated with fractions of methanogens have a significant impact on these organisms, inducing cell agglutination, and decreasing growth of methanogens and production of methane. Only antisera to selected methanogen fractions were able to achieve these effects. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a vaccination strategy to mitigate emission

  6. Effects of the PPAR-β agonist GW501516 in an in vitro model of brain inflammation and antibody-induced demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honegger Paul

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain inflammation plays a central role in numerous brain pathologies, including multiple sclerosis (MS. Microglial cells and astrocytes are the effector cells of neuroinflammation. They can be activated also by agents such as interferon-γ (IFN-γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Peroxisome proliferator-associated receptor (PPAR pathways are involved in the control of the inflammatory processes, and PPAR-β seems to play an important role in the regulation of central inflammation. In addition, PPAR-β agonists were shown to have trophic effects on oligodendrocytes in vitro, and to confer partial protection in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of MS. In the present work, a three-dimensional brain cell culture system was used as in vitro model to study antibody-induced demyelination and inflammatory responses. GW 501516, a specific PPAR-β agonist, was examined for its capacity to protect from antibody-mediated demyelination and to prevent inflammatory responses induced by IFN-γ and LPS. Methods Aggregating brain cells cultures were prepared from embryonal rat brain, and used to study the inflammatory responses triggered by IFN-γ and LPS and by antibody-mediated demyelination induced by antibodies directed against myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG. The effects of GW 501516 on cellular responses were characterized by the quantification of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, inducible NO synthase (i-NOS, PPAR-β, PPAR-γ, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, myelin basic protein (MBP, and high molecular weight neurofilament protein (NF-H. GFAP expression was also examined by immunocytochemistry, and microglial cells were visualized by isolectin B4 (IB4 and ED1 labeling. Results GW 501516 decreased the IFN-γ-induced up-regulation of TNF-α and iNOS in accord with the proposed anti-inflammatory effects of this PPAR-β agonist. However, it increased IL

  7. Cytotoxicity of human lymphocytes induced by rabbit antibodies to chicken erythrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Å.; Perlmann, P.; Natvig, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    Normal IgG preparations of human, rabbit or guinea-pig origin (IgG2) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the cytotoxicity of purified human lymphocytes, as induced by rabbit IgG antibodies to chicken erythrocytes. All IgGs were found to be about equally efficient inhibitors. Human F(ab′)2 used for control, gave no inhibition. Human myeloma proteins of subclasses IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3, were about equally efficient inhibitors. In contrast, the inhibitory action of myeloma proteins belonging to subclass IgG4 was weak and more irregular. In this assay system, a large excess (∼ 106 ×) of normal IgG over antibodies had to be added in order to achieve ≥50 per cent inhibition. Heating of the inhibitors to 63° for 30 minutes did not significantly enhance their inhibitory capacity. For comparison, the same human IgG preparations and myeloma proteins were also tested for their capacity to inhibit phagocytosis by human blood monocytes of chicken erythrocytes sensitized with rabbit IgG antibody. As was to be expected in this system, only HGG, IgG1 and IgG3 caused inhibition whereas F(ab′)2, IgG2 and IgG4 were completely negative. PMID:4127729

  8. A life-style physical activity intervention and the antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joanna E; Ring, Chris; Bosch, Jos A; Eves, Francis; Drayson, Mark T; Calver, Rebecca; Say, Vanessa; Allen, Daniel; Burns, Victoria E

    2013-10-01

    To assess whether a life-style physical activity intervention improved antibody response to a pneumococcal vaccination in sedentary middle-aged women. Eighty-nine sedentary women completed a 16-week exercise (physical activity consultation, pedometer, telephone/e-mail prompts; n = 44) or control (advisory leaflet; n = 45) intervention. Pneumococcal vaccination was administered at 12 weeks, and antibody titers (11 of the 23 contained in the pneumococcal vaccine) were determined before vaccination and 4 weeks and 6 months later. Physical activity, aerobic fitness, body composition, and psychological factors were measured before and after the intervention. The intervention group displayed a greater increase in walking behavior (from mean [standard deviation] = 82.16 [90.90] to 251.87 [202.13]) compared with the control condition (111.67 [94.64] to 165.16 [117.22]; time by group interaction: F(1,68) = 11.25, p = .001, η(2) = 0.14). Quality of life also improved in the intervention group (from 19.37 [3.22] to 16.70 [4.29]) compared with the control condition (19.97 [4.22] to 19.48 [5.37]; time by group interaction: F(1,66) = 4.44, p = .039, η(2) = 0.06). However, no significant effects of the intervention on antibody response were found (time by group η(2) for each of the 11 pneumococcal strains ranged from 0.001 to 0.018; p values all >.264). Participation in a life-style physical activity intervention increased subjective and objective physical activity levels and quality of life but did not affect antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination.

  9. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten A; dos Santos Marques Resende, Mafalda; de Jongh, Willem A

    2015-01-01

    of VAR2CSA, a parasite-derived antigen. Protection against PM is mediated by antibodies that inhibit binding of IE in the placental intervillous space. VAR2CSA is a large antigen incompatible with large scale recombinant protein expression. Vaccines based on sub-units encompassing the functionally...... recombinant subunits of the VAR2CSA antigen is unpredictable, demonstrating the need for large-scale screening in order to identify antigens that induce a broadly strain-transcending antibody response....

  10. Induction of Broadly Cross-Reactive Stalk-Specific Antibody Responses to Influenza Group 1 and Group 2 Hemagglutinins by Natural H7N9 Virus Infection in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Zhu, Lingyan; Huang, Yang; Xie, Xinci; Jin, Shan; Zhang, Anli; Wan, Yanmin; Hirsh, Ariana; Tian, Di; Shi, Xiaolin; Dong, Zhaoguang; Yuan, Songhua; Hu, Yunwen; Krammer, Florian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing

    2017-02-15

    The outbreak of novel avian H7N9 influenza virus infections in China in 2013 has demonstrated the continuing threat posed by zoonotic pathogens. Deciphering the immune response during natural infection will guide future vaccine development. We assessed the induction of heterosubtypic cross-reactive antibodies induced by H7N9 infection against a large panel of recombinant hemagglutinins and neuraminidases by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and novel chimeric hemagglutinin constructs were used to dissect the anti-stalk or -head humoral immune response. H7N9 infection induced strong antibody responses against divergent H7 hemagglutinins. Interestingly, we also found induction of antibodies against heterosubtypic hemagglutinins from both group 1 and group 2 and a boost in heterosubtypic neutralizing activity in the absence of hemagglutination inhibitory activity. Kinetic monitoring revealed that heterosubtypic binding/neutralizing antibody responses typically appeared and peaked earlier than intrasubtypic responses, likely mediated by memory recall responses. Our results indicate that cross-group binding and neutralizing antibody responses primarily targeting the stalk region can be elicited after natural influenza virus infection. These data support our understanding of the breadth of the postinfection immune response that could inform the design of future, broadly protective influenza virus vaccines.

  11. The IgM Response to Modified LDL in Experimental Atherosclerosis Hypochlorite-modified LDL IgM Antibodies versus Classical Natural T15 IgM Antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Marcella; Damoiseaux, Jan; Duijvestijn, Adriaan; Heeringa, Peter; Gijbels, Marion; de Winther, Menno; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Shoenfeld, Y; Gershwin, ME

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It is hypothesized that IgM antibodies to oxidized LDL are anti-atherogenic. Myeloperoxidase from plaque-infiltrating neutrophils catalyzes the production of hypochlorite (HOCl), which oxidizes LDL. Here we study the IgM response to HOCl-modified LDL in comparison to titers of T15

  12. Presence of common idiotypes on antibodies induced by glutamic acid-lysine-containing terpolymers in responder and nonresponder mice with the Ig-1b heavy chain allotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipps, T J; Benacerraf, B; Dorf, M E

    1977-12-01

    A B10.A (5R) responder mouse to the random linear terpolymer, poly--(Glu, Lys, Phe), GLphi, can produce immunoglobulins which bind poly-L (Glu, Lys), GL, that share idiotypic determinants with GL-binding antibodies produced by other members of the same strain. Expression of these common idiotypic determinants, termed BGL, is independent of the H-2 halotype and closely linked to the Ig-lb heavy chain allotype. Moreover, nonresponder mice with the Ig-lb heavy chain allotype, when immunized with GLphi that has been chemically coupled to an immunogenic carrier, chicken IgG, can produce GL-binding antibodies that share BGL idiotypic specificities with anti-GLphi antibodies produced by responder animals. Also, the responses to other GL-containing polymers, such as poly-L (Glu, Lys, Ala) and poly-L (Glu, Lys, Pro), which are under the control of distinct Ir genes, can stimulate the production of GL-binding antibodies that share common BGL idiotypic determinants with antibodies induced with GLphi. These findings are discussed with respect to their implications concerning the mechanism(s) of Ir gene control.

