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Sample records for antibody recognition force

  1. Adsorption orientations and immunological recognition of antibodies on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, J. G.; Dumitru, A. C.; Herruzo, Elena T.; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I.; Garcia, Ricardo; Serena, P. A.; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid are combined to characterize the adsorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies over a hydrophobic surface modeled with a three-layer graphene slab. We consider explicitly the water solvent, simulating systems with massive sizes (up to 770 000 atoms), for four different adsorption orientations. Protocols based on steered MD to speed up the protein diffusion stage and to enhance the dehydration process are combined with long simulation times (>150 ns) in order to make sure that the final adsorption states correspond to actual stable configurations. Our MD results and the AFM images demonstrate that the IgG antibodies are strongly adsorbed, do not unfold, and retain their secondary and tertiary structures upon deposition. Statistical analysis of the AFM images shows that many of the antibodies adopt vertical orientations, even at very small coverages, which expose at least one Fab binding site for recognition events. Single molecule force spectroscopy experiments demonstrate the immunological response of the deposited antibodies by recognizing its specific antigens. The above properties together with the strong anchoring and preservation of the secondary structure, make graphene an excellent candidate for the development of immunosensors.Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid are combined to characterize the adsorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies over a hydrophobic surface modeled with a three-layer graphene slab. We consider explicitly the water solvent, simulating systems with massive sizes (up to 770 000 atoms), for four different adsorption orientations. Protocols based on steered MD to speed up the protein diffusion stage and to enhance the dehydration process are combined with long simulation times (>150 ns) in order to make sure that the final adsorption states correspond to actual stable configurations. Our

  2. Confidence in Forced-Choice Recognition: What Underlies the Ratings?

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    Zawadzka, Katarzyna; Higham, Philip A.; Hanczakowski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Two-alternative forced-choice recognition tests are commonly used to assess recognition accuracy that is uncontaminated by changes in bias. In such tests, participants are asked to endorse the studied item out of 2 presented alternatives. Participants may be further asked to provide confidence judgments for their recognition decisions. It is often…

  3. Curvature recognition and force generation in phagocytosis

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    Prassler Jana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uptake of particles by actin-powered invagination of the plasma membrane is common to protozoa and to phagocytes involved in the immune response of higher organisms. The question addressed here is how a phagocyte may use geometric cues to optimize force generation for the uptake of a particle. We survey mechanisms that enable a phagocyte to remodel actin organization in response to particles of complex shape. Results Using particles that consist of two lobes separated by a neck, we found that Dictyostelium cells transmit signals concerning the curvature of a surface to the actin system underlying the plasma membrane. Force applied to a concave region can divide a particle in two, allowing engulfment of the portion first encountered. The phagosome membrane that is bent around the concave region is marked by a protein containing an inverse Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (I-BAR domain in combination with an Src homology (SH3 domain, similar to mammalian insulin receptor tyrosine kinase substrate p53. Regulatory proteins enable the phagocyte to switch activities within seconds in response to particle shape. Ras, an inducer of actin polymerization, is activated along the cup surface. Coronin, which limits the lifetime of actin structures, is reversibly recruited to the cup, reflecting a program of actin depolymerization. The various forms of myosin-I are candidate motor proteins for force generation in particle uptake, whereas myosin-II is engaged only in retracting a phagocytic cup after a switch to particle release. Thus, the constriction of a phagocytic cup differs from the contraction of a cleavage furrow in mitosis. Conclusions Phagocytes scan a particle surface for convex and concave regions. By modulating the spatiotemporal pattern of actin organization, they are capable of switching between different modes of interaction with a particle, either arresting at a concave region and applying force in an attempt to sever the particle

  4. Atomic force microscopy imaging and single molecule recognition force spectroscopy of coat proteins on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore.

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    Tang, Jilin; Krajcikova, Daniela; Zhu, Rong; Ebner, Andreas; Cutting, Simon; Gruber, Hermann J; Barak, Imrich; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Coat assembly in Bacillus subtilis serves as a tractable model for the study of the self-assembly process of biological structures and has a significant potential for use in nano-biotechnological applications. In the present study, the morphology of B. subtilis spores was investigated by magnetically driven dynamic force microscopy (MAC mode atomic force microscopy) under physiological conditions. B. subtilis spores appeared as prolate structures, with a length of 0.6-3 microm and a width of about 0.5-2 microm. The spore surface was mainly covered with bump-like structures with diameters ranging from 8 to 70 nm. Besides topographical explorations, single molecule recognition force spectroscopy (SMRFS) was used to characterize the spore coat protein CotA. This protein was specifically recognized by a polyclonal antibody directed against CotA (anti-CotA), the antibody being covalently tethered to the AFM tip via a polyethylene glycol linker. The unbinding force between CotA and anti-CotA was determined as 55 +/- 2 pN. From the high-binding probability of more than 20% in force-distance cycles it is concluded that CotA locates in the outer surface of B. subtilis spores. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Recognition imaging of chromatin and chromatin-remodeling complexes in the atomic force microscope.

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    Lohr, Dennis; Wang, Hongda; Bash, Ralph; Lindsay, Stuart M

    2009-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can directly visualize single molecules in solution, which makes it an extremely powerful technique for carrying out studies of biological complexes and the processes in which they are involved. A recent development, called Recognition Imaging, allows the identification of a specific type of protein in solution AFM images, a capability that greatly enhances the power of the AFM approach for studies of complex biological materials. In this technique, an antibody against the protein of interest is attached to an AFM tip. Scanning a sample with this tip generates a typical topographic image simultaneously and in exact spatial registration with a "recognition image." The latter identifies the locations of antibody-antigen binding events and thus the locations of the protein of interest in the image field. The recognition image can be electronically superimposed on the topographic image, providing a very accurate map of specific protein locations in the topographic image. This technique has been mainly used in in vitro studies of biological complexes and reconstituted chromatin, but has great potential for studying chromatin and protein complexes isolated from nuclei.

  6. Structural biology of antibody recognition of carbohydrate epitopes and potential uses for targeted cancer immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingjan, Tamir; Spendlove, Ian; Durrant, Lindy G; Scott, Andrew M; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Ramsland, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies represent the most successful class of biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of cancer. Mechanisms of action of therapeutic antibodies are very diverse and reflect their ability to engage in antibody-dependent effector mechanisms, internalize to deliver cytotoxic payloads, and display direct effects on cells by lysis or by modulating the biological pathways of their target antigens. Importantly, one of the universal changes in cancer is glycosylation and carbohydrate-binding antibodies can be produced to selectively recognize tumor cells over normal tissues. A promising group of cell surface antibody targets consists of carbohydrates presented as glycolipids or glycoproteins. In this review, we outline the basic principles of antibody-based targeting of carbohydrate antigens in cancer. We also present a detailed structural view of antibody recognition and the conformational properties of a series of related tissue-blood group (Lewis) carbohydrates that are being pursued as potential targets of cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simple test system for single molecule recognition force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riener, Christian K.; Stroh, Cordula M.; Ebner, Andreas; Klampfl, Christian; Gall, Alex A.; Romanin, Christoph; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Gruber, Hermann J.

    2003-01-01

    We have established an easy-to-use test system for detecting receptor-ligand interactions on the single molecule level using atomic force microscopy (AFM). For this, avidin-biotin, probably the best characterized receptor-ligand pair, was chosen. AFM sensors were prepared containing tethered biotin molecules at sufficiently low surface concentrations appropriate for single molecule studies. A biotin tether, consisting of a 6 nm poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chain and a functional succinimide group at the other end, was newly synthesized and covalently coupled to amine-functionalized AFM tips. In particular, PEG 800 diamine was glutarylated, the mono-adduct NH 2 -PEG-COOH was isolated by ion exchange chromatography and reacted with biotin succinimidylester to give biotin-PEG-COOH which was then activated as N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester to give the biotin-PEG-NHS conjugate which was coupled to the aminofunctionalized AFM tip. The motional freedom provided by PEG allows for free rotation of the biotin molecule on the AFM sensor and for specific binding to avidin which had been adsorbed to mica surfaces via electrostatic interactions. Specific avidin-biotin recognition events were discriminated from nonspecific tip-mica adhesion by their typical unbinding force (∼40 pN at 1.4 nN/s loading rate), unbinding length (<13 nm), the characteristic nonlinear force-distance relation of the PEG linker, and by specific block with excess of free d-biotin. The convenience of the test system allowed to evaluate, and compare, different methods and conditions of tip aminofunctionalization with respect to specific binding and nonspecific adhesion. It is concluded that this system is well suited as calibration or start-up kit for single molecule recognition force microscopy

  8. Efficient unfolding pattern recognition in single molecule force spectroscopy data

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    Labudde Dirk

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS is a technique that measures the force necessary to unfold a protein. SMFS experiments generate Force-Distance (F-D curves. A statistical analysis of a set of F-D curves reveals different unfolding pathways. Information on protein structure, conformation, functional states, and inter- and intra-molecular interactions can be derived. Results In the present work, we propose a pattern recognition algorithm and apply our algorithm to datasets from SMFS experiments on the membrane protein bacterioRhodopsin (bR. We discuss the unfolding pathways found in bR, which are characterised by main peaks and side peaks. A main peak is the result of the pairwise unfolding of the transmembrane helices. In contrast, a side peak is an unfolding event in the alpha-helix or other secondary structural element. The algorithm is capable of detecting side peaks along with main peaks. Therefore, we can detect the individual unfolding pathway as the sequence of events labeled with their occurrences and co-occurrences special to bR's unfolding pathway. We find that side peaks do not co-occur with one another in curves as frequently as main peaks do, which may imply a synergistic effect occurring between helices. While main peaks co-occur as pairs in at least 50% of curves, the side peaks co-occur with one another in less than 10% of curves. Moreover, the algorithm runtime scales well as the dataset size increases. Conclusions Our algorithm satisfies the requirements of an automated methodology that combines high accuracy with efficiency in analyzing SMFS datasets. The algorithm tackles the force spectroscopy analysis bottleneck leading to more consistent and reproducible results.

  9. Synthetic multivalent V3 glycopeptides display enhanced recognition by glycan-dependent HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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    Cai, Hui; Orwenyo, Jared; Guenaga, Javier; Giddens, John; Toonstra, Christian; Wyatt, Richard T; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2017-05-14

    We describe here the synthesis of novel multivalent HIV V3 domain glycopeptides and their binding to broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT128 and 10-1074. Our binding data reveal a distinct mode of antigen recognition by the two antibodies and further suggest that multivalent glycopeptides could mimic the neutralizing epitopes more efficiently than the monomeric glycopeptide.

  10. Imaging and Force Recognition of Single Molecular Behaviors Using Atomic Force Microscopy

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    Mi Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM has provided a powerful tool for investigating the behaviors of single native biological molecules under physiological conditions. AFM can not only image the conformational changes of single biological molecules at work with sub-nanometer resolution, but also sense the specific interactions of individual molecular pair with piconewton force sensitivity. In the past decade, the performance of AFM has been greatly improved, which makes it widely used in biology to address diverse biomedical issues. Characterizing the behaviors of single molecules by AFM provides considerable novel insights into the underlying mechanisms guiding life activities, contributing much to cell and molecular biology. In this article, we review the recent developments of AFM studies in single-molecule assay. The related techniques involved in AFM single-molecule assay were firstly presented, and then the progress in several aspects (including molecular imaging, molecular mechanics, molecular recognition, and molecular activities on cell surface was summarized. The challenges and future directions were also discussed.

  11. Evaluation of temperature effect on the interaction between β-lactoglobulin and anti-β-lactoglobulin antibody by atomic force microscopy.

