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Sample records for antibody responses induced

  1. Polyanhydride Nanovaccines Induce Germinal Center B Cell Formation and Sustained Serum Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, Julia E; Tygrett, Lorraine T; Hao, Jihua; Habte, Habtom H; Cho, Michael W; Greenspan, Neil S; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle-based subunit vaccines have shown promising characteristics by enhancing antigen presentation and inducing protective immune responses when compared with soluble protein. Specifically, polyanhydride nanoparticle-based vaccines (i.e., nanovaccines) have been shown to successfully encapsulate and release antigens, activate B and T cells, and induce both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity towards a variety of immunogens. One of the characteristics of strong thymus-dependent antibody responses is the formation of germinal centers (GC) and the generation of GC B cells, which is part of the T helper cell driven cellular response. In order to further understand the role of nanovaccines in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, their ability to induce germinal center B cell formation and isotype switching and the effects thereof on serum antibody responses were investigated in these studies. Polyanhydride nanovaccines based on 1,6-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)hexane and 1,8-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-3,6-dioxaoctane were used to subcutaneously administer a viral antigen. GC B cell formation and serum antibody responses induced by the nanovaccines were compared to that induced by alum-based vaccine formulations. It was demonstrated that a single dose of polyanhydride nanovaccines resulted in the formation of robust GCs and serum antibody in comparison to that induced by the alum-based formulation. This was attributed to the sustained release of antigen provided by the nanovaccines. When administered in a multiple dose regimen, the highest post-immunization titer and GC B cell number was enhanced, and the immune response induced by the nanovaccines was further sustained. These studies provide foundational information on the mechanism of action of polyanhydride nanovaccines. PMID:27319223

  2. Delivering HIV Gagp24 to DCIR Induces Strong Antibody Responses In Vivo.

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    Anne-Laure Flamar

    Full Text Available Targeting dendritic cell-specific endocytic receptors using monoclonal antibodies fused to desired antigens is an approach widely used in vaccine development to enhance the poor immunogenicity of protein-based vaccines and to induce immune responses. Here, we engineered an anti-human DCIR recombinant antibody, which cross-reacts with the homologous cynomolgous macaque receptor and was fused via the heavy chain C-terminus to HIV Gagp24 protein (αDCIR.Gagp24. In vitro, αDCIR.Gagp24 expanded multifunctional antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells recognizing multiple Gagp24 peptides from HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In non human primates, priming with αDCIR.Gagp24 without adjuvant elicited a strong anti-Gagp24 antibody response after the second immunization, while in the non-targeted HIV Gagp24 protein control groups the titers were weak. The presence of the double-stranded RNA poly(I:C adjuvant significantly enhanced the anti-Gagp24 antibody response in all the groups and reduced the discrimination between the different vaccine groups. The avidity of the anti-Gagp24 antibody responses was similar with either αDCIR.Gagp24 or Gagp24 immunization, but increased from medium to high avidity in both groups when poly(I:C was co-administered. This data provides a comparative analysis of DC-targeted and non-targeted proteins for their capacity to induce antigen-specific antibody responses in vivo. This study supports the further development of DCIR-based DC-targeting vaccines for protective durable antibody induction, especially in the absence of adjuvant.

  3. A Bivalent, Chimeric Rabies Virus Expressing Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Induces Multifunctional Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkel, Amber; Shen, Shixue; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David; McGettigan, James P

    2015-11-01

    We previously showed that a matrix (M) gene-deleted rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccine (RABV-ΔM) is highly immunogenic and induces potent B cell responses in the context of RABV infection. We speculated that RABV-ΔM expressing HIV proteins would also induce potent B cell responses against HIV antigens. As a prerequisite to future studies in nonhuman primates, we completed immunogenicity studies in mice to confirm the ability of RABV-ΔM to induce polyfunctional B cell responses in the context of HIV. To that end, the envelope protein from the mac239 strain of SIV (SIVmac239Env) was cloned into RABV-ΔM, resulting in RABV-ΔM-Env. Infectious virus was recovered following standard methods and propagated on baby hamster kidney cells stably expressing RABV M [>10(7) focus forming units (ffu)/ml]. Western blot analysis of cell lysates or of purified virions confirmed Env expression on the surface of infected cells and within virus particles, respectively. Positive neutralization activity against a neutralization-sensitive SIV strain and to a lesser extent against a neutralization-resistant SIV strain was detected in mice after a single intramuscular inoculation with RABV-ΔM-Env. The quality, but not quantity, of the antibody response was enhanced via boosting with recombinant gp130 or RABV-ΔM-Env as measured by an increase in antibody avidity and a skewing toward a Th1-type antibody response. We also show that an intradermal inoculation induces higher antibodies than an intramuscular or intranasal inoculation. An intradermal inoculation of RABV-ΔM-Env followed by a boost inoculation with recombinant gp130 produced anti-SIV antibodies with neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibody (nNAb) effector functions. Together, RABV-ΔM-Env induces B cells to secrete antibodies against SIV with the potential to clear both "free" and cell-associated virus. Strategies capable of eliciting both NAbs as well as nNAbs might help to improve the efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines. PMID

  4. Vaccinia virus strain NYVAC induces substantially lower and qualitatively different human antibody responses compared with strains Lister and Dryvax

    OpenAIRE

    Midgley, Claire M.; Putz, Mike M.; Weber, Jonathan N.; Smith, Geoffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    The antibody responses elicited by immunization of humans with vaccinia virus (VACV) strains Lister, Dryvax and NYVAC have been determined and compared. Neutralizing antibodies against intracellular mature virus (IMV) and extracellular enveloped virus (EEV), and binding antibody titres (ELISA) against the EEV protein B5, the IMV proteins A27 and H3, and VACV-infected cell lysate were measured. Lister and Dryvax induced broadly similar antibody titres, consistent with the fact that these vacci...

  5. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway1

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Quarles, Ellen K.; Lai, Marvin A.; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K.; Smith, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1 and IL-18 receptors, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. Herein we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in antibody responses generated towards flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize innate immune components that regulate isotype specific antibody responses. Using purified flagellin from Salmonella, we dissected the contribution of innate flagellin recognition pathways to promote antibody responses towards flagellin and co-administered ovalbumin in C57BL/6 mice. We demonstrate IgG2c responses towards flagellin were TLR5- and inflammasome-dependent; IgG1 was the dominant isotype and partially TLR5- and inflammasome-dependent. Our data indicates a substantial flagellin-specific IgG1 response was induced through a TLR5-, inflammasome-, and MyD88-independent pathway. IgA anti-FliC responses were TLR5- & MyD88-dependent and caspase-1-independent. Unlike C57BL/6 mice, flagellin immunized A/J mice induced co-dominant IgG1 and IgG2a responses. Furthermore, MyD88-independent flagellin-induced antibody responses were even more pronounced in A/J MyD88−/− mice, and IgA anti-FliC responses were suppressed by MyD88. Flagellin also worked as an adjuvant toward co-administered ovalbumin, but it only promoted IgG1 anti-OVA responses. Our results demonstrate that a novel pathway for flagellin recognition contributes to antibody production. Characterization of this pathway will be useful for understanding immunity to flagellin and the rationale design of flagellin-based vaccines. PMID:24442437

  6. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Alam, Jahangir; Afsar, Nure Alam; Huda, Nazmul; Kabir, Yearul; Qadri, Firdausi; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy. Infants received tetanus and pertussis vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. TT and PT anti-IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes was measured at 15 wk. Plasma antibodies were measured at 6 wk (pre-vaccination), 15 wk and 1 y of age. Prior to vaccination, TT and PT antibody were detected in 94.6% and 15.2% of infants. At 15 wk anti-TT-IgG and anti-PT-IgG in plasma was increased by 7-9 fold over pre-vaccination levels, while at 1 y plasma anti-TT-IgG was decreased by approximately 5-fold from the peak and had returned to near the pre-vaccination level. At 1 y plasma anti-PT-IgG was decreased by 2-fold 1 yfrom the 15 wk level. However, 89.5% and 82.3% of infants at 1 y had protective levels of anti-TT and anti-PT IgG, respectively. Pre-vaccination plasma IgG levels were associated with lower vaccine-specific IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes at 15 wk (p < 0.10). This apparent inhibition was seen for anti-TT-IgG at both 15 wk (p < 0.05) and t 1 y (p < 0.10) of age. In summary, we report an apparent inhibitory effect of passively derived maternal antibody on an infants' own antibody response to the same vaccine. However, since the cut-off values for protective titers are low, infants had protective antibody levels throughout infancy. PMID:27176823

  7. Evaluation of Vaccine-induced Antibody Responses: Impact of New Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Zaccaro, Daniel J.; Wagener, Diane K.; Whisnant, Carol C; Staats, Herman F.

    2013-01-01

    Host response to vaccination has historically been evaluated based on a change in antibody titer that compares the post-vaccination titer to the pre-vaccination titer. A four-fold or greater increase in antigen-specific antibody has been interpreted to indicate an increase in antibody production in response to vaccination. New technologies, such as the bead-based assays, provide investigators and clinicians with precise antibody levels (reported as concentration per mL) in ranges below and ab...

  8. AAV Natural Infection Induces Broad Cross-Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Multiple AAV Serotypes in Chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James M

    2016-06-01

    Cross-sectional studies of primates have revealed that natural neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to adeno-associated viruses (AAV) span multiple serotypes. This differs from the phenotype of the NAb response to an AAV vector delivered to seronegative nonhuman primates that is typically restricted to the administered AAV serotype. To better understand the mechanism by which natural AAV infections result in broad NAb responses, we conducted a longitudinal study spanning 10 years in which we evaluated serum-circulating AAV NAb levels in captive-housed chimpanzees. In a cohort of 25 chimpanzees we identified 3 distinct groups of animals: those that never seroconverted to AAV (naïve), those that were persistently seropositive (chronic), and those that seroconverted during the 10-year period (acute). For the chronic group we found a broad seroresponse characterized by NAbs reacting to multiple AAV serotypes. A similar cross-neutralization pattern of NAbs was observed in the acute group. These data support our hypothesis that a single natural infection with AAV induces a broadly cross-reactive NAb response to multiple AAV serotypes. PMID:27314914

  9. Intratypic heterologous vaccination of calves can induce an antibody response in presence of maternal antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, A.; Eble, P.L.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Chenard, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Maternal antibodies can interfere with foot-and-mouth disease vaccination. In this study we determined whether intratypic heterologous vaccination could help to improve herd immunity. Results - In unvaccinated calves, a half-life of maternal antibodies of 21 days was determined. At two weeks of age, calves without maternal antibodies showed a good antibody response against both vaccines used in the trial, while in calves with maternal antibodies no antibody response to homologous...

  10. Analysis by Flow Cytometry of B-Cell Activation and Antibody Responses Induced by Toll-Like Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pone, Egest J

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in B lymphocytes and contribute to B-cell activation, antibody responses, and their maturation. TLR stimulation of mouse B cells induces class switch DNA recombination (CSR) to isotypes specified by cytokines, and also induces formation of IgM(+) as well as class-switched plasma cells. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, while on its own inducing limited B-cell proliferation and no CSR, can enhance CSR driven by TLRs. Particular synergistic or antagonistic interactions among TLR pathways, BCR, and cytokine signaling can have important consequences for B-cell activation, CSR, and plasma cell formation. This chapter outlines protocols for the induction and analysis of B-cell activation and antibody production by TLRs with or without other stimuli. PMID:26803633

  11. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway1

    OpenAIRE

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Ellen K Quarles; Lai, Marvin A.; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K.; Smith, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1 and IL-18 receptors, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. Herein we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in antibody responses generated towards flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize ...

  12. Epigenetics of the antibody response

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone posttranslational modifications and microRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and microRNAs modulate t...

  13. Genetic control of antibody responses induced by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Lagranderie, M; Lo-Man, R; Dériaud, E; Gicquel, B; Gheorghiu, M; Leclerc, C

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing foreign antigens represents a promising candidate for the development of future vaccines and was shown in several experimental models to induce protective immunity against bacterial or parasitic infections. Innate resistance to BCG infection is under genetic control and could modify the immune responses induced against an antigen delivered by such engineered microorganisms. To investigate this question, we analyzed the immune responses of various...

  14. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes.

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    Monica Poggianella

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well.

  15. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses. PMID:25124037

  16. Intranasal Delivery of Group B Meningococcal Native Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Induces Local Mucosal and Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Shoemaker, David R.; Saunders, Nancy B.; Brandt, Brenda L.; Moran, E. Ellen; LaClair, Andrew D.; Zollinger, Wendell D.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that intranasal immunization of mice with meningococcal native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) induces both a good local mucosal antibody response and a good systemic bactericidal antibody response. However, in the intranasal mouse model, some of the NOMV entered the lung and caused an acute granulocytic response. We therefore developed an alternate animal model using the rabbit. This model reduces the probability of lung involvement and more closely mimics intranasal ...

  17. Intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate the serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Kihara-Fujioka, Miran; Hachimura, Satoshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2010-08-16

    Colonization of the gut by commensal bacteria modulates the induction of oral tolerance and allergy. However, how these intestinal bacteria modulate antigen-specific T cell responses induced by oral antigens remains unclear. In order to investigate this, we used germ-free (GF) ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA23-3) mice. Conventional (CV) or GF mice were administered an OVA-containing diet. Cytokine production by CD4(+) cells from spleen (SP), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) was evaluated by ELISA, as was the peripheral antibody titer. T cell phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry. CD4(+) cells from the SP and MLN of CV and GF mice fed an OVA diet for 3 weeks produced significantly less IL-2 than the corresponding cells from mice receiving a control diet, suggesting that oral tolerance could be induced at the T cell level in the systemic and intestinal immune systems of both bacterial condition of mice. However, we also observed that the T cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dietary antigen was delayed in the systemic immune tissues and was weaker in the intestinal immune tissues of the GF mice. Intestinal MLN and PP CD4(+) T cells from these animals also produced lower levels of IL-10, had less activated/memory type CD45RB(low) cells, and expressed lower levels of CTLA-4 but not Foxp3 compared to their CV counterparts. Furthermore, GF mice produced higher serum levels of OVA-specific antibodies than CV animals. CD40L expression by SP CD4(+) cells from GF mice fed OVA was higher than that of CV mice. These results suggest that intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigens through modulation of the intestinal and systemic T cell phenotype. PMID:20621647

  18. Protective antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses to the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induced by a nanoparticle vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Kaba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The worldwide burden of malaria remains a major public health problem due, in part, to the lack of an effective vaccine against the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. An effective vaccine will most likely require the induction of antigen specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells as well as long-lasting antibody responses all working in concert to eliminate the infection. We report here the effective modification of a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN vaccine previously proven effective in control of a P. berghei infection in a rodent model to now present B- and T-cell epitopes of the human malaria parasite P. falciparum in a platform capable of being used in human subjects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To establish the basis for a SAPN-based vaccine, B- and CD8(+ T-cell epitopes from the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and the universal CD4 T-helper epitope PADRE were engineered into a versatile small protein (∼125 amino acids that self-assembles into a spherical nanoparticle repetitively displaying the selected epitopes. P. falciparum epitope specific immune responses were evaluated in mice using a transgenic P. berghei malaria parasite of mice expressing the human malaria full-length P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (Tg-Pb/PfCSP. We show that SAPN constructs, delivered in saline, can induce high-titer, long-lasting (1 year protective antibody and poly-functional (IFNγ(+, IL-2(+ long-lived central memory CD8(+ T-cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these Ab or CD8(+ T-cells can independently provide sterile protection against a lethal challenge of the transgenic parasites. CONCLUSION: The SAPN construct induces long-lasting antibody and cellular immune responses to epitope specific sequences of the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and prevents infection in mice by a transgenic P. berghei parasite displaying the full length PfCSP.

  19. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Quarles, Ellen K; Lai, Marvin A; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K; Smith, Kelly D

    2014-02-15

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1Rs and IL-18Rs, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. In this study, we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in Ab responses generated toward flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize innate immune components that regulate isotype-specific Ab responses. Using purified flagellin from Salmonella, we dissected the contribution of innate flagellin recognition pathways to promote Ab responses toward flagellin and coadministered OVA in C57BL/6 mice. We demonstrate IgG2c responses toward flagellin were TLR5 and inflammasome dependent; IgG1 was the dominant isotype and partially TLR5 and inflammasome dependent. Our data indicate a substantial flagellin-specific IgG1 response was induced through a TLR5-, inflammasome-, and MyD88-independent pathway. IgA anti-FliC responses were TLR5 and MyD88 dependent and caspase-1 independent. Unlike C57BL/6 mice, flagellin-immunized A/J mice induced codominant IgG1 and IgG2a responses. Furthermore, MyD88-independent, flagellin-induced Ab responses were even more pronounced in A/J MyD88(-/-) mice, and IgA anti-FliC responses were suppressed by MyD88. Flagellin also worked as an adjuvant toward coadministered OVA, but it only promoted IgG1 anti-OVA responses. Our results demonstrate that a novel pathway for flagellin recognition contributes to Ab production. Characterization of this pathway will be useful for understanding immunity to flagellin and the rationale design of flagellin-based vaccines. PMID:24442437

  20. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins. PMID:26826546

  1. Mycobacterium bovis BCG priming induces a strong potentiation of the antibody response induced by recombinant BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghiu, M; Lagranderie, M R; Gicquel, B M; Leclerc, C D

    1994-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that strong cellular or humoral immune responses can be induced against foreign antigens expressed by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG. It has therefore been suggested that BCG could represent one of the best candidate vectors for live recombinant vaccines. However, a large percentage of the human population has been immunized by BCG, and this priming could modify the immune response to future recombinant BCG vaccines. In the present study, we have ...

  2. The respiratory syncytial virus G protein conserved domain induces a persistent and protective antibody response in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien N Nguyen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is an important cause of severe upper and lower respiratory disease in infants and in the elderly. There are 2 main RSV subtypes A and B. A recombinant vaccine was designed based on the central domain of the RSV-A attachment G protein which we had previously named G2Na (aa130-230. Here we evaluated immunogenicity, persistence of antibody (Ab response and protective efficacy induced in rodents by: (i G2Na fused to DT (Diphtheria toxin fragments in cotton rats. DT fusion did not potentiate neutralizing Ab responses against RSV-A or cross-reactivity to RSV-B. (ii G2Nb (aa130-230 of the RSV-B G protein either fused to, or admixed with G2Na. G2Nb did not induce RSV-B-reactive Ab responses. (iii G2Na at low doses. Two injections of 3 µg G2Na in Alum were sufficient to induce protective immune responses in mouse lungs, preventing RSV-A and greatly reducing RSV-B infections. In cotton rats, G2Na-induced RSV-reactive Ab and protective immunity against RSV-A challenge that persisted for at least 24 weeks. (iv injecting RSV primed mice with a single dose of G2Na/Alum or G2Na/PLGA [poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide]. Despite the presence of pre-existing RSV-specific Abs, these formulations effectively boosted anti-RSV Ab titres and increased Ab titres persisted for at least 21 weeks. Affinity maturation of these Abs increased from day 28 to day 148. These data indicate that G2Na has potential as a component of an RSV vaccine formulation.

  3. Cross-clade neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 induced in rabbits by focusing the immune response on a neutralizing epitope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were performed to induce cross-clade neutralizing antibodies (Abs) by testing various combinations of prime and boost constructs that focus the immune response on structurally-conserved epitopes in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120. Rabbits were immunized with gp120 DNA containing a V3 loop characterized by the GPGR motif at its tip, and/or with gp120 DNA with a V3 loop carrying the GPGQ motif. Priming was followed by boosts with V3-fusion proteins (V3-FPs) carrying the V3 sequence from a subtype B virus (GPGR motif), and/or with V3 sequences from subtypes A and C (GPGQ motif). The broadest and most consistent neutralizing responses were generated when using a clade C gp120 DNA prime and with the V3B-FP boost. Immune sera displayed neutralizing activity in three assays against pseudoviruses and primary isolates from subtypes A, AG, B, C, and D. Polyclonal Abs in the immune rabbit sera neutralized viruses that were not neutralized by pools of human anti-V3 monoclonal Abs. Greater than 80% of the neutralizing Abs were specific for V3, showing that the immune response could be focused on a neutralizing epitope and that vaccine-induced anti-V3 Abs have cross-clade neutralizing activity.

  4. HAHA--nothing to laugh about. Measuring the immunogenicity (human anti-human antibody response) induced by humanized monoclonal antibodies applying ELISA and SPR technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechansky, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Immunogenicity induced by passively applied proteins is a serious issue because it is directly related to the patient's safety. The out-come of an immune reaction to a therapeutic protein can range from transient appearance of antibodies without any clinical significance to severe life threatening conditions. Within this article, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methodology to measure immunogenicity are compared and the pros and cons are discussed. PMID:19679421

  5. Candidate Multi-Peptide-Vaccine Against Classical Swine Fever Virus Induces Strong Antibody Response with Predefined Specificity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耿; 董晓楠; 陈应华

    2002-01-01

    Previous investigations demonstrated that the envelope glycoprotein E2 (gp55) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the most immunogenic protein. Interestingly, recombinant protein E2 that contains only one structural antigenic unit (unit B/C or A) could protect pigs from a lethal challenge of CSFV. Based on these findings, we designed and prepared five overlapping synthetic peptides that covered the sequence unit B/C (aa 693-777) of Shimen E2 and conjugated individual peptides with bovine serum albumin (BSA). After the vaccination, the specificity of the rabbit sera was analyzed in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). The results show that each of the five candidate peptide-vaccines can successfully induce a high titer of specific antibodies in New Zealand White Rabbits (n=3). Subsequently, the five candidate peptide-vaccines were applied in combination for immunization of pigs (n=10) and induced specific and strong humoral responses against all of the five designed peptides in pigs. Our studies indicate that the candidate multi-peptide-vaccine would prove an excellent marker vaccine against CSFV and provide a model for developing effective synthetic peptide vaccines to stop viral epidemics in humans and animals.

  6. TLR9-adjuvanted pneumococcal conjugate vaccine induces antibody-independent memory responses in HIV-infected adults

    OpenAIRE

    Offersen, Rasmus; Melchjorsen, Jesper; Paludan, Søren R; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Søgaard, Ole S.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-patients have excess of pneumococcal infection. We immunized 40 HIV-patients twice with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar, Pfizer) +/− a TLR9 agonist (CPG 7909). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with pneumococcal polysaccharides and cytokine concentrations measured. The CPG 7909 adjuvant group had significantly higher relative cytokine responses than the placebo group for IL-1β, IL-2R, IL-6, IFN-γ and MIP-β, which, did not correlate with IgG antibody responses. The...

  7. The respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein formulated with a novel combination adjuvant induces balanced immune responses in lambs with maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R; Latimer, L; Gerdts, V; Potter, A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S

    2015-03-10

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe respiratory illness in infants. There are no licensed vaccines to prevent RSV infection. The neonate receives short-term protection from maternally derived antibodies, which, however, can also interfere with the active response to vaccination. A RSV vaccine consisting of a truncated version of the fusion protein formulated with polyI:C, innate defense regulator peptide and polyphosphazene (ΔF/TriAdj), was evaluated in two to three week-old lambs. When delivered intrapulmonary, ΔF/TriAdj elicited IgA production in the lung in addition to a robust systemic response similar to that induced by intramuscular immunization. To investigate potential interference by maternal antibodies, pregnant ewes were vaccinated with ΔF/TriAdj. Lambs born to RSV F-immune or non-immune ewes were then given three vaccinations with ΔF/TriAdj at 3 days, 4 weeks and 8 weeks post-birth. Lambs immunized intramuscularly with ΔF/TriAdj vaccine developed high-affinity ΔF-specific serum IgG and virus neutralizing antibodies, and displayed an increase in the frequency of IFN-γ-secreting cells by in vitro restimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Maternal antibodies did not interfere with the development of an immune response to ΔF/TriAdj in the newborn lambs. These results indicate that immunization of neonates with ΔF/TriAdj is effective even in the face of maternal antibodies. PMID:25637860

  8. Analysis of V2 antibody responses induced in vaccinees in the ALVAC/AIDSVAX HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolla-Pazner, Susan; deCamp, Allan C; Cardozo, Timothy; Karasavvas, Nicos; Gottardo, Raphael; Williams, Constance; Morris, Daryl E; Tomaras, Georgia; Rao, Mangala; Billings, Erik; Berman, Phillip; Shen, Xiaoying; Andrews, Charla; O'Connell, Robert J; Ngauy, Viseth; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; de Souza, Mark; Korber, Bette; Koup, Richard; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Pinter, Abraham; Montefiori, David; Haynes, Barton F; Robb, Merlin L; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Michael, Nelson L; Gilbert, Peter B; Kim, Jerome H

    2013-01-01

    The RV144 clinical trial of a prime/boost immunizing regimen using recombinant canary pox (ALVAC-HIV) and two gp120 proteins (AIDSVAX B and E) was previously shown to have a 31.2% efficacy rate. Plasma specimens from vaccine and placebo recipients were used in an extensive set of assays to identify correlates of HIV-1 infection risk. Of six primary variables that were studied, only one displayed a significant inverse correlation with risk of infection: the antibody (Ab) response to a fusion protein containing the V1 and V2 regions of gp120 (gp70-V1V2). This finding prompted a thorough examination of the results generated with the complete panel of 13 assays measuring various V2 Abs in the stored plasma used in the initial pilot studies and those used in the subsequent case-control study. The studies revealed that the ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX vaccine induced V2-specific Abs that cross-react with multiple HIV-1 subgroups and recognize both conformational and linear epitopes. The conformational epitope was present on gp70-V1V2, while the predominant linear V2 epitope mapped to residues 165-178, immediately N-terminal to the putative α4β7 binding motif in the mid-loop region of V2. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to compare the risk of infection with data from 12 V2 assays, and in 11 of these, the ORs were ≤1, reaching statistical significance for two of the variables: Ab responses to gp70-V1V2 and to overlapping V2 linear peptides. It remains to be determined whether anti-V2 Ab responses were directly responsible for the reduced infection rate in RV144 and whether anti-V2 Abs will prove to be important with other candidate HIV vaccines that show efficacy, however, the results support continued dissection of Ab responses to the V2 region which may illuminate mechanisms of protection from HIV-1 infection and may facilitate the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:23349725

  9. Analysis of V2 antibody responses induced in vaccinees in the ALVAC/AIDSVAX HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Zolla-Pazner

    Full Text Available The RV144 clinical trial of a prime/boost immunizing regimen using recombinant canary pox (ALVAC-HIV and two gp120 proteins (AIDSVAX B and E was previously shown to have a 31.2% efficacy rate. Plasma specimens from vaccine and placebo recipients were used in an extensive set of assays to identify correlates of HIV-1 infection risk. Of six primary variables that were studied, only one displayed a significant inverse correlation with risk of infection: the antibody (Ab response to a fusion protein containing the V1 and V2 regions of gp120 (gp70-V1V2. This finding prompted a thorough examination of the results generated with the complete panel of 13 assays measuring various V2 Abs in the stored plasma used in the initial pilot studies and those used in the subsequent case-control study. The studies revealed that the ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX vaccine induced V2-specific Abs that cross-react with multiple HIV-1 subgroups and recognize both conformational and linear epitopes. The conformational epitope was present on gp70-V1V2, while the predominant linear V2 epitope mapped to residues 165-178, immediately N-terminal to the putative α4β7 binding motif in the mid-loop region of V2. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated to compare the risk of infection with data from 12 V2 assays, and in 11 of these, the ORs were ≤1, reaching statistical significance for two of the variables: Ab responses to gp70-V1V2 and to overlapping V2 linear peptides. It remains to be determined whether anti-V2 Ab responses were directly responsible for the reduced infection rate in RV144 and whether anti-V2 Abs will prove to be important with other candidate HIV vaccines that show efficacy, however, the results support continued dissection of Ab responses to the V2 region which may illuminate mechanisms of protection from HIV-1 infection and may facilitate the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine.

  10. The relationship between RTS,S vaccine-induced antibodies, CD4⁺ T cell responses and protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T White

    Full Text Available Vaccination with the pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine RTS,S induces high levels of antibodies and CD4(+ T cells specific for the circumsporozoite protein (CSP. Using a biologically-motivated mathematical model of sporozoite infection fitted to data from malaria-naive adults vaccinated with RTS,S and subjected to experimental P. falciparum challenge, we characterised the relationship between antibodies, CD4(+ T cell responses and protection from infection. Both anti-CSP antibody titres and CSP-specific CD4(+ T cells were identified as immunological surrogates of protection, with RTS,S induced anti-CSP antibodies estimated to prevent 32% (95% confidence interval (CI 24%-41% of infections. The addition of RTS,S-induced CSP-specific CD4(+ T cells was estimated to increase vaccine efficacy against infection to 40% (95% CI, 34%-48%. This protective efficacy is estimated to result from a 96.1% (95% CI, 93.4%-97.8% reduction in the liver-to-blood parasite inoculum, indicating that in volunteers who developed P. falciparum infection, a small number of parasites (often the progeny of a single surviving sporozoite are responsible for breakthrough blood-stage infections.

  11. Antibody Response to Pneumocystis jirovecii

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Kieran R.; Huang, Laurence; Morris, Alison; Koch, Judy; Crothers, Kristina; Levin, Linda; Eiser, Shary; Satwah, Supriya; Zucchi, Patrizia; Walzer, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prospective pilot study of the serologic responses to overlapping recombinant fragments of the Pneumocystis jirovecii major surface glycoprotein (Msg) in HIV-infected patients with pneumonia due to P. jirovecii and other causes. Similar baseline geometric mean antibody levels to the fragments measured by an ELISA were found in both groups. Serum antibodies to MsgC in P. jirovecii patients rose to a peak level 3–4 weeks (p50 cells/μL and first episode of pneumocystosis were the ...

  12. Synonymous Deoptimization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Causes Attenuation In Vivo while Inducing a Strong Neutralizing Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Medina, Gisselle N.; Ramirez-Medina, Elizabeth; Velazquez-Salinas, Lauro; Koster, Marla; Grubman, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Codon bias deoptimization has been previously used to successfully attenuate human pathogens, including poliovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. We have applied a similar technology to deoptimize the capsid-coding region (P1) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite the introduction of 489 nucleotide changes (19%), synonymous deoptimization of the P1 region rendered a viable FMDV progeny. The resulting strain was stable and reached cell culture titers similar to those obtained for wild-type (WT) virus, but at reduced specific infectivity. Studies in mice showed that 100% of animals inoculated with the FMDV A12 P1 deoptimized mutant (A12-P1 deopt) survived, even when the animals were infected at doses 100 times higher than the dose required to cause death by WT virus. All mice inoculated with the A12-P1 deopt mutant developed a strong antibody response and were protected against subsequent lethal challenge with WT virus at 21 days postinoculation. Remarkably, the vaccine safety margin was at least 1,000-fold higher for A12-P1 deopt than for WT virus. Similar patterns of attenuation were observed in swine, in which animals inoculated with A12-P1 deopt virus did not develop clinical disease until doses reached 1,000 to 10,000 times the dose required to cause severe disease in 2 days with WT A12. Consistently, high levels of antibody titers were induced, even at the lowest dose tested. These results highlight the potential use of synonymous codon pair deoptimization as a strategy to safely attenuate FMDV and further develop live attenuated vaccine candidates to control such a feared livestock disease. IMPORTANCE Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is one of the most feared viral diseases that can affect livestock. Although this disease appeared to be contained in developed nations by the end of the last century, recent outbreaks in Europe, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, etc., have demonstrated that infection can spread rapidly, causing

  13. Novel Adenoviral Vector Induces T Cell Responses Despite Anti-Adenoviral Neutralizing Antibodies in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, Michael A; Chaudhry, Arvind; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S; Hobeika, Amy C.; Osada, Takuya; Clay, Timothy M.; Amalfitano, Andrea; Burnett, Bruce K.; Devi, Gayathri R.; Hsu, David S; Xu, Younong; Balcaitis, Stephanie; Dua, Rajesh; Nguyen, Susan; Balint, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    First generation, E1-deleted Adenovirus subtype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors, although promising platforms for use as cancer vaccines, are impeded in activity by naturally occurring or induced Ad-specific neutralizing antibodies. Ad5-based vectors with deletions of the E1 and the E2b regions (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]), the latter encoding the DNA polymerase and the pre-terminal protein, by virtue of diminished late phase viral protein expression, were hypothesized to avoid immunological clearance and induce ...

  14. A New Potent Route of DNA Vaccine Inoculation: DNA-Liposome Complexes on Bare Skin Induce Antigen-Special Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Duan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous immunization is a novel strategy for genetic vaccine immunization to induce detectable antigen-special antibody in humor and mucosal. In this study, plasmid expressing hepatitis B surface antigen (pGFP-HBsAg was encapsulated in liposome, then DNA- liposome complexes were glued on bare skin of mice ear in different dosage (50μg, 10μg and 1μg. As control, DNA- liposome complexes of pGFP-HBsAg and pGFP vector were inoculated intraperitoneally. The anti-HBsAg antibodies of serum were detected weekly by ELISA. It was found that the detectable antibodies of transcutaneous immunized mouse were elicited after four weeks, and reached a maximum at the sixth week. Even 1μg plasmid DNA in liposomes through immune skin can elicit the highest ELISA antibody titer (> 1:512 in test group, and corresponding percentage of positive response is up to 71% at sixth week, but higher amounts of plasmid DNA (50μg DNA per mice on immune skin cannot induce higher antibody levels. The result showed that DNA- liposome complexes glued on bare skin appear to be a novel method for the administration of DNA vaccines.

  15. Polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies mimicking the small cell lung carcinoma antigen cluster-5A interact with a panel of antibodies and induce specific immune response in animals.

    OpenAIRE

    Zwicky, C.; Stahel, R A; Jaksche, H.; Waibel, R.; Lehmann, H. P.; Loibner, H

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (ab2) were generated by immunising goats with the murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody SWA20 which recognises the SCLC antigen cluster-5A, a tumour-associated sialoglycoprotein. Ab2 was shown to bind specifically to antibody SWA20, but not to isotype matched control antibodies. Pre-incubation with ab2 completely inhibited target cell binding of antibody SWA20 and of four other antibodies to cluster-5A antigen, while no effect was seen with antibodies to cluste...

  16. Per-oral immunization with antigen-conjugated nanoparticles followed by sub-cutaneous boosting immunization induces long-lasting mucosal and systemic antibody responses in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E Howe

    Full Text Available Food or water-borne enteric pathogens invade their hosts via intestinal mucosal surfaces, thus developing effective oral vaccines would greatly reduce the burden of infectious diseases. The nature of the antigen, as well as the mode of its internalization in the intestinal mucosa affects the ensuing immune response. We show that model protein antigen ovalbumin (Ova given per-orally (p.o. induces oral tolerance (OT, characterized by systemic IgG1-dominated antibody response, which cannot be boosted by sub-cutaneous (s.c. immunization with Ova in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA. Intestinal IgA generated in response to Ova feeding diminished over time and was abrogated by s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA. Humoral response to Ova was altered by administering Ova conjugated to 20 nm nanoparticles (NP-Ova. P.o. administration of NP-Ova induced systemic IgG1/IgG2c, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. These responses were boosted by secondary s.c. immunization with Ova+CFA or p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. However, only in s.c.-boosted mice serum and mucosal antibody titers remained elevated for 6 months after priming. In contrast, s.c. priming with NP-Ova induced IgG1-dominated serum antibodies, but did not prime the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA, even after secondary p.o. immunization with NP-Ova. These results indicate that Ova conjugated to NPs reaches the internal milieu in an immunogenic form and that mucosal immunization with NP-Ova is necessary for induction of a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal IgA response. In addition, mucosal priming with NP-Ova, followed by s.c. boosting induces superior systemic and mucosal memory responses. These findings are important for the development of efficacious mucosal vaccines.

  17. Immunization with heat-inactivated Staphylococcus aureus induced an antibody response mediated by IgG1 and IgG2 in patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Romo, Gina Stella; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Misael; Donis-Hernandez, Felipe Raul; Zendejas-Buitron, Victor Manuel; Pedroza-Gonzalez, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Currently Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant pathogen isolated from the respiratory tract of patients with recurrent tonsillitis. Because of an increase in multi-drug resistant strains of S. aureus, there is a pressing need for effective treatments and preventive approaches to reduce the risk of invasive and life-threatening infections. A preventive vaccine against S. aureus would have a tremendous clinical impact. However, multiple clinical trials have failed to identify an agent that can induce protective responses. Most trials have been based on subunit vaccines using one or a few purified antigens, which may not be enough to confer protection. Here, the impact of a whole-cell vaccine comprised of heat-inactivated S. aureus was investigated in patients with RT. The vaccine was well tolerated and had no significant local or systemic reactions. Immunization with heat-inactivated S. aureus elicited a significant antibody response characterized by production of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies and, to a lesser extent, of IgA antibodies. Notably, this response was associated with an important decrease in the incidence of tonsillitis and bacterial colonization of the oropharyngeal mucosa. Our results show that whole-cell inactivated S. aureus is safe and capable of evoking specific antibody responses in patients with recurrent tonsillitis. PMID:25648612

  18. Antibody response is required for protection from Theiler's virus-induced encephalitis in C57BL/6 mice in the absence of CD8+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracerebral infection of susceptible mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces immune-mediated demyelinating disease and this system serves as a relevant infectious model for human multiple sclerosis. It was previously shown that β2M-deficient C57BL/6 mice lacking functional CD8+ T cells display increased viral persistence and enhanced susceptibility to TMEV-induced demyelination, and yet the majority of mice are free of clinical signs. To understand the mechanisms involved in this general resistance of C57BL/6 mice in the absence of CTL responses, mice (μMT) deficient in the B-cell compartment lacking membrane IgM molecules were treated with anti-CD8 antibody and then infected with TMEV. Although little difference in the proliferative responses of peripheral T cells to UV-inactivated TMEV and the resistance to demyelinating disease was observed between virus-infected μMT and control B6 mice, the levels of CD4+ T cells were higher in the CNS of μMT mice. However, after treatment with anti-CD8 antibody, 100% of the mice displayed clinical gray matter disease and prolonged viral persistence in μMT mice, while only 10% of B6 mice showed clinical symptoms and very low viral persistence. Transfusion of sera from TMEV-infected B6 mice into anti-CD8 antibody-treated μMT mice partially restored resistance to virus-induced encephalitis. These results indicate that the early anti-viral antibody response is also important in the protection from TMEV-induced encephalitis particularly in the absence of CD8+ T cells

  19. A multi-subunit Chlamydia vaccine inducing neutralizing antibodies and strong IFN-γ(+) CMI responses protects against a genital infection in minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Sarah; Olsen, Anja Weinreich; Erneholm, Karin; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Jungersen, Gregers; Andersen, Peter; Follmann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia is the most widespread sexually transmitted bacterial disease and a prophylactic vaccine is highly needed. Ideally, this vaccine is required to induce a combined response of Th1 cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in concert with neutralizing antibodies. Using a novel Göttingen minipig......F infectivity in vitro. Both Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 and UV-SvD/CAF01 vaccination protected pigs against a vaginal C. trachomatis SvD infection. In conclusion, the Hirep1+CTH93/CAF01 vaccine proved highly immunogenic and equally protective as UV-SvD/CAF01 showing promise for the development of a subunit vaccine...

  20. Vaccination of dogs with canine parvovirus type 2b (CPV-2b) induces neutralising antibody responses to CPV-2a and CPV-2c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Illambas, Joanna; Siedek, Elisabeth; Stirling, Catrina; Thomas, Anne; Plevová, Edita; Sture, Gordon; Salt, Jeremy

    2014-09-22

    Since the identification of canine parvovirus type 2, three variants have subsequently been observed differing from the historical CPV-2 and each other by 1-2 amino acids only. As a result there has been considerable research into differential diagnostics, with some researchers indicating there is a need for new vaccines containing different strains of CPV-2. In this study we investigated whether vaccination with a CPV-2b containing vaccine would induce cross-reactive antibody responses to the other CPV-2 variants. Two studies where dogs were vaccinated with a multivalent vaccine, subsequently challenged with CPV-2b and sera samples analysed are presented. Six week old pups with defined serological status were vaccinated twice, three weeks apart and challenged either 5 weeks (MDA override study) or one year after vaccination (duration of immunity study). Sera samples were collected before each vaccination and at periods throughout each study. In each study the antibody profiles were very similar; serological responses against CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c were higher than those for CPV-2. Nevertheless, responses against CPV-2 were well above levels considered clinically protective. In each study dogs also showed a rapid increase in antibody titres following vaccination, reached a plateau following second vaccination with a slight decline to challenge after which rapid anamnestic responses were seen. Evaluation of the serological responses suggests vaccination with CPV-2b would cross-protect against CPV-2a and CPV-2c, as well as against CPV-2 which is now extinct in the field. In conclusion we have demonstrated that vaccination of minimum aged dogs with a multivalent vaccine containing the CPV-2b variant strain will induce serological responses which are cross-reactive against all currently circulating field strains, CPV-2a and CPV-2c, and the now extinct field strain CPV-2. PMID:25148778

  1. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thrombocytopenia Platelet Factor 4 Antibody Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Platelet Count , Serotonin Release Assay, Heparin-induced Platelet Aggregation All content on Lab Tests Online has been ...

  2. A bivalent virus-like particle based vaccine induces a balanced antibody response against both enterovirus 71 and norovirus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Ku, Zhiqiang; Dai, Wenlong; Chen, Tan; Ye, Xiaohua; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yingyi; Liu, Qingwei; Jin, Xia; Huang, Zhong

    2015-10-26

    Noroviruses are the main cause of severe viral gastroenteritis, which results in estimated 200,000 deaths each year, primarily in children in the developing world. Genogroup II.4 (GII.4) strains are responsible for the majority of norovirus outbreaks. Enterovirus 71 (EV71), the leading causative agent of hand, foot and mouth disease, has recently been prevalent in Asia-Pacific regions, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in young children. However, no vaccine is commercially available for either norovirus GII.4 or EV71. Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from either GII.4 or EV71 have been shown to be promising monovalent vaccine candidates. In this study, we investigate the possibility to formulate a VLP-based bivalent vaccine for both norovirus GII.4 and EV71. The GII.4- and EV71-VLPs were produced in a baculovirus-insect cell expression system. A bivalent combination vaccine comprised of GII.4 and EV71 VLPs was formulated and compared with monovalent GII.4- and EV71-VLPs for their immunogenicity in mice. We found that the bivalent vaccine elicited durable antibody responses toward both GII.4 and EV71, and the antibody titers were comparable to that induced by the monovalent vaccines, indicating there is no immunological interference between the two antigens in the combination vaccine. More significantly, the bivalent vaccine-immunized mouse sera could efficiently neutralize EV71 infection and block GII.4-VLP binding to mucin. Together, our results demonstrate that the experimental combination vaccine comprised of GII.4 and EV71-VLPs is able to induce a balanced protective antibody response, and therefore strongly support further preclinical and clinical development of such a bivalent VLP vaccine targeting both norovirus GII.4 and EV71. PMID:26424606

  3. Humoral immune responses induced by anti-idiotypic antibody fusion protein of 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF in BALB/c mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background We have previously developed and characterized a monoclonal anti-idiotype antibody, designated 6B11, which mimics an ovarian carcinoma associated antigen OC166-9 and whose corresponding monoclonal antibody is COC166-9 (Ab1). In this study, we evaluate the humoral immune responses induced by the fusion protein 6B11 single-chain variable fragment (scFv)/human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) and 6B11scFv in BALB/c mice. Methods The fusion protein 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF was constructed by fusing a recombinant single-chain variable fragment of 6B11scFv to GM-CSF. BALB/c mice were administrated by 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF and 6B11scFv, respectively. Results The fusion protein 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF retained binding to the anti-mouse F(ab)2' and was also biologically active as measured by proliferation of human GM-CSF dependent cell TF1 in vitro. After immunization with the 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF and 6B11ScFv, BALB/c mice showed significantly enhanced Ab3 antibody responses to 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF compared with the 6B11scFv alone. The level of Ab3 was the highest after the first week and maintained for five weeks after the last immunization. Another booster was given when the Ab3 titer descended, and it would reach to the high level in a week. Conclusion The fusion protein 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF can induce humoral immunity against ovarian carcinoma in vivo. We also provide the theoretical foundation for the application of the fusion protein 6B11scFv/hGM-CSF for active immunotherapy of ovarian cancer.

  4. Salmonella typhi Ty21a bacterial ghost vector augments HIV-1 gp140 DNA vaccine-induced peripheral and mucosal antibody responses via TLR4 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jing; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Guangyu; Tong, Shuang; Yu, Hong; Jin, Xia; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2012-08-24

    Because of their stability and ease of manipulation, DNA vaccines have considerable potential for eliciting immune responses. However, they are limited by their weak immunogenicity, especially in humans. To address this challenge, we explored a new strategy of HIV vaccine delivery using Salmonella typhi Ty21a bacterial ghosts (BGs). We found that Ty21a BGs loaded with an HIV gp140 DNA vaccine (Ty21a BG-DNA) were readily taken up by murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, and gp140 was efficiently expressed in these cells. Peripheral and intestinal mucosal anti-gp120 antibody responses in mice vaccinated with BGs-DNA vaccine were significantly higher than those in mice immunized with naked DNA vaccine. The enhancement of antibody responses was associated with BG-induced production of IL-10 through TLR4 pathway. These results demonstrate that Ty21a BGs is a novel and effective delivery vehicle for DNA vaccines, which could therefore be used as a new strategy for development of HIV vaccines. PMID:22819719

  5. Vaccine-induced plasmablast responses in rhesus macaques: phenotypic characterization and a source for generating antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; Kasturi, Sudhir P.; Kovalenkov, Yevgeniy; Ur Rasheed, Ata; Yeiser, Patryce; Jinnah, Zarpheen S.; Legere, Traci H.; Pulendran, Bali; Villinger, Francois; Wrammert, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Over 100 broadly neutralizing antibodies have been isolated from a minority of HIV infected patients, but the steps leading to the selection of plasmacells producing such antibodies remain incompletely understood, hampering the development of vaccines able to elicit them. Rhesus macaques have become a preferred animal model system used to study SIV/HIV, for the characterization and development of novel therapeutics and vaccines as well as to understand pathogenesis. However, most of our knowl...

  6. Qualification and application of a surface plasmon resonance-based assay for monitoring potential HAHA responses induced after passive administration of a humanized anti Lewis-Y antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolar, O H J; Stranner, S; Zinoecker, I; Mudde, G C; Himmler, G; Waxenecker, G; Nechansky, A

    2006-06-16

    A sensitive, surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based assay monitoring potential human-anti-human antibody (HAHA) reactions against the monoclonal antibody (mAb) IGN311 is presented. The latter is a fully humanized Lewis-Y carbohydrate specific mAb that is currently tested in a passive immune therapy approach in a clinical phase I trial. For the SPR experiments a BIACORE 3000 analyzer was used. The ligand IGN311 was covalently coupled to the carboxy-methylated dextran matrix of a CM5 research grade chip (BIACORE). In the course of a fully nested experimental design, a four parameter logistic equation was identified as appropriate calibration model ranging from 0.3 microg/mL (lower limit of quantitation, LLOQ) to 200 microg/mL (upper limit of quantitation, ULOQ) using an anti-idiotypic mAb ('HAHA mimic') as calibrator. The bias ranged from -2.4% to 5.5% and the intermediate precision expressed as 95% CI revealed values from 5.6% to 8.3%. Specificity was evaluated using six human serum matrices from healthy donors spiked with calibrator at the limit of quantitation (LOQ) with >80% of values being recovered with less than 25% relative error. The qualified assay was applied to monitor potentially induced HAHA reactivity in 11 patients from a clinical phase I trial with passively administered IGN311. Of the 11 patients, one high HAHA responder and several low responders were identified. Protein-G depletion experiments with human serum samples revealed that the observed response is predominantly caused by IgG binding to the ligand. The characteristics of these HAHA responses were all of the so-called 'Type I' which is defined by a peak response around day 15 that decreases from this point steadily suggesting that some kind of tolerance is established. Therefore, this type of HAHA response is regarded as non critical for the patient's safety. PMID:16644171

  7. Egg yolk IgY: protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, C; Bok, M; Chacana, P; Saif, L; Fernandez, F; Parreño, V

    2011-08-15

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. All calves in groups Gp 1, 2 and 3 received control colostrum (CC; BRV virus neutralization Ab titer - VN=65,536; ELISA BRV IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure. After gut closure, calves received milk supplemented with 6% BRV-immune egg yolk [(Gp 1) VN=2048; ELISA IgY Ab titer=4096] or non-immune control egg yolk [(Gp 2) VNcolostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4, respectively). Calves were inoculated with 10(5.85)focus forming units (FFU) of virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Control calves (Gp 3 and 4) and calves fed control IgY (Gp 2) were infected and developed severe diarrhea. Around 80% calves in Gp 1 (IgY 4096) were infected, but they showed 80% (4/5) protection against BRV diarrhea. Bovine RV-specific IgY Ab were detected in the feces of calves in Gp 1, indicating that avian antibodies (Abs) remained intact after passage through the gastrointestinal tract. At post infection day 21, the duodenum was the major site of BRV specific antibody secreting cells (ASC) in all experimental groups. Mucosal ASC responses of all isotypes were significantly higher in the IgY treated groups, independently of the specificity of the treatment, indicating that egg yolk components modulated the immune response against BRV infection at the mucosal level. These results indicate that supplementing newborn calves' diets for the first 14 days of life with egg yolk enriched in BRV-specific IgY represents a promising strategy to prevent BRV

  8. In vivo effects of monoclonal anti-L3T4 antibody on immune responsiveness of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Reduction of irradiated cercariae-induced resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, E.A.; Colley, D.G.

    1988-04-15

    Mice can be partially protected against challenge infections of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae by either single or multiple exposure to irradiated cercariae (x-cerc). The participation of L3T4+ lymphocytes on this resistance phenomenon was evaluated by selectively depleting this cell population through in vivo administration of mAb anti-L3T4 at three different times in relationship to the challenge infections. Treatment with anti-L3T4 before challenge such that depletion was effective during the time of cercarial skin penetration and dermal/s.c. residence significantly reduced the level of resistance induced by x-cerc sensitization. When treatment was delayed until after challenge, depletion of L3T4+ cells coincided with either the lung or post-lung/liver phases of schistosomular migration, and normal levels of x-cerc-induced resistance were induced. In contrast to once-immunized mice, mice hyperimmunized by five exposures to x-cerc and then depleted of L3T4+ cells at the time of challenge still expressed resistance to the challenge. These data suggest that when mice are sensitized only once with x-cerc the challenge infection provides a necessary immunologic boost which requires L3T4+ cells for effective expression of resistance. The requirement for this anamnestic effect by the challenge infection can be circumvented by hyperimmunization. Evaluation of the immune response of one-time sensitized or hyperimmunized mice demonstrated that cellular Ag-specific proliferative responses and mitogen-induced lymphokine production were abrogated after any of the various in vivo regimens of anti-L3T4 antibody. In contrast, immunoblot analysis of humoral responsiveness revealed a correlation between the expression of resistance and the ability of sera from immunized and anti-L3T4 treated mice to recognize a 75-kDa parasite antigenic component.

  9. In vivo effects of monoclonal anti-L3T4 antibody on immune responsiveness of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Reduction of irradiated cercariae-induced resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice can be partially protected against challenge infections of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae by either single or multiple exposure to irradiated cercariae (x-cerc). The participation of L3T4+ lymphocytes on this resistance phenomenon was evaluated by selectively depleting this cell population through in vivo administration of mAb anti-L3T4 at three different times in relationship to the challenge infections. Treatment with anti-L3T4 before challenge such that depletion was effective during the time of cercarial skin penetration and dermal/s.c. residence significantly reduced the level of resistance induced by x-cerc sensitization. When treatment was delayed until after challenge, depletion of L3T4+ cells coincided with either the lung or post-lung/liver phases of schistosomular migration, and normal levels of x-cerc-induced resistance were induced. In contrast to once-immunized mice, mice hyperimmunized by five exposures to x-cerc and then depleted of L3T4+ cells at the time of challenge still expressed resistance to the challenge. These data suggest that when mice are sensitized only once with x-cerc the challenge infection provides a necessary immunologic boost which requires L3T4+ cells for effective expression of resistance. The requirement for this anamnestic effect by the challenge infection can be circumvented by hyperimmunization. Evaluation of the immune response of one-time sensitized or hyperimmunized mice demonstrated that cellular Ag-specific proliferative responses and mitogen-induced lymphokine production were abrogated after any of the various in vivo regimens of anti-L3T4 antibody. In contrast, immunoblot analysis of humoral responsiveness revealed a correlation between the expression of resistance and the ability of sera from immunized and anti-L3T4 treated mice to recognize a 75-kDa parasite antigenic component

  10. Class specific antibody response to gonococcal infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Miettinen, A; Hakkarainen, K; Grönroos, P; Heinonen, P.; Teisala, K; Aine, R; Sillantaka, I; Saarenmaa, K; Lehtinen, M; Punnonen, R

    1989-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay was used to determine IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies to gonococcal pili in 68 patients with uncomplicated gonorrhoea, 35 women with pelvic inflammatory disease, and in 115 normal controls. A clear difference in response rate in all three antibody classes between patients with gonorrhoea and healthy controls was evident. Among women with gonorrhoea, the magnitude of antibody response was higher than among men with gonorrhoea, especially in the IgM class. No major difference...

  11. Protection induced by Plasmodium falciparum MSP1(42 is strain-specific, antigen and adjuvant dependent, and correlates with antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Lyon

    Full Text Available Vaccination with Plasmodium falciparum MSP1(42/complete Freund's adjuvant (FA followed by MSP1(42/incomplete FA is the only known regimen that protects Aotus nancymaae monkeys against infection by erythrocytic stage malaria parasites. The role of adjuvant is not defined; however complete FA cannot be used in humans. In rodent models, immunity is strain-specific. We vaccinated Aotus monkeys with the FVO or 3D7 alleles of MSP1(42 expressed in Escherichia coli or with the FVO allele expressed in baculovirus (bv combined with complete and incomplete FA, Montanide ISA-720 (ISA-720 or AS02A. Challenge with FVO strain P. falciparum showed that suppression of cumulative day 11 parasitemia was strain-specific and could be induced by E. coli expressed MSP1(42 in combination with FA or ISA-720 but not with AS02A. The coli42-FVO antigen induced a stronger protective effect than the bv42-FVO antigen, and FA induced a stronger protective effect than ISA-720. ELISA antibody (Ab responses at day of challenge (DOC were strain-specific and correlated inversely with c-day 11 parasitemia (r = -0.843. ELISA Ab levels at DOC meeting a titer of at least 115,000 ELISA Ab units identified the vaccinees not requiring treatment (noTx with a true positive rate of 83.3% and false positive rate of 14.3 %. Correlation between functional growth inhibitory Ab levels (GIA and cumulative day 11 parasitemia was weaker (r = -0.511, and was not as predictive for a response of noTx. The lowest false positive rate for GIA was 30% when requiring a true positive rate of 83.3%. These inhibition results along with those showing that antigen/FA combinations induced a stronger protective immunity than antigen/ISA-720 or antigen/AS02 combinations are consistent with protection as ascribed to MSP1-specific cytophilic antibodies. Development of an effective MSP1(42 vaccine against erythrocytic stage P. falciparum infection will depend not only on antigen quality, but also upon the selection of

  12. Antibody responses to recombinant and plasma derived hepatitis B vaccines.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, S E; Stanley, C.; Howard, C. R.; Zuckerman, A J; Steward, M W

    1986-01-01

    The antibody response to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) induced in 25 recipients of a recombinant hepatitis B vaccine derived from yeast was compared with that induced in 25 recipients of a vaccine prepared from hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) derived from plasma. Anti-HBs affinity and specificity were compared using assays of antibody affinity with two different antigens, a complex of the major polypeptide of HBsAg (p25; molecular weight 25 000 daltons) covalently linked to its g...

  13. Antibody and B cell responses to Plasmodium sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna N Dups

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are capable of blocking infection of the liver by Plasmodium sporozoites. Accordingly the induction of anti-sporozoite antibodies is a major aim of various vaccine approaches to malaria. In recent years our knowledge of the specificity and quantities of antibodies required for protection has been greatly expanded by clinical trials of various whole sporozoite and subunit vaccines. Moreover, the development of humanized mouse models and transgenic parasites have also aided our ability to assess the specificity of antibodies and their ability to block infection. Nonetheless, considerable gaps remain in our knowledge - in particular in understanding what antigens are recognized by infection blocking antibodies and in knowing how we can induce robust, long-lived antibody responses. Maintaining high levels of circulating antibodies is likely to be of primary importance, as antibodies must block infection in the short time it takes for sporozoites to reach the liver from the skin. It is clear that a better understanding of the development of protective B cell-mediated immunity will aid the development and refinement of malaria vaccines.

  14. Sperm Cells Induce Distinct Cytokine Response in Peripheral Mononuclear Cells from Infertile Women with Serum Anti-Sperm Antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kverka, Miloslav; Ulčová-Gallová, Z.; Bártová, J.; Cibulka, J.; Bibková, K.; Mičanová, Z.; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2012), e44172. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : IMMUNE-RESPONSES * GROWTH-FACTOR * ENDOMETRIOSIS Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  15. The single-chain anti-TNF-α antibody DLX105 induces clinical and biomarker responses upon local administration in patients with chronic plaque-type psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsianakas, Athanasios; Brunner, Patrick M; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Berger, Claudia; Loser, Karin; Röcken, Martin; Stingl, Georg; Luger, Thomas; Jung, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    It is not clear whether TNF-α antagonists used in the treatment of psoriasis need to act systemically, or whether local inhibition of skin-produced TNF-α would be sufficient to silence skin inflammation. To answer this question, we conducted two multicentre, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials with the novel single-chain anti-TNF-α-PENTRA(®) -antibody DLX105. Upon intra-dermal injection, DLX105 induced a mean local PASI decrease of 33% over baseline after 2 weeks of treatment, while the placebo response was only 12% (P = 0.001). The clinical response was accompanied by changes in biomarkers such as reductions in K16, Ki67 and epidermal thickness as well as decreased mRNA levels of IL-17, TNF-α, IL-23p19, IL-12p40 and IFN-γ. Next, we applied the drug topically twice daily in a 0.5% hydrogel formulation. While the local PASI did not change, topical DLX105 mediated significant reductions of mRNA levels of key proinflammatory cytokines when compared to placebo, and this effect was further enhanced after weekly tape stripping of plaques to increase drug penetration. These results suggest that longer treatment periods and/or increased local drug concentrations might result in better therapeutic efficacy of topically applied DLX105. In sum, we can show for the first time that local inhibition of TNF-α is sufficient to mediate a biological response in psoriasis that translates into clinical efficacy. PMID:26738450

  16. An amino-terminal segment of hantavirus nucleocapsid protein presented on hepatitis B virus core particles induces a strong and highly cross-reactive antibody response in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we have demonstrated that hepatitis B virus (HBV) core particles tolerate the insertion of the amino-terminal 120 amino acids (aa) of the Puumala hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein. Here, we demonstrate that the insertion of 120 amino-terminal aa of N proteins from highly virulent Dobrava and Hantaan hantaviruses allows the formation of chimeric core particles. These particles expose the inserted foreign protein segments, at least in part, on their surface. Analysis by electron cryomicroscopy of chimeric particles harbouring the Puumala virus (PUUV) N segment revealed 90% T = 3 and 10% T = 4 shells. A map computed from T = 3 shells shows additional density splaying out from the tips of the spikes producing the effect of an extra shell of density at an outer radius compared with wild-type shells. The inserted Puumala virus N protein segment is flexibly linked to the core spikes and only partially icosahedrally ordered. Immunisation of mice of two different haplotypes (BALB/c and C57BL/6) with chimeric core particles induces a high-titered and highly cross-reactive N-specific antibody response in both mice strains

  17. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy. PMID:26808665

  18. Mucosal Immunization Induces a Higher Level of Lasting Neutralizing Antibody Response in Mice by a Replication-Competent Smallpox Vaccine: Vaccinia Tiantan Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Lu; Wenbo Yu; Xiaoxing Huang; Haibo Wang; Li Liu; Zhiwei Chen

    2011-01-01

    The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes ...