  13. Antibody functionalized graphene biosensor for label-free electrochemical immunosensing of fibrinogen, an indicator of trauma induced coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Waqas; Salinas, Carlos; Watkins, Brian; Garvey, Gavin; Sharma, Anjal C; Ghosh, Ritwik

    2016-12-15

    An antibody, specific to fibrinogen, has been covalently attached to graphene and deposited onto screen printed electrodes using a chitosan hydrogel binder to prepare an inexpensive electrochemical fibrinogen biosensor. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy has been utilized to confirm the presence of the antibody on the graphene scaffold. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has been utilized to demonstrate that the biosensor responds in a selective manner to fibrinogen in aqueous media even in the presence of plasminogen, a potentially interfering molecule in the coagulopathy cascade. Furthermore, the biosensor was shown to reliably sense fibrinogen in the presence of high background serum albumin levels. Finally, we demonstrated detection of clinically relevant fibrinogen concentrations (938-44,542μg/dL) from human serum and human whole blood samples using this biosensor. This biosensor can potentially be used in a point-of-care device to detect the onset of coagulopathy and monitor response following therapeutic intervention in trauma patients. Thus this biosensor may improve the clinical management of patients with trauma-induced coagulopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Early and enhanced antitoxin responses elicited with complexes of tetanus toxoid and specific mouse and human antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, R.D.; Terres, G.; Hess, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were early and enhanced in mice when tetanus toxoid was administered in complex with specific isologous antitoxin or specific mouse γ-globulin. Antitoxin responses were enhanced when fluid tetanus toxoid was complexed in vitro in antigen-to-antibody ratios of equivalence or antigen excess; responses to complexed toxoid in antibody excess were comparatively repressed. Primary responses were greatly inhibited in mice immunized with the same amount of toxoid complexed at equivalence or in antibody excess with specific human γ-globulin. Although primary responses were totally repressed, a primed state developed; a second injection of fluid toxoid within a few days produced excellent antitoxin responses. Separate injections of antigen and antibody at different sites produced an excellent in vivo primed state for early and high responses. Antibody production after stimulation with complexed toxoid was also enhanced in mice irradiated with 400 rads, a dose that ordinarily completely suppresses primary responses with fluid toxoid alone. These data provide evidence for the efficacy of antigen-antibody complexes in early and active immunization. (U.S.)

  15. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrick, Meggan; Theis, Kara; Molitor, Thomas W

    2014-06-05

    Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI.

  16. Antibody titers and response to vaccination against hepatitis A and B in pediatric patients with portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Mariana Nogueira de Paula; Hessel, Gabriel; Alves De Tommaso, Adriana María

    2008-09-01

    In Brazil, approximately 130 new cases of hepatitis A per 100,000 inhabitants occur annually and 15% of the population has been in contact with hepatitis B virus. Portal hypertension causes hypersplenism and reduces T cell production, which may lead to less effective response to hepatitis vaccination. The objective of the study was to evaluate the response to hepatitis A and B vaccination in patients with portal hypertension secondary to chronic liver disease or portal vein thrombosis. Twenty-three patients (2 to 18 years) with portal hypertension seen at the Pediatric Hepatology Service of Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, between 1994 and 2006 were studied. Hepatitis A and B serology was tested in all patients. Patients who had not been vaccinated before their visits received the vaccines during the study period. Patients who had been vaccinated before but had negative anti-HB antibodies received a booster dose, and their serology was repeated Blood counts were performed in each patient to assess for immunosuppression. Eighteen patients received hepatitis A vaccine and all became positive for anti-HAV antibodies. All patients had received hepatitis B vaccine and 17 (73.9%) were anti-HBs positive at the time of the study The other 6 received a booster dose and became anti-HBs positive afterward. The anti-HBs-positive and -negative patients did not differ significantly in age, leukocytes, lymphocytes, or duration between the vaccination and positive serology. In this study, hepatitis A vaccines elicited a 100% response and hepatitis B vaccine conferred protection and induced an anamnestic response in pediatric patients with portal hypertension.

  17. Several domains from VAR2CSA can induce Plasmodium falciparum adhesion-blocking antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salanti, Ali; Resende, Mafalda; Ditlev, Sisse B

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum can result in several different syndromes with severe clinical consequences for the about 200 million individuals infected each year. During pregnancy, women living in endemic areas become susceptible to malaria due to lack of antibodies...... against a unique P. falciparum membrane protein, named VAR2CSA. This antigen is not expressed in childhood infections, since it binds chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) expressed on the intervillous space in the placenta. A vaccine appears possible because women acquire protective antibodies hindering...... sequestration in the placenta as a function of parity. A challenge for vaccine development is to design small constructs of this large antigen, which can induce broadly protective antibodies. It has previously been shown that one domain of VAR2CSA, DBL4-FCR3, induces parasite adhesion-blocking antibodies...

  18. Reporter gene assay for the quantification of the activity and neutralizing antibody response to TNFα antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemand, Christophe; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Steenholdt, Casper

    2011-01-01

    A cell-based assay has been developed for the quantification of the activity of TNFα antagonists based on human erythroleukemic K562 cells transfected with a NFκB regulated firefly luciferase reporter-gene construct. Both drug activity and anti-drug neutralizing antibodies can be quantified...... with a high degree of precision within 2h, and without interference from cytokines and other factors known to activate NFκB. The assay cells also contain the Renilla luciferase reporter gene under the control of a constitutive promoter that allows TNFα-induced firefly luciferase activity to be normalized...

  19. Receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV spike protein induces highly potent neutralizing antibodies: implication for developing subunit vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yuxian; Zhou Yusen; Liu Shuwen; Kou Zhihua; Li Wenhui; Farzan, Michael; Jiang Shibo

    2004-01-01

    The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV), a type I transmembrane envelope glycoprotein, consists of S1 and S2 domains responsible for virus binding and fusion, respectively. The S1 contains a receptor-binding domain (RBD) that can specifically bind to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the receptor on target cells. Here we show that a recombinant fusion protein (designated RBD-Fc) containing 193-amino acid RBD (residues 318-510) and a human IgG1 Fc fragment can induce highly potent antibody responses in the immunized rabbits. The antibodies recognized RBD on S1 domain and completely inhibited SARS-CoV infection at a serum dilution of 1:10,240. Rabbit antisera effectively blocked binding of S1, which contains RBD, to ACE2. This suggests that RBD can induce highly potent neutralizing antibody responses and has potential to be developed as an effective and safe subunit vaccine for prevention of SARS

  20. Augmentation of the antibody response of Atlantic salmon by oral administration of alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihan Chen