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    Wakayama, Jun'ichi; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2012-01-10

    Molecular recognition such as antigen-antibody interaction is characterized by the parameters of kinetics and the energy landscape. Examinations of molecules involved in the interaction at different temperatures using atomic force microscopy (AFM) can provide information on not only the effects of temperature on the unbinding force between a molecule of interest and a complementary molecule but also the parameters of kinetics and the energy landscape for dissociation of the molecular complex. We investigated the effect of temperature on the dissociation process of the complex of β-lactoglobulin and anti-bovine β-lactoglobulin IgG polyclonal antibody using AFM. Measurements of the unbinding forces between β-lactoglobulin and the antibody were performed at 25, 35, and 45 °C. The following results were obtained in our present study: (i) The unbinding forces decreased as temperature increased, suggesting that the binding force between β-lactoglobulin and the antibody includes the force originating from temperature-dependent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding). (ii) At each temperature, the unbinding force exhibited two linear regimes in the force spectra, indicating that the dissociation process of the β-lactoglobulin-antibody complex passes at least two energy barriers from the bound state to the dissociated state. (iii) The dissociation rates at zero force and the position of energy barriers increased as temperature increased. (iv) The heights of the two energy barriers in the reaction coordinates were 49.7 k(B)T and 14.5 k(B)T. (v) The values of roughness of the barriers were ca. 6.1 k(B)T and 3.2 k(B)T. Overall, the present study using AFM revealed more information about the β-lactoglobulin-antibody interaction than studies using conventional bulk measurement such as surface plasmon resonance.

  12. Structural Basis for Recognition of Human Enterovirus 71 by a Bivalent Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody.

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    Xiaohua Ye

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the main pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications and even death in young children. We have recently identified a highly potent anti-EV71 neutralizing monoclonal antibody, termed D5. Here we investigated the structural basis for recognition of EV71 by the antibody D5. Four three-dimensional structures of EV71 particles in complex with IgG or Fab of D5 were reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM single particle analysis all at subnanometer resolutions. The most critical EV71 mature virion-Fab structure was resolved to a resolution of 4.8 Å, which is rare in cryo-EM studies of virus-antibody complex so far. The structures reveal a bivalent binding pattern of D5 antibody across the icosahedral 2-fold axis on mature virion, suggesting that D5 binding may rigidify virions to prevent their conformational changes required for subsequent RNA release. Moreover, we also identified that the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3 of D5 heavy chain directly interacts with the extremely conserved VP1 GH-loop of EV71, which was validated by biochemical and virological assays. We further showed that D5 is indeed able to neutralize a variety of EV71 genotypes and strains. Moreover, D5 could potently confer protection in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Since the conserved VP1 GH-loop is involved in EV71 binding with its uncoating receptor, the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2, the broadly neutralizing ability of D5 might attribute to its inhibition of EV71 from binding SCARB2. Altogether, our results elucidate the structural basis for the binding and neutralization of EV71 by the broadly neutralizing antibody D5, thereby enhancing our understanding of antibody-based protection against EV71 infection.

  13. Human antibody recognition of antigenic site IV on Pneumovirus fusion proteins.

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    Mousa, Jarrod J; Binshtein, Elad; Human, Stacey; Fong, Rachel H; Alvarado, Gabriela; Doranz, Benjamin J; Moore, Martin L; Ohi, Melanie D; Crowe, James E

    2018-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major human pathogen that infects the majority of children by two years of age. The RSV fusion (F) protein is a primary target of human antibodies, and it has several antigenic regions capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies. Antigenic site IV is preserved in both the pre-fusion and post-fusion conformations of RSV F. Antibodies to antigenic site IV have been described that bind and neutralize both RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV). To explore the diversity of binding modes at antigenic site IV, we generated a panel of four new human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and competition-binding suggested the mAbs bind at antigenic site IV. Mutagenesis experiments revealed that binding and neutralization of two mAbs (3M3 and 6F18) depended on arginine (R) residue R429. We discovered two R429-independent mAbs (17E10 and 2N6) at this site that neutralized an RSV R429A mutant strain, and one of these mAbs (17E10) neutralized both RSV and hMPV. To determine the mechanism of cross-reactivity, we performed competition-binding, recombinant protein mutagenesis, peptide binding, and electron microscopy experiments. It was determined that the human cross-reactive mAb 17E10 binds to RSV F with a binding pose similar to 101F, which may be indicative of cross-reactivity with hMPV F. The data presented provide new concepts in RSV immune recognition and vaccine design, as we describe the novel idea that binding pose may influence mAb cross-reactivity between RSV and hMPV. Characterization of the site IV epitope bound by human antibodies may inform the design of a pan-Pneumovirus vaccine.

  14. Machine learning techniques for gait biometric recognition using the ground reaction force

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, James Eric; Woungang, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on how machine learning techniques can be used to analyze and make use of one particular category of behavioral biometrics known as the gait biometric. A comprehensive Ground Reaction Force (GRF)-based Gait Biometrics Recognition framework is proposed and validated by experiments. In addition, an in-depth analysis of existing recognition techniques that are best suited for performing footstep GRF-based person recognition is also proposed, as well as a comparison of feature extractors, normalizers, and classifiers configurations that were never directly compared with one another in any previous GRF recognition research. Finally, a detailed theoretical overview of many existing machine learning techniques is presented, leading to a proposal of two novel data processing techniques developed specifically for the purpose of gait biometric recognition using GRF. This book · introduces novel machine-learning-based temporal normalization techniques · bridges research gaps concerning the effect of ...

  15. Minute Time Scale Prolyl Isomerization Governs Antibody Recognition of an Intrinsically Disordered Immunodominant Epitope*

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    Fassolari, Marisol; Chemes, Lucia B.; Gallo, Mariana; Smal, Clara; Sánchez, Ignacio E.; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Conformational rearrangements in antibody·antigen recognition are essential events where kinetic discrimination of isomers expands the universe of combinations. We investigated the interaction mechanism of a monoclonal antibody, M1, raised against E7 from human papillomavirus, a prototypic viral oncoprotein and a model intrinsically disordered protein. The mapped 12-amino acid immunodominant epitope lies within a “hinge” region between the N-terminal intrinsically disordered and the C-terminal globular domains. Kinetic experiments show that despite being within an intrinsically disordered region, the hinge E7 epitope has at least two populations separated by a high energy barrier. Nuclear magnetic resonance traced the origin of this barrier to a very slow (t½ ∼4 min) trans-cis prolyl isomerization event involving changes in secondary structure. The less populated (10%) cis isomer is the binding-competent species, thus requiring the 90% of molecules in the trans configuration to isomerize before binding. The association rate for the cis isomer approaches 6 × 107 m−1 s−1, a ceiling for antigen-antibody interactions. Mutagenesis experiments showed that Pro-41 in E7Ep was required for both binding and isomerization. After a slow postbinding unimolecular rearrangement, a consolidated complex with KD = 1.2 × 10−7 m is reached. Our results suggest that presentation of this viral epitope by the antigen-presenting cells would have to be “locked” in the cis conformation, in opposition to the most populated trans isomer, in order to select the specific antibody clone that goes through affinity and kinetic maturation. PMID:23504368

  16. Comparison of Forced-Alignment Speech Recognition and Humans for Generating Reference VAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraljevski, Ivan; Tan, Zheng-Hua; Paola Bissiri, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This present paper aims to answer the question whether forced-alignment speech recognition can be used as an alternative to humans in generating reference Voice Activity Detection (VAD) transcriptions. An investigation of the level of agreement between automatic/manual VAD transcriptions...... and the reference ones produced by a human expert was carried out. Thereafter, statistical analysis was employed on the automatically produced and the collected manual transcriptions. Experimental results confirmed that forced-alignment speech recognition can provide accurate and consistent VAD labels....

  17. Structural Basis for Ligand Recognition and Discrimination of a Quorum-quenching Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Garner, Amanda L.; Flack, Caralyn E.; Mee, Jenny M.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Janda, Kim D.; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (Iowa)

    2011-09-16

    In the postantibiotic era, available treatment options for severe bacterial infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have become limited. Therefore, new and innovative approaches are needed to combat such life-threatening infections. Virulence factor expression in S. aureus is regulated in a cell density-dependent manner using 'quorum sensing,' which involves generation and secretion of autoinducing peptides (AIPs) into the surrounding environment to activate a bacterial sensor kinase at a particular threshold concentration. Mouse monoclonal antibody AP4-24H11 was shown previously to blunt quorum sensing-mediated changes in gene expression in vitro and protect mice from a lethal dose of S. aureus by sequestering the AIP signal. We have elucidated the crystal structure of the AP4-24H11 Fab in complex with AIP-4 at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution to determine its mechanism of ligand recognition. A key GluH95 provides much of the binding specificity through formation of hydrogen bonds with each of the four amide nitrogens in the AIP-4 macrocyclic ring. Importantly, these structural data give clues as to the interactions between the cognate staphylococcal AIP receptors AgrC and the AIPs, as AP4-24H11 {center_dot} AIP-4 binding recapitulates features that have been proposed for AgrC-AIP recognition. Additionally, these structural insights may enable the engineering of AIP cross-reactive antibodies or quorum quenching vaccines for use in active or passive immunotherapy for prevention or treatment of S. aureus infections.

  18. Monoclonal antibody-assisted structure-function analysis of the carbohydrate recognition domain of surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L; White, Mitchell R; Rynkiewicz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in host defense against a variety of pathogens including influenza A virus (IAV). Ligand binding by SP-D is mediated by the trimeric neck and carbohydrate recognition domain (NCRD). We used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human SP-D and a panel...

  19. Antibody recognition of Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cells by symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals in the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratus, Alessandra Sampaio Bassi; Cabral, Fernanda Janku; Fotoran, Wesley Luzetti; Medeiros, Márcia Melo; Carlos, Bianca Cechetto; Martha, Rosimeire dalla; da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando Pereira; Lopes, Stefanie Costa Pinto; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Wunderlich, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In the Amazon Region, there is a virtual absence of severe malaria and few fatal cases of naturally occurring Plasmodium falciparum infections; this presents an intriguing and underexplored area of research. In addition to the rapid access of infected persons to effective treatment, one cause of this phenomenon might be the recognition of cytoadherent variant proteins on the infected red blood cell (IRBC) surface, including the var gene encoded P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1. In order to establish a link between cytoadherence, IRBC surface antibody recognition and the presence or absence of malaria symptoms, we phenotype-selected four Amazonian P. falciparum isolates and the laboratory strain 3D7 for their cytoadherence to CD36 and ICAM1 expressed on CHO cells. We then mapped the dominantly expressed var transcripts and tested whether antibodies from symptomatic or asymptomatic infections showed a differential recognition of the IRBC surface. As controls, the 3D7 lineages expressing severe disease-associated phenotypes were used. We showed that there was no profound difference between the frequency and intensity of antibody recognition of the IRBC-exposed P. falciparum proteins in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic infections. The 3D7 lineages, which expressed severe malaria-associated phenotypes, were strongly recognised by most, but not all plasmas, meaning that the recognition of these phenotypes is frequent in asymptomatic carriers, but is not necessarily a prerequisite to staying free of symptoms. PMID:25099336

  20. Attachment of trianglamines to silicon wafers, chiral recognition by chemical force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlinka, J.; Hodačová, Jana; Raehm, L.; Granier, M.; Ramonda, M.; Durand, J. O.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2010), s. 481-485 ISSN 1631-0748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk MEB020748 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : trianglamines * chemical force microscopy * chiral recognition Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.600, year: 2010

  1. How hydrophobic drying forces impact the kinetics of molecular recognition.

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    Mondal, Jagannath; Morrone, Joseph A; Berne, B J

    2013-08-13

    A model of protein-ligand binding kinetics, in which slow solvent dynamics results from hydrophobic drying transitions, is investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations show that solvent in the receptor pocket can fluctuate between wet and dry states with lifetimes in each state that are long enough for the extraction of a separable potential of mean force and wet-to-dry transitions. We present a diffusive surface hopping model that is represented by a 2D Markovian master equation. One dimension is the standard reaction coordinate, the ligand-pocket separation, and the other is the solvent state in the region between ligand and binding pocket which specifies whether it is wet or dry. In our model, the ligand diffuses on a dynamic free-energy surface which undergoes kinetic transitions between the wet and dry states. The model yields good agreement with results from explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation and an improved description of the kinetics of hydrophobic assembly. Furthermore, it is consistent with a "non-Markovian Brownian theory" for the ligand-pocket separation coordinate alone.