  19. Antibody responses induced by recombinant ALV-A gp85 protein vaccine combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant in breeder hens and the protection for their offspring against early infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Li, Hongmei; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Sun, Shuhong; Cheng, Ziqiang; Liu, Jianzhu; Zhao, Peng; Ren, Qingya; Guo, Huijun

    2015-04-01

    To observe the antibody responses induced by recombinant A subgroup avian leukosis virus (ALV-A) gp85 protein vaccine plus CpG-ODN adjuvant and the protection of maternal antibodies (MAbs) for the hatched chickens against early infection, the gp85 gene was amplified from the proviral cDNA of ALV-A-SDAU09C1 strain using PCR and the recombinant plasmid containing target gene was constructed and expressed in EscherichiaColi. The expressed product was confirmed using SDS-PAGE and western blot that it is about 46KD of recombinant protein. The purified recombinant proteins combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant or Freund's adjuvant were inoculated into the breeder hens, the ALV-A antibodies in serum and in egg-yolk were detected; the fertilized eggs from the vaccinated hens with different titers of egg-yolk antibody were hatched and then challenged with 10(4.2)/0.1mL TCID50 of ALV-A-SDAU09C1 strain, all the hatched chickens were weekly detected for the viremias and the cloacal swab P27 antigen and pathological lesions; the neutralizing test of antisera in vitro was conducted. The results showed that the recombinant gp85 proteins combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant could induce the breeder hens to produce better antibody responses than gp85 protein with Freund's adjuvant or without adjuvant; the MAbs with higher titers induced by CpG-ODN+gp85 proteins could obviously decrease the ratios of viremias (13% vs 33%), cloacal detoxification (20% vs 67%) and death (0% vs 22%) caused by ALV-A infection than those by gp85 protein without adjuvant. The results of the neutralizing test indicated that the antisera from the hatched chickens could neutralize the ALV-A-SDAU09C1 strain in vitro, but which depends on the antibody titers. The results of IFA confirmed that the serum antibody could combine with the ALV in DF1 cells. It can be concluded that the prepared ALV-A gp85 subunit vaccine combining with CpG-ODN adjuvant could induce the breeder hens to produce better neutralizing antibody

  20. Anti-survivin antibody responses in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikas, Vaios; Khalil, Sanaa; Kerenidi, Theodora; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Germenis, Anastasios E

    2009-09-18

    Existing evidence regarding spontaneous anti-survivin humoral responses in lung cancer is inconclusive. Moreover, despite that cancer cell death elicited by radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents seems to be immunogenic, information about the possible effect of treatment on these responses, is lacking. Serum samples from 33 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 117 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients upon diagnosis, and from 100 controls, were tested by ELISA for anti-survivin antibodies. Cutoff was set to the mean+2SD of controls. 7.7% of NSCLC, none of the SCLC patients and 2% of the controls appeared with elevated antibody levels (OR 3.6, 95% CI 0.7-17.3 for NSCLC, OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.03-12.6 for SCLC). Measurement of antibodies in 76 NSCLC patients post therapies and during their follow-up, revealed that in 12 NSCLC patients the antibody levels increased up to 2-38 times, and in seven others, they decreased by 2-8 times. No significant correlation was uncovered between either the antibody levels upon diagnosis or their changes post therapies and during follow-up, and any clinicopathological parameter, their response to therapy and survival. Survivin does not induce considerable humoral responses in lung cancer. Potentially, however, strong anti-survivin antibody responses can be elicited during the post therapy and follow-up of the patients, whose clinical significance remains to be elucidated. These findings, together with our previous data concerning survivin expression and the related cytolytic T cell responses in lung cancer, signify a high tolerogenic potential of this tumor-associated antigen. PMID:19380192

  1. Aerosolized measles and measles-rubella vaccines induce better measles antibody booster responses than injected vaccines: randomized trials in Mexican schoolchildren.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett John V.; Fernandez de Castro Jorge; Valdespino-Gomez Jose Luis; Garcia-Garcia Ma de Lourdes; Islas-Romero Rocio; Echaniz-Aviles Gabriela; Jimenez-Corona Aida; Sepulveda-Amor Jaime

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare antibody responses and side-effects of aerosolized and injected measles vaccines after revaccination of children enrolling in elementary schools. METHODS: Vaccines for measles (Edmonston-Zagreb) or measles-rubella (Edmonston-Zagreb with RA27/3) were given by aerosol or injection to four groups of children. An additional group received Schwarz measles vaccine by injection. These five groups received vaccines in usual standard titre doses. A sixth group received only 1000 ...

  2. Antibody responses induced by Japanese whole inactivated vaccines against equine influenza virus (H3N8) belonging to Florida sublineage clade2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Takashi; Bannai, Hiroshi; Nemoto, Manabu; Tsujimura, Koji; Kondo, Takashi; Matsumura, Tomio

    2011-04-01

    In 2010, the World Organisation for Animal Health recommended the inclusion of a Florida sublineage clade2 strain of equine influenza virus (H3N8), which is represented by A/equine/Richmond/1/07 (Richmond07), in equine influenza vaccines. Here, we evaluate the antigenic differences between Japanese vaccine strains and Richmond07 by performing hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Ferret antiserum raised to A/equine/La Plata/93 (La Plata93), which is a Japanese vaccine strain, reacted with Richmond07 at a similar titer to La Plata93. Moreover, two hundred racehorses exhibited similar geometric mean HI antibody titers against La Plata93 and Richmond07 (73.1 and 80.8, respectively). Therefore, we can expect the antibody induced by the current Japanese vaccines to provide some protection against Richmond07-like viruses. PMID:21099188

  3. Influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccination by a skin targeted, dry coated, densely packed microprojection array (Nanopatch) induces potent antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Germain J P; Zhang, Jin; Ng, Hwee-Ing; Haigh, Oscar L; Yukiko, Sally R; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-09-10

    DNA vaccines have many advantages such as thermostability and the ease and rapidity of manufacture; for example, in an influenza pandemic situation where rapid production of vaccine is essential. However, immunogenicity of DNA vaccines was shown to be poor in humans unless large doses of DNA are used. If a highly efficacious DNA vaccine delivery system could be identified, then DNA vaccines have the potential to displace protein vaccines. In this study, we show in a C57BL/6 mouse model, that the Nanopatch, a microprojection array of high density (>21,000 projections/cm(2)), could be used to deliver influenza nucleoprotein DNA vaccine to skin, to generate enhanced antigen specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses compared to the conventional intramuscular (IM) delivery by the needle and syringe. Antigen specific antibody was measured using ELISA assays of mice vaccinated with a DNA plasmid containing the nucleoprotein gene of influenza type A/WSN/33 (H1N1). Antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses were measured ex-vivo in splenocytes of mice using IFN-γ ELISPOT assays. These results and our previous antibody and CD4(+) T cell results using the Nanopatch delivered HSV DNA vaccine indicate that the Nanopatch is an effective delivery system of general utility that could potentially be used in humans to increase the potency of the DNA vaccines. PMID:27381247

  4. Mucosal Immunization Induces a Higher Level of Lasting Neutralizing Antibody Response in Mice by a Replication-Competent Smallpox Vaccine: Vaccinia Tiantan Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible bioterrorism threat using the variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, has promoted us to further investigate the immunogenicity profiles of existing vaccines. Here, we study for the first time the immunogenicity profile of a replication-competent smallpox vaccine (vaccinia Tiantan, VTT strain for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs through mucosal vaccination, which is noninvasive and has a critical implication for massive vaccination programs. Four different routes of vaccination were tested in parallel including intramuscular (i.m., intranasal (i.n., oral (i.o., and subcutaneous (s.c. inoculations in mice. We found that one time vaccination with an optimal dose of VTT was able to induce anti-VTT Nabs via each of the four routes. Higher levels of antiviral Nabs, however, were induced via the i.n. and i.o. inoculations when compared with the i.m. and s.c. routes. Moreover, the i.n. and i.o. vaccinations also induced higher sustained levels of Nabs overtime, which conferred better protections against homologous or alternating mucosal routes of viral challenges six months post vaccination. The VTT-induced immunity via all four routes, however, was partially effective against the intramuscular viral challenge. Our data have implications for understanding the potential application of mucosal smallpox vaccination and for developing VTT-based vaccines to overcome preexisting antivaccinia immunity.

  5. Serum Antibody Response to Clostridium botulinum Toxin in Infant Botulism

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, Lorry G.; Dezfulian, Manuchehr; Yolken, Robert H.

    1982-01-01

    A serum antibody response has not been previously demonstrated after infection with Clostridium botulinum. We developed an enzyme immunoassay for measuring serum antibody to C. botulinum toxins A, B, and E. This assay system detected a specific immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibody response to C. botulinum toxin in two patients with infant botulism.

  6. Radiosensitivity of antibody responses and radioresistant secondary tetanus antitoxin responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were increasingly repressed in mice when gamma radiation doses of 100 to 400 rads were delivered by whole-body exposure prior to immunization with fluid tetanus toxoid (FTT). Nearly normal secondary antitoxin responses were obtained in mice exposed to 600 rads of gamma radiation 4 days after secondary antigenic stimulation with FTT. A rapid transition from radiosensitivity of the antibody-forming system on days 1 to 3 was followed by relative radioresistance on day 4 after the booster injection of toxoid. Studies on lymphoid cellular kinetics in popliteal lymph nodes after injection of 3H--thymidine (3H--TdR) and incorporation of 3H--L-histidine into circulating antitoxin were carried out. Analysis of tritium radioactivity in antigen--antibody precipitates of serums 2 hr after injection of the labeled amino acid revealed maximum incorporation into antibody around day 7 after the booster in nonirradiated controls and about day 12, i.e., 8 days after irradiation, in experimental mice. The shift from radiosensitivity to relative radioresistance was attributed to a marked peak of plasma-cell proliferation in the medulla of lymph nodes on day 3. Many medullary plasma cells survived and continued to proliferate after exposure to radiation. Germinal centers were destroyed by radiation within 1 day. Since antibody formation continued after exposure to radiation and after the loss of germinal centers, this supports the view that germinal-center cells were involved more in the generation of memory cells than in antibody synthesis

  7. Porcine humoral immune responses to multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren; Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Eriksen, L.

    cognate antigen in the pigs were used. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to quantitate the circulating m-mAbs, as well as the induced pig anti-mouse antibodies (PAMA), in serum samples from m-mAb-treated pigs. As expected, we generally saw vigorous PAMA responses within 10 days aft er......In humans and cattle, multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies (m-mAbs) induce anti-mouse antibody responses. The objectives of the present. study were to investigate whether a similar response could be seen when pigs were subjected to m-mAb therapy, and to study the kinetics of such a...

  8. Antiplatelet antibodies in oxaliplatin-induced immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Michael J; Curtis, Brian R; McCrae, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Lesson Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia may be potentially fatal; here we report the development of severe thrombocytopenia with strong oxaliplatin-dependent antiplatelet antibodies. PMID:25057402

  9. Antibody Response and Disease Severity in Healthcare Worker MERS Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshukairi, Abeer N; Khalid, Imran; Ahmed, Waleed A; Dada, Ashraf M; Bayumi, Daniyah T; Malic, Laut S; Althawadi, Sahar; Ignacio, Kim; Alsalmi, Hanadi S; Al-Abdely, Hail M; Wali, Ghassan Y; Qushmaq, Ismael A; Alraddadi, Basem M; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-06-01

    We studied antibody response in 9 healthcare workers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, who survived Middle East respiratory syndrome, by using serial ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay testing. Among patients who had experienced severe pneumonia, antibody was detected for >18 months after infection. Antibody longevity was more variable in patients who had experienced milder disease. PMID:27192543

  10. Antibody Response and Disease Severity in Healthcare Worker MERS Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Imran; Ahmed, Waleed A.; Dada, Ashraf M.; Bayumi, Daniyah T.; Malic, Laut S.; Althawadi, Sahar; Ignacio, Kim; Alsalmi, Hanadi S.; Al-Abdely, Hail M.; Wali, Ghassan Y.; Qushmaq, Ismael A.; Alraddadi, Basem M.; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    We studied antibody response in 9 healthcare workers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, who survived Middle East respiratory syndrome, by using serial ELISA and indirect immunofluorescence assay testing. Among patients who had experienced severe pneumonia, antibody was detected for >18 months after infection. Antibody longevity was more variable in patients who had experienced milder disease. PMID:27192543

  11. Antibody responses in allogeneic radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras, free of graft-versus-host disease, has been achieved using serologic elimination of Thy 1+ cells from donor bone marrow. Humoral immune function was not restored in these animals as evidenced by lack of primary antibody responses to a T cell-dependent antigen, namely, sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) both in vivo and in vitro. No evidence for a suppressor cell-mediated mechanism was found. Using separated chimera spleen cell populations and specific helper cell soluble mediators, the functional capabilities of chimera B cells, T cells, and macrophages were assessed. These findings suggested that the failure of chimeras to produce antibody is not the result of impaired B cell, T cell, or macrophage function, but rather, that it is due to ineffective cellular interactions. Physiologic cellular interactions depend upon the sharing of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) determinants between interacting cells. However, the self-recognition repertoire of developing T cells may be influenced by the environment which these cells differentiate such that they learn to recognize host MHC determinants as self. These findings support the interpretation that the immunologic hyporeactivity of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras reflects the role of the host environment in restricting the interactive capabilities of donor-derived cells

  12. An HIV-1 envelope immunogen with W427S mutation in CD4 binding site induced more T follicular helper memory cells and reduced non-specific antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Tong Yu

    Full Text Available The CD4 binding site (CD4BS of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env contains epitopes for broadly neutralizing antibody (nAb and is the target for the vaccine development. However, the CD4BS core including residues 425-430 overlaps the B cell superantigen site and may be related to B cell exhaustion in HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, production of nAb and high-affinity plasma cells needs germinal center reaction and the help of T follicular helper (Tfh cells. We believe that strengthening the ability of Env CD4BS in inducing Tfh response and decreasing the effects of the superantigen are the strategies for eliciting nAb and development of HIV-1 vaccine. We constructed a gp120 mutant W427S of an HIV-1 primary R5 strain and examined its ability in the elicitation of Ab and the production of Tfh by immunization of BALB/c mice. We found that the trimeric wild-type gp120 can induce more non-specific antibody-secreting plasma cells, higher serum IgG secretion, and more Tfh cells by splenocyte. The modified W427S gp120 elicits higher levels of specific binding antibodies as well as nAbs though it produces less Tfh cells. Furthermore, higher Tfh cell frequency does not correlate to the specific binding Abs or nAbs indicating that the wild-type gp120 induced some non-specific Tfh that did not contribute to the production of specific Abs. This gp120 mutant led to more memory Tfh production, especially, the effector memory Tfh cells. Taken together, W427S gp120 could induce higher level of specific binding and neutralizing Ab production that may be associated with the reduction of non-specific Tfh but strengthening of the memory Tfh.

  13. HIV-1 Envelope Induces Memory B Cell Responses That Correlate with Plasma Antibody Levels after Envelope gp120 Protein Vaccination or HIV-1 Infection1

    OpenAIRE

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M. Anthony; Parks, Robert J.; Holl, T. Matt; Kelsoe, Garnett; Hicks, Charles B.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2009-01-01

    Successful vaccines (i.e., tetanus and diphtheria) can induce long-lived Ab levels that are maintained by bone marrow plasma cells and plasma Ab levels do not correlate with numbers of blood memory B cells. Destruction of CD4+ T cells early in HIV-1 acute infection may result in insufficient induction of neutralizing Ab responses; thus, an HIV-1 vaccine should elicit high levels of durable Abs by long-lived plasma cells to be protective. We asked if HIV-1 envelope-specific memory responses we...

  14. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  15. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-09-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [(18)F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [(18)F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  16. MF59- and Al(OH3-adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph vaccines induce sustained protective humoral and cellular immune responses, with a critical role for effector CD4 T cells at low antibody titers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta eMonaci

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to increasing antibiotic-resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen.

  17. Duration of serum antibody response to rabies vaccination in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alison M; Watson, Johanna L; Brault, Stephanie A; Edman, Judy M; Moore, Susan M; Kass, Philip H; Wilson, W David

    2016-08-15

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the impact of age and inferred prior vaccination history on the persistence of vaccine-induced antibody against rabies in horses. DESIGN Serologic response evaluation. ANIMALS 48 horses with an undocumented vaccination history. PROCEDURES Horses were vaccinated against rabies once. Blood samples were collected prior to vaccination, 3 to 7 weeks after vaccination, and at 6-month intervals for 2 to 3 years. Serum rabies virus-neutralizing antibody (RVNA) values were measured. An RVNA value of ≥ 0.5 U/mL was used to define a predicted protective immune response on the basis of World Health Organization recommendations for humans. Values were compared between horses vaccinated and those inferred to be immunologically naïve. RESULTS A protective RVNA value (≥ 0.5 U/mL) was maintained for 2 to 3 years in horses inferred to have been previously vaccinated on the basis of prevaccination RVNA values. No significant difference was evident in response to rabies vaccination or duration of protective RVNA values between horses vaccination. Significant differences were identified between horses inferred to have been previously vaccinated and horses inferred to be naïve prior to the study. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A rabies vaccination interval > 1 year may be appropriate for previously vaccinated horses but not for horses vaccinated only once. Additional research is required to confirm this finding and characterize the optimal primary dose series for rabies vaccination. PMID:27479286

  18. Antibodies Produced in Response to Cryptococcus neoformans Pulmonary Infection in Mice Have Characteristics of Nonprotective Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Casadevall, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Murine cryptocococcal pulmonary infection elicited serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG to the capsular polysaccharide, but only IgG stained yeast cells in alveoli. Both isotypes produced punctuate immunofluorescence patterns on yeast cells like those of nonprotective antibodies. The difficulties involved in associating humoral immunity with protection in murine cryptocococcal infection could reflect nonprotective antibody responses.

  19. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    detail so far. Analysis of the specificity of anti-virus trout antibodies has been complicated by a generally insufficient ability of the antibodies to bind the viral proteins in assays such as immunoblotting. However, other assays, specifically designed for detection of fish anti IHNV/VHSV antibodies...... occasional detrimental effect on rainbow trout farming. Research efforts have been focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in protective immunity. Several specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral parameters are believed to be involved, but only the antibody response has been characterised in......, have demonstrated that rainbow trout can produce specific and highly functional antibodies that are able to neutralise virus pathogenicity in vitro as well as in vivo. The apparently more restricted antibody response to IHNV and VHSV antigens in fish compared to mammals could possibly be explained by...

  20. Enhancing antibody: a novel component of the immune response.

    OpenAIRE

    Nemazee, D A; Sato, V L

    1982-01-01

    Current descriptions of the immune response identify two classes of antigenic stimuli that result in the production of specific antibody: (i) exogenous antigens and (ii) endogenous variable-region determinants of the immune system. We expand this scheme to include a third class of antigenic stimulus--new determinants created by the binding of antibody to antigen. This paper describes a set of monoclonal antibodies which arose after repeated immunization with antigen alone but which bound anti...

  1. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    An experimental model of proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) in the cat, which closely resembles human proliferative forms of GN, has been used to study the role of antibody and antibody affinity in the development of immune complex-mediated renal disease. The serum IgG and IgM antibody response to antigen, average antibody affinity (avidity) and affinity heterogeneity of the IgG and IgM populations was assessed at varying times after commencement of chronic immunization with the antigen, human serum albumin (HSA), by enzyme immunoassay. Cats could be classified according to whether they were "low", "intermediate" or "high" IgG responders, by quantification of serum IgG values. Cats with the lowest serum IgG values failed to develop glomerulonephritis. However, there was no relationship between actual IgG values and the severity of the induced disease. In contrast to IgG, there was no division of cats into low or high IgM anti-HSA responders. Again, cats with the lowest IgM values failed to develop GN, but, more interestingly, a late, marked increase in serum IgM anti-HSA occurred only in cats that developed clinical signs of GN (anterior uveitis and nephrotic syndrome). Maturation of average, functional IgG affinity (avidity) for HSA following chronic immunization was clearly demonstrated for all cats. At the end of the experiment, all cats had IgG of high affinity for HSA and the average affinity heterogeneity of the IgG populations was less than in measurements taken earlier. Values of IgG affinity at the end of the experiment were very similar both in cats which developed GN and in those which remained clinically, biochemically and pathologically normal. In contrast to IgG antibody, some cats developed IgM of increased affinity, whilst others produced antibody of reduced affinity, following chronic immunization. There was no correlation between the development of disease and the production of either low or high affinity IgM antibody. Data indicated that an

  2. Inadequate Antibody Response to Rabies Vaccine in Immunocompromised Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Kopel, Eran; Oren, Gal; Sidi, Yechezkel; David, Dan

    2012-01-01

    We describe an inadequate antibody response to rabies vaccine in an immunocompromised patient. A literature search revealed 15 additional immunocompromised patients, of whom 7 did not exhibit the minimum acceptable level of antibodies after a complete postexposure prophylaxis regimen. An international rabies registry is needed to provide a basis for determining appropriate vaccination protocols.

  3. Feedback Enhancement of Antibody Responses via Complement and Fc Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Jörgen

    2001-01-01

    IgG, IgM and IgE in complex with antigen have the capacity to regulate specific immune responses. In this investigation, the role of Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRI, FcγRII and FcγRIII) and complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) for antibody-mediated enhancement of antibody responses are investigated. IgM is known to efficiently activate complement and thereby enhance specific antibody responses but it is not known if this involves binding to CR1/2. Using CR1/2 deficient mice, immunized with sheep ...

  4. Targeting HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers to B Cells by Using APRIL Improves Antibody Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Melchers M; Bontjer I; Tong T; Chung NP; Klasse PJ; Eggink D; Montefiori DC; Gentile M; Cerutti A; Olson WC; Berkhout B; Binley JM; Moore JP; Sanders RW

    2012-01-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, in part because various factors limit the quantity and quality of the antibodies raised against the viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). We hypothesized that targeting Env vaccines directly to B cells, by fusing them to molecules that bind and activate these cells, would improve Env-specific antibody responses. Therefore, we fused trimeric Env gp140 to A PRoliferation-Inducing Ligand (APRIL), B-cell Activating Factor (BAFF), and CD40 Ligand (CD40L). The...

  5. Antibody Response to Serpin B13 Induces Adaptive Changes in Mouse Pancreatic Islets and Slows Down the Decline in the Residual Beta Cell Function in Children with Recent Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvalap, Yury; Lo, Chi-Wen; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Baldzizhar, Raman; Jospe, Nicholas; Czyzyk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is characterized by a heightened antibody (Ab) response to pancreatic islet self-antigens, which is a biomarker of progressive islet pathology. We recently identified a novel antibody to clade B serpin that reduces islet-associated T cell accumulation and is linked to the delayed onset of T1D. As natural immunity to clade B arises early in life, we hypothesized that it may influence islet development during that time. To test this possibility healthy young Balb/c male mice were injected with serpin B13 mAb or IgG control and examined for the number and cellularity of pancreatic islets by immunofluorescence and FACS. Beta cell proliferation was assessed by measuring nucleotide analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-EdU) incorporation into the DNA and islet Reg gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Human studies involved measuring anti-serpin B13 autoantibodies by Luminex. We found that injecting anti-serpin B13 monoclonal Ab enhanced beta cell proliferation and Reg gene expression, induced the generation of ∼80 pancreatic islets per animal, and ultimately led to increase in the beta cell mass. These findings are relevant to human T1D because our analysis of subjects just diagnosed with T1D revealed an association between baseline anti-serpin activity and slower residual beta cell function decline in the first year after the onset of diabetes. Our findings reveal a new role for the anti-serpin immunological response in promoting adaptive changes in the endocrine pancreas and suggests that enhancement of this response could potentially help impede the progression of T1D in humans. PMID:26578518

  6. Antibody responses in patients with invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsson, G; Colque-Navarro, P.; Gustafsson, E.; Andersson, R.; Möllby, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Correlation between antibody response and clinical outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia has yielded conflicting results. Immunization schedules have failed in clinical trials. Is the humoral response toward S. aureus of protective nature? A prospective study was performed in patients with invasive S. aureus (ISA) infections during the period 2003?2005. The antibody levels were determined at the beginning and at the end of treatment and one month later (n?=?96, n?=?7...

  7. An Adjuvanted, Tetravalent Dengue Virus Purified Inactivated Vaccine Candidate Induces Long-Lasting and Protective Antibody Responses Against Dengue Challenge in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J.; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G.; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Bruce L. Innis; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J. Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented vire...

  8. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    occasional detrimental effect on rainbow trout farming. Research efforts have been focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in protective immunity. Several specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral parameters are believed to be involved, but only the antibody response has been characterised in......, have demonstrated that rainbow trout can produce specific and highly functional antibodies that are able to neutralise virus pathogenicity in vitro as well as in vivo. The apparently more restricted antibody response to IHNV and VHSV antigens in fish compared to mammals could possibly be explained by...

  9. A plant-derived quadrivalent virus like particle influenza vaccine induces cross-reactive antibody and T cell response in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Stéphane; Aubin, Éric; Trépanier, Sonia; Bussière, Diane; Dargis, Michèle; Poulin, Jean-François; Yassine-Diab, Bader; Ward, Brian J; Landry, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    Recent issues regarding efficacy of influenza vaccines have re-emphasized the need of new approaches to face this major public health issue. In a phase 1-2 clinical trial, healthy adults received one intramuscular dose of a seasonal influenza plant-based quadrivalent virus-like particle (QVLP) vaccine or placebo. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers met all the European licensure criteria for the type A influenza strains at the 3μg/strain dose and for all four strains at the higher dosages 21days after immunization. High HI titers were maintained for most of the strains 6months after vaccination. QVLP vaccine induced a substantial and sustained increase of hemagglutinin-specific polyfunctional CD4 T cells, mainly transitional memory and TEMRA effector IFN-γ(+) CD4 T cells. A T cells cross-reactive response was also observed against A/Hong-Kong/1/1968 H3N2 and B/Massachusetts/2/2012. Plant-based QVLP offers an attractive alternative manufacturing method for producing effective and HA-strain matching seasonal influenza vaccines. PMID:26987887

  10. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated. PMID:27375618

  11. The cellular bases of antibody responses during dengue virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Yam-Puc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic or memory B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections.This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events like the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation and germinal centers (GCs formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs, till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated.

  12. Maternal Antibody Protected Chicks from Growth Retardation and Immunosuppression Induced by Early Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shu-hong; GUI Zhi-zhong; QU Li-xin

    2007-01-01

    To determine if the maternal antibody from breeders vaccinated with cell culture-adapted reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) could protect chicks from early REV infection, one-day-old chicks with or without anti-REV maternal antibodies were inoculated with REV, and then their growth rates and antibody tilers to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and avian influenza virus (AIV), after vaccination with inactivated vaccines, were compared. This study indicated that REV infection could cause growth retardation and severely inhibit immune reactions to inactivated vaccines against NDV and Avian influenza virus (AIV, H9 and H5) in one-day-old broilers without maternal antibodies specific to REV. Maternal antibody from breeders vaccinated with an attenuated REV vaccine effectively protected REV-challenged birds from growth retardation and immunosuppression on antibody reactions to NDV and AIV vaccines. Four weeks after vaccination, the HI liters to NDV, AIV-H9, and AIV-H5 in maternal antibody positive and negative groups were 3.36±2.04 versus 1.58±1.69 (P<0.01), 6.27±3.87 versus 0.71±1.60(P<0.01), and 6.72 versus 0.54±1.44(p<0.01). Maternal antibodies from breeders vaccinated with REV vaccine could successfully protect chicks from REV infection and effectively prevent REV-induced growth retardation and immunosuppression in antibody responses to NDV and AIV.

  13. Interrelationships of radiation, viruses, and the immune response in radium-induced tumors. Part IV. Search for specific antibodies to osteosarcomas by indirect immunofluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of observing immunofluorescence positive (IF+) sera with all the osteosarcoma cell lines tested was found to be essentially the same in normal control subjects (22 percent, 14/65) as in persons carrying a high burden of radium but with no evidence of current osteosarcoma (22 percent, 11/49). Only one of the radium patients and two control subjects had sera which was IF+ with two of the osteosarcoma cell lines tested. No increased frequency was observed either for the control subjects or for the radium patients when three additional tumor cell lines unrelated to osteosarcoma were examined. The sera of none of the radium patients tested could be shown to have a different pattern from those of the normal controls. In contrast, sera from lung tumor patients showed IF+ reactions with 63 percent of all of the tumor cell lines, compared with 20 percent for the controls. With three of the cell lines the sera from the lung tumor cases showed 100 percent reactivity compared with 29 percent for the controls. These results suggest that additional antibodies must be present in the sera of these tumor-bearing patients compared with those of the controls. Although the nature of these antibodies has not been determined, it is likely that some, at least, are antibodies to fetal antigens which have been shown by others to be present in patients with other malignant tumors as well as with some nonmalignant states. If sera from patients with a high body burden of radium were shown to have a greatly increased reactivity with the cell lines studied here, malignancy might be suspected, although the possibility of other causes could not be excluded. (U.S.)

  14. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R.; Singer, Bernhard B.; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1−/− mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1−/− mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  15. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R; Singer, Bernhard B; Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1(-/-) mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1(-/-) mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  16. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. ► We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. ► CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. ► CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  17. Antibody to eosinophil cationic protein suppresses dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuko Shichijo; Kazuya Makiyama; Chun-Yang Wen; Mutsumi Matsuu; Toshiyuki Nakayama; Masahiro Nakashima; Makoto Ihara; Ichiro Sekine

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To produce an antibody against rat eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and to examine the effects of the antibody in rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis.METHODS: An antibody was raised against rat ECP. Rats were treated with 3% DSS in drinking water for 7 d and received the antibody or normal serum. The colons were exarmined histologically and correlated with clinical symptoms.Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were estimated as a grade of inflammation.RESULTS: The ECP antibody stained the activated eosinophils around the injured crypts in the colonic mucosa.Antibody treatment reduced the severity of colonic ulceration and acute clinical symptoms (diarrhea and/or blood-stained stool). Body weight gain was significantly greater and the colon length was significantly longer in anti-ECP-treated rats than in normal serum-treated rats. Expression of ECP in activated eosinophils was associated with the presence of erosions and inflammation. The number of Ki-67-positive cells in the regenerated surface epithelium increased in anti-ECP-treated rats compared with normal serum-treated rats. Western blot analysis revealed reduced expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in anti-ECP-treated rats.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that treatment with ECP antibody, improved DSS-induced colitis in rats, possibly by increasing the regenerative activity of the colonic epithelium and downregulation of the immune response,and suggest that anti-ECP may promote intestinal wound healing in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).

  18. ELISA to study antibody responses to anthrax vaccine in cattle, sheep and goats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ELISA based on tri-partite toxin partially purified from Bacillus anthracis was used to determine the antibody responses of groups of cattle, sheep and goats after anthrax vaccination. All species produced detectable increases in antibody titres after vaccination with the order being cattle>sheep>goats. A second vaccination induced variable anamnestic responses depending on the species or time (6 or 22 weeks) after the primary dose. Large differences were observed between individual animals with respect to the antibody induced by the 2 vaccine doses. This observation, together with differences in vaccine quality and apparent immunogenicity may affect efficient control of anthrax outbreaks. ELISA provided a convenient method of determining the relative contribution of these factors to the protection afforded by anthrax vaccination programs. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Focusing antibody responses against distraction and loss in diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    Pathogens are complex and evolving fast. They have developed full ranges of disguises to divert immune responses and often manage to escape recognition and thereby outpace natural immunity. A prominent example is the scarce and staggered development of broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly mutable viruses. It remains unclear under what evolutionary conditions these exceptional antibodies could emerge and dominate the response. To address this challenge, we construct an individual-based stochastic model of the Darwinian evolution of antibody-producing immune cells. We consider complexity of viral epitopes, vary seeding diversity of the immune cell population, and allow a time varying population size and extinction - new aspects essential for designing a realistic vaccine. We show that various temporal statistics of antigenic environments would select distinct evolutionary paths that lead to predominantly non-neutralizing, strain-specific or broadly neutralizing antibody responses. We suggest strategies to focus antibody responses on the targeted vulnerability of the virus and confer selective advantage to cross-reactive lineages. This implies a new step toward an effective vaccine against rapidly mutating complex pathogens. This work is supported by NIH.

  20. Immunostimulatory complexes containing Eimeria tenella antigens and low toxicity plant saponins induce antibody response and provide protection from challenge in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, V E; Bogoyavlenskyi, A P; Khudiakova, S S; Alexuk, P G; Omirtaeva, E S; Zaitceva, I A; Tustikbaeva, G B; Barfield, R C; Fetterer, R H

    2010-01-20

    Immunostimulating complexes (ISCOMs) are unique multimolecular structures formed by encapsulating antigens, lipids and triterpene saponins and are one of the most successful antigen delivery systems for microbial antigens. In the current study, both the route of administration and the antigen concentration of ISCOMs, containing Eimeria tenella antigens and saponins from native plants, were evaluated in their ability to stimulate humoral immunity and to protect chickens against a challenge infection with E. tenella. Broiler chickens were immunized with ISCOM preparations containing E. tenella antigens and the purified saponins Gg6, Ah6 and Gp7 isolated from Glycyrrhiza glabra, Aesculus hippocastanum and Gipsophila paniculata, respectively. The effects of the route of administration, dose of antigen and type of saponin used for construction of ISCOMs were evaluated for ability to stimulate serum IgG and IgM and to protect chickens against a homologous challenge. A single intranasal immunization was the most effective route for administering ISCOMs although the in ovo route was also quite effective. Dose titration experiments demonstrated efficacy after single immunization with various ISCOM doses but maximum effects were observed when ISCOMs contain 5-10mug antigen. Immunization of birds by any of the three routes with E. tenella antigens alone or antigens mixed with alum hydroxide adjuvant resulted in lower serum antibody and reduced protection to challenge relative to immunization with ISCOMs. Overall the results of this study confirm that significant immunostimulation and protection to challenge are achieved by immunization of chickens with ISCOMs containing purified saponins and native E. tenella antigens and suggest that ISCOMs may be successfully used to develop a safe and effective vaccine for prevention of avian coccidiosis. PMID:19879050

  1. Enhancement by ampicillin of antibody responses induced by a protein antigen and a DNA vaccine carried by live-attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, P C; Tsoi, H W; Leung, H C; Wong, L P; Wong, S S; Chan, E; Yuen, K Y

    2000-07-01

    Live-attenuated Salmonella species are effective carriers of microbial antigens and DNA vaccines. In a mouse model, the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and total antibody levels directed toward the lipopolysaccharide of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were significantly enhanced at day 21 after oral immunization with live-attenuated serovar Typhi (strain Ty21a) when ampicillin was concomitantly administered (P Ty21a-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation indices for the ampicillin group at day 21 were significantly higher than those for the normal saline (NS) group (P Ty21a per well, respectively). The 50% lethal doses for mice from the ampicillin and NS groups immunized with Ty21a with pBR322 after wild-type serovar Typhi challenge on day 24 were 3.4 x 10(7) and 5.0 x 10(6) CFU, respectively. The fecal bacterial counts for the ampicillin group at days 1, 3, and 5 were significantly lower than those for the NS group (P Ty21a in a larger number of mice from the ampicillin group than from the NS group. Furthermore, the IgG2a levels directed toward tetanus toxoid were significantly enhanced at days 7 and 21 after oral immunization with Ty21a that carried the fragment c of tetanus toxoid when ampicillin was concomitantly administered (P Ty21a that carried the DNA vaccine that encodes hepatitis B surface antigen when ampicillin was concomitantly administered. The present observation may improve the efficacy of the protein antigens and DNA vaccines carried in live-attenuated bacteria, and further experiments should be carried out to determine the best antibiotics and dosage regimen to be used, as well as the best carrier system for individual protein antigens and DNA vaccines. PMID:10882658

  2. Egg Yolk IgY: Protection against Rotavirus induced Diarrhea and Modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves

    OpenAIRE

    Vega, C.; De Bok, M; Chacana, P.; Saif, L; Fernandez, F; Parreño, V.

    2011-01-01

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. ...

  3. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F;

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the histamine-2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (100 mg intravenously every 12 hours for 72 hours) on postoperative serum antibody responses to preoperative immunization with six limit of flocculation tetanus toxoid and six limit of flocculation diphtheria toxoid was assessed in a...... and antidiphtheria toxoid were drawn before skin incision and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28. Ranitidine significantly increased the postoperative antibody response to tetanus toxoid, (p less than 0.01) and insignificantly increased that to diphtheria toxoid vaccination (p less...

  4. Antibody contributes to heterosubtypic protection against influenza A-induced tachypnea in cotton rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ottolini Martin G; Straight Timothy M; Prince Gregory A; Eichelberger Maryna C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Influenza virus infection or vaccination evokes an antibody response to viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) surface glycoproteins, which results in immunity against influenza A viruses of the same HA and NA subtype. A heterosubtypic immune response that offers some protection against different influenza A subtypes has been suggested from epidemiologic studies in human influenza outbreaks, and has been induced in experimental animal models. Original studies of s...

  5. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against radiation-induced protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtained the 6 monoclonal antibodies against gamma-induced proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans, and these antibodies were designated as Mab-3F, 4B, 4D, 4F, 4G and 12G. Using these antibodies, we investigated the relations between gamma-induced proteins and other stress protein in strain R1, and the induction of proteins were compared among strain R1, resistant mutant (rec1) and radiosensitive mutant (rec30). We found new 6 proteins recognized by these monoclonal antibodies which were induced after gamma-irradiation especially in strain R1 and rec 1, but not induced in strain rec30. We suppose that these proteins participate in repair of DNA damages including double strand breaks caused by gamma-irradiation. One of them was around 46kDa protein band recognized by Mab-12G, and this protein was so induced in a large quantity after irradiation that the protein could detect by gold staining. In addition to this observation, we found some proteins which were induced in R1 and rec 1 by gamma-irradiation and other stress, but not in strain rec30, such as 31kDa protein band recognized by Mab-3F, 4B and 4G, and other 11 proteins which were especially induced in irradiated strain R1. The latter proteins might be reinforcement factor to radioresistance such as GroE and DnaK, or participant in repair of damage by gamma-irradiation in strain R1. (author)

  6. Protein X of Streptococcus agalactiae induces opsonic antibodies in cows.

    OpenAIRE

    Rainard, P; Lautrou, Y; Sarradin, P.; Poutrel, B

    1991-01-01

    Protein X of Streptococcus agalactiae is a surface protein frequently associated with strains isolated from cases of mastitis of dairy cows. By immunizing cows with purified protein X, we obtained an antibody response which was restricted to X-bearing strains of S. agalactiae in a whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This response resulted in an increase in the opsonic activity of serum for strains bearing protein X, as assessed through the augmentation of the chemiluminescence respo...

  7. Effect of previous vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaballie, H; Wuyts, G; Dillaerts, D; Frans, G; Moens, L; Proesmans, M; Vermeulen, F; De Boeck, K; Meyts, I; Bossuyt, X

    2016-08-01

    During the past 10 years, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) has become part of the standard childhood vaccination programme. This may impact upon the diagnosis of polysaccharide antibody deficiency by measurement of anti-polysaccharide immunoglobulin (Ig)G after immunization with unconjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV). Indeed, contrary to PPV, PCV induces a T-dependent, more pronounced memory response. The antibody response to PPV was studied retrospectively in patients referred for suspected humoral immunodeficiency. The study population was divided into four subgroups based on age (2-5 years versus ≥ 10 years) and time tested (1998-2005 versus 2010-12). Only 2-5-year-old children tested in 2010-12 had been vaccinated with PCV prior to PPV. The PCV primed group showed higher antibody responses for PCV-PPV shared serotypes 4 and 18C than the unprimed groups. To a lesser extent, this was also found for non-PCV serotype 9N, but not for non-PCV serotypes 19A and 8. Furthermore, PCV-priming elicited a higher IgG2 response. In conclusion, previous PCV vaccination affects antibody response to PPV for shared serotypes, but can also influence antibody response to some non-PCV serotypes (9N). With increasing number of serotypes included in PCV, the diagnostic assessment for polysaccharide antibody deficiency requires careful selection of serotypes that are not influenced by prior PCV (e.g. serotype 8). Further research is needed to identify more serotypes that are not influenced. PMID:26939935

  8. Neutralizing Antibody Response and Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in HIV-1-Infected Individuals from Guinea-Bissau and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov; Heyndrickx, Leo; Palm, Angelica A; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Jespersen, Sanne; da Silva, Zacarias José; Karlsson, Ingrid; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2016-05-01

    The development of therapeutic and prophylactic HIV vaccines for African countries is urgently needed, but the question of what immunogens to use needs to be answered. One approach is to include HIV envelope immunogens derived from HIV-positive individuals from a geographically concentrated epidemic with more limited viral genetic diversity for a region-based vaccine. To address if there is a basis for a regional selected antibody vaccine, we have screened two regionally separate cohorts from Guinea-Bissau and Denmark for neutralizing antibody activity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against local and nonlocal circulating HIV-1 strains. The neutralizing activity did not demonstrate higher potential against local circulating strains according to geography and subtype determination, but the plasma from Danish individuals demonstrated significantly higher inhibitory activity than that from Guinea-Bissau individuals against both local and nonlocal virus strains. Interestingly, an opposite pattern was observed with ADCC activity, where Guinea-Bissau individual plasma demonstrated higher activity than Danish plasma and was specifically against the local circulating subtype. Thus, on basis of samples from these two cohorts, no local-specific neutralizing activity was detected, but a local ADCC response was identified in the Guinea-Bissau samples, suggesting potential use of regional immunogens for an ADCC-inducing vaccine. PMID:26621287

  9. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  10. Role of antiviral antibodies in resistance against coxsackievirus B3 infection: interaction between preexisting antibodies and an interferon inducer.

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, C T; Feng, K. K.; McCarthy, V P; Lenahan, M F

    1982-01-01

    An experimental model of coxsackievirus B3 infection in newborn mice was utilized to examine the protective role of antiviral antibodies and an interferon inducer, polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)]. Subcutaneous administration to the infected mice of specific antiviral antibodies resulted in significant protection against coxsackievirus B3 infection. Antibody-treated animals had shortened viremia, early clearance of virus from tissues, and a reduced mortality rate. Dose respons...

  11. Development of enhanced antibody response toward dual delivery of nano-adjuvant adsorbed human Enterovirus-71 vaccine encapsulated carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohamed I; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Hussein, Mohd Z; Elkhidir, Isam M; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a new approach for enhancing immunity toward mucosal vaccines. HEV71 killed vaccine that is formulated with nanosize calcium phosphate adjuvant and encapsulated onto chitosan and alginate delivery carriers was examined for eliciting antibody responses in serum and saliva collected at weeks 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 for viral-specific IgA & IgG levels and viral neutralizing antibody titers. The antibody responses induced in rabbits by the different formulations delivered by a single (buccal) route were compared to those of dual immunization (intradermal / mucosal) and un-immunized control. Chitosan-loaded vaccine adjuvant induced elevated IgA antibody, while Alginate-adjuvant irreversible bonding sequestered the vaccine and markedly reduced immunogenicity. The induced mucosal and parenteral antibody profiles appeared in an inverse manner of enhanced mucosal IgA antibody accompanied by lower systemic IgG following a single oral immunization route. The combined intradermal and oral dual-immunized group developed an elevated salivary IgA, systemic IgG, and virus neutralizing response. A reduced salivary neutralizing antibody titer was observed and attributed to the continual secretion exchanges in saliva. Designing a successful mucosal delivery formulation needs to take into account the vaccine delivery site, dosage, adjuvant and carrier particle size, charge, and the reversibility of component interactions. The dual immunization seems superior and is a important approach for modulating the antibody response and boosting mucosal protection against HEV71 and similar pathogens based on their transmission mode, tissue tropism and shedding sites. Finally, the study has highlighted the significant role of dual immunization for simultaneous inducing and modulating the systemic and mucosal immune responses to EV71. PMID:26186664

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollah Jafarzadeh; Masoome Bagheri-Jamebozorgi; Maryam Nemati; Forough Golsaz-Shirazi; Fazel Shokri

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L) in 90-99% of vaccinees.The lack ...

  13. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Hanne R; Brix, Susanne; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2004-05-01

    While allergic reactions to soya are increasingly investigated, the normal immune response to ingested soya is scarcely described. In the present study, we wanted to characterise the soya-specific immune response in healthy mice ingesting soya protein. Mice fed a soya-containing diet (F0) and mice of the first (F1) and second (F2) offspring generation bred on a soya protein-free diet were used either directly or were transferred between the soya-containing and soya protein-free diet during pregnancy or neonatal life. The mice were compared as to levels of naturally occurring specific antibodies analysed by ELISA, and to the presence of oral tolerance detected as a suppressed antibody and cell-proliferation response upon immunisation with soya protein. F0 mice generated soya-specific antibodies, while oral tolerance to the same soya proteins was also clearly induced. When F0 dams were transferred to soya protein-free feed before mating, the F1 and F2 offspring generations showed no significantly different response, indicating that soya-specific immune components were not maternally transmitted. However, the ingestion of dietary soya protein by F1 mice during late pregnancy and lactation caused a lasting antibody response in the offspring, but in this case in the absence of oral tolerance. This indicates that, under certain conditions, factors involved in spontaneous antibody production can be transmitted from mother to offspring. Understanding the immune response to soya protein ingested under healthy conditions is important in the assessment of adverse effects of soya protein and in the use of animal allergy models. The present results add to this understanding. PMID:15137924

  14. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  15. Impact of a Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 vaccine on antibody responses in adult Malians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alassane Dicko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 of Plasmodium falciparum merozoites is a leading blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate. Protection of Aotus monkeys after vaccination with AMA1 correlates with antibody responses. STUDY DESIGN/RESULTS: A randomized, controlled, double-blind phase 1 clinical trial was conducted in 54 healthy Malian adults living in an area of intense seasonal malaria transmission to assess the safety and immunogenicity of the AMA1-C1 malaria vaccine. AMA1-C1 contains an equal mixture of yeast-expressed recombinant proteins based on sequences from the FVO and 3D7 clones of P. falciparum, adsorbed on Alhydrogel. The control vaccine was the hepatitis B vaccine (Recombivax. Participants were enrolled into 1 of 3 dose cohorts (n = 18 per cohort and randomized 2:1 to receive either AMA1-C1 or Recombivax. Participants in the first, second, and third cohorts randomized to receive AMA1-C1 were vaccinated with 5, 20 and 80 microg of AMA1-C1, respectively. Vaccinations were administered on days 0, 28, and 360, and participants were followed until 6 months after the final vaccination. AMA1-C1 was well tolerated; no vaccine-related severe or serious adverse events were observed. AMA1 antibody responses to the 80 microg dose increased rapidly from baseline levels by days 14 and 28 after the first vaccination and continued to increase after the second vaccination. After a peak 14 days following the second vaccination, antibody levels decreased to baseline levels one year later at the time of the third vaccination that induced little or no increase in antibody levels. CONCLUSIONS: Although the AMA1-C1 vaccine candidate was well-tolerated and induced antibody responses to both vaccine and non-vaccine alleles, the antibody response after a third dose given at one year was lower than the response to the initial vaccinations. Additionally, post-vaccination increases in anti-AMA1 antibody levels were not associated with significant changes

  16. Measuring and evaluating interferon beta-induced antibodies in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, C; Clemmesen, K M; Sørensen, P S;

    2006-01-01

    Administration of interferons (IFNs) may induce antibodies that interfere with therapeutic efficacy. We have optimized and validated methods for large-scale economic screening. Sera from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) were investigated for binding antibody (BAb) by prot......Administration of interferons (IFNs) may induce antibodies that interfere with therapeutic efficacy. We have optimized and validated methods for large-scale economic screening. Sera from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) were investigated for binding antibody (BAb...

  17. Induction of ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+ TH Cells Correlates with Antibody Responses to Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Lopez, Santiago; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Schmitt, Nathalie; Mueller, Cynthia; Harrod, Carson; Flano, Emilio; Mejias, Asuncion; Albrecht, Randy A.; Blankenship, Derek; Xu, Hui; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Ramilo, Octavio; Ueno, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccine protects 60 to 90% of healthy young adults from influenza infection. The immunological events that lead to the induction of protective antibody responses remain poorly understood in humans. We identified the type of CD4+ T cells associated with protective antibody responses after seasonal influenza vaccinations. The administration of trivalent split-virus influenza vaccines induced a temporary increase of CD4+ T cells expressing ICOS, which peaked at day 7, as did plasmablasts. The induction of ICOS was largely restricted to CD4+ T cells co-expressing the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR5, a subpopulation of circulating memory T follicular helper cells. Up to 60% of these ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells were specific for influenza antigens and expressed interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, IL-21, and interferon-γ upon antigen stimulation. The increase of ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells in blood correlated with the increase of preexisting antibody titers, but not with the induction of primary antibody responses. Consistently, purified ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells efficiently induced memory B cells, but not naïve B cells, to differentiate into plasma cells that produce influenza-specific antibodies ex vivo. Thus, the emergence of blood ICOS+CXCR3+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells correlates with the development of protective antibody responses generated by memory B cells upon seasonal influenza vaccination. PMID:23486778

  18. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Bagheri-Jamebozorgi, Masoome; Nemati, Maryam; Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Shokri, Fazel

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L) in 90-99% of vaccinees. The lack of response to HBsAg has been attributed to a variety of immunological mechanisms, including defect in antigen presentation, defect in HBsAg-specific T and/or B cell repertoires, T-cell suppression, increase in the regulatory T cell count, lack of necessary help of T-cells for production of anti-HBs by B cells, defect in Th1 and/or Th2 cytokine production and selective killing of HBsAg-specific B-cells by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The HLA complex plays an important role in many of these immunological processes. A variety of HLA class I, II, and III alleles and antigens have been reported to be associated with antibody response to HBsAg vaccination in different ethnic populations. Moreover, some HLA haplotypes were also associated with responsiveness to HBsAg. In this review the association of the HLA specificities with antibody response to hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is discussed. PMID:26546891

  19. Immunization of Macaca fascicularis (Macaca irus) monkeys with Streptococcus mutans: specificity of antibody responses in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmings, F G; Evans, R T; Genco, R J

    1976-04-01

    M fascicularis monkeys were immunized subcutaneously in the vicinity of the major salivary glands and by retrograde infusion into the parotid duct, with a vaccine containing Formalin-killed S mutans strain 6715 cells and culture-fluid antigens. Indirect immunofluorescent staining was used to titrate and classify antibodies. Subcutaneous immunization induced only a serum response, whereas intraductal infusion stimulated both an IgA antibody response in the parotid fluid and a serum response. Immunized and nonimmunized control groups were orally infected with S mutans strain 6715. The establishment in dental plaque was quantitated by recovery of the infecting organism on selective media and by immunofluorescent staining of plaque smears taken from individual tooth surfaces. The establishment of S mutans strain 6715 was noticeably inhibited in immune monkeys. Immunofluorescent assays for antibody also showed that serum and parotid fluid containing serum IgA antibodies cross reacted with other d serotype and a serotype strains but not representative b and c strains. Immune and control groups were then orally infected with S mutans strain GS-5, a c serotype strain, and no inhibition in establishment was detected of the non-cross-reacting type c organism in the immune group. A latter series of booster immunizations via the intraductal route resulted in a significant decrease in parotid fluid flow. Histological investigations showed inflammatory cell infiltration and replacement of epithelium by connective tissue in the glands from immunized monkeys. A separate group of monkeys, younger than the first, was immunized with the same vaccine via the duct only. In this group, immunizations were given at shorter intervals, but the immunization response was similar to that observed in the first group. The investigations reviewed here and new experiments reported show that immunization of monkeys with S mutan strain 6715 via the parotid duct elicited a reproducible IgA antibody

  20. Antibody Response against Parvovirus in Patients with Inflammatory Rheumatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Raeisi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some viral infections have been suggested to trigger or cause autoimmune diseases. One of these viruses is parvovirus B19 which can have various rheumatologic manifestations. In this study we investigated the association between parvovirus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosis(SLE, systemic sclerosis(SSc and undifferentiated arthritis at the Rheumatological Clinic, Imam Khomeini hospital. Methods: In this sectional case-control study, IgM and IgG antibodies against parvovirus B19 were measured with ELISA in 41 patients with RA, 28 patients with SLE, 13 patients with SSc, 8 patients with undifferentiated arthritis as well as 90 healthy controls. The ELISA kit (DRG, Germany was semi-quantitative and qualititative. Results: Parvovirus B19 IgM was detected in one patient with RA, one with SSc and four in the control group. IgG anti- B19-specific antibody was detected in 58.5% of RA patients, 67.9% of SLE patients, 69. 2% of SSc patients, 87.5% of undifferentiated arthritis patients as compared to 53.3% of controls. The results were compared between the patient and control groups(p>0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, there was no significant correlation for the antibody titer against parvovirus B19 in the patient and control group. The highly positive response of IgG against parvovirus in undifferentiated arthritis implies the need for more research.

  1. Genomic copy number variants: evidence for association with antibody response to anthrax vaccine adsorbed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Falola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anthrax and its etiologic agent remain a biological threat. Anthrax vaccine is highly effective, but vaccine-induced IgG antibody responses vary widely following required doses of vaccinations. Such variation can be related to genetic factors, especially genomic copy number variants (CNVs that are known to be enriched among genes with immunologic function. We have tested this hypothesis in two study populations from a clinical trial of anthrax vaccination. METHODS: We performed CNV-based genome-wide association analyses separately on 794 European Americans and 200 African-Americans. Antibodies to protective antigen were measured at week 8 (early response and week 30 (peak response using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We used DNA microarray data (Affymetrix 6.0 and two CNV detection algorithms, hidden markov model (PennCNV and circular binary segmentation (GeneSpring to determine CNVs in all individuals. Multivariable regression analyses were used to identify CNV-specific associations after adjusting for relevant non-genetic covariates. RESULTS: Within the 22 autosomal chromosomes, 2,943 non-overlapping CNV regions were detected by both algorithms. Genomic insertions containing HLA-DRB5, DRB1 and DQA1/DRA genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region (chromosome 6p21.3 were moderately associated with elevated early antibody response (β = 0.14, p = 1.78×10(-3 among European Americans, and the strongest association was observed between peak antibody response and a segmental insertion on chromosome 1, containing NBPF4, NBPF5, STXMP3, CLCC1, and GPSM2 genes (β = 1.66, p = 6.06×10(-5. For African-Americans, segmental deletions spanning PRR20, PCDH17 and PCH68 genes on chromosome 13 were associated with elevated early antibody production (β = 0.18, p = 4.47×10(-5. Population-specific findings aside, one genomic insertion on chromosome 17 (containing NSF, ARL17 and LRRC37A genes was associated

  2. The surgically induced stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A; Herndon, David N

    2013-09-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes that induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Burn injuries provide an extreme model of trauma induced stress responses that can be used to study the long-term effects of a prolonged stress response. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to confer improved chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  3. Assessment of pulmonary antibodies with induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage induced by nasal vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a clinical phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freihorst Joachim

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a desirable albeit challenging strategy for prevention of airway infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We assessed the immunogenicity of a nasal vaccine based on the outer membrane proteins F and I from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lower airways in a phase I/II clinical trial. Methods N = 12 healthy volunteers received 2 nasal vaccinations with an OprF-OprI gel as a primary and a systemic (n = 6 or a nasal booster vaccination (n = 6. Antibodies were assessed in induced sputum (IS, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, and in serum. Results OprF-OprI-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were found in both BAL and IS at comparable rates, but differed in the predominant isotype. IgA antibodies in IS did not correlate to the respective serum levels. Pulmonary antibodies were detectable in all vaccinees even 1 year after the vaccination. The systemic booster group had higher IgG levels in serum. However, the nasal booster group had the better long-term response with bronchial antibodies of both isotypes. Conclusion The nasal OprF-OprI-vaccine induces a lasting antibody response at both, systemic and airway mucosal site. IS is a feasible method to non-invasively assess bronchial antibodies. A further optimization of the vaccination schedule is warranted.

  4. Immunosuppressive drugs impairs antibody response of the polysaccharide and conjugated pneumococcal vaccines in patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam; Thomsen, Ole Østergaard;

    2015-01-01

    with and without immunosuppressive treatment four weeks post vaccination. METHODS: In a randomized trial of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV13), a group of CD patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs (IS) alone or in...... between treatment groups showed that immunosuppressive treatment impaired the antibody response to both vaccines and that TNF-a treatment further conveyed additional impairment of the response. CONCLUSION: PCV13 induces higher antibody response for some serotypes compared to PPV23. In addition, CD...... patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs alone or in combination with TNF-α antagonists had an impaired antibody response to both PPV23 and PCV13 compared to patients not receiving any of these treatments. The study has been registered in the European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT, record no 2012...

  5. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    OpenAIRE

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress respo...

  6. T cell-independent type I antibody response against B cell epitopes expressed repetitively on recombinant virus particles

    OpenAIRE

    Fehr, Thomas; Skrastina, Dace; Pumpens, Paul; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant viral or virus-like particles offer new tools for vaccine development. This study investigated hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) capsids and RNA phage Qβ coats as carriers of a foreign epitope to induce antibody responses in mice. HBcAg capsids were shown to induce T cell-independent (TI) antibodies. We found that these particles behave as antigen-specific TI type 1 (TI-1) Ag comparable to other rigidly structured viruses. When a 5-aa long epitope of the pre-S1 domain of hepatitis ...

  7. Evaluation of antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccines with ELISA and opsonophagocytic assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, K H; Seoh, J. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Antibodies to a capsular polysaccharide (PS) provide protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae which express the homologous capsular serotype, and pneumococcal vaccines are designed to induce antibodies in the capsular PS. Levels and opsonophagocytic capacity of antibodies to the capsular PS of S. pneumoniae serotype 19F were determined by sera from adults immunized with 23-valent S. pneumoniae capsular PS vaccines. Geometric means of IgG anti-19F antibody level and specific opsonic titer r...

  8. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-04-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers were measured in plasma samples obtained at 36 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3-5 days and at 4 and 18 months of age were analyzed for T- and B-cell numbers, proportions of naive and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells. Multivariate factor analyses show that higher anti-MMR antibody titers were associated with a lower degree of adaptive immune maturation, that is, lower proportions of memory T cells and a lower capacity of mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, but with higher proportions of putative regulatory T cells. Further, children born by cesarean section (CS) had significantly higher anti-measles titers than vaginally-born children; and CS was found to be associated with delayed adaptive immunity. Also, girls presented with significantly higher anti-mumps and anti-rubella antibody levels than boys at 36 months of age. These results indicate that delayed adaptive immune maturation before and in close proximity to immunization seems to be advantageous for the ability of children to respond with higher anti-MMR antibody levels after vaccination. PMID:27195118

  9. Persistence of Antibodies Induced by Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine in Children in India

    OpenAIRE

    S. K. Raut; Mr. P.S. Kulkarni; Phadke, M. A.; S. S Jadhav; Kapre, S. V.; Dhere, R. M.; Dhorje, S. P.; Godse, S. R.

    2008-01-01

    Antibody levels in 41 Indian girls were measured 6 years after measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination. Rates of seropositivity were 88% (measles antibodies), 95% (mumps antibodies), and 100% (rubella antibodies). The MMR vaccine induces long-term immunity in a majority of vaccinees; however, due to the observation of some seronegative vaccinees, the policy of administering a second dose of the MMR vaccine seems appropriate.