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of alginate-encapsulated infectious pancreatic necrosis virus antigens in inducing the immune response of Atlantic salmon as booster vaccines. One year after intraperitoneal injection with an oil-adjuvanted vaccine, post-smolts were orally boosted either by 1 alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens (ENCAP; 2 soluble antigens (UNENCAP or 3 untreated feed (control. This was done twice, seven weeks apart. Sampling was done twice, firstly at 7 weeks post 1st oral boost and the 2nd, at 4 weeks after the 2nd oral boost. Samples included serum, head kidney, spleen and hindgut. Serum antibodies were analyzed by ELISA while tissues were used to assess the expression of IgM, IgT, CD4, GATA3, FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes by quantitative PCR. Compared to controls, fish fed with ENCAP had a significant increase (p<0.04 in serum antibodies following the 1st boost but not after the 2nd boost. This coincided with significant up-regulation of CD4 and GATA3 genes. In contrast, serum antibodies in the UNENCAP group decreased both after the 1st and 2nd oral boosts. This was associated with significant up-regulation of FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes. The expression of IgT was not induced in the hindgut after the 1st oral boost but was significantly up-regulated following the 2nd one. CD4 and GATA3 mRNA expressions exhibited a similar pattern to IgT in the hindgut. IgM mRNA expression on the other hand was not differentially regulated at any of the times examined. Our findings suggest that 1 Parenteral prime with oil-adjuvanted vaccines followed by oral boost with ENCAP results in augmentation of the systemic immune response; 2 Symmetrical prime and boost (mucosal with ENCAP results in augmentation of mucosal immune response and 3 Symmetrical priming and boosting (mucosal with soluble antigens results in the induction of systemic immune tolerance.

  1. Evaluation of antibody response against recombinant domain III proteins of dengue virus type 1 and 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagesh K Tripathi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dengue, a mosquito borne viral disease caused by dengue virus has emerged as a major health problem during the last few decades. The envelope domain III (DIII protein of dengue virus is highly immunogenic and capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies against wild-type dengue virus. The envelope domain III protein is a potential subunit vaccine candidate as well as a diagnostic reagent for dengue. This report describes the high yield production and immunogenicity of recombinant DIII proteins of dengue virus type 1 and 2. The subunit DIII proteins were produced in Escherichia coli using batch and fed-batch fermentation process. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography was used to capture DIII proteins of dengue virus type 1 and 2. The purified proteins were refolded by diafiltration to achieve biologically active proteins. After fed-batch fermentation, the recombinant E. coli resulted in purified DIII proteins of about 10.06 mg and 47.70 mg per gram of dry cell weight for recombinant dengue virus type 1 and 2 respectively with more than 95% purity. Biological function of the purified DIII proteins were confirmed by their ability to generate DIII specific antibodies in mice. The DIII antigens in combination with adjuvant resulted antibody endpoint titers of 1:64,000 and 1:1,28,000 for recombinant dengue virus type 1 and 2 respectively. These findings establish that the DIII proteins in combination with adjuvant are immunogenic, which suggests that refolded and purified DIII proteins can be a potential vaccine candidates.

  2. Oral immunotherapy induces IgG antibodies that act through FcγRIIb to suppress IgE-mediated hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Oliver T; Logsdon, Stephanie L; Zhou, Joseph S; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Noval Rivas, Magali; Koleoglou, Kyle J; Chatila, Talal A; Schneider, Lynda C; Rachid, Rima; Umetsu, Dale T; Oettgen, Hans C

    2014-12-01

    Food-induced anaphylaxis is triggered by specific IgE antibodies. Paradoxically, some subjects with significant IgE levels can ingest allergenic foods without incident. Similarly, subjects completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) tolerate food challenges despite persistent high-titer food-specific IgE. We sought to test whether IgG antibodies induced by food immunotherapy prevent food-induced anaphylaxis and whether this occurs through the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb. Food allergy-susceptible Il4raF709 mice were enterally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). Similarly sensitized IgE-deficient (IgE(-/-)) Il4raF709 mice, which can ingest OVA without anaphylaxis, were subjected to a high-dose enteral OVA desensitization protocol (OIT). Sera from both groups were tested for the ability to activate or inhibit bone marrow mast cells (BMMCs) exposed to allergen or to passively transfer allergy to naive hosts. In parallel experiments sera obtained from patients with peanut allergy before and after undergoing OIT were interrogated for their ability to enhance or suppress peanut-induced activation in an indirect assay by using basophils from nonallergic donors. Il4raF709 mice exhibited strong OVA-specific IgE responses. Their sera efficiently sensitized BMMCs for activation by antigen challenge. Sera from Il4raF709/IgE(-/-) mice subjected to OVA OIT suppressed BMMC responses. This inhibition was IgG mediated and FcγRIIb dependent. Similarly, pre-OIT but not post-OIT sera from patients efficiently sensitized basophils for peanut-induced activation. IgG antibodies in post-OIT sera suppressed basophil activation by pre-OIT sera. This inhibition was blocked by antibodies against FcγRII. Food-specific IgG antibodies, such as those induced during OIT, inhibit IgE-mediated reactions. Strategies that favor IgG responses might prove useful in the management of food allergy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibody response in naïve and sensitised goats infested by Sarcoptes scabiei

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    Simson Tarigan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize the IgG and IgE antibody responses in goats infested repeatedly with Sarcoptes scabiei. Ten goats purchased from scabies-free farms were infested with 2000 live mites on the auricles. Fifty days after the initial infestation, the goats were treated with ivermectin. After being completely recovered, the goats were reinfested then treated again at 50 days post infestation. Blood samples were collected at the time of the first infestation, then every 10 days afterwards for 270 days. Seroconversion for IgG took place after 30 days following the first infestation, whereas the maximum level of the specific IgG antibodies occurred after 50 days. Immunoblot analysis identified a number of antigens (Mr 180, 135, 43 and 38 KDa that recognised by the IgG at 10 days and continuously recognised throughout the course of the multiple infestations. Being consistently recognised, those antigens should be essential in the development immunological diagnostic tests for scabies. The levels of scabies-specific IgE antibodies increased slowly during the first infestation and rapidly dropped following treatment of the animals with ivermectin. In the second and third infestations, however, the reaginic antibodies rose rapidly and with a grater level. On immunoblot analysis, at least 10 antigens (Mr 130, 72, 64, 58, 48, 44, 41, 39, 27 and 25 KDa were observed to be recognised by the IgE present in the sera from scabies-infested animals. Since IgE response is considered to play a major role in the immune protection, those allergens, therefore, could be used as the main component of an anti-scabies vaccine.

  4. Interferon gamma modulation of disease manifestation and the local antibody response to alphavirus encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Victoria K; Griffin, Diane E

    2016-11-01

    Infection of mice with Sindbis virus (SINV) produces encephalomyelitis and provides a model for examination of the central nervous system (CNS) immune response to alphavirus infection. Clearance of infectious virus is accomplished through a cooperative effort between SINV-specific antibody and IFN-γ, but the regulatory interactions are poorly understood. To determine the effects of IFN-γ on clinical disease and the antiviral immune response, C57BL/6 mice lacking IFN-γ (Ifng-/-) or IFN-γ receptor (Ifngr1-/-) were studied in comparison to WT mice. Maximum production of Ifng mRNA and IFN-γ protein in the CNS of WT and Ifngr1-/- mice occurred 5-7 days after infection, with higher levels of IFN-γ in Ifngr1-/- mice. Onset of clinical disease was earlier in mice with impaired IFN-γ signalling, although Ifngr1-/- mice recovered more rapidly. Ifng-/- and Ifngr1-/- mice maintained body weight better than WT mice, associated with better food intake and lower brain levels of inflammatory cytokines. Clearance of infectious virus from the spinal cords was slower, and CNS, but not serum, levels of SINV-specific IgM, IgG2a and IgG2b were lower in Ifngr1-/- and Ifng-/- mice compared to WT mice. Decreased CNS antiviral antibody was associated with lower expression of mRNAs for B-cell attracting chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL13 and fewer B cells in the CNS. Therefore, IFN-γ signalling increases levels of CNS pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to clinical disease, but synergistically clears virus with SINV-specific antibody at least in part by increasing chemokine production important for infiltration of antibody-secreting B cells into the CNS.