  2. Structural basis for diverse N-glycan recognition by HIV-1-neutralizing V1-V2-directed antibody PG16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancera, Marie; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McLellan, Jason S.; Bailer, Robert T.; Dai, Kaifan; Loesgen, Sandra; Louder, Mark K.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Blinn, Julie; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Amin, Mohammed N.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D. [NIH; (Scripps); (Duke); (Maryland-MED); (IAVI)

    2013-08-05

    HIV-1 uses a diverse N-linked-glycan shield to evade recognition by antibody. Select human antibodies, such as the clonally related PG9 and PG16, recognize glycopeptide epitopes in the HIV-1 V1–V2 region and penetrate this shield, but their ability to accommodate diverse glycans is unclear. Here we report the structure of antibody PG16 bound to a scaffolded V1–V2, showing an epitope comprising both high mannose–type and complex-type N-linked glycans. We combined structure, NMR and mutagenesis analyses to characterize glycan recognition by PG9 and PG16. Three PG16-specific residues, arginine, serine and histidine (RSH), were critical for binding sialic acid on complex-type glycans, and introduction of these residues into PG9 produced a chimeric antibody with enhanced HIV-1 neutralization. Although HIV-1–glycan diversity facilitates evasion, antibody somatic diversity can overcome this and can provide clues to guide the design of modified antibodies with enhanced neutralization.

  3. Bimodal atomic force microscopy imaging of isolated antibodies in air and liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, N F; Lozano, J R; Herruzo, E T; Garcia, F; Garcia, R [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, CSIC, Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Richter, C; Sulzbach, T [NanoWorld Services GmbH, Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: rgarcia@imm.cnm.csic.es

    2008-09-24

    We have developed a dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) method based on the simultaneous excitation of the first two flexural modes of the cantilever. The instrument, called a bimodal atomic force microscope, allows us to resolve the structural components of antibodies in both monomer and pentameric forms. The instrument operates in both high and low quality factor environments, i.e., air and liquids. We show that under the same experimental conditions, bimodal AFM is more sensitive to compositional changes than amplitude modulation AFM. By using theoretical and numerical methods, we study the material contrast sensitivity as well as the forces applied on the sample during bimodal AFM operation.

  4. Toxocara canis glycans influence antigen recognition by mouse IgG1 and IgM antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Długosz, Ewa; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The impact of sugar moieties of Toxocara canis glycoprotein antigens on their recognition by infected mouse antibodies was investigated in this study. Native TES and recombinant Toxocara mucins generated in Pichia pastoris yeast as well as their deglycosylated forms were used in ELISA. TES and recombinant mucins were equally recognized by T. canis infected mouse IgG1 antibodies. IgM immunoglobulins predominantly recognized TES antigens. Among mucins recognition of Tc-MUC-4 was the most significant. Deglycosylation of antigens resulted in significant loss of IgM and IgG1 reactivity to TES, mucins, Tc-MUC-3 and Tc-MUC-4. The presence of sugar moieties had no influence on IgE binding to native or recombinant T. canis antigens. Our results suggest that glycans are involved in epitope formation what should be taken into consideration in production of recombinant helminth antigens for diagnostic purposes.

  5. Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I shall examine the cognitive, heuristic and theoretical functions of the concept of recognition. To evaluate both the explanatory power and the limitations of a sociological concept, the theory construction must be analysed and its actual productivity for sociological theory must...... be evaluated. In the first section, I will introduce the concept of recognition as a travelling concept playing a role both on the intellectual stage and in real life. In the second section, I will concentrate on the presentation of Honneth’s theory of recognition, emphasizing the construction of the concept...... and its explanatory power. Finally, I will discuss Honneth’s concept in relation to the critique that has been raised, addressing the debate between Honneth and Fraser. In a short conclusion, I will return to the question of the explanatory power of the concept of recognition....

  6. Rationalization and Design of the Complementarity Determining Region Sequences in an Antibody-Antigen Recognition Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Lee, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jun-Bo; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Hung-Ju; Chang, Hung-Ju; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Huang, Kai-Fa; Ma, Alex Che; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are critical determinants in biological systems. Engineered proteins binding to specific areas on protein surfaces could lead to therapeutics or diagnostics for treating diseases in humans. But designing epitope-specific protein-protein interactions with computational atomistic interaction free energy remains a difficult challenge. Here we show that, with the antibody-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) interaction as a model system, the experimentally observed amino acid preferences in the antibody-antigen interface can be rationalized with 3-dimensional distributions of interacting atoms derived from the database of protein structures. Machine learning models established on the rationalization can be generalized to design amino acid preferences in antibody-antigen interfaces, for which the experimental validations are tractable with current high throughput synthetic antibody display technologies. Leave-one-out cross validation on the benchmark system yielded the accuracy, precision, recall (sensitivity) and specificity of the overall binary predictions to be 0.69, 0.45, 0.63, and 0.71 respectively, and the overall Matthews correlation coefficient of the 20 amino acid types in the 24 interface CDR positions was 0.312. The structure-based computational antibody design methodology was further tested with other antibodies binding to VEGF. The results indicate that the methodology could provide alternatives to the current antibody technologies based on animal immune systems in engineering therapeutic and diagnostic antibodies against predetermined antigen epitopes. PMID:22457753

  7. Definition of essential amino acid residues in the recognition of a peptide by a mouse monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanó, L; Di Modugno, F; Romagnoli, G; Chersi, A

    1997-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody reacting in ELISA with a synthetic peptide representing a linear amino acid stretch of the protein antigen was tested on all overlapping 5-mer to 9-mer fragments of the peptide, as prepared by multi-pin synthesis. Analysis of the binding data suggests that several residues in the peptide might be relatively unrelevant for recognition, while few others seem to play a critical role as key residues. On the basis of such observations, we attempted to reconstruct an alternative essential epitope by introducing multiple amino acid substitutions in the 9-mer peptide exhibiting the best binding activity, and then tested its ability to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody.

  8. RNA recognition by a human antibody against brain cytoplasmic 200 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Euihan; Lee, Jungmin; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Park, Insoo; Lee, Younghoon

    2014-06-01

    Diverse functional RNAs participate in a wide range of cellular processes. The RNA structure is critical for function, either on its own or as a complex form with proteins and other ligands. Therefore, analysis of the RNA conformation in cells is essential for understanding their functional mechanisms. However, no appropriate methods have been established as yet. Here, we developed an efficient strategy for panning and affinity maturation of anti-RNA human monoclonal antibodies from a naïve antigen binding fragment (Fab) combinatorial phage library. Brain cytoplasmic 200 (BC200) RNA, which is also highly expressed in some tumors, was used as an RNA antigen. We identified MabBC200-A3 as the optimal binding antibody. Mutagenesis and SELEX experiments showed that the antibody recognized a domain of BC200 in a structure- and sequence-dependent manner. Various breast cancer cell lines were further examined for BC200 RNA expression using conventional hybridization and immunoanalysis with MabBC200-A3 to see whether the antibody specifically recognizes BC200 RNA among the total purified RNAs. The amounts of antibody-recognizable BC200 RNA were consistent with hybridization signals among the cell lines. Furthermore, the antibody was able to discriminate BC200 RNA from other RNAs, supporting the utility of this antibody as a specific RNA structure-recognizing probe. Intriguingly, however, when permeabilized cells were subjected to immunoanalysis instead of purified total RNA, the amount of antibody-recognizable RNA was not correlated with the cellular level of BC200 RNA, indicating that BC200 RNA exists as two distinct forms (antibody-recognizable and nonrecognizable) in breast cancer cells and that their distribution depends on the cell type. Our results clearly demonstrate that anti-RNA antibodies provide an effective novel tool for detecting and analyzing RNA conformation. © 2014 Jung et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  9. Conformational Heterogeneity in Antibody-Protein Antigen Recognition IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGH AFFINITY PROTEIN COMPLEX FORMATION

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Addis, P. W.; Hall, c. J.; Bruton, S.; Veverka, Václav; Wilkinson, I. C.; Muskett, F. W.; Renshaw, P. S.; Prosser, C. E.; Carrington, B.; Lawson, A. D. G.; Griffin, R.; Taylor, R. J.; Waters, L. C.; Henry, A. J.; Carr, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 289, č. 10 (2014), s. 7200-7210 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR * antibody * protein-protein interaction * protein conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.573, year: 2014

  10. Interrogation of side chain biases for oligomannose recognition by antibody 2G12 via structure-guided phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Yi; Lai, Jonathan R

    2017-10-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are essential reagents for deciphering gene or protein function and have been a fruitful source of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. However, developing anticarbohydrate antibodies to target glycans for those purposes has been less successful because the molecular basis for glycan-mAb interactions is poorly understood relative to protein- or peptide-binding mAbs. Here, we report our investigation on glycan-mAb interactions by using the unique architectural scaffold of 2G12, an antibody that targets oligomannoses on the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120, as the template for engineering highly specific mAbs to target glycans. We first analyzed 24 different X-ray structures of antiglycan mAbs from the Protein Data Bank to determine side chain amino acid distributions in of glycan-mAb interactions. We identified Tyr, Arg, Asn, Ser, Asp, and His as the six most prevalent residues in the glycan-mAb contacts. We then utilized this information to construct two phage display libraries ("Lib1" and "Lib2") in which positions on the heavy chain variable domains of 2G12 were allowed to vary in restricted manner among Tyr, Asp, Ser, His, Asn, Thr, Ala and Pro to interrogate the minimal physicochemical requirements for oligomannose recognition. We analyzed the sequences of 39 variants from Lib1 and 14 variants from Lib2 following selection against gp120, the results showed that there is a high degree of malleability within the 2G12 for glycan recognitions. We further characterized five unique phage clones from both libraries that exhibited a gp120-specific binding profile. Expression of two of these variants as soluble mAbs indicated that, while specificity of gp120-binding was retained, the affinity of these mutants was significantly reduced relative to WT 2G12. Nonetheless, the results indicate these is some malleability in the identity of contact residues and provide a novel insight into the nature of glycan-antibody interactions and how they may differ

  11. List length and overlap effects in forced-choice associative recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S E; Hori, A

    1995-07-01

    Two experiments examined forced-choice associative recognition for OLAP and NOLAP test conditions. OLAP test trials consist of pairs with overlapping items (e.g., AB vs. AD), whereas NOLAP test trials contain no overlapping items (e.g., AB vs. CF). Previous results show better performance for NOLAP than for OLAP tests, contrary to the predictions of global memory models. The present experiments varied list length to examine the hypothesis that the NOLAP advantage is produced by recall-like retrieval processes. The use of longer lists either eliminated (Experiment 1) or greatly reduced (Experiment 2) the NOLAP advantage. However, a reliable OLAP advantage was not obtained. Implications for models are discussed.