  10. Antibody response in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) immunized with a model antigen associated with different adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, T R; Di Domenico, J; Kirsten, K S; Nied, C O; Frandoloso, R; Kreutz, L C

    2016-07-25

    Adjuvants are essential to boost the immune response to inoculated antigen and play a central role in vaccine development. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of several adjuvants in the production of anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies in silver catfish. Two hundred and seventy juvenile silver catfish (60-80 g) of both sexes were intraperitoneally vaccinated with BSA (200 µg/fish) alone or mixed to the following adjuvants: Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), aluminum hydroxide (AlOH), Montanide, four types of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) and three concentrations of β-glucan, and the immune enhancing property was evaluated by measuring anti-BSA antibodies in blood samples at biweekly intervals. Our results demonstrated that CpGs ODNs and β-glucan were as effective as classical adjuvants (FCA, FIA, AlOH and Montanide) in promoting anti-BSA antibodies and that the kinetics of antibody production induced by all adjuvants used in our study had a similar trend to that observed in other fish species, with a peak at 28 days post-vaccination. These results may be useful for the selection of adjuvants for vaccine formulation intended for silver catfish and for the development of vaccine and vaccination strategies to other fish species. PMID:27464022

  11. Antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental human malaria infection or vaccination show limited relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen M; Okitsu, Shinji; Porter, David W; Duncan, Christopher; Amacker, Mario; Pluschke, Gerd; Cavanagh, David R; Hill, Adrian V S; Todryk, Stephen M

    2015-05-01

    This study examined specific antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental malaria infection or malaria vaccination, in malaria-naive human volunteers within phase I/IIa vaccine trials, with a view to investigating inter-relationships between these types of response. Malaria infection was via five bites of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes, with individuals reaching patent infection by 11-12 days, having harboured four or five blood-stage cycles before drug clearance. Infection elicited a robust antibody response against merozoite surface protein-119 , correlating with parasite load. Classical class switching was seen from an early IgM to an IgG1-dominant response of increasing affinity. Malaria-specific T-cell responses were detected in the form of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4) ELIspot, but their magnitude did not correlate with the magnitude of antibody or its avidity, or with parasite load. Different individuals who were immunized with a virosome vaccine comprising influenza antigens combined with P. falciparum antigens, demonstrated pre-existing interferon-γ, IL-2 and IL-5 ELIspot responses against the influenza antigens, and showed boosting of anti-influenza T-cell responses only for IL-5. The large IgG1-dominated anti-parasite responses showed limited correlation with T-cell responses for magnitude or avidity, both parameters being only negatively correlated for IL-5 secretion versus anti-apical membrane antigen-1 antibody titres. Overall, these findings suggest that cognate T-cell responses across a range of magnitudes contribute towards driving potentially effective antibody responses in infection-induced and vaccine-induced immunity against malaria, and their existence during immunization is beneficial, but magnitudes are mostly not inter-related. PMID:25471322

  12. Immunization with Immune Complexes Modulates the Fine Specificity of Antibody Responses to a Flavivirus Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Tsouchnikas, Georgios; Zlatkovic, Juergen; Jarmer, Johanna; Strauß, Judith; Vratskikh, Oksana; Kundi, Michael; Stiasny, Karin; Heinz, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    The antibody response to proteins may be modulated by the presence of preexisting antigen-specific antibodies and the formation of immune complexes (ICs). Effects such as a general increase or decrease of the response as well as epitope-specific phenomena have been described. In this study, we investigated influences of IC immunization on the fine specificity of antibody responses in a structurally well-defined system, using the envelope (E) protein of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus as a...

  13. Decreased Serum Antibody Responses to Recombinant Pneumocystis Antigens in HIV-Infected and Uninfected Current Smokers▿

    OpenAIRE

    Crothers, Kristina; Daly, Kieran R.; Rimland, David; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Butt, Adeel A.; Justice, Amy C.; Djawe, Kpandja; Levin, Linda; Walzer, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Serologic studies can provide important insights into the epidemiology and transmission of Pneumocystis jirovecii. Exposure to P. jirovecii can be assessed by serum antibody responses to recombinant antigens from the major surface glycoprotein (MsgC), although factors that influence the magnitude of the antibody response are incompletely understood. We determined the magnitudes of antibody responses to P. jirovecii in comparison to adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in HIV-infec...

  14. Drug-induced hepatitis superimposed on the presence of anti-SLA antibody: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etxagibel Aitziber

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autoimmune hepatitis is a necroinflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of circulating antibodies, hypergammaglobulinemia, and response to immunosuppression. It has the histological features of chronic hepatitis. The onset is usually insidious, but in some patients the presentation may be acute and occasionally severe. Certain drugs can induce chronic hepatitis mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Different autoantibodies have been associated with this process but they are not detectable after drug withdrawal and clinical resolution. Case presentation We describe a case of drug-induced acute hepatitis associated with antinuclear, antisoluble liver-pancreas and anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies in a 66-year-old woman. Abnormal clinical and biochemical parameters resolved after drug withdrawal, but six months later anti-soluble liver-pancreas antibodies remained positive and liver biopsy showed chronic hepatitis and septal fibrosis. Furthermore, our patient has a HLA genotype associated with autoimmune hepatitis. Conclusion Patient follow-up will disclose whether our patient suffers from an autoimmune disease and if the presence of anti-soluble liver antigens could precede the development of an autoimmune hepatitis, as the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies can precede primary biliary cirrhosis.

  15. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1 −/− mice limits...

  16. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.;

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in...... antibody response was compared to the findings in 12 healthy volunteers with the aim of establishing the optimal time for vaccination. Serum antibodies against 6 of the pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens (types 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C and 23F) contained in the vaccine were determined by an ELISA. Antibody...... response to pneumococcal type antigens was similar in healthy adults and in patients with early stage HD before therapy. After treatment, postvaccination antibody response became negligible. Even up to 7 years after cessation of therapy patients were not able to raise a significant antibody response...

  17. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B; Specht, L; Henrichsen, J;

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in...... antibody response was compared to the findings in 12 healthy volunteers with the aim of establishing the optimal time for vaccination. Serum antibodies against 6 of the pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens (types 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C and 23F) contained in the vaccine were determined by an ELISA. Antibody...... response to pneumococcal type antigens was similar in healthy adults and in patients with early stage HD before therapy. After treatment, postvaccination antibody response became negligible. Even up to 7 years after cessation of therapy patients were not able to raise a significant antibody response....

  18. Antibody response to respiratory syncytial virus infection in children <18 months old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Scarselli, Elisa; Lelii, Mara; Scala, Alessia; Vitelli, Alessandra; Capone, Stefania; Fornili, Marco; Biganzoli, Elia; Orenti, Annalisa; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Principi, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    The development of a safe and effective respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine might be facilitated by knowledge of the natural immune response to this virus. The aims of this study were to evaluate the neutralizing antibody response of a cohort of healthy children <18 months old to RSV infection. During the RSV season, 89 healthy children <18 months old were enrolled and followed up weekly for 12 weeks. At each visit, a nasopharyngeal swab was obtained for RSV detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). During the study period, 2 blood samples were drawn and they were used to determine RSV geometric mean neutralizing antibody titres (GMT) against RSV. A total of 35 (39.3%) children had RSV detected during the study period. Among RSV-positive patients, children ≥7 months showed a significantly higher increase in antibody response (p<0.001). A significantly higher number of patients with a ≥4 -fold increase in GMT were ≥7 months old (p = 0.02) and presented lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) during the study period (p = 0.01). Viral shedding was longer among children aged ≥7 months (p = 0.06), those with viral load ≥10(6) copies/mL (p = 0.03), and those with LRTIs during the study period (p = 0.03), but it was not associated with the immune response (p = 0.41). In conclusion, natural RSV infection seems to evoke a low immune response in younger children. To be effective in this infant population, which is at highest risk of developing severe LRTIs, vaccines must be able to induce in the first months of life a stronger immune response than that produced by the natural infection. PMID:26901128

  19. Age affects quantity but not quality of antibody responses after vaccination with an inactivated flavivirus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Stiasny

    Full Text Available The impairment of immune functions in the elderly (immunosenescence results in post-vaccination antibody titers that are significantly lower than in young individuals. It is, however, a controversial question whether also the quality of antibodies declines with age. In this study, we have therefore investigated the age-dependence of functional characteristics of antibody responses induced by vaccination with an inactivated flavivirus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE. For this purpose, we quantified TBE virus-specific IgG and neutralizing antibody titers in post-vaccination sera from groups of young and elderly healthy adults and determined antibody avidities and NT/ELISA titer ratios (functional activity. In contrast to the quantitative impairment of antibody production in the elderly, we found no age-related differences in the avidity and functional activity of antibodies induced by vaccination, which also appeared to be independent of the age at primary immunization. There was no correlation between antibody avidity and NT/ELISA ratios suggesting that additional factors affect the quality of polyclonal responses, independent of age. Our work indicates that healthy elderly people are able to produce antibodies in response to vaccination with similar avidity and functional activity as young individuals, albeit at lower titers.

  20. IgE antibody responses in schistosomiasis measured by a radioallergosorbent test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helminth infections are associated with the production of unusually high concentrations of circulating IgE antibody. Assays for IgE antibodies should provide useful approaches for the study of protective immunity and may also be of use in serodiagnosis of diseases induced by helminths. The radioallergosorbent test is carried out by attaching the antigen or allergen to an insoluble supportive material, allowing the IgE antibodies in the test serum to react with excess bound antigen, and then estimating the IgE antibody bound by its reaction with 125I-labelled goat anti-human IgE antibody

  1. Heterosubtypic antiviral activity of hemagglutinin-specific antibodies induced by intranasal immunization with inactivated influenza viruses in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieko Muramatsu

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus subtypes are classified on the basis of the antigenicity of their envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA; H1-H17 and neuraminidase. Since HA-specific neutralizing antibodies are predominantly specific for a single HA subtype, the contribution of antibodies to the heterosubtypic immunity is not fully understood. In this study, mice were immunized intranasally or subcutaneously with viruses having the H1, H3, H5, H7, H9, or H13 HA subtype, and cross-reactivities of induced IgG and IgA antibodies to recombinant HAs of the H1-H16 subtypes were analyzed. We found that both subcutaneous and intranasal immunizations induced antibody responses to multiple HAs of different subtypes, whereas IgA was not detected remarkably in mice immunized subcutaneously. Using serum, nasal wash, and trachea-lung wash samples of H9 virus-immunized mice, neutralizing activities of cross-reactive antibodies were then evaluated by plaque-reduction assays. As expected, no heterosubtypic neutralizing activity was detected by a standard neutralization test in which viruses were mixed with antibodies prior to inoculation into cultured cells. Interestingly, however, a remarkable reduction of plaque formation and extracellular release of the H12 virus, which was bound by the H9-induced cross-reactive antibodies, was observed when infected cells were subsequently cultured with the samples containing HA-specific cross-reactive IgA. This heterosubtypic plaque reduction was interfered when the samples were pretreated with anti-mouse IgA polyclonal serum. These results suggest that the majority of HA-specific cross-reactive IgG and IgA antibodies produced by immunization do not block cellular entry of viruses, but cross-reactive IgA may have the potential to inhibit viral egress from infected cells and thus to play a role in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A viruses.

  2. Interplay of foot-and-mouth disease virus, antibodies and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: virus opsonization under non-neutralizing conditions results in enhanced interferon-alpha responses

    OpenAIRE

    Lannes Nils; Python Sylvie; Summerfield Artur

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly infectious member of the Picornaviridae inducing an acute disease of cloven-hoofed species. Vaccine-induced immune protection correlates with the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies but also opsonising antibodies have been proposed as an important mechanism of the immune response contributing to virus clearance by macrophages and leading to the production of type-I interferon (IFN) by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC). T...

  3. Specific antibodies induce apoptosis in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Presas, Ana María; Tato, Patricia; Becker, Ingeborg; Solano, Sandra; Copitin, Natalia; Kopitin, Natalia; Berzunza, Miriam; Willms, Kaethe; Hernández, Joselin; Molinari, José Luis

    2010-05-01

    The susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes to lysis by normal or immune sera in a complement-dependent reaction has been reported. Mouse immune sera depleted complement-induced damage in epimastigotes characterized by morphological changes and death. The purpose of this work was to study the mechanism of death in epimastigotes exposed to decomplemented mouse immune serum. Epimastigotes were maintained in RPMI medium. Immune sera were prepared in mice by immunization with whole crude epimastigote extracts. Viable epimastigotes were incubated with decomplemented normal or immune sera at 37 degrees C. By electron microscopy, agglutinated parasites showed characteristic patterns of membrane fusion between two or more parasites; this fusion also produced interdigitation of the subpellicular microtubules. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and annexin V assays. Nuclear features were examined by 4'-,6-diamidino-2'-phenylindole diHCI cytochemistry that demonstrated apoptotic nuclear condensation. Caspase activity was also measured. TUNEL results showed that parasites incubated with decomplemented immune sera took up 26% of specific fluorescence as compared to 1.3% in parasites incubated with decomplemented normal sera. The Annexin-V-Fluos staining kit revealed that epimastigotes incubated with decomplemented immune sera exposed phosphatidylserine on the external leaflet of the plasma membrane. The incubation of parasites with immune sera showed caspase 3 activity. We conclude that specific antibodies are able to induce agglutination and apoptosis in epimastigotes, although the pathway is not elucidated. PMID:20237802

  4. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to improve chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  5. The allergy adjuvant effect of particles – genetic factors influence antibody and cytokine responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Løvik Martinus

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing epidemiological and experimental evidence for an aggravating effect of particulate air pollution on asthma and allergic symptoms and, to a lesser extent, on allergic sensitization. Genetic factors appear to influence not only the magnitude, but also the quality of the adjuvant effect of particles with respect to allergen-specific IgE (Th2-associated and IgG2a (Th1-associated responses. In the present study, we aimed to investigate how the genetic background influences the responses to the allergen and particles alone and in combination. We examined how polystyrene particles (PSP affected the IgE and IgG2a responses against the model allergen ovalbumin (OVA, after subcutaneous injection into the footpad of BALB/cA, BALB/cJ, NIH and C3H/HeN mice, Further, ex vivo IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-10 cytokine secretion by Con A-stimulated cells from the draining popliteal lymph node (PLN five days after injection of OVA and PSP separately or in combination was determined. Results PSP injected with OVA increased the levels of OVA-specific IgE antibodies in all strains examined. In contrast, the IgG2a levels were significantly increased only in NIH and C3H/HeN mice. PSP in the presence of OVA increased cell numbers and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels in BALB/cA, NIH and C3H/HeN mice, with the exception of IFN-γ in NIH mice. However, each mouse strain had their unique pattern of response to OVA+PSP, OVA and PSP, and also their unique background cytokine response (i.e. the cytokine response in cells from mice injected with buffer only. Conclusion Genetic factors (i.e. the strain of mice influenced the susceptibility to the adjuvant effect of PSP on both secondary antibody responses and primary cellular responses in the lymph node, as well as the cellular responses to both OVA and PSP given separately. Interestingly, PSP alone induced cytokine responses in the lymph node in some of the mouse strains. Furthermore, we found that

  6. Mucosal Antibodies Induced by Intranasal but Not Intramuscular Immunization Block Norovirus GII.4 Virus-Like Particle Receptor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) account for the majority of diagnosed cases of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines against NoV are currently under development. Serum antibodies that block the binding of NoV VLPs to histo-blood group antigens, the putative receptors for NoV, correlate with protection against NoV infection. The role of functional mucosal antibodies in protection is largely unknown, even though the intestinal mucosa is the entry port for NoV. Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly (IM) or intranasally (IN) with NoV GII.4 VLPs, and systemic and mucosal blocking antibody responses were studied. IN immunization elicited NoV-specific serum and mucosal IgG and IgA antibodies, whereas IM immunized animals completely lacked IgA. Both immunization routes induced similar blocking activity in serum but only IN route generated blocking antibodies in mucosa. The level of IgA in the mucosal (nasal) lavages strongly correlated (r = 0.841) with the blocking activity, suggesting that IgA, but not IgG, is the major NoV blocking antibody on mucosal surfaces. The results indicate that only mucosal immunization route induces the development of functional anti-NoV IgA on mucosal surface. PMID:27135874

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Jafarzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI. Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L in 90-99% of vaccinees.The lack of  response to  HBsAg has  been attributed  to a variety of  immunological mechanisms, including defect in antigen presentation, defect in HBsAg-specific T and/or B cell repertoires, T-cell suppression, increase in the regulatory T cell count, lack of necessary help of T-cells for production of anti-HBs by B cells, defect in Th1 and/or Th2 cytokine production  and  selective  killing  of  HBsAg-specific  B-cells  by  human  leukocyte  antigen (HLA-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The HLA complex plays an important role in many of these immunological processes.A variety of HLA class I, II, and III alleles and antigens have been reported to beassociated with antibody response to HBsAg vaccination in different ethnic populations. Moreover, some HLA haplotypes were also associated with responsiveness to HBsAg.In this review the association of the HLA specificities with antibody response to hepatitis B (HB vaccine is discussed.

  8. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

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    Natalia Makarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV. RESULTS: Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  9. A truncated receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV spike protein potently inhibits MERS-CoV infection and induces strong neutralizing antibody responses: implication for developing therapeutics and vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanying Du

    Full Text Available An emerging respiratory infectious disease with high mortality, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS, is caused by a novel coronavirus (MERS-CoV. It was first reported in 2012 in Saudi Arabia and has now spread to eight countries. Development of effective therapeutics and vaccines is crucial to save lives and halt the spread of MERS-CoV. Here, we show that a recombinant protein containing a 212-amino acid fragment (residues 377-588 in the truncated receptor-binding domain (RBD: residues 367-606 of MERS-CoV spike (S protein fused with human IgG Fc fragment (S377-588-Fc is highly expressed in the culture supernatant of transfected 293T cells. The purified S377-588-Fc protein efficiently binds to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4, the receptor of MERS-CoV, and potently inhibited MERS-CoV infection, suggesting its potential to be further developed as a therapeutic modality for treating MERS-CoV infection and saving the patients' lives. The recombinant S377-588-Fc is able to induce in the vaccinated mice strong MERS-CoV S-specific antibodies, which blocks the binding of RBD to DPP4 receptor and effectively neutralizes MERS-CoV infection. These findings indicate that this truncated RBD protein shows promise for further development as an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of MERS-CoV infection.

  10. Antibody Response to Actinomyces Antigen and Dental Caries Experience: Implications for Caries Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Martin; Owen, Willis L; Avery, Kevin T

    2005-01-01

    Fluoridated dentifrices reduce dental caries in subjects who perform effective oral hygiene. Actinomyces naeslundii increases in teeth-adherent microbial biofilms (plaques) in these subjects, and a well-characterized serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response (Actinomyces antibody [A-Ab]) is also increased. Other studies suggest that a serum IgG antibody response to streptococcal d-alanyl poly(glycerophosphate) (S-Ab) may indicate caries experience associated strongly with gingival health...

  11. Mutations in Antibody Fragments Modulate Allosteric Response Via Hydrogen-Bond Network Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Livesay, Dennis R; Jacobs, Donald J

    2016-05-10

    A mechanical perturbation method that locally restricts conformational entropy along the protein backbone is used to identify putative allosteric sites in a series of antibody fragments. The method is based on a distance constraint model that integrates mechanical and thermodynamic viewpoints of protein structure wherein mechanical clamps that mimic substrate or cosolute binding are introduced. Across a set of six single chain-Fv fragments of the anti-lymphotoxin-β receptor antibody, statistically significant responses are obtained by averaging over 10 representative structures sampled from a molecular dynamics simulation. As expected, the introduced clamps locally rigidify the protein, but long-ranged increases in both rigidity and flexibility are also frequently observed. Expanding our analysis to every molecular dynamics frame demonstrates that the allosteric responses are modulated by fluctuations within the hydrogen-bond network where the native ensemble is comprised of conformations that both are, and are not, affected by the perturbation in question. Population shifts induced by the mutations alter the allosteric response by adjusting which hydrogen-bond networks are the most probable. These effects are compared using response maps that track changes across each single chain-Fv fragment, thus providing valuable insight into how sensitive allosteric mechanisms are to mutations. PMID:27166802

  12. Antibody and T cell responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in health and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Shin

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9. The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3(+CD4(+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  13. Systemic antibody response to nano-size calcium phospate biocompatible adjuvant adsorbed HEV-71 killed vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Since 1980s, human enterovirus-71 virus (HEV-71) is one of the common infectious disease in Asian Pacific region since late 1970s without effective commercial antiviral or protective vaccine is unavailable yet. The work examines the role of vaccine adjuvant particle size and the route of administration on postvaccination antibody response towards HEV-71 vaccine adsorbed to calcium phosphate (CaP) adjuvant. Materials and Methods First, CaP nano-particles were compared to a commercial micro-size and vaccine alone. Secondly, intradermal reduced dosage was compared to the conventional intramuscular immunization. Killed HEV-71 vaccines adsorbed to CaP nano-size (73 nm) and commercial one of micro-size (1.7 µm) were administered through intradermal, intramuscular, rabbits received vaccine alone and unvaccinated animals. Results CaP nano-particles adsorbed HEV-71 vaccine displayed higher antibody than the micro-size or unadsorbed vaccine alone, through both parenteral immunization routes. Moreover, the intradermal route (0.5 µg/mL) of 0.1-mL volume per vaccine dose induced equal IgG antibody level to 1.0-mL intramuscular route (0.5 µg/mL). Conclusion The intradermal vaccine adsorbed CaP nano-adjuvant showed safer and significant antibody response after one-tenth reduced dose quantity (0.5 µg/mL) of only 0.1-mL volume as the most suitable protective, cost effective and affordable formulation not only for HEV-71; but also for developing further effective vaccines toward other human pathogens. PMID:25649429

  14. Induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV coreceptor CCR5 upon intramuscular immunization and aerosol delivery of a Virus-like Particle based vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Z; Smyth, HD; Durfee, P; Chackerian, B

    2009-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be exploited as platforms to increase the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic antigens, including self-proteins. We have developed VLP-based vaccines that target two domains of the HIV coreceptor CCR5 that are involved in HIV binding. These vaccines induce anti-CCR5 antibodies that bind to native CCR5 and inhibit SIV infection in vitro. Given the role of mucosal surfaces in HIV transmission and replication, we also asked whether an aerosolized, VLP-based pulmonary vaccine targeting CCR5 could induce a robust mucosal response in addition to a systemic response. In rats, both intramuscular and pulmonary immunization induced high titer IgG and IgA against the vaccine in the serum, but only aerosol vaccination induced IgA antibodies at local mucosal sites. An intramuscular prime followed by an aerosol boost resulted in strong serum and mucosal antibody responses. These results show that VLP-based vaccines targeting CCR5 induce high-titer systemic antibodies, and can elicit both local and systemic mucosal response when administered via an aerosol. Vaccination against a self-molecule that is critically involved during HIV transmission and pathogenesis is an alternative to targeting the virus itself. More generally, our results provide a general method for inducing broad systemic and mucosal antibody responses using VLP-based immunogens. PMID:19849995

  15. Mimotopes selected with a neutralizing antibody against urease B from Helicobacter pylori induce enzyme inhibitory antibodies in mice upon vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Min

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urease B is an important virulence factor that is required for Helicobacter pylori to colonise the gastric mucosa. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that inhibit urease B enzymatic activity will be useful as vaccines for the prevention and treatment of H. pylori infection. Here, we produced murine mAbs against urease B that neutralize the enzyme's activity. We mapped their epitopes by phage display libraries and investigated the immunogenicity of the selected mimotopes in vivo. Results The urease B gene was obtained (GenBank accession No. DQ141576 and the recombinant pGEX-4T-1/UreaseB protein was expressed in Escherichia coli as a 92-kDa recombinant fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase (GST. Five mAbs U001-U005 were produced by a hybridoma-based technique with urease B-GST as an immunogen. Only U001 could inhibit urease B enzymatic activity. Immunoscreening via phage display libraries revealed two different mimotopes of urease B protein; EXXXHDM from ph.D.12-library and EXXXHSM from ph.D.C7C that matched the urease B proteins at 347-353 aa. The antiserum induced by selected phage clones clearly recognised the urease B protein and inhibited its enzymatic activity, which indicated that the phagotope-induced immune responses were antigen specific. Conclusions The present work demonstrated that phage-displayed mimotopes were accessible to the mouse immune system and triggered a humoral response. The urease B mimotope could provide a novel and promising approach for the development of a vaccine for the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori infection.

  16. Morning vaccination enhances antibody response over afternoon vaccination: A cluster-randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Joanna E.; Drayson, Mark T; Taylor, Angela E.; Toellner, Kai M.; Lord, Janet M.; Phillips, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Highlights • Early small studies provide mixed evidence for effects of time of vaccination on antibody response. • This is the first large scale randomised trial of different times of vaccination. • Morning vaccination enhances the antibody response to the influenza vaccine. • This simple manipulation is cost neutral and may improve protection from influenza in older adults.

  17. Detection of newly antibody-defined epitopes on HLA class I alleles reacting with antibodies induced during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, R J; Hönger, G; Hösli, I; Marrari, M; Schaub, S

    2016-08-01

    The determination of HLA mismatch acceptability at the epitope level can be best performed with epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. The website-based International Registry of HLA Epitopes (http://www.epregistry.com.br) has a list of 81 antibody-verified HLA-ABC epitopes but more epitopes need to be added. Pregnancy offers an attractive model to study antibody responses to mismatched HLA epitopes which can be readily determined from the HLA types of child and mother. This report describes a HLAMatchmaker-based analysis of 16 postpregnancy sera tested in single HLA-ABC allele binding assays. Most sera reacted with alleles carrying epitopes that have been antibody-verified, and this study focused on the reactivity of additional alleles that share other epitopes corresponding to eplets and other amino acid residue configurations. This analysis led in the identification of 16 newly antibody-defined epitopes, seven are equivalent to eplets and nine correspond to combinations of eplets in combination with other nearby residue configurations. These epitopes will be added to the repertoire of antibody-verified epitopes in the HLA Epitope Registry. PMID:27312793

  18. A single dose biodegradable vaccine depot that induces persistently high levels of antibody over a year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Brendon Y; Sekiya, Toshiki; Al Kobaisi, Mohammad; Short, Kirsty R; Mainwaring, David E; Jackson, David C

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we describe a biodegradable vaccine depot which persists in vivo for at least 4-months, provides synergistic adjuvant effects and also allows dose sparing of both antigen and adjuvant. A single administration results in immediate release of a priming dose of vaccine, by a process of syneresis, which is then followed by release of remaining vaccine which maintains robust antibody levels that last for more than a year. The platform technology comprises two aqueous components; one contains chitosan and hydroxyapatite, in which the vaccine is incorporated, and the other consists of a crosslinking agent, tripolyphosphate (TPP) and chondroitin sulphate. When co-injected into tissue, they spontaneously crosslink forming a firm yet compliant vaccine-containing depot. Whole body imaging of animals inoculated with the material show that the depot persists in situ for up to 19 weeks. Vaccination of mice with depot formulations containing ovalbumin (OVA) emulsified in Montanide ISA 61 adjuvant results in the induction of robust antibody responses using doses of adjuvant 40-fold less than those recommended by the manufacturer. Dose sparing effects were also apparent with antigen when delivered in the depot. Similar dose sparing effects were observed with Montanide ISA 50, complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvants but not with aluminium hydroxide nor Quil A. Antibody titres, induced by a single dose of antigen/adjuvant formulation incorporated in the depot, persisted at high levels for at least 55 weeks following a single dose of vaccine. PMID:25890706

  19. Characterization of isotypes of antibody response against leishmania parasite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELIZA) was developed to detect IgG,IgM and IgA response in visceral leishmaniasis patients (VL) against L.donovain and L. major antigens compared to control groups; cutaneous leishmaniasis patients (CL), mucosal leishmaniasis patients (ML), patients with other tropical diseases and healthy controls.Highly specific IgG were found in VL patients with test specificity (93.7%) and sensitivity(93.4%). A moderate IgG were found in VL patients but non-specific while no IgA were detected in all studied groups. Also VL patients showed high specificity and sensitivity (95.2 and 96.6% respectively) against L.major antigen.The distribution of IgG subclasses (IgG1,IgG2,IgG3 and IgG4) antibodies in VL patients were assayed.IgG3 showed the highest specificity and sensitivity and titers followed by IgG1.Also the diagnostic value of ELIZA test for different leishmaniasis forms were discussed. (Author)

  20. Influence of protein expression system on elicitation of IgE antibody responses: experience with lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Rachael J; Flanagan, Brian F; Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2012-11-15

    With increased interest in genetically modified (GM) crop plants there is an important need to understand the properties that contribute to the ability of such novel proteins to provoke immune and/or allergic responses. One characteristic that may be relevant is glycosylation, particularly as novel expression systems (e.g. bacterial to plant) will impact on the protein glycoprofile. The allergenicity (IgE inducing) and immunogenicity (IgG inducing) properties of wild type native human lactoferrin (NLF) from human milk (hm) and neutrophil granules (n) and a recombinant molecule produced in rice (RLF) have been assessed. These forms of lactoferrin have identical amino acid sequences, but different glycosylation patterns: hmNLF and nNLF have complex glycoprofiles including Lewis (Le)(x) structures, with particularly high levels of Le(x) expressed by nNLF, whereas RLF is simpler and rich in mannose residues. Antibody responses induced in BALB/c strain mice by intraperitoneal exposure to the different forms of lactoferrin were characterised. Immunisation with both forms of NLF stimulated substantial IgG and IgE antibody responses. In contrast, the recombinant molecule was considerably less immunogenic and failed to stimulate detectable IgE, irrespective of endotoxin and iron content. The glycans did not contribute to epitope formation, with equivalent IgE and IgG binding recorded for high titre anti-NLF antisera regardless of whether the immunising NLF or the recombinant molecule were used substrates in the analyses. These data demonstrate that differential glycosylation profiles can have a profound impact on protein allergenicity and immunogenicity, with mannose and Le(x) exhibiting opposing effects. These results have clear relevance for characterising the allergenic hazards of novel proteins in GM crops. PMID:22813905

  1. Impact of Fighting on Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Virus Vaccine in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng; Li, Xin; Wan, Min; Hua, Li; Xiao, Yue; Dong, Boqi; Liu, Jialin; Diao, Wenzhen; Yu, Yongli; Wang, Liying

    2015-11-01

    Antibody responses to vaccines can be influenced by various behavioral and psychosocial factors. Few reports exist on the impact of fighting on antibody response to vaccines. This study unexpectedly found that fighting could significantly enhance antibody production in male mice immunized with hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines. To confirm the finding, a mouse-fighting model was established in which it was observed that only intense fighting, not mild fighting, enhanced the antibody response to HBV surface antigen in male mice, and that the frequency of fighting and active attacks during fighting showed no obvious relationship with the antibody levels in the male mice that experienced fighting. In addition, fighting can cause significant upregulation of CD80 in CD11c(+) cells in the spleen of male mice. These data suggest that fighting could influence the humoral immune response in individuals immunized with vaccines or infected with microbes. PMID:26417964

  2. Longitudinal study of interferon-gamma, serum antibody and milk antibody responses in cattle infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, A.; Jungersen, Gregers; Lind, Peter

    During a 2-year study period, 252 animals from dairy herds infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 119 animals from non-infected herds were subjected to repeated blood and faecal sampling. Animals were retrospectively grouped by infection status as infected, exposed (culture......-blood lymphocytes (IFN-gamma test), and measurement of antibody responses against M. paratuberculosis in serum and milk by an in-house absorbed ELISA. The IFN-gamma test diagnosed higher proportions of infected and exposed animals than the antibody ELISAs. The highest sensitivity of IFN-gamma test was in infected...... compared with repeated samplings showed better performance of the IFN-gamma test by repeated samplings, and the milk antibody ELISA in animals of 3+ years of age performed significantly better with repeated sampling compared with single sampling. In conclusion, the IFN-gamma test may be applied for...

  3. Human antibody response to herpes simplex virus-specific polypeptides after primary and recurrent infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlon, J; Lakeman, F. D.; Ackermann, M; Whitley, R J

    1986-01-01

    Human antibody responses to specific polypeptides of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively) were assessed in serial serum specimens from 18 infected patients by immunoblot technology. Nine patients had HSV-1 infections (six genital and three oral) and nine had HSV-2 genital infections. Antibodies to homologous and heterologous HSV antigens were studied and correlated with total microneutralization and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibodies as well as correlat...

  4. Impaired Antigen-Specific Immune Response to Vaccines in Children with Antibody Production Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra; Breborowicz, Anna; Samara, Husam; Ossowska, Lidia; Dworacki, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    The impaired synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies, which is indispensable for an adaptive immune response to infections, is a fundamental pathomechanism that leads to clinical manifestations in children with antibody production defects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies following immunization in relation to peripheral blood B cell subsets in young children with hypogammaglobulinemia. Twenty-two children, aged from 8 to 61 months, with a def...

  5. Antibody responses of horses to equine influenza viruses during a postepizootic period in Japan.

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, H; Shimizu, K; Taya, Y; Noda, H; Tokunaga, T

    1982-01-01

    The antibody responses to equine influenza viruses were investigated during a postepizootic period of the disease. Serum samples were collected from a total of 128 horses on three occasions during the years 1967-77. No significant increase of hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titers to subtypes 1 and 2 of equine influenza virus were detected in any of the sera tested. The maternal hemagglutination-inhibition antibody titers of foals decreased over a four month interval. A marked increase o...

  6. Masking of antigenic epitopes by antibodies shapes the humoral immune response to influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnitsyna, Veronika I; Ellebedy, Ali H; Davis, Carl; Jacob, Joshy; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom

    2015-09-01

    The immune responses to influenza, a virus that exhibits strain variation, show complex dynamics where prior immunity shapes the response to the subsequent infecting strains. Original antigenic sin (OAS) describes the observation that antibodies to the first encountered influenza strain, specifically antibodies to the epitopes on the head of influenza's main surface glycoprotein, haemagglutinin (HA), dominate following infection with new drifted strains. OAS suggests that responses to the original strain are preferentially boosted. Recent studies also show limited boosting of the antibodies to conserved epitopes on the stem of HA, which are attractive targets for a 'universal vaccine'. We develop multi-epitope models to explore how pre-existing immunity modulates the immune response to new strains following immunization. Our models suggest that the masking of antigenic epitopes by antibodies may play an important role in describing the complex dynamics of OAS and limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA. Analysis of recently published data confirms model predictions for how pre-existing antibodies to an epitope on HA decrease the magnitude of boosting of the antibody response to this epitope following immunization. We explore strategies for boosting of antibodies to conserved epitopes and generating broadly protective immunity to multiple strains. PMID:26194761

  7. Effect of concurrent intratracheal lipopolysaccharide and human serum albumin challenge on primary and secondary antibody responses in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, H K; Klompen, A L; De Vries Reilingh, G; Lammers, A

    2008-10-01

    Activation of the innate immune system by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) may direct specific immune responses and as a consequence probably significantly affect vaccination. Previously, we described modulation of specific antibody responses to systemically administered model antigens by intravenously (i.v.) as well as intratracheally (i.t.) administered PAMP such as the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In this study effects of various doses of i.t.-administered LPS on primary and secondary specific total and individual isotype (IgM, IgG and IgA)-specific antibody responses of chickens simultaneously i.t. challenged with various doses of human serum albumin (HuSA) were determined. i.t.-administered LPS enhanced primary and secondary HuSA-specific total and isotype-specific antibody titers depending on the dose of LPS and the dose of simultaneously administered HuSA. i.t.-administered HuSA enhanced primary and secondary total antibody responses to 'environmental' LPS as shown in birds receiving the zero i.t. LPS treatment, which also depended on dose of HuSA. HuSA administration decreased antibody responses to high doses of LPS. Body weight gain as a measurement of an acute phase cachectin response to LPS was affected by a HuSA by LPS interaction, indicating that simultaneously administered higher doses of HuSA decreased LPS-induced cachectin responses of the birds. Our results suggest a complex interaction of innate and specific immune system activating airborne antigens, which may have significant consequences for vaccination and husbandry management procedures. PMID:18694797

  8. Acute infection by hepatitis E virus with a slight immunoglobulin M antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yuki; Oshiro, Yukio; Imanishi, Mamiko; Ishige, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody response is generally regarded as a useful marker for diagnosing primary infection. However, in some cases, this antibody is not detected during the acute phase of infection. An 81-year-old man with stable membranous nephropathy who presented with asymptomatic acute liver dysfunction came to our hospital. HEV RNA of genotype 3 was detected in his serum, and he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis E. According to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, high-level positivity for anti-HEV IgG and IgA antibodies was observed, but the assay was negative for IgM antibody throughout the clinical course of infection. The patient was not immunosuppressed. We further investigated the presence of IgM antibody using two other polyclonal antibodies against human IgM as secondary antibodies and another recombinant ORF2 protein of genotype 3 as an immobilized antigen. IgM was weakly detected in the serum during the acute phase only by the test with the antigen of genotype 3. Multi-genotype antigens can detect a slight IgM antibody response; however, anti-HEV IgA is more useful in diagnosing primary HEV infection, particularly in cases with a low IgM antibody response. PMID:26215116

  9. IgA Antibody Response of Swine to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection and Vaccination▿ #

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Juan M.; Butler, John E.; Jew, Jessica; Ferman, Geoffrey S.; Zhu, James; Golde, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) continues to be a significant economic problem worldwide. Control of the disease involves the use of killed-virus vaccines, a control measure developed decades ago. After natural infection, the primary site of replication of FMDV is the pharyngeal area, suggesting that a mucosal immune response is the most effective. Humoral immunity to killed-virus vaccination induces antibodies that can prevent the clinical disease but not local infection. Determining whe...

  10. Antibody response of definitive hosts against antigens of two life stages of the neuropathogenic schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti

    OpenAIRE

    Turjanicová, Libuše; Mikeš, Libor; Pecková, Monika; Horák, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Background The nasal avian schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti spends part of its intravertebrate period of life within the central nervous system. Migration of the parasites can be accompanied by neuromotor disorders or paralysis in natural definitive hosts (ducks) and even in laboratory mammals. Cercariae are also able to penetrate human skin and induce cercarial dermatitis. While the cellular and antibody responses against cercariae and migrating schistosomula have been investigated in mic...

  11. Wildtype p53-specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses in Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune;

    2011-01-01

    Mutation in the p53 gene based on single amino acid substitutions is a frequent event in human cancer. Accumulated mutant p53 protein is released to antigen presenting cells of the immune system and anti-p53 immune responses even against wt p53 is induced and observed in a number of human cancer...... patients. Detection of antibodies against wt p53 protein has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker and discovery of new T-cell epitopes has enabled design of cancer vaccination protocols with promising results. Here, we identified wt p53-specific antibodies in various cancer patients and...... identified a broad range of responses against wt p53 protein and 15-mer peptides using a novel print array technology. Likewise, using bioinformatic tools in silico, we identified CD8 T-cell specificity or reactivity against HLA-A*02:01 binding peptides wt p53(65-73), wt p53(187-197), and wt p53(264-272) in...

  12. A genetically detoxified derivative of heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin induces neutralizing antibodies against the A subunit

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli enterotoxin (LT) and the homologous cholera toxin (CT) are A-B toxins that cause travelers' diarrhea and cholera, respectively. So far, experimental live and killed vaccines against these diseases have been developed using only the nontoxic B portion of these toxins. The enzymatically active A subunit has not been used because it is responsible for the toxicity and it is reported to induce a negligible titer of toxin neutralizing antibodies. We used site- directed mutagenesis...

  13. Optimizing selection of large animals for antibody production by screening immune response to standard vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mary K; Fridy, Peter C; Keegan, Sarah; Chait, Brian T; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies made in large animals are integral to many biomedical research endeavors. Domesticated herd animals like goats, sheep, donkeys, horses and camelids all offer distinct advantages in antibody production. However, their cost of use is often prohibitive, especially where poor antigen response is commonplace; choosing a non-responsive animal can set a research program back or even prevent experiments from moving forward entirely. Over the course of production of antibodies from llamas, we found that some animals consistently produced a higher humoral antibody response than others, even to highly divergent antigens, as well as to their standard vaccines. Based on our initial data, we propose that these "high level responders" could be pre-selected by checking antibody titers against common vaccines given to domestic farm animals. Thus, time and money can be saved by reducing the chances of getting poor responding animals and minimizing the use of superfluous animals. PMID:26775851

  14. Neuraminidase inhibiting antibody responses in pigs differ between influenza A virus N2 lineages and by vaccine type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandbulte, Matthew R; Gauger, Phillip C; Kitikoon, Pravina; Chen, Hongjun; Perez, Daniel R; Roth, James A; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-07-19

    The neuraminidase (NA) protein of influenza A viruses (IAV) has important functional roles in the viral replication cycle. Antibodies specific to NA can reduce viral replication and limit disease severity, but are not routinely measured. We analyzed NA inhibiting (NI) antibody titers in serum and respiratory specimens of pigs vaccinated with intramuscular whole-inactivated virus (WIV), intranasal live-attenuated influenza virus (LAIV), and intranasal wild type (WT) IAV. NI titers were also analyzed in sera from an investigation of piglet vaccination in the presence of passive maternally-derived antibodies. Test antigens contained genetically divergent swine-lineage NA genes homologous or heterologous to the vaccines with mismatched hemagglutinin genes (HA). Naïve piglets responded to WIV and LAIV vaccines and WT infection with strong homologous serum NI titers. Cross-reactivity to heterologous NAs depended on the degree of genetic divergence between the NA genes. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens of LAIV and WT-immunized groups also had significant NI titers against the homologous antigen whereas the WIV group did not. Piglets of vaccinated sows received high levels of passive NI antibody, but their NI responses to homologous LAIV vaccination were impeded. These data demonstrate the utility of the enzyme-linked lectin assay for efficient NI antibody titration of serum as well as respiratory tract secretions. Swine IAV vaccines that induce robust NI responses are likely to provide broader protection against the diverse and rapidly evolving IAV strains that circulate in pig populations. Mucosal antibodies to NA may be one of the protective immune mechanisms induced by LAIV vaccines. PMID:27325350

  15. Immune history shapes specificity of pandemic H1N1 influenza antibody responses

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yang; Myers, Jaclyn L.; Bostick, David L; Sullivan, Colleen B.; Madara, Jonathan; Linderman, Susanne L.; Liu, Qin; Carter, Donald M.; Wrammert, Jens; Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Ross, Ted M.; Ahmed, Rafi; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Human antibody responses against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus are predominantly directed against conserved epitopes in the stalk and receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. This is in stark contrast to pH1N1 antibody responses generated in ferrets, which are focused on the variable Sa antigenic site of HA. Here, we show that most humans born between 1983 and 1996 elicited pH1N1 antibody responses that are directed against an epitope near the HA receptor–binding doma...

  16. Oral Application of T4 Phage Induces Weak Antibody Production in the Gut and in the Blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Majewska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A specific humoral response to bacteriophages may follow phage application for medical purposes, and it may further determine the success or failure of the approach itself. We present a long-term study of antibody induction in mice by T4 phage applied per os: 100 days of phage treatment followed by 112 days without the phage, and subsequent second application of phage up to day 240. Serum and gut antibodies (IgM, IgG, secretory IgA were analyzed in relation to microbiological status of the animals. T4 phage applied orally induced anti-phage antibodies when the exposure was long enough (IgG day 36, IgA day 79; the effect was related to high dosage. Termination of phage treatment resulted in a decrease of IgA again to insignificant levels. Second administration of phage induces secretory IgA sooner than that induced by the first administrations. Increased IgA level antagonized gut transit of active phage. Phage resistant E. coli dominated gut flora very late, on day 92. Thus, the immunological response emerges as a major factor determining phage survival in the gut. Phage proteins Hoc and gp12 were identified as highly immunogenic. A low response to exemplary foreign antigens (from Ebola virus presented on Hoc was observed, which suggests that phage platforms can be used in oral vaccine design.

  17. Oral Application of T4 Phage Induces Weak Antibody Production in the Gut and in the Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, Joanna; Beta, Weronika; Lecion, Dorota; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Kłopot, Anna; Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Miernikiewicz, Paulina; Piotrowicz, Agnieszka; Ciekot, Jarosław; Owczarek, Barbara; Kopciuch, Agnieszka; Wojtyna, Karolina; Harhala, Marek; Mąkosa, Mateusz; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2015-08-01

    A specific humoral response to bacteriophages may follow phage application for medical purposes, and it may further determine the success or failure of the approach itself. We present a long-term study of antibody induction in mice by T4 phage applied per os: 100 days of phage treatment followed by 112 days without the phage, and subsequent second application of phage up to day 240. Serum and gut antibodies (IgM, IgG, secretory IgA) were analyzed in relation to microbiological status of the animals. T4 phage applied orally induced anti-phage antibodies when the exposure was long enough (IgG day 36, IgA day 79); the effect was related to high dosage. Termination of phage treatment resulted in a decrease of IgA again to insignificant levels. Second administration of phage induces secretory IgA sooner than that induced by the first administrations. Increased IgA level antagonized gut transit of active phage. Phage resistant E. coli dominated gut flora very late, on day 92. Thus, the immunological response emerges as a major factor determining phage survival in the gut. Phage proteins Hoc and gp12 were identified as highly immunogenic. A low response to exemplary foreign antigens (from Ebola virus) presented on Hoc was observed, which suggests that phage platforms can be used in oral vaccine design. PMID:26308042

  18. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection

  19. Rapid antibody responses by low-dose, single-step, dendritic cell-targeted immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Griffiths, Michelle N.; Burton, Dennis R; Ghazal, Peter

    2000-01-01

    We have compared the kinetics of antibody responses in conventional and dendritic cell-targeted immunization by using a model antigen in mice. Targeting was achieved by linking the reporter antigen (polyclonal goat anti-hamster antibody) to N418, a hamster mAb that binds to the CD11c molecule on the surface of murine dendritic cells. Intradermal injection of submicrogram quantities of goat anti-hamster antibody complexed to mAb N418 elicited goat antibody-specific serum IgG in mice. Antigen-s...

  20. Differential inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced phenomena by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, S N; Havell, E A

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) has been implicated as a major mediator of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced phenomena. Administration to mice of a polyclonal, monospecific antibody prepared against recombinant murine TNF alpha abolished detection of LPS-induced TNF alpha activity and significantly reduced levels of LPS-induced colony-stimulating factor but failed to reduce the production of LPS-induced interferon, corticosterone, or LPS-induced hypoglycemia.

  1. The Early Protective Thymus-Independent Antibody Response to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Is Mediated by Splenic CD9+ B Lymphocytes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrowski, Matias; Vermeulen, Monica; Zabal, Osvaldo; Zamorano, Patricia I; Sadir, Ana M; Jorge R. Geffner; Lopez, Osvaldo J.

    2007-01-01

    Infection of mice with cytopathic foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces a rapid and specific thymus-independent (TI) neutralizing antibody response that promptly clears the virus. Herein, it is shown that FMDV-infected dendritic cells (DCs) directly stimulate splenic innate-like CD9+ B lymphocytes to rapidly (3 days) produce neutralizing anti-FMDV immunoglobulin M antibodies without T-lymphocyte collaboration. In contrast, neither follicular (CD9−) B lymphocytes from the spleen nor B ly...

  2. Antibody Responses After Analytic Treatment Interruption in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Individuals on Early Initiated Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Bricault, Christine A.; Shields, Jennifer; Bayne, Madeleine; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Seaman, Michael S.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    The examination of antibody responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals in the setting of antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption can provide insight into the evolution of antibody responses during viral rebound. In this study, we assessed antibody responses in 20 subjects in AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5187, wherein subjects were treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection, underwent analytic treatment interruption, and subsequently demonstrated viral rebound. Our data suggest that early initiation of ART arrests the maturation of HIV-1-specific antibody responses, preventing epitope diversification of antibody binding and the development of functional neutralizing capacity. Antibody responses do not appear permanently blunted, however, because viral rebound triggered the resumption of antibody maturation in our study. We also found that antibody responses measured by these assays did not predict imminent viral rebound. These data have important implications for the HIV-1 vaccine and eradication fields.

  3. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades. PMID:15640788

  4. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  5. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM (90yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM (131I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades

  6. Characterization of Thyrotropin Receptor Antibody-Induced Signaling Cascades

    OpenAIRE

    Morshed, Syed A.; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2008-01-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) is constitutively active and is further enhanced by TSH ligand binding or by stimulating TSHR antibodies (TSHR-Abs) as seen in Graves’ disease. TSH is known to activate the thyroid epithelial cell via both Gαs-cAMP/protein kinase A/ERK and Gαq-Akt/protein kinase C coupled signaling networks. The recent development of monoclonal antibodies to the TSHR has enabled us to investigate the hypothesis that different TSHR-Abs may have unique signaling imprints that differ from...

  7. Antibody response and clinical reactions in children given measles vaccine with immunoglobulin.

    OpenAIRE

    Lingam, S.; Miller, C L; Clarke, M; Pateman, J

    1986-01-01

    Antibody responses and clinical reactions to three measles vaccines (Attenuvax, Mevilin, and Rimevax) injected into the opposite arm to immunoglobulin were assessed in 45 children with brain disorders making them susceptible to fits if given measles vaccine alone. In this small study no unacceptable reactions occurred and in only three cases was the antibody response minimal or absent. More children in this special category should be considered for vaccination against measles in this way.

  8. Effect of nonprotective vaccination on antibody response to subsequent human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Pincus, S H; Messer, K G; Hu, S L

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the systemic anti-HIV antibody response in chimpanzees who were immunized with live vaccinia containing either the HIV envelope glycoprotein (gp160IIIB) or a control antigen (herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D) and then challenged with either a high dose (300,000 TCID50) or low dose (100 TCID50) of HIVIIIB. HIV was subsequently isolated from all animals, indicating failure of the vaccination to protect against HIV infection. Serum antibody responses were evaluated before...

  9. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-02-18

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia. PMID:25613718

  10. Immunoproteomics analysis of the murine antibody response to vaccination with an improved Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Twine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. An attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS has been shown to be efficacious in humans, but safety concerns have prevented its licensure by the FDA. Recently, F. tularensis LVS has been produced under Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP guidelines. Little is known about the immunogenicity of this new vaccine preparation in comparison with extensive studies conducted with laboratory passaged strains of LVS. Thus, the aim of the current work was to evaluate the repertoire of antibodies produced in mouse strains vaccinated with the new LVS vaccine preparation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to examine the repertoire of antibodies induced following successful immunization of BALB/c versus unsuccessful vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with the new preparation of F. tularensis LVS. Successful vaccination of BALB/c mice elicited antibodies to nine identified proteins that were not recognized by antisera from vaccinated but unprotected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, the CGMP formulation of LVS stimulated a greater repertoire of antibodies following vaccination compared to vaccination with laboratory passaged ATCC LVS strain. A total of 15 immunoreactive proteins were identified in both studies, however, 16 immunoreactive proteins were uniquely reactive with sera from the new formulation of LVS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report characterising the antibody based immune response of the new formulation of LVS in the widely used murine model of tularemia. Using two mouse strains, we show that successfully vaccinated mice can be distinguished from unsuccessfully vaccinated mice based upon the repertoire of antibodies generated. This opens the door towards downselection of antigens for incorporation into tularemia subunit vaccines. In addition, this work

  11. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  12. Antibody response to hidden epitope of influenza a hemagglutinin elicited by anti-idiotypic antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) IIF4 defines an epitope on the HA2 part of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)It was also found this epitope becomes fully accessible after pH 5 treatment of the antigen and is shared by strains of H3 subtype. In this study we found binding of MoAb IIF4 also to some strains belonging to H2, H4, H7, and H10 subtypes. We prepared rabbit polyclonal anti-IIF4 anti-idiotype (anti-Id) antibody. In competitive assays, the inhibition potential of anti-Id was considerably higher than that of native HA. Anti-Id was used for the preparation of mouse Ab3 (anti-anti-IIF4) serum. Reactivity pattern of Ab3 with influenza virus strains differed from Ab1 in in (i) appearance of binding to some strains of H2 and H7 subtype and (ii) decreased dependency of Ab3 binding on the pH forms of antigen. The reactivity of Ab1 and Ab3 with two amantadine-resistant virus mutants indicates that IIF4 epitope (and its related region recognized by Ab3) becomes accessible in consequence of destabilization of trimeric arrangement of HA and it it also correlates with expulsion of N-terminus of HA2. (author)

  13. Discordant antibody and cellular responses to Pneumocystis major surface glycoprotein variants in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishop Lisa R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major surface glycoprotein (Msg of Pneumocystis is encoded by approximately 50 to 80 unique but related genes. Msg diversity may represent a mechanism for immune escape from host T cell responses. We examined splenic T cell proliferative and cytokine as well as serum antibody responses to recombinant and native Pneumocystis antigens in immunized or Pneumocystis-infected mice. In addition, immune responses were examined in 5 healthy humans. Results Proliferative responses to each of two recombinant Msg variant proteins were seen in mice immunized with either recombinant protein, but no proliferation to these antigens was seen in mice immunized with crude Pneumocystis antigens or in mice that had cleared infection, although the latter animals demonstrated proliferative responses to crude Pneumocystis antigens and native Msg. IL-17 and MCP-3 were produced in previously infected animals in response to the same antigens, but not to recombinant antigens. Antibody responses to the recombinant P. murina Msg variant proteins were seen in all groups of animals, demonstrating that all groups were exposed to and mounted immune responses to Msg. No human PBMC samples proliferated following stimulation with P. jirovecii Msg, while antibody responses were detected in sera from 4 of 5 samples. Conclusions Cross-reactive antibody responses to Msg variants are common, while cross-reactive T cell responses are uncommon; these results support the hypothesis that Pneumocystis utilizes switching of Msg variant expression to avoid host T cell responses.

  14. Cellular cooperation during in vivo anti-hapten antibody responses. I. The effect of cell number on the response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular interactions in adoptive secondary anti-hapten antibody responses to the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) have been studied. It was shown that DNP-specific B cells must interact with carrier specific helper T cells to give optimal responses. Independent titration of B cell and helper cell activity in adoptive anti-DNP antibody responses gave the following results: Doubling the number of transferred B cells approximately doubled the subsequent antibody response. Doubling the number of helper cells leads to nearly 4 times as much anti-DNP antibody, measured 7 days after boosting (''premium effect''). This marked effect of helper cell number on the antibody response is thought to be due primarily to the interaction of two populations of carrier-specific cells in the helper effect, or to the interaction of two activities of a single population of helper cells, namely clone activation and clone expansion. Only a very small proportion of the premium effect given by helper cells could be attributed to increases in antibody affinity. (U.S.)

  15. Effects of Cytokine IL-18 Gene on Antibody Production Induced by Ag85A DNA Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENHai-wen; WANGZi-ming; FANXiong-lin; GANWei-min; SHITao; XUZhi-kai; LIYuan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of plasmid containing human IL-18 gene on the humoral immune response of mice immunized by Ag85A DNA vaccines of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 Rv strain. Methods: Human IL-18 cDNA was amplified from RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMCs)by RT-PCR and cloned into the pGEM-TEasy vector.After sequencing IL-18 gene was subcloned into the the sites of BamH I and EooR I digestion of pcDNA3.1. BALB/c mice were injected intramuscularly with eukaryotic expression plasmid pclL18, together with MTB pcAg85A DNA vaccines. The same immunization was repeated three times at intervals of two weeks. Mouse serawere collected at two weeks after the each injection. The titers of anti-Ag85A antibody were detected by ELISA. Results:IL-18 cDNA was amplified successfully from RNA of human PBMCs by RT-PCR and the result of sequencing was correct. The IL-18 gene was correctly inserted into the vector pcDNA3.1, which was confirmed with BamH I and EooR I digestion analysis. The positive plasmid was called pcIL18.After being immtmized with DNA vaccines,the titers of antibody obtained from mice being immtmized by pcAg85A combining with pclL18 were superior to mice inmunized by pcAg85A independently. Conc/us/on: Combination of IL-18 gene with MTB pcAg85A DNA vaccine could observably enhance the humoral immune responses to pcAg85A. It remains further investigated whether IL-18 gene plus MTB pcAg85A DNA vaccine could markedly induce the cellular mediated immune response to Ag85A or not.

  16. Immunoprotective mechanisms in swine within the "grey zone" in antibody response after immunization with foot-and-mouth disease vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liu; Feng, Xia; Jin, Ye; Ma, Junwu; Cai, Hu; Zhang, Xiaoxia

    2016-07-15

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals caused by the FMD virus (FMDV). Vaccination represents one approach for limiting the effects of FMD. The level of protection in vaccinated animals after challenge with foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is closely related to the antibody titer, which can be classified into three zones: a "white zone", a "grey zone", and a "black zone". The aim of the present study was to clarify the immunoprotective mechanisms operating in the grey zone, in which vaccinated animals have intermediate antibody titers, making it difficult to predict the level of protection. Thirty-three pigs were used to analyze the distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations in whole blood and the expression levels of 40 cytokines before vaccination and challenge. The antibody titer in pigs in the grey zone ranged from 1:6-1:45. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte subpopulations, expression levels of Th1 cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-12, IL-15, IL-18, and monocyte interferon gamma inducing factor (MIG), and of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-1α, transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), and TWEAK R varied between protected and unprotected animals. The results of this study suggest that the cellular immune response is the key factor responsible for immunoprotection in vaccinated animals with antibody titers within the grey zone. PMID:27067203

  17. Impaired Antigen-Specific Immune Response to Vaccines in Children with Antibody Production Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczawinska-Poplonyk, Aleksandra; Breborowicz, Anna; Samara, Husam; Ossowska, Lidia; Dworacki, Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    The impaired synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies, which is indispensable for an adaptive immune response to infections, is a fundamental pathomechanism that leads to clinical manifestations in children with antibody production defects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synthesis of antigen-specific antibodies following immunization in relation to peripheral blood B cell subsets in young children with hypogammaglobulinemia. Twenty-two children, aged from 8 to 61 months, with a deficiency in one or more major immunoglobulin classes participated in the study. Postvaccination antibodies against tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, the surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus, and the capsular Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide antigen were assessed along with an immunophenotypic evaluation of peripheral blood B lymph cell maturation. A deficiency of antibodies against the tetanus toxoid was assessed in 73% of cases and that against the diphtheria toxoid was assessed in 68% of cases, whereas a deficiency of antibodies against the surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus was revealed in 59% of the children included in the study. A defective response to immunization with a conjugate vaccine with the Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide antigen was demonstrated in 55% of hypogammaglobulinemic patients. Increased proportions of transitional B lymph cells and an accumulation of plasmablasts accompanied antibody deficiencies. The defective response to vaccine protein and polysaccharide antigens is a predominating disorder of humoral immunity in children with hypogammaglobulinemia and may result from a dysfunctional state of the cellular elements of the immune system. PMID:26018535

  18. Antibody Response against Parvovirus in Patients with Inflammatory Rheumatological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    SH Raeisi; S Jafari; F Khajali; Abdollahi, A.; SR Najafizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Some viral infections have been suggested to trigger or cause autoimmune diseases. One of these viruses is parvovirus B19 which can have various rheumatologic manifestations. In this study we investigated the association between parvovirus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosis(SLE), systemic sclerosis(SSc) and undifferentiated arthritis at the Rheumatological Clinic, Imam Khomeini hospital. Methods: In this sectional case-control study, IgM and IgG antibodi...

  19. Amplification of rabies virus-induced stimulation of human T-cell lines and clones by antigen-specific antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Celis, E; Wiktor, T J; Dietzschold, B.; Koprowski, H

    1985-01-01

    The effect of antigen-specific antibodies on the response of human T-cell lines and clones to rabies virus was studied. Plasmas from rabies-immune vaccine recipients, but not those from nonimmune individuals, enhanced the proliferative response of rabies-reactive T cells to whole inactivated virus or to the purified glycoprotein and nucleocapsid from the rabies virion. Rabies-immune plasma also increased the antigen-induced production of gamma interferon by the rabies-specific T-cell lines. E...

  20. Multiple mechanisms in serum factor-induced resistance of Haemophilus influenzae type b to antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuratana, M; Hansen, E J; Anderson, P

    1990-01-01

    Incubation of Haemophilus influenzae type b at less than or equal to 10(7) CFU/ml with serum ultrafiltrate induces a phenotypic conversion in which complement-mediated bactericidal activity by somatic antibodies decreases while killing by capsular antibody is unchanged. Conversion had been shown to occur in a capsule-deficient (b-) mutant of strain Eag (thus appearing independent of capsulation), to include an increase in lipopolysaccharide content, and to be inhibited by chloramphenicol or p...