  5. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome, oral microbiota and systemic antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcalı, Aliye; Bostanci, Nagihan; Özçaka, Özgün; Öztürk-Ceyhan, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Buduneli, Nurcan; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis.

  6. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome, oral microbiota and systemic antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Akcalı

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis.

  7. Antibody responses to a novel Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein vaccine correlate with protection against experimental malaria infection in Aotus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, David R; Kocken, Clemens H M; White, John H; Cowan, Graeme J M; Samuel, Kay; Dubbeld, Martin A; Voorberg-van der Wel, Annemarie; Thomas, Alan W; McBride, Jana S; Arnot, David E

    2014-01-01

    The Block 2 region of the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum has been identified as a target of protective immunity by a combination of seroepidemiology and parasite population genetics. Immunogenicity studies in small animals and Aotus monkeys were used to determine the efficacy of recombinant antigens derived from this region of MSP-1 as a potential vaccine antigen. Aotus lemurinus griseimembra monkeys were immunized three times with a recombinant antigen derived from the Block 2 region of MSP-1 of the monkey-adapted challenge strain, FVO of Plasmodium falciparum, using an adjuvant suitable for use in humans. Immunofluorescent antibody assays (IFA) against erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum using sera from the immunized monkeys showed that the MSP-1 Block 2 antigen induced significant antibody responses to whole malaria parasites. MSP-1 Block 2 antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) showed no significant differences in antibody titers between immunized animals. Immunized animals were challenged with the virulent P. falciparum FVO isolate and monitored for 21 days. Two out of four immunized animals were able to control their parasitaemia during the follow-up period, whereas two out of two controls developed fulminating parasitemia. Parasite-specific serum antibody titers measured by IFA were four-fold higher in protected animals than in unprotected animals. In addition, peptide-based epitope mapping of serum antibodies from immunized Aotus showed distinct differences in epitope specificities between protected and unprotected animals.

  8. The heptide repeat 2 and upstream region of TGEV induces potent cross-neutralizing antibodies against group I coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huiling; Wu, Nannan; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Tianhou

    2012-10-01

    The coronavirus heptide repeat (HR) region in the spike protein induces neutralizing antibodies that block the postfusion core formation and inhibit virus entry into target cells. The HR2 regions for coronaviruses of the same serogroup share high homology. We found that polyclonal antibodies derived from transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus HR2 and upstream region were cross-reactive with the S proteins of the same serogroup in western blotting. The polyclonal antibodies also potently cross-neutralized viruses from the same serogroup. This study provides new insight for designing vaccine and therapeutic reagents against coronavirus infections.

  9. Cell death induced by a {sup 131}I-labeled monoclonal antibody in ovarian cancer multicell spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippovich, I.V.; Sorokina, N.; Robillard, N.; Faivre-Chauvet, A.; Bardies, M.; Chatal, J.F

    1996-07-01

    Treatment of OVCAR-3 spheroids with {sup 131}I-OC125 monoclonal antibody produced a decrease in spheroid volume and a concomitant rise in necrotic cell number. No increase in apoptotic cell number was observed during incubation of spheroids with the labeled antibody. Necrosis began early, reaching a maximum after 3 Gy of accumulated dose delivered at a dose rate of 1.8 cGy/h. Higher accumulated doses induced necrosis for longer incubation times. Thus, dose rate and time are both determinants of ultimate radiation effects when spheroids are incubated with labeled antibodies, although dose rate is the most important factor.

  10. Molecular dissection of the human antibody response to the structural repeat epitope of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite from a protected donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers William O

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The circumsporozoite surface protein is the primary target of human antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites, these antibodies are predominantly directed to the major repetitive epitope (Asn-Pro-Asn-Alan, (NPNAn. In individuals immunized by the bites of irradiated Anopheles mosquitoes carrying P. falciparum sporozoites in their salivary glands, the anti-repeat response dominates and is thought by many to play a role in protective immunity. Methods The antibody repertoire from a protected individual immunized by the bites of irradiated P. falciparum infected Anopheles stephensi was recapitulated in a phage display library. Following affinity based selection against (NPNA3 antibody fragments that recognized the PfCSP repeat epitope were rescued. Results Analysis of selected antibody fragments implied the response was restricted to a single antibody fragment consisting of VH3 and VκI families for heavy and light chain respectively with moderate affinity for the ligand. Conclusion The dissection of the protective antibody response against the repeat epitope revealed that the response was apparently restricted to a single VH/VL pairing (PfNPNA-1. The affinity for the ligand was in the μM range. If anti-repeat antibodies are involved in the protective immunity elicited by exposure to radiation attenuated P. falciparum sporozoites, then high circulating levels of antibodies against the repeat region may be more important than intrinsic high affinity for protection. The ability to attain and sustain high levels of anti-(NPNAn will be one of the key determinants of efficacy for a vaccine that relies upon anti-PfCSP repeat antibodies as the primary mechanism of protective immunity against P. falciparum.

  11. C-reactive protein enhances the respiratory burst of neutrophils-induced by antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng-cheng; Hao, Jian; Yang, Xiao-wei; Chang, Dong-yuan; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2012-10-01

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was one of the useful biomarkers for evaluating the disease activity in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Cumulating studies proved that CRP was pathogenic in a variety of diseases. In the current study, the in vitro effects of CRP to prime neutrophils for ANCA-induced respiratory burst were investigated with flow cytometry. Without TNF-α in the reactive system, ANCA could only induce a slight level of respiratory burst of neutrophils. CRP could enhance the respiratory burst of neutrophils induced by ANCA against myeloperoxidse [mean fluorescence intensity (MFI, 68.45 ± 16.87 vs. 58.65 ± 15.09, P Heat-treated CRP could not enhance the levels of neutrophils respiratory burst induced by ANCA or increase the expression of membrane proteinase 3 of neutrophils. So CRP can prime neutrophils and enhance the respiratory burst induced by ANCA and might be pathogenic in AAV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oral Vaccination with the Porcine Rotavirus VP4 Outer Capsid Protein Expressed by Lactococcus lactis Induces Specific Antibody Production

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    Yi-jing Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study to design a delivery system resistant to the gastrointestinal environment for oral vaccine against porcine rotavirus. Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 was transformed with segments of vP4 of the porcine rotavirus inserted into the pNZ8112 surface-expression vector, and a recombinant L. lactis expressing VP4 protein was constructed. An approximately 27 kDa VP4 protein was confirmed by SDS-PAGE , Western blot and immunostaining analysis. BALB/c mice were immunized orally with VP4-expression recombinant L. lactis and cellular, mucosal and systemic humoral immune responses were examined. Specific anti-VP4 secretory IgA and IgG were found in feces, ophthalmic and vaginal washes and in serum. The induced antibodies demonstrated neutralizing effects on porcine rotavirus infection on MA104 cells. Our findings suggest that oral immunization with VP4-expressing L. lactis induced both specific local and systemic humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

  13. Elicitation of neutralizing antibodies directed against CD4-induced epitope(s using a CD4 mimetic cross-linked to a HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein.

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    Antu K Dey

    Full Text Available The identification of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env structures that can generate broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs is pivotal to the development of a successful vaccine against HIV-1 aimed at eliciting effective humoral immune responses. To that end, the production of novel Env structure(s that might induce BNAbs by presentation of conserved epitopes, which are otherwise occluded, is critical. Here, we focus on a structure that stabilizes Env in a conformation representative of its primary (CD4 receptor-bound state, thereby exposing highly conserved "CD4 induced" (CD4i epitope(s known to be important for co-receptor binding and subsequent virus infection. A CD4-mimetic miniprotein, miniCD4 (M64U1-SH, was produced and covalently complexed to recombinant, trimeric gp140 envelope glycoprotein (gp140 using site-specific disulfide linkages. The resulting gp140-miniCD4 (gp140-S-S-M64U1 complex was recognized by CD4i antibodies and the HIV-1 co-receptor, CCR5. The gp140-miniCD4 complex elicited the highest titers of CD4i binding antibodies as well as enhanced neutralizing antibodies against Tier 1 viruses as compared to gp140 protein alone following immunization of rabbits. Neutralization against HIV-2(7312/V434M and additional serum mapping confirm the specific elicitation of antibodies directed to the CD4i epitope(s. These results demonstrate the utility of structure-based approach in improving immunogenic response against specific region, such as the CD4i epitope(s here, and its potential role in vaccine application.