  12. Preferential recognition of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal modified DNA in the cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mohammad; Shahab, Uzma; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Ahmad, Saheem

    2017-11-01

    The structural perturbations in DNA molecule may be caused by a break in a strand, a missing base from the backbone, or a chemically changed base. These alterations in DNA that occurs naturally can result from metabolic or hydrolytic processes. DNA damage plays a major role in the mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging and various other patho-physiological conditions. DNA damage can be induced through hydrolysis, exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other reactive carbonyl metabolites including 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). 4-HNE is an important lipid peroxidation product which has been implicated in the mutagenesis and carcinogenesis processes. The present study examines to probe the presence of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal damaged DNA (HNE-DNA) in various cancer subjects. In this study, the purified calf thymus DNA was damaged by the action of 4-HNE. The DNA was incubated with 4-HNE for 24 h at 37°C temperature. The binding characteristics of cancer auto-antibodies were assessed by direct binding and competitive inhibition ELISA. DNA modifications produced hyperchromicity in UV spectrum and decreased fluorescence intensity. Cancer sera exhibited enhanced binding with the 4-HNE modified calf thymus DNA as compared to its native conformer. The 4-HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the auto-antibody induction in cancer patients. The HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the autoantibody induction in cancer patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Features of Recently Transmitted HIV-1 Clade C Viruses that Impact Antibody Recognition: Implications for Active and Passive Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademeyer, Cecilia; Korber, Bette; Seaman, Michael S; Giorgi, Elena E; Thebus, Ruwayhida; Robles, Alexander; Sheward, Daniel J; Wagh, Kshitij; Garrity, Jetta; Carey, Brittany R; Gao, Hongmei; Greene, Kelli M; Tang, Haili; Bandawe, Gama P; Marais, Jinny C; Diphoko, Thabo E; Hraber, Peter; Tumba, Nancy; Moore, Penny L; Gray, Glenda E; Kublin, James; McElrath, M Juliana; Vermeulen, Marion; Middelkoop, Keren; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Hoelscher, Michael; Maboko, Leonard; Makhema, Joseph; Robb, Merlin L; Abdool Karim, Salim; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Kim, Jerome H; Hahn, Beatrice H; Gao, Feng; Swanstrom, Ronald; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David C; Williamson, Carolyn

    2016-07-01

    The development of biomedical interventions to reduce acquisition of HIV-1 infection remains a global priority, however their potential effectiveness is challenged by very high HIV-1 envelope diversity. Two large prophylactic trials in high incidence, clade C epidemic regions in southern Africa are imminent; passive administration of the monoclonal antibody VRC01, and active immunization with a clade C modified RV144-like vaccines. We have created a large representative panel of C clade viruses to enable assessment of antibody responses to vaccines and natural infection in Southern Africa, and we investigated the genotypic and neutralization properties of recently transmitted clade C viruses to determine how viral diversity impacted antibody recognition. We further explore the implications of these findings for the potential effectiveness of these trials. A panel of 200 HIV-1 Envelope pseudoviruses was constructed from clade C viruses collected within the first 100 days following infection. Viruses collected pre-seroconversion were significantly more resistant to serum neutralization compared to post-seroconversion viruses (p = 0.001). Over 13 years of the study as the epidemic matured, HIV-1 diversified (p = 0.0009) and became more neutralization resistant to monoclonal antibodies VRC01, PG9 and 4E10. When tested at therapeutic levels (10ug/ml), VRC01 only neutralized 80% of viruses in the panel, although it did exhibit potent neutralization activity against sensitive viruses (IC50 titres of 0.42 μg/ml). The Gp120 amino acid similarity between the clade C panel and candidate C-clade vaccine protein boosts (Ce1086 and TV1) was 77%, which is 8% more distant than between CRF01_AE viruses and the RV144 CRF01_AE immunogen. Furthermore, two vaccine signature sites, K169 in V2 and I307 in V3, associated with reduced infection risk in RV144, occurred less frequently in clade C panel viruses than in CRF01_AE viruses from Thailand. Increased resistance of pre

  14. Recognition of phage-expressed peptides containing Asx-Pro sequences by monoclonal antibodies produced against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D R; Wirtz, R A; Finlay, B B

    1997-05-01

    The immunodominant region of the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein is comprised mainly of a series of tetrapeptide repeats that can, depending on the starting cadence chosen, be described as (NANP)n, (ANPN)n, (NPNA)n or (PNAN)n in one-letter amino acid code. Data from several studies suggest that the NPNA cadence alone is structurally correct, in that each NPNA tetrapeptide effectively forms a structural unit initiated by an Asx-Pro turn. To explore this idea further and to assess the immunological relevance of peptide conformation as it relates to the cadence of these tetrapeptide repeats, we used ELISA to compare the abilities of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced against P. falciparum sporozoites to recognize repeat-related heptapeptides expressed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage. Having included representatives of both NANP and NPNA cadences and other peptides in which the number and location of Asx-Pro sequences varied, we provide evidence that Asx-Pro sequences play an important role in peptide conformation and antibody recognition, that peptide conformation is influenced by the cadence of the tetrapeptide repeats and that peptide conformation is important to the abilities of these MAbs to recognize their epitopes.

  15. iBodies: modular synthetic antibody mimetics based on hydrophilic polymers decorated with functional moieties as tools for molecular recognition, imaging and specific drug delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šácha, Pavel; Dvořáková, Petra; Knedlík, Tomáš; Schimer, Jiří; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Bušek, P.; Navrátil, Václav; Sedlák, František; Majer, Pavel; Šedo, A.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 284, Suppl 1 (2017), s. 340 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress /42./ From Molecules to Cells and Back. 10.09.2017-14.09.2017, Jerusalem] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : antibody mimetics * molecular recognition * polymer conjugates Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  16. Recognition of anti-mycolic acid antibody at self-assembled mycolic acid antigens on a gold electrode: a potential impedimetric immunosensing platform for active tuberculosis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathebula, NS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical impedimetric recognition by anti-mycolic acid antibodies, present in tuberculosis (TB)-positive human serum co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of mycolic acids (MA) integrated into a self-assembled monolayer of N-(2...

  17. Human scFv antibodies (Afribumabs) against Africanized bee venom: Advances in melittin recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessenda, Gabriela; Silva, Luciano C; Campos, Lucas B; Pacello, Elenice M; Pucca, Manuela B; Martinez, Edson Z; Barbosa, José E

    2016-03-15

    Africanized Apis mellifera bees, also known as killer bees, have an exceptional defensive instinct, characterized by mass attacks that may cause envenomation or death. From the years 2000-2013, 77,066 bee accidents occurred in Brazil. Bee venom comprises several substances, including melittin and phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Due to the lack of antivenom for bee envenomation, this study aimed to produce human monoclonal antibody fragments (single chain fragment variable; scFv), by using phage display technology. These fragments targeted melittin and PLA2, the two major components of bee venom, to minimize their toxic effects in cases of mass envenomation. Two phage antibody selections were performed using purified melittin. As the commercial melittin is contaminated with PLA2, phages specific to PLA2 were also obtained during one of the selections. Specific clones for melittin and PLA2 were selected for the production of soluble scFvs, named here Afribumabs: prefix: afrib- (from Africanized bee); stem/suffix: -umab (fully human antibody). Afribumabs 1 and 2 were tested in in vitro and in vivo assays to assess their ability to inhibit the toxic actions of purified melittin, PLA2, and crude bee venom. Afribumabs reduced hemolysis caused by purified melittin and PLA2 and by crude venom in vitro and reduced edema formation in the paws of mice and prolonged the survival of venom-injected animals in vivo. These results demonstrate that Afribumabs may contribute to the production of the first non-heterologous antivenom treatment against bee envenomation. Such a treatment may overcome some of the difficulties associated with conventional immunotherapy techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recognition of N-glycoforms in human chorionic gonadotropin by monoclonal antibodies and their interaction motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daoyuan; Zhang, Ping; Li, Fei; Chi, Lequan; Zhu, Deyu; Zhang, Qunye; Chi, Lianli

    2015-09-11

    The glycosylation of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) plays an important role in reproductive tumors. Detecting hCG N-glycosylation alteration may significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of related cancers. However, developing an immunoassay directly against the N-linked oligosaccharides is unlikely because of the heterogeneity and low immunogenicity of carbohydrates. Here, we report a hydrogen/deuterium exchange and MS approach to investigate the effect of N-glycosylation on the binding of antibodies against different hCG glycoforms. Hyperglycosylated hCG was purified from the urine of invasive mole patients, and the structure of its N-linked oligosaccharides was confirmed to be more branched by MS. The binding kinetics of the anti-hCG antibodies MCA329 and MCA1024 against hCG and hyperglycosylated hCG were compared using biolayer interferometry. The binding affinity of MCA1024 changed significantly in response to the alteration of hCG N-linked oligosaccharides. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange-MS reveals that the peptide β65-83 of the hCG β subunit is the epitope for MCA1024. Site-specific N-glycosylation analysis suggests that N-linked oligosaccharides at Asn-13 and Asn-30 on the β subunit affect the binding affinity of MCA1024. These results prove that some antibodies are sensitive to the structural change of N-linked oligosaccharides, whereas others are not affected by N-glycosylation. It is promising to improve glycoprotein biomarker-based cancer diagnostics by developing combined immunoassays that can determine the level of protein and measure the degree of N-glycosylation simultaneously. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. T cell receptor-like recognition of tumor in vivo by synthetic antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith R Miller

    Full Text Available A major difficulty in treating cancer is the inability to differentiate between normal and tumor cells. The immune system differentiates tumor from normal cells by T cell receptor (TCR binding of tumor-associated peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC molecules. The peptides, derived from the tumor-specific proteins, are presented by MHC proteins, which then serve as cancer markers. The TCR is a difficult protein to use as a recombinant protein because of production issues and has poor affinity for pMHC; therefore, it is not a good choice for use as a tumor identifier outside of the immune system. We constructed a synthetic antibody-fragment (Fab library in the phage-display format and isolated antibody-fragments that bind pMHC with high affinity and specificity. One Fab, fE75, recognizes our model cancer marker, the Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (HER2/neu peptide, E75, bound to the MHC called Human Leukocyte Antigen-A2 (HLA-A2, with nanomolar affinity. The fE75 bound selectively to E75/HLA-A2 positive cancer cell lines in vitro. The fE75 Fab conjugated with (64Cu selectively accumulated in E75/HLA-A2 positive tumors and not in E75/HLA-A2 negative tumors in an HLA-A2 transgenic mouse as probed using positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT imaging. Considering that hundreds to thousands of different peptides bound to HLA-A2 are present on the surface of each cell, the fact that fE75 arrives at the tumor at all shows extraordinary specificity. These antibody fragments have great potential for diagnosis and targeted drug delivery in cancer.