  1. Enhanced antibody responses to a detoxified lipopolysaccharide-group B meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine are due to synergistic engagement of Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wilbur H; Basu, Subhendu; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Cross, Alan S

    2010-10-01

    When given passively or elicited actively, antibodies induced by a detoxified Escherichia coli Rc chemotype (J5) mutant lipopolysaccharide (J5dLPS)-group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (OMP) complex vaccine protected animals from lethal sepsis. The protection from sepsis is believed to be dependent on high levels of antibodies against the core glycolipid (CGL), a region of LPS that is rather conserved among Enterobacteriaceae. The addition of unmethylated deoxycytidyl-deoxyguanosine dinucleotide (CpG)-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) was used as an immuno-adjuvant to improve antibody responses. In preparation for a Phase I human trial, we elucidated potential contributions by which the sepsis vaccine (J5dLPS-OMP) and CpG ODN might enhance the antibody response and provide evidence that the generation of immune responses is Toll-like receptor (TLR) dependent. Toll-like receptor 2, TLR4, and TLR9 were each essential for generating robust cytokine and antibody responses. The signature cytokine of dendritic cells, interleukin-12, was one of the cytokines that demonstrated synergy with the optimal TLR ligand/ engagement combination. We conclude that the involvement of multiple TLRs upon immunization was critical for the generation of optimal antibody responses. These observations provide further evidence for the inclusion of innate immune-based adjuvants during the development of next-generation vaccines. PMID:19822632

  2. Effects of Route of Inoculation and Viral Genetic Variation on Antibody Responses to Polyomavirus SV40 in Syrian Golden Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Swain, Jody L.; Sroller, Vojtech; Wong, Connie; Zhang, Shaojie; Halvorson, Steven J.; Herron, Alan J.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Butel, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants of polyomavirus SV40 are powerful agents with which to define viral effects on cells and carcinogenesis pathways. We hypothesized that differences in biologic variation among viral strains affect the process of viral infection and are reflected in antibody responses to the viral nonstructural large T-antigen (TAg) protein but not in neutralizing antibody responses against the inoculated viral particles. We analyzed the production of TAg antibody and neutralizing antibody in S...

  3. Formalin-inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate induced cross-neutralizing antibody against subgenotypes B1, B4, B5 and C4A in adult volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Hsiang Chou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has caused several epidemics of hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD in Asia. No effective EV71 vaccine is available. A randomized and open-label phase I clinical study registered with ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01268787, aims to evaluate the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a formalin-inactivated EV71 vaccine candidate (EV71vac at 5- and 10-µg doses. In this study we report the cross-neutralizing antibody responses from each volunteer against different subgenotypes of EV71 and CVA16. METHODS: Sixty eligible healthy adults were recruited and vaccinated. Blood samples were obtained on day 0, 21 and 42 and tested against B1, B4, B5, C2, C4A, C4B and CVA16 for cross-neutralizing antibody responses. RESULTS: The immunogenicity of both 5- and 10- µg doses were found to be very similar. Approximately 45% of the participants had 4-fold increase in Nt, but there was no further increase in Nt after the second dose. EV71vac induced very strong cross-neutralizing antibody responses in >85% of volunteers without pre-existing Nt against subgenotype B1, B5 and C4A. EV71vac elicited weak cross-neutralizing antibody responses (∼20% of participants against a C4B and Coxsackie virus A16. Over 90% of vaccinated volunteers did not develop cross-neutralizing antibody responses (Nt<8 against a C2 strain. EV71vac can boost and significantly enhance the neutralizing antibody responses in volunteers who already had pre-vaccination antibodies against EV71 and/or CVA16. CONCLUSION: EV71vac is efficient in eliciting cross-neutralizing antibody responses against EV71 subgenotypes B1, B4, B5, and C4A, and provides the rationale for its evaluation in phase II clinical trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01268787.

  4. Epitope specificity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M Anthony; Pazgier, Marzena; Haynes, Barton F; Ferrari, Guido

    2013-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] has been suggested to play an important role in control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 [HIV-1] viral load and protection from infection. ADCC antibody responses have been mapped to multiple linear and conformational epitopes within the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Many epitopes targeted by antibodies that mediate ADCC overlap with those recognized by antibodies capable of virus neutralization. In addition, recent studies conducted with human monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1 infected individuals and HIV-1 vaccine-candidate vaccinees have identified a number of antibodies that lack the ability to capture primary HIV-1 isolates or mediate neutralizing activity, but are able to bind to the surface of infected CD4+ T cells and mediate ADCC. Of note, the conformational changes in the gp120 that may not exclusively relate to binding of the CD4 molecule are important in exposing epitopes recognized by ADCC responses. Here we discuss the HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by ADCC antibodies in the context of the potential protective capacities of ADCC. PMID:24191939

  5. HIV-1 therapy with monoclonal antibody 3BNC117 elicits host immune responses against HIV-1

    OpenAIRE

    Schoofs, Till; Klein, Florian; Braunschweig, Malte; Kreider, Edward F.; Feldmann, Anna; Nogueira, Lilian; Oliveira, Thiago; Lorenzi, Julio C. C.; Parrish, Erica H.; Learn, Gerald H.; West, Anthony P.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Schlesinger, Sarah J.; Seaman, Michael S.; Czartoski, Julie

    2016-01-01

    3BNC117 is a broad and potent neutralizing antibody to HIV-1 that targets the CD4 binding site on the viral envelope spike. When administered passively, this antibody can prevent infection in animal models and suppress viremia in HIV-1–infected individuals. Here we report that HIV-1 immunotherapy with a single injection of 3BNC117 affects host antibody responses in viremic individuals. In comparison to untreated controls that showed little change in their neutralizing activity over a 6-month ...

  6. Evaluation of an in vitro method for the measurement of specific IgE antibody responses: the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of allergenic potential is a key parameter in the safety assessment of novel proteins, including those expressed in genetically modified crops and foodstuffs. The majority of allergic reactions to food proteins are immediate type hypersensitivity reactions in which the principal biological effector is IgE antibody; the accurate measurement of specific IgE antibody is therefore a critical factor in experimental systems designed to characterize protein allergenic potential. Due to the presence of much higher concentrations of other immunoglobulin isotypes, the assessment of specific serum IgE antibody poses substantial technical challenges. We have examined the utility of the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cell line for the measurement of murine IgE responses. RBL cells were sensitized with mouse monoclonal anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody and challenged with DNP-albumin conjugates with various hapten substitution ratios (SR). Polyclonal anti-OVA IgE antisera were also assessed for activity in the RBL assay. Results were compared with titers measured in homologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) assay. Marked degranulation of RBL cells was induced by conjugates with SRs of between 16 and 32, whereas conjugates with lower SRs (of 10 or 3) failed to elicit significant serotonin release. All conjugates were able to induce mast cell degranulation in vivo in a PCA assay. Anti-OVA antisera with PCA titers of 1/32 to 1/64 failed to stimulate RBL cell degranulation, whereas high titer antibody (1/2048 to 1/4096 by PCA) induced a positive RBL cell response. Successful stimulation of RBL cell degranulation requires not only appropriate epitope densities but also high affinity antibody. These data indicate that this assay is inappropriate for the routine analysis of specific polyclonal IgE antibody responses such as those that are induced by exposure to complex protein allergens

  7. ANTIBODY RESPONSE TO EPSILON TOXIN OF CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS IN CAPTIVE RED DEER (CERVUS ELAPHUS) OVER A 13-MONTH PERIOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Christopher; Duffard, Nicolas; Beauchamp, Guy; Boullier, Séverine; Locatelli, Yann

    2016-03-01

    Deer are sensitive to clostridial diseases, and vaccination with clostridial toxoids is the method of choice to prevent these infections in ruminants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the serologic responses in red deer (Cervus elaphus) over a 13-mo period after vaccination with a multivalent clostridial vaccine, containing an aluminium hydroxide adjuvant. Antibody production to the Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin component of the vaccine was measured using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Animals from group 1 (9 mo old; n = 6) were naïve and received an initial vaccination with a booster vaccine 4 wk apart and one annual booster. Animals from group 2 (21 mo old; n = 10) had been previously vaccinated 12 mo prior and received a first annual booster at the beginning of this study and a second annual booster 12 mo later. The multivalent clostridial vaccine induced a high antibody response that peaked after each injection and then slowly decreased with time. In group 1, a booster vaccine was required to obtain an initial high humoral response. The annual booster injection induced a strong, rapid, and consistent anamnestic response in both groups. The serologic responses persisted significantly over the baseline value for 9-12 mo in group 1, but more than 12 mo in group 2. It is unknown whether the measured humoral immune responses would have been protective as no challenge studies were performed. Further investigation is needed to determine the protective antibody titers to challenge and how long this immunity might persist after vaccination. PMID:27010263

  8. Interplay of foot-and-mouth disease virus, antibodies and plasmacytoid dendritic cells: virus opsonization under non-neutralizing conditions results in enhanced interferon-alpha responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannes Nils

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV is a highly infectious member of the Picornaviridae inducing an acute disease of cloven-hoofed species. Vaccine-induced immune protection correlates with the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies but also opsonising antibodies have been proposed as an important mechanism of the immune response contributing to virus clearance by macrophages and leading to the production of type-I interferon (IFN by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC. The present study demonstrates that the opsonising antibody titres mediating enhanced IFN-α responses in pDC were similar to neutralizing titres, when antigenically related viruses from the same serotype were employed. However, sera cross-reacted also with non-neutralized isolates of multiple serotypes, when tested in this assay. Both uncomplexed virus and immune complexed virus stimulated pDC via Toll-like receptor 7. An additional finding of potential importance for strain-specific differences in virulence and/or immunogenicity was that pDC activation by FMDV strongly differed between viral isolates. Altogether, our results indicate that opsonising antibodies can have a broader reactivity than neutralizing antibodies and may contribute to antiviral responses induced against antigenically distant viruses.

  9. Western blot analysis of the human antibody response to Campylobacter jejuni cellular antigens during gastrointestinal infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Nachamkin, I; Hart, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    Western blot analysis was used to identify antigenic components of Campylobacter jejuni whole cells and outer membranes that elicit antibody responses in patients with campylobacter enteritis. Acute- and convalescent-phase sera from eight patients were analyzed for antibody activity against their homologous infecting strains and heterologous clinical isolates. Whole-cell and Sarkosyl-insoluble membrane components were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ...

  10. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines Overcome Splenic Dependency of Antibody Response to Pneumococcal Polysaccharides

    OpenAIRE

    Breukels, Mijke A.; Zandvoort, Andre; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P. J. M.; van den Muijsenberg, Adrie; Lodewijk, Monique E.; Beurret, Michel; Pieter A Klok; Timens, Wim; Rijkers, Ger T.

    2001-01-01

    Protection against infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae depends on the presence of antibodies against capsular polysaccharides that facilitate phagocytosis. Asplenic patients are at increased risk for pneumococcal infections, since both phagocytosis and the initiation of the antibody response to polysaccharides take place in the spleen. Therefore, vaccination with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines is recommended prior to splenectomy, which, as in the case of trauma, is not always feasi...

  11. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    RODRIGUES da SILVA Andréa de Cássia; Caporale, Graciane Maria Medeiros; GONÇALVES Celso Alberto; TARGUETA Mosar Couteiro; Fabiano COMIN; Carlos Roberto ZANETTI; Kotait, Ivanete

    2000-01-01

    Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac) and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac) vaccine. The antibody ti...

  12. Anti-B7-H3 monoclonal antibody ameliorates the damage of acute experimental pancreatitis by attenuating the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaohui; Shen, Jiaqing; Jia, Zhengyu; Wu, Airong; Xu, Ting; Shi, Yuqi; Xu, Chunfang

    2016-06-01

    B7-H3, a recently discovered B7 family member, is documented as a regulator in the inflammatory response as well as T cell-mediated immune responses. In this paper, we find that patients with acute pancreatitis revealed overwhelming levels of serum soluble B7-H3 (sB7-H3) associated with the clinical outcomes. Furthermore, B7-H3 protein was marked increased in l-arginine-induced acute experimental pancreatitis. Anti-B7-H3 monoclonal antibody treatment attenuated the proinflammatory cytokine production, downregulated the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and ameliorated the pancreas disruption in l-arginine-induced pancreatitis. In addition, although l-arginine alone failed to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokine and anti-B7-H3 mAb had no effect on the proinflammatory cytokine production of acinar cells, administration of anti-B7-H3 mAb in the coculture model of acinar cells and macrophages stimulated by l-arginine displayed the similar effects. On the whole, B7-H3 participates in the development of acute pancreatitis, and anti-B7-H3 monoclonal antibody ameliorates severity of acute experimental pancreatitis via attenuation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27003113

  13. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children

    OpenAIRE

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E.; Rudin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles–mumps–rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-...

  14. The Role of Interleukin-6 in Mucosal IgA Antibody Responses in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Alistair J.; Husband, Alan J.; Ramshaw, Ian A.; Bao, Shisan; Matthaei, Klaus I.; Koehler, Georges; Kopf, Manfred

    1994-04-01

    In mice with targeted disruption of the gene that encodes interleukin-6 (IL-6), greatly reduced numbers of immunoglobulin A (IgA)-producing cells were observed at mucosae and grossly deficient local antibody responses were recorded after mucosal challenge with either ovalbumin or vaccinia virus. The IgA response in the lungs was completely restored after intranasal infection with recombinant vaccinia viruses engineered to express IL-6. These findings demonstrate a critical role for IL-6 in vivo in the development of local IgA antibody responses and illustrate the effectiveness of vector-directed cytokine gene therapy.

  15. Low-dose immunization with adenovirus expressing the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor A-subunit deviates the antibody response toward that of autoantibodies in human Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Rong; Pichurin, Pavel; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D; Aliesky, Holly; Nagayama, Yuji; McLachlan, Sandra M; Rapoport, Basil

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with adenovirus expressing the TSH receptor (TSHR) induces hyperthyroidism in 25-50% of mice. Even more effective is immunization with a TSHR A-subunit adenovirus (65-84% hyperthyroidism). Nevertheless, TSHR antibody characteristics in these mice do not mimic accurately those of autoantibodies in typical Graves' patients, with a marked TSH-blocking antibody response. We hypothesized that this suboptimal antibody response was consequent to the standard dose of TSHR-adenovirus providing too great an immune stimulus. To test this hypothesis, we compared BALB/c mice immunized with the usual number (10(11)) and with far fewer viral particles (10(9) and 10(7)). Regardless of viral dose, hyperthyroidism developed in a similar proportion (68-80%) of mice. We then examined the qualitative nature of TSHR antibodies in each group. Sera from all mice had TSH binding-inhibitory (TBI) activity after the second immunization, with TBI values in proportion to the viral dose. After the third injection, all groups had near-maximal TBI values. Remarkably, in confirmation of our hypothesis, immunization with progressively lower viral doses generated TSHR antibodies approaching the characteristics of autoantibodies in human Graves' disease as follows: 1) lower TSHR antibody titers on ELISA and 2) lower TSH-blocking antibody activity without decrease in thyroid-stimulating antibody activity. In summary, low-dose immunization with adenovirus expressing the free TSHR A-subunit provides an induced animal model with a high prevalence of hyperthyroidism as well as TSHR antibodies more closely resembling autoantibodies in Graves' disease. PMID:14576177

  16. Fab-mediated binding of drug-dependent antibodies to platelets in quinidine- and quinine-induced thrombocytopenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Christie, D J; Mullen, P C; Aster, R H

    1985-01-01

    Platelets coated with quinine- or quinidine-induced antibodies form rosettes around protein A-Sepharose beads and normal platelets form rosettes about protein A-Sepharose beads coated with these antibodies. These reactions occurred only in the presence of sensitizing drug. Platelets also formed rosettes about protein A-Sepharose beads coated with an anti-PIA1 antibody, but drug was not required. Formation of rosettes between antibody-coated platelets and protein A-Sepharose was inhibited by F...

  17. Altered immune response of immature dendritic cells following dengue virus infection in the presence of specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Silvia; Flipse, Jacky; Upasani, Vinit C; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) replication is known to prevent maturation of infected dendritic cells (DCs) thereby impeding the development of adequate immunity. During secondary DENV infection, dengue-specific antibodies can suppress DENV replication in immature DCs (immDCs), however how dengue-antibody complexes (DENV-IC) influence the phenotype of DCs remains elusive. Here, we evaluated the maturation state and cytokine profile of immDCs exposed to DENV-ICs. Indeed, DENV infection of immDCs in the absence of antibodies was hallmarked by blunted upregulation of CD83, CD86 and the major histocompatibility complex molecule HLA-DR. In contrast, DENV infection in the presence of neutralizing antibodies triggered full DC maturation and induced a balanced inflammatory cytokine response. Moreover, DENV infection under non-neutralizing conditions prompted upregulation of CD83 and CD86 but not HLA-DR, and triggered production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The effect of DENV-IC was found to be dependent on the engagement of FcγRIIa. Altogether, our data show that the presence of DENV-IC alters the phenotype and cytokine profile of DCs. PMID:27121645

  18. Induction of antibody responses to African horse sickness virus (AHSV in ponies after vaccination with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Chiam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: African horse sickness virus (AHSV causes a non-contagious, infectious disease in equids, with mortality rates that can exceed 90% in susceptible horse populations. AHSV vaccines play a crucial role in the control of the disease; however, there are concerns over the use of polyvalent live attenuated vaccines particularly in areas where AHSV is not endemic. Therefore, it is important to consider alternative approaches for AHSV vaccine development. We have carried out a pilot study to investigate the ability of recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA vaccines expressing VP2, VP7 or NS3 genes of AHSV to stimulate immune responses against AHSV antigens in the horse. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VP2, VP7 and NS3 genes from AHSV-4/Madrid87 were cloned into the vaccinia transfer vector pSC11 and recombinant MVA viruses generated. Antigen expression or transcription of the AHSV genes from cells infected with the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Pairs of ponies were vaccinated with MVAVP2, MVAVP7 or MVANS3 and both MVA vector and AHSV antigen-specific antibody responses were analysed. Vaccination with MVAVP2 induced a strong AHSV neutralising antibody response (VN titre up to a value of 2. MVAVP7 also induced AHSV antigen-specific responses, detected by western blotting. NS3 specific antibody responses were not detected. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrates the immunogenicity of recombinant MVA vectored AHSV vaccines, in particular MVAVP2, and indicates that further work to investigate whether these vaccines would confer protection from lethal AHSV challenge in the horse is justifiable.

  19. Effects of deceleration on the humoral antibody response in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, R. P.; Caren, L. D.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of hypergravity, simulated by chronic centrifugation, followed by a return to normal G (deceleration) on the immune system of rats were investigated. Two groups of male rats (28 days at 2.1 G, and 3.1 G) were compared to the control group (1.0 G). The animals were immunized by i.p. injections of sheep red blood cells on days 29, 42, and 57, and bled on days 36, 47, and 62. While the centrifuged rats ate and gainedsignificantly less than the control rats, the antibody titers and the organ/body mass ratios for the adrenal glands, kidneys, lungs, heart, and thymus were unaffected by gravity exposures, as were the values of the hematocrit and the white blood cell counts. It is concluded that deceleration does not adversely affect these particular aspects of the immune system.

  20. The successful induction of T-cell and antibody responses by a recombinant measles virus-vectored tetravalent dengue vaccine provides partial protection against dengue-2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui-Mei; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ju; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chung, Han-Hsuan; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Pan, Chien-Hsiung

    2016-07-01

    Dengue has a major impact on global public health, and the use of dengue vaccine is very limited. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a dengue vaccine made from a recombinant measles virus (MV) that expresses envelope protein domain III (ED3) of dengue-1 to 4. Following immunization with the MV-vectored dengue vaccine, mice developed specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses against dengue virus and MV. Neutralizing antibodies against MV and dengue viruses were also induced, and protective levels of FRNT50 ≥ 10 to 4 serotypes of dengue viruses were detected in the MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice. In addition, specific interferon-gamma and antibody responses to dengue viruses were still induced by the MV-vectored dengue vaccine in mice that were pre-infected with MV. This finding suggests that the pre-existing immunity to MV did not block the initiation of immune responses. By contrast, mice that were pre-infected with dengue-3 exhibited no effect in terms of their antibody responses to MV and dengue viruses, but a dominant dengue-3-specific T-cell response was observed. After injection with dengue-2, a detectable but significantly lower viremia and a higher titer of anti-dengue-2 neutralizing antibodies were observed in MV-vectored dengue vaccine-immunized mice versus the vector control, suggesting that an anamnestic antibody response that provided partial protection against dengue-2 was elicited. Our results with regard to T-cell responses and the effect of pre-immunity to MV or dengue viruses provide clues for the future applications of an MV-vectored dengue vaccine. PMID:26901482

  1. Prevention and Reversal of Antibody Responses Against Factor IX in Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RolandW.Herzog

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Intramuscular (IM administration of an adeno-associated viral (AAV vector represents a simple and safe method of gene transfer for treatment of the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia B (factor IX, F.IX, deficiency. However, the approach is hampered by an increased risk of immune responses against F.IX. Previously, we demonstrated that the drug cocktail of immune suppressants rapamycin, IL-10, and a specific peptide (encoding a dominant CD4+ T cell epitope caused an induction of regulatory T cells (Treg with a concomitant apoptosis of antigen-specific effector T cells (J. Thromb. Haemost. 7:1523, 2009. This protocol was effective in preventing inhibitory antibody formation against human F.IX (hF.IX in muscle gene transfer to C3H/HeJ hemophilia B mice (with targeted F9 gene deletion. Here, we show that this protocol can also be used to reverse inhibitor formation. IM injection of AAV1-hF.IX vector resulted in inhibitors of on average 8-10 BU within 1 month. Subsequent treatment with the tolerogenic cocktail accomplished a rapid reduction of hF.IX-specific antibodies to <2 BU, which lasted for >4.5 months. Systemic hF.IX expression increased from undetectable to >200 ng/ml, and coagulation times improved. In addition, we developed an alternative prophylactic protocol against inhibitor formation that did not require knowledge of T cell epitopes, consisting of daily oral administration of rapamycin for 1-month combined with frequent, low-dose intravenous injection of hF.IX protein. Experiments in T cell receptor transgenic mice showed that the route and dosing schedule of drug administration substantially affected Treg induction. When combined with intravenous antigen administration, oral delivery of rapamycin had to be performed daily in order to induce Treg, which were suppressive and phenotypically comparable to natural Treg.

  2. Rapid detection of antibodies against cytomegalovirus induced immediate early and early antigens by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Musiani; Carpi, C; Zerbini, M

    1984-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting antibodies against cytomegalovirus induced immediate early antigens and early antigens was developed using purified nuclear antigens and was compared with the indirect immunofluorescence test. The tests were comparable in their ability to detect positive and negative sera, and antibody titres determined by both assays were similar. The use of ELISA for the detection of antibodies against cytomegalovirus induced immediate early and ear...

  3. Natural and Induced Humoral Responses to MUC1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MUC1 is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the ductal cell surface of glandular epithelial cells. Loss of polarization, overexpression and aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 in mucosal inflammation and in adenocarcinomas induces humoral immune responses to the mucin. MUC1 IgG responses have been associated with a benefit in survival in patients with breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. Antibodies bound to the mucin may curb tumor progression by restoring cell-cell interactions altered by tumor-associated MUC1, thus preventing metastatic dissemination, as well as counteracting the immune suppression exerted by the molecule. Furthermore, anti-MUC1 antibodies are capable of effecting tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Although cytotoxic T cells are indispensable to achieve anti-tumor responses in advanced disease, abs to tumor-associated antigens are ideally suited to address minimal residual disease and may be sufficient to exert adequate immune surveillance in an adjuvant setting, destroying tumor cells as they arise or maintaining occult disease in an equilibrium state. Initial evaluation of MUC1 peptide/glycopeptide mono and polyvalent vaccines has shown them to be immunogenic and safe; anti-tumor responses are scarce. Progress in carbohydrate synthesis has yielded a number of sophisticated substrates that include MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes that are at present in preclinical testing. Adjuvant vaccination with MUC1 glycopeptide polyvalent vaccines that induce strong humoral responses may prevent recurrence of disease in patients with early stage carcinomas. Furthermore, prophylactic immunotherapy targeting MUC1 may be a strategy to strengthen immune surveillance and prevent disease in subjects at hereditary high risk of breast, ovarian and colon cancer

  4. Natural and Induced Humoral Responses to MUC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensdorff-Pouilly, Silvia von, E-mail: s.vonmensdorff@vumc.nl; Moreno, Maria [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands); Verheijen, René H. M. [Department of Woman & Baby, Division of Surgical & Oncological Gynaecology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands)

    2011-07-29

    MUC1 is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the ductal cell surface of glandular epithelial cells. Loss of polarization, overexpression and aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 in mucosal inflammation and in adenocarcinomas induces humoral immune responses to the mucin. MUC1 IgG responses have been associated with a benefit in survival in patients with breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. Antibodies bound to the mucin may curb tumor progression by restoring cell-cell interactions altered by tumor-associated MUC1, thus preventing metastatic dissemination, as well as counteracting the immune suppression exerted by the molecule. Furthermore, anti-MUC1 antibodies are capable of effecting tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Although cytotoxic T cells are indispensable to achieve anti-tumor responses in advanced disease, abs to tumor-associated antigens are ideally suited to address minimal residual disease and may be sufficient to exert adequate immune surveillance in an adjuvant setting, destroying tumor cells as they arise or maintaining occult disease in an equilibrium state. Initial evaluation of MUC1 peptide/glycopeptide mono and polyvalent vaccines has shown them to be immunogenic and safe; anti-tumor responses are scarce. Progress in carbohydrate synthesis has yielded a number of sophisticated substrates that include MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes that are at present in preclinical testing. Adjuvant vaccination with MUC1 glycopeptide polyvalent vaccines that induce strong humoral responses may prevent recurrence of disease in patients with early stage carcinomas. Furthermore, prophylactic immunotherapy targeting MUC1 may be a strategy to strengthen immune surveillance and prevent disease in subjects at hereditary high risk of breast, ovarian and colon cancer.

  5. Antibody responses of swine following infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, João Carlos; Strait, Erin L; Raymond, Matthew; Ramirez, Alejandro; Minion, F Chris

    2014-11-01

    Several mycoplasma species possessing a range of virulence have been described in swine. The most commonly described are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma flocculare. They are ubiquitious in many pig producing areas of the world, and except for M. hyopneumoniae, commercial antibody-based assays are lacking for most of these. Antibody cross-reactivity among these four mycoplasma species is not well characterized. Recently, the use of pen-based oral fluids for herd surveillance is of increasing interest. Thus, this study sought to measure pig antibody responses and the level of cross-reactivity in serum and pen-based oral fluids after challenge with four species of swine mycoplasmas. Four groups of four mycoplasma-free growing pigs were separately inoculated with the different mycoplasma species. Pen-based oral fluids and serum samples were collected weekly until necropsy. Species-specific Tween 20 ELISAs were used to measure antibody responses along with four other commercial M. hyopneumoniae ELISAs. Animals from all groups seroconverted to the challenge species of mycoplasma and no evidence of cross-contamination was observed. A delayed antibody response was seen with all but M. hyorhinis-infected pigs. Cross-reactive IgG responses were detected in M. hyopneumoniae- and M. flocculare-infected animals by the M. hyorhinis Tween 20 ELISA, while sera from M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare-infected pigs were positive in one commercial assay. In pen-based oral fluids, specific anti-M. hyopneumoniae IgA responses were detected earlier after infection than serum IgG responses. In summary, while some antibody-based assays may have the potential for false positives, evidence of this was observed in the current study. PMID:25240775

  6. A Novel Replication-Competent Vaccinia Vector MVTT Is Superior to MVA for Inducing High Levels of Neutralizing Antibody via Mucosal Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xiaoxing; Lu, Bin; Yu, Wenbo; Fang, Qing; Liu, Li; Zhuang, Ke; Shen, Tingting; Wang, Haibo; Tian, Po; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallp...

  7. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxing Huang; Bin Lu; Wenbo Yu; Qing Fang; Li Liu; Ke Zhuang; Tingting Shen; Haibo Wang; Po Tian; Linqi Zhang; Zhiwei Chen

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallp...

  8. Single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations can broaden the antibody response against the variable V3 domain of HIV-1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, F; Keller, H; Kieny, M P; Thèze, J

    1995-05-01

    The third variable (V3) domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) external envelope glycoprotein gp120 is a major target of neutralizing antibodies in infected persons and in experimental immunized animals. Given the high degree of sequence variability of V3, the humoral response toward this region is very type-specific. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a single peptide and an anti-idiotypic antibody to broaden the anti-V3 antibody specificity in BALB/c mice. We show that a synthetic peptide derived from the V3 determinant of HIV-1 MN isolate (V3MN), when used as an immunogen, was able to induce an antibody response to multiple (up to six) HIV-1 strains. The extent of this cross-reactivity, which tended to enlarge as the injections increased, appeared to be inversely correlated with the binding affinity to V3MN peptide. These data thus present evidence that, despite its great sequence heterogeneity, the V3 loop encompasses conserved amino-acid positions and/or stretches which may be less immunogenic than their variable counterparts. We additionally demonstrate that a rabbit anti-idiotype (Ab2), recognizing a binding site related idiotype on a V3-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (Ab1), could mount a broadened humoral response (Ab3) in mice. Unlike nominal antibody Ab1 which strictly reacted with the European HIV-1 LAI isolate, elicited Ab3 recognized the two divergent HIV-1 strains SF2 and 1286, originating respectively from North America and Central Africa, in addition to LAI. The reasons accounting for this Ab2-induced enlargement of the V3 antibody response are discussed. Our findings suggest that single peptide and anti-idiotype based immunizations may provide viable approaches to overcome, at least in part, HIV epitope variability. PMID:7783749

  9. Subsets of memory CD4+ T cell and bactericidal antibody response to Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C after immunization of HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar G Milagres

    Full Text Available Meningococcal disease is endemic in Brazil, with periodic outbreaks and case fatality rates reach as high as 18 to 20% of cases. Conjugate vaccines against meningococci are immunogenic in healthy children. However, we have previously shown a poor bactericidal antibody response to a Men C conjugate vaccine in Brazilian HIV-infected children and adolescents after a single vaccine administration. The goal of the present work was to investigate associations between bactericidal antibody response induced by MenC vaccine and the frequency and activation profile (expression of CD38, HLA-DR and CCR5 molecules of total CD4+ memory T cell sub-populations in HIV-1-infected children and adolescents. Responders to vaccination against MenC had a predominance (about 44% of CD4+ TINTERMEDIATE subset followed by TTRANSITIONAL memory subset (23 to 26%. Importantly, CD4+ TINT frequency was positively associated with bactericidal antibody response induced by vaccination. The positive correlation persisted despite the observation that the frequency TINT CD38+HLA-DR+ was higher in responders. In contrast, CD4+ TCENTRAL MEMORY (TCM subset negatively correlated with bactericidal antibodies. In conclusion, these data indicate that less differentiated CD+ T cells, like TCM may be constantly differentiating into intermediate and later differentiated CD4+ T cell subsets. These include CD4 TINT subset which showed a positive association with bactericidal antibodies.

  10. Silicone oil- and agitation-induced aggregation of a monoclonal antibody in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumangalathu, Renuka; Krishnan, Sampathkumar; Ricci, Margaret Speed; Brems, David N; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2009-09-01

    Silicone oil, which is used as a lubricant or coating in devices such as syringes, needles and pharmaceutical containers, has been implicated in aggregation and particulation of proteins and antibodies. Aggregation of therapeutic protein products induced by silicone oil can pose a challenge to their development and commercialization. To systematically characterize the role of silicone oil on protein aggregation, the effects of agitation, temperature, pH, and ionic strength on silicone oil-induced loss of monomeric anti-streptavidin IgG 1 antibody were examined. Additionally, the influences of excipients polysorbate 20 and sucrose on protein aggregation were investigated. In the absence of agitation, protein absorbed to silicone oil with approximately monolayer coverage, however silicone oil did not stimulate aggregation during isothermal incubation unless samples were also agitated. A synergistic stimulation of aggregation by a combination of agitation and silicone oil was observed. Solution conditions which reduced colloidal stability of the antibody, as assessed by determination of osmotic second virial coefficients, accelerated aggregation during agitation with silicone oil. Polysorbate 20 completely inhibited silicone oil-induced monomer loss during agitation. A formulation strategy involving optimization of colloidal stability of the antibody as well as incorporation of surfactants such as polysorbate 20 is proposed to reduce silicone oil-induced aggregation of therapeutic protein products. PMID:19360857

  11. Analysis of Antibody Responses to Protective Antigen-Based Anthrax Vaccines through Use of Competitive Assays▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rebecca A Brady; Verma, Anita; Meade, Bruce D.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2010-01-01

    The licensed anthrax vaccine and many of the new anthrax vaccines being developed are based on protective antigen (PA), a nontoxic component of anthrax toxin. For this reason, an understanding of the immune response to PA vaccination is important. In this study, we examined the antibody response elicited by PA-based vaccines and identified the domains of PA that contribute to that response in humans as well as nonhuman primates (NHPs) and rabbits, animal species that will be used to generate ...

  12. Class specific antibody responses to newborn larva antigens during Trichinella spiralis human infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendez-Loredo B.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A follow-up study of the class antibody responses to newborn larva (NBL antigens in individuals involved in an outbreak of human trichinellosis was carried out by ELISA assays. The data showed that similar kinetics of antibody responses of different magnitude developed in trichinellosis patients; it was low by week 3, a peak raised by week 5 and decreased from week 7 up to the end of the study. The IgA-ELISA assay was the most sensitive and specific while the IgM was the least sensitive and specific. IgA antibodies to NBL antigens were detected in 80 % of patients while IgE, IgG and IgM responses were observed in 44, 31 and 19 % of the patients by week 3, respectively. From weeks 5 to 7, IgA antibodies were found in 89 to 100 % of the patients while lower percentages (0-82 % were found for the other isotypes. Reactivity of IgA, IgE, IgG and IgM to NBL antigens decreased from week 37 to 57 after infection (0-38 %. These results suggest that detection of IgA antibodies may be useful for early diagnosis and epidemiological studies in human trichinellosis.

  13. Collision Induced Unfolding of Intact Antibodies: Rapid Characterization of Disulfide Bonding Patterns, Glycosylation, and Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuwei; Han, Linjie; Buckner, Adam C; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2015-11-17

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are among the fastest growing class of therapeutics due to their high specificity and low incidence of side effects. Unlike most drugs, mAbs are complex macromolecules (∼150 kDa), leading to a host of quality control and characterization challenges inherent in their development. Recently, we introduced a new approach for the analysis of the intact proteins based on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Our protocol involves the collision induced unfolding (CIU) of intact antibodies, where collisional heating in the gas-phase is used to generate unfolded antibody forms, which are subsequently separated by IM and then analyzed by MS. Collisional energy is added to the antibody ions in a stepwise fashion, and "fingerprint plots" are created that track the amount of unfolding undergone as a function of the energy imparted to the ions prior to IM separation. In this report, we have used these fingerprints to rapidly distinguish between antibody isoforms, possessing different numbers and/or patterns of disulfide bonding and general levels of glycosylation. In addition, we validate our CIU protocols through control experiments and systematic statistical evaluations of CIU reproducibility. We conclude by projecting the impact of our approach for antibody-related drug discovery and development applications. PMID:26471104

  14. HIV-1 subtype C superinfected individuals mount low autologous neutralizing antibody responses prior to intrasubtype superinfection

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    Basu Debby

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential role of antibodies in protection against intra-subtype HIV-1 superinfection remains to be understood. We compared the early neutralizing antibody (NAb responses in three individuals, who were superinfected within one year of primary infection, to ten matched non-superinfected controls from a Zambian cohort of subtype C transmission cases. Sequence analysis of single genome amplified full-length envs from a previous study showed limited diversification in the individuals who became superinfected with the same HIV-1 subtype within year one post-seroconversion. We hypothesized that this reflected a blunted NAb response, which may have made these individuals more susceptible to superinfection. Results Neutralization assays showed that autologous plasma NAb responses to the earliest, and in some cases transmitted/founder, virus were delayed and had low to undetectable titers in all three superinfected individuals prior to superinfection. In contrast, NAbs with a median IC50 titer of 1896 were detected as early as three months post-seroconversion in non-superinfected controls. Early plasma NAbs in all subjects showed limited but variable levels of heterologous neutralization breadth. Superinfected individuals also exhibited a trend toward lower levels of gp120- and V1V2-specific IgG binding antibodies but higher gp120-specific plasma IgA binding antibodies. Conclusions These data suggest that the lack of development of IgG antibodies, as reflected in autologous NAbs as well as gp120 and V1V2 binding antibodies to the primary infection virus, combined with potentially competing, non-protective IgA antibodies, may increase susceptibility to superinfection in the context of settings where a single HIV-1 subtype predominates.

  15. Evidence for a novel human-specific xeno-auto-antibody response against vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tho; Gregg, Christopher J; Karp, Felix; Chow, Renee; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Xi; Witztum, Joseph L; Varki, Nissi M; Varki, Ajit

    2009-12-10

    Humans are genetically unable to synthesize the common mammalian sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). However, Neu5Gc can be metabolically incorporated and covalently expressed on cultured human cell surfaces. Meanwhile, humans express varying and sometimes high titers of polyclonal anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. Here, a survey of human tissues by immunohistochemistry with both a monospecific chicken anti-Neu5Gc antibody and with affinity-purified human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies demonstrates endothelial expression of Neu5Gc, likely originating from Neu5Gc-rich foods like red meats. We hypothesized that the combination of Neu5Gc incorporation and anti-Neu5Gc antibodies can induce endothelial activation. Indeed, the incubation of high-titer human sera with Neu5Gc-fed endothelial cells led to Neu5Gc-dependent antibody binding, complement deposition, endothelial activation, selectin expression, increased cytokine secretion, and monocyte binding. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha also selectively enhanced human anti-Neu5Gc antibody reactivity. Anti-Neu5Gc antibodies affinity-purified from human serum also directed Neu5Gc-dependent complement deposition onto cultured endothelial cells. These data indicate a novel human-specific mechanism in which Neu5Gc-rich foods deliver immunogenic Neu5Gc to the endothelium, giving anti-Neu5Gc antibody- and complement-dependent activation, and potentially contributing to human vascular pathologies. In the case of atherosclerosis, Neu5Gc is present both in endothelium overlying plaques and in subendothelial regions, providing multiple pathways for accelerating inflammation in this disease. PMID:19828701

  16. Preparation of an antibody that recognizes and neutralizes Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubohara, Yuzuru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Koji; Matsuo, Yusuke; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2010-05-28

    In the development of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, the differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1; 1-(3,5-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)hexan-1-one) plays an important role in the regulation of cell differentiation and chemotaxis; however, the cellular signaling systems involving DIF-1 remain to be elucidated. To obtain a probe for DIF-1, we synthesized a DIF derivative (DIF-1-NH(2); 6-amino-1-(3,5-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)hexan-1-one), and prepared an anti-DIF-1 antibody using a DIF-1-NH(2)-conjugated macromolecule as the immunogen. A 100-fold dilution of the antibody bound to DIF-1-NH(2)-conjugated resin, and this binding was inhibited by co-addition of 20 microM DIF-1 or DIF-1-NH(2). In a monolayer culture of HM44 cells, a DIF-deficient D. discoideum strain, 0.5 nM exogenous DIF-1 induced stalk cell formation in approximately 60% of the cells; this induction was dose-dependently inhibited by the antibody (diluted 12.5- or 25-fold). Furthermore, this inhibition by the antibody was recovered by co-addition of 2.5 or10 nM DIF-1. The results indicate that the anti-DIF-1 antibody recognizes DIF-1 and neutralizes its function. PMID:20416278

  17. Removing N-Terminal Sequences in Pre-S1 Domain Enhanced Antibody and B-Cell Responses by an HBV Large Surface Antigen DNA Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Guohong Ge; Shixia Wang; Yaping Han; Chunhua Zhang; Shan Lu; Zuhu Huang

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg) protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal ...

  18. Anti-thromboxane B2 antibodies protect against acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ćavar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids are lipid compounds that mediate a variety of physiological and pathological functions in almost all body tissues and organs. Thromboxane (TX A2 is a powerful inducer of platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction and it has ulcerogenic activity in the gastrointestinal tract. Overdose or chronic use of a high dose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-paminophenol, APAP is a major cause of acute liver failure in the Western world. We investigated whether TXA2 plays a role in host response to toxic effect of APAP. CBA/H Zg mice of both sexes were intoxicated with a single lethal or high sublethal dose of APAP, which was administered to animals by oral gavage. The toxicity of APAP was determined by observing the survival of mice during 48 h, by measuring concentration of alanine-aminotransferase (ALT in plasma 20-22 h after APAP administration and by liver histology. The results have shown that anti-thromboxane (TX B2 antibodies (anti-TXB2 and a selective inhibitor of thromboxane (TX synthase, benzylimidazole (BZI, were significantly hepatoprotective, while a selective thromboxane receptor (TPR antagonist, daltroban, was slightly protective in this model of acute liver injury. A stabile metabolite of TXA2, TXB2, and a stabile agonist of TPR, U-46619, had no influence on APAP-induced liver damage. Our findings suggest that TXA2 has a pathogenic role in acute liver toxicity induced with APAP, which was highly abrogated by administration of anti-TXB2. According to our results, this protection is mediated, at least in part, through decreased production of TXB2 by liver fragments ex vivo.

  19. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky Flipse

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

  20. Malaria-induced acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ofori, Michael F; Dodoo, Daniel; Staalsoe, Trine; Kurtzhals, Jørgen; Koram, Kwadwo; Theander, Thor G; Akanmori, Bartholomew D; Hviid, Lars

    2002-01-01

    In areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, protective immunity is acquired during childhood in parallel with acquisition of agglutinating antibodies to parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed on parasitized red blood cells. In a semi-immune child in such an area, cl...... donors (the malaria patient). The data from this first detailed longitudinal study of acquisition of VSA antibodies support the hypothesis that naturally acquired protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria is mediated, at least in part, by VSA-specific antibodies.......In areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, protective immunity is acquired during childhood in parallel with acquisition of agglutinating antibodies to parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed on parasitized red blood cells. In a semi-immune child in such an area...... antibody responses to other parasite isolates are relatively unaffected. However, the detailed kinetics of this VSA antibody acquisition are unknown and hence were the aim of this study. We show that P. falciparum malaria in Ghanaian children generally caused a rapid and sustained increase in variant...

  1. Synergistic innate and adaptive immune response to combination immunotherapy with anti-tumor antigen antibodies and extended serum half-life IL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Eric F; Gai, Shuning A; Opel, Cary F; Kwan, Byron H; Surana, Rishi; Mihm, Martin C; Kauke, Monique J; Moynihan, Kelly D; Angelini, Alessandro; Williams, Robert T; Stephan, Matthias T; Kim, Jacob S; Yaffe, Michael B; Irvine, Darrell J; Weiner, Louis M; Dranoff, Glenn; Wittrup, K Dane

    2015-04-13

    Cancer immunotherapies under development have generally focused on either stimulating T cell immunity or driving antibody-directed effector functions of the innate immune system such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We find that a combination of an anti-tumor antigen antibody and an untargeted IL-2 fusion protein with delayed systemic clearance induces significant tumor control in aggressive isogenic tumor models via a concerted innate and adaptive response involving neutrophils, NK cells, macrophages, and CD8(+) T cells. This combination therapy induces an intratumoral "cytokine storm" and extensive lymphocyte infiltration. Adoptive transfer of anti-tumor T cells together with this combination therapy leads to robust cures of established tumors and development of immunological memory. PMID:25873172

  2. GSN antibody pretreatment aggravates radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced lung injury is one of the main dose limiting factors for thoracic radiation therapy. Gelsolin (GSN) is a widespread, multifunctional regulator of cellular structure and metabolism. In this work, the roles of GSN in radiation-induced lung injury in Balb/c mice were studied. The GSN levels in plasma reduced progressively in 72 hours after irradiation, and then increased gradually. GSN contents in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid increased after thoracic irradiation, whereas mRNA levels of GSN in the lung tissue decreased significantly within 24 hours after irradiation and then increased again. Mice were intravenously injected with 50 μg GSN antibody 0.5 hour before 20 Gy of thoracic irradiation. GSN antibody pretreatment increased lung inflammation, protein concentration in the BAL fluid and leukocytes infiltration in the irradiated mice. The activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) in the plasma and the BAL fluid in irradiated mice injected with GSN antibody were less than that of control groups, whereas the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased. These results suggest that pretreatment of GSN antibody may aggravate radiation-induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  3. Mucosal adjuvanticity of fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3: systemic and local antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhisheng Dang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that a bacterial fibronectin attachment protein (FAP is able to stimulate strong systemic and mucosal antibody responses when it is used alone or co-administrated with other antigens (Ags. Thus, it has been suggested to be a promising adjuvant candidate for the development of efficient vaccines. However, the co-administered Ags and FAP were cloned, expressed and purified individually to date. In a recent study, we first evaluated the adjuvanticity of a fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP, 24 amino acids of Mycobacterium avium FAP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3 (Em-TSP3 by detecting systemic and local antibody responses in intranasally (i.n. immunized BALB/c mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Em-TSP3 and FBP fragments were linked with a GSGGSG linker and expressed as a single fusion protein (Em-TSP3-FBP using the pBAD/Thio-TOPO expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized i.n. with recombinant Em-TSP3-FBP (rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG and the systemic and local antibody responses were detected by ELISA. The results showed that both rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG evoked strong serum IgG (p<0.001 and IgG1 responses (p<0.001, whereas only the latter induced a high level IgG2α production (p<0.001, compared to that of rEm-TSP3 alone without any adjuvant. There were no significant differences in IgG and IgG1 production between the groups. Low level of serum IgA and IgM were detected in both groups. The tendency of Th1 and Th2 cell immune responses were assessed via detecting the IgG1/IgG2α ratio after the second and third immunizations. The results indicated that i.n. immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP resulted in an increased IgG1/IgG2α ratio (a Th2 tendency, while rEm-TSP3+CpG caused a rapid Th1 response that later shifted to a Th2 response. Immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP provoked significantly stronger IgA antibody responses in intestine (p<0.05, lung (p<0.001 and spleen (p<0.001 compared to those

  4. Effects of antibodies induced by a conjugate vaccine on 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone absorptive transport, metabolism, and proliferation of human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buck, Stefan S; Schellenberger, Mario T; Ensch, Corinne; Muller, Claude P

    2010-08-01

    One of the most abundant and potent lung carcinogen is the nicotine-derived tobacco-specific nitrosamine, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). The monoclonal antibody P9D5 induced with a NNK-conjugate vaccine was used to investigate the ability of NNK-specific antibodies to modulate NNK-induced adverse effects as well as its absorptive transport and metabolism in two lung cancer cell lines (Calu-3 and NCI-H82). Transport experiments in Calu-3 cells with a 50-fold molar excess of apical P9D5 increased the recovery of coadministered apical NNK, with a concomitant decrease in NNK transepithelial transport of more than 50% compared to controls. In contrast, basolateral P9D5 did neither influence transepithelial transport of NNK nor its disappearance from the apical compartment. Calu-3 cells were also found to reduce NNK to NNAL and a 65-fold molar excess of NNK-specific antibody inhibited this metabolic conversion by 46 and 54% compared to irrelevant control antibody after 48 and 72 hr, respectively. The biological relevance of NNK redistribution by antibody was demonstrated by reversion of NNK-induced cell proliferation in NCI-H82 cells. Repartitioning of tobacco carcinogens by antibody may reduce their early effective peak concentrations in susceptible target organs and thus relieve overloaded local DNA repair mechanisms and diminish carcinogen-induced cell proliferation. These in vitro data therefore suggest that a prophylactic antibody response may be associated with a reduced risk of cancer. PMID:19960439

  5. Immune Response to Recombinant Capsid Proteins of Adenovirus in Humans: Antifiber and Anti-Penton Base Antibodies Have a Synergistic Effect on Neutralizing Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahéry-Ségard, Hanne; Farace, Françoise; Godfrin, Dominique; Gaston, Jesintha; Lengagne, Renée; Tursz, Thomas; Boulanger, Pierre; Guillet, Jean-Gérard

    1998-01-01

    Replication-deficient adenovirus used in humans for gene therapy induces a strong immune response to the vector, resulting in transient recombinant protein expression and the blocking of gene transfer upon a second administration. Therefore, in this study we examined in detail the capsid-specific humoral immune response in sera of patients with lung cancer who had been given one dose of a replication-defective adenovirus. We analyzed the immune response to the three major components of the viral capsid, hexon (Hx), penton base (Pb), and fiber (Fi). A longitudinal study of the humoral response assayed on adenovirus particle-coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates showed that patients had preexisting immunity to adenovirus prior to the administration of adenovirus–β-gal. The level of the response increased in three patients after adenovirus administration and remained at a maximum after three months. One patient had a strong immune response to adenovirus prior to treatment, and this response was unaffected by adenovirus administration. Sera collected from the patients were assayed for recognition of each individual viral capsid protein to determine more precisely the molecular basis of the humoral immune response. Clear differences existed in the humoral response to the three major components of the viral capsid in serum from humans. Sequential appearance of these antibodies was observed: anti-Fi antibodies appeared first, followed by anti-Pb antibodies and then by anti-Hx antibodies. Moreover, anti-Fi antibodies preferentially recognized the native trimeric form of Fi protein, suggesting that they recognized conformational epitopes. Our results showed that sera with no neutralizing activity contained only anti-Fi antibodies. In contrast, neutralizing activity was only obtained with sera containing anti-Fi and anti-Pb antibodies. More importantly, we showed that anti-native Fi and anti-Pb antibodies had a synergistic effect on neutralization. The

  6. Antibody response in animals immunized after oral delivery of attenuated liver hepatitis a vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microspheres were prepared by encapsulating live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine with PLA/PLG, and the rhesus monkeys and mice were immunized by such microspheres through oral route. Then serum was collected to detect the HAV-IgM, HAV-IgG, HAV-IgA with EIA, so as to find a convenient immunization way. Results showed that HAV-IgG in rhesus monkeys was detected in the 3rd week and reached a peak value (1267mlU/mL), and then decreased by degrees. HAV-IgM titer was 1:4000. After an oral booster was given, the HAV-IgG level increased, and HAV-IgM titer was 1:1000. The level reached 1244mIU/mL after challenge with wild virus strain, and HAV-IgM was 1:100. HAV-IgM was detected in the control group only after challenge with wild virus strain. HAV-IgG in mice was detected in the 2nd week and reached a peak value in the 4th week. HAV S-IgA was detected in the 1st week and reached a peak value in the 4th week. Antibody response was induced in the rhesus monkeys after oral delivery of the biodegradable microspheres containing live attenuated HA vaccine. The results in mice were similar with the report but the anti-HAV was present earlier as compared with rhesus monkeys. (authors)

  7. Antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Gyhrs, A; Lausen, B;

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antibody response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine (HibCP-TT) in preterm infants. SUBJECTS: Thirty-five healthy preterm infants with gestational ages (GA) from 27 to 36 weeks and birth weights from ...

  8. Immunoglobulin M and G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Rowe, P; Bennett, S;

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the age-related immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG response to part of a 220-kDa glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) from Plasmodium falciparum and to determine possible correlations of possession of these antibodies with malaria morbidity. IgM and IgG levels...

  9. INADEQUATE ANTIBODY-RESPONSE AGAINST RESPIRATORY VIRAL-INFECTION IN LONG-SURVIVING RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; GROEN, M; VANDERLOGT, K; WILDEVUUR, CRH; PROP, J

    1995-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients suffer from a high number of viral infections. It has been suggested that the defense against viral infections is impaired in lung transplants, Therefore, we investigated in rat lung transplants whether antibody responses against an intrapulmonary viral infection were impa

  10. Association of selenocysteine transfer RNA fragments with serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to identify transfer RNA fragments (tRFs) associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected...

  11. Anti-α-galactosidase A antibody response to agalsidase beta treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcox, William R; Linthorst, Gabor E; Germain, Dominique P; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Waldek, Stephen; Richards, Susan M; Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Cizmarik, Marta; Cole, J Alexander; Kingma, Wytske; Warnock, David G

    2012-01-01

    Agalsidase beta, a form of recombinant human α-galactosidase A (αGAL), is approved for use as enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease. An immunogenic response against a therapeutic protein could potentially impact its efficacy or safety. The development of anti-αGAL IgG antibodies was ...

  12. Removing N-terminal sequences in pre-S1 domain enhanced antibody and B-cell responses by an HBV large surface antigen DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Guohong; Wang, Shixia; Han, Yaping; Zhang, Chunhua; Lu, Shan; Huang, Zuhu

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg) protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal models. However, one form of the the HBsAg antigen, the large S antigen (HBs-L), expressed by DNA vaccine, was not sufficiently immunogenic in eliciting antibody responses. In the current study, we produced a modified large S antigen DNA vaccine, HBs-L(T), which has a truncated N-terminal sequence in the pre-S1 region. Compared to the original HBs-L DNA vaccine, the HBs-L(T) DNA vaccine improved secretion in cultured mammalian cells and generated significantly enhanced HBsAg-specific antibody and B cell responses. Furthermore, this improved HBsL DNA vaccine, along with other HBsAg-expressing DNA vaccines, was able to maintain predominantly Th1 type antibody responses while recombinant HBsAg protein vaccines produced in either yeast or CHO cells elicited mostly Th2 type antibody responses. Our data indicate that HBsAg DNA vaccines with improved immunogenicity offer a useful alternative choice to recombinant protein-based HBV vaccines, particularly for therapeutic purposes against chronic hepatitis infection where immune tolerance led to poor antibody responses to S antigens. PMID:22844502

  13. Removing N-terminal sequences in pre-S1 domain enhanced antibody and B-cell responses by an HBV large surface antigen DNA vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Ge

    Full Text Available Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal models. However, one form of the the HBsAg antigen, the large S antigen (HBs-L, expressed by DNA vaccine, was not sufficiently immunogenic in eliciting antibody responses. In the current study, we produced a modified large S antigen DNA vaccine, HBs-L(T, which has a truncated N-terminal sequence in the pre-S1 region. Compared to the original HBs-L DNA vaccine, the HBs-L(T DNA vaccine improved secretion in cultured mammalian cells and generated significantly enhanced HBsAg-specific antibody and B cell responses. Furthermore, this improved HBsL DNA vaccine, along with other HBsAg-expressing DNA vaccines, was able to maintain predominantly Th1 type antibody responses while recombinant HBsAg protein vaccines produced in either yeast or CHO cells elicited mostly Th2 type antibody responses. Our data indicate that HBsAg DNA vaccines with improved immunogenicity offer a useful alternative choice to recombinant protein-based HBV vaccines, particularly for therapeutic purposes against chronic hepatitis infection where immune tolerance led to poor antibody responses to S antigens.

  14. Comparison of antibody responses after vaccination with two inactivated rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, J M; Bouvet, J; Cliquet, F; Wasniewski, M; Guiot, A L; Lemaitre, L; Cariou, C; Cozette, V; Vergne, L; Guigal, P M

    2009-01-13

    Thirty laboratory dogs were randomly assigned to two groups (A and B) of 15 dogs and subcutaneously vaccinated with a single dose of one of two commercially available monovalent inactivated rabies vaccines: RABISIN (Merial, France) (group A) and NOBIVAC Rabies (Intervet International) (group B). Rabies antibodies were measured over a period of 4 months using the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test. The two vaccines performed differently in terms of magnitude and persistence of rabies antibodies titers in dogs. Two weeks after vaccination, average rabies antibody titers peaked at 2.53 IU/mL (range, 0.17-13.77 IU/mL) and 1.26 IU/mL (range, 0.50-4.56 IU/mL) in groups A and B dogs, respectively. The average FAVN antibody titres against rabies on D28, D56, D84, D112 and D120 were significantly higher in group A than in group B. Although all dogs from group B serologically responded to vaccination, the proportion of dogs with antibody titres >or=0.5 IU/mL dropped significantly after D28 and was statistically significantly lower on D56, D84 and D112 compared to group A dogs. In conclusion, in the context of international trade, the choice of the vaccine and the timing of blood tests are critical factors in achieving successful serological test results after rabies vaccination. RABISIN induces high and sustained antibody titres against rabies, increasing the flexibility for the time of blood sampling after primo-vaccination. PMID:18757142

  15. ACE inhibitors can induce circulating antibodies directed to antigens of the superficial epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Rosa, Gian Marco; Drosera, Massimo; Intra, Chiara; Barsotti, Antonio; Parodi, Aurora

    2011-07-01

    Drug-induced pemphigus has been reported in patients receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The aim of this work was to study a group of hypertensive patients without skin diseases treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors (I), to verify the presence of serum circulating anti-antibodies. The indirect immunofluorescence showed that 33 sera (52.38%) presented autoantibodies directed to an antigen of the cytoplasm of the superficial epidermal keratinocytes. Two of the 33 positive sera had antibodies to Dsg1 and/or 3 in ELISA. Immunoblot analyses were negative. All the 48 control sera were found to have no circulating antibodies using the three assays. Our results would confirm that ACEI drugs may trigger the production of circulating autoantibodies also in patients without clinical manifestations of pemphigus. PMID:20563876

  16. Lack of association between mannose binding lectin and antibody responses after acellular pertussis vaccinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is one of the key molecules in innate immunity and its role in human vaccine responses is poorly known. This study aimed to investigate the possible association of MBL polymorphisms with antibody production after primary and booster vaccinations with acellular pertussis vaccines in infants and adolescents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five hundred and sixty eight subjects were included in this study. In the adolescent cohort 355 subjects received a dose of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (dTpa vaccine ten years previously. Follow-up was performed at 3, 5 and 10 years. Infant cohort consisted of 213 subjects, who had received three primary doses of DTaP vaccine at 3, 5, and 12 months of age according to Finnish immunization program. Blood samples were collected before the vaccinations at 2,5 months of age and after the vaccinations at 13 months and 2 years of age. Concentrations of IgG antibodies to pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin and antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids were measured by standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of MBL2 gene exon1 (codons 52, 54, 57 were examined. MBL serum concentration was also measured from the adolescent cohort. No association was found with MBL2 exon 1 polymorphisms and antibody responses against vaccine antigens, after primary and booster dTpa vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that MBL polymorphisms do not affect the production and persistence of antibodies after acellular pertussis vaccination. Our finding also suggests that MBL might not be involved in modulating antibody responses to the vaccines made of purified bacterial proteins.

  17. High-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay for analysis of natural and vaccine-induced antibodies against human papillomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sehr

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, automated, purely add-on, high-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (HT-PBNA with excellent repeatability and run-to-run reproducibility was developed for human papillomavirus types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 45, 52, 58 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. Preparation of 384 well assay plates with serially diluted sera and the actual cell-based assay are separated in time, therefore batches of up to one hundred assay plates can be processed sequentially. A mean coefficient of variation (CV of 13% was obtained for anti-HPV 16 and HPV 18 titers for a standard serum tested in a total of 58 repeats on individual plates in seven independent runs. Natural antibody response was analyzed in 35 sera from patients with HPV 16 DNA positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ lesions. The new HT-PBNA is based on Gaussia luciferase with increased sensitivity compared to the previously described manual PBNA (manPBNA based on secreted alkaline phosphatase as reporter. Titers obtained with HT-PBNA were generally higher than titers obtained with the manPBNA. A good linear correlation (R(2 = 0.7 was found between HT-PBNA titers and anti-HPV 16 L1 antibody-levels determined by a Luminex bead-based GST-capture assay for these 35 sera and a Kappa-value of 0.72, with only 3 discordant sera in the low titer range. In addition to natural low titer antibody responses the high sensitivity of the HT-PBNA also allows detection of cross-neutralizing antibodies induced by commercial HPV L1-vaccines and experimental L2-vaccines. When analyzing the WHO international standards for HPV 16 and 18 we determined an analytical sensitivity of 0.864 and 1.105 mIU, respectively.

  18. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Subunit Vaccines Induce High Levels of Neutralizing Antibodies But No Protection in STAT1 Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortekaas, Jeroen; Vloet, Rianka P M; McAuley, Alexander J; Shen, Xiaoli; Bosch, Berend Jan; de Vries, Laura; Moormann, Rob J M; Bente, Dennis A

    2015-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus is a tick-borne bunyavirus of the Nairovirus genus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans with high case fatality. Here, we report the development of subunit vaccines and their efficacy in signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) knockout mice. Ectodomains of the structural glycoproteins Gn and Gc were produced using a Drosophila insect cell-based expression system. A single vaccination of STAT129 mice with adjuvanted Gn or Gc ectodomains induced neutralizing antibody responses, which were boosted by a second vaccination. Despite these antibody responses, mice were not protected from a CCHFV challenge infection. These results suggest that neutralizing antibodies against CCHFV do not correlate with protection of STAT1 knockout mice. PMID:26684523

  19. Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) deficiency protects C57BL/6 mice from antibody-induced arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Anjana; Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Hartenstein, Bettina; Szabowski, Sibylle; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Angel, Peter; Bräuer, Rolf; Illges, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in tissue remodelling. Here we investigate the role of collagenase-3 (MMP-13) in antibody-induced arthritis. Methods For this study we employed the K/BxN serum-induced arthritis model. Arthritis was induced in C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MMP-13-deficient (MMP-13 –/– ) mice by intraperitoneal injection of 200 μl of K/BxN serum. Arthritis was assessed by measuring the ankle swelling. During the course of the experiments, mice were sacri...