  14. BAFF mediates splenic B cell response and antibody production in experimental Chagas disease.

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    Daniela A Bermejo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: B cells and antibodies are involved not only in controlling the spread of blood circulating Trypanosoma cruzi, but also in the autoreactive manifestations observed in Chagas disease. Acute infection results in polyclonal B cell activation associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, delayed specific humoral immunity and high levels of non-parasite specific antibodies. Since TNF superfamily B lymphocyte Stimulator (BAFF mediates polyclonal B cell response in vitro triggered by T. cruzi antigens, and BAFF-Tg mice show similar signs to T. cruzi infected mice, we hypothesized that BAFF can mediate polyclonal B cell response in experimental Chagas disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BAFF is produced early and persists throughout the infection. To analyze BAFF role in experimental Chagas disease, Balb/c infected mice were injected with BR3:Fc, a soluble receptor of BAFF, to block BAFF activity. By BAFF blockade we observed that this cytokine mediates the mature B cell response and the production of non-parasite specific IgM and IgG. BAFF also influences the development of antinuclear IgG and parasite-specific IgM response, not affecting T. cruzi-specific IgG and parasitemia. Interestingly, BAFF inhibition favors the parasitism in heart. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate, for the first time, an active role for BAFF in shaping the mature B cell repertoire in a parasite infection.

  15. Immunity to Brugia pahangi in athymic nude and normal mice: eosinophilia, antibody and hypersensitivity responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, A C; Vincent, A L

    1984-11-01

    Congenitally athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, immunologically reconstituted by thymus grafting before inoculation with infective larvae, and mice heterozygous for the nu gene (nu/+), mounted potent protective humoral and cellular immune responses to Brugia pahangi. Although responses were not identical, both groups of mice produced IgM, IgG and IgE antibodies specific for adult worm antigen (S-Ag) present in a crude aqueous extract, made immediate and delayed hypersensitivity footpad swelling responses when challenged with S-Ag and eliminated their infection in the early larval stages. Heterozygotes also exhibited a marked eosinophilia which peaked coincident with larval killing. In contrast, thymus grafting of patent nudes had no effect upon microfilaraemias or adult worm burdens and did not completely protect against a challenge larval inoculum although antibodies specific for S-Ag were produced. With the occasional exceptions of moderate immediate footpad swelling and very low titres of IgM specific for S-Ag, no specific immune responses to B. pahangi were found in ungrafted nude mice which allowed full development of adult worms and supported patent infections.

  16. Differential lymphocyte and antibody responses in deer mice infected with Sin Nombre hantavirus or Andes hantavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schountz, Tony; Quackenbush, Sandra; Rovnak, Joel; Haddock, Elaine; Black, William C; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a rodent-borne disease with a high case-fatality rate that is caused by several New World hantaviruses. Each pathogenic hantavirus is naturally hosted by a principal rodent species without conspicuous disease and infection is persistent, perhaps for life. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the natural reservoirs of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the etiologic agent of most HCPS cases in North America. Deer mice remain infected despite a helper T cell response that leads to high-titer neutralizing antibodies. Deer mice are also susceptible to Andes hantavirus (ANDV), which causes most HCPS cases in South America; however, deer mice clear ANDV. We infected deer mice with SNV or ANDV to identify differences in host responses that might account for this differential outcome. SNV RNA levels were higher in the lungs but not different in the heart, spleen, or kidneys. Most ANDV-infected deer mice had seroconverted 14 days after inoculation, but none of the SNV-infected deer mice had. Examination of lymph node cell antigen recall responses identified elevated immune gene expression in deer mice infected with ANDV and suggested maturation toward a Th2 or T follicular helper phenotype in some ANDV-infected deer mice, including activation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) pathway in T cells and B cells. These data suggest that the rate of maturation of the immune response is substantially higher and of greater magnitude during ANDV infection, and these differences may account for clearance of ANDV and persistence of SNV. Hantaviruses persistently infect their reservoir rodent hosts without pathology. It is unknown how these viruses evade sterilizing immune responses in the reservoirs. We have determined that infection of the deer mouse with its homologous hantavirus, Sin Nombre virus, results in low levels of immune gene expression in antigen-stimulated lymph node cells and a poor antibody response. However, infection of deer mice with a

  17. [The difference in specific humoral immune responses induced with the attenuated equine infectious anemia vaccine strain and virulent strain.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhen-Ying; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Yu-Hong; Zhao, Li-Ping; Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2009-12-01

    To disclose the potential roles of humoral immune response in the EIAV vaccine-induced protective immunity. In this study, major parameters of humoral immunity be compared between horses inoculated with the EIAV vaccine strain and the pathogenic virulent strain. Experimental horses were randomly assigned into the group inoculated with the vaccine strain EIAV(DLV); (the vaccinated group) and the group inoculated with sub-morbigenous dose of virulent strain EIAV(Liao); (the inapparent infection group). Humoral immunity parameters, including binding endpoint titer and avidity index of antibodies to the envelop protein (Env) and the capsid protein (P26), and the conformation-dependent index of the Env antibody, were assayed and compared between these two groups by using ELISA. Neutralizing antibodies to the EIAV vaccine strain and a pathogenic strain were simultaneously detected by using plaque forming unite assay (PFU) and reverse transcriptase activity assay, respectively. In general, all humoral parameters increased with a time-dependent manner in both the vaccinated and the inapparent infection group. However, significantly higher antibody activities for P26 binding endpoint titer and Env avidity index were detected in the vaccinated group within 2 months post infection (Pinfection group throughout the entire observation period (Pinfected horses (P<0.01 for EIAV(FDDV); and P<0.05 for EIAV(DLV34);). Statistically significant differences in EIAV-specific binding antibodies and the neutralizing antibody are detected between animals induced with the EIAV vaccine strain and the virulent strain. Importantly, the significantly early and strong responses in the neutralizing antibody and the conformation-dependent Env antibody induced by the vaccine implicate special roles these antibodies playing in EIAV vaccine-induced immune protection.

  18. Physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Shigeki; Kim, Yeon-Kyu

    2005-01-01

    The specific physiological responses induced by pleasant stimuli were investigated in this study. Various physiological responses of the brain (encephaloelectrogram; EEG), autonomic nervous system (ANS), immune system and endocrine system were monitored when pleasant stimuli such as odors, emotional pictures and rakugo, a typical Japanese comical story-telling, were presented to subjects. The results revealed that (i) EEG activities of the left frontal brain region were enhanced by a pleasant odor; (ii) emotional pictures related to primitive element such as nudes and erotic couples elevated vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity; and (iii) an increase in secretory immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) and a decrease in salivary cortisol (s-cortisol) were induced by rakugo-derived linguistic pleasant emotion. Pleasant emotion is complicated state. However, by considering the evolutionary history of human being, it is possible to assess and evaluate pleasant emotion from certain physiological responses by appropriately summating various physiological parameters.

  19. Immunoglobulin M and G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Rowe, P; Bennett, S

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the age-related immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG response to part of a 220-kDa glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) from Plasmodium falciparum and to determine possible correlations of possession of these antibodies with malaria morbidity. IgM and IgG levels...... in May and in October. Seropositivity rates increased with age to a maximum of 77% for IgM and 95% for IgG in adults. High prevalences of seropositivity were associated with certain human leukocyte antigen class II alleles (DRw8, DR9, DR7, DR4, DQw7, and DQw2) or haplotypes. The relationship between anti......-GLURP489-1271 antibodies and clinical immunity is not clear; asymptomatically infected children aged 5 to 8 years had significantly higher levels of IgG than clinically ill children of the same age, suggesting that antibodies to the carboxy-terminal part of the GLURP may contribute to immunity to P...