  20. Mapping molecular adhesion sites inside SMIL coated capillaries using atomic force microscopy recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitner, Michael [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Stock, Lorenz G. [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Traxler, Lukas [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria); Leclercq, Laurent [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Bonazza, Klaus; Friedbacher, Gernot [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, 1060 Vienna (Austria); Cottet, Hervé [Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM, UMR 5247, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier), Place Eugène Bataillon, CC 1706, 34095 Montpellier (France); Stutz, Hanno [Division of Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Department of Molecular Biology, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Innovative Tools for the Characterization of Biosimilars, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstrasse 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Ebner, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.ebner@jku.at [Institute of Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Gruberstrasse 40, 4020 Linz (Austria)

    2016-08-03

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is a powerful analytical technique for fast and efficient separation of different analytes ranging from small inorganic ions to large proteins. However electrophoretic resolution significantly depends on the coating of the inner capillary surface. High technical efforts like Successive Multiple Ionic Polymer Layer (SMIL) generation have been taken to develop stable coatings with switchable surface charges fulfilling the requirements needed for optimal separation. Although the performance can be easily proven in normalized test runs, characterization of the coating itself remains challenging. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for topographical investigation of biological and analytical relevant surfaces with nanometer resolution and yields information about the surface roughness and homogeneity. Upgrading the scanning tip to a molecular biosensor by adhesive molecules (like partly inverted charged molecules) allows for performing topography and recognition imaging (TREC). As a result, simultaneously acquired sample topography and adhesion maps can be recorded. We optimized this technique for electrophoresis capillaries and investigated the charge distribution of differently composed and treated SMIL coatings. By using the positively charged protein avidin as a single molecule sensor, we compared these SMIL coatings with respect to negative charges, resulting in adhesion maps with nanometer resolution. The capability of TREC as a functional investigation technique at the nanoscale was successfully demonstrated. - Highlights: • SMIL coating allows generation of homogeneous ultra-flat surfaces. • Molecular electrostatic adhesion forces can be determined in the inner wall of CZE capillary with picoNewton accuracy. • Topographical images and simultaneously acquired adhesion maps yield morphological and chemical information at the nanoscale.

  1. Metal Oxide Nanosensors Using Polymeric Membranes, Enzymes and Antibody Receptors as Ion and Molecular Recognition Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of recognition and biofunctionality has attracted increasing interest in the fields of chemistry and material sciences. Advances in the field of nanotechnology for the synthesis of desired metal oxide nanostructures have provided a solid platform for the integration of nanoelectronic devices. These nanoelectronics-based devices have the ability to recognize molecular species of living organisms, and they have created the possibility for advanced chemical sensing functionalities with low limits of detection in the nanomolar range. In this review, various metal oxides, such as ZnO-, CuO-, and NiO-based nanosensors, are described using different methods (receptors of functionalization for molecular and ion recognition. These functionalized metal oxide surfaces with a specific receptor involve either a complex formation between the receptor and the analyte or an electrostatic interaction during the chemical sensing of analytes. Metal oxide nanostructures are considered revolutionary nanomaterials that have a specific surface for the immobilization of biomolecules with much needed orientation, good conformation and enhanced biological activity which further improve the sensing properties of nanosensors. Metal oxide nanostructures are associated with certain unique optical, electrical and molecular characteristics in addition to unique functionalities and surface charge features which shows attractive platforms for interfacing biorecognition elements with effective transducing properties for signal amplification. There is a great opportunity in the near future for metal oxide nanostructure-based miniaturization and the development of engineering sensor devices.

  2. Human abdomen recognition using camera and force sensor in medical robot system for automatic ultrasound scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Mustafa, Ammar Safwan; Ishii, Takashi; Matsunaga, Yoshiki; Nakadate, Ryu; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Kouji; Saito, Akiko; Sugawara, Motoaki; Niki, Kiyomi; Takanishi, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    Physicians use ultrasound scans to obtain real-time images of internal organs, because such scans are safe and inexpensive. However, people in remote areas face difficulties to be scanned due to aging society and physician's shortage. Hence, it is important to develop an autonomous robotic system to perform remote ultrasound scans. Previously, we developed a robotic system for automatic ultrasound scan focusing on human's liver. In order to make it a completely autonomous system, we present in this paper a way to autonomously localize the epigastric region as the starting position for the automatic ultrasound scan. An image processing algorithm marks the umbilicus and mammary papillae on a digital photograph of the patient's abdomen. Then, we made estimation for the location of the epigastric region using the distances between these landmarks. A supporting algorithm distinguishes rib position from epigastrium using the relationship between force and displacement. We implemented these algorithms with the automatic scanning system into an apparatus: a Mitsubishi Electric's MELFA RV-1 six axis manipulator. Tests on 14 healthy male subjects showed the apparatus located the epigastric region with a success rate of 94%. The results suggest that image recognition was effective in localizing a human body part.

  3. Yes/No Versus Forced-Choice Recognition Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease: Patterns of Impairment and Associations with Dementia Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lindsay R.; Stricker, Nikki H.; Libon, David J.; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Salmon, David P.; Delis, Dean C.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Memory tests are sensitive to early identification of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but less useful as the disease advances. However, assessing particular types of recognition memory may better characterize dementia severity in later stages of AD. We sought to examine patterns of recognition memory deficits in individuals with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Memory performance and global cognition data were collected from participants with AD (n=37), MCI (n=37), and cognitively intact older adults (normal controls, NC; n=35). One-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) examined differences between groups on yes/no and forced-choice recognition measures. Individuals with amnestic MCI performed worse than NC and nonamnestic MCI participants on yes/no recognition, but were comparable on forced-choice recognition. AD patients were more impaired across yes/no and forced-choice recognition tasks. Individuals with mild AD (≥120 Dementia Rating Scale, DRS) performed better than those with moderate-to-severe AD (recognition, but were equally impaired on yes/no recognition. There were differences in the relationships between learning, recall, and recognition performance across groups. Although yes/no recognition testing may be sensitive to MCI, forced-choice procedures may provide utility in assessing severity of anterograde amnesia in later stages of AD. Implications for assessment of insufficient effort and malingering are also discussed. PMID:23030301

  4. Recognition of HLA class II molecules by antipeptide antibodies elicited by synthetic peptides selected from regions of HLA-DP antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Houghten, R A; Morganti, M C; Muratti, E

    1987-01-01

    Repeated immunizations of rabbits with chemically synthesized peptides from selected regions of HLA-DP histocompatibility antigens resulted in the production of specific antibodies that were then isolated from the immune sera by chromatography on Sepharose-peptide immunoadsorbents. The purified antibodies, when tested with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, specifically bound to the inciting fragments; moreover, two of them recognized glycoproteins extracted by nonionic detergents from human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, as revealed by binding assays. The results suggest that amino acid stretches 51-61 of the alpha chain and 80-90 of the beta chain of HLA-DP histocompatibility antigens are likely exposed on the surface of the protein molecule. The specific recognition of DP regions is strongly suggested by the difference in the binding of those antibodies to soluble membrane proteins, as compared to the binding of monomorphic anti-Class II monoclonal antibodies to the same antigens.

  5. A nanobiosensing method based on force measurement of antibody-antigen interaction for direct detection of enterovirus 71 by the chemically modified atomic force microscopic probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chung-Hung; Hsieh, Chung-Fan; Tseng, Chi-Shin; Huang, Wei-Chih; Guo, Cheng-Yan; Lin, Shiming; Lee, Si-Chen

    2017-10-01

    Hand, Foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common disease with high infectivity for children, and enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the main pathogens to cause the type of illness. Therefore, the aim of this study was to propose a rapid and effective technique for detecting EV71 directly based on the mechanism of biological intermolecular force by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). At first, we coated EV71 particles on the mica surface and made the EV71 antibodies (anti-EV71) fixed on the AFM tip by means of several chemical procedures. Then, AFM chemically modified tip was applied to measure the unbinding forces between EV71 and anti-EV71 by contact mode. Finally, by using AFM imaging calculating software, the EV71 particle size (mean±SD) was 31.36±3.87 nm (n = 200) and this result was concordance with previous literature. Besides, the force (mean±SD) between EV71 antigen and antibody complex was 336.9±64.7 pN. The force (mean±SD) between anti-EV71 and non-specific specimens was 47.1±15.1 pN and was significantly smaller (P measuring the force magnitude and observing the occurrence of EV71/anti-EV71 unbinding events. Therefore, the combination of AFM system and the chemically modified tip has the potential to be a rapid and effective method for detecting EV71 directly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Critical contribution of aromatic rings to specific recognition of polyether rings. The case of ciguatoxin CTX3C-ABC and its specific antibody 1C49.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumoto, Kouhei; Yokota, Akiko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Ui, Mihoko; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo; Kumagai, Izumi; Nagumo, Yoko; Oguri, Hiroki; Inoue, Masayuki; Hirama, Masahiro

    2008-05-02

    To address how proteins recognize polyether toxin compounds, we focused on the interaction between the ABC ring compound of ciguatoxin 3C and its specific antibody, 1C49. Surface plasmon resonance analyses indicated that Escherichia coli-expressed variable domain fragments (Fv) of 1C49 had the high affinity constants and slow dissociation constants typical of antigen-antibody interactions. Linear van't Hoff analyses suggested that the interaction is enthalpy-driven. We resolved the crystal structure of 1C49 Fv bound to ABC ring compound of ciguatoxin 3C at a resolution of 1.7A. The binding pocket of the antibody had many aromatic rings and bound the antigen by shape complementarity typical of hapten-antibody interactions. Three hydrogen bonds and many van der Waals interactions were present. We mutated several residues of the antibody to Ala, and we used surface plasmon resonance to analyze the interactions between the mutated antibodies and the antigen. This analysis identified Tyr-91 and Trp-96 in the light chain as hot spots for the interaction, and other residues made incremental contributions by conferring enthalpic advantages and reducing the dissociation rate constant. Systematic mutation of Tyr-91 indicated that CH-pi and pi-pi interactions between the aromatic ring at this site and the antigen made substantial contributions to the association, and van der Waals interactions inhibited dissociation, suggesting that aromaticity and bulkiness are critical for the specific recognition of polyether compounds by proteins.

  7. Recognition of and intervention in forced marriage as a form of violence and abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantler, Khatidja

    2012-07-01

    This paper highlights the importance of recognising forced marriage as a form of violence and draws attention to the interventions that are developing in Europe as a response to forced marriage. The paper highlights the difficulties of conflating all child marriages as forced marriage and discusses the different contexts of childhood in different parts of the globe. The UK is reputed to have the widest range of policy interventions and practice guidance to tackle forced marriage and is therefore used as a case study in this paper, but reference is also made to other countries thus ensuring a wider relevance. The paper's analysis of UK based research studies on forced marriage identifies three key themes: i) lack of adequate reporting of incidents of forced marriage; ii) lack of professional knowledge of forced marriage and their fear of intervention; iii) the tension between conceptualizing forced marriage as purely cultural or as a form of gender based violence. It also highlights the largely legislative responses to forced marriage in Europe; Civil Protection for victims of forced marriage in the UK is discussed and a critical analysis is offered of the increase in marriage and sponsorship age in the UK and in many European countries. Health and clinical issues related to forced marriage are highlighted and the paper calls for further research globally to i) better understand the extent and nature of forced marriage; ii) to evaluate current interventions; iii) to investigate the clinical and potential mental health implications of forced marriage.

  8. Design and test of a hybrid foot force sensing and GPS system for richer user mobility activity recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zelun; Poslad, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC) methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling) and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF) sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis) and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy) and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy) as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95%) with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals.

  9. Design and Test of a Hybrid Foot Force Sensing and GPS System for Richer User Mobility Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Poslad

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95% with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals.