  20. Antibody response of five bird species after vaccination with a killed West Nile virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Llizo, Shirley Yeo; Miller, Christine L; Glaser, Amy L

    2007-06-01

    West Nile virus has been associated with numerous bird mortalities in the United States since 1999. Five avian species at three zoological parks were selected to assess the antibody response to vaccination for West Nile virus: black-footed penguins (Spheniscus demersus), little blue penguins (Eudyptula minor), American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), Chilean flamingos (Phoenicopterus chilensis), and Attwater's prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri). All birds were vaccinated intramuscularly at least twice with a commercially available inactivated whole virus vaccine (Innovator). Significant differences in antibody titer over time were detected for black-footed penguins and both flamingo species. PMID:17679507

  1. Antibody responses after vaccination against equine influenza in the Republic of Korea in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Ju; KIM, Bo-Hye; YANG, Sunjoo; Choi, Eun-jin; SHIN, Ye-Jin; SONG, Jae-Young; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, antibody responses after equine influenza vaccination were investigated among 1,098 horses in Korea using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. The equine influenza viruses, A/equine/South Africa/4/03 (H3N8) and A/equine/Wildeshausen/1/08 (H3N8), were used as antigens in the HI assay. The mean seropositive rates were 91.7% (geometric mean antibody levels (GMT), 56.8) and 93.6% (GMT, 105.2) for A/equine/South Africa/4/03 and A/equine/Wildeshausen/1/08, respectively. Yearli...

  2. Immune senescence in old and very old rhesus monkeys: reduced antibody response to influenza vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Coe, Christopher L.; Lubach, Gabriele R.; Kinnard, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    The health of old monkeys usually begins to deteriorate by 20 years of age, coinciding with the onset of a slowly progressing immune senescence. Changes in lymphocyte subsets and responses to several antigens have been characterized in geriatric primates, but systematic research has not been conducted on vaccination against influenza virus, a topic of considerable clinical concern for elderly humans. Antibody responses were significantly reduced to primary immunizations in old monkeys, but by...

  3. Stability of a viral infection model with state-dependent delay, CTL and antibody immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Rezounenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A virus dynamics model with intracellular state-dependent delay and nonlinear infection rate of Beddington-DeAngelis functional response is studied. The technique of Lyapunov functionals is used to analyze stability of an interior infection equilibrium which describes the case of both CTL and antibody immune responses activated. We consider first a particular biologically motivated class of discrete state-dependent delays. Next, the general case is investigated.

  4. Canine antibody response to Phlebotomus perniciosus bites negatively correlates with the risk of Leishmania infantum transmission.

    OpenAIRE

    Michaela Vlkova; Iva Rohousova; Jan Drahota; Dorothee Stanneck; Eva Maria Kruedewagen; Norbert Mencke; Domenico Otranto; Petr Volf

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phlebotomine sand flies are blood-sucking insects that can transmit Leishmania parasites. Hosts bitten by sand flies develop an immune response against sand fly salivary antigens. Specific anti-saliva IgG indicate the exposure to the vector and may also help to estimate the risk of Leishmania spp. transmission. In this study, we examined the canine antibody response against the saliva of Phlebotomus perniciosus, the main vector of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean Basin, an...

  5. Induction of protective neutralizing antibody responses against botulinum neurotoxin serotype C using plasmid carried by PLGA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwona, Tinashe B; Xu, Haiyue; Li, Junwei; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Kumar, Amit; Zeng, Mingtao; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a lethal neurotoxin, for which there is currently not an approved vaccine. Recent efforts in developing vaccine candidates against botulism have been directed at the heavy chain fragment of BoNT, because antibodies against this region have been shown to prevent BoNT from binding to its receptor and thus to nerve cell surface, offering protection against BoNT intoxication. In the present study, it was shown that immunization with plasmid DNA that encodes the 50 KDa C-terminal fragment of the heavy chain of BoNT serotype C (i.e., BoNT/C-Hc50) and is carried by cationic poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles induces stronger BoNT/C-specific antibody responses, as compared to immunization with the plasmid alone. Importantly, the antibodies have BoNT/C-neutralizing activity, protecting the immunized mice from a lethal dose of BoNT/C challenge. A plasmid DNA vaccine encoding the Hc50 fragments of BoNT serotypes that cause human botulism may represent a viable vaccine candidate for protecting against botulinum neurotoxin intoxication. PMID:26837242

  6. Antibody response in cattle, sheep and rats to infection with. gamma. -irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.L.; Doy, T.G. (Agricultural Research Council, Compton (UK). Inst. for Research on Animal Diseases); Hanna, R.E.B. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (UK))

    1982-05-01

    Cattle, sheep and rats were infected orally with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica, or with normal metacercariae. The antibody response was monitored in each host to metacercarial tegument (T0), juvenile tegument (T1), adult tegument (T2) and gut antigens. The response was examined at weekly intervals for cattle and sheep throughout 15 weeks of infection and four weeks after infection in rats, using an indirect fluorescent antibody labelling technique. It was found that the irradiated metacercariae engendered a normal humoral response to T0, T1 and gut antigens in all three hosts although the antibody levels were somewhat reduced due to early death or stunting of the flukes. T0 and T1 appeared to be antigenically similar. Antibodies against T2 appeared late in the animals infected with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae and the titres attained were considerably lower than in the controls. The T2 antigen stimulus in the animals given ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae was probably provided by flukes which 'broke through' the developmental barrier imposed by irradiation and which were found alive at autopsy.

  7. Immune response of mallard ducks treated with immunosuppressive agents: antibody response to erythrocytes and in vivo response to phytohemagglutinin-P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrank, C.S.; Cook, M.E.; Hansen, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of two in vivo tests to assay immune competence of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) treated with various immunomodulatory agents was examined. Skin responses to phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) injected intradermally and serum antibody levels produced in response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) were measured. As measured by the skin response to PHA-P, ducks injected intramuscularly with cyclophosphamide or cyclosporine did not respond differently from control-injected ducks. Dexamethasone injected intramuscularly significantly suppressed the skin response to PHA-P. As measured by antibody levels in response to SRBC, ducks injected intramuscularly with cyclophosphamide responded with antibody titers similar to controls. Cyclosporine injected intramuscularly reduced the level of immunoglobulin (Ig) G significantly in one of two experiments. Dexamethasone injected intramuscularly reduced peak total and IgG titers. These experiments provide information on the viability of these two in vivo tests to reflect immune competence of mallard ducks.

  8. Antibody Response is More Likely to Pneumococcal Proteins Than to Polysaccharide After HIV-associated Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Green, Nicola; Goldblatt, David;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). In order to assess the immunogenicity of pneumococcal proteins and polysaccharide, we investigated protein and serotype-specific antibody responses after HIV......-associated IPD. METHODS: Specific antipneumococcal immunoglobulin G to 27 pneumococcal protein antigens and 30 serotype polysaccharides was measured in plasma before and after IPD in HIV-infected individuals and compared to HIV-infected individuals without IPD. RESULTS: Over time, 81% of IPD cases responded to...... HIV-infected individuals with IPD had a serotype-specific antibody response. Younger age at the time of IPD was the only predictor of a serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody response, whereas we did not identify predictors of a protein-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: Antibody responses...

  9. Haploinsufficiency of activation-induced deaminase for antibody diversification and chromosome translocations both in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isora V Sernández

    Full Text Available The humoral immune response critically relies on the secondary diversification of antibodies. This diversification takes places through somatic remodelling of the antibody genes by two molecular mechanisms, Class Switch Recombination (CSR and Somatic Hypermutation (SHM. The enzyme Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID initiates both SHM and CSR by deaminating cytosine residues on the DNA of immunoglobulin genes. While crucial for immunity, AID-catalysed deamination is also the triggering event for the generation of lymphomagenic chromosome translocations. To address whether restricting the levels of AID expression in vivo contributes to the regulation of its function, we analysed mice harbouring a single copy of the AID gene (AID(+/-. AID(+/- mice express roughly 50% of normal AID levels, and display a mild hyperplasia, reminiscent of AID deficient mice and humans. Moreover, we found that AID(+/- cells have an impaired competence for CSR and SHM, which indicates that AID gene dose is limiting for its physiologic function. We next evaluated the impact of AID reduction in AID(+/- mice on the generation of chromosome translocations. Our results show that the frequency of AID-promoted c-myc/IgH translocations is reduced in AID(+/- mice, both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, AID is haploinsufficient for antibody diversification and chromosome translocations. These findings suggest that limiting the physiologic levels of AID expression can be a regulatory mechanism that ensures an optimal balance between immune proficiency and genome integrity.

  10. Antibodies with higher bactericidal activity induced by a Neisseria gonorrhoeae Rmp deletion mutant strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guocai Li

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein reduction modifiable protein (Rmp has strong immunogenicity. However, anti-Rmp antibodies block rather than preserve the antibacterial effects of protective antibodies, which hampers the development of vaccines for gonococcal infections. We herein constructed an Rmp deletion mutant strain of N. gonorrhoeae by gene homologous recombination. The 261-460 nucleotide residues of Rmp gene amplified from N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain were replaced with a kanamycin-resistant Kan gene amplified from pET-28a. The resultant hybridized DNA was transformed into N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain. PCR was used to screen the colonies in which wild-type Rmp gene was replaced with a mutant gene fragment. Western blotting revealed that the Rmp deletion mutant strain did not express Rmp protein. Rmp deletion did not alter the morphological and Gram staining properties of the mutant strain that grew slightly more slowly than the wild-type one. Rmp gene mutated stably throughout 25 generations of passage. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay indicated that the antibodies induced by the mutant strain had evidently higher bactericidal activities than those induced by the wild-type strain. Further modification of the Rmp deletion mutant strain is still required in the development of novel live attenuated vaccines for gonorrhea by Opa genes deletion or screening of phenotypic variant strains that do not express Opa proteins.

  11. Evaluation of the effects of dexamethasone-induced stress on levels of natural antibodies in immunized laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Stefano; Rossetti, Michele; Tomaso, Francesco Di; Caputo, Anna Rocchina

    2016-09-01

    Natural antibodies (NAb) are an important humoral component of innate immunity, playing a pivotal role as first line of defence against pathogens even without prior antigen-specific activation or antigen-driven selection. The levels of NAb in plasma of young laying hens were explored in more detail and identified 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl bovine serum albumin (TNP-BSA), as the non-self antigen showing the highest levels of IgΥ- and IgM-NAb. Subsequently, the relation between specific antibody (SpAb) levels and NAb levels, and the effect of dexamethasone (DEX)-induced stress on the acquired Ab response and on NAb levels were examined. According to obtained results, the affinity of NAb and SpAb, measured using the thiocyanate elution method, resulted higher in SpAb than in NAb. After stress induction, IgM-NAb and SpAb levels showed a transient decrease, whereas the levels of IgΥ-NAb were not changed. Moreover, statistical analysis showed positive correlations between IgΥ- and IgM-NAb levels and between IgM-NAb and SpAb levels that are lost as stress has been induced, whereas no correlation was observed between IgΥ-NAb and SpAb levels, neither before nor after the DEX-administration. This indicates that IgM-NAb assessment could be a valid tool to estimate the potential of the acquired Ab response and that the dexamethasone-induced stress condition causes depression of IgM-NAb levels and the acquired Ab response, but it has no evaluable effects on IgΥ-NAb levels. PMID:27436442

  12. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sulggi A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Chomont, Nicolas; Fromentin, Remi; Lewin, Sharon R.; O’Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Richman, Douglas D.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Yukl, Steven A.; Deeks, Steven G.; Burbelo, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the “reservoir”). We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR); integrated DNA (Alu PCR); unspliced RNA (rtPCR), multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA), residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR), and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay). We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR). Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables. Results Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years), the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004) and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003). However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results. Conclusions Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV

  13. Neonatal molecular pathologies induced by maternal anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera-Esparza R.; Avalos-Díaz E

    2015-01-01

    Maternal antinuclear antibodies with anti-Ro or anti-La specificity might be pathogenic to the fetus and could induce molecular neonatal pathologies, such as neonatal lupus (NL) with or without congenital heart block (CHB). The cutaneous manifestations of neonatal lupus appear at birth or a few weeks later, and skin lesions may persist for weeks. While CHB is characterized by intrauterine bradycardia or low heart rates at birth and may persist for months, depending on the degree of blockage....

  14. Nebulized Anti-IL-13 Monoclonal Antibody Fab' Fragment Reduces Allergen-Induced Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Hacha, Jonathan; Tomlinson, K; Maertens, Ludovic; Paulissen, Geneviève; Rocks, Natacha; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnès; Palframan, R; Guéders, Maud; Cataldo, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a prototypic Th2 cytokine and a central mediator of the complex cascade of events leading to asthmatic phenotype. Indeed, IL-13 plays key roles in IgE synthesis, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, mucus hypersecretion, subepithelial fibrosis and eosinophil infiltration. Objectives: We assessed the potential efficacy of inhaled anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibody Fab' fragment on allergen-induced airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in an experime...

  15. Antigens linked to synthetic microspheres induce immune responses in primates in the absence of adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlik, C; Perraut, R; Bonnemains, B; Leclerc, C

    1996-01-01

    Although most strategies of vaccination require immunopotentiation to induce efficient immune responses, the development of new adjuvants for human vaccines is highly limited by safety problems. In order to overcome this problem, we developed a new vaccine formulation based on the covalent linkage of protein or peptide to synthetic microspheres. In previous experiments performed in mice, we demonstrated that these particulate antigens induce strong antigen-specific CD4+ T cell proliferative responses in the absence of adjuvant. In the present study, we analyzed the immunogenicity in primate Saimiri sciureus monkeys of two different proteins linked to synthetic microspheres. Immune responses induced by these particulate proteins administered without adjuvant were compared to those stimulated by the soluble antigens injected with alum. We currently demonstrated that, in monkeys, particulate antigens administered without adjuvant, induced good PBMC proliferative response and antibody production. Furthermore, the analysis of antibody responses using mAbs specific for different Saimiri sciureus immunoglobulins showed that the antibody response profiles were different in monkeys immunized with soluble versus particulate form of antigens. Results of this study demonstrate that particulate form of antigen may stimulate qualitatively different immune responses as compared to alum and therefore suggest that this new antigen formulation could be an attractive candidate for the development of vaccines. PMID:8852604

  16. A comparison of antibody responses to commercial equine influenza vaccines following primary vaccination of Thoroughbred weanlings--a randomised blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Sarah; Arkins, Sean; Walsh, Cathal; Cullinane, Ann

    2011-11-15

    Many racing authorities, sales companies and equestrian bodies have mandatory vaccination policies for equine influenza (EI). The consequences of lack of vaccine efficacy include clinical disease, disruption to training programmes, the cancellation of equestrian events and the introduction of virus to susceptible populations. The correlation between antibody against the virus haemagglutinin and protection against influenza has been well established. The objective of this study was to compare the antibody responses of 66 unvaccinated Thoroughbred weanlings on four different stud farms, following primary vaccination (V1, V2 and V3) with the five EI vaccines commercially available in Ireland (Duvaxyn IET Plus, Equilis Resequin, Equip FT, Equilis Prequenza Te, ProteqFlu Te). Antibody responses were monitored for 6 months post V3 by single radial haemolysis. The pattern of antibody response was similar for all vaccines and for all antigens tested. A rapid decline of antibody level was observed by 3 months post V2 for all vaccines. The antibody response of the horses vaccinated with the whole virus vaccine Duvaxyn IET Plus was significantly higher than that of the horses vaccinated with the other four products. Five weanlings had maternally derived antibodies (MDA) at the time of V1. The canary pox recombinant vaccine, subunit vaccine and whole virus inactivated vaccines administered to these weanlings did not induce a detectable antibody response against the background of MDA but effectively primed the animals as revaccination resulted in a strong antibody response. In this study 43% of the weanlings failed to seroconvert after V1. This high incidence of poor responders has not been reported in previous experimental studies relating to these products. The poor responders were observed in all vaccine groups except those vaccinated with Duvaxyn IET Plus. Post V2 the incidence of poor responders was reduced to 7% and all horses responded to V3. The study demonstrates that

  17. Antibody-induced down-regulation of a mutated insulin receptor lacking an intact cytoplasmic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin receptor down-regulation was studied in various Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing transfected human insulin receptor cDNAs. In addition to a cell line expressing the normal receptor (CHO.T line), three lines expressing mutated receptors were studied: the CHO.T-t line, which expresses a receptor with a degraded cytoplasmic domain due to the removal of the C-terminal 112 amino acids, and the CHO.YF1 and CHO.YF3 lines, in which important autophosphorylation sites of the receptor kinase (tyrosines-1162 and -1163) have been replaced by phenylalanine. A monoclonal anti-receptor antibody, but not insulin itself, was found to down-regulate cell surface receptor levels in all four cell lines by 60-80% after 18-h treatment at 370C. Down-regulation of the CHO.T and CHO.T-t receptors occurred at similar antibody concentrations and with a similar time course, although the maximum level of CHO.T-t down-regulation (60%) was generally lower than the level of CHO.T down-regulation (80%). Pulse-chase labeling of these two cell types with [35S]methionine revealed that antibody treatment of both CHO.T and CHO.T-t cells resulted in a similar increase in the rate of degradation of mature receptor subunits. These results indicate that antibody-induced down-regulation of the insulin receptor in these cells can occur in the absence of various autophosphorylation sites of the receptor and that the mechanism of antibody-induced down-regulation is different from that for insulin

  18. Requirement for Fc Effector Mechanisms in the APOBEC3/Rfv3-Dependent Neutralizing Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halemano, Kalani; Barrett, Bradley S.; Heilman, Karl J.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses are often evaluated in the absence of Fc-dependent immune effectors. In murine Friend retrovirus infection, Apobec3/Rfv3 promotes a potent polyclonal NAb response. Here, we show that the Apobec3/Rfv3-dependent NAb response correlated with virus-specific IgG2 titers and that the in vivo neutralization potency of Apobec3/Rfv3-resistant antisera was dependent on activating Fcγ receptors but not complement. The data strengthen retroviral vaccine strategies aimed at eliciting NAbs that activate specific Fcγ receptors. PMID:25589647

  19. Murine antibody response to oral infection with live aroA recombinant Salmonella dublin vaccine strains expressing filamentous hemagglutinin antigen from Bordetella pertussis.

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, N C; Parker, C D

    1990-01-01

    Two plasmids which express either nearly intact or truncated filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) from Bordetella pertussis and which are marked with a tetracycline resistance (Tcr) gene were transformed into Salmonella dublin SL1438, an aroA deletion mutant intended for use as an attenuated oral vaccine against salmonellosis. These S. dublin recombinants, when fed to mice, induced serum immunoglobulin, immunoglobulin M (IgM), and sometimes IgA antibody responses to FHA and S. dublin. In addition,...

  20. Concomitant Administration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG with the Meningococcal C Conjugate Vaccine to Neonatal Mice Enhances Antibody Response and Protective Efficacy ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Brynjolfsson, Siggeir F.; Bjarnarson, Stefania P.; Mori, Elena; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Jonsdottir, Ingileif

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG is administered to human neonates in many countries worldwide. The objective of the study was to assess if BCG could act as an adjuvant for polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines in newborns and thereby induce protective immunity against encapsulated bacteria in early infancy when susceptibility is high. We assessed whether BCG could enhance immune responses to a meningococcal C (MenC) conjugate vaccine, MenC-CRM197, in mice primed as neonates, broaden the antibody ...

  1. Relationship between exposure to vector bites and antibody responses to mosquito salivary gland extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albin Fontaine

    Full Text Available Mosquito-borne diseases are major health problems worldwide. Serological responses to mosquito saliva proteins may be useful in estimating individual exposure to bites from mosquitoes transmitting these diseases. However, the relationships between the levels of these IgG responses and mosquito density as well as IgG response specificity at the genus and/or species level need to be clarified prior to develop new immunological markers to assess human/vector contact. To this end, a kinetic study of antibody levels against several mosquito salivary gland extracts from southeastern French individuals living in three areas with distinct ecological environments and, by implication, distinct Aedes caspius mosquito densities were compared using ELISA. A positive association was observed between the average levels of IgG responses against Ae. caspius salivary gland extracts and spatial Ae. caspius densities. Additionally, the average level of IgG responses increased significantly during the peak exposure to Ae. caspius at each site and returned to baseline four months later, suggesting short-lived IgG responses. The species-specificity of IgG antibody responses was determined by testing antibody responses to salivary gland extracts from Cx. pipiens, a mosquito that is present at these three sites at different density levels, and from two other Aedes species not present in the study area (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. The IgG responses observed against these mosquito salivary gland extracts contrasted with those observed against Ae. caspius salivary gland extracts, supporting the existence of species-specific serological responses. By considering different populations and densities of mosquitoes linked to environmental factors, this study shows, for the first time, that specific IgG antibody responses against Ae. caspius salivary gland extracts may be related to the seasonal and geographical variations in Ae. caspius density. Characterisation of such

  2. Regulation of B Cell Differentiation by Intracellular Membrane-Associated Proteins and microRNAs: Role in the Antibody Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zheng; Casali, Paolo; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-01-01

    B cells are central to adaptive immunity and their functions in antibody responses are exquisitely regulated. As suggested by recent findings, B cell differentiation is mediated by intracellular membrane structures (including endosomes, lysosomes, and autophagosomes) and protein factors specifically associated with these membranes, including Rab7, Atg5, and Atg7. These factors participate in vesicle formation/trafficking, signal transduction and induction of gene expression to promote antigen presentation, class switch DNA recombination (CSR)/somatic hypermutation (SHM), and generation/maintenance of plasma cells and memory B cells. Their expression is induced in B cells activated to differentiate and further fine-tuned by immune-modulating microRNAs, which coordinates CSR/SHM, plasma cell differentiation, and memory B cell differentiation. These short non-coding RNAs would individually target multiple factors associated with the same intracellular membrane compartments and collaboratively target a single factor in addition to regulating AID and Blimp-1. These, together with regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activities by endosomes and autophagosomes, show that intracellular membranes and microRNAs, two broadly relevant cell constituents, play important roles in balancing gene expression to specify B cell differentiation processes for optimal antibody responses. PMID:26579118

  3. Regulation of B cell differentiation by intracellular membrane associated proteins and microRNAs: role in the antibody response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng eLou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available B cells are central to adaptive immunity and their functions in antibody responses are exquisitely regulated. As suggested by recent findings, B cell differentiation is mediated by intracellular membrane structures (including endosomes, lysosomes and autophagosomes and protein factors specifically associated with these membranes, including Rab7, Atg5 and Atg7. These factors participate in vesicle formation/trafficking, signal transduction and induction of gene expression to promote antigen presentation, CSR/SHM, and generation/maintenance of plasma cells and memory B cells. Their expression is induced in B cells activated to differentiate and further fine-tuned by immune-modulating microRNAs, which coordinates CSR/SHM, plasma cell differentiation and memory B cell differentiation. These short non-coding RNAs would individually target multiple factors associated with the same intracellular membrane compartments and collaboratively target a single factor in addition to regulate AID and Blimp-1. These, together with regulation of microRNA biogenesis and activities by endosomes and autophagosomes, show that intracellular membranes and microRNAs, two broadly relevant cell constituents, play important roles in balancing gene expression to specify B cell differentiation processes for optimal antibody responses.

  4. Facial recognition of heroin vaccine opiates: Type 1 cross-reactivities of antibodies induced by hydrolytically stable haptenic surrogates of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine, and morphine

    OpenAIRE

    Matyas, Gary R.; Rice, Kenner C.; Cheng, Kejun; Li, Fuying; Antoline, Joshua F. G.; Iyer, Malliga R.; Jacobson, Arthur E; Mayorov, Alexander V.; Beck, Zoltan; Torres, Oscar; Alving, Carl R.

    2014-01-01

    Novel synthetic compounds similar to heroin and its major active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine, were examined as potential surrogate haptens for the ability to interface with the immune system for a heroin vaccine. Recent studies have suggested that heroin-like haptens must degrade hydrolytically to induce independent immune responses both to heroin and to the metabolites, resulting in antisera containing mixtures of antibodies (type 2 cross-reactivity). To test this concept, two...

  5. Prebiotic and probiotic agents enhance antibody-based immune responses to Salmonella Typhimurium infection in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Naqid, Ibrahim A.; Jonathan P. Owen; Maddison, Ben C; Gardner, David S.; Foster, Neil; Tchorzewska, Monika; La Ragione, Roberto M; Gough, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonellosis causes significant economic losses to the pig industry and contaminated pork products are an important source of Salmonella for humans. The EU ban on the use of antibiotic growth promoters in pig production, and the emergence of antibiotic resistance has meant there is a pressing need for alternative control strategies for pathogenic bacteria such as S. Typhimurium in pigs. Here, we determined the effects of prebiotic, probiotic and synbiotic diet regimes on antibody responses t...

  6. Antibody Response Rates To Hepatitis B Vaccination in Children With Chronic Renal Failure: An Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ece, İbrahim; Kibar, Ayse Esin; Oflaz, Burhan; Cakar, Nilgun; Balli, Sevket; Akkok, Nermin; Kara, Nazli

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the most important factors increasing the mortality and the mobility in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). There are a limited number of studies of pediatric patients with CRF regarding the response to double doses and protection rates. In this study, our aim was to compare the antibody levels and the respond rates to recombinant hepatitis B vaccine in children with chronic renal failure (CRF). Materials and Methods: In this pr...

  7. Canine antibody response to Phlebotomus perniciosus bites negatively correlates with the risk of Leishmania infantum transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Vlkova

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phlebotomine sand flies are blood-sucking insects that can transmit Leishmania parasites. Hosts bitten by sand flies develop an immune response against sand fly salivary antigens. Specific anti-saliva IgG indicate the exposure to the vector and may also help to estimate the risk of Leishmania spp. transmission. In this study, we examined the canine antibody response against the saliva of Phlebotomus perniciosus, the main vector of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean Basin, and characterized salivary antigens of this sand fly species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sera of dogs bitten by P. perniciosus under experimental conditions and dogs naturally exposed to sand flies in a L. infantum focus were tested by ELISA for the presence of anti-P. perniciosus antibodies. Antibody levels positively correlated with the number of blood-fed P. perniciosus females. In naturally exposed dogs the increase of specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 was observed during sand fly season. Importantly, Leishmania-positive dogs revealed significantly lower anti-P. perniciosus IgG2 compared to Leishmania-negative ones. Major P. perniciosus antigens were identified by western blot and mass spectrometry as yellow proteins, apyrases and antigen 5-related proteins. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that monitoring canine antibody response to sand fly saliva in endemic foci could estimate the risk of L. infantum transmission. It may also help to control canine leishmaniasis by evaluating the effectiveness of anti-vector campaigns. Data from the field study where dogs from the Italian focus of L. infantum were naturally exposed to P. perniciosus bites indicates that the levels of anti-P. perniciosus saliva IgG2 negatively correlate with the risk of Leishmania transmission. Thus, specific IgG2 response is suggested as a risk marker of L. infantum transmission for dogs.

  8. Formation of antibodies against infliximab and adalimumab strongly correlates with functional drug levels and clinical responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radstake, T R D J; Svenson, M; Eijsbouts, A M;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) neutralising antibody constructs are increasingly being used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: To determine potential differences in clinical responses, soluble drug levels and antibody formation between patients with RA receiving...... 16 (47%), 8 (24%) and 10 (29%). Clinical responses correlated with the levels of S-infliximab/adalimumab and the formation of anti-infliximab/anti-adalimumab antibodies. CONCLUSION: The clinical response to two anti-TNFalpha biological agents closely follows the trough drug levels and the presence of...... antibodies directed against the drugs. Further studies that focus on the underlying pathways leading to antibody formation are warranted to predict immunogenicity of these expensive biological agents and treatment outcomes....

  9. Neutralizing antibody response in the patients with hand, foot and mouth disease to enterovirus 71 and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Liye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a significant pathogen causing large outbreaks in China for the past 3 years. Developing an EV71 vaccine is urgently needed to stop the spread of the disease; however, the adaptive immune response of humans to EV71 infection remains unclear. We examined the neutralizing antibody titers in HFMD patients and compared them to those of asymptomatic healthy children and young adults. We found that 80% of HFMD patients became positive for neutralizing antibodies against EV71 (GMT = 24.3 one day after the onset of illness. The antibody titers in the patients peaked two days (GMT = 79.5 after the illness appeared and were comparable to the level of adults (GMT = 45.2. Noticeably, the antibody response was not correlated with disease severity, suggesting that cellular immune response, besides neutralizing antibodies, could play critical role in controlling the outcome of EV71 infection in humans.

  10. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP......-specific IgG antibodies were found more frequently (43.2 versus 13.5%), and the antibody levels were higher in the TFI cases than in the controls (P < 0.001). C. trachomatis EB-induced lymphocyte responses were positive in 81.8% of the TFI cases and 58.9% of the controls (P < 0.001). Similarly, CHSP60-induced...... lymphocyte responses were found in 45.5% of the TFI cases and 30.7% of the controls (P < 0.001). CHSP60 antibody test was the best single test predicting TFI. Compared to cases with all four markers negative, the estimated risk for TFI was 4.1 (95% CI 1.4-11.9) among those with one positive marker and 19...

  11. Antibody response to vaccines for rhinotracheitis, caliciviral disease, panleukopenia, feline leukemia, and rabies in tigers (Panthera tigris) and lions (Panthera leo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risi, Emmanuel; Agoulon, Albert; Allaire, Franck; Le Dréan-Quénec'hdu, Sophie; Martin, Virginie; Mahl, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the results of a study of captive tigers (Panthera tigris) and lions (Panthera leo) vaccinated with a recombinant vaccine against feline leukemia virus; an inactivated adjuvanted vaccine against rabies virus; and a multivalent modified live vaccine against feline herpesvirus, calicivirus, and panleukopenia virus. The aim of the study was to assess the immune response and safety of the vaccines and to compare the effects of the administration of single (1 ml) and double (2 ml) doses. The animals were separated into two groups and received either single or double doses of vaccines, followed by blood collection for serologic response for 400 days. No serious adverse event was observed, with the exception of abortion in one lioness, potentially caused by the incorrect use of the feline panleukopenia virus modified live vaccine. There was no significant difference between single and double doses for all vaccines. The recombinant vaccine against feline leukemia virus did not induce any serologic response. The vaccines against rabies and feline herpesvirus induced a significant immune response in the tigers and lions. The vaccine against calicivirus did not induce a significant increase in antibody titers in either tigers or lions. The vaccine against feline panleukopenia virus induced a significant immune response in tigers but not in lions. This report demonstrates the value of antibody titer determination after vaccination of nondomestic felids. PMID:22779227

  12. Antibody and inflammatory responses in laying hens with experimental primary infections of Ascaridia galli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Atxutegi, C; Gandolfi, B; Arangüena, T; Sepúlveda, R; Arévalo, M; Simón, F

    2009-04-01

    Ascaridia galli, an intestinal nematode that affects hens and other domestic and wild birds, causes economic losses in avian exploitations. The present work shows that A. galli stimulates a strong antibody response as well as an intense inflammatory reaction, in the intestinal mucous of experimentally infected Lohmann Brown laying hens. IgG antibodies against soluble extracts of A. galli embrionated eggs and adult worms, were detected in both blood and yolks eggs from infected hens during a period of 105 days after the infection. This indicates that hens transfer to their offspring a part of the IgG antibodies produced when they become infected. The antigens responsible for the stimulation of specific IgG were molecules of 30-34, 44-54 and 58-90 kDa, while in the yolk eggs of infected hens a reactivity directed against antigens of molecular weight (M(w)) lower than 50 kDa was detected. Histology revealed traumatic lesions with leukocyte infiltration, and inflammation of the intestinal wall of the infected hens after 105 days of initial infection. The possible influence of the immune and inflammatory response on the population dynamics of the parasite is discussed. PMID:19167166

  13. The clonal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa heat shock protein is highly diverse in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulanova, M; Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O;

    1997-01-01

    The GroEL protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the bacterial 60-65 kDa heat shock protein family. A strong antibody response to GroEL has been found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic pulmonary infection caused by P. aeruginosa. Clonotypes of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies against Gro...

  14. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGUES da SILVA Andréa de Cássia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared.

  15. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues da Silva, A C; Caporale, G M; Gonçalves, C A; Targueta, M C; Comin, F; Zanetti, C R; Kotait, I

    2000-01-01

    Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac) and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac) vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA) higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared. PMID:10810324

  16. Monoclonal antibodies against ROR1 induce apoptosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmanesh, A H; Hojjat-Farsangi, M; Khan, A S; Jeddi-Tehrani, M; Akhondi, M M; Bayat, A A; Ghods, R; Mahmoudi, A-R; Hadavi, R; Österborg, A; Shokri, F; Rabbani, H; Mellstedt, H

    2012-06-01

    ROR1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) recently identified to be overexpressed at the gene and protein levels in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against RTKs have been successfully applied for therapy of solid tumors. We generated five MAbs against the Ig (n = 1), cysteine-rich (CRD) (n = 2) and kringle (KNG) (n = 2) domains, respectively, of the extracellular part of ROR1. All CLL patients (n = 20) expressed ROR1 on the surface of the leukemic cells. A significantly higher frequency of ROR1 expression was found in patients with progressive versus non-progressive disease, and in those with unmutated versus mutated IgVH genes. All five MAbs alone induced apoptosis in the absence of complement or added effector cells (Annexin-V and MTT, as well as cleavage of poly-(ADP ribose)-polymerase, caspase-8 and caspase-9) of CLL cells but not of normal B cells. Most effective were MAbs against CRD and KNG, significantly superior to rituximab (P < 0.005). Cross-linking of anti-ROR1 MAbs using the F(ab')(2) fragments of anti-Fc antibodies significantly augmented apoptosis. Two of the MAbs induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) similar to that of rituximab and one anti-ROR1 MAb (KNG) (IgG1) showed killing activity by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The identified ROR1 epitopes may provide a basis for generating human ROR1 MAbs for therapy. PMID:22289919

  17. Antibody against the insulin receptor causes disappearance of insulin receptors in 3T3-L1 cells: a possible explanation of antibody-induced insulin resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Grunfeld, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a rabbit antibody induced against the rat insulin receptor (RAR) was tested using cultured 3T3-L1 fat cells. As previously seen with antibodies against the insulin receptor from patients with the type B syndrome of insulin resistance and acanthosis nigricans, RAR acutely mimicked the action of insulin by stimulating deoxyglucose uptake. After prolonged exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to RAR, insulinomimetic activity was lost and the cells became resistant to the action of insulin. This...

  18. Early and enhanced antitoxin responses elicited with complexes of tetanus toxoid and specific mouse and human antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were early and enhanced in mice when tetanus toxoid was administered in complex with specific isologous antitoxin or specific mouse γ-globulin. Antitoxin responses were enhanced when fluid tetanus toxoid was complexed in vitro in antigen-to-antibody ratios of equivalence or antigen excess; responses to complexed toxoid in antibody excess were comparatively repressed. Primary responses were greatly inhibited in mice immunized with the same amount of toxoid complexed at equivalence or in antibody excess with specific human γ-globulin. Although primary responses were totally repressed, a primed state developed; a second injection of fluid toxoid within a few days produced excellent antitoxin responses. Separate injections of antigen and antibody at different sites produced an excellent in vivo primed state for early and high responses. Antibody production after stimulation with complexed toxoid was also enhanced in mice irradiated with 400 rads, a dose that ordinarily completely suppresses primary responses with fluid toxoid alone. These data provide evidence for the efficacy of antigen-antibody complexes in early and active immunization. (U.S.)

  19. Antibody response following Hepatitis B vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients: does normalized urea clearance matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Erkan Dervisoglu; Melih Simsek; Ahmet Yilmaz

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Data on the factors that contribute to the antibody response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients are scarce. The current study was conducted on a group of peritoneal dialysis patients to learn how the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination varies according to the patient's clearance of urea normalized to total body water (Kt/V). METHODS: A convenience sample of 33 peritoneal dialysis patients (13 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 49¡12 years) was...

  20. Specific serum antibody responses in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) provide limited protection against Streptococcus ictaluri challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnik, David J; Evans, Joyce J; Klesius, Phillip H

    2011-11-15

    Passive immunization studies were conducted to determine the role of specific antibodies in immunity to Streptococcus ictaluri. Adult channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were injected i.p. with tryptic soy broth as control or with 1.5 × 10(7)colony-forming units (cfu) S. ictaluri/fish at 0, 30, and 60 d, and serum was collected 90 d after the original challenge. Fish were passively immunized by i.p. injection with serum from the tryptic soy broth (TSB) control group, anti-S. ictaluri serum from fish immunized three times and sampled at 90 d (SSI), or heat-inactivated anti-S. ictaluri serum from fish immunized three times and sampled at 90 d (HISSI). These passively immunized fish were then challenged 72 h later with 1.5 × 10(8)cfu S. ictaluri/fish. Over 21 d, the mean cumulative percent survival was 43.3 (TSB), 63.3 (SSI), and 50.0 (HISSI). A significant difference in cumulative percent survival was noted between the TSB and the HISSI groups, and significant differences were noted between these groups and the SSI group. Serum obtained from immunized fish 72 h after passive immunization exhibited increased anti-S. ictaluri antibody levels. Twenty-one days after the challenge, the HISSI and SSI group antibody levels significantly increased above their corresponding pre-challenge levels. No significant (r(2)=0.0806; P<0.5985) correlation between increased pre-challenge specific serum antibody levels and survival after challenge was demonstrated when analyzing the control and passive immunization groups. The results indicate that both specific anti-S. ictaluri antibodies and non-specific immune responses are important for protection against S. ictaluri. PMID:21962634

  1. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  2. Live and Inactivated Influenza Vaccines Induce Similar Humoral Responses, but Only Live Vaccines Induce Diverse T-Cell Responses in Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Hoft, Daniel F.; Babusis, Elizabeth; Worku, Shewangizaw; Spencer, Charles T.; Lottenbach, Kathleen; Truscott, Steven M.; Abate, Getahun; Sakala, Isaac G.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; CREECH, C. BUDDY; Gerber, Michael A.; Bernstein, David I.; Newman, Frances; Graham, Irene; Anderson, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Two doses of either trivalent live attenuated or inactivated influenza vaccines (LAIV and TIV, respectively) are approved for young children (≥24 months old for LAIV and ≥6 months old for TIV) and induce protective antibody responses. However, whether combinations of LAIV and TIV are safe and equally immunogenic is unknown. Furthermore, LAIV is more protective than TIV in children for unclear reasons.

  3. Radiation-induced gene responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5' region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression

  4. Immunization of N terminus of enterovirus 71 VP4 elicits cross-protective antibody responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is major cause of hand, foot and mouth disease. Large epidemics of EV71 infection have been recently reported in the Asian-Pacific region. Currently, no vaccine is available to prevent EV71 infection. Results The peptide (VP4N20) consisting of the first 20 amino acids at the N-terminal of VP4 of EV71 genotype C4 were fused to hepatitis B core (HBcAg) protein. Expression of fusion proteins in E. coli resulted in the formation of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs). Mice immunized with the chimeric VLPs elicited anti-VP4N20 antibody response. In vitro microneutralization experiments showed that anti-chimeric VLPs sera were able to neutralize not only EV71 of genotype C4 but also EV71 of genotype A. Neonatal mice model confirmed the neutralizing ability of anti-chimeric VLPs sera. Eiptope mapping led to the identification of a “core sequence” responsible for antibody recognition within the peptide. Conclusions Immunization of chimeric VLPs is able to elicit antibodies displaying a broad neutralizing activity against different genotypes of EV71 in vitro. The “core sequence” of EV71-VP4 is highly conserved across EV71 genotypes. The chimeric VLPs have a great potential to be a novel vaccine candidate with a broad cross-protection against different EV71 genotypes. PMID:24320792

  5. MOUSE ANTIBODY RESPONSE FOLLOWING REPETITIVE INJECTIONS OF GAMMA-IRRADIATED HUMAN PLACENTA COLLAGENA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秉慈; MelvinSpira; 许增禄

    1994-01-01

    Injectable bovine collagen has been used clinically for years.But both the necessity of repeated injections to maintain corrections and the question of adverse allergic reactions developing from the use of a xenogenic collagen have been an area of serious concern.To overoome these adyerse effects,we have developed injectable collagen preparations from human placenta.Gamma irradiation was used for sterilization and crosslinking of the collagen.We observed the mouse immune respose to gamma-irradiated human placenta soluble and insoluble collagen follow-ing multiple injections.After six injections of these materials,no total IgG level increase was found,nor was anti-body specifically directed against human collagen found.Mouse antibody levels were also observed following Zyderm Ⅱ and Zyplast repetitive injections and follow-ing repetitive implantations of coated vicryl and chromic gut.No humoral immune response was found in this het-erologous type system.

  6. Protective role of antibodies induced by Brucella melitensis B115 against B. melitensis and Brucella abortus infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adone, Rosanna; Francia, Massimiliano; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Pesciaroli, Michele; Pasquali, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that antibodies specific for O-PS antigen of Brucella smooth strains are involved in the protective immunity of brucellosis. Since the rough strain Brucella melitensis B115 was able to protect mice against wild Brucella strains brucellosis despite the lack of anti-OPS antibodies, in this study we evaluated the biological significance of antibodies induced by this strain, directed to antigens other than O-PS, passively tranferred to untreated mice prior to infection with Brucella abortus 2308 and B. melitensis 16M virulent strains. The protective ability of specific antisera collected from mice vaccinated with B. melitensis B115, B. abortus RB51 and B. abortus S19 strains was compared. The results indicated that antibodies induced by B115 were able to confer a satisfactory protection, especially against B. abortus 2308, similar to that conferred by the antiserum S19, while the RB51 antiserum was ineffective. These findings suggest that antibodies induced by B115 could act as opsonins as well as antibodies anti-O-PS, thus triggering more efficient internalization and degradation of bacteria within phagocytes. This is the first study assessing the efficacy of antibodies directed to antigens other than O-PS in the course of brucellosis infection. PMID:22521283

  7. Augmentation of the antibody response of Atlantic salmon by oral administration of alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihan Chen

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of alginate-encapsulated infectious pancreatic necrosis virus antigens in inducing the immune response of Atlantic salmon as booster vaccines. One year after intraperitoneal injection with an oil-adjuvanted vaccine, post-smolts were orally boosted either by 1 alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens (ENCAP; 2 soluble antigens (UNENCAP or 3 untreated feed (control. This was done twice, seven weeks apart. Sampling was done twice, firstly at 7 weeks post 1st oral boost and the 2nd, at 4 weeks after the 2nd oral boost. Samples included serum, head kidney, spleen and hindgut. Serum antibodies were analyzed by ELISA while tissues were used to assess the expression of IgM, IgT, CD4, GATA3, FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes by quantitative PCR. Compared to controls, fish fed with ENCAP had a significant increase (p<0.04 in serum antibodies following the 1st boost but not after the 2nd boost. This coincided with significant up-regulation of CD4 and GATA3 genes. In contrast, serum antibodies in the UNENCAP group decreased both after the 1st and 2nd oral boosts. This was associated with significant up-regulation of FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes. The expression of IgT was not induced in the hindgut after the 1st oral boost but was significantly up-regulated following the 2nd one. CD4 and GATA3 mRNA expressions exhibited a similar pattern to IgT in the hindgut. IgM mRNA expression on the other hand was not differentially regulated at any of the times examined. Our findings suggest that 1 Parenteral prime with oil-adjuvanted vaccines followed by oral boost with ENCAP results in augmentation of the systemic immune response; 2 Symmetrical prime and boost (mucosal with ENCAP results in augmentation of mucosal immune response and 3 Symmetrical priming and boosting (mucosal with soluble antigens results in the induction of systemic immune tolerance.

  8. How one TSH receptor antibody induces thyrocyte proliferation while another induces apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Morshed, Syed A.; Ma, Risheng; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) activates two major G-protein arms, Gsα and Gq leading to initiation of down-stream signaling cascades for survival, proliferation and production of thyroid hormones. Antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR-Abs), found in patients with Graves’ disease, may have stimulating, blocking, or neutral actions on the thyroid cell. We have shown previously that such TSHR-Abs are distinct signaling imprints after binding to the TSHR and that such events can have variable ...

  9. Dynamics of virus shedding and antibody responses in influenza A virus-infected feral swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hailiang; Cunningham, Fred L; Harris, Jillian; Xu, Yifei; Long, Li-Ping; Hanson-Dorr, Katie; Baroch, John A; Fioranelli, Paul; Lutman, Mark W; Li, Tao; Pedersen, Kerri; Schmit, Brandon S; Cooley, Jim; Lin, Xiaoxu; Jarman, Richard G; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Given their free-ranging habits, feral swine could serve as reservoirs or spatially dynamic 'mixing vessels' for influenza A virus (IAV). To better understand virus shedding patterns and antibody response dynamics in the context of IAV surveillance amongst feral swine, we used IAV of feral swine origin to perform infection experiments. The virus was highly infectious and transmissible in feral swine, and virus shedding patterns and antibody response dynamics were similar to those in domestic swine. In the virus-inoculated and sentinel groups, virus shedding lasted ≤ 6 and ≤ 9 days, respectively. Antibody titres in inoculated swine peaked at 1 : 840 on day 11 post-inoculation (p.i.), remained there until 21 days p.i. and dropped to nucleoprotein position 473. Using data from cell culture as a benchmark, sensitivity and specificity of a matrix gene-based quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method using nasal swab samples for detection of IAV in feral swine were 78.9 and 78.1 %, respectively. Using data from haemagglutination inhibition assays as a benchmark, sensitivity and specificity of an ELISA for detection of IAV-specific antibody were 95.4 and 95.0 %, respectively. Serological surveillance from 2009 to 2014 showed that ∼7.58 % of feral swine in the USA were positive for IAV. Our findings confirm the susceptibility of IAV infection and the high transmission ability of IAV amongst feral swine, and also suggest the need for continued surveillance of IAVs in feral swine populations. PMID:26297148

  10. Antibody response in naïve and sensitised goats infested by Sarcoptes scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize the IgG and IgE antibody responses in goats infested repeatedly with Sarcoptes scabiei. Ten goats purchased from scabies-free farms were infested with 2000 live mites on the auricles. Fifty days after the initial infestation, the goats were treated with ivermectin. After being completely recovered, the goats were reinfested then treated again at 50 days post infestation. Blood samples were collected at the time of the first infestation, then every 10 days afterwards for 270 days. Seroconversion for IgG took place after 30 days following the first infestation, whereas the maximum level of the specific IgG antibodies occurred after 50 days. Immunoblot analysis identified a number of antigens (Mr 180, 135, 43 and 38 KDa that recognised by the IgG at 10 days and continuously recognised throughout the course of the multiple infestations. Being consistently recognised, those antigens should be essential in the development immunological diagnostic tests for scabies. The levels of scabies-specific IgE antibodies increased slowly during the first infestation and rapidly dropped following treatment of the animals with ivermectin. In the second and third infestations, however, the reaginic antibodies rose rapidly and with a grater level. On immunoblot analysis, at least 10 antigens (Mr 130, 72, 64, 58, 48, 44, 41, 39, 27 and 25 KDa were observed to be recognised by the IgE present in the sera from scabies-infested animals. Since IgE response is considered to play a major role in the immune protection, those allergens, therefore, could be used as the main component of an anti-scabies vaccine.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of colloidal stability of antibody solutions using PEG-induced liquid-liquid phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Latypov, Ramil F; Lomakin, Aleksey; Meyer, Julie A; Kerwin, Bruce A; Vunnum, Suresh; Benedek, George B

    2014-05-01

    Colloidal stability of antibody solutions, i.e., the propensity of the folded protein to precipitate, is an important consideration in formulation development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. In a protein solution, different pathways including crystallization, colloidal aggregation, and liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) can lead to the formation of precipitates. The kinetics of crystallization and aggregation are often slow and vary from protein to protein. Due to the diverse mechanisms of these protein condensation processes, it is a challenge to develop a standardized test for an early evaluation of the colloidal stability of antibody solutions. LLPS would normally occur in antibody solutions at sufficiently low temperature, provided that it is not preempted by freezing of the solution. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can be used to induce LLPS at temperatures above the freezing point. Here, we propose a colloidal stability test based on inducing LLPS in antibody solutions and measuring the antibody concentration of the dilute phase. We demonstrate experimentally that such a PEG-induced LLPS test can be used to compare colloidal stability of different antibodies in different solution conditions and can be readily applied to high-throughput screening. We have derived an equation for the effects of PEG concentration and molecular weight on the results of the LLPS test. Finally, this equation defines a binding energy in the condensed phase, which can be determined in the PEG-induced LLPS test. This binding energy is a measure of attractive interactions between antibody molecules and can be used for quantitative characterization of the colloidal stability of antibody solutions. PMID:24679215

  12. The Effect of Prophylactic Antipyretic Administration on Post-Vaccination Adverse Reactions and Antibody Response in Children: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rashmi Ranjan Das; Inusha Panigrahi; Sushree Samiksha Naik

    2014-01-01

    Background Prophylactic antipyretic administration decreases the post-vaccination adverse reactions. Recent study finds that they may also decrease the antibody responses to several vaccine antigens. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence for a relationship between prophylactic antipyretic administration, post-vaccination adverse events, and antibody response in children. Methods A systematic search of major databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE was carried out till March 2014. ...

  13. Enhanced Innate Inflammation Induced by Anti-BTLA Antibody in Dual Insult Model of Hemorrhagic Shock/Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tingting; Bai, Jianwen; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Chen, Yaping; Biron, Bethany M; Ayala, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis following hemorrhagic shock is a common clinical condition, in which innate immune system suffers from severe suppression. B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) is an immune-regulatory coinhibitory receptor expressed not only on adaptive, but also on innate immune cells. Our previous data showed that BTLA gene deficient mice were protected from septic mortality when compared with wild-type control C57BL/6 mice. Here, we extended our study by treating C57BL/6 mice with an anti-BTLA monoclonal antibody (clone 6A6; reported to have the ability to neutralize or agonize/potentiate BTLA signaling) in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock (Hem) followed by sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP); positing initially that if BTLA engagement was neutralized, like gene deficiency, an anti-BTLA mAb would have the similar effects on the inflammatory response/morbidity in these mice after such insults. Here, we report that BTLA expression is elevated on innate immune cells after Hem/CLP. However, anti-BTLA antibody treatment increased cytokine (TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10)/chemokine (KC, MIP-2, MCP-1) levels and inflammatory cells (neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells) recruitment in the peritoneal cavity, which in turn aggravated organ injury and elevated these animals' mortality in Hem/CLP. When compared with the protective effects of our previous study using BTLA gene deficient mice in a model of lethal septic challenge, we further confirmed BTLA's contribution to enhanced innate cell recruitment, elevated IL-10 levels, and reduced survival, and that engagement of antibody with BTLA potentiates/exacerbates the pathophysiology in Hem/sepsis. PMID:26674453

  14. Assessment of neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibody responses against Porcine circovirus 2 in vaccinated and non-vaccinated farmed pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsfold, Cristina Solis; Dardari, Rkia; Law, Sampson; Eschbaumer, Michael; Nourozieh, Narges; Marshall, Frank; Czub, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Vaccination is the most efficacious procedure to curtail Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2)-associated diseases (PCVAD). Experimental studies indicate that PCV2 vaccine-induced virus-neutralizing antibodies play a major role in protection from PCVAD. However, the immune response to PCV2 vaccination of pigs on farms is less clear. Analysing groups of age-matched vaccinated and non-vaccinated farmed pigs, we found significantly increased levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies only in vaccinated pigs belonging to the age group with the highest risk for developing PCVAD. Serum levels of PCV2 genomes were not different between corresponding age groups. Levels of antibodies directed against a linear peptide from the PCV2 capsid protein correlated with those of virus-neutralizing antibodies and reached the highest levels in older, non-vaccinated animals, pointing towards an intense interaction between PCV2-infected cells and the immune system. In conclusion, current PCV2 vaccines are in need of improvement to induce stronger and more rapid immunity to prevent PCV2 infection. PMID:26033118

  15. Haemolytic complement activity, C3 and FactorB consumption in serum from chickens divergently selected for antibody responses to sheep red blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H.K.; Baelmans, R.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Dorny, P.; Demey, F.

    2002-01-01

    Antibody responses, serum complement haemolytic activity, and complement component C3 and Factor B consumption were studied in chickens divergently selected for high and low antibody responses to sheep red blood cells, and in a randombred control line. Significantly higher total and IgG antibody res

  16. Epstein-Barr virus but not cytomegalovirus is associated with reduced vaccine antibody responses in Gambian infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Holder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV are persistent herpesviruses that have various immunomodulatory effects on their hosts. Both viruses are usually acquired in infancy in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region where childhood vaccines are less effective than in high income settings. To establish whether there is an association between these two observations, we tested the hypothesis that infection with one or both viruses modulate antibody responses to the T-cell independent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the T-cell dependent measles vaccines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Infection with EBV and CMV was diagnosed by the presence of virus-specific IgM in the peripheral blood or by the presence of IgG at higher levels than that found in umbilical cord blood. Anti-meningococcus IgG and IgM were quantified by ELISA. Anti-measles antibody responses were quantified by haemagglutinin antibody inhibition assay. Infants infected with EBV had reduced IgG and IgM antibody responses to meningococcal polysaccharides and to measles vaccine. Infection with CMV alone predicted no changes in the response to meningococcal polysaccharide. While CMV alone had no discernable effect on the antibody response to measles, the response of infants infected with both CMV and EBV was similar to that of infants infected with neither, suggesting that the effects of CMV infection countered the effects of EBV on measles antibody responses. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this exploratory study indicate that infection with EBV is associated with reduced antibody responses to polysaccharides and to measles vaccine, but suggest that the response to T-cell dependent antigens such as measles haemagglutinin may be restored by infection with CMV.

  17. Effect of Early Antibiotic Treatment on the Antibody Response to Cytoplasmic Proteins of Brucella melitensis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Raul A.; Racaro, Graciela C.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    1999-01-01

    To test whether antibiotic therapy hampers the antibody response to Brucella antigens, 30 BALB/c mice were infected with Brucella melitensis H38 and randomized for treatment with doxycycline administered intraperitoneally for 42 days starting at 7 or 28 days postinfection (p.i.) (groups DOX7 and DOX28, respectively) or for no treatment (control group). Antibodies to smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reached peak levels (mean optical density [OD] = 2.618) between days 56 and 70 p.i. in the control group, and similar peak levels (mean OD = 2.486) were observed in the DOX28 group, but significantly lower peak levels (mean OD = 0.821) were observed at 28 days p.i. in the DOX7 group. The antibody response against cytoplasmic proteins depleted of LPS (CPs) reached maximal levels (mean OD = 2.402) between days 56 and 70 p.i. in the control group, but no response was detected in the DOX7 group. Anti-CP antibodies were detected in only three animals from the DOX28 group, at levels significantly lower than those in the control group (mean maximal OD = 0.791). The pattern of antibody response to an 18-kDa cytoplasmic protein of Brucella spp. was similar to that against the CP antigen. This study shows that early antibiotic treatment affects the antibody response of mice to cytoplasmic proteins of Brucella and, to a lesser extent, to LPS. PMID:10225853

  18. SSB peptide and DNA co-immunization induces inhibition of anti-dsDNA antibody production in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus often have various autoantibodies.The relationship between these antibodies is still poorly understood.The aim of the present study was to observe the anti-SSB antibody and anti-dsDNA antibody production profiles following immunization with synthetic SSB peptide alone,DNA alone or co-immunization with these two antigens.Methods SSB 214-225 aa peptide was synthesized by organic chemistry solid-phase peptide synthesis.Rabbits were immunized with the foliowing antigens:synthetic SSB peptide linked with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH),DNA,SSB plus dsDNA,KLH and PBS.Antibodies were measured by ELISA.Histopathology and direct immufluorescence assays were also applied.Results Ainit-SSB and anti-dsDNA antibodies were produced following immunization with SSB peptide and DNA respectively.The level of SSB antibody in the co-immunization group was higher than that of the SSB peptide immunization group.The level of anti-dsDNA antibody in the co-immunization group was,however,lower than that in the DNA immunization group.Meanwhile,the level of anti-SSB antibody was higher than that of anti-DNA antibody in the co-immunization group.No morphological or immunological abnormalities were found in the heart,liver,kidney,spleen or skin tissues.Conclusion Inhibition of anti-dsDNA-antibody was induced by co-immunization with synthesized SSB peptide and DNA,which might explain,at least partly,the mild disease in some LE subsets associated with SSB antibody.

  19. Elicitation of neutralizing antibodies directed against CD4-induced epitope(s using a CD4 mimetic cross-linked to a HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antu K Dey

    Full Text Available The identification of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env structures that can generate broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs is pivotal to the development of a successful vaccine against HIV-1 aimed at eliciting effective humoral immune responses. To that end, the production of novel Env structure(s that might induce BNAbs by presentation of conserved epitopes, which are otherwise occluded, is critical. Here, we focus on a structure that stabilizes Env in a conformation representative of its primary (CD4 receptor-bound state, thereby exposing highly conserved "CD4 induced" (CD4i epitope(s known to be important for co-receptor binding and subsequent virus infection. A CD4-mimetic miniprotein, miniCD4 (M64U1-SH, was produced and covalently complexed to recombinant, trimeric gp140 envelope glycoprotein (gp140 using site-specific disulfide linkages. The resulting gp140-miniCD4 (gp140-S-S-M64U1 complex was recognized by CD4i antibodies and the HIV-1 co-receptor, CCR5. The gp140-miniCD4 complex elicited the highest titers of CD4i binding antibodies as well as enhanced neutralizing antibodies against Tier 1 viruses as compared to gp140 protein alone following immunization of rabbits. Neutralization against HIV-2(7312/V434M and additional serum mapping confirm the specific elicitation of antibodies directed to the CD4i epitope(s. These results demonstrate the utility of structure-based approach in improving immunogenic response against specific region, such as the CD4i epitope(s here, and its potential role in vaccine application.