  20. Guinea pig complement potently measures vibriocidal activity of human antibodies in response to cholera vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Whun; Jeong, Soyoung; Ahn, Ki Bum; Yang, Jae Seung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-12-01

    The vibriocidal assay using guinea pig complement is widely used for the evaluation of immune responses to cholera vaccines in human clinical trials. However, it is unclear why guinea pig complement has been used over human complement in the measurement of vibriocidal activity of human sera and there have not been comparison studies for the use of guinea pig complement over those from other species. Therefore, we comparatively investigated the effects of complements derived from human, guinea pig, rabbit, and sheep on vibriocidal activity. Complements from guinea pig, rabbit, and human showed concentration-dependent vibriocidal activity in the presence of quality control serum antibodies. Of these complements, guinea pig complement was the most sensitive and effective over a wide concentration range. When the vibriocidal activity of complements was measured in the absence of serum antibodies, human, sheep, and guinea pig complements showed vibriocidal activity up to 40-fold, 20-fold, and 1-fold dilution, respectively. For human pre- and post-vaccination sera, the most potent vibriocidal activity was observed when guinea pig complement was used. In addition, the highest fold-increases between pre- and post- vaccinated sera were obtained with guinea pig complement. Furthermore, human complement contained a higher amount of V. cholerae- and its lipopolysaccharide-specific antibodies than guinea pig complement. Collectively, these results suggest that guinea pig complements are suitable for vibriocidal assays due to their high sensitivity and effectiveness to human sera.

  1. Intrasubtype B HIV-1 Superinfection Correlates with Delayed Neutralizing Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landais, Elise; Caballero, Gemma; Phung, Pham; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Poignard, Pascal; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Smith, Davey M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding whether the neutralizing antibody (NAb) response impacts HIV-1 superinfection and how superinfection subsequently modulates the NAb response can help clarify correlates of protection from HIV exposures and better delineate pathways of NAb development. We examined associations between the development of NAb and the occurrence of superinfection in a well-characterized, antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive, primary infection cohort of men who have sex with men. Deep sequencing was applied to blood plasma samples from the cohort to detect cases of superinfection. We compared the NAb activity against autologous and heterologous viruses between 10 participants with intrasubtype B superinfection and 19 monoinfected controls, matched to duration of infection and risk behavior. Three to 6 months after primary infection, individuals who would later become superinfected had significantly weaker NAb activity against tier 1 subtype B viruses (P = 0.003 for SF-162 and P = 0.017 for NL4-3) and marginally against autologous virus (P = 0.054). Lower presuperinfection NAb responses correlated with weaker gp120 binding and lower plasma total IgG titers. Soon after superinfection, the NAb response remained lower, but between 2 and 3 years after primary infection, NAb levels strengthened and reached those of controls. Superinfecting viruses were typically not susceptible to neutralization by presuperinfection plasma. These observations suggest that recently infected individuals with a delayed NAb response against primary infecting and tier 1 subtype B viruses are more susceptible to superinfection. IMPORTANCE Our findings suggest that within the first year after HIV infection, a relatively weak neutralizing antibody response against primary and subtype-specific neutralization-sensitive viruses increases susceptibility to superinfection in the face of repeated exposures. As natural infection progresses, the immune response strengthens significantly in some

  2. A Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibody to Nematode Haemoglobin Enhances Protective Immune Responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E.; Meter, Jeanne M.; Horsnell, William G.; Hoving, J. Claire; Fick, Lizette; Sharp, Michael F.; Darby, Matthew G.; Parihar, Suraj P.; Brombacher, Frank; Lopata, Andreas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg) against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four –HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. Conclusion The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity to a hookworm

  3. Cross-lineage influenza B and heterologous influenza A antibody responses in vaccinated mice: immunologic interactions and B/Yamagata dominance.

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    Danuta M Skowronski

    Full Text Available The annually reformulated trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV includes both influenza A/subtypes (H3N2 and H1N1 but only one of two influenza B/lineages (Yamagata or Victoria. In a recent series of clinical trials to evaluate prime-boost response across influenza B/lineages, influenza-naïve infants and toddlers originally primed with two doses of 2008-09 B/Yamagata-containing TIV were assessed after two doses of B/Victoria-containing TIV administered in the subsequent 2009-10 and 2010-11 seasons. In these children, the Victoria-containing vaccines strongly recalled antibody to the initiating B/Yamagata antigen but induced only low B/Victoria antibody responses. To further evaluate this unexpected pattern of cross-lineage vaccine responses, we conducted additional immunogenicity assessment in mice. In the current study, mice were primed with two doses of 2008-09 Yamagata-containing TIV and subsequently boosted with two doses of 2010-11 Victoria-containing TIV (Group-Yam/Vic. With the same vaccines, we also assessed the reverse order of two-dose Victoria followed by two-dose Yamagata immunization (Group-Vic/Yam. The Group-Yam/Vic mice showed strong homologous responses to Yamagata antigen. However, as previously reported in children, subsequent doses of Victoria antigen substantially boosted Yamagata but induced only low antibody response to the immunizing Victoria component. The reverse order of Group-Vic/Yam mice also showed low homologous responses to Victoria but subsequent heterologous immunization with even a single dose of Yamagata antigen induced substantial boost response to both lineages. For influenza A/H3N2, homologous responses were comparably robust for the differing TIV variants and even a single follow-up dose of the heterologous strain, regardless of vaccine sequence, substantially boosted antibody to both strains. For H1N1, two doses of 2008-09 seasonal antigen significantly blunted response to two doses of the 2010

  4. Pre-existing neutralizing antibody mitigates B cell dysregulation and enhances the Env-specific antibody response in SHIV-infected rhesus macaques.

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    Juan Pablo Jaworski

    Full Text Available Our central hypothesis is that protection against HIV infection will be powerfully influenced by the magnitude and quality of the B cell response. Although sterilizing immunity, mediated by pre-formed abundant and potent antibodies is the ultimate goal for B cell-targeted HIV vaccine strategies, scenarios that fall short of this may still confer beneficial defenses against viremia and disease progression. We evaluated the impact of sub-sterilizing pre-existing neutralizing antibody on the B cell response to SHIV infection. Adult male rhesus macaques received passive transfer of a sub-sterilizing amount of polyclonal neutralizing immunoglobulin (Ig purified from previously infected animals (SHIVIG or control Ig prior to intra-rectal challenge with SHIVSF162P4 and extensive longitudinal sampling was performed. SHIVIG treated animals exhibited significantly reduced viral load and increased de novo Env-specific plasma antibody. Dysregulation of the B cell profile was grossly apparent soon after infection in untreated animals; exemplified by a ≈50% decrease in total B cells in the blood evident 2-3 weeks post-infection which was not apparent in SHIVIG treated animals. IgD+CD5+CD21+ B cells phenotypically similar to marginal zone-like B cells were highly sensitive to SHIV infection, becoming significantly decreased as early as 3 days post-infection in control animals, while being maintained in SHIVIG treated animals, and were highly correlated with the induction of Env-specific plasma antibody. These results suggest that B cell dysregulation during the early stages of infection likely contributes to suboptimal Env-specific B cell and antibody responses, and strategies that limit this dysregulation may enhance the host's ability to eliminate HIV.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus but not cytomegalovirus is associated with reduced vaccine antibody responses in Gambian infants.