  10. Stabilization of Z-DNA by chemical bromination and its recognition by anti-Z-DNA antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, D.A.; Puglisi, J.D.; Trulson, M.O.; Davis, P.W.; Tinoco, I. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Limited chemical bromination of poly[r(C-G)] (32% br 8 G, 26% br 5 C) results in partial modification of guanine C8 and cytosine C5, producing a mixture of A- and Z-RNA forms. The Z conformation in the brominated polynucleotide is stabilized at much lower ionic strength than in the unmodified polynucleotide. Raising the ionic strength to 6 M NaBr or NaClO 4 results in a transition in Br-poly[r(C-G)] to a Z-RNA (Z/sub R/) conformation as judged by CD spectroscopy. 1 H NMR data demonstrate a 1/1 mixture of A- and Z-RNAs in 110 mM NaBr buffer at 37 0 C. Nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) experiments permit complete assignments of GH8, CH6, CH5, GH1', AND CH1' resonances in both the A- and Z-forms. The NMR results indicate that unbrominated guanine residues undergo transition to the syn conformation (Z-form). Raman scattering data are consistent with a mixture of A- and Z-RNAs in 110 mM NaCl buffer at 37 0 C. 31 P NMR spectra show six to eight resonances spread over a 1.8 ppm range whose chemical shifts are also consistent with an equilibrium mixture of A- and Z-RNAs. Radioimmunoassay and nitrocellulose filter binding competition experiments were performed to determine the extent of recognition of Br-poly[r(C-G)] by anti-Z-DNA antibodies. Competition RIA experiments verify the presence of a Z-DNA-like determinant in left-handed Br-poly[r(C-G)] at physiological NaCl concentration. In summary, these spectroscopic and immunochemical studies demonstrate that under conditions of conformational stress (i.e., containing brominated nucleosides) left-handed Z-RNA is stable and is specifically recognized by proteins at physiological temperature and ionic strength

  11. Comprehensive Cross-Clade Characterization of Antibody-Mediated Recognition, Complement-Mediated Lysis, and Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity of HIV-1 Envelope-Specific Antibodies toward Eradication of the HIV-1 Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujib, Shariq; Liu, Jun; Rahman, A K M Nur-Ur; Schwartz, Jordan A; Bonner, Phil; Yue, Feng Yun; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2017-08-15

    Immunotherapy with passive administration of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 envelope-specific antibodies (bnAbs) in the setting of established infection in vivo has yielded mixed results. The contribution of different antibodies toward the direct elimination of infected cells is poorly understood. In this study, we determined the ability of 12 well-characterized anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies to recognize and eliminate primary CD4 T cells infected with HIV-1 belonging to clades A, B, C, and D, via antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis (ADCML) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), in vitro We further tested unique combinations of these antibodies to determine the optimal antibody cocktails to be tested in future clinical trials. We report that antibody binding to infected CD4 T cells is highly variable and correlates with ADCML and ADCC processes. Particularly, antibodies targeting the envelope glycan shield (2G12) and V1/V2 site (PG9, PG16, and PGT145) are best at recognizing HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells. However, only PG9 and PG16 and their combinations with other bnAbs sufficiently induced the elimination of HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells by ADCML, ADCC, or both. Notably, CD4 binding site antibodies VRC01, 3BNC117, and NIH45-46 G54W did not exhibit recognition of infected cells and were unable to induce their killing. Future trials geared toward the development of a cure for HIV/AIDS should incorporate V1/V2 antibodies for maximal clearance of infected cells. With the use of only primary immune cells, we conducted a comprehensive cross-clade physiological analysis to aid the direction of antibodies as therapeutics toward the development of a cure for HIV/AIDS. IMPORTANCE Several antibodies capable of neutralizing the majority of circulating HIV-1 strains have been identified to date and have been shown to prevent infection in animal models. However, the use of combinations of such broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) for the treatment and

  12. Structure-based, targeted deglycosylation of HIV-1 gp120 and effects on neutralization sensitivity and antibody recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Markus; Pancera, Marie; Kwong, Peter D.; Kolchinsky, Peter; Grundner, Christoph; Wang Liping; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, mediates receptor binding and is the major target for neutralizing antibodies. Primary HIV-1 isolates are characteristically more resistant to broadly neutralizing antibodies, although the structural basis for this resistance remains obscure. Most broadly neutralizing antibodies are directed against functionally conserved gp120 regions involved in binding to either the primary virus receptor, CD4, or the viral coreceptor molecules that normally function as chemokine receptors. These antibodies are known as CD4 binding site (CD4BS) and CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, respectively. Inspection of the gp120 crystal structure reveals that although the receptor-binding regions lack glycosylation, sugar moieties lie proximal to both receptor-binding sites on gp120 and thus in proximity to both the CD4BS and the CD4i epitopes. In this study, guided by the X-ray crystal structure of gp120, we deleted four N-linked glycosylation sites that flank the receptor-binding regions. We examined the effects of selected changes on the sensitivity of two prototypic HIV-1 primary isolates to neutralization by antibodies. Surprisingly, removal of a single N-linked glycosylation site at the base of the gp120 third variable region (V3 loop) increased the sensitivity of the primary viruses to neutralization by CD4BS antibodies. Envelope glycoprotein oligomers on the cell surface derived from the V3 glycan-deficient virus were better recognized by a CD4BS antibody and a V3 loop antibody than were the wild-type glycoproteins. Absence of all four glycosylation sites rendered a primary isolate sensitive to CD4i antibody-mediated neutralization. Thus, carbohydrates that flank receptor-binding regions on gp120 protect primary HIV-1 isolates from antibody-mediated neutralization

  13. Viral escape from HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies drives increased plasma neutralization breadth through sequential recognition of multiple epitopes and immunotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Kurt Wibmer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the targets of broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 and understanding how these antibodies develop remain important goals in the quest to rationally develop an HIV-1 vaccine. We previously identified a participant in the CAPRISA Acute Infection Cohort (CAP257 whose plasma neutralized 84% of heterologous viruses. In this study we showed that breadth in CAP257 was largely due to the sequential, transient appearance of three distinct broadly neutralizing antibody specificities spanning the first 4.5 years of infection. The first specificity targeted an epitope in the V2 region of gp120 that was also recognized by strain-specific antibodies 7 weeks earlier. Specificity for the autologous virus was determined largely by a rare N167 antigenic variant of V2, with viral escape to the more common D167 immunotype coinciding with the development of the first wave of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Escape from these broadly neutralizing V2 antibodies through deletion of the glycan at N160 was associated with exposure of an epitope in the CD4 binding site that became the target for a second wave of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Neutralization by these CD4 binding site antibodies was almost entirely dependent on the glycan at position N276. Early viral escape mutations in the CD4 binding site drove an increase in wave two neutralization breadth, as this second wave of heterologous neutralization matured to recognize multiple immunotypes within this site. The third wave targeted a quaternary epitope that did not overlap any of the four known sites of vulnerability on the HIV-1 envelope and remains undefined. Altogether this study showed that the human immune system is capable of generating multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies in response to a constantly evolving viral population that exposes new targets as a consequence of escape from earlier neutralizing antibodies.

  14. Label Free QCM Immunobiosensor for AFB1 Detection Using Monoclonal IgA Antibody as Recognition Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Ertekin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces the use of an IgA isotype aflatoxin (AF specific monoclonal antibody for the development of a highly sensitive Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM immunobiosensor for the detection of AF in inhibitory immunoassay format. The higher molecular weight of IgA antibodies proved an advantage over commonly used IgG antibodies in label free immunobiosensor measurements. IgA and IgG antibodies with similar affinity for AF were used in the comparative studies. Sensor surface was prepared by covalent immobilization of AFB1, using self assembled monolayer (SAM formed on gold coated Quartz Crystal, with 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide/N-hydroxy succinimide (EDC/NHS method using a diamine linker. Nonspecific binding to the surface was decreased by minimizing the duration of EDC/NHS activation. Sensor surface was chemically blocked after AF immobilization without any need for protein blocking. This protein free sensor chip endured harsh solutions with strong ionic detergent at high pH, which is required for the regeneration of the high affinity antibody-antigen interaction. According to the obtained results, the detection range with IgA antibodies was higher than IgG antibodies in QCM immunosensor developed for AFB1.

  15. Label Free QCM Immunobiosensor for AFB1 Detection Using Monoclonal IgA Antibody as Recognition Element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Özlem; Öztürk, Selma; Öztürk, Zafer Ziya

    2016-08-11

    This study introduces the use of an IgA isotype aflatoxin (AF) specific monoclonal antibody for the development of a highly sensitive Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) immunobiosensor for the detection of AF in inhibitory immunoassay format. The higher molecular weight of IgA antibodies proved an advantage over commonly used IgG antibodies in label free immunobiosensor measurements. IgA and IgG antibodies with similar affinity for AF were used in the comparative studies. Sensor surface was prepared by covalent immobilization of AFB1, using self assembled monolayer (SAM) formed on gold coated Quartz Crystal, with 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxy succinimide (EDC/NHS) method using a diamine linker. Nonspecific binding to the surface was decreased by minimizing the duration of EDC/NHS activation. Sensor surface was chemically blocked after AF immobilization without any need for protein blocking. This protein free sensor chip endured harsh solutions with strong ionic detergent at high pH, which is required for the regeneration of the high affinity antibody-antigen interaction. According to the obtained results, the detection range with IgA antibodies was higher than IgG antibodies in QCM immunosensor developed for AFB1.

  16. Driving Forces Controlling Host-Guest Recognition in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrosso, Francesca; Altarsha, Muhannad; Dumarçay, Florence; Kevern, Gwendal; Barth, Danielle; Marsura, Alain; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2016-02-24

    The formation of supramolecular host-guest complexes is a very useful and widely employed tool in chemistry. However, supramolecular chemistry in non-conventional solvents such as supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 ), one of the most promising sustainable solvents, is still in its infancy. In this work, we explored a successful route to the development of green processes in supercritical CO2 by combining a theoretical approach with experiments. We were able to synthesize and characterize an inclusion complex between a polar aromatic molecule (benzoic acid) and peracetylated-β-cyclodextrin, which is soluble in the supercritical medium. This finding opens the way to wide, environmental friendly, applications of scCO2 in many areas of chemistry, including supramolecular synthesis, reactivity and catalysis, micro and nano-particle formation, molecular recognition, as well as enhanced extraction processes with increased selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A network that performs brute-force conversion of a temporal sequence to a spatial pattern: relevance to odor recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honi eSanders

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A classic problem in neuroscience is how temporal sequences can be recognized. This problem is exemplified in the olfactory system, where an odor is defined by the temporal sequence of olfactory bulb output that occurs during a sniff. This sequence is discrete because the output is subdivided by gamma frequency oscillations. Here we propose a new class of brute-force solutions to recognition of discrete sequences. We demonstrate a network architecture in which there are a small number of modules, each of which provides a persistent snapshot of what occurs in a different gamma cycle. The collection of these snapshots forms a spatial pattern that can be recognized by standard attractor-based network mechanisms. We will discuss the implications of this strategy for recognizing odor-specific sequences generated by the olfactory bulb.