  20. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourichon David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three different general immune criteria; high antibody response to Newcastle disease virus 3 weeks after vaccination (ND3, high cell-mediated immune response, using the wing web response to phytohemglutinin (PHA and high phagocytic activity, measured as carbone clearance (CC. Line ND3-L was selected on ND3, line PHA-L was selected on PHA, and line CC-L on CC, but all lines were measured for all three traits. The fourth line was a contemporary random bred control maintained throughout the selection experiment. Principal component analysis was used to distinguish clusters based on the overall set of immune measures. Results In the KLH immunised group, no differences were present between lines for natural antibodies binding to KLH and LPS, and, lines ND3-L and PHA-L had higher titers to LTA and anti-Gal titers measured before the immunisation protocol. The measure of ND3 was correlated positively with LPS titers measured post KLH immunisation and with the difference between LPS titers measured at day 0 and 7 post immunisation. In the M. butyricum immunised group, Line ND3-L showed significantly higher specific antibody response to M. butyricum, and this result agrees well with the hypothesis that the Th-1 pathway was expected to be selected for in this line. Conclusion This study has shown that the two different antigens KLH and M. butyricum gave rise to different responses in the set of selected lines, and that the response was only enhanced for the antigen associated with the same response mechanism as that for the trait (ND3, PHA or CC for which the line was selected. Interactions between innate and acquired immunity have been observed mainly for the

  1. rBCSP31 Antibody Response in Patients with Brucellosis: A Candidate for Brucella Vaccine

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    Khoramabadi , N. (PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: One of the proteins shared in all strains of Brucella is 31 kDa surface protein (BCPS31 that could be an appropriate target for immunization and serological diagnosis. Material and Methods: In the present study, BCSP31 produced as a recombinant protein in pET28a (+ expression system was utilized, using ELISA, to detect trace specific antibody (IgG in brucellosis patients' serum that was confirmed by culture. We also evaluated cytokine response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to this protein in the cell culture. Results: The results indicated a significant amount of surface protein antibodies (IgG in the serum of patients with brucellosis. Evaluation of lymphocyte responses to rBCSP31 also showed a significant IL-12 and IFN-γ production in patients’ lymphocyte cultures. Conclusion: These results suggest that BCSP31 can elicit specific humoral and cellular responses during host infection and it can be used in designing immunization and serologic diagnosis systems

  2. Oral Vaccination with the Porcine Rotavirus VP4 Outer Capsid Protein Expressed by Lactococcus lactis Induces Specific Antibody Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-jing Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study to design a delivery system resistant to the gastrointestinal environment for oral vaccine against porcine rotavirus. Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 was transformed with segments of vP4 of the porcine rotavirus inserted into the pNZ8112 surface-expression vector, and a recombinant L. lactis expressing VP4 protein was constructed. An approximately 27 kDa VP4 protein was confirmed by SDS-PAGE , Western blot and immunostaining analysis. BALB/c mice were immunized orally with VP4-expression recombinant L. lactis and cellular, mucosal and systemic humoral immune responses were examined. Specific anti-VP4 secretory IgA and IgG were found in feces, ophthalmic and vaginal washes and in serum. The induced antibodies demonstrated neutralizing effects on porcine rotavirus infection on MA104 cells. Our findings suggest that oral immunization with VP4-expressing L. lactis induced both specific local and systemic humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

  3. Osthole prevents anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis in mice by affecting the caspase-3-mediated apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Toru; Hino, Okio

    2003-02-15

    Fas (Apo-1/CD95) ligand, which is a type II membrane protein, is a major inducer of apoptosis. Osthole is a coumarin derivative present in medicinal plants. The effect of osthole on hepatitis induced by anti-Fas antibody in mice was studied. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented the elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) caused by anti-Fas antibody (175 microg/kg, i.v.). Administration of osthole to mice even at a dose of 10 mg/kg significantly inhibited of anti-Fas antibody-induced elevation of plasma ALT. Capase-3 is a cysteine protease, and treatment of mice with anti-Fas antibody caused an elevation of caspase-3 activity at 3.5 and 6 hr. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (100 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited the elevation of caspase-3 activity caused by anti-Fas antibody. However, the addition of osthole (up to 10(-4)M) to a liver cytosol fraction isolated from mice treated with anti-Fas antibody did not inhibit caspase-3 activity in vitro. Thus, treatment of mice with osthole inhibited caspase-3 activity by an effect upstream of caspase-3 activation. The livers of mice treated with anti-Fas antibody contained apoptotic and dead cells; osthole attenuated the development of this apoptosis and cell death. The present results show that osthole prevented anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis by inhibiting the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway. PMID:12566097

  4. Influence of routes and administration parameters on antibody response of pigs following DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Annette Malene; Kirstensen, Birte; Dannemann-Jensen, Tove;

    2004-01-01

    Using the nucleoprotein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus as model antigen, we optimised parameters for gene gun vaccination of pigs, including firing pressure and vaccination site. As criteria for optimisation, we characterised particle penetration and local tissue damage by...... histology. For selected combinations, vaccination efficiency in terms of antibody response was studied. Gene gun vaccination on ear alone was as efficient as a multi-site (ear, thorax, inguinal area, tongue mucosa) gene gun approach, and more efficient than combined intramuscular (i.m.)/intradermal (i.......d.) injection of plasmid DNA. This indicates, that the ear is an attractive site for gene gun vaccination of pigs....

  5. Neonatal molecular pathologies induced by maternal anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera-Esparza R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maternal antinuclear antibodies with anti-Ro or anti-La specificity might be pathogenic to the fetus and could induce molecular neonatal pathologies, such as neonatal lupus (NL with or without congenital heart block (CHB. The cutaneous manifestations of neonatal lupus appear at birth or a few weeks later, and skin lesions may persist for weeks. While CHB is characterized by intrauterine bradycardia or low heart rates at birth and may persist for months, depending on the degree of blockage. Clinical and experimental data demonstrated that anti-Ro and anti-La autoantibodies functionally inhibit L-type calcium channels and induce abnormalities in electrical conduction of the cardiac myocytes. It has been 38 years since the first clinical description of CHB. Presently, the pathophysiology of CHB has been clarified through clinical and basic research studies.

  6. Anti-asialo GM1 antibodies prevents guanethidine-induced sympathectomy in athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Hougen, H P; Christensen, H B; Rygaard, J; Svendsen, O; Juul, P

    Guanethidine sulphate induces destruction of peripheral sympathetic neurons and infiltration of mononuclear cells in rat sympathetic ganglia. The effect of guanethidine is believed to be an autoimmune reaction. In order to determine the effect of anti-asialo GM1, an antibody that binds to the...... glycolipid asialo GM1 expressed on rodent natural killer cells, athymic Lewis rats received guanethidine 40 mg/kg i.p. daily from day 1 to 14 and anti-asialo GM1 i.p. 1 mg/rat on day -2, 0, 2, 6, and 10 in the study period. Saline and anti-asialo GM1 were given alone in the same doses as control. The number...... of neurons in the sympathetic ganglia were counted and the ganglionic volume determined. The presence of natural killer cells in the ganglia were determined by immunohistochemical methods. Our results shows that anti-asialo GM1 can prevent guanethidine-induced reduction of sympathetic neurons, but...

  7. Laser-induced breakdown detection of temperature-ramp generated aggregates of therapeutic monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzen, Tim; Friess, Wolfgang; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    The detection and characterization of protein aggregation is essential during development and quality control of therapeutic proteins, as aggregates are typically inactive and may trigger anti-drug-antibody formation in patients. Especially large multi-domain molecules, such as the important class of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), can form various aggregates that differ in size and morphology. Although particle analysis advanced over the recent years, new techniques and orthogonal methods are highly valued. To our knowledge, the physical principle of laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) was not yet applied to sense aggregates in therapeutic protein formulations. We established a LIBD setup to monitor the temperature-induced aggregation of a mAb. The obtained temperature of aggregation was in good agreement with the results from previously published temperature-ramped turbidity and dynamic light scattering measurements. This study demonstrates the promising applicability of LIBD to investigate aggregates from therapeutic proteins. The technique is also adaptive to online detection and size determination, and offers interesting opportunities for morphologic characterization of protein particles and impurities, which will be part of future studies. PMID:26158409

  8. Assessment of gold nanoparticles as a size-dependent vaccine carrier for enhancing the antibody response against synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the ability of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to act as a size-dependent carrier, a synthetic peptide resembling foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) protein was conjugated to GNPs ranging from 2 to 50 nm in diameter (2, 5, 8, 12, 17, 37, and 50 nm). An extra cysteine was added to the C-terminus of the FMDV peptide (pFMDV) to ensure maximal conjugation to the GNPs, which have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups. The resultant pFMDV-GNP conjugates were then injected into BALB/c mice. Immunization with pFMDV-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (pFMDV-KLH) conjugate was also performed as a control. Blood was obtained from the mice after 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks and antibody titers against both pFMDV and the carriers were measured. For the pFMDV-GNP immunization, specific antibodies against the synthetic peptide were detected in the sera of mice injected with 2, 5, 8, 12, and 17 nm pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Maximal antibody binding was noted for GNPs of diameter 8-17 nm. The pFMDV-GNPs induced a three-fold increase in the antibody response compared to the response to pFMDV-KLH. However, sera from either immunized mouse group did not exhibit an antibody response to GNPs, while the sera from pFMDV-KLH-immunized mice presented high levels of binding activity against KLH. Additionally, the uptake of pFMDV-GNP in the spleen was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantity of GNPs that accumulated in the spleen correlated to the magnitude of the immune response induced by pFMDV-GNP. In conclusion, we demonstrated the size-dependent immunogenic properties of pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Furthermore, we established that GNPs ranging from 8 to 17 nm in diameter may be ideal for eliciting a focused antibody response against a synthetic pFMDV peptide.

  9. Assessment of gold nanoparticles as a size-dependent vaccine carrier for enhancing the antibody response against synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Lin, Wei-Hsu; Huang, Guewha Steven

    2010-05-01

    To assess the ability of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to act as a size-dependent carrier, a synthetic peptide resembling foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) protein was conjugated to GNPs ranging from 2 to 50 nm in diameter (2, 5, 8, 12, 17, 37, and 50 nm). An extra cysteine was added to the C-terminus of the FMDV peptide (pFMDV) to ensure maximal conjugation to the GNPs, which have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups. The resultant pFMDV-GNP conjugates were then injected into BALB/c mice. Immunization with pFMDV-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (pFMDV-KLH) conjugate was also performed as a control. Blood was obtained from the mice after 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks and antibody titers against both pFMDV and the carriers were measured. For the pFMDV-GNP immunization, specific antibodies against the synthetic peptide were detected in the sera of mice injected with 2, 5, 8, 12, and 17 nm pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Maximal antibody binding was noted for GNPs of diameter 8-17 nm. The pFMDV-GNPs induced a three-fold increase in the antibody response compared to the response to pFMDV-KLH. However, sera from either immunized mouse group did not exhibit an antibody response to GNPs, while the sera from pFMDV-KLH-immunized mice presented high levels of binding activity against KLH. Additionally, the uptake of pFMDV-GNP in the spleen was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantity of GNPs that accumulated in the spleen correlated to the magnitude of the immune response induced by pFMDV-GNP. In conclusion, we demonstrated the size-dependent immunogenic properties of pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Furthermore, we established that GNPs ranging from 8 to 17 nm in diameter may be ideal for eliciting a focused antibody response against a synthetic pFMDV peptide.

  10. Assessment of gold nanoparticles as a size-dependent vaccine carrier for enhancing the antibody response against synthetic foot-and-mouth disease virus peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, EE137, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hung, Yao-Ching [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, China Medical University and Hospital, 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wei-Hsu [Institute of Nanotechnology, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Huang, Guewha Steven, E-mail: gstevehuang@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Nanotechnology, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, Republic of China (China)

    2010-05-14

    To assess the ability of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to act as a size-dependent carrier, a synthetic peptide resembling foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) protein was conjugated to GNPs ranging from 2 to 50 nm in diameter (2, 5, 8, 12, 17, 37, and 50 nm). An extra cysteine was added to the C-terminus of the FMDV peptide (pFMDV) to ensure maximal conjugation to the GNPs, which have a high affinity for sulfhydryl groups. The resultant pFMDV-GNP conjugates were then injected into BALB/c mice. Immunization with pFMDV-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (pFMDV-KLH) conjugate was also performed as a control. Blood was obtained from the mice after 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks and antibody titers against both pFMDV and the carriers were measured. For the pFMDV-GNP immunization, specific antibodies against the synthetic peptide were detected in the sera of mice injected with 2, 5, 8, 12, and 17 nm pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Maximal antibody binding was noted for GNPs of diameter 8-17 nm. The pFMDV-GNPs induced a three-fold increase in the antibody response compared to the response to pFMDV-KLH. However, sera from either immunized mouse group did not exhibit an antibody response to GNPs, while the sera from pFMDV-KLH-immunized mice presented high levels of binding activity against KLH. Additionally, the uptake of pFMDV-GNP in the spleen was examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantity of GNPs that accumulated in the spleen correlated to the magnitude of the immune response induced by pFMDV-GNP. In conclusion, we demonstrated the size-dependent immunogenic properties of pFMDV-GNP conjugates. Furthermore, we established that GNPs ranging from 8 to 17 nm in diameter may be ideal for eliciting a focused antibody response against a synthetic pFMDV peptide.

  11. Modulation of radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced normal tissue response as prophylaxis of their side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Ionising radiation and cytostatic agents used in cancer therapy induce an immune response in normal tissues mediated by cytokines and adhesion molecules. Strategies modulating this response may downregulate cancer therapy side effects. The data published on the given topic have been reviewed. Conclusions. The strategies influencing the tissue immune response with the aim to reduce the side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are conflicting. Some of them inhibit this response supposing that an exaggerated reaction may have a damaging effect (e.g. corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), lisofylline, anti-cytokine antibodies, anti-sense oligonucleotides, sialyl Lewis X analogues), others promote this reaction by inducing endogenous production of cytokines (AS101) or use recombinant forms of appropriate cytokines involved in this response in order to intensify the physiologic tissue response. In clinical practice, corticosteroids and NSAID are widely used to modulate this response, while other agents are still experimental. (author)

  12. Identification of aneuploidy-inducing agents using cytokinesis-blocked human lymphocytes and an antikinetochore antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastmond, D.A.; Tucker, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The identification of agents causing aneuploidy in humans, a condition associated with carcinogenesis and birth defects, is currently limited due to the highly skilled and time-consuming nature of cytogenetic analyses. We report the development of a new simple and rapid assay to identify aneuploidy-inducing agents (aneuploidogens). The assay involves the chemical- or radiation-induced formation of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked human lymphocytes and the use of an antikinetochore antibody to determine whether the micronuclei contain centromeres--a condition indicating a high potential for aneuploidy. All agents tested produced dose-related increases in the frequency of micronucleated cells. The micronucleated cells induced by the known aneuploidogens--colchicine, vincristine sulfate, and diethylstilbestrol--contained kinetochore-positive micronuclei 92, 87, and 76% of the time, respectively. In contrast, the micronucleated cells induced by the potent clastogens--ionizing radiation and sodium arsenite--contained kinetochore-positive micronuclei only 3 and 19% of the time, respectively. These results indicate that this relatively simple assay can discriminate between aneuploidogens and clastogens and may allow a more rapid identification of environmental and therapeutic agents with aneuploidy-inducing potential.

  13. TRAIL-R2 Superoligomerization Induced by Human Monoclonal Agonistic Antibody KMTR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamada, Taro; Shinmi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Masahiro; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Kataoka, Shiro; Kuroki, Ryota; Mori, Eiji; Motoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The fully human monoclonal antibody KMTR2 acts as a strong direct agonist for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2), which is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death without cross-linking. To investigate the mechanism of direct agonistic activity induced by KMTR2, the crystal structure of the extracellular region of TRAIL-R2 and a Fab fragment derived from KMTR2 (KMTR2-Fab) was determined to 2.1 Å resolution. Two KMTR2-Fabs assembled with the complementarity-determining region 2 of the light chain via two-fold crystallographic symmetry, suggesting that the KMTR2-Fab assembly tended to enhance TRAIL-R2 oligomerization. A single mutation at Asn53 to Arg located at the two-fold interface in the KMTR2 resulted in a loss of its apoptotic activity, although it retained its antigen-binding activity. These results indicate that the strong agonistic activity, such as apoptotic signaling and tumor regression, induced by KMTR2 is attributed to TRAIL-R2 superoligomerization induced by the interdimerization of KMTR2. PMID:26672965

  14. The antibody response to well-defined malaria antigens after acute malaria in individuals living under continuous malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E; Høgh, B; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Borre, M; Björkman, A; Marbiah, N T; Dolopaye, E; Hanson, A P; Jepsen, S

    1992-01-01

    The IgG and IgM antibody responses to the C-terminal 783 amino acids of the P. falciparum glutamate-rich protein, GLURP489-1271, expressed as an E. coli fusion protein, the IgG response to a 18-mer synthetic peptide EDKNEKGQHEIVEVEEIL (GLURP899-916) representing the C-terminal repeats of GLURP, and...... a synthetic peptide (EENV)6 representing the C-terminal repeats from Pf155/RESA, were investigated longitudinally in 13 children and 7 adults living under conditions of continuous, intense malaria transmission. Some subjects did not recognize the antigens after malaria infection, and in subjects...... recognizing the antigens, the responses were often short-lived. In adults, the antibody responses to the GLURP489-1271 fusion protein and the (EENV)6 peptide peaked after 2 weeks, and not all individuals responded to all antigens. The antibody response, even against large fragments of conserved antigens, is...

  15. Heritability of antibody isotype and subclass responses to Plasmodium falciparum antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy O Duah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is important to understand the extent to which genetic factors regulate acquired immunity to common infections. A classical twin study design is useful to estimate the heritable component of variation in measurable immune parameters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study assessed the relative heritability of different plasma antibody isotypes and subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgM, IgA and IgE naturally acquired to P. falciparum blood stage antigens AMA1, MSP1-19, MSP2 (two allelic types and MSP3 (two allelic types. Separate analyses were performed on plasma from 213 pairs of Gambian adult twins, 199 child twin pairs sampled in a dry season when there was little malaria transmission, and another set of 107 child twin pairs sampled at the end of the annual wet season when malaria was common. There were significantly positive heritability (h(2 estimates for 48% (20/42 of the specific antibody assays (for the seven isotypes and subclasses to the six antigens tested among the adults, 48% (20/42 among the children in the dry season and 31% (13/42 among the children in the wet season. In children, there were significant heritability estimates for IgG4 reactivity against each of the antigens, and this subclass had higher heritability than the other subclasses and isotypes. In adults, 75% (15/20 of the significantly heritable antigen-specific isotype responses were attributable to non-HLA class II genetic variation, whereas none showed a significant HLA contribution. SIGNIFICANCE: Genome-wide approaches are now warranted to map the major genetic determinants of variable antibody isotype and subclass responses to malaria, alongside evaluation of their impact on infection and disease. Although plasma levels of IgG4 to malaria antigens are generally low, the exceptionally high heritability of levels of this subclass in children deserves particular investigation.

  16. Protective Effect of an Antibody against Specific Extracellular Domain of TLR2 on Agonists-Driven Inflammatory and Allergic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianwu; Cai, Jun; Peng, Yanxia; Zhang, Lifang; Lan, Qiaofen; Chen, Yanwen; Liao, Huanjin; Xie, Tong; Wu, Ping; Pan, Qingjun

    2016-01-01

    Specific blocking strategies of TLR2-mediated inflammatory signaling and hypersensitivity reactions may offer novel therapeutic strategies to prevent a variety of diseases. In this study, we investigated the blocking effects of a new anti-TLR2 antibody anti-T20 against a 20 mer peptide T20 located in the extracellular specific domain of mouse TLR2. In addition, the effects of the anti-T20 in vitro, measuring the inhibition of the IL-6 and TNF-α production in response to PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, were determined. In vivo, the effects of anti-T20 on a lethal anaphylaxis model using PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice, including the rectal temperature and mortality, and serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 were assayed. The results showed that anti-T20 specifically bound to TLR2 and significantly inhibited PGN, LTA, and Pam3CSK4-driven TNF-α and IL-6 production by RAW264.7 cells. Also, anti-T20 protected OVA allergic mice from PGN-induced lethal anaphylaxis, and the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and LTC4 of anti-T20 treated PGN-challenged OVA allergic mice were decreased as compared to isotype control of anti-T20 treated mice. In summary, this study produced a new antibody against the specific extracellular domain of TLR2 which has protective effect on TLR2 agonists-driven inflammatory and allergic response.

  17. Facial recognition of heroin vaccine opiates: type 1 cross-reactivities of antibodies induced by hydrolytically stable haptenic surrogates of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine, and morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Gary R; Rice, Kenner C; Cheng, Kejun; Li, Fuying; Antoline, Joshua F G; Iyer, Malliga R; Jacobson, Arthur E; Mayorov, Alexander V; Beck, Zoltan; Torres, Oscar B; Alving, Carl R

    2014-03-14

    Novel synthetic compounds similar to heroin and its major active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine, were examined as potential surrogate haptens for the ability to interface with the immune system for a heroin vaccine. Recent studies have suggested that heroin-like haptens must degrade hydrolytically to induce independent immune responses both to heroin and to the metabolites, resulting in antisera containing mixtures of antibodies (type 2 cross-reactivity). To test this concept, two unique hydrolytically stable haptens were created based on presumed structural facial similarities to heroin or to its active metabolites. After conjugation of a heroin-like hapten (DiAmHap) to tetanus toxoid and mixing with liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A, high titers of antibodies after two injections in mice had complementary binding sites that exhibited strong type 1 ("true") specific cross-reactivity with heroin and with both of its physiologically active metabolites. Mice immunized with each surrogate hapten exhibited reduced antinociceptive effects caused by injection of heroin. This approach obviates the need to create hydrolytically unstable synthetic heroin-like compounds to induce independent immune responses to heroin and its active metabolites for vaccine development. Facial recognition of hydrolytically stable surrogate haptens by antibodies together with type 1 cross-reactivities with heroin and its metabolites can help to guide synthetic chemical strategies for efficient development of a heroin vaccine. PMID:24486371

  18. Dietary germanium biotite supplementation enhances the induction of antibody responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yoo, Han Sang; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential ability of germanium biotite (GB) to stimulate the production of antibodies specific for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). To this aim, we measured the total FMDV-specific antibody responses and IgM production after vaccination against FMD both experimentally and in the field. GB supplementation with FMDV vaccination stimulated the production of anti-FMDV antibodies, and effectively increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. These results suggest that GB may be a novel al...

  19. Rare and transient anti-D antibody response in D(-) liver transplant recipients transfused with D(+) red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin des Roziers, N; Ibanez, C; Samuel, D; Francoz, C; Idri, S; François, A; Mortelecque, R; Bierling, P; Pirenne, F

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted on 20 D(-) liver transplant (LT) recipients transfused with D(+) RBCs perioperatively and screened for RBC antibodies between 2 and 6 months later. None developed anti-D detectable by the indirect antiglobulin test. Two patients produced weak anti-D that reacted only with papain-treated RBCs at 10 and 11 days without any sign of immune haemolysis. Antibodies became quickly undetectable. These data suggest an unusual pattern of alloimmunization in LT recipients with rapid, weak and transient antibody response and support the safety of transfusing D(+) RBCs in most of D(-) patients during LT surgery. PMID:26918570

  20. Antibody response of healthy children to pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito Susanna; Daleno Cristina; Tagliabue Claudia; Scala Alessia; Picciolli Irene; Taroni Francesca; Galeone Carlotta; Baldanti Fausto; Principi Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about the proportion of pediatric pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza cases who showed seroconversion, the magnitude of this seroconversion, or the factors that can affect the antibody level evoked by the pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza. Aims of this study were to analyse antibody responses and the factors associated with high antibody titres in a cohort of children with naturally acquired A/H1N1/2009 influenza infection confirmed by reverse-transcriptase polymer...

  1. Frequency and Domain Specificity of Toxin-Neutralizing Paratopes in the Human Antibody Response to Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed▿

    OpenAIRE

    Reason, Donald; Liberato, Justine; Sun, Jinying; Keitel, Wendy; Zhou, Jianhui

    2009-01-01

    Protective antigen (PA) is the cell surface recognition unit of the binary anthrax toxin system and the primary immunogenic component in both the current and proposed “next-generation” anthrax vaccines. Several studies utilizing animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies, acquired by either active or passive immunization, are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. To investigate the human antibody response to anthrax immunization, we have established a ...

  2. Effect of Early Antibiotic Treatment on the Antibody Response to Cytoplasmic Proteins of Brucella melitensis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bowden, Raul A.; Racaro, Graciela C.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    1999-01-01

    To test whether antibiotic therapy hampers the antibody response to Brucella antigens, 30 BALB/c mice were infected with Brucella melitensis H38 and randomized for treatment with doxycycline administered intraperitoneally for 42 days starting at 7 or 28 days postinfection (p.i.) (groups DOX7 and DOX28, respectively) or for no treatment (control group). Antibodies to smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reached peak levels (mean optical density [OD] = 2.618) between days...

  3. Comprehensive Mapping of Common Immunodominant Epitopes in the West Nile Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Recognized by Avian Antibody Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, EnCheng; Jing ZHAO; Liu, Nihong; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Qin, Yongli; Bu, Zhigao; Yang, Yinhui; Lunt, Ross A.; Wang, Linfa; Wu, Donglai

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for se...

  4. Psychosocial factors are associated with the antibody response to both thymus-dependent and thymus-independent vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Stephen; Phillips, Anna C.; Ferraro, Alastair J; Drayson, Mark T; Carroll, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the association between psychological stress, social support and antibody response to both thymus-dependent and thymus-independent vaccinations. Stressful life events in the previous year and customary social support were measured by standard questionnaires at baseline in 75 (41 females) healthy students. Antibody status was assessed at baseline, 4 and 18 weeks following vaccination with formaldehyde inactivated hepatitis A virus and pneumococcal polysaccharides, wh...

  5. Antibody Responses Elicited against the Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins Differ during Infection with Different Isolates of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum

    OpenAIRE

    Leader, Brandon T.; Hevner, Karin; Molini, Barbara J.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2003-01-01

    Variation in the expression of the different Tpr proteins in the syphilis spirochete, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, may have important implications in its ability to evade host immune detection and cause persistent infection. In the present study we examined the pattern of antibody responsiveness to different Tpr members during infection with three isolates of T. pallidum. There was variability in the specificities and temporal patterns of reactivity of the antibodies elicited against t...

  6. CD32a antibodies induce thrombocytopenia and type II hypersensitivity reactions in FCGR2A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Todd; Robles-Carrillo, Liza; Davila, Monica; Brodie, Meghan; Desai, Hina; Rivera-Amaya, Mildred; Francis, John L; Amirkhosravi, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The CD32a immunoglobulin G (IgG) receptor (Fcγ receptor IIa) is a potential therapeutic target for diseases in which IgG immune complexes (ICs) mediate inflammation, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a promising strategy for treating such diseases. However, IV.3, perhaps the best characterized CD32a-blocking mAb, was recently shown to induce anaphylaxis in immunocompromised "3KO" mice. This anaphylactic reaction required a human CD32a transgene because mice lack an equivalent of this gene. The finding that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in CD32a-transgenic mice was surprising because IV.3 had long been thought to lack the intrinsic capacity to trigger cellular activation via CD32a. Such an anaphylactic reaction would also limit potential therapeutic applications of IV.3. In the present study, we examine the molecular mechanisms by which IV.3 induces anaphylaxis. We now report that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in immunocompetent CD32a-transgenic "FCGR2A" mice, along with the novel finding that IV.3 and 2 other well-characterized CD32a-blocking mAbs, AT-10 and MDE-8, also induce severe thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Using recombinant variants of these same mAbs, we show that IgG "Fc" effector function is necessary for the induction of anaphylaxis and thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Variants of these mAbs lacking the capacity to activate mouse IgG receptors not only failed to induce anaphylaxis or thrombocytopenia, but also very potently protected FCGR2A mice from near lethal doses of IgG ICs. Our findings show that effector-deficient IV.3, AT-10, and MDE-8 are promising candidates for developing therapeutic mAbs to treat CD32a-mediated diseases. PMID:26396093

  7. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Huang

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallpox vaccine for millions of Chinese people. The spike glycoprotein (S of SARS-CoV was used as the test antigen after the S gene was constructed in the identical genomic location of two vectors to generate vaccine candidates MVTT-S and MVA-S. Using identical doses, MVTT-S induced lower levels ( approximately 2-3-fold of anti- SARS-CoV neutralizing antibodies (Nabs than MVA-S through intramuscular inoculation. MVTT-S, however, was capable of inducing consistently 20-to-100-fold higher levels of Nabs than MVA-S when inoculated via either intranasal or intraoral routes. These levels of MVTT-S-induced Nab responses were substantially (approximately 10-fold higher than that induced via the intramuscular route in the same experiments. Moreover, pre-exposure to the wild-type VTT via intranasal or intraoral route impaired the Nab response via the same routes of MVTT-S vaccination probably due to the pre-existing anti-VTT Nab response. The efficacy of intranasal or intraoral vaccination, however, was still 20-to-50-fold better than intramuscular inoculation despite the subcutaneous pre-exposure to wild-type VTT. Our data have implications for people who maintain low levels of anti-VTT Nabs after historical smallpox vaccination. MVTT is therefore an attractive live viral vector for mucosal vaccination.

  8. The assessment of antibody response following immunization with polysaccharide vaccine in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghamohammadi A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: An increased risk for invasive infections with encapsulated bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae has been described in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD or in those on dialysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibody response to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide vaccine in CKD patients. "n"nMethods : Sixty-six patients with CKD and 40 healthy individuals were vaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. The serum antibody response (IgG and IgG2 to the Pneumovax antigens was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA prior to and four weeks after vaccination."n"nResults : Out of 66 vaccinated patients with CKD, 14 were found to be hyporesponsive to the vaccine (Group 1. Patients with normal specific antibody response were regarded as respondents and were assigned to Group 2 (n=52. The mean post-vaccination IgG titer to the pneumococcal antigens in Group 1 was significantly lower than those in Group 2 (P=0.012 for IgG and P=0.02 for IgG2. The increased anti-pneumococcal IgG titer was significantly lower in patients in Group 1 versus Group 2 (P=0.001 or the healthy control group (P=0.005. During the follow-up period of patients, patients in Group 1 developed

  9. Anti-ganglioside antibody-induced tumor cell death by loss of membrane integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque-Navarro, Lourdes; Chakrabandhu, Krittalak; de León, Joel; Rodríguez, Sandra; Toledo, Carlos; Carr, Adriana; de Acosta, Cristina Mateo; Hueber, Anne-Odile; Pérez, Rolando

    2008-07-01

    Gangliosides have been involved in multiple cellular processes such as growth, differentiation and adhesion, and more recently as regulators of cell death signaling pathways. Some of these molecules can be considered as tumor-associated antigens, in particular, N-glycolyl sialic acid-containing gangliosides, which are promising candidates for cancer-targeted therapy because of their low expression in normal human tissues. In this study, we provided the molecular and cellular characterization of a novel cell death mechanism induced by the anti-NGcGM3 14F7 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in L1210 murine tumor cell line but not in mouse normal cells (B and CD4(+) T lymphocytes) that expressed the antigen. Impairment of ganglioside synthesis in tumor cells abrogated the 14F7 mAb cytotoxic effect; however, exogenous reincorporation of the ganglioside did not restore tumor cell sensitivity to 14F7 mAb-induced cytotoxicity. 14F7 F(ab')(2) but not Fab fragments retained the cytotoxic capacity of the whole mAb. By contrary, other mAb, which recognizes N-glycolylated gangliosides, did not show any cytotoxic effect. These mAbs showed quite different capacities to bind NGcGM3-positive cell lines measured by binding inhibition experiments. Interestingly, this complement-independent cell death mechanism did not resemble apoptosis, because no DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, or Fas mediation were observed. However, NGcGM3 ganglioside-mediated 14F7 mAb-induced cell death was accompanied by cellular swelling, membrane lesion formation, and cytoskeleton activation, suggesting an oncosis-like phenomenon. This novel mechanism of cell death lets us to support further therapeutic approaches using NGcGM3 as a molecular target for antibody-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:18645013

  10. Mapping of epitopes recognized by antibodies induced by immunization of mice with PspA and PspC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadesilho, Cintia F M; Ferreira, Daniela M; Gordon, Stephen B; Briles, David E; Moreno, Adriana T; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Ho, Paulo L; Miyaji, Eliane N

    2014-07-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) and pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) are important candidates for an alternative vaccine against pneumococcal infections. Since these antigens show variability, the use of variants that do not afford broad protection may lead to the selection of vaccine escape bacteria. Epitopes capable of inducing antibodies with broad cross-reactivities should thus be the preferred antigens. In this work, experiments using peptide arrays show that most linear epitopes recognized by antibodies induced in mice against different PspAs were located at the initial 44 amino acids of the mature protein and that antibodies against these linear epitopes did not confer protection against a lethal challenge. Conversely, linear epitopes recognized by antibodies to PspC included the consensus sequences involved in the interaction with human factor H and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). Since linear epitopes of PspA were not protective, larger overlapping fragments containing 100 amino acids of PspA of strain Rx1 were constructed (fragments 1 to 7, numbered from the N terminus) to permit the mapping of antibodies with conformational epitopes not represented in the peptide arrays. Antibodies from mice immunized with fragments 1, 2, 4, and 5 were capable of binding onto the surface of pneumococci and mediating protection against a lethal challenge. The fact that immunization of mice with 100-amino-acid fragments located at the more conserved N-terminal region of PspA (fragments 1 and 2) induced protection against a pneumococcal challenge indicates that the induction of antibodies against conformational epitopes present at this region may be important in strategies for inducing broad protection against pneumococci. PMID:24807052

  11. Prophylaxis and Therapy of Inhalational Anthrax by a Novel Monoclonal Antibody to Protective Antigen That Mimics Vaccine-Induced Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Laura; Blanset, Diann; Lowy, Israel; O'Neill, Thomas; Goldstein, Joel; Little, Stephen F.; Andrews, Gerard P.; Dorough, Gary; Taylor, Ronald K.; Keler, Tibor

    2006-01-01

    The neutralizing antibody response to the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin elicited by approved anthrax vaccines is an accepted correlate for vaccine-mediated protection against anthrax. We reasoned that a human anti-PA monoclonal antibody (MAb) selected on the basis of superior toxin neutralization activity might provide potent protection against anthrax. The fully human MAb (also referred to as MDX-1303 or Valortim) was chosen from a large panel of anti-PA human MAbs gener...

  12. Antibody response following Hepatitis B vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients: does normalized urea clearance matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Dervisoglu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Data on the factors that contribute to the antibody response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients are scarce. The current study was conducted on a group of peritoneal dialysis patients to learn how the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination varies according to the patient's clearance of urea normalized to total body water (Kt/V. METHODS: A convenience sample of 33 peritoneal dialysis patients (13 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 49¡12 years was administered double doses (20 μg IM in each deltoid muscle of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1, 2, and 6 months. Response to immunization was measured at one to three months after the final dose of vaccine. The subjects were divided into groups according to the level of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs, including non-responders ( 100 IU/L. RESULTS: Among non-responders, weak responders, and good responders, significant differences were found in age (54 ± 12 vs. 56 ± 9 vs. 45¡12 years, respectively; p = 0.049 and recombinant human erythropoietin use (20 vs. 29 vs. 76%, respectively; p = 0.016. No significant differences in weekly total Kt/V (p = 0.704, weekly peritoneal Kt/V (p = 0.064 and residual glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.355 were found across the three groups. CONCLUSIONS: Delivered clearance measured by weekly peritoneal Kt/V and total clearance measured by weekly total Kt/V did not predict the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  13. Radiolabeled isatin binding to caspase-3 activation induced by anti-Fas antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Noninvasive imaging methods that can distinguish apoptosis from necrosis may be useful in furthering our understanding of diseases characterized by apoptotic dysregulation as well as aiding drug development targeting apoptotic pathways. We evaluated the ability of radiolabeled isatins to quantify caspase-3 activity induced by the activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway by the anti-Fas antibody in mice. Methods: The behavior of three different radiolabeled isatins ([18F]WC-II-89, [18F]WC-IV-3 and [11C]WC-98) was characterized in mice with and without anti-Fas antibody treatment by microPET imaging and biodistribution studies. The activity of [18F]WC-II-89 was also compared with [99mTc]mebrofenin. The effect of pan-caspase inhibition with quinolyl-valyl-O-methylaspartyl-[2,6-difluorophenoxy]-methyl ketone (Q-VD-OPh) on [18F]WC-II-89 uptake was studied. Caspase-3 activity was confirmed by a fluorometric enzyme assay. Results: All three tracers behaved similarly in microPET and biodistribution studies. Increased retention of all tracers was observed in the livers of treated animals and several other organs, all of which demonstrated increased caspase-3 enzyme activity; however, impaired hepatobiliary excretion made attribution of these findings to caspase-3 activity difficult. The isatin [18F]WC-II-89 was retained at statistically significantly higher levels in the organs after anti-Fas antibody treatment while [99mTc]mebrofenin activity cleared, suggesting specific binding to activated caspase-3, but the magnitude of increased binding was still relatively low. Caspase inhibition with Q-VD-OPh partially blocked [18F]WC-II-89 retention but completely blocked caspase-3 enzyme activity in the liver. Conclusions: The radiolabeled isatins appear to bind specifically to caspase-3 in vivo, but their sensitivity is limited. Further optimization is required for these tracers to be useful for clinical applications.

  14. A sequence in subdomain 2 of DBL1α of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 induces strain transcending antibodies.

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    Karin Blomqvist

    Full Text Available Immunity to severe malaria is the first level of immunity acquired to Plasmodium falciparum. Antibodies to the variant antigen PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 present at the surface of the parasitized red blood cell (pRBC confer protection by blocking microvascular sequestration. Here we have generated antibodies to peptide sequences of subdomain 2 of PfEMP1-DBL1α previously identified to be associated with severe or mild malaria. A set of sera generated to the amino acid sequence KLQTLTLHQVREYWWALNRKEVWKA, containing the motif ALNRKE, stained the live pRBC. 50% of parasites tested (7/14 were positive both in flow cytometry and immunofluorescence assays with live pRBCs including both laboratory strains and in vitro adapted clinical isolates. Antibodies that reacted selectively with the sequence REYWWALNRKEVWKA in a 15-mer peptide array of DBL1α-domains were also found to react with the pRBC surface. By utilizing a peptide array to map the binding properties of the elicited anti-DBL1α antibodies, the amino acids WxxNRx were found essential for antibody binding. Complementary experiments using 135 degenerate RDSM peptide sequences obtained from 93 Ugandan patient-isolates showed that antibody binding occurred when the amino acids WxLNRKE/D were present in the peptide. The data suggests that the ALNRKE sequence motif, associated with severe malaria, induces strain-transcending antibodies that react with the pRBC surface.

  15. Cure of Chronic Viral Infection and Virus-Induced Type 1 Diabetes by Neutralizing Antibodies

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    Mette Ejrnaes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of neutralizing antibodies is one of the most successful methods to interfere with receptor-ligand interactions in vivo. In particular blockade of soluble inflammatory mediators or their corresponding cellular receptors was proven an effective way to regulate inflammation and/or prevent its negative consequences. However, one problem that comes along with an effective neutralization of inflammatory mediators is the general systemic immunomodulatory effect. It is therefore important to design a treatment regimen in a way to strike at the right place and at the right time in order to achieve maximal effects with minimal duration of immunosuppression or hyperactivation. In this review we reflect on two examples of how short time administration of such neutralizing antibodies can block two distinct inflammatory consequences of viral infection. First, we review recent findings that blockade of IL-10/IL-10R interaction can resolve chronic viral infection and second, we reflect on how neutralization of the chemokine CXCL10 can abrogate virus-induced type 1 diabetes.

  16. Regulation of IL-2 induced proliferation and cytotoxicity in human natural killer cells by monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural killer (NK) activity is mediated by a subpopulation of cells termed large granular lymphocytes (LGL), which exhibit cytotoxic activity against a variety of tumor targets. LGL express OKT8, OKT9, OKT10, OKT11, 3G8 (FcγR), OKM1, NKH1. The addition of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2), increases cytotoxicity, induces IFN-γ production and leads to LGL proliferation. Since monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) represent highly specific probes to analyze possible surface molecules, they have studied the role of various MoAbs in the regulation of cytotoxicity, proliferation, and secretory function of purified LGL. LGL were isolated from nonadherent human peripheral blood leukocytes on discontinuous Percoll density gradients, followed by 290C E-rosette depletion of contaminating T cells. These preparations were ≥ 85% LGL and contained ≥ 5% OKT3+ cells. Using a limiting dilution assay, purified LGL were incubated with rIL-2 and the MoAbs (10 μg/ml) for 7 days. These cells were tested for cytotoxicity against K562 in a 51Cr- release assay, and for proliferation as determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Results indicate that the OKT9 antibody inhibited both the cytotoxicity and proliferation. MoAb against LGl markers (OKT11, OKT8, OKM1, 3G8, and NKH1) had no effect on cytotoxicity or proliferation. Unlike the T cell receptor complex (with OKT3), the surface molecules examined do not regulate LGL lysis or proliferation

  17. Preserved in vivo response to interferon-alpha in multiple sclerosis patients with neutralising antibodies against interferon-beta (REPAIR study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magyari, Melinda; Bach Søndergaard, Helle; Sellebjerg, Finn;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A major problem in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with interferon-beta (IFN-β) is the development of neutralising antibodies (NAbs). High levels of NAbs block the induction of IFN-β-inducible markers, including Myxovirus Resistance Protein A (encoded by the MX1 gene......), resulting in a loss of bioactivity and therapeutic benefit. OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this study is to investigate the in vivo biological response to interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in MS patients, who have developed neutralising antibodies (NAbs) against IFN-β. DESIGN/METHODS: The study was an open......-label phase II study in 10 patients with relapsing-remitting MS with persisting NAbs against IFN-β and absent in vivo mRNA MxA response. We used in vivo induction of MX1 mRNA and other IFN-inducible genes as measure of the biological response. The primary endpoint was the in vivo mRNA MX1 response after an...

  18. Gene Expression Driven by a Strong Viral Promoter in MVA Increases Vaccination Efficiency by Enhancing Antibody Responses and Unmasking CD8+ T Cell Epitopes

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    Pablo D. Becker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors are promising tools for vaccination strategies and immunotherapies. However, CD8+ T cell responses against pathogen-derived epitopes are usually limited to dominant epitopes and antibody responses to recombinant encoded antigens (Ags are mostly weak. We have previously demonstrated that the timing of viral Ag expression in infected professional Ag-presenting cells strongly shapes the epitope immunodominance hierarchy. T cells recognizing determinants derived from late viral proteins have a clear disadvantage to proliferate during secondary responses. In this work we evaluate the effect of overexpressing the recombinant Ag using the modified vaccinia virus early/late promoter H5 (mPH5. Although the Ag-expression from the natural promoter 7.5 (P7.5 and the mPH5 seemed similar, detailed analysis showed that mPH5 not only induces higher expression levels than P7.5 during early phase of infection, but also Ag turnover is enhanced. The strong overexpression during the early phase leads to broader CD8 T cell responses, while preserving the priming efficiency of stable Ags. Moreover, the increase in Ag-secretion favors the induction of strong antibody responses. Our findings provide the rationale to develop new strategies for fine-tuning the responses elicited by recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara by using selected promoters to improve the performance of this viral vector.

  19. Radiation-induced preventive bystander response and adaptive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced bystander response (BR) is a phenomenon not observed in cells irradiated directly but in cells nearby. Recently, the relationship between BR and adaptive response (AR) has been studied and BR is suggested to be one of important mechanisms involved in AR induction through key molecules like reactive oxygen (RO) and nitrogen species. In this paper, the possible contribution of BR to AR is discussed on recent findings including author's ones. Many biological responses in bystander cells, cultured tissues and mice by cell-cell communication molecules such as cytokines and nitrogen oxide (NO) have been elucidated for BR to involve the cell death, sister chromatid exchange, chromosome instability, mutation, increased/ decreased p53 level, etc. However, BR has been recently found to contain biologically favorable events like the increase of radio-resistance and of cellular take rate and decrease of micronucleus formation through NO by X-ray and HIMAC C-ion. AR is observed in irradiated cell population with previous exposure to low dose and involves the above mentioned biologically favorable responses, which having lead to the possible interrelationship between BR and AR. Together with findings obtained hitherto, hypothesized is that AR is induced in bystander cells through a sequence of signals of evoked radicals like RO/ NO by pre-irradiation, and of consequent intermediating molecules like transforming growth factor (TGF)-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1 and estrogen to activate NF-KB for inducing COX-2 and NO synthase, which resulting in stimulation of damaged DNA repairing mechanism and of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade that constructs the signaling between plasma membrane and nucleus. (K.T.)

  20. Soluble human CD4 elicits an antibody response in rhesus monkeys that inhibits simian immunodeficiency virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhesus monkeys infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIVmac) demonstrate significant virologic and clinical improvement as a result of treatment with human recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4). The authors show that human rsCD4 does not efficiently inhibit SIVmac replication in bone marrow macrophages of rhesus monkeys and does not significantly augment bone marrow hematopoietic colony formation in vitro. However, plasma of human rsCD4-treated rhesus monkeys does exhibit significant anti-SIVmac activity in vitro. Plasma of these animals efficiently blocks SIVmac replicaton in peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow macrophages. It also increases granulocyte/macrophage colony formation in vitro by bone marrow cells of SIVmac-infected monkeys. This plasma and the IgG fraction of plasma from a rhesus monkey immunized with human rsCD4 in adjuvant demonstrate reactivity with a soluble form of the rhesus monkey CD4 molecule, exhibit binding to CD4+ but not CD8+ concanavalin A-activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes, and precipitate the CD4 molecule from surface-labeled activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-viral activity is demonstrable in the IgG fraction of plasma from a human rsCD4-immunized monkey. These studies raise the possibility that a modified human CD4 molecule serving as an immunogen might elicit an antibody response that could potentially induce a beneficial therapeutic response in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals

  1. Immunomodulatory activity of andrographolide on macrophage activation and specific antibody response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei; Jing WANG; Dong, Sheng-Fu; Liu, Chun-Hong; Italiani, Paola; Sun, Shu-Hui; Xu, Jing; Boraschi, Diana; Ma, Shi-ping; Qu, Di

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the immunomodulatory effects of andrographolide on both innate and adaptive immune responses. Methods: Andrographolide (10 μg/mL in vitro or 1 mg/kg in vivo) was used to modulate LPS-induced classical activated (M1) or IL-4-induced alternative activated (M2) macrophages in vitro and humor immune response to HBsAg in vivo. Cytokine gene expression profile (M1 vs M2) was measured by real-time PCR, IL-12/IL-10 level was detected by ELISA, and surface antigen expression was ev...

  2. The Antibody Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis

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    Mehmet Aşık

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to investigate the presence of antibodies (Anti-BIP against binding immunoglobulin protein (BIP, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperone with immune modulator and anti-apoptotic effects in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT patients. Material and Method: We included sixty-two autoimmune thyroiditis patients, 20 with euthyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, 27 with subclinical hypothyroidism and 15 with hypothyroid, and a control group of 37 healthy subjects. Results: No statistically significant difference was determined in anti-BIP levels among the HT subgroups or in comparison with the control group (p=0.889.Discussion: Although BIP activation has been shown in vitro in thyroid cells, no difference was determined in our study in anti-BIP levels between the HT patient subgroups and the control group. This suggests that antibodies developing against BIP through apoptosis and/or T cell response are either not related to HT or at levels that cannot be determined by measuring serum. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 53-6

  3. Antibody responses after vaccination against equine influenza in the Republic of Korea in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Bo-Hye; Yang, Sunjoo; Choi, Eun-Jin; Shin, Ye-Jin; Song, Jae-Young; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2015-11-01

    In this study, antibody responses after equine influenza vaccination were investigated among 1,098 horses in Korea using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. The equine influenza viruses, A/equine/South Africa/4/03 (H3N8) and A/equine/Wildeshausen/1/08 (H3N8), were used as antigens in the HI assay. The mean seropositive rates were 91.7% (geometric mean antibody levels (GMT), 56.8) and 93.6% (GMT, 105.2) for A/equine/South Africa/4/03 and A/equine/Wildeshausen/1/08, respectively. Yearlings and two-year-olds in training exhibited lower positive rates (68.1% (GMT, 14) and 61.7% (GMT, 11.9), respectively, with different antigens) than average. Horses two years old or younger may require more attention in vaccination against equine influenza according to the vaccination regime, because they could be a target of the equine influenza virus. PMID:26062436

  4. Antibody response to rabies vaccination in captive and freeranging wolves (Canis lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federoff, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen captive and five free-ranging Minnesota gray wolves (Canis lupus) were tested for the presence of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) after vaccination with an inactivated canine rabies vaccine. Blood was collected from all wolves prior to vaccination and at 1 mo postvaccination (PV) and from all captive and three wild wolves at 3 mo PV. In addition, one free-ranging wolf was sampled at 4 mo PV, and two free-ranging wolves were sampled at 6 mo PV. All wolves were seronegative prior to vaccination. RVNA were detected in 14 (100%) captive wolves and in four of five (80%) free-ranging wolves. The geometric mean titer of the captive wolves at 1 mo PV was significantly higher (P = 0.023) than in the free-ranging wolves. Five of 13 (38.5%) captive wolves and none of the three (0%) free-ranging wolves had measurable RVNA at 3 mo PV. No measurable RVNA were detected in the serum samples collected from the free-ranging wolves at 4 and 6 mo PV. These results should be interpreted with caution because of the small number of free-ranging wolves tested. Further research is needed to properly assess immune function and antibody response to vaccination in captive wolves in comparison with their free-ranging counterparts.

  5. Naturally acquired antibody responses to recombinant Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 transmission blocking vaccine candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sophie; Grignard, Lynn; Nebie, Issa;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 are Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage proteins and promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidates. Antibody responses against these proteins may be naturally acquired and target antigens may be under selective pressure. This has consequences for the...... future evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in populations naturally exposed to malaria. METHODS: We determined naturally acquired antibody responses to the recombinant proteins Pfs48/45-10C and Pfs230-230CMB in children from three malaria endemic settings in Ghana, Tanzania and Burkina Faso...... region. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude there are naturally acquired antibody responses to both vaccine candidates which have functional relevance by reducing the transmissibility of infected individuals. We identified genetic polymorphisms, in pfs48/45 which exhibited geographical specificity....

  6. Functionally fused antibodies--a novel adjuvant fusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin; Jensen, Kim Bak; Christensen, Peter Astrup;

    2008-01-01

    -, radioactivity- or effector-domain delivery. There is now a growing interest in using anti-idiotypic antibodies or other antigen mimics to induce potent immune responses against antigen structures in question. We have earlier reported on the functional rescue of antibodies that are active when fused to the phage......-idiotypic antibodies in mice, and facilitates the use of antibodies that are non-functional as non-fused soluble protein...

  7. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J;

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported that slowly progressing HIV infection (SPI) was associated with the presence of contemporaneous autologous neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, a group of individuals with more rapidly progressing infection (RPI) generally lacked these antibodies. To understand the im...

  8. Structural Constraints of Vaccine-Induced Tier-2 Autologous HIV Neutralizing Antibodies Targeting the Receptor-Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies that neutralize autologous transmitted/founder (TF HIV occur in most HIV-infected individuals and can evolve to neutralization breadth. Autologous neutralizing antibodies (nAbs against neutralization-resistant (Tier-2 viruses are rarely induced by vaccination. Whereas broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb-HIV-Envelope structures have been defined, the structures of autologous nAbs have not. Here, we show that immunization with TF mutant Envs gp140 oligomers induced high-titer, V5-dependent plasma neutralization for a Tier-2 autologous TF evolved mutant virus. Structural analysis of autologous nAb DH427 revealed binding to V5, demonstrating the source of narrow nAb specificity and explaining the failure to acquire breadth. Thus, oligomeric TF Envs can elicit autologous nAbs to Tier-2 HIVs, but induction of bnAbs will require targeting of precursors of B cell lineages that can mature to heterologous neutralization.

  9. Evaluation of tests for rabies antibody and analysis of serum responses after administration of three different types of rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandien, M

    1977-01-01

    Humoral antibody response to three types of rabies vaccines were assayed by the neutralization (NT), the mixed hemadsorption (MH), and the indirect immunofluorescence (IF) tests. The NT and MH tests were used to detect antibodies combining with antigens at the surface of virions and infected cells, whereas the indirect IF test measured antibodies mainly to the rabies nucleocapsid antigen. After immunization with a human diploid cell vaccine, antibodies were detected by both the NT and the MH test in the 14th- and 30th-day serum samples from each of eight vaccinated persons. There was a good correlation between titers obtained with the two tests in this group of vaccinees. Antibodies elicited by duck embryo and nervous tissue vaccines occurred less frequently and in lower titers. In these groups of vaccinees, 5 of 14 and 5 of 10, respectively, had antibodies detectable by the NT test in the 14th- and 30th-day sera but were negative by the MH test. It is suggested that this was due to the high levels of immunoglobulin M antibodies, which are known to be elicited by daily injections of vaccine. Since antibodies of the immunoglobulin M class are considered to be less important for protection against rabies, the MH test is recommended for immunity determinations. Compared with the NT test, this test also offers the advantage of being technically more convenient because of its capacity for testing numerous sera in a single run. Antibody titers obtained by the indirect IF test in the human diploid cell vaccine group were relatively low. Titers in the duck embryo and nervous tissue vaccine groups were higher but did not correlate with the results of the NT test. PMID:323275

  10. Injury-induced immune responses in Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Yvan; Buzgariu, Wanda; Reiter, Silke; Galliot, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The impact of injury-induced immune responses on animal regenerative processes is highly variable, positive or negative depending on the context. This likely reflects the complexity of the innate immune system that behaves as a sentinel in the transition from injury to regeneration. Early-branching invertebrates with high regenerative potential as Hydra provide a unique framework to dissect how injury-induced immune responses impact regeneration. A series of early cellular events likely require an efficient immune response after amputation, as antimicrobial defence, epithelial cell stretching for wound closure, migration of interstitial progenitors toward the wound, cell death, phagocytosis of cell debris, or reconstruction of the extracellular matrix. The analysis of the injury-induced transcriptomic modulations of 2636 genes annotated as immune genes in Hydra identified 43 genes showing an immediate/early pulse regulation in all regenerative contexts examined. These regulations point to an enhanced cytoprotection via ROS signaling (Nrf, C/EBP, p62/SQSMT1-l2), TNFR and TLR signaling (TNFR16-like, TRAF2l, TRAF5l, jun, fos-related, SIK2, ATF1/CREB, LRRC28, LRRC40, LRRK2), proteasomal activity (p62/SQSMT1-l1, Ced6/Gulf, NEDD8-conjugating enzyme Ubc12), stress proteins (CRYAB1, CRYAB2, HSP16.2, DnaJB9, HSP90a1), all potentially regulating NF-κB activity. Other genes encoding immune-annotated proteins such as NPYR4, GTPases, Swap70, the antiproliferative BTG1, enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (5-lipoxygenase, ACSF4), secreted clotting factors, secreted peptidases are also pulse regulated upon bisection. By contrast, metalloproteinases and antimicrobial peptide genes largely follow a context-dependent regulation, whereas the protease inhibitor α2macroglobulin gene exhibits a sustained up-regulation. Hence a complex immune response to injury is linked to wound healing and regeneration in Hydra. PMID:25086685

  11. Normally Occurring Human Anti-GM1 Immunoglobulin M Antibodies and the Immune Response to Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Alaniz, María E.; Lardone, Ricardo D.; Yudowski, Silvia L.; Farace, María I.; Nores, Gustavo A.

    2004-01-01

    Anti-GM1 antibodies of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) isotype are normal components of the antibody repertoire of adult human serum. Using a sensitive high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) immunostaining assay, we found that these antibodies were absent in the umbilical vein and children

  12. C3 polymorphism in a Danish cystic fibrosis population and its possible association with antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, P O; Høiby, N; Morling, N;

    1978-01-01

    The C3 types of human serum are reported for a material of 113 Danish cystic fibrosis patients, age 0-30 years. The frequency of the C3F gene was 0.2832 which was significantly higher (p less than 0.0005) than the frequency found in a control group of 224 healthy babies (C3F = 0.1585). It also...... differed significantly (p less than 0.01) from the C3F gene frequency of 0.1780 found in 177 blood donors, age 20-24 years. A significant association between any of the C3 phenotypes and the most serious infection in cystic fibrosis, chronic mucoid P. aeruginosa infection, or the antibody response against...

  13. Diversity of the antibody response to tetanus toxoid: comparison of hybridoma library to phage display library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Sorouri

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are important tools in research and since the 1990s have been an important therapeutic class targeting a wide variety of diseases. Earlier methods of mAb production relied exclusively on the lengthy process of making hybridomas. The advent of phage display technology introduced an alternative approach for mAb production. A potential concern with this approach is its complete dependence on an in vitro selection process, which may result in selection of V(H-V(L pairs normally eliminated during the in vivo selection process. The diversity of V(H-V(L pairs selected from phage display libraries relative to an endogenous response is unknown. To address these questions, we constructed a panel of hybridomas and a phage display library using the spleen of a single tetanus toxoid-immunized mouse and compared the diversity of the immune response generated using each technique. Surprisingly, the tetanus toxoid-specific antibodies produced by the hybridoma library exhibited a higher degree of V(H-V(L genetic diversity than their phage display-derived counterparts. Furthermore, the overlap among the V-genes from each library was very limited. Consistent with the notion that accumulation of many small DNA changes lead to increased antigen specificity and affinity, the phage clones displayed substantial micro-heterogeneity. Contrary to previous reports, we found that antigen specificity against tetanus toxoid is encoded by both V(κ and V(H genes. Finally, the phage-derived tetanus-specific clones had a lower binding affinity than the hybridomas, a phenomenon thought to be the result of random pairing of the V-genes.