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    Beth Holder

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV are persistent herpesviruses that have various immunomodulatory effects on their hosts. Both viruses are usually acquired in infancy in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region where childhood vaccines are less effective than in high income settings. To establish whether there is an association between these two observations, we tested the hypothesis that infection with one or both viruses modulate antibody responses to the T-cell independent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the T-cell dependent measles vaccines.Infection with EBV and CMV was diagnosed by the presence of virus-specific IgM in the peripheral blood or by the presence of IgG at higher levels than that found in umbilical cord blood. Anti-meningococcus IgG and IgM were quantified by ELISA. Anti-measles antibody responses were quantified by haemagglutinin antibody inhibition assay. Infants infected with EBV had reduced IgG and IgM antibody responses to meningococcal polysaccharides and to measles vaccine. Infection with CMV alone predicted no changes in the response to meningococcal polysaccharide. While CMV alone had no discernable effect on the antibody response to measles, the response of infants infected with both CMV and EBV was similar to that of infants infected with neither, suggesting that the effects of CMV infection countered the effects of EBV on measles antibody responses.The results of this exploratory study indicate that infection with EBV is associated with reduced antibody responses to polysaccharides and to measles vaccine, but suggest that the response to T-cell dependent antigens such as measles haemagglutinin may be restored by infection with CMV.

  6. Serologic profile of a cohort of pigs and antibody response to an autogenous vaccine for Actinobacillus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, L; D'Allaire, S; Lacouture, S; Gottschalk, M

    2001-01-01

    Actinobacillus suis is a commensal opportunistic pathogen in swine. However, in recent years, an increasing prevalence of clinical signs associated with A. suis has been observed in high health status herds in North America. The objectives of the study were to assess the kinetics of antibodies to A. suis in pigs from a herd showing clinical signs of A. suis infection and, to evaluate the antibody response in gilts following vaccination with an autogenous vaccine. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a saline extract of boiled-formalinized whole cells of a field strain as the coating antigen was standardized. This ELISA was used as a tool for monitoring, in a comparative way, the variations in A. suis antibody levels. The herd selected for the serologic profile was negative for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection and showed clinical signs of A. suis infection in 16 to 19-week-old pigs. A cohort of 20 pigs was blood sampled at 5, 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age. The lowest level of serum antibodies was observed between weeks 8 and 12, this probably corresponding to a decrease in maternal immunity. A marked increase in the antibody response was seen at 16-week of age, at the approximate time of onset of A. suis clinical signs in the herd. The evaluation of serum antibody responses to an autogenous vaccine revealed that the humoral immunity of gilts further increased following vaccination although the level of antibodies was already high prior to vaccination. The magnitude of the response to vaccination was higher when the level of antibodies was low prior to the first injection. The ELISA test seems to detect antibodies against the O-chain LPS.

  7. Influence of routes and administration parameters on antibody response of pigs following DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Annette Malene; Kirstensen, Birte; Dannemann-Jensen, Tove

    2004-01-01

    Using the nucleoprotein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus as model antigen, we optimised parameters for gene gun vaccination of pigs, including firing pressure and vaccination site. As criteria for optimisation, we characterised particle penetration and local tissue damage...... by histology. For selected combinations, vaccination efficiency in terms of antibody response was studied. Gene gun vaccination on ear alone was as efficient as a multi-site (ear, thorax, inguinal area, tongue mucosa) gene gun approach, and more efficient than combined intramuscular (i.m.)/intradermal (i.......d.) injection of plasmid DNA. This indicates, that the ear is an attractive site for gene gun vaccination of pigs....

  8. Induction of neutralizing antibody response against four dengue viruses in mice by intramuscular electroporation of tetravalent DNA vaccines.

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    Prompetchara, Eakachai; Ketloy, Chutitorn; Keelapang, Poonsook; Sittisombut, Nopporn; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccine against dengue is an interesting strategy for a prime/boost approach. This study evaluated neutralizing antibody (NAb) induction of a dengue tetravalent DNA (TDNA) vaccine candidate administered by intramuscular-electroporation (IM-EP) and the benefit of homologous TDNA boosting in mice. Consensus humanized pre-membrane (prM) and envelope (E) of each serotypes, based on isolates from year 1962-2003, were separately cloned into a pCMVkan expression vector. ICR mice, five-six per group were immunized for three times (2-week interval) with TDNA at 100 µg (group I; 25 µg/monovalent) or 10 µg (group II; 2.5 µg/monovalent). In group I, mice received an additional TDNA boosting 13 weeks later. Plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT) were performed at 4 weeks post-last immunization. Both 100 µg and 10 µg doses of TDNA induced high NAb levels against all DENV serotypes. The median PRNT50 titers were comparable among four serotypes of DENV after TDNA immunization. Median PRNT50 titers ranged 240-320 in 100 µg and 160-240 in 10 µg groups (p = ns). A time course study of the 100 µg dose of TDNA showed detectable NAb at 2 weeks after the second injection. The NAb peaked at 4 weeks after the third injection then declined over time but remained detectable up to 13 weeks. An additional homologous TDNA boosting significantly enhanced the level of NAb from the nadir for at least ten-fold (pdengue viral strain for both vaccine immunogen design and neutralization assays is critical to avoid a mismatching outcome. In summary, this TDNA vaccine candidate induced good neutralizing antibody responses in mice; and the DNA/DNA prime/boost strategy is promising and warranted further evaluation in non-human primates.

  9. Equine Arteritis Virus Elicits a Mucosal Antibody Response in the Reproductive Tract of Persistently Infected Stallions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carossino, Mariano; Wagner, Bettina; Loynachan, Alan T; Cook, R Frank; Canisso, Igor F; Chelvarajan, Lakshman; Edwards, Casey L; Nam, Bora; Timoney, John F; Timoney, Peter J; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2017-10-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) has the ability to establish persistent infection in the reproductive tract of the stallion (carrier) and is continuously shed in its semen. We have recently demonstrated that EAV persists within stromal cells and a subset of lymphocytes in the stallion accessory sex glands in the presence of a significant local inflammatory response. In the present study, we demonstrated that EAV elicits a mucosal antibody response in the reproductive tract during persistent infection with homing of plasma cells into accessory sex glands. The EAV-specific immunoglobulin isotypes in seminal plasma included IgA, IgG1, IgG3/5, and IgG4/7. Interestingly, seminal plasma IgG1 and IgG4/7 possessed virus-neutralizing activity, while seminal plasma IgA and IgG3/5 did not. However, virus-neutralizing IgG1 and IgG4/7 in seminal plasma were not effective in preventing viral infectivity. In addition, the serological response was primarily mediated by virus-specific IgM and IgG1, while virus-specific serum IgA, IgG3/5, IgG4/7, and IgG6 isotype responses were not detected. This is the first report characterizing the immunoglobulin isotypes in equine serum and seminal plasma in response to EAV infection. The findings presented herein suggest that while a broader immunoglobulin isotype diversity is elicited in seminal plasma, EAV has the ability to persist in the reproductive tract, in spite of local mucosal antibody and inflammatory responses. This study provides further evidence that EAV employs complex immune evasion mechanisms during persistence in the reproductive tract that warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination.

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    Xiaoxing Huang

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallpox vaccine for millions of Chinese people. The spike glycoprotein (S of SARS-CoV was used as the test antigen after the S gene was constructed in the identical genomic location of two vectors to generate vaccine candidates MVTT-S and MVA-S. Using identical doses, MVTT-S induced lower levels ( approximately 2-3-fold of anti- SARS-CoV neutralizing antibodies (Nabs than MVA-S through intramuscular inoculation. MVTT-S, however, was capable of inducing consistently 20-to-100-fold higher levels of Nabs than MVA-S when inoculated via either intranasal or intraoral routes. These levels of MVTT-S-induced Nab responses were substantially (approximately 10-fold higher than that induced via the intramuscular route in the same experiments. Moreover, pre-exposure to the wild-type VTT via intranasal or intraoral route impaired the Nab response via the same routes of MVTT-S vaccination probably due to the pre-existing anti-VTT Nab response. The efficacy of intranasal or intraoral vaccination, however, was still 20-to-50-fold better than intramuscular inoculation despite the subcutaneous pre-exposure to wild-type VTT. Our data have implications for people who maintain low levels of anti-VTT Nabs after historical smallpox vaccination. MVTT is therefore an attractive live viral vector for mucosal vaccination.