  18. Antibodies directed to drug epitopes to investigate the structure of drug-protein photoadducts. Recognition of a common photobound substructure in tiaprofenic acid/ketoprofen cross-photoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, A; Hernández, D; Miranda, M A; Pérez-Prieto, J; Morera, I M; Castell, J V

    2001-11-01

    Drug-induced photoallergy is an immune adverse reaction to the combined effect of drugs and light. From the mechanistic point of view, it first involves covalent binding of drug to protein resulting in the formation of a photoantigen. Hence, determination of the structures of drug-protein photoadducts is of great relevance to understand the molecular basis of photoallergy and cross-immunoreactivity among drugs. Looking for new strategies to investigate the covalent photobinding of drugs to proteins, we generated highly specific antibodies to drug chemical substructures. The availability of such antibodies has allowed us to discriminate between the different modes by which tiaprofenic acid (TPA), suprofen (SUP), and ketoprofen (KTP) photobind to proteins. The finding that the vast majority of the TPA photoadduct can be accounted for by means of antibody anti-benzoyl strongly supports the view that the drug binds preferentially via the thiophene ring, leaving the benzene ring more accessible. By contrast, selective recognition of SUP-protein photoadducts by antibody anti-thenoyl evidences a preferential coupling via the benzene ring leaving the thiophene moiety more distant from the protein matrix. In the case of KTP, photoadducts are exclusively recognized by antibody anti-benzoyl, indicating that the benzene ring is again more accessible. As a result of this research, we have been able to identify a common substructure that is present in TPA-albumin and KTP-albumin photoadducts. This is remarkable since, at a first sight, the greatest structural similarities can be found between TPA and SUP as they share the same benzoylthiophene chromophore. These findings can explain the previously reported observations of cross-reactivity to KTP (or TPA) in patients photosensitized to TPA (or KTP).

  19. Gait Phases Recognition from Accelerations and Ground Reaction Forces: Application of Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rafajlović

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to test the applicability of accelerometer as the sensor for assessment of the walking. We present here the comparison of gait phases detected from the data recorded by force sensing resistors mounted in the shoe insoles, non-processed acceleration and processed acceleration perpendicular to the direction of the foot. The gait phases in all three cases were detected by means of a neural network. The output from the neural network was the gait phase, while the inputs were data from the sensors. The results show that the errors were in the ranges: 30 ms (2.7% – force sensors; 150 ms (13.6% – nonprocessed acceleration, and 120 ms (11% – processed acceleration data. This result suggests that it is possible to use the accelerometer as the gait phase detector, however, with the knowledge that the gait phases are time shifted for about 100 ms with respect the neural network predicted times.

  20. Specific recognition of the C-terminal end of A beta 42 by a high affinity monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, T.V.; Holm, A.; Birkelund, S.

    2009-01-01

    ) with high specificity. By this is meant that the paratope of the antibody must enclose the C-terminal end of A beta(42) including the carboxy-group of amino acid 42, and not just recognize a linear epitope in the C-terminal part of A beta. This has been accomplished by using a unique antigen construct made...... in human AD tissue and stains plaques with high specificity. Therefore the monoclonal antibody can thus be useful in the histological investigations of the AD pathology Udgivelsesdato: 2009/7...

  1. Structural basis for the recognition in an idiotype-anti-idiotype antibody complex related to celiac disease

    KAUST Repository

    Vangone, Anna

    2014-07-30

    Anti-idiotype antibodies have potential therapeutic applications in many fields, including autoimmune diseases. Herein we report the isolation and characterization of AIM2, an anti-idiotype antibody elicited in a mouse model upon expression of the celiac disease-specific autoantibody MB2.8 (directed against the main disease autoantigen type 2 transglutaminase, TG2). To characterize the interaction between the two antibodies, a 3D model of the MB2.8-AIM2 complex has been obtained by molecular docking. Analysis and selection of the different obtained docking solutions was based on the conservation within them of the inter-residue contacts. The selected model is very well representative of the different solutions found and its stability is confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, the binding mode it adopts is very similar to that observed in most of the experimental structures available for idiotype-anti-idiotype antibody complexes. In the obtained model, AIM2 is directed against the MB2.8 CDR region, especially on its variable light chain. This makes the concurrent formation of the MB2.8-AIM2 complex and of the MB2.8-TG2 complex incompatible, thus explaining the experimentally observed inhibitory effect on the MB2.8 binding to TG2. © 2014 Vangone et al.

  2. Human movement onset detection from isometric force and torque measurements: a supervised pattern recognition approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Cavallo, Giuseppe; Guglielmelli, Eugenio; Iannello, Giulio

    2010-09-01

    Recent research has successfully introduced the application of robotics and mechatronics to functional assessment and motor therapy. Measurements of movement initiation in isometric conditions are widely used in clinical rehabilitation and their importance in functional assessment has been demonstrated for specific parts of the human body. The determination of the voluntary movement initiation time, also referred to as onset time, represents a challenging issue since the time window characterizing the movement onset is of particular relevance for the understanding of recovery mechanisms after a neurological damage. Establishing it manually as well as a troublesome task may also introduce oversight errors and loss of information. The most commonly used methods for automatic onset time detection compare the raw signal, or some extracted measures such as its derivatives (i.e., velocity and acceleration) with a chosen threshold. However, they suffer from high variability and systematic errors because of the weakness of the signal, the abnormality of response profiles as well as the variability of movement initiation times among patients. In this paper, we introduce a technique to optimise onset detection according to each input signal. It is based on a classification system that enables us to establish which deterministic method provides the most accurate onset time on the basis of information directly derived from the raw signal. The approach was tested on annotated force and torque datasets. Each dataset is constituted by 768 signals acquired from eight anatomical districts in 96 patients who carried out six tasks related to common daily activities. The results show that the proposed technique improves not only on the performance achieved by each of the deterministic methods, but also on that attained by a group of clinical experts. The paper describes a classification system detecting the voluntary movement initiation time and adaptable to different signals. By

  3. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    Two methods have been used to examine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor distribution in human scalp and foreskin. The first employed [125I]EGF viable explants and autoradiography to determine the EGF binding pattern while the second used a monoclonal antibody to the human EGF receptor to map...... the distribution on frozen skin sections of an extracellular epitope on the EGF receptor. The [125I]EGF binding experiments showed accessible, unoccupied EGF receptors to be present on the epidermal basal cells (with reduced binding to spinous cells), the basal cells of the hair shaft and sebaceous gland......, the eccrine sweat glands, capillary system, and the hair follicle outer root sheath, generally similar in pattern to that previously reported for full-thickness rat skin and human epidermis. The same areas also bound EGF-R1 but in addition the monoclonal antibody recognized a cone of melanin containing...

  4. [Head drop syndrome in a patient with immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy with anti-signal recognition particle antibody: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushimura, Yukie; Shiga, Kensuke; Mukai, Mao; Yoshida, Masakatu; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    We report an 87-year-old female patient who presented a dropped head and progressive weakness in proximal muscles over five months. The value of serum creatine kinase was 2,708 IU/l and the antibody against signal recognition particle (SRP) was detected by means of immunoprecipitation. The computed tomography of skeletal muscles revealed atrophy and fatty degeneration preferentially in the neck extensors and paraspinal muscles. The biopsied specimen of the deltoid muscle showed necrotic fibers scattered in fascicles with marked myophagia. The mononuclear cells in necrotic fibers were positive against CD68, leading to the diagnosis of immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. We hypothesize that a group of patients with necrotizing myopathy can present a preferential involvement in neck extensors resulting in dropped head syndrome.

  5. Natively glycosylated HIV-1 Env structure reveals new mode for antibody recognition of the CD4-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristick, Harry B; von Boehmer, Lotta; West, Anthony P; Schamber, Michael; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Seaman, Michael S; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2016-10-01

    HIV-1 vaccine design is informed by structural studies elucidating mechanisms by which broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize and/or accommodate N-glycans on the trimeric envelope glycoprotein (Env). Variability in high-mannose and complex-type Env glycoforms leads to heterogeneity that usually precludes visualization of the native glycan shield. We present 3.5-Å- and 3.9-Å-resolution crystal structures of the HIV-1 Env trimer with fully processed and native glycosylation, revealing a glycan shield of high-mannose and complex-type N-glycans, which we used to define complete epitopes of two bNAbs. Env trimer was complexed with 10-1074 (against the V3-loop) and IOMA, a new CD4-binding site (CD4bs) antibody. Although IOMA derives from VH1-2*02, the germline gene of CD4bs-targeting VRC01-class bNAbs, its light chain lacks the short CDRL3 that defines VRC01-class bNAbs. Thus IOMA resembles 8ANC131-class/VH1-46-derived CD4bs bNAbs, which have normal-length CDRL3s. The existence of bNAbs that combine features of VRC01-class and 8ANC131-class antibodies has implications for immunization strategies targeting VRC01-like bNAbs.

  6. Comparisons of an open-ended vs. forced-choice 'mind reading' task: implications for measuring perspective-taking and emotion recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy G Cassels

    Full Text Available Perspective-taking and emotion recognition are essential for successful social development and have been the focus of developmental research for many years. Although the two abilities often overlap, they are distinct and our understanding of these abilities critically rests upon the efficacy of existing measures. Lessons from the literature differentiating recall versus recognition memory tasks led us to hypothesize that an open-ended emotion recognition measure would be less reliant on compensatory strategies and hence a more specific measure of emotion recognition abilities than a forced-choice task. To this end, we compared an open-ended version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Task with the original forced-choice version in two studies: 118 typically-developing 4- to 8-year-olds (Study 1 and 139 5- to 12-year-olds; 85 typically-developing and 54 with learning disorders (Study 2. We found that the open-ended version of the task was a better predictor of empathy and more reliably discriminated typically-developing children from those with learning disorders. As a whole, the results suggest that the open-ended version is a more sensitive measure of emotion recognition specifically.

  7. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  8. Serum reactome induced by Bordetella pertussis infection and Pertussis vaccines: qualitative differences in serum antibody recognition patterns revealed by peptide microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Davide; Ferrara, Giovanni; Advani, Reza; Hallander, Hans O; Maeurer, Markus J

    2015-07-01

    Pertussis (whooping cough) remains a public health problem despite extensive vaccination strategies. Better understanding of the host-pathogen interaction and the detailed B. pertussis (Bp) target recognition pattern will help in guided vaccine design. We characterized the specific epitope antigen recognition profiles of serum antibodies ('the reactome') induced by whooping cough and B. pertussis (Bp) vaccines from a case-control study conducted in 1996 in infants enrolled in a Bp vaccine trial in Sweden (Gustafsson, NEJM, 1996, 334, 349-355). Sera from children with whooping cough, vaccinated with Diphtheria Tetanus Pertussis (DTP) whole-cell (wc), acellular 5 (DPTa5), or with the 2 component (a2) vaccines and from infants receiving only DT (n=10 for each group) were tested with high-content peptide microarrays containing 17 Bp proteins displayed as linear (n=3175) peptide stretches. Slides were incubated with serum and peptide-IgG complexes detected with Cy5-labeled goat anti-human IgG and analyzed using a GenePix 4000B microarray scanner, followed by statistical analysis, using PAM (Prediction Analysis for Microarrays) and the identification of uniquely recognized peptide epitopes. 367/3,085 (11.9%) peptides were recognized in 10/10 sera from children with whooping cough, 239 (7.7%) in DTPwc, 259 (8.4%) in DTPa5, 105 (3.4%) DTPa2, 179 (5.8%) in the DT groups. Recognition of strongly recognized peptides was similar between whooping cough and DPTwc, but statistically different between whooping cough vs. DTPa5 (p<0.05), DTPa2 and DT (p<0.001 vs. both) vaccines. 6/3,085 and 2/3,085 peptides were exclusively recognized in (10/10) sera from children with whooping cough and DTPa2 vaccination, respectively. DTPwc resembles more closely the whooping cough reactome as compared to acellular vaccines. We could identify a unique recognition signature common for each vaccination group (10/10 children). Peptide microarray technology allows detection of subtle differences in

  9. Linear epitope recognition antibodies strongly respond to the C-terminal domain of HP-PRRSV GP5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinglong; Qui, Li; Dang, Yu; Xiao, Sha; Zhang, Shuxia; Yang, Zengqi