  14. Concurrent influenza vaccination reduces anti-FVIII antibody responses in murine hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jesse D; Moorehead, Paul C; Sponagle, Kate; Steinitz, Katharina N; Reipert, Birgit M; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2016-06-30

    Inflammatory signals such as pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns have been hypothesized as risk factors for the initiation of the anti-factor VIII (FVIII) immune response seen in 25% to 30% of patients with severe hemophilia A (HA). In these young patients, vaccines may be coincidentally administered in close proximity with initial exposure to FVIII, thereby providing a source of such stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of 3 vaccines commonly used in pediatric patients on FVIII immunogenicity in a humanized HA murine model with variable tolerance to recombinant human FVIII (rhFVIII). Mice vaccinated intramuscularly against the influenza vaccine prior to multiple infusions of rhFVIII exhibited a decreased incidence of rhFVIII-specific neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies. Similar findings were observed with the addition of an adjuvant. Upon exposure to media from influenza- or FVIII-stimulated lymph node or splenic lymphocytes, naïve CD4(+) lymphocytes preferentially migrated toward media from influenza-stimulated cells, indicating that antigen competition, by means of lymphocyte recruitment to the immunization site, is a potential mechanism for the observed decrease in FVIII immunogenicity. We also observed no differences in incidence or titer of rhFVIII-specific antibodies and inhibitors in mice exposed to the live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccine regardless of route of administration. Together, our results suggest that concomitant FVIII exposure and vaccination against influenza does not increase the risk of inhibitor formation and may in fact decrease anti-FVIII immune responses. PMID:27034428

  15. Oral Delivery of a Novel Recombinant Streptococcus mitis Vector Elicits Robust Vaccine Antigen-Specific Oral Mucosal and Systemic Antibody Responses and T Cell Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Xie

    Full Text Available The pioneer human oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus mitis has unique biologic features that make it an attractive mucosal vaccine or therapeutic delivery vector. S. mitis is safe as a natural persistent colonizer of the mouth, throat and nasopharynx and the oral commensal bacterium is capable of inducing mucosal antibody responses. A recombinant S. mitis (rS. mitis that stably expresses HIV envelope protein was generated and tested in the germ-free mouse model to evaluate the potential usefulness of this vector as a mucosal vaccine against HIV. Oral vaccination led to the efficient and persistent bacterial colonization of the mouth and the induction of both salivary and systemic antibody responses. Interestingly, persistently colonized animals developed antigen-specific systemic T cell tolerance. Based on these findings we propose the use of rS. mitis vaccine vector for the induction of mucosal antibodies that will prevent the penetration of the mucosa by pathogens such as HIV. Moreover, the first demonstration of rS. mitis having the ability to elicit T cell tolerance suggest the potential use of rS. mitis as an immunotherapeutic vector to treat inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  16. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  17. Differential anti-glycan antibody responses in Schistosoma mansoni-infected children and adults studied by shotgun glycan microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela van Diepen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis (bilharzia is a chronic and potentially deadly parasitic disease that affects millions of people in (subtropical areas. An important partial immunity to Schistosoma infections does develop in disease endemic areas, but this takes many years of exposure and maturation of the immune system. Therefore, children are far more susceptible to re-infection after treatment than older children and adults. This age-dependent immunity or susceptibility to re-infection has been shown to be associated with specific antibody and T cell responses. Many antibodies generated during Schistosoma infection are directed against the numerous glycans expressed by Schistosoma. The nature of glycan epitopes recognized by antibodies in natural schistosomiasis infection serum is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The binding of serum antibodies to glycans can be analyzed efficiently and quantitatively using glycan microarray approaches. Very small amounts of a large number of glycans are presented on a solid surface allowing binding properties of various glycan binding proteins to be tested. We have generated a so-called shotgun glycan microarray containing natural N-glycan and lipid-glycan fractions derived from 4 different life stages of S. mansoni and applied this array to the analysis of IgG and IgM antibodies in sera from children and adults living in an endemic area. This resulted in the identification of differential glycan recognition profiles characteristic for the two different age groups, possibly reflecting differences in age or differences in length of exposure or infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using the shotgun glycan microarray approach to study antibody response profiles against schistosome-derived glycan elements, we have defined groups of infected individuals as well as glycan element clusters to which antibody responses are directed in S. mansoni infections. These findings are significant for further

  18. Antibody responses following incident anal and penile infection with human papillomavirus in teenage men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Huachun; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Grulich, Andrew E; Hocking, Jane S; Garland, Suzanne M; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Cornall, Alyssa M; Fairley, Christopher K; Chen, Marcus Y

    2016-08-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal cancer. Few data exist on antibody responses following incident anogenital infection with HPV in teenage MSM. A cohort of 200 MSM aged 16-20 years from Melbourne, Australia were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. At each visit anal and penile swabs were collected for HPV DNA and serum for HPV antibodies for genotypes 6, 11, 16 and 18 (Merck's Multiplex Assays using Luminex). The main outcome, seroconversion, was defined as the detection of HPV antibodies following a negative antibody result for the same HPV type at baseline. The seroincidence rates for HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18 were: 19 (95% CI 12-26), 7 (3-12), 4 (1-8) and 6 (3-11) per 100 person-years, respectively. Men who experienced incident anal HPV infections from types 6/11 were significantly more likely to develop serum antibodies to the same HPV type(s) than those who experienced incident anal infections from types 16/18 [73 vs. 18%, odds ratio (OR) = 15, 95% CI: 2-118]. The median time between incident anal HPV infection and seroconversion for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 was: 91, 38, 161 and 182 days, respectively. Antibody responses against HPV types 6/11 were significantly more likely to occur following incident anal compared with incident penile infection with HPV types 6/11 (OR = 6, 95% CI: 2-21). The likelihood of antibody responses following anogenital HPV infections depends on the HPV type and site of infection. PMID:26991809

  19. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten A; Resende, Mafalda; de Jongh, Willem A; Ditlev, Sisse B; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Houard, Sophie; Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Hamborg, Mette; Massougbodji, Achille; Issifou, Saddou; Strøbæk, Anette; Poulsen, Lars; Leroy, Odile; Kremsner, Peter G; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Luty, Adrian J F; Deloron, Philippe; Theander, Thor G; Dyring, Charlotte; Salanti, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) involves different clinical manifestations that, cumulatively, kill hundreds of thousands every year. Placental malaria (PM) is one such manifestation in which Pf infected erythrocytes (IE) bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA) through expression of VAR2CSA, a parasite-derived antigen. Protection against PM is mediated by antibodies that inhibit binding of IE in the placental intervillous space. VAR2CSA is a large antigen incompatible with large scale recombinant protein expression. Vaccines based on sub-units encompassing the functionally constrained receptor-binding domains may, theoretically, circumvent polymorphisms, reduce the risk of escape-mutants and induce cross-reactive antibodies. However, the sub-unit composition and small differences in the borders, may lead to exposure of novel immuno-dominant antibody epitopes that lead to non-functional antibodies, and furthermore influence the folding, stability and yield of expression. Candidate antigens from the pre-clinical development expressed in High-Five insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system were transitioned into the Drosophila Schneider-2 cell (S2) expression-system compliant with clinical development. The functional capacity of antibodies against antigens expressed in High-Five cells or in S2 cells was equivalent. This enabled an extensive down-selection of S2 insect cell-expressed antigens primarily encompassing the minimal CSA-binding region of VAR2CSA. In general, we found differential potency of inhibitory antibodies against antigens with the same borders but of different var2csa sequences. Likewise, we found that subtle size differences in antigens of the same sequence gave varying levels of inhibitory antibodies. The study shows that induction of a functional response against recombinant subunits of the VAR2CSA antigen is unpredictable, demonstrating the need for large-scale screening in order to identify antigens that induce a

  20. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten A Nielsen

    Full Text Available The disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum (Pf involves different clinical manifestations that, cumulatively, kill hundreds of thousands every year. Placental malaria (PM is one such manifestation in which Pf infected erythrocytes (IE bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA through expression of VAR2CSA, a parasite-derived antigen. Protection against PM is mediated by antibodies that inhibit binding of IE in the placental intervillous space. VAR2CSA is a large antigen incompatible with large scale recombinant protein expression. Vaccines based on sub-units encompassing the functionally constrained receptor-binding domains may, theoretically, circumvent polymorphisms, reduce the risk of escape-mutants and induce cross-reactive antibodies. However, the sub-unit composition and small differences in the borders, may lead to exposure of novel immuno-dominant antibody epitopes that lead to non-functional antibodies, and furthermore influence the folding, stability and yield of expression. Candidate antigens from the pre-clinical development expressed in High-Five insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system were transitioned into the Drosophila Schneider-2 cell (S2 expression-system compliant with clinical development. The functional capacity of antibodies against antigens expressed in High-Five cells or in S2 cells was equivalent. This enabled an extensive down-selection of S2 insect cell-expressed antigens primarily encompassing the minimal CSA-binding region of VAR2CSA. In general, we found differential potency of inhibitory antibodies against antigens with the same borders but of different var2csa sequences. Likewise, we found that subtle size differences in antigens of the same sequence gave varying levels of inhibitory antibodies. The study shows that induction of a functional response against recombinant subunits of the VAR2CSA antigen is unpredictable, demonstrating the need for large-scale screening in order to identify antigens

  1. Anti-GD(2) with an FC point mutation reduces complement fixation and decreases antibody-induced allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Linda S; Otto, Mario; Baldwin, William M; Vail, Emily; Gillies, Stephen D; Handgretinger, Rupert; Barfield, Raymond C; Ming Yu, Hui; Yu, Alice L

    2010-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against GD(2) ganglioside, such as ch14.18, the human-mouse chimeric antibody, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of neuroblastoma. However, treatment is associated with generalized, relatively opiate-resistant pain. We investigated if a point mutation in ch14.18 antibody (hu14.18K332A) to limit complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) would ameliorate the pain behavior, while preserving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro, CDC and ADCC were measured using europium-TDA assay. In vivo, allodynia was evaluated by measuring thresholds to von Frey filaments applied to the hindpaws after injection of either ch14.18 or hu14.18K332 into wild type rats or rats with deficient complement factor 6. Other rats were pretreated with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist and tested following ch14.18 injection. The mutation reduces the antibody's ability to activate complement, while maintaining its ADCC capabilities. Injection of hu14.18K322 (1 or 3mg/kg) produced faster resolving allodynia than that engendered by ch14.18 (1mg/kg). Injection of ch14.18 (1mg/kg) into rats with C6 complement deficiency further reduced antibody-induced allodynia, while pre-treatment with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist completely abolished ch14.18-induced allodynia. These findings showed that mutant hu14.18 K322 elicited less allodynia than ch14.18 and that ch14.18-elicited allodynia is due to activation of the complement cascade: in part, to formation of membrane attack complex, but more importantly to release of complement factor C5a. Development of immunotherapeutic agents with decreased complement-dependent lysis while maintaining cellular cytotoxicity may offer treatment options with reduced adverse side effects, thereby allowing dose escalation of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:20171010

  2. Liver-X-receptor activator prevents homocysteine-induced production of IgG antibodies from murine B lymphocytes via the ROS-NF-κB pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous study showed that homosysteine (Hcy) promotes proliferation of mouse splenic B lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated whether Hcy could stimulate the production of IgG antibodies. Hcy significantly increased the production of IgG antibodies from resting B lymphocytes. B lymphocytes from ApoE-knockout mice with hyperhomocysteinemia showed elevated IgG secretion at either the basal Hcy level or in response to lipopolysaccharide. Hcy promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and free radical scavengers, MnTMPyP decreased Hcy-induced IgG secretion. The inhibitor of NF-κB (MG132) also significantly reduced Hcy-induced IgG secretion. Furthermore, Hcy-induced formation of ROS, activation of NF-κB, and secretion of IgG could be inhibited by the liver-X-receptor (LXR) agonist TO 901317. Thus, our data provide strong evidence that HHcy induces IgG production from murine splenic B lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism might be through the ROS-NF-κB pathway and can be attenuated by the activation of LXR

  3. DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits AID-induced antibody gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J L Cook

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Affinity maturation and class switching of antibodies requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-dependent hypermutation of Ig V(DJ rearrangements and Ig S regions, respectively, in activated B cells. AID deaminates deoxycytidine bases in Ig genes, converting them into deoxyuridines. In V(DJ regions, subsequent excision of the deaminated bases by uracil-DNA glycosylase, or by mismatch repair, leads to further point mutation or gene conversion, depending on the species. In Ig S regions, nicking at the abasic sites produced by AID and uracil-DNA glycosylases results in staggered double-strand breaks, whose repair by nonhomologous end joining mediates Ig class switching. We have tested whether nonhomologous end joining also plays a role in V(DJ hypermutation using chicken DT40 cells deficient for Ku70 or the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs. Inactivation of the Ku70 or DNA-PKcs genes in DT40 cells elevated the rate of AID-induced gene conversion as much as 5-fold. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs-deficiency appeared to reduce point mutation. The data provide strong evidence that double-strand DNA ends capable of recruiting the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex are important intermediates in Ig V gene conversion.

  4. Multi-epitope Models Explain How Pre-existing Antibodies Affect the Generation of Broadly Protective Responses to Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Lavine, Jennie; Ellebedy, Ali; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom

    2016-01-01

    The development of next-generation influenza vaccines that elicit strain-transcendent immunity against both seasonal and pandemic viruses is a key public health goal. Targeting the evolutionarily conserved epitopes on the stem of influenza’s major surface molecule, hemagglutinin, is an appealing prospect, and novel vaccine formulations show promising results in animal model systems. However, studies in humans indicate that natural infection and vaccination result in limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA, and the level of stem-specific antibody elicited is insufficient to provide broad strain-transcendent immunity. Here, we use mathematical models of the humoral immune response to explore how pre-existing immunity affects the ability of vaccines to boost antibodies to the head and stem of HA in humans, and, in particular, how it leads to the apparent lack of boosting of broadly cross-reactive antibodies to the stem epitopes. We consider hypotheses where binding of antibody to an epitope: (i) results in more rapid clearance of the antigen; (ii) leads to the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which inhibit B cell activation through Fcγ receptor-mediated mechanism; and (iii) masks the epitope and prevents the stimulation and proliferation of specific B cells. We find that only epitope masking but not the former two mechanisms to be key in recapitulating patterns in data. We discuss the ramifications of our findings for the development of vaccines against both seasonal and pandemic influenza. PMID:27336297

  5. Fire-Induced Response in Foam Encapsulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, T.T.; Chu, T.Y.; Erickson, K.L.; Gill, W.; Hobbs, M.L.; Humphries, L.L.; Renlund, A.M.; Ulibarri, T.A.

    1999-04-02

    The paper provides a concise overview of a coordinated experimental/theoretical/numerical program at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an experimentally validated model of fire-induced response of foam-filled engineered systems for nuclear and transportation safety applications. Integral experiments are performed to investigate the thermal response of polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. A suite of laboratory experiments is performed to characterize the decomposition chemistry of polyurethane. Mass loss and energy associated with foam decomposition and chemical structures of the virgin and decomposed foam are determined. Decomposition chemistry is modeled as the degradation of macromolecular structures by bond breaking followed by vaporization of small fragments of the macromolecule with high vapor pressures. The chemical decomposition model is validated against the laboratory data. Data from integral experiments is used to assess and validate a FEM foam thermal response model with the chemistry model developed from the decomposition experiments. Good agreement was achieved both in the progression of the decomposition front and the in-depth thermal response.

  6. Antibody response of healthy children to pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Susanna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the proportion of pediatric pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza cases who showed seroconversion, the magnitude of this seroconversion, or the factors that can affect the antibody level evoked by the pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza. Aims of this study were to analyse antibody responses and the factors associated with high antibody titres in a cohort of children with naturally acquired A/H1N1/2009 influenza infection confirmed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results Demographic, clinical and virologic data were collected from 69 otherwise healthy children with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza (27 females, mean age ± SD: 5.01 ± 4.55 years. Their antibody levels against pandemic A/H1N1/2009 and seasonal A/H1N1 influenza viruses were evaluated by measuring hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies using standard assays. Sixty-four patients (92.8% with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza had A/H1N1/2009 antibody levels of ≥40, whereas only 28/69 (40.6% were seroprotected against seasonal A/H1N1 influenza virus. Those who were seroprotected against seasonal A/H1N1 virus were significantly older, significantly more often hospitalised, had a diagnosis of pneumonia significantly more frequently, and were significantly more often treated with oseltamivir than those who were not seroprotected (p Conclusions Otherwise healthy children seem to show seroprotective antibody titres after natural infection with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus. The strength of the immune response seems to be related to the severity of the disease, but not to previous seasonal A/H1N1 influenza immunity.

  7. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van de Pol, Denise P I; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts' antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  8. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts’ antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  9. Antibody responses to surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte-infected erythrocytes and their relation to gametocytaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinko, B; King, E; Targett, G A T; Sutherland, C J

    2016-06-01

    An essential element for continuing transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is the availability of mature gametocytes in human peripheral circulation for uptake by mosquitoes. Natural immune responses to circulating gametocytes may play a role in reducing transmission from humans to mosquitoes. Here, antibody recognition of the surface of mature intra-erythrocytic gametocytes produced either by a laboratory-adapted parasite, 3D7, or by a recent clinical isolate of Kenyan origin (HL1204), was evaluated longitudinally in a cohort of Ghanaian school children by flow cytometry. This showed that a proportion of children exhibited antibody responses that recognized gametocyte surface antigens on one or both parasite lines. A subset of the children maintained detectable anti-gametocyte surface antigen (GSA) antibody levels during the 5 week study period. There was indicative evidence that children with anti-GSA antibodies present at enrolment were less likely to have patent gametocytaemia at subsequent visits (odds ratio = 0·29, 95% CI 0·06-1·05; P = 0·034). Our data support the existence of antigens on the surface of gametocyte-infected erythrocytes, but further studies are needed to confirm whether antibodies against them reduce gametocyte carriage. The identification of GSA would allow their evaluation as potential anti-gametocyte vaccine candidates and/or biomarkers for gametocyte carriage. PMID:27084060

  10. The NTS-DBL2X region of VAR2CSA Induces cross-reactive antibodies that inhibit adhesion of several Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chondroitin sulfate A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigey, Pascal; Gnidehou, Sédami; Doritchamou, Justin;

    2011-01-01

    -adapted parasite lines and field isolates expressing VAR2CSA. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to analyze functional resemblance between antibodies induced in animals and those naturally acquired by immune multigravidae. Results. Antibodies targeting the N-terminal sequence (NTS......) up to DBL2X (NTS-DBL2X) efficiently blocked parasite adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A in a manner similar to that of antibodies raised against the entire VAR2CSA extracellular domain. Interestingly, naturally acquired antibodies and those induced by vaccination against NTS-DBL2X target overlapping...

  11. Visfatin induces sickness responses in the brain.

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    Byong Seo Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Visfatin, also known as nicotiamide phosphoribosyltransferase or pre-B cell colony enhancing factor, is a pro-inflammatory cytokine whose serum level is increased in sepsis and cancer as well as in obesity. Here we report a pro-inflammatory role of visfatin in the brain, to mediate sickness responses including anorexia, hyperthermia and hypoactivity. METHODOLOGY: Rats were intracerebroventricularly (ICV injected with visfatin, and changes in food intake, body weight, body temperature and locomotor activity were monitored. Real-time PCR was applied to determine the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines, proopiomelanocortin (POMC and prostaglandin-synthesizing enzymes in their brain. To determine the roles of cyclooxygenase (COX and melanocortin in the visfatin action, rats were ICV-injected with visfatin with or without SHU9119, a melanocortin receptor antagonist, or indomethacin, a COX inhibitor, and their sickness behaviors were evaluated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Administration of visfatin decreased food intake, body weight and locomotor activity and increased body temperature. Visfatin evoked significant increases in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, prostaglandin-synthesizing enzymes and POMC, an anorexigenic neuropeptide. Indomethacin attenuated the effects of visfatin on hyperthermia and hypoactivity, but not anorexia. Further, SHU9119 blocked visfatin-induced anorexia but did not affect hyperthermia or hypoactivity. CONCLUSIONS: Visfatin induced sickness responses via regulation of COX and the melanocortin pathway in the brain.

  12. Whole-Chain Tick Saliva Proteins Presented on Hepatitis B Virus Capsid-Like Particles Induce High-Titered Antibodies with Neutralizing Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Kolb

    Full Text Available Ticks are vectors for various, including pathogenic, microbes. Tick saliva contains multiple anti-host defense factors that enable ticks their bloodmeals yet also facilitate microbe transmission. Lyme disease-causing borreliae profit specifically from the broadly conserved tick histamine release factor (tHRF, and from cysteine-rich glycoproteins represented by Salp15 from Ixodes scapularis and Iric-1 from Ixodes ricinus ticks which they recruit to their outer surface protein C (OspC. Hence these tick proteins are attractive targets for anti-tick vaccines that simultaneously impair borrelia transmission. Main obstacles are the tick proteins´ immunosuppressive activities, and for Salp15 orthologs, the lack of efficient recombinant expression systems. Here, we exploited the immune-enhancing properties of hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc derived capsid-like particles (CLPs to generate, in E. coli, nanoparticulate vaccines presenting tHRF and, as surrogates for the barely soluble wild-type proteins, cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 variants. The latter CLPs were exclusively accessible in the less sterically constrained SplitCore system. Mice immunized with tHRF CLPs mounted a strong anti-tHRF antibody response. CLPs presenting cysteine-free Salp15 and Iric-1 induced antibodies to wild-type, including glycosylated, Salp15 and Iric-1. The broadly distributed epitopes included the OspC interaction sites. In vitro, the anti-Salp15 antibodies interfered with OspC binding and enhanced human complement-mediated killing of Salp15 decorated borreliae. A mixture of all three CLPs induced high titered antibodies against all three targets, suggesting the feasibility of combination vaccines. These data warrant in vivo validation of the new candidate vaccines´ protective potential against tick infestation and Borrelia transmission.

  13. Profiles of acute cytokine and antibody responses in patients infected with avian influenza A H7N9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Huang

    Full Text Available The influenza A H7N9 virus outbreak in Eastern China in the spring of 2013 represented a novel, emerging avian influenza transmission to humans. While clinical and microbiological features of H7N9 infection have been reported in the literature, the current study investigated acute cytokine and antibody responses in acute H7N9 infection. Between March 27, 2013 and April 23, 2013, six patients with confirmed H7N9 influenza infection were admitted to Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing, China. Acute phase serum cytokine profiles were determined using a high-throughput multiplex assay. Daily H7 hemagglutinin (HA-specific IgG, IgM, and IgA responses were monitored by ELISA. Neutralizing antibodies specific for H7N9 viruses were determined against a pseudotyped virus expressing the novel H7 subtype HA antigen. Five cytokines (IL-6, IP-10, IL-10, IFNγ, and TNFα were significantly elevated in H7N9-infected patients when compared to healthy volunteers. Serum H7 HA-specific IgG, as well as IgM and IgA responses, were detected within 8 days of disease onset and increased in a similar pattern during acute infection. Neutralizing antibodies developed shortly after the appearance of binding antibody responses and showed similar kinetics as a fraction of the total H7 HA-specific IgG responses. H7N9 infection resulted in hallmark serum cytokine increases, which correlated with fever and disease persistence. The novel finding of simultaneous development of IgG, IgM, and IgA responses in acute H7N9 infection points to the potential for live influenza viruses to elicit fast and potent protective antibodies to limit the infection.

  14. Serum antibody responses in pigs trickle-infected with Ascaris and Trichuris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringel, Helene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Petersen, Heidi Huus;

    2015-01-01

    A humoral immune response following helminth infection in pigs is well documented. However, it has been difficult to confirm the existence of antibody mediated resistance against the large roundworm, Ascaris suum, and whipworm, Trichuris suis, in experimental settings by correlating worm burdens ...

  15. Development of a multiplex microsphere immunoassay for the quantitation of salivary antibody responses to selected waterborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliva has an important advantage over serum as a medium for antibody detection due to non-invasive sampling, which is critical for community-based epidemiological surveys. The development of a Luminex multiplex immunoassay for measurement of salivary IgG and IgA responses to pot...

  16. Association of bta-miR-24-3p with serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma spp. in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: summer of 2013, after calves were born; fall of the same year at weaning; and spring, 2014. All sera collec...

  17. Antibody responses measured by various serologic tests in pigs orally inoculated with low numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubey, J. P.; Andrews, C.D.; Lind, Peter; Kwok, O.C.H.; Thulliez, P.; Lunney, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    Objective-To follow antibody responses measured by various serologic tests in pigs orally inoculated with low (less than or equal to 10 oocysts) numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. Animals-24, 2- to 3-month-old pigs. Procedure-Pigs (n = 42) were inoculated orally with 10 (14 pigs) or 1 (28 pigs...

  18. Insulin and C peptide response, and antibody levels in hepatitis C related chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Patients with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C (HC) have an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus. The pathogenic mechanism by which HC predisposes to DM is not clear. The objective of this study was to determine the insulin and C-peptide response to 75 gram oral glucose load and measure anti phospholipid antibody levels in patients with chronic liver disease due to HC. Design: a prospective study. Place and duration of study: This study was conducted at the department of medicine, Jinnah postgraduate medical centre over period of three months. Subjects and methods: An analytical case control study was carried out on 37 patients (m-18,f=19); none of these patients had received interferon. They were divided into four groups: (a) HC cirrhosis with DM (n=9 ), (b) HC cirrhosis without DM (n=11), (c) hepatitis B (HB) cirrhosis without DM (n=7), (d) chronic hepatitis C without DM (n=10). Group C and D were taken as controls. Fasting blood samples were taken and repeated after 2 hours of 75 gram oral glucose load (2 h PG). Result: mean ages of group A,B,C and D were (yr +- SD) 51.3 +- 7.6,48.9 +- 2.4, 33.7 +-10.8 and 31.7 +- 8.8 respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the age, Pugh score and body mass index of HC cirrhotic patients with and without DM. Patients of group A had higher fasting and 2 h PG glucose levels (P=0.003 and 0.000) and higher fasting insulin level (p=0.045). However, increments in insulin and c peptide levels 2 h PG were much less (p=0.048 and 0.003). HB cirrhotics without diabetes (group C behaved just like HC cirrhotic without diabetes (group B). Patients of group D had normal glucose tolerance and insulin and C peptide levels. All four groups had normal anti phospholipid antibody levels. Conclusion: Patients with cirrhosis due to HC nd HB show evidence of glucose intolerance in spite of hyperinsulinaemia probably due to insulin resistance. HC cirrhotics with diabetes have fasting hyperglycemia in spite of

  19. Characterization of a Novel Anti-DR5 Monoclonal Antibody WD1 with the Potential to Induce Tumor Cell Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Beifen Shen; Yuanfang Ma; Yan Li; Zhou Lin; Chunxia Qiao; Ming Lv; Ming Yu; He Xiao; Qingyang Wang; Liyan Wang; Jiannan Feng

    2008-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis. inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a TNF family member capable of inducing apoptosis. Death receptor 5(DR 51 is a key receptor of TRAIL and plays an important role in TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To prepare monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against DR5, cDNA encoding soluble DR5(sDR5)was firstly amplified by revere transcriptase. polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specific primers, and then inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-30a. The recombinant plasmid Was expressed in Escherichia coil strain BL21(DE3), and sDR5 was purified by nickel affinity chromatography. As an antigen. sDR5 Was used to immunize mice. Hybridomas secreting antibodies against sDR5 were identified. One positive clone Was selected to produce antibody, WD1. ELISA and immunofluorescence demonstrated that WD1 could bind recombinant sDR5 and membrane bound DR5 (mDR5)on Jurkat and Molt-4 cells. ATPLite assays showed that Jurkat and Molt-4 cells were sensitive to the antibody in a dose dependent manner. The Annexin V/PI assays and Giemsa's staining both showed that WD1 could induce Jurkat cell apoptosis efficiently. Transient transfection of 293T cells and indirect immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that mAb(WD1)couldn't cross. react with DR4.Our findings indicated that the novel antibody, WD1 could act as a direct agonist, bind DR5 characteristically, and initiate efficient apoptotic signaling and tumor regression. Thus, WD1 would be a leading candidate for potential cancer therapeutics. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(1):55-60.

  20. T cell regulation of the thymus-independent antibody response to trinitrophenylated-Brucella abortus (TNP-BA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanay, A.; Strober, S.

    1985-06-01

    The authors have previously observed a reduction of the T cell-dependent primary antibody response to dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and an enhancement of the T cell-independent response to trinitrophenylated Brucella abortus (TNP-BA) in BALB/c mice after treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). To elucidate the relative contribution of T and B cells to the enhanced T cell-independent antibody responses after TLI, a syngeneic primary adoptive transfer system was utilized whereby irradiated hosts were reconstituted with unfractionated spleen cells or a combination of purified T and B cells from TLI-treated and untreated control mice. Antibody responses of purified splenic B cells from TLI-treated BALB/c mice (TLI/B) to TNP-BA were enhanced 10-fold as compared with those of unfractionated (UF) spleen cells or B cells from normal (NL) BALB/c mice (NL/UF and NL/B, respectively). Splenic T cells from normal animals (NL/T) suppressed the anti-TNP-BA response of TLI/B by more than 100-fold. NL/T neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of NL/B. On the other hand, T cells from TLI-treated mice (TLI/T) enhanced by 100-fold the anti-TNP-BA response of NL/B, but neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of TLI/B. Thus, T cells can regulate the T cell-independent antibody response to TNP-BA. However, experimental manipulation of the T and B cell populations is needed to demonstrate the regulatory functions.

  1. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Responses in a Large Longitudinal Sub-Saharan HIV Primary Infection Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Landais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs are thought to be a critical component of a protective HIV vaccine. However, designing vaccines immunogens able to elicit bnAbs has proven unsuccessful to date. Understanding the correlates and immunological mechanisms leading to the development of bnAb responses during natural HIV infection is thus critical to the design of a protective vaccine. The IAVI Protocol C program investigates a large longitudinal cohort of primary HIV-1 infection in Eastern and South Africa. Development of neutralization was evaluated in 439 donors using a 6 cross-clade pseudo-virus panel predictive of neutralization breadth on larger panels. About 15% of individuals developed bnAb responses, essentially between year 2 and year 4 of infection. Statistical analyses revealed no influence of gender, age or geographical origin on the development of neutralization breadth. However, cross-clade neutralization strongly correlated with high viral load as well as with low CD4 T cell counts, subtype-C infection and HLA-A*03(- genotype. A correlation with high overall plasma IgG levels and anti-Env IgG binding titers was also found. The latter appeared not associated with higher affinity, suggesting a greater diversity of the anti-Env responses in broad neutralizers. Broadly neutralizing activity targeting glycan-dependent epitopes, largely the N332-glycan epitope region, was detected in nearly half of the broad neutralizers while CD4bs and gp41-MPER bnAb responses were only detected in very few individuals. Together the findings suggest that both viral and host factors are critical for the development of bnAbs and that the HIV Env N332-glycan supersite may be a favorable target for vaccine design.

  2. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M.; Hudson, William H.; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S.; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  3. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M; Hudson, William H; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J; Wilson, Patrick C; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-07-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth. PMID:26519949

  5. Symptoms of periodontitis and antibody responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Lauren; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; McCracken, Courtney; Wang, Gabriel; Ponder, Lori A.; Angeles-Han, Sheila T.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly A; Hersh, Aimee O; Vogler, Larry B.; Bohnsack, John F.; Abramowicz, Shelly; Mikuls, Ted R; Prahalad, Sampath

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis is well established. Some children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) phenotypically resemble adults with RA, characterized by the presence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies. We sought to investigate an association between CCP-positive JIA and symptoms of periodontitis and antibodies to oral microbiota. Methods Antibodies to oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, a...

  6. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events. PMID:11559561

  7. Endothelial cells' activation and apoptosis induced by a subset of antibodies against human cytomegalovirus: relevance to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lunardi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We have previously shown in patients with atherosclerosis that antibodies directed against the hCMV-derived proteins US28 and UL122 are able to induce endothelial cell damage and apoptosis of non-stressed endothelial cells through cross-rection with normally expressed surface molecules. Our aim was to dissect the molecular basis of such interaction and to investigate mechanisms linking innate immunity to atherosclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the gene expression profiles in endothelial cells stimulated with antibodies affinity-purified against either the UL122 or the US28 peptides using the microarray technology. Microarray results were validated by quantitative PCR and by detection of proteins in the medium. Supernatant of endothelial cells incubated with antibodies was analysed also for the presence of Heat Shock Protein (HSP60 and was used to assess stimulation of Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR4. Antibodies against UL122 and US28 induced the expression of genes encoding for adhesion molecules, chemokines, growth factors and molecules involved in the apoptotis process together with other genes known to be involved in the initiation and progression of the atherosclerotic process. HSP60 was released in the medium of cells incubated with anti-US28 antibodies and was able to engage TLR4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Antibodies directed against hCMV modulate the expression of genes coding for molecules involved in activation and apoptosis of endothelial cells, processes known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, endothelial cells exposed to such antibodies express HSP60 on the cell surface and release HSP60 in the medium able to activate TLR4. These data confirm that antibodies directed against hCMV-derived proteins US28 and UL122 purified from patients with coronary artery disease induce endothelial cell

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis recombinant MOMP encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles triggers primarily T helper 1 cellular and antibody immune responses in mice: a desirable candidate nanovaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairley SJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stacie J Fairley, Shree R Singh, Abebayehu N Yilma, Alain B Waffo, Praseetha Subbarayan, Saurabh Dixit, Murtada A Taha, Chino D Cambridge, Vida A Dennis Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA Abstract: We recently demonstrated by in vitro experiments that PLGA (poly D, L-lactide-co-glycolide potentiates T helper 1 (Th1 immune responses induced by a peptide derived from the recombinant major outer membrane protein (rMOMP of Chlamydia trachomatis, and may be a promising vaccine delivery system. Herein we evaluated the immune-potentiating potential of PLGA by encapsulating the full-length rMOMP (PLGA-rMOMP, characterizing it in vitro, and investigating its immunogenicity in vivo. Our hypothesis was that PLGA-rMOMP triggers Th1 immune responses in mice, which are desirable prerequisites for a C. trachomatis candidate nanovaccine. Physical-structural characterizations of PLGA-rMOMP revealed its size (approximately 272 nm, zeta potential (−14.30 mV, apparent spherical smooth morphology, and continuous slow release pattern. PLGA potentiated the ability of encapsulated rMOMP to trigger production of cytokines and chemokines by mouse J774 macrophages. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with PLGA-rMOMP had elevated numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets, and secreted more rMOMP-specific interferon-gamma (Th1 and interleukin (IL-12p40 (Th1/Th17 than IL-4 and IL-10 (Th2 cytokines. PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice produced higher serum immunoglobulin (IgG and IgG2a (Th1 than IgG1 (Th2 rMOMP-specific antibodies. Notably, sera from PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice had a 64-fold higher Th1 than Th2 antibody titer, whereas mice immunized with rMOMP in Freund's adjuvant had only a four-fold higher Th1 than Th2 antibody titer, suggesting primarily induction of a Th1 antibody response in PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice. Our data underscore PLGA as an effective delivery system for a C

  9. Neutralizing antibody response during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: type and group specificity and viral escape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Sönnerborg, A; Svennerholm, B; Akerblom, L; Nielsen, C; Clausen, H; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    The paradox that group-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA) exist in the majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients, whereas the NA response against autologous HIV-1 virus isolates is highly type-specific, motivated us to study the type- and group-specific NA...... demonstrated, suggesting that the majority of the change in neutralization sensitivity is driven by the selective pressure of type-specific NA. Furthermore, no differences were observed in sensitivity to neutralization by anti-carbohydrate neutralizing monoclonal antibodies or the lectin concanavalin A...

  10. Filarial-specific antibody response in East African bancroftian filariasis: effects of host infection, clinical disease, and filarial endemicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaoko, Walter G; Simonsen, Paul E; Meyrowitsch, Dan W;

    2006-01-01

    The effect of host infection, chronic clinical disease, and transmission intensity on the patterns of specific antibody responses in Bancroftian filariasis was assessed by analyzing specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, and IgE profiles among adults from two communities with high and low Wuchereria...... bancrofti endemicity. In the high endemicity community, intensities of the measured antibodies were significantly associated with infection status. IgG1, IgG2, and IgE were negatively associated with microfilaria (MF) status, IgG3 was negatively associated with circulating filarial antigen (CFA) status...

  11. Long-Lived Antibody and B Cell Memory Responses to the Human Malaria Parasites, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax

    OpenAIRE

    Wipasa, J; Suphavilai, C; Okell, LC; Cook, J; Corran, PH; Thaikla, K; Liewsaree, W; Riley, EM; Hafalla, JC

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary It is widely perceived that immunity to malaria is short-lived, rendering people susceptible to repeated malaria infections. However, there have been very few studies on “memory” responses, how the human immune system recognizes previously encountered malaria parasites. In particular, very little is known about the durability of malaria-specific B cells and antibodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the induction and maintenance of B cell memory responses to malaria p...

  12. Presence of maternal anti-HBs antibodies does not influence hepatitis B vaccine response in Brazilian neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Luiza N Junqueira; Viviane R Tavares; Regina MB Martins; Kamilla V Frauzino; Agabo M da Costa e Silva; Izolina MX Rodrigues; Ruth Minamisava; Teles, Sheila A

    2011-01-01

    Recently, it was suggested that maternal hepatitis B surface antigen antibodies (anti-HBs) acquired transplacentally could play a negative role in newborn infants' immune response to the hepatitis B vaccine. We compared the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine response in infants born to mothers previously vaccinated against HBV (n = 91) to infants born to mothers who were not previously vaccinated (n = 221). All newborn infants received three intramuscular doses (10 μg) of HBV vaccine (Butang®) a...

  13. [Platelet factor 4, target of anti-heparin antibodies: application to biological diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiral, J

    1997-01-01

    Heparin-platelet factor 4 (H-PF4) complexes are the target for heparin-dependent antibodies present in most of heparin-induced thrombocytopenias (HIT). The highest reactivity is obtained with 27 IU of heparin per mg of PF4. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and pentosane polysulphate can also form these complexes. Antibodies to H-PF4, may be of the IgG, IgA or IgM isotypes. In some HIT, IgGs are absent and only IgMs and/or IgAs are observed. These antibodies may also develop in heparin (15%) or LMWH (8%) treated patients in the absence of thrombocytopenia. IgGs rarely develop in these cases. Presence of antibodies to H-PF4 is therefore a risk factor for developing HIT. Development of pathology requires additional factors such as: PF4 and heparin at an optimised ratio allowing formation of macromolecular complexes; presence of activated platelets exposing increased Fc gamma RII-A and heparin receptors; His. 131 phenotype of Fc gamma RII-A; pre-thrombotic and/or inflammatory clinical manifestations. Assay of antibodies to H-PF4 improves HIT diagnosis and could be predictive for monitoring heparin-therapies. PMID:9238439

  14. Rapid assessment of antibody-induced ricin neutralization by employing a novel functional cell-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Yoav; Alcalay, Ron; Sabo, Tamar; Noy-Porat, Tal; Epstein, Eyal; Kronman, Chanoch; Mazor, Ohad

    2015-09-01

    Ricin is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known against which there is no available antidote. Currently, the most promising countermeasures against the toxin are based on neutralizing antibodies elicited by active vaccination or administered passively. A cell-based assay is widely applied for the primary screening and evaluation of anti-ricin antibodies, yet such assays are usually time-consuming (18-72 h). Here, we report of a novel assay to monitor ricin activity, based on HeLa cells that stably express the rapidly-degraded ubiquitin-luciferase (Ub-FL, half-life of 2 min). Ricin-induced arrest of protein synthesis could be quantified within 3 to 6h post intoxication (IC90 of 300 and 100 ng/ml, respectively). Furthermore, by stabilizing the intracellular levels of Ub-FL in the last hour of the assay, a 3-fold increase in the assay sensitivity was attained. We applied this assay to monitor the efficacy of a ricin holotoxin-based vaccine by measuring the formation of neutralizing antibodies throughout the immunization course. The potency of anti-ricin monoclonal antibodies (directed to either subunit of the toxin) could also be easily and accurately measured in this assay format. Owing to its simplicity, this assay may be implemented for high-throughput screening of ricin-neutralizing antibodies and for identification of small-molecule inhibitors of the toxin, as well as other ribosome-inactivating toxins. PMID:26003675

  15. Synthetic. cap alpha. subunit peptide 125-147 of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor induces antibodies to native receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, D.J.; Griesmann, G.E.; Huang, Z.; Lennon, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    A synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 125-147 of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ..cap alpha.. subunit proved to be a major antigenic region of the AChR. Rats inoculated with 50 ..mu..g of peptide (T ..cap alpha.. 125-147) developed T cell immunity and antibodies to native AChR and signs of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. They report the synthesis and preliminary testing of a disulfide-looped peptide comprising residues 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit. Peptide H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 differs from T ..cap alpha.. 125-147 at residues 139 (Glu for Gln) and 143 (Ser for Thr). In immunoprecipitation assays, antibodies to Torpedo AChR bound /sup 125/I-labelled H..cap alpha.. 125-147 antibody bound H..cap alpha.. 125-147, but monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant region of native AChR bound neither H..cap alpha.. 125-147 nor T ..cap alpha.. 125-147. Rats immunized with H ..cap alpha.. 125-147 produced anti-mammalian muscle AChR antibodies that induced modulation of AChRs from cultured human myotubes. Thus, region 125-147 of the human AChR ..cap alpha.. subunit is extracellular in muscle, and is both antigenic and immunogenic. It remains to be determined whether or not autoantibodies to this region may in part cause the weakness or myasthenia gravis in man.

  16. Generation and characterization of function-blocking anti-ectodysplasin A (EDA) monoclonal antibodies that induce ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Willen, Laure; Dang, Anh Thu; Sarrasin, Heidi; Tardivel, Aubry; Hermes, Katharina; Schneider, Holm; Gaide, Olivier; Donzé, Olivier; Kirby, Neil; Headon, Denis J; Schneider, Pascal

    2014-02-14

    Development of ectodermal appendages, such as hair, teeth, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, and mammary glands, requires the action of the TNF family ligand ectodysplasin A (EDA). Mutations of the X-linked EDA gene cause reduction or absence of many ectodermal appendages and have been identified as a cause of ectodermal dysplasia in humans, mice, dogs, and cattle. We have generated blocking antibodies, raised in Eda-deficient mice, against the conserved, receptor-binding domain of EDA. These antibodies recognize epitopes overlapping the receptor-binding site and prevent EDA from binding and activating EDAR at close to stoichiometric ratios in in vitro binding and activity assays. The antibodies block EDA1 and EDA2 of both mammalian and avian origin and, in vivo, suppress the ability of recombinant Fc-EDA1 to rescue ectodermal dysplasia in Eda-deficient Tabby mice. Moreover, administration of EDA blocking antibodies to pregnant wild type mice induced in developing wild type fetuses a marked and permanent ectodermal dysplasia. These function-blocking anti-EDA antibodies with wide cross-species reactivity will enable study of the developmental and postdevelopmental roles of EDA in a variety of organisms and open the route to therapeutic intervention in conditions in which EDA may be implicated. PMID:24391090

  17. Generation and Characterization of Function-blocking Anti-ectodysplasin A (EDA) Monoclonal Antibodies That Induce Ectodermal Dysplasia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Willen, Laure; Dang, Anh Thu; Sarrasin, Heidi; Tardivel, Aubry; Hermes, Katharina; Schneider, Holm; Gaide, Olivier; Donzé, Olivier; Kirby, Neil; Headon, Denis J.; Schneider, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Development of ectodermal appendages, such as hair, teeth, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, and mammary glands, requires the action of the TNF family ligand ectodysplasin A (EDA). Mutations of the X-linked EDA gene cause reduction or absence of many ectodermal appendages and have been identified as a cause of ectodermal dysplasia in humans, mice, dogs, and cattle. We have generated blocking antibodies, raised in Eda-deficient mice, against the conserved, receptor-binding domain of EDA. These antibodies recognize epitopes overlapping the receptor-binding site and prevent EDA from binding and activating EDAR at close to stoichiometric ratios in in vitro binding and activity assays. The antibodies block EDA1 and EDA2 of both mammalian and avian origin and, in vivo, suppress the ability of recombinant Fc-EDA1 to rescue ectodermal dysplasia in Eda-deficient Tabby mice. Moreover, administration of EDA blocking antibodies to pregnant wild type mice induced in developing wild type fetuses a marked and permanent ectodermal dysplasia. These function-blocking anti-EDA antibodies with wide cross-species reactivity will enable study of the developmental and postdevelopmental roles of EDA in a variety of organisms and open the route to therapeutic intervention in conditions in which EDA may be implicated. PMID:24391090

  18. Antibody response in cattle, sheep and rats to infection with γ-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattle, sheep and rats were infected orally with γ-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica, or with normal metacercariae. The antibody response was monitored in each host to metacercarial tegument (T0), juvenile tegument (T1), adult tegument (T2) and gut antigens. The response was examined at weekly intervals for cattle and sheep throughout 15 weeks of infection and four weeks after infection in rats, using an indirect fluorescent antibody labelling technique. It was found that the irradiated metacercariae engendered a normal humoral response to T0, T1 and gut antigens in all three hosts although the antibody levels were somewhat reduced due to early death or stunting of the flukes. T0 and T1 appeared to be antigenically similar. Antibodies against T2 appeared late in the animals infected with γ-irradiated metacercariae and the titres attained were considerably lower than in the controls. The T2 antigen stimulus in the animals given γ-irradiated metacercariae was probably provided by flukes which 'broke through' the developmental barrier imposed by irradiation and which were found alive at autopsy. (author)

  19. Noninfectious retrovirus particles drive the APOBEC3/Rfv3 dependent neutralizing antibody response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S Smith

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the APOBEC3 family of deoxycytidine deaminases counteract a broad range of retroviruses in vitro through an indirect mechanism that requires virion incorporation and inhibition of reverse transcription and/or hypermutation of minus strand transcripts in the next target cell. The selective advantage to the host of this indirect restriction mechanism remains unclear, but valuable insights may be gained by studying APOBEC3 function in vivo. Apobec3 was previously shown to encode Rfv3, a classical resistance gene that controls the recovery of mice from pathogenic Friend retrovirus (FV infection by promoting a more potent neutralizing antibody (NAb response. The underlying mechanism does not involve a direct effect of Apobec3 on B cell function. Here we show that while Apobec3 decreased titers of infectious virus during acute FV infection, plasma viral RNA loads were maintained, indicating substantial release of noninfectious particles in vivo. The lack of plasma virion infectivity was associated with a significant post-entry block during early reverse transcription rather than G-to-A hypermutation. The Apobec3-dependent NAb response correlated with IgG binding titers against native, but not detergent-lysed virions. These findings indicate that innate Apobec3 restriction promotes NAb responses by maintaining high concentrations of virions with native B cell epitopes, but in the context of low virion infectivity. Finally, Apobec3 restriction was found to be saturable in vivo, since increasing FV inoculum doses resulted in decreased Apobec3 inhibition. By analogy, maximizing the release of noninfectious particles by modulating APOBEC3 expression may improve humoral immunity against pathogenic human retroviral infections.

  20. Levofloxacin rescues mice from lethal intra-nasal infections with virulent Francisella tularensis and induces immunity and production of protective antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimpel, Gary R; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia; Moen, Scott T; Taormina, Joanna; Peterson, Johnny W; Chopra, Ashok K; Niesel, David W; Carness, Paige; Haithcoat, Judith L; Kirtley, Michelle; Nasr, Abdelhakim Ben

    2008-12-01

    The ability to protect mice against respiratory infections with virulent Francisella tularensis has been problematic and the role of antibody-versus-cell-mediated immunity controversial. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that protective immunity can develop in mice that were given antibiotic therapy following infection via the respiratory tract with F. tularensis SCHU S4. We show that mice infected with a lethal dose of SCHU S4, via an intra-nasal challenge, could be protected with levofloxacin treatment. This protection was evident even when levofloxacin treatment was delayed 72h post-infection. At early time points after levofloxacin treatment, significant numbers of bacteria could be recovered from the lungs and spleens of mice, which was followed by a dramatic disappearance of bacteria from these tissues. Mice successfully treated with levofloxacin were later shown to be almost completely resistant to re-challenge with SCHU S4 by the intra-nasal route. Serum antibody appeared to play an important role in this immunity. Normal mice, when given sera from animals protected by levofloxacin treatment, were solidly protected from a lethal intra-nasal challenge with SCHU S4. The protective antiserum contained high titers of SCHU S4-specific IgG2a, indicating that a strong Th1 response was induced following levofloxacin treatment. Thus, this study describes a potentially valuable animal model for furthering our understanding of respiratory tularemia and provides suggestive evidence that antibody can protect against respiratory infections with virulent F. tularensis. PMID:18930100

  1. Antibody-targeted horseradish peroxidase associated with indole-3-acetic acid induces apoptosis in vitro in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmazzo, Leandro F F; Santana-Lemos, Bárbara A; Jácomo, Rafael H; Garcia, Aglair B; Rego, Eduardo M; da Fonseca, Luiz M; Falcão, Roberto P

    2011-05-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), when oxidized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP), is transformed into cytotoxic molecules capable of inducing cell injury. The aim of this study was to test if, by targeting hematopoietic tumors with HRP-conjugated antibodies in association with IAA treatment, there is induction of apoptosis. We used two lineages of hematologic tumors: NB4, derived from acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and Granta-519 from mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). We also tested cells from 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and from 10 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). HRP targeting was performed with anti-CD33 or anti-CD19 antibodies (depending on the origin of the cell), followed by incubation with goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with HRP. Eight experimental groups were analyzed: control, HRP targeted, HRP targeted and incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA, and cells not HRP targeted but incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA. Apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide labeling. Results showed that apoptosis was dependent on the dose of IAA utilized, the duration of exposure to the prodrug and the origin of the neoplasia. Targeting HRP with antibodies was efficient in activating IAA and inducing apoptosis. PMID:21168913

  2. A role for uric acid and the Nalp3 inflammasome in antiphospholipid antibody-induced IL-1β production by human first trimester trophoblast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J Mulla

    Full Text Available Women with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS are at risk of recurrent pregnancy loss and obstetrical disorders, such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR. Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL directly target the placenta by binding beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI expressed on the trophoblast. We recently demonstrated in human first trimester trophoblast cells that anti-β2GPI antibodies (Abs induce the secretion of IL-1β in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-dependent manner. IL-1β secretion requires processing of pro-IL-1β and this is mediated by the inflammasome, a complex of Nalp3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC and caspase-1. The objective of this study was to determine if aPL induce IL-1β production in trophoblast via the inflammasome. Using a human first trimester trophoblast cell line, we demonstrated that a mouse anti-β2GPI mAb and human polyclonal aPL-IgG induce IL-1β processing and secretion, which was partially blocked upon caspase-1 inhibition. Nalp3 and ASC knockdown also attenuated anti-β2GPI Ab-induced IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, aPL stimulated the production of uric acid in a TLR4-dependent manner; and inhibition of uric acid prevented aPL-induced IL-1β production by the trophoblast. These findings demonstrate that aPL, via TLR4 activation, induce a uric acid response in human trophoblast, which in turn activates the Nalp3/ASC inflammasome leading to IL-1β processing and secretion. This novel mechanism may account for the inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface, which causes placental dysfunction and increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in patients with APS.

  3. A role for uric acid and the Nalp3 inflammasome in antiphospholipid antibody-induced IL-1β production by human first trimester trophoblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Melissa J; Salmon, Jane E; Chamley, Larry W; Brosens, Jan J; Boeras, Crina M; Kavathas, Paula B; Abrahams, Vikki M

    2013-01-01

    Women with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are at risk of recurrent pregnancy loss and obstetrical disorders, such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) directly target the placenta by binding beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) expressed on the trophoblast. We recently demonstrated in human first trimester trophoblast cells that anti-β2GPI antibodies (Abs) induce the secretion of IL-1β in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent manner. IL-1β secretion requires processing of pro-IL-1β and this is mediated by the inflammasome, a complex of Nalp3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) and caspase-1. The objective of this study was to determine if aPL induce IL-1β production in trophoblast via the inflammasome. Using a human first trimester trophoblast cell line, we demonstrated that a mouse anti-β2GPI mAb and human polyclonal aPL-IgG induce IL-1β processing and secretion, which was partially blocked upon caspase-1 inhibition. Nalp3 and ASC knockdown also attenuated anti-β2GPI Ab-induced IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, aPL stimulated the production of uric acid in a TLR4-dependent manner; and inhibition of uric acid prevented aPL-induced IL-1β production by the trophoblast. These findings demonstrate that aPL, via TLR4 activation, induce a uric acid response in human trophoblast, which in turn activates the Nalp3/ASC inflammasome leading to IL-1β processing and secretion. This novel mechanism may account for the inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface, which causes placental dysfunction and increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in patients with APS. PMID:23762324

  4. Immunization with avian metapneumovirus harboring chicken Fc induces higher immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Sarita; Easwaran, Maheswaran; Jang, Hyun; Jung, Ho-Kyoung; Kim, Joo-Hun; Shin, Hyun-Jin

    2016-07-15

    In this study, we evaluated the immune responses of avian metapneumovirus harboring chicken Fc molecule. Stable Vero cells expressing chicken Fc chimera on its surface (Vero-cFc) were established, and we confirmed that aMPV grown in Vero-cFc incorporated host derived chimera Fc into the aMPV virions. Immunization of chicken with aMPV-cFc induced higher level of antibodies and inflammatory cytokines; (Interferon (IFN)-γ and Interleukin (IL)-1β) compared to those of aMPV. The increased levels of antibodies and inflammatory cytokines in chicken immunized with aMPV-cFc were statistically significantly (p<0.05) to that of aMPV and control. The aMPV-cFc group also generated the highest neutralizing antibody response. After challenges, chickens immunized with aMPV-cFc showed much less pathological signs in nasal turbinates and trachea so that we could confirm aMPV-cFc induced higher protection than that of aMPV. The greater ability of aMPV harboring chicken Fc to that of aMPV presented it as a possible vaccine candidate. PMID:27130629

  5. Toll-like receptor 5 is not essential for the promotion of secretory immunoglobulin A antibody responses to flagellated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Toll-like receptor 5 recognizes bacterial flagellin, plays a critical role in innate immunity, and contributes to flagellin-specific humoral immunity. Further, TLR5-expressing dendritic cells play an important role in IgA synthesis in the intestine; however, the contribution of TLR5 to antigen (Ag)-specific mucosal immunity remains unclear. Thus, whether TLR5 is essential for the induction of intestinal secretory (S)IgA antibody (Ab) responses against flagellin and bacterial Ags attached to the bacterial surface in response to an oral flagellated bacterium, Salmonella, was explored in this study. Our results indicate that when TLR5 knockout (TLR5(-/-)) mice are orally immunized with recombinant Salmonella expressing fragment C of tetanus toxin (rSalmonella-Tox C), tetanus toxoid (TT)- and flagellin (FliC)-specific systemic IgG and intestinal SIgA Abs are elicited. The numbers of TT-specific IgG Ab-forming cells (AFCs) in the spleen and IgA AFCs in the lamina propria (LP) of TLR5(-/-) mice were comparable to those in wild-type mice. rSalmonella-Tox C was equally disseminated in TLR5(-/-) mice, TLR5(-/-) mice lacking Peyer's patches (PPs), and wild-type mice. In contrast, TLR5(-/-) PP-null mice failed to induce TT- and FliC-specific SIgA Abs in the intestine and showed significantly reduced numbers of TT-specific IgA AFCs in the LP. These results suggest that TLR5 is dispensable for the induction of flagellin and surface Ag-specific systemic and mucosal immunity against oral flagellated bacteria. Rather, pathogen recognition, which occurs in PPs, is a prerequisite for the induction of mucosal immunity against flagellated bacteria. PMID:26564803

  6. The effect of prophylactic antipyretic administration on post-vaccination adverse reactions and antibody response in children: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Ranjan Das

    Full Text Available Prophylactic antipyretic administration decreases the post-vaccination adverse reactions. Recent study finds that they may also decrease the antibody responses to several vaccine antigens. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence for a relationship between prophylactic antipyretic administration, post-vaccination adverse events, and antibody response in children.A systematic search of major databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE was carried out till March 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing prophylactic antipyretic treatment versus placebo post-vaccination in children ≤ 6 years of age were included. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed the studies for methodological quality, and extracted data [PROSPERO registration: CRD42014009717].Of 2579 citations retrieved, a total of 13 RCTs including 5077 children were included in the review. Prophylactic antipyretic administration significantly reduced the febrile reactions (≥ 38.0 °C after primary and booster vaccinations. Though there were statistically significant differences in the antibody responses between the two groups, the prophylactic PCM group had what would be considered protective levels of antibodies to all of the antigens given after the primary and booster vaccinations. No significant difference in the nasopharyngeal carriage rates (short-term and long-term of H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae serotypes was found between the prophylactic and no prophylactic PCM group. There was a significant reduction in the local and systemic symptoms after primary, but not booster vaccinations.Though prophylactic antipyretic administration leads to relief of the local and systemic symptoms after primary vaccinations, there is a reduction in antibody responses to some vaccine antigens without any effect on the nasopharyngeal carriage rates of S. pneumoniae & H. influenza serotypes. Future trials and surveillance programs should also aim at

  7. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J; Machuca, R; Nielsen, C; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported that slowly progressing HIV infection (SPI) was associated with the presence of contemporaneous autologous neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, a group of individuals with more rapidly progressing infection (RPI) generally lacked these antibodies. To understand the...... importance of autologous neutralizing antibodies in SPI more fully, we have now conducted a prospective study taking consecutive blood samples from the individuals with SPI (8 patients) and RPI (10 patients). Blood sampling in the group with SPI was done 110 and 123 months after the estimated seroconversion...... (geometric mean titer [GMT] 8.7 versus 1.6 in SPI and RPI, respectively; p = 0.0048). However, not all individuals withSPI possessed autologous neutralizing antibodies, indicating that other factors may be decisive for SPI. Furthermore, neutralizing antibody titers did not increase from early to late serum...

  8. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and μ(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of 125I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay

  9. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation on IgE antibody responses in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terr, A.I.; Moss, R.B.; Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Thirteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and nephritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation because of severe disease refractory to other forms of treatment. Serum samples before and after irradiation were tested for changes in total serum IgE and for changes in specific IgE antibodies to ryegrass pollen, dust mite, cat dander, and Alternaria. There were no statistically significant changes in total or specific IgE from lymphoid irradiation in these patients. The therapy caused a significant decrease in circulating total lymphocyte and Leu-3 (helper/inducer) T-lymphocyte counts. Therefore, reduction in circulating levels of helper/inducer T cells does not appear to influence preexisting levels of IgE antibodies.

  10. Immunization routes in cattle impact the levels and neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced against S. aureus immune evasion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerhout, Eveline; Vrieling, Manouk; Benedictus, Lindert; Daemen, Ineke; Ravesloot, Lars; Rutten, Victor; Nuijten, Piet; van Strijp, Jos; Koets, Ad; Eisenberg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against S. aureus bovine mastitis are scarce and show limited protection only. All currently available vaccines are applied via the parenteral (usually intramuscular) route. It is unknown, however, whether this route is the most suitable to specifically increase intramammary immunity to combat S. aureus at the site of infection. Hence, in the present study, immunization via mucosal (intranasal; IN), intramuscular (triangle of the neck; IM), intramammary (IMM) and subcutaneous (suspensory ligament; SC) routes were analyzed for their effects on the quantity of the antibody responses in serum and milk as well as the neutralizing capacity of the antibodies within serum. The experimental vaccine comprised the recombinant S. aureus immune evasion proteins extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) and the leukotoxin subunit LukM in an oil-in-water adjuvant combined with a hydrogel and alginate. The highest titer increases for both Efb and LukM specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibody levels in serum and milk were observed following SC/SC immunizations. Furthermore, the harmful effects of Efb and leukotoxin LukMF' on host-defense were neutralized by serum antibodies in a route-dependent manner. SC/SC immunization resulted in a significant increase in the neutralizing capacity of serum antibodies towards Efb and LukMF', shown by increased phagocytosis of S. aureus and increased viability of bovine leukocytes. Therefore, a SC immunization route should be considered when aiming to optimize humoral immunity against S. aureus mastitis in cattle. PMID:26411347

  11. Polar lipids of Burkholderia pseudomallei induce different host immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Gonzalez-Juarrero

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a disease in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. In endemic regions the disease occurs primarily in humans and goats. In the present study, we used the goat as a model to dissect the polar lipids of B. pseudomallei to identify lipid molecules that could be used for adjuvants/vaccines or as diagnostic tools. We showed that the lipidome of B. pseudomallei and its fractions contain several polar lipids with the capacity to elicit different immune responses in goats, namely rhamnolipids and ornithine lipids which induced IFN-γ, whereas phospholipids and an undefined polar lipid induced strong IL-10 secretion in CD4(+ T cells. Autologous T cells co-cultured with caprine dendritic cells (cDCs and polar lipids of B. pseudomallei proliferated and up-regulated the expression of CD25 (IL-2 receptor molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polar lipids were able to up-regulate CD1w2 antigen expression in cDCs derived from peripheral blood monocytes. Interestingly, the same polar lipids had only little effect on the expression of MHC class II DR antigens in the same caprine dendritic cells. Finally, antibody blocking of the CD1w2 molecules on cDCs resulted in decreased expression for IFN-γ by CD4(+ T cells. Altogether, these results showed that polar lipids of B. pseudomallei are recognized by the caprine immune system and that their recognition is primarily mediated by the CD1 antigen cluster.

  12. Serum antibody responses to vaccinal antigens in lean and obese geriatric dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John; Gow, Sheryl; Rhodes, Carrie; Lacoste, Stacey; Kong, Lyndsay; Musil, Kristyna; Snead, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    The immune responses in control dogs [1 to 4 years of age, body condition score (BCS): 4 to 5 out of 9] were compared to those of aging dogs (based on breed and body size) either categorized as lean (BCS: 4 to 5 out of 9) or obese (BCS: 8 to 9 out of 9). Of interest were the serum titers to the following common agents found in vaccines, canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), and Bordetella bronchiseptica. There were no statistical differences in the antibodies to CPIV, B. bronchispetica, and CRCoV, among the age/weight categories, nor among the age/weight categories and the time, in days, between the date of sample collection and the date of the last recorded vaccination for CPIV, B. bronchiseptica, CPV, and CDV. For CPV, the control dogs had significantly (P < 0.002) higher serum neutralization (SN) titers than the lean geriatric dogs and the obese geriatric dogs. For CDV SN titers, the only statistically significant (P = 0.01) difference was that the control dogs had higher SN titers than the lean geriatric dogs. PMID:27152043

  13. Thymic abnormalities: antigen or antibody? Response to thymectomy in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, A S; Jaretzki, A; Wolff, M; Chang, H W; Tennyson, V

    1981-01-01

    The therapeutic value of thymectomy for myasthenia is still questioned although it retains an important place among management modalities that strive for sustained remission. Questions derive from uncertainty as to appropriate timing, variable extent of resection and quantitation of response. Forty-seven patients, followed one to seven years, underwent an extended transsternal or combined transcervical-transsternal procedure with anterior mediastinal exenteration. Sixteen have been in complete remission from six months to six years, four are asymptomatic on occasional pyridostigmine and eight are significantly improved. Evaluation of thymic pathology (hyperplasic, involuted areas, and thymoma) included a search for thymic myoid cells by fluorescence cytochemistry. Antibodies to acetylcholine receptor present in 38 of 43, decreased post-operatively to normal in four, by 50% to 80% in 14, by 20 to 50% in three and were unchanged in 14. Most remissions occurred in young women with noninvoluted hyperplastic glands and variably high anti-AChR titers which dropped toward normal in seven of 15. These results encourage us to utilize this procedure routinely. PMID:6951500

  14. Immunization with recombinant enterovirus 71 viral capsid protein 1 fragment stimulated antibody responses in hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch’ng Wei-Choong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 causes severe neurological diseases resulting in high mortality in young children worldwide. Development of an effective vaccine against EV71 infection is hampered by the lack of appropriate animal models for efficacy testing of candidate vaccines. Previously, we have successfully tested the immunogenicity and protectiveness of a candidate EV71 vaccine, containing recombinant Newcastle disease virus capsids that display an EV71 VP1 fragment (NPt-VP11-100 protein, in a mouse model of EV71 infection. A drawback of this system is its limited window of EV71 susceptibility period, 2 weeks after birth, leading to restricted options in the evaluation of optimal dosing regimens. To address this issue, we have assessed the NPt-VP11-100 candidate vaccine in a hamster system, which offers a 4-week susceptibility period to EV71 infection. Results obtained showed that the NPt-VP11-100 candidate vaccine stimulated excellent humoral immune response in the hamsters. Despite the high level of antibody production, they failed to neutralize EV71 viruses or protect vaccinated hamsters in viral challenge studies. Nevertheless, these findings have contributed towards a better understanding of the NPt-VP11-100 recombinant protein as a candidate vaccine in an alternative animal model system.