  11. Assessment of gold nanoparticles as a size-dependent vaccine carrier for enhancing the antibody response against synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, EE137, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hung, Yao-Ching [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, China Medical University and Hospital, 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wei-Hsu [Institute of Nanotechnology, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Huang, Guewha Steven, E-mail: gstevehuang@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Nanotechnology, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, Republic of China (China)

    2010-05-14

    To assess the ability of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to act as a size-dependent carrier, a synthetic peptide resembling foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) protein was conjugated to GNPs ranging from 2 to 50 nm in diameter (2, 5, 8, 12, 17, 37, and 50 nm). An extra cysteine was added to the C-terminus of the FMDV peptide (pFMDV) to ensure maximal conjugation to the GNPs, which have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups. The resultant pFMDV-GNP conjugates were then injected into BALB/c mice. Immunization with pFMDV-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (pFMDV-KLH) conjugate was also performed as a control. Blood was obtained from the mice after 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks and antibody titers against both pFMDV and the carriers were measured. For the pFMDV-GNP immunization, specific antibodies against the synthetic peptide were detected in the sera of mice injected with 2, 5, 8, 12, and 17 nm pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Maximal antibody binding was noted for GNPs of diameter 8-17 nm. The pFMDV-GNPs induced a three-fold increase in the antibody response compared to the response to pFMDV-KLH. However, sera from either immunized mouse group did not exhibit an antibody response to GNPs, while the sera from pFMDV-KLH-immunized mice presented high levels of binding activity against KLH. Additionally, the uptake of pFMDV-GNP in the spleen was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantity of GNPs that accumulated in the spleen correlated to the magnitude of the immune response induced by pFMDV-GNP. In conclusion, we demonstrated the size-dependent immunogenic properties of pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Furthermore, we established that GNPs ranging from 8 to 17 nm in diameter may be ideal for eliciting a focused antibody response against a synthetic pFMDV peptide.

  12. Association of Distinct Fine Specificities of Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies With Elevated Immune Responses to Prevotella intermedia in a Subgroup of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenzer, Anja; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Marzeda, Anna M; Wong, Alicia; Montgomery, Anna B; Sayles, Harlan R; Eick, Sigrun; Gawron, Katarzyna; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria; Łazarz-Bartyzel, Katarzyna; Davis, Simon; Potempa, Jan; Kessler, Benedikt M; Fischer, Roman; Venables, Patrick J; Payne, Jeffrey B; Mikuls, Ted R; Midwood, Kim S

    2017-12-01

    In addition to the long-established link with smoking, periodontitis (PD) is a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism by which PD could induce antibodies to citrullinated peptides (ACPAs), by examining the antibody response to a novel citrullinated peptide of cytokeratin 13 (CK-13) identified in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), and comparing the response to 4 other citrullinated peptides in patients with RA who were well-characterized for PD and smoking. The citrullinomes of GCF and periodontal tissue from patients with PD were mapped by mass spectrometry. ACPAs of CK13 (cCK13), tenascin-C (cTNC5), vimentin (cVIM), α-enolase (CEP-1), and fibrinogen β (cFIBβ) were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in patients with RA (n = 287) and patients with osteoarthritis (n = 330), and cross-reactivity was assessed by inhibition assays. A novel citrullinated peptide cCK13-1 ( 444 TSNASGR-Cit-TSDV-Cit-RP 458 ) identified in GCF exhibited elevated antibody responses in RA patients (24%). Anti-cCK13-1 antibody levels correlated with anti-cTNC5 antibody levels, and absorption experiments confirmed this was not due to cross-reactivity. Only anti-cCK13-1 and anti-cTNC5 were associated with antibodies to the periodontal pathogen Prevotella intermedia (P = 0.05 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with antibodies to Porphyromonas gingivalis arginine gingipains. Levels of antibodies to CEP-1, cFIBβ, and cVIM correlated with each other, and with smoking and shared epitope risk factors in RA. This study identifies 2 groups of ACPA fine specificities associated with different RA risk factors. One is predominantly linked to smoking and shared epitope, and the other links anti-cTNC5 and cCK13-1 to infection with the periodontal pathogen P intermedia. © 2017 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Prostaglandin D2 Receptor DP1 Antibodies Predict Vaccine-induced and Spontaneous Narcolepsy Type 1: Large-scale Study of Antibody Profiling

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    Helle Sadam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuropathological findings support an autoimmune etiology as an underlying factor for loss of orexin-producing neurons in spontaneous narcolepsy type 1 (narcolepsy with cataplexy; sNT1 as well as in Pandemrix influenza vaccine-induced narcolepsy type 1 (Pdmx-NT1. The precise molecular target or antigens for the immune response have, however, remained elusive. Methods: Here we have performed a comprehensive antigenic repertoire analysis of sera using the next-generation phage display method - mimotope variation analysis (MVA. Samples from 64 children and adolescents were analyzed: 10 with Pdmx-NT1, 6 with sNT1, 16 Pandemrix-vaccinated, 16 H1N1 infected, and 16 unvaccinated healthy individuals. The diagnosis of NT1 was defined by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine international criteria of sleep disorders v3. Findings: Our data showed that although the immunoprofiles toward vaccination were generally similar in study groups, there were also striking differences in immunoprofiles between sNT1 and Pdmx-NT1 groups as compared with controls. Prominent immune response was observed to a peptide epitope derived from prostaglandin D2 receptor (DP1, as well as peptides homologous to B cell lymphoma 6 protein. Further validation confirmed that these can act as true antigenic targets in discriminating NT1 diseased along with a novel epitope of hemagglutinin of H1N1 to delineate exposure to H1N1. Interpretation: We propose that DP1 is a novel molecular target of autoimmune response and presents a potential diagnostic biomarker for NT1. DP1 is involved in the regulation of non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep and thus alterations in its functions could contribute to the disturbed sleep regulation in NT1 that warrants further studies. Together our results also show that MVA is a helpful method for finding novel peptide antigens to classify human autoimmune diseases, possibly facilitating the design of better therapies. Keywords: Narcolepsy type 1

  14. Modulation of immune response to Lol p I by pretreatment with anti-idiotypic antibody is not restricted to the idiotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Y; Hébert, J

    1994-05-01

    To study the role of anti-idiotypic antibodies in the regulation of the immune response to Lol p I (the major allergenic component of rye grass pollen), we have recently generated a panel of three MoAbs directed against distinct epitopes of Lolp I and an anti-idiotypic MoAb directed against the idiotype borne by one of the anti-Lol p I MoAbs (290A-167). The effects of pretreatment with this anti-idiotypic MoAb in BALB/c mice before immunization with the antigen have been examined. The anti-idiotypic MoAb or unrelated MoAb were given weekly for 8 weeks intraperitoneally. Mice then received the antigen (2 micrograms) adsorbed with alum (2 mg) at weeks 9, 11 and 13. Serum anti-Lol p I antibodies (IgG or IgE) and specific idiotypic responses were measured. Anti-Lol p I IgG antibodies could be detected before immunization with Lol p I only in mice pretreated with anti-idiotypic MoAb. Immunization with Lol p I induced an anti-Lol p I IgG response in both groups, but this response was higher in mice that received anti-idiotypic MoAb. Similar profiles were seen for specific IgE antibodies and idiotypic responses. Surprisingly, idiotypes borne by other anti-Lol p I MoAbs (539A-6 and 348A-6) had also been enhanced after pretreatment with the anti-290A-167 MoAb. These observations suggested that the pretreatment with this anti-idiotypic MoAb modulates not only the expression of the respective idiotype, but also affects other idiotype responses.

  15. A virosomal malaria peptide vaccine elicits a long-lasting sporozoite-inhibitory antibody response in a phase 1a clinical trial.

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    Shinji L Okitsu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptides delivered on the surface of influenza virosomes have been shown to induce solid humoral immune responses in experimental animals. High titers of peptide-specific antibodies were also induced in a phase 1a clinical trial in volunteers immunized with virosomal formulations of two peptides derived from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP and the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1