    2014-12-05

    A total of 155 peptides derived from the highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) glycoprotein 5 (GP5) were printed on a chip to reveal the antigen reaction characteristics of the protein. The reactions of these peptides to HP-PRRSV-specific pig serum were scanned and quantified using fluorescence intensity via the PepSlide(®) Analyzer software. The intensity plots showed different reactions in the different sectors of GP5. The highest reaction intensity value reached 3894.5, with a peptide sequence of IVEKGGKVEVEGHLI. Seventeen peptides that showed relatively high reaction levels with HP-PRRSV-specific pig serum were selected as epitope candidates. Furthermore, the antigenic character was predicted using a software and was compared with the peptide scan results. In contrast to the software prediction, the HP-PRRSV-specific antibodies strongly responded to the C-terminal domain of GP5. The acquired data may be useful for understanding the antigenic characteristics of HP-PRRSV GP5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A network approach for provisional assay recognition of a Hendra virus antibody ELISA: test validation with low sample numbers from infected horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Axel; Lunt, Ross; Bergfeld, Jemma; McNabb, Leanne; Halpin, Kim; Juzva, Susan; Newberry, Kim; Morrissy, Chris; Loomes, Cameron; Warner, Simone; Diallo, Ibrahim; Kirkland, Peter; Broder, Christopher C; Carlile, Gemma; Loh, Mai Hlaing; Waugh, Caryll; Wright, Lynda; Watson, James; Eagles, Debbie; Zuelke, Kurt; McCullough, Sam; Daniels, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Obtaining statistically sound numbers of sera from Hendra virus (HeV)-infected horses is problematic because affected individuals usually die or are euthanized before developing a serum antibody response. As a consequence, test validation becomes a challenge. Our approach is an extension of OIE principles for provisional recognition and included 7 validation panels tested across multiple laboratories that provided estimates for test performance characteristics. At a 0.4 S/P cutoff, 16 of 19 sera from HeV-infected horses gave positive results in the HeV soluble G, indirect ELISA (HeVsG iELISA; DSe 84.2% [95% CI: 60.4-96.6%]); 463 of 477 non-infected horse sera tested negative (DSp 97.1% [95% CI: 95.1-98.4%]). The HeVsG iELISA eliminated almost all false-positive results from the previously used HeV iELISA, with marginally decreased relative sensitivity. Assay robustness was evaluated in inter-laboratory and proficiency testing panels. The HeVsG iELISA is considered to be fit for purpose for serosurveillance and international movement of horses when virus neutralization is used for follow-up testing of positive or inconclusive serum samples.

  11. Antibody recognition of cathepsin L1-derived peptides in Fasciola hepatica-infected and/or vaccinated cattle and identification of protective linear B-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Cuartero, Laura; Geurden, Thomas; Mahan, Suman M; Hardham, John M; Dalton, John P; Mulcahy, Grace

    2018-02-08

    Fasciola hepatica infection causes important economic losses in livestock and food industries around the world. In the Republic of Ireland F. hepatica infection has an 76% prevalence in cattle. Due to the increase of anti-helminthic resistance, a vaccine-based approach to control of Fasciolosis is urgently needed. A recombinant version of the cysteine protease cathepsin L1 (rmFhCL1) from F. hepatica has been a vaccine candidate for many years. We have found that vaccination of cattle with this immunodominant antigen has provided protection against infection in some experimental trials, but not in others. Differential epitope recognition between animals could be a source of variable levels of vaccine protection. Therefore, we have characterised for first time linear B-cell epitopes recognised within the FhCL1 protein using sera from F. hepatica-infected and/or vaccinated cattle from two independent trials. Results showed that all F. hepatica infected animals recognised the region 19-31 of FhCL1, which is situated in the N-terminal part of the pro-peptide. Vaccinated animals that showed fluke burden reduction elicited antibodies that bound to the regions 120-137, 145-155, 161-171 of FhCL1, which were not recognised by non-protected animals. This data, together with the high production of specific IgG2 in animals showing vaccine efficacy, suggest important targets for vaccine development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Molecular Determinants of Antibody Recognition and Antigenic Drift in the H3 Hemagglutinin of Swine Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abente, Eugenio J.; Santos, Jefferson; Lewis, Nicola S.; Gauger, Phillip C.; Stratton, Jered; Skepner, Eugene; Rajao, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A virus (IAV) of the H3 subtype is an important respiratory pathogen that affects both humans and swine. Vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) is the primary method used to control disease. However, due to antigenic drift, vaccine strains must be periodically updated. Six of the 7 positions previously identified in human seasonal H3 (positions 145, 155, 156, 158, 159, 189, and 193) were also indicated in swine H3 antigenic evolution. To experimentally test the effect on virus antigenicity of these 7 positions, substitutions were introduced into the HA of an isogenic swine lineage virus. We tested the antigenic effect of these introduced substitutions by using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) data with monovalent swine antisera and antigenic cartography to evaluate the antigenic phenotype of the mutant viruses. Combinations of substitutions within the antigenic motif caused significant changes in antigenicity. One virus mutant that varied at only two positions relative to the wild type had a >4-fold reduction in HI titers compared to homologous antisera. Potential changes in pathogenesis and transmission of the double mutant were evaluated in pigs. Although the double mutant had virus shedding titers and transmissibility comparable to those of the wild type, it caused a significantly lower percentage of lung lesions. Elucidating the antigenic effects of specific amino acid substitutions at these sites in swine H3 IAV has important implications for understanding IAV evolution within pigs as well as for improved vaccine development and control strategies in swine. IMPORTANCE A key component of influenza virus evolution is antigenic drift mediated by the accumulation of amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, resulting in escape from prior immunity generated by natural infection or vaccination. Understanding which amino acid positions of the HA contribute to the ability

  13. Functional analysis of bispecific antibody (EpCAMxCD3)-mediated T-lymphocyte and cancer cell interaction by single-cell force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sabrina C; Wabnitz, Guido H; Samstag, Yvonne; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Ludwig, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    The atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful tool to analyze forces generated on cellular interactions on the single-cell level. This highly sensitive device can record changes in force in the pico-Newton range, which equals single molecule bonds. Here, we have used single-cell force spectroscopy by AFM to investigate the interaction between T cells and tumor cells that is induced by the bispecific antibody HEA125xOKT3 (specificity anti-EpCAMxCD3). We show that HEA125xOKT3 induces a specific increase in adhesion force between T cells and cancer cells. The adhesive force that is generated on cell-cell contact is dependent on the applied force on initial contact and the duration of this initial contact. In summary, HEA125xOKT3 has been found to mediate contact formation by distinct processes. It induces direct cell-cell interaction, which results in the activation of T-cell signaling, facilitates the formation of supramolecular activation clusters and ultimately of an immune synapse. Copyright © 2010 UICC.

  14. Antibody-Hapten Recognition at the Surface of Functionalized Liposomes Studied by SPR: Steric Hindrance of Pegylated Phospholipids in Stealth Liposomes Prepared for Targeted Radionuclide Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliot. P. Botosoa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted PEGylated liposomes could increase the amount of drugs or radionuclides delivered to tumor cells. They show favorable stability and pharmacokinetics, but steric hindrance of the PEG chains can block the binding of the targeting moiety. Here, specific interactions between an antihapten antibody (clone 734, specific for the DTPA-indium complex and DTPA-indium-tagged liposomes were characterized by surface plasmon resonance (SPR. Non-PEGylated liposomes fused on CM5 chips whereas PEGylated liposomes did not. By contrast, both PEGylated and non-PEGylated liposomes attached to L1 chips without fusion. SPR binding kinetics showed that, in the absence of PEG, the antibody binds the hapten at the surface of lipid bilayers with the affinity of the soluble hapten. The incorporation of PEGylated lipids hinders antibody binding to extents depending on PEGylated lipid fraction and PEG molecular weight. SPR on immobilized liposomes thus appears as a useful technique to optimize formulations of liposomes for targeted therapy.

  15. Evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and long-term management of thrombosis in antiphospholipid antibody-positive patients : Report of a Task Force at the 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Irastorza, G.; Cuadrado, M. J.; Ruiz-Arruza, I.; Brey, R.; Crowther, M.; Derksen, R.; Erkan, D.; Krilis, S.; Machin, S.; Pengo, V.; Pierangeli, S.; Tektonidou, M.; Khamashta, M.

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the presence of thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity in combination with the persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies: lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and/or anti-beta 2-glycoprotein I antibodies in medium to

  16. A glycoconjugate antigen based on the recognition motif of a broadly neutralizing human immunodeficiency virus antibody, 2G12, is immunogenic but elicits antibodies unable to bind to the self glycans of gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astronomo, Rena D; Lee, Hing-Ken; Scanlan, Christopher N

    2008-01-01

    The glycan shield of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 contributes to viral evasion from humoral immune responses. However, the shield is recognized by the HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody (Ab), 2G12, at a relatively conserved cluster of oligomannose glycans. The discovery of 2...

  17. Recognition of Plasmodium falciparum mature gametocyte-infected erythrocytes by antibodies of semi-immune adults and malaria-exposed children from Gabon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebru, Tamirat; Ajua, Anthony; Theisen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transmission of malaria from man to mosquito depends on the presence of gametocytes, the sexual stage of Plasmodium parasites in the infected host. Naturally acquired antibodies against gametocytes exist and may play a role in controlling transmission by limiting the gametocyte develo...

  18. Specific recognition of influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies in human serum: a simple virus-free ELISA method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario M Alvarez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been estimated that pandemic Influenza A H1N1/2009 has infected millions of people from April to October 2009, a more precise figure requires a worldwide large-scale diagnosis of the presence of Influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies within the population. Assays typically used to estimate antibody titers (hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization would require the use of the virus, which would seriously limit broad implementation.An ELISA method to evaluate the presence and relative concentration of specific Influenza A/H1N1/2009 antibodies in human serum samples is presented. The method is based on the use of a histidine-tagged recombinant fragment of the globular region of the hemagglutinin (HA of the Influenza A H1N1/2009 virus expressed in E. coli.The ELISA method consistently discerns between Inf A H1N1 infected and non-infected subjects, particularly after the third week of infection/exposure. Since it does not require the use of viral particles, it can be easily and quickly implemented in any basic laboratory. In addition, in a scenario of insufficient vaccine availability, the use of this ELISA could be useful to determine if a person has some level of specific antibodies against the virus and presumably at least partial protection.

  19. [The Polish Task Force position statement on safety of biologic treatment with monoclonal antibodies and soluble receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnz-Rozyk, Karina; Wiesik-Szewczyk, Ewa

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of biologic therapies for treatment in many fields of medicine such as rheumatology oncology, dermatology, hematology and allergology, became one of the most important achievements of the modem medicine. The first biological therapeutics have already reached patent expiration date and corresponding biosimilars were approved by EMA (European Medicine Agency) and FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Many more biosimilar products are currently under review for marketing authorization around the world. The approval of products similar, but not identical to already known innovative biologics, due to complexity of structure and manufacturing technology, stirs a lot of discussions regarding safety concerns related to differences in posttranslational processing and in immunogenicity between reference and biosimilar products, and relevance of these differences to the clinical practice. Critical issues involve extrapolation to different clinical indication, automatic substitution and switching. Despite EMA recommendation and advocacy for biosimilars, it is beyond this regulatory authority to establish definitive regulation for each EU member, which it is expected to be country related. The aim of the study was an attempt to define the stance regarding particular aspects of biological treatment conducted in Poland is undertaken. The Task Force of 13 experts involved in various aspects of biologic therapies in Poland was established. A modified Delphi voting was performed