  15. Sucralose induces biochemical responses in Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Kristin Eriksson Wiklund

    Full Text Available The intense artificial sweetener sucralose has no bioconcentration properties, and no adverse acute toxic effects have been observed in standard ecotoxicity tests, suggesting negligible environmental risk. However, significant feeding and behavioural alterations have been reported in non-standard tests using aquatic crustaceans, indicating possible sublethal effects. We hypothesized that these effects are related to alterations in acetylcholinesterase (AChE and oxidative status in the exposed animals and investigated changes in AChE and oxidative biomarkers (oxygen radical absorbing capacity, ORAC, and lipid peroxidation, TBARS in the crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to sucralose (0.0001-5 mg L(-1. The sucralose concentration was a significant positive predictor for ORAC, TBARS and AChE in the daphnids. Moreover, the AChE response was linked to both oxidative biomarkers, with positive and negative relationships for TBARS and ORAC, respectively. These joint responses support our hypothesis and suggest that exposure to sucralose may induce neurological and oxidative mechanisms with potentially important consequences for animal behaviour and physiology.

  16. Immune response after exposure to varicella zoster virus: characterization of virus-specific antibodies and their corresponding antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Zweerink, H J; Neff, B J

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen varicella zoster virus antigens were identified that induce antibodies during primary and recurrent infections. These antigens, which included the major nucleocapsid polypeptide (molecular weight, 155,000) and three glycoproteins (molecular weights, 130,000, 88,000, and 60,000, respectively) plus a number of minor antigens, were identified in radioimmunoprecipitation assays, using [35S]methionine-labeled extracts of cells infected with varicella zoster virus and sera from patients wi...

  17. Trivalent combination vaccine induces broad heterologous immune responses to norovirus and rotavirus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Tamminen

    Full Text Available Rotavirus (RV and norovirus (NoV are the two major causes of viral gastroenteritis (GE in children worldwide. We have developed an injectable vaccine design to prevent infection or GE induced with these enteric viruses. The trivalent combination vaccine consists of NoV capsid (VP1 derived virus-like particles (VLPs of GI-3 and GII-4 representing the two major NoV genogroups and tubular RV recombinant VP6 (rVP6, the most conserved and abundant RV protein. Each component was produced in insect cells by a recombinant baculovirus expression system and combined in vitro. The vaccine components were administered intramuscularly to BALB/c mice either separately or in the trivalent combination. High levels of NoV and RV type specific serum IgGs with high avidity (>50% as well as intestinal IgGs were detected in the immunized mice. Cross-reactive IgG antibodies were also elicited against heterologous NoV VLPs not used for immunization (GII-4 NO, GII-12 and GI-1 VLPs and to different RVs from cell cultures. NoV-specific serum antibodies blocked binding of homologous and heterologous VLPs to the putative receptors, histo-blood group antigens, suggesting broad NoV neutralizing activity of the sera. Mucosal antibodies of mice immunized with the trivalent combination vaccine inhibited RV infection in vitro. In addition, cross-reactive T cell immune responses to NoV and RV-specific antigens were detected. All the responses were sustained for up to six months. No mutual inhibition of the components in the trivalent vaccine combination was observed. In conclusion, the NoV GI and GII VLPs combination induced broader cross-reactive and potentially neutralizing immune responses than either of the VLPs alone. Therefore, trivalent vaccine might induce protective immune responses to the vast majority of circulating NoV and RV genotypes.

  18. Nivolumab, an Anti-Programmed Cell Death-1 Antibody, Induces Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Ogawa, Osamu; Oyama, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), an immunoreceptor, is located on T cells and pro-B cells and interacts with its ligands to inhibit T cell activation and proliferation, thereby promoting immunological self-tolerance. Nivolumab, an anti-PD1 antibody, blocks PD-1 and can restore anticancer immune responses by abrogating PD-1 pathway-mediated T-cell inhibition. Autoimmune adverse events are expected with PD-1 therapy. Fulminant type 1 diabetes is the subtype of type 1 diabetes. The clinical feature is the extremely rapid progression of hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis. Here we describe a 66-year-old woman with advanced melanoma who was treated with nivolumab. After 4 months and six doses of the medicine, the patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of nausea and vomiting. The laboratory data showed ketonuria, hyperglycemia (531 mg/dl), high anion gap metabolic acidosis, HbA1c (7.3%), and absence of insulin-secreting capacity. These data are compatible with the criteria of fulminant type 1 diabetes. The patient was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis because of fulminant type 1 diabetes. The findings of this case indicated that nivolumab can cause fulminant type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis due to fulminant type 1 diabetes is potentially fatal condition. Thus, diabetic ketoacidosis due to fulminant type 1 diabetes should be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients treated with nivolumab complain of gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27297738

  19. Maturation of shark single-domain (IgNAR) antibodies: evidence for induced-fit binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Robyn L; Dooley, Helen; Verdino, Petra; Flajnik, Martin F; Wilson, Ian A

    2007-03-23

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop. PMID:17258766

  20. Recombinant outer membrane protein C of Aeromonas hydrophila elicits mixed immune response and generates agglutinating antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Meena, Jitendra Kumar; Sharma, Mahima; Dixit, Aparna

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative fish pathogenic bacterium, also responsible for causing opportunistic pathological conditions in humans. It causes a number of diseases in fish due to which the fish industry incurs huge economic losses annually. Due to problems of antibiotic resistance, and the rapidity with which the infection spreads among fishes, vaccination remains the most effective strategy to combat this infection in fish populations. Among various virulence factors associated with bacterial virulence, outer membrane proteins have been widely evaluated for their vaccine potential owing to their surface exposure and related role in pathogenicity. In the present study, we have investigated the immunogenic potential of a non-specific porin, outer membrane protein C (OmpC) whose expression is regulated by the two-component regulatory system and plays a major role in the survival of A. hydrophila under different osmolaric conditions. The full-length gene (~1 kb) encoding OmpC of A. hydrophila was cloned, characterized and expressed in E. coli. High yield (~112 mg/L at shake flask level) of the recombinant OmpC (rOmpC) (~40 kDa) of A. hydrophila was obtained upon purification from inclusion bodies using Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Immunization with purified rOmpC in murine model generated high endpoint (>1:40,000) titers. IgG isotyping, ELISA and ELISPOT assay indicated mixed immune response with a TH2 bias. Also, the anti-rOmpC antibodies were able to agglutinate A. hydrophila in vitro and exhibited specific cross-reactivity with different Aeromonas strains, which will facilitate easy detection of different Aeromonas isolates in infected samples. Taken together, these data clearly indicate that rOmpC could serve as an effective vaccine against different strains of Aeromonas, a highly heterogenous group of bacteria. PMID:27328672

  1. A case of transfusion-related acute lung injury induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies in acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Sun Mi; Jang, Moon Ju; Huh, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Hee; Song, Eun Young; Oh, Doyeun

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a noncardiogenic pulmonary edema that occurs during or within 6 hours after transfusion. Risk factors for TRALI, which is relatively common in critically ill patients, include recent surgery, hematologic malignancy, and sepsis. Here, we report a case of TRALI induced by anti-human leukocyte antigen (anti-HLA) class II antibodies (HLA-DR) occurring after transfusion of platelet concentrates in a patient with acute leukemia. Although most patient...

  2. HPV16/18 L1 VLP Vaccine Induces Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies that May Mediate Cross-Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Troy J; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Dauner, Joseph G.; Pan, Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 VLP-based vaccines are protective against HPV vaccine-related types; however, the correlates of protection have not been defined. We observed that vaccination with Cervarix™ induced cross-neutralizing antibodies for HPV types for which evidence of vaccine efficacy has been demonstrated (HPV31/45) but not for other types (HPV52/58). In addition, HPV31/45 cross-neutralizing titers showed a significant increase with number of doses (HPV31, p

  3. Characterization of Polyclonal Antibody Induced by Autoantibody TPO (Thyroidperoxidase) From Autoimmune Thyroid Disease (AITD) Serum with ELISA and Western Blotting

    OpenAIRE

    Maulidya Aulia Fiqriyana; Aulanni'am Aulanni'am; Anna Roosdiana

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibody TPO is a potential marker for early detection of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Autoantibody TPO has a specifity and a sensitivity ranging from 82% to100% in comparison to other AITD serology markers. Concentration of autoantibody TPO in sera had a positive correlation with activities of chronic AITD. This research have been conducted to investigate the characteristic of polyclonal antibody TPO induced by autoantibody TPO from serum of AITD patients. The autoantibody TPO was ...

  4. Regulatory T cells and IL-10 independently counterregulate cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses induced by transcutaneous immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Stein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The imidazoquinoline derivate imiquimod induces inflammatory responses and protection against transplanted tumors when applied to the skin in combination with a cognate peptide epitope (transcutaneous immunization, TCI. Here we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (T(reg and the suppressive cytokine IL-10 in restricting TCI-induced cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TCI was performed with an ointment containing the TLR7 agonist imiquimod and a CTL epitope was applied to the depilated back skin of C57BL/6 mice. Using specific antibodies and FoxP3-diphteria toxin receptor transgenic (DEREG mice, we interrogated inhibiting factors after TCI: by depleting FoxP3(+ regulatory T cells we found that specific CTL-responses were greatly enhanced. Beyond this, in IL-10 deficient (IL-10(-/- mice or after blocking of IL-10 signalling with an IL-10 receptor specific antibody, the TCI induced CTL response is greatly enhanced indicating an important role for this cytokine in TCI. However, by transfer of T(reg in IL-10(-/- mice and the use of B cell deficient JHT(-/- mice, we can exclude T(reg and B cells as source of IL-10 in the setting of TCI. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We identify T(reg and IL-10 as two important and independently acting suppressors of CTL-responses induced by transcutaneous immunization. Advanced vaccination strategies inhibiting T(reg function and IL-10 release may lead the development of effective vaccination protocols aiming at the induction of T cell responses suitable for the prophylaxis or treatment of persistent infections or tumors.

  5. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Encheng; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Nihong; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Qin, Yongli; Bu, Zhigao; Yang, Yinhui; Lunt, Ross A; Wang, Linfa; Wu, Donglai

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24) were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV), Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), Duck Plague Virus (DPV) and Goose Parvovirus (GPV) antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and subunit vaccines

  6. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the eastern equine encephalitis virus E2 protein recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV is a mosquito-borne virus that can cause both human and equine encephalitis with high case fatality rates. EEEV can also be widespread among birds, including pheasants, ostriches, emu, turkeys, whooping cranes and chickens. The E2 protein of EEEV and other Alphaviruses is an important immunogenic protein that elicits antibodies of diagnostic value. While many therapeutic and diagnostic applications of E2 protein-specific antibodies have been reported, the specific epitopes on E2 protein recognized by the antibody responses of different susceptible hosts, including avian species, remain poorly defined. In the present study, the avian E2-reactive polyclonal antibody (PAb response was mapped to linear peptide epitopes using PAbs elicited in chickens and ducks following immunization with recombinant EEEV E2 protein and a series of 42 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire EEEV E2 protein. We identified 12 and 13 peptides recognized by the chicken and duck PAb response, respectively. Six of these linear peptides were commonly recognized by PAbs elicited in both avian species. Among them five epitopes recognized by both avian, the epitopes located at amino acids 211-226 and 331-352 were conserved among the EEEV antigenic complex, but not other associated alphaviruses, whereas the epitopes at amino acids 11-26, 30-45 and 151-166 were specific to EEEV subtype I. The five common peptide epitopes were not recognized by avian PAbs against Avian Influenza Virus (AIV and Duck Plague Virus (DPV. The identification and characterization of EEEV E2 antibody epitopes may be aid the development of diagnostic tools and facilitate the design of epitope-based vaccines for EEEV. These results also offer information with which to study the structure of EEEV E2 protein.

  7. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24 were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV, Duck Plague Virus (DPV and Goose Parvovirus (GPV antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and

  8. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Garcia Beatriz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2 were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell.

  9. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: Genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors embarked upon a program to develop monoclonal antibodies to the biologically active amino terminal region of PTH. Using the BALB/c mouse for immunization, fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods and a solid-phase screening assay in which PTH-(1-34) was adhered to polyvinylchloride plates in a manner that preserved immunoreactivity. They generated 17 monoclonal antibodies against the amino-terminal portion of parathyroid hormone. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat anti-mouse immunoglobins specific for IgG heavy chains, γ/sub 1/, γ/sub 2a/, γ/sub 2b/, γ/sub 3/; α(IgA); and μ(Igm). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background radioactivity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labeled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. All incubations with iodinated second antibodies to other heavy chain classes of immunoglobins demonstrated background radioactivity. Extensive synthetic work in the laboratory for multiple biologic studies of structure-activity relationships of PTH, as well as analog design, has led to the synthesis of many peptide analogues and fragments from 7 to 34 amino acids in length. Study of the antibody recognition site (region specificity) by two of these monoclonal antibodies, 10A/sub 7/, and 6B/sub 1/, was undertaken with synthetic peptides

  10. The protective antibodies induced by a novel epitope of human TNF-alpha could suppress the development of collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Dong

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha is a major inflammatory mediator that exhibits actions leading to tissue destruction and hampering recovery from damage. At present, two antibodies against human TNF-alpha (hTNF-alpha are available, which are widely used for the clinic treatment of certain inflammatory diseases. This work was undertaken to identify a novel functional epitope of hTNF-alpha. We performed screening peptide library against anti-hTNF-alpha antibodies, ELISA and competitive ELISA to obtain the epitope of hTNF-alpha. The key residues of the epitope were identified by means of combinatorial alanine scanning and site-specific mutagenesis. The N terminus (80-91 aa of hTNF-alpha proved to be a novel epitope (YG1. The two amino acids of YG1, proline and valine, were identified as the key residues, which were important for hTNF-alpha biological function. Furthermore, the function of the epitope was addressed on an animal model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA. CIA could be suppressed in an animal model by prevaccination with the derivative peptides of YG1. The antibodies of YG1 could also inhibit the cytotoxicity of hTNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that YG1 is a novel epitope associated with the biological function of hTNF-alpha and the antibodies against YG1 can inhibit the development of CIA in animal model, so it would be a potential target of new therapeutic antibodies.

  11. Effect of praziquantel treatment of Schistosoma mansoni during pregnancy on intensity of infection and antibody responses to schistosome antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tweyongyere, Robert; Mawa, Patrice A.; Emojong, Nicholas O.;

    2009-01-01

    with those first treated after delivery (undetected (88.5%), light (10.6%), moderate (0.9%) and heavy (0%), p = 0.16). Parasite specific antibody levels were lower during pregnancy than after delivery. Praziquantel treatment during pregnancy boosted anti-worm IgG isotypes and to a lesser extent Ig......E, but these boosts were less pronounced than in women whose treatment was delayed until after delivery. Praziquantel had limited effects on antibodies against egg antigens. Conclusion S mansoni antigen-specific antibody levels and praziquantel-induced boosts in antibody levels were broadly suppressed...

  12. Induction of antigen-specific antibody response in human pheripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro by a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV).

    OpenAIRE

    Uytdehaag, Fons; Osterhaus, Ab; Loggen, H.G.; Bakker, Roland; Van Asten, Jack; Kreeftenberg, J.G.; Marel, P.; Steenis, Bert

    1983-01-01

    textabstractIn the present report an in vitro method for obtaining a secondary human antibody response to a dog kidney cell vaccine against rabies virus (DKCV) is described. Cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal rabies-immune and nonimmune donors were stimulated in vitro by DKCV. The production of virus-specific antibody in supernatant fluids was monitored by ELISA. Antibody was produced by lymphocytes from rabies-immune individuals, whereas those of nonimmune subjects co...

  13. Vaccination with dengue virus-like particles induces humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Quanfu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of dengue, an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV, has dramatically increased around the world in recent decades and is becoming a severe public health threat. However, there is currently no specific treatment for dengue fever, and licensed vaccine against dengue is not available. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs has shown considerable promise for many viral diseases, but the effect of DENV VLPs to induce specific immune responses has not been adequately investigated. Results By optimizing the expression plasmids, recombinant VLPs of four antigenically different DENV serotypes DENV1-4 were successfully produced in 293T cells. The vaccination effect of dengue VLPs in mice showed that monovalent VLPs of each serotype stimulated specific IgG responses and potent neutralizing antibodies against homotypic virus. Tetravalent VLPs efficiently enhanced specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies against all four serotypes of DENV. Moreover, vaccination with monovalent or tetravalent VLPs resulted in the induction of specific cytotoxic T cell responses. Conclusions Mammalian cell expressed dengue VLPs are capable to induce VLP-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and being a promising subunit vaccine candidate for prevention of dengue virus infection.

  14. Prediction of clinical and endoscopic responses to anti-tumor necrosis factor-α antibodies in ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yukihiro; Bamba, Shigeki; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Nishida, Atsushi; Inatomi, Osamu; Sasaki, Masaya; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Andoh, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Objective In patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), the relationship between the initial endoscopic findings and the response to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibodies remains unclear. We herein evaluated the potential of endoscopic assessment using the ulcerative colitis endoscopic index of severity (UCEIS) to predict the response to anti-TNF-α antibodies. Methods We enrolled 64 patients with UC undergoing anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy with infliximab (IFX) or adalimumab (ADA) between April 2010 and March 2015. Anti-TNF-α trough levels were determined by ELISA. Endoscopic disease activity was assessed using the UCEIS. Results The clinical response rate at 8 weeks was 77.4% for IFX and 66.7% for ADA. Serum albumin levels were significantly higher and the UCEIS bleeding descriptor before treatment was significantly lower in the responders than in the non-responders (p CRP levels at 2 weeks were significantly lower in the responders (p CRP levels), is useful for the prediction of the treatment outcome of UC patients in response to anti-TNF-α antibodies. PMID:26888161

  15. Detection of antibodies to single-stranded DNA in naturally acquired and experimentally induced viral hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive ''Farr'' assay, utilizing 125I-labelled DNA was developed for detecting antibody to single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA). The test was shown to be specific and as sensitive as assays using 14C-labelled DNA, for the detection of antibody in patients with connective tissue diseases. Groups of sera from patients with naturally acquired viral hepatitis and experimentally infected chimpanzees were tested for anti-ssDNA by the 125I assay and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). No consistent pattern was observed with either technique, indicating the elevated levels of this antibody are not as reliable markers of parenchymal liver damage as had been previously suggested

  16. Variability in detection and quantification of interferon β-1b–induced neutralizing antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartung Hans-Peter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon-beta (IFNB therapy for multiple sclerosis can lead to the induction of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against IFNB. Various methods are used for detection and quantification of NAbs. Methods Blood samples from 125 IFNB-1b–treated patients, which were tested NAb negative or NAb positive after conclusion of a clinical study, were retested three years after first being assessed in four different laboratories that offer routine NAb testing to practicing neurologists. The myxovirus protein A (MxA induction assay, the cytopathic effect (CPE assay (two laboratories, or the luciferase assay were used. Intra- and inter-laboratory agreement between assays with respect to NAb detection and NAb titer quantification were evaluated. Results High agreement for NAb detection (kappa coefficient, 0.86 and for titer levels was observed for the intra-laboratory comparison in the laboratory using the MxA induction assay performed three years ago and now. A similarly high agreement for NAb detection (kappa coefficient, 0.87 and for titer quantification was noted for the MxA assay of this laboratory with one of two laboratories using the CPE assay. All other inter-laboratory comparisons showed kappa values between 0.57 and 0.68 and remarkable differences in individual titer levels. Conclusions There are considerable differences in the detection and quantification of IFNB-induced NAbs among laboratories offering NAb testing for clinical practice using different assay methods. It is important that these differences are considered when interpreting NAb results for clinical decision-making and when developing general recommendations for potentially clinically meaningful NAb titer levels.

  17. A conserved multi-gene family induces cross-reactive antibodies effective in defense against Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Subhash Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two related merozoite surface proteins, MSP3 and MSP6, have previously been identified as targets of antibody-dependent cellular inhibition (ADCI, a protective mechanism against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Both MSP3 and MSP6 share a common characteristic small N-terminal signature amino-acid stretch (NLRNA/G, a feature similar to MSP3-like orthologs identified in other human and primate malaria parasites. METHODS/RESULTS: This signature amino-acid sequence led to the identification of eight ORFs contiguously located on P. falciparum chromosome 10. Our subsequent investigations on their expression, localization, sequence conservation, epitope sharing, immunogenicity and the functional role of antibodies in defense are reported here. Six members of P. falciparum MSP3-multigene family share similar sequence organization within their C-terminal regions, are simultaneously expressed as merozoite surface proteins and are highly conserved among parasite isolates. Each of these proteins is a target of naturally occurring antibodies effective at parasite killing in ADCI assays. Moreover, both naturally occurring antibodies and those generated by immunization display cross-reactivity with other members of the family and exhibit varied binding avidities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The unusual characteristics of the MSP3 multi-gene family lead us to hypothesize that the simultaneous expression of targets eliciting cross-reactive antibody responses capable of controlling parasite densities could represent an immune process selected through evolution to maintain homeostasis between P. falciparum and human hosts; a process that allows the continuous transmission of the parasite without killing the host. Our observations also have practical consequences for vaccine development by suggesting MSP3 vaccine efficacy might be improved when combined with the various C-terminus regions of the MSP3 family members to generate a wider range of antibodies

  18. Coombs Antiglobulin Test Using Brucella abortus 99 as Antigen To Detect Incomplete Antibodies Induced by B. abortus RB51 Vaccine in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Ciuchini, Franco; Adone, Rosanna; Pasquali, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    This study showed that vaccination of cattle with Brucella abortus rough strain RB51 induces incomplete antibodies that can be detectable by a Coombs antiglobulin test using the B. abortus 99 smooth strain.

  19. Guillain-Barré syndrome- and Miller Fisher syndrome-associated Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharides induce anti-GM1 and anti-GQ1b Antibodies in rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. de Klerk; H.P. Endtz (Hubert); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); J.D. Laman (Jon); F.G.A. van der Meché; P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); C.W. Ang (Wim)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractCampylobacter jejuni infections are thought to induce antiganglioside antibodies in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) by molecular mimicry between C. jejuni lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and gangliosides. We used purifi

  20. Antibody response of cattle to vaccination with commercial modified live rabies vaccines in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Amy; Greenberg, Lauren; Moran, David; Alvarez, Danilo; Alvarado, Marlon; Garcia, Daniel L; Peruski, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Vampire bat rabies is a public and animal health concern throughout Latin America. As part of an ecological study of vampire bat depredation on cattle in southern Guatemala, we conducted a vaccine seroconversion study among three dairy farms. The main objectives of this cross sectional and cohort study were to understand factors associated with bat bites among cattle, to determine whether unvaccinated cattle had evidence of rabies virus exposure and evaluate whether exposure was related to bat bite prevalence, and to assess whether cattle demonstrate adequate seroconversion to two commercial vaccines used in Guatemala. In 2012, baseline blood samples were collected immediately prior to intramuscular inoculation of cattle with one of two modified live rabies vaccines. Post vaccination blood samples were collected 13 and 393 days later. Sera were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNA) by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Across two years of study, 36% (254/702) of inspected cattle presented gross evidence of vampire bat bites. Individual cattle with a bat bite in 2012 were more likely have a bat bite in 2013. Prior to vaccination, 12% (42/350) of cattle sera demonstrated rVNA, but bite status in 2012 was not associated with presence of rVNA. Vaccine brand was the only factor associated with adequate rVNA response of cattle by day 13. However, vaccine brand and rVNA status at day 13 were associated with an adequate rVNA titer on day 393, with animals demonstrating an adequate titer at day 13 more likely to have an adequate titer at day 393. Our findings support stable levels of vampire bat depredation and evidence of rVNA in unvaccinated cattle. Brand of vaccine may be an important consideration impacting adequate rVNA response and long-term maintenance of rVNA in cattle. Further, the results demonstrate that initial response to vaccination is associated with rVNA status over one year following vaccination. PMID:25466762

  1. Antibody Responses against Pneumocystis jirovecii in Health Care Workers Over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Serena; Daly, Kieran R.; Tipirneni, Renuka; Leah G Jarlsberg; Djawe, Kpandja; Koch, Judy V.; Swartzman, Alexandra; Roth, Brenna; Walzer, Peter D.; Huang, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    In a previous cross-sectional study, we showed that clinical staff working in a hospital had significantly higher antibody levels than nonclinical staff to Pneumocystis jirovecii. We conducted a longitudinal study, described here, to determine whether occupation and self-reported exposure to a patient with P. jirovecii pneumonia were associated with antibody levels to P. jirovecii over time. Baseline and quarterly serum specimens were collected and analyzed by using an ELISA that targeted dif...

  2. Neutralizing Antibody Response in Dogs and Cats Inoculated with Commercial Inactivated Rabies Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    SHIRAISHI, Rikiya; NISHIMURA, Masaaki; NAKASHIMA, Ryuji; ENTA, Chiho; HIRAYAMA, Norio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Japan, the import quarantine regulation against rabies has required from 2005 that dogs and cats should be inoculated with the rabies vaccine and that the neutralizing antibody titer should be confirmed to be at least 0.5 international units (IU)/ml. The fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test is used as an international standard method for serological testing for rabies. To achieve proper immunization of dogs and cats at the time of import and export, changes in the...

  3. Conformational epitopes of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein are targets of potentially pathogenic antibody responses in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Menge Til; Lalive Patrice H; von Büdingen H -Christian; Genain Claude P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a putative autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS). Establishing the pathological relevance and validity of anti-MOG antibodies as biomarkers has yielded conflicting reports mainly due to different MOG isoforms used in different studies. Because epitope specificity may be a key factor determining anti-MOG reactivity we aimed at identifying a priori immunodominant MOG epitopes by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and at assessing clini...

  4. Normally Occurring Human Anti-GM1 Immunoglobulin M Antibodies and the Immune Response to Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaniz, María E.; Lardone, Ricardo D.; Yudowski, Silvia L.; Farace, María I.; Nores, Gustavo A.

    2004-01-01

    Anti-GM1 antibodies of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) isotype are normal components of the antibody repertoire of adult human serum. Using a sensitive high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) immunostaining assay, we found that these antibodies were absent in the umbilical vein and children <1 month of age but could be detected after 1 month of age. Although most of the children older than 6 months of age were positive, there were still a few negative children. The appearance of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies showed a perfect concordance with two well-characterized antibacterial antibodies, anti-Forssman and anti-blood group A, which indicates a similar origin. We also studied IgM reactivity with lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from gram-negative bacteria isolated from stool samples from healthy babies and from Escherichia coli HB101 in serum from individuals of different ages. We found a positive reaction with both LPSs in all the children more than 1 month of age analyzed, even in those that were negative for anti-GM1 antibodies. Anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were purified from adult serum by affinity chromatography and tested for the ability to bind LPSs from different bacteria. This highly specific preparation showed reactivity only with LPS from a strain of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from a patient with diarrhea. We conclude that normally occurring IgM antibodies are generated after birth, probably during the immune defense against specific bacterial strains. PMID:15039337

  5. Antibody response to accelerated Hib immunisation in preterm infants receiving dexamethasone for chronic lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, M.; Campbell, F.; Powell, P; Sims, D; Thornton, C

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To study the effect of dexamethasone on the routine immunisation of preterm infants with chronic lung disease.
METHODS—Serum samples were obtained before and after immunisation from an unselected cohort of 59 preterm infants. Haemophilus influenzae antibodies were measured using an ELISA method and differences in the geometric mean values between the two groups of babies analysed.
RESULTS—Sixteen infants received no dexamethasone. Before and after immunisation antibody t...

  6. Toxoplasma-SPECIFIC IgG SUBCLASS ANTIBODY RESPONSE IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUID SAMPLES FROM PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL TOXOPLASMOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda S. NASCIMENTO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Cerebral toxoplasmosis can be highly debilitating and occasionally fatal in persons with immune system deficiencies. In this study, we evaluated the Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgG subclass antibody response in 19 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis who had a positive IgG anti-T. gondii ELISA standardized with a cyst antigen preparation. There were no significant differences between the rates of positivity and the antibody concentrations (arithmetic means of the ELISA absorbances, MEA for IgG1 and IgG2, but the rates of positivity and MEA values for these two IgG subclasses were significantly higher than those for IgG3 and IgG4. The marked IgG2 response in CSF from patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis merits further investigation.

  7. A critical review of the role of Fc gamma receptor polymorphisms in the response to monoclonal antibodies in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellor James D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC is a major mechanism of action of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs such as cetuximab, rituximab and trastuzumab. Fc gamma receptors (FcgR on human white blood cells are an integral part of the ADCC pathway. Differential response to therapeutic mAbs has been reported to correlate with specific polymorphisms in two of these genes: FCGR2A (H131R and FCGR3A (V158F. These polymorphisms are associated with differential affinity of the receptors for mAbs. This review critically examines the current evidence for genotyping the corresponding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to predict response to mAbs in patients with cancer.

  8. Evaluation of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody seroconversion induced by minocycline, sulfasalazine, or penicillamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, HK; Slot, MC; Pan, GL; Weissbach, CA; Niles, JL; Merkel, PA

    2000-01-01

    Objective, Case reports have suggested that minocycline, sulfasalazine, and penicillamine are associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis, This study evaluated ANCA seroconversion due to these agents in serum samples prospectively collected in randomized, double-bl

  9. Neutralization of Japanese Encephalitis Virus by heme-induced broadly reactive human monoclonal antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Nimesh Gupta; Mélissanne de Wispelaere; Maxime Lecerf; Manjula Kalia; Tobias Scheel; Sudhanshu Vrati; Claudia Berek; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Philippe Desprès; Sébastien Lacroix-Desmazes; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    International audience Geographical expansion and re-emerging new genotypes of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) require the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we studied a non-conventional approach for antibody therapy and show that, upon exposure to heme, a fraction of natural human immunoglobulins acquires high-affinity reactivity with the antigenic domain-III of JEV E glycoprotein. These JEV-reactive antibodies exhibited neutralizing activity against recently domina...

  10. Tumor therapy with an antibody-targeted superantigen generates a dichotomy between local and systemic immune responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Litton, M. J.; Dohlsten, M; Hansson, J.; Rosendahl, A; Ohlsson, L.; Kalland, T; Andersson, J; Andersson, U.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated injections of a fusion protein containing the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) combined with a Fab fragment of a tumor-specific antibody is a highly efficient immunotherapy for mice expressing lung melanoma micrometastasis. In the present study, the systemic and local immune responses generated by this therapy were analyzed at a cellular level. Two distinct but coupled immune reactions occurred after repeated therapy. Tumor necrosis factor and macrophage inflammatory p...

  11. Cellular Immune Responses in HIV-Negative Immunodeficiency with Anti-Interferon-γ Antibodies and Opportunistic Intracellular Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Wipasa, Jiraprapa; Wongkulab, Panuwat; Chawansuntati, Kriangkrai; Chaiwarit, Romanee; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-mediated immunity plays a crucial role in resistance to intracellular infection. We previously reported antibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in HIV− negative (HIV−) patients with acquired immunodeficiency presenting with repeated episodes of disseminated infection caused by uncommon opportunistic intracellular fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens. This follow-up study aimed to investigate cellular immune responses in these unusual patients. Methods Twenty HIV− patient...

  12. Influenza A virus infection engenders a poor antibody response against the ectodomain of matrix protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunner William

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix protein 2 (M2 is an integral tetrameric membrane protein of influenza A virus (IAV. Its ectodomain (M2e shows remarkably little diversity amongst human IAV strains. As M2e-specific antibodies (Abs have been shown to reduce the severity of infection in animals, M2e is being studied for its capability of providing protection against a broad range of IAV strains. Presently, there is little information about the concentration of M2e-specific Abs in humans. Two previous studies made use of ELISA and Western blot against M2e peptides and recombinant M2 protein as immunosorbents, respectively, and reported Ab titers to be low or undetectable. An important caveat is that these assays may not have detected all Abs capable of binding to native tetrameric M2e. Therefore, we developed an assay likely to detect all M2e tetramer-specific Abs. Results We generated a HeLa cell line that expressed full length tetrameric M2 (HeLa-M2 or empty vector (HeLa-C10 under the control of the tetracycline response element. These cell lines were then used in parallel as immunosorbents in ELISA. The assay was standardized and M2e-specific Ab titers quantified by means of purified murine or chimeric (mouse variable regions, human constant regions M2e-specific Abs in the analysis of mouse and human sera, respectively. We found that the cell-based ELISA was substantially more effective than immobilized M2e peptide in detecting M2e-specific Abs in sera of mice that had recovered from repetitive IAV infections. Still, titers remained low ( Conclusion The results provide convincing evidence that M2e-specific Ab-mediated protection is currently lacking or suboptimal in humans.

  13. Curcumin induced nanoscale CD44 molecular redistribution and antigen-antibody interaction on HepG2 cell surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mu [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Ruan Yuxia [Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Xing Xiaobo; Chen Qian; Peng, Yuan [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Cai Jiye, E-mail: tjycai@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, 601 Huangpu Road West, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2011-07-04

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > In this study, we investigate the changes of CD44 expression and distribution on HepG2 cells after curcumin treatment. > We find curcumin is able to change the morphology and ultrastructure of HepG2 cells. > Curcumin can reduce the expression of CD44 molecules and induce the nanoscale molecular redistribution on cell surface. > The binding force between CD44-modified AFM tip and the HepG2 cell surface decreases after curcumin-treatment. - Abstract: The cell surface glycoprotein CD44 was implicated in the progression, metastasis and apoptosis of certain human tumors. In this study, we used atomic force microscope (AFM) to monitor the effect of curcumin on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell surface nanoscale structure. High-resolution imaging revealed that cell morphology and ultrastructure changed a lot after being treated with curcumin. The membrane average roughness increased (10.88 {+-} 4.62 nm to 129.70 {+-} 43.72 nm) and the expression of CD44 decreased (99.79 {+-} 0.16% to 75.14 {+-} 8.37%). Laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) imaging showed that CD44 molecules were located on the cell membrane. The florescence intensity in control group was weaker than that in curcumin treated cells. Most of the binding forces between CD44 antibodies and untreated HepG2 cell membrane were around 120-220 pN. After being incubated with curcumin, the major forces focused on 70-150 pN (10 {mu}M curcumin-treated) and 50-120 pN (20 {mu}M curcumin-treated). These results suggested that, as result of nanoscale molecular redistribution, changes of the cell surface were in response to external treatment of curcumin. The combination of AFM and LSCM could be a powerful method to detect the distribution of cell surface molecules and interactions between molecules and their ligands.

  14. Primary stimulation by dendritic cells induces antiviral proliferative and cytotoxic T cell responses in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    We used well-gassed hanging drop (20 microliters) cultures with high concentrations of purified T cells from normal BALB/c mice to examine whether dendritic cells (DC) can induce primary antiviral proliferative T cell responses and generate virus-specific CTL. We found that DC exposed to infectious influenza virus in vitro or in vivo in small numbers (0.1-1%) resulted in strong proliferation of responder T cells within 3 d, and this was strongly inhibited by antibodies to class II MHC molecul...

  15. Commonly administered bacille Calmette-Guerin strains induce comparable immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jun-fang; Dai, Fu-Ying; Gong, Xue-Li; Bao, Lang

    2015-01-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is currently the only available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), but its protective efficacy in adults is highly variable. This study aimed to compare the immune response induced by two widely used BCG strains: BCG China strain (derivative of BCG Danish strain) in DU2-III group and BCG Pasteur in DU2 -IV group. Healthy BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG China strain or BCG Pasteur strain. Specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a antibodies titers, the proliferation of sp...

  16. HPV-16 L1 genes with inactivated negative RNA elements induce potent immune responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction of point mutations in the 5' end of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) L1 gene specifically inactivates negative regulatory RNA processing elements. DNA vaccination of C57Bl/6 mice with the mutated L1 gene resulted in improved immunogenicity for both neutralizing antibodies as well as for broad cellular immune responses. Previous reports on the activation of L1 by codon optimization may be explained by inactivation of the regulatory RNA elements. The modified HPV-16 L1 DNA that induced anti-HPV-16 immunity may be seen as a complementary approach to protein subunit immunization against papillomavirus

  17. Vibriocidal antibody responses to a bivalent killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine in a phase III trial in Kolkata, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Kanungo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the development of a vaccine, identification of the correlates of protection is of paramount importance for establishing an objective criterion for the protective performance of the vaccine. However, the ascertainment of correlates of immunity conferred by any vaccine is a difficult task. METHODS: While conducting a phase three double-blind, cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a bivalent killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine in Kolkata, we evaluated the immunogenicity of the vaccine in a subset of participants. Randomly chosen participants (recipients of vaccine or placebo were invited to provide blood samples at baseline, 14 days after the second dose and one year after the first dose. At these time points, serum geometric mean titers (GMT of vibriocidal antibodies and seroconversion rates for vaccine and placebo arms were calculated and compared across the age strata (1 to 5 years, 5 to 15 years and more than 15 years as well as for all age groups. RESULTS: Out of 137 subjects included in analysis, 69 were vaccinees and 68 received placebo. There were 5•7 and 5•8 geometric mean fold (GMF rises in titers to Vibrio cholerae Inaba and Ogawa, respectively at 14 days after the second dose, with 57% and 61% of vaccinees showing a four-fold or greater titer rise, respectively. After one year, the titers to Inaba and Ogawa remained 1•7 and 2•8 fold higher, respectively, compared to baseline. Serum vibriocidal antibody response to V. cholerae O139 was much lower than that to Inaba or Ogawa. No significant differences in the GMF-rises were observed among the age groups. CONCLUSIONS: The reformulated oral cholera vaccine induced a statistically significant anti-O1 Inaba and O1 Ogawa vibriocidal antibody response 14 days after vaccination, which although declined after one year remained significantly higher than baseline. Despite this decline, the vaccine remained protective five years after vaccination.

  18. A novel recombinant Peste des petits ruminants-canine adenovirus vaccine elicits long-lasting neutralizing antibody response against PPR in goats.

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    Junling Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peste des petits ruminants (PPR is a highly contagious infectious disease of goats, sheep and small wild ruminant species with high morbidity and mortality rates. The Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV expresses a hemagglutinin (H glycoprotein on its outer envelope that is crucial for viral attachment to host cells and represents a key antigen for inducing the host immune response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether H can be exploited to generate an effective PPRV vaccine, a replication-competent recombinant canine adenovirus type-2 (CAV-2 expressing the H gene of PPRV (China/Tibet strain was constructed by the in vitro ligation method. The H expression cassette, including the human cytomegalovirus (hCMV promoter/enhancer and the BGH early mRNA polyadenylation signal, was inserted into the SspI site of the E3 region, which is not essential for proliferation of CAV-2. Infectious recombinant rCAV-2-PPRV-H virus was generated in transfected MDCK cells and used to immunize goats. All vaccinated animals produced antibodies upon primary injection that were effective in neutralizing PPRV in vitro. Higher antibody titer was obtained following booster inoculation, and the antibody was detectable in goats for at least seven months. No serious recombinant virus-related adverse effect was observed in immunized animals and no adenovirus could be isolated from the urine or feces of vaccinated animals. Results showed that the recombinant virus was safe and could stimulate a long-lasting immune response in goats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This strategy not only provides an effective PPR vaccine candidate for goats but may be a valuable mean by which to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals (the so-called DIVA approach.

  19. Novel polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies against extracellular β-d-glucans from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C Semedo, Magda; Karmali, Amin; Martins, Sónia; Fonseca, Luís

    2016-01-01

    β-d-glucans from mushroom strains play a major role as biological response modifiers in several clinical disorders. Therefore, a specific assay method is of critical importance to find useful and novel sources of β-d-glucans with anti-tumor activity. Hybridoma technology was used to raise monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against extracellular β-d-glucans (EBG) from Pleurotus ostreatus. Two of these hybridoma clones (3F8_3H7 and 1E6_1E8_B3) secreting Mabs against EBG from P. ostreatus were selected and 3F8_3H7 was used to investigate if they are polyol-responsive Mabs (PR-Mabs) by using ELlSA-elution assay. This hybridoma cell line secreted Mab of IgM class, which was purified in a single step by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-300HR, which revealed a protein band on native PAGE with Mr of 917 kDa. Specificity studies of Mab 3F8_3H7 revealed that it recognized a common epitope on several β-d-glucans from different basidiomycete strains as determined by indirect ELlSA and Western blotting under native conditions. This Mab exhibited high apparent affinity constant (KApp) for β-d-glucans from several mushroom strains. However, it revealed differential reactivity to some heat-treated β-d-glucans compared with the native forms suggesting that it binds to a conformation-sensitive epitope on β-d-glucan molecule. Epitope analysis of Mab 3F8_3H7 and 1E6_1E8_B3 was investigated by additivity index parameter, which revealed that they bound to the same epitope on some β-d-glucans and to different epitopes in other antigens. Therefore, these Mab can be used to assay for β-d-glucans as well as to act as powerful probes to detect conformational changes in these biopolymers. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:116-125, 2016. PMID:26580487

  20. Association of MicroRNAs with Antibody Response to Mycoplasma bovis in Beef Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Eduardo; Cai, Guohong; Kuehn, Larry A; Register, Karen B; McDaneld, Tara G; Neill, John D

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify microRNAs associated with a serum antibody response to Mycoplasma bovis in beef cattle. Serum from sixteen beef calves was collected at three points: in summer after calves were born, in fall at weaning, and in the following spring. All sera collected in the summer were ELISA-negative for anti-M. bovis. By the fall, eight animals were seropositive for IgG (positive group), while eight remained negative (negative group). By spring, all animals in both groups were seropositive. MicroRNAs were extracted from sera and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq next-generation sequencer. A total of 1,374,697 sequences mapped to microRNAs in the bovine genome. Of these, 82% of the sequences corresponded to 27 microRNAs, each represented by a minimum of 10,000 sequences. There was a statistically significant interaction between ELISA response and season for bta-miR-24-3p (P = 0.0268). All sera collected at the initial summer had a similar number of copies of this microRNA (P = 0.773). In the fall, the positive group had an increased number of copies when compared to the negative group (P = 0.021), and this grew more significant by the following spring (P = 0.0001). There were 21 microRNAs associated (P< 0.05) with season. These microRNAs could be evaluated further as candidates to potentially improve productivity in cattle. The microRNAs bta-let-7b, bta-miR- 24-3p, bta-miR- 92a, and bta-miR-423-5p, were significatly associated with ELISA status (P< 0.05). These microRNAs have been recognized as playing a role in the host defense against bacteria in humans, mice, and dairy cattle. Further studies are needed to establish if these microRNAs could be used as diagnostic marker or indicator of exposure, or whether intervention strategies could be developed as an alternative to antibiotics for controlling disease due to M. bovis. PMID:27537842

  1. Myelin protein zero and its antibody in serum as biomarkers of n-hexane-induced peripheral neuropathy and neurotoxicity effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Xiaowei; Liu Qingjun; Zhang Yanshu; Dai Yufei; Duan Huawei; Bin Ping; Niu Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to n-hexane can lead to peripheral neuropathy that no effective treatment regimen could be applied presently.This study investigated whether myelin protein zero (P0) protein and its antibody could be used to distinguish n-hexane intoxication and protect workers from peripheral neuropathy.Methods We compared P0 protein and its antibody among three levels of n-hexane-exposed groups,which included 18 patients with n-hexane-induced peripheral neuropathy as case group,120 n-hexane-exposed workers as n-hexaneexposed control group,and 147 non-hexane-exposed participants used as control group.ELISA method was applied to detect P0 protein and its antibody.Results P0 protein in serum was significantly higher in the case group and n-hexane-exposed control group in comparison with the control group (P<0.01).Compared with the n-hexane-exposed control group,the case group also had significant increase of P0 protein (P<0.01).After 6 months therapy,P0 protein was observed to decrease significantly in the case group (P<0.01).The P0 antibody in serum was significantly higher in the n-hexane-exposed control group than in the control group (P<0.01),but not significantly different between cases and controls.Conclusions P0 antibodies in serum may be a short-term effect biomarker for n-hexane exposure.P0 protein in serum may be an early effective biomarker for peripheral nerve neuropathy and its biological limit value needs investigation in the future study.

  2. A Lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea Agglomerans Is a Promising Adjuvant for Sublingual Vaccines to Induce Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses in Mice via TLR4 Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Fukasaka, Masahiro; Asari, Daisuke; Kiyotoh, Eiji; Okazaki, Arimichi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo; Hori, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A lipopolysaccharide from Pantoea agglomerans (LPSpa) has been applied to various fields for human use as a Toll-like receptor 4 ligand and its safety has been confirmed. Here, we showed for the first time the application of LPSpa as an effective mucosal adjuvant for activating vaccine-induced antigen specific immune responses. Mice sublingually immunized with influenza vaccine (HA split vaccine) with LPSpa induced both HA-specific IgG (systemic) and IgA (mucosal) antibody responses, which le...

  3. Multimeric scaffolds displaying the HIV-1 envelope MPER induce MPER-specific antibodies and cross-neutralizing antibodies when co-immunized with gp160 DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly J Krebs

    Full Text Available Developing a vaccine that overcomes the diversity of HIV-1 is likely to require a strategy that directs antibody (Ab responses toward conserved regions of the viral Envelope (Env. However, the generation of neutralizing Abs (NAbs targeting these regions through vaccination has proven to be difficult. One conserved region of particular interest is the membrane proximal external region (MPER of Env located within the gp41 ectodomain. In order to direct the immune response to this region, the MPER and gp41 ectodomain were expressed separately as N-terminal fusions to the E2 protein of Geobacillus stearothermophilus. The E2 protein acts as a scaffold by self-assembling into 60-mer particles, displaying up to 60 copies of the fused target on the surface. Rabbits were immunized with E2 particles displaying MPER and/or the gp41 ectodomain in conjunction with DNA encoding full-length gp160. Only vaccines including E2 particles displaying MPER elicited MPER-specific Ab responses. NAbs were elicited after two immunizations that largely targeted the V3 loop. To overcome V3 immunodominance in the DNA component, E2 particles displaying MPER were used in conjunction with gp160 DNA lacking hypervariable regions V2, V3, or combined V1V2V3. All rabbits had HIV binding Ab responses and NAbs following the second vaccination. Using HIV-2/HIV-1 MPER chimeric viruses as targets, NAbs were detected in 12/16 rabbits after three immunizations. Low levels of NAbs specific for Tier 1 and 2 viruses were observed in all groups. This study provides evidence that co-immunizing E2 particles displaying MPER and gp160 DNA can focus Ab responses toward conserved regions of Env.

  4. Vaccination of dogs with Trypanosoma rangeli induces antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area of Córdoba, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Beatriz; Marini, Vanina; Gauna, Diego; Frias, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Dogs play a major role in the domestic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, acting as reservoirs. In a previous work we have developed a model of vaccination of dogs in captivity with nonpathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli epimastigotes, resulting in the production of protective antibodies against T. cruzi, with dramatic decrease of parasitaemia upon challenge with 100,000 virulent forms of this parasite. The aim of this work was to evaluate the immunogenicity of this vaccine in dogs living in a rural area. Domestic dogs, free from T. cruziinfection, received three immunisations with fixed T. rangeliepimastigotes. Dogs were not challenged with T. cruzi, but they were left in their environment. This immunisation induced antibodies againstT. cruzi for more than three years in dogs in their natural habitat, while control dogs remained serologically negative. PMID:27074257

  5. Neutralizing antibody response in dogs and cats inoculated with commercial inactivated rabies vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Rikiya; Nishimura, Masaaki; Nakashima, Ryuji; Enta, Chiho; Hirayama, Norio

    2014-04-01

    In Japan, the import quarantine regulation against rabies has required from 2005 that dogs and cats should be inoculated with the rabies vaccine and that the neutralizing antibody titer should be confirmed to be at least 0.5 international units (IU)/ml. The fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test is used as an international standard method for serological testing for rabies. To achieve proper immunization of dogs and cats at the time of import and export, changes in the neutralizing antibody titer after inoculation of the rabies vaccine should be understood in detail. However, few reports have provided this information. In this study, we aimed to determine evaluated, such changes by using sera from experimental dogs and cats inoculated with the rabies vaccine, and we tested samples using the routine FAVN test. In both dogs and cats, proper, regular vaccination enabled the necessary titer of neutralizing antibodies to be maintained in the long term. However, inappropriate timing of blood sampling after vaccination could result in insufficient detected levels of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:24389741

  6. "Unconventional" Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Against HIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are recognized to be one of the essential elements of the adaptive immune response that must be induced by an effective vaccine against HIV. However, only a limited number of antibodies have been identified to neutralize a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 and attempts to induce such antibodies by immunization were unsuccessful. The difficulties to generate such antibodies are mainly due to intrinsic properties of HIV-1 envelope spikes, such as high sequence diversity, heavy glycosylation, and inducible and transient nature of certain epitopes. In vitro neutralizing antibodies are identified using "conventional" neutralization assay which uses phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs as target cells. Thus, in essence the assay evaluates HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Recently, several laboratories including us demonstrated that some monoclonal antibodies and HIV-1-specific polyclonal IgG purified from patient sera, although they do not have neutralizing activity when tested by the "conventional" neutralization assay, do exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity in "unconventional" ways. The neutralizing activity of these antibodies and IgG fractions is acquired through post-translational modifications, through opsonization of virus particles into macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDCs), or through expression of antibodies on the surface of HIV-1-susceptible cells. This review will focus on recent findings of this area and point out their potential applications in the development of preventive strategies against HIV.

  7. Human agonistic TRAIL receptor antibodies Mapatumumab and Lexatumumab induce apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma and act synergistically with cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felley-Bosco Emanuela

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is associated with exposure to asbestos, and projections suggest that the yearly number of deaths in Western Europe due to MPM will increase until 2020. Despite progress in chemo- and in multimodality therapy, MPM remains a disease with a poor prognosis. Inducing apoptosis by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL or agonistic monoclonal antibodies which target TRAIL-receptor 1 (TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 has been thought to be a promising cancer therapy. Results We have compared the sensitivity of 13 MPM cell lines or primary cultures to TRAIL and two fully human agonistic monoclonal antibodies directed to TRAIL-R1 (Mapatumumab and TRAIL-R2 (Lexatumumab and examined sensitization of the MPM cell lines to cisplatin-induced by the TRAIL-receptor antibodies. We found that sensitivity of MPM cells to TRAIL, Mapatumumab and Lexatumumab varies largely and is independent of TRAIL-receptor expression. TRAIL-R2 contributes more than TRAIL-R1 to death-receptor mediated apoptosis in MPM cells that express both receptors. The combination of cisplatin with Mapatumumab or Lexatumumab synergistically inhibited the cell growth and enhanced apoptotic death. Furthermore, pre-treatment with cisplatin followed by Mapatumumab or Lexatumumab resulted in significant higher cytotoxic effects as compared to the reverse sequence. Combination-induced cell growth inhibition was significantly abrogated by pre-treatment of the cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Conclusion Our results suggest that the sequential administration of cisplatin followed by Mapatumumab or Lexatumumab deserves investigation in the treatment of patients with MPM.

  8. The Study on The ImmuneResponse Induced by Expressing Recombinant Plasmid of Dengue Virus Type 2 NS3 Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The PSV · NS3, an expressing recombinant plasmid of dengue virus type 2 NS3 protein, was in Jected directly into the quadriceps of Balb/C mice to explore whether it could inducing immune response. The splenic T cell subsets of two groups was analysed by flow cytometry. It was found that the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of experimental group were significantly higher than those of the control group. The titer of IgG antibody was as high as 1:S 120 in experimental group, but it couldn't be detected in control group by ELISA. The western blot further proved that the IgG antibody was specific for NS3 protein. Those results Suggested that inoculation Balb/C mice with PSV · NS3 could inducing immune response, and the NS3 protein might be used as the candidate protein of DNA vaccine of dengue virus.

  9. Depletion of OX-8 lymphocytes from the blood and airways using monoclonal antibodies enhances the late airway response in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Olivenstein, R.; Renzi, P M; Yang, J P; P. Rossi; Laberge, S.; Waserman, S; Martin, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for T lymphocytes in allergic airway responses. We hypothesized that reducing blood T suppressor cells (Ts) might increase the late airway response (LR). Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were sensitized with ovalbumin (OA). On days 8, 10, and 12, post-sensitization test SD (n = 14) received monoclonal antibody intravenously (OX-8; 1 mg) specific to rat Ts. Controls received saline (n = 7) or mouse ascites IgG (n = 7). On day 14, animals were challenged with OA aerosol ...

  10. Potent T cell Responses Induced by Single DNA Vaccine Boosted with Recombinant Vaccinia Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianxing Liu; Chao Qiu; Yang Huang; Jianqing Xu; Yiming Shao

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid DNA,an effective vaccine vector,can induce both cellular and humoral immune responses.However,plasmid DNA raises issues concerning potential genomic integration after injection.This issue should be considered in preclinical studies.Tiantan vaccinia virus (TV) has been most widely utilized in eradicating smallpox in China.This virus has also been considered as a successful vaccine vector against a few infectious diseases.Potent T cell responses through T-cell receptor (TCR) could be induced by three injections of the DNA prime vaccine followed by a single injection of recombinant vaccinia vaccine.To develop a safer immunization strategy,a single DNA prime followed by a single recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTV) AIDS vaccine was used to immunize mice.Our data demonstrated that one DNA prime/rTV boost regimen induced mature TCR activation with high functional avidity,preferential T cell Vβ receptor usage and high sensitivity to anti-CD3 antibody stimulation.No differences in T cell responses were observed among one,two or three DNA prime/rTV boost regimens.This study shows that one DNA prime/rTV boost regimen is sufficient to induce potent T cell responses against HIV.

  11. Mechanisms of protective immunity against Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercaria- I. analysis of antibody and T-lymphocyte responses in mouse strains developing differing levels of immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.L. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA); Labine, M.; Sher, A.

    1981-11-15

    The kinetics of cellular and humoral responses directed against schistosomula were examined in mice of three inbred strains which demonstrate differences in the degree of resistance induced by immunization with irradiated cercariae. T-Cell reactivity was observed during the first 4 weeks after vaccination but declined to control levels thereafter. Anti-schistosomulum antibody was first detected 2 weeks after vaccination, peaked by 6 weeks, and persisted as late as 15 weeks. In sera obtained at 6 weeks, antibody activity was detected in affinity chromatography-purified fractions containing IgM, IgA, IgG/sub 1/, IgG/sub 2//sub a/, and IgG/sub 3/ immunoglobulins. In general, the cellular and humoral responses observed in C57Bl/6J mice, which consistently developed a high level of immunity after vaccination, were not significantly different from those observed in C3H/HeJ or CBA/J mice, which achieved only low to moderate levels of immunity. Thus, although antibody production appears to correlate more closely than T lymphocyte responsiveness with the typical long-term resistance pattern observed in this model, the absence of striking differences in parasite-specific antibody levels between mice of these different strains suggests that additional mechanisms may be involved in the development of immunity after vaccination.

  12. Mechanisms of protective immunity against Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercaria- I. analysis of antibody and T-lymphocyte responses in mouse strains developing differing levels of immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of cellular and humoral responses directed against schistosomula were examined in mice of three inbred strains which demonstrate differences in the degree of resistance induced by immunization with irradiated cercariae. T-Cell reactivity was observed during the first 4 weeks after vaccination but declined to control levels thereafter. Anti-schistosomulum antibody was first detected 2 weeks after vaccination, peaked by 6 weeks, and persisted as late as 15 weeks. In sera obtained at 6 weeks, antibody activity was detected in affinity chromatography-purified fractions containing IgM, IgA, IgG1, IgG2/sub a/, and IgG3 immunoglobulins. In general, the cellular and humoral responses observed in C57Bl/6J mice, which consistently developed a high level of immunity after vaccination, were not significantly different from those observed in C3H/HeJ or CBA/J mice, which achieved only low to moderate levels of immunity. Thus, although antibody production appears to correlate more closely than T lymphocyte responsiveness with the typical long-term resistance pattern observed in this model, the absence of striking differences in parasite-specific antibody levels between mice of these different strains suggests that additional mechanisms may be involved in the development of immunity after vaccination

  13. Immunoproteomic Analysis of Antibody Responses to Extracellular Proteins of Candida albicans Revealing the Importance of Glycosylation for Antigen Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ting; Krüger, Thomas; Knüpfer, Uwe; Kasper, Lydia; Wielsch, Natalie; Hube, Bernhard; Kortgen, Andreas; Bauer, Michael; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Dimopoulos, George; Brakhage, Axel A; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans undergoes a yeast-to-hypha transition, secretes numerous proteins for invasion of host tissues, and modulates the host's immune response. Little is known about the interplay of C. albicans secreted proteins and the host adaptive immune system. Here, we applied a combined 2D gel- and LC-MS/MS-based approach for the characterization of C. albicans extracellular proteins during the yeast-to-hypha transition, which led to a comprehensive C. albicans secretome map. The serological responses to C. albicans extracellular proteins were investigated by a 2D-immunoblotting approach combined with MS for protein identification. On the basis of the screening of sera from candidemia and three groups of noncandidemia patients, a core set of 19 immunodominant antibodies against secreted proteins of C. albicans was identified, seven of which represent potential diagnostic markers for candidemia (Xog1, Lip4, Asc1, Met6, Tsa1, Tpi1, and Prx1). Intriguingly, some secreted, strongly glycosylated protein antigens showed high cross-reactivity with sera from noncandidemia control groups. Enzymatic deglycosylation of proteins secreted from hyphae significantly impaired sera antibody recognition. Furthermore, deglycosylation of the recombinantly produced, secreted aspartyl protease Sap6 confirmed a significant contribution of glycan epitopes to the recognition of Sap6 by antibodies in patient's sera. PMID:27386892

  14. Concomitant administration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG with the meningococcal C conjugate vaccine to neonatal mice enhances antibody response and protective efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynjolfsson, Siggeir F; Bjarnarson, Stefania P; Mori, Elena; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Jonsdottir, Ingileif

    2011-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis BCG is administered to human neonates in many countries worldwide. The objective of the study was to assess if BCG could act as an adjuvant for polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines in newborns and thereby induce protective immunity against encapsulated bacteria in early infancy when susceptibility is high. We assessed whether BCG could enhance immune responses to a meningococcal C (MenC) conjugate vaccine, MenC-CRM(197), in mice primed as neonates, broaden the antibody response from a dominant IgG1 toward a mixed IgG1 and IgG2a/IgG2b response, and increase protective efficacy, as measured by serum bactericidal activity (SBA). Two-week-old mice were primed subcutaneously (s.c.) with MenC-CRM(197). BCG was administered concomitantly, a day or a week before MenC-CRM(197). An adjuvant effect of BCG was observed only when it was given concomitantly with MenC-CRM(197), with increased IgG response (P = 0.002) and SBA (8-fold) after a second immunization with MenC-CRM(197) without BCG, indicating increased T-cell help. In neonatal mice (1 week old) primed s.c. with MenC-CRM(197) together with BCG, MenC-polysaccharide (PS)-specific IgG was enhanced compared to MenC-CRM(197) alone (P = 0.0015). Sixteen days after the second immunization with MenC-CRM(197), increased IgG (P CRM(197) plus BCG showed affinity maturation and detectable SBA (SBA > 128). Thus, vaccination with a meningococcal conjugate vaccine (and possibly with other conjugates) may benefit from concomitant administration of BCG in the neonatal period to accelerate and enhance production of protective antibodies, compared to the current infant administration of conjugate which follows BCG vaccination at birth. PMID:21900528

  15. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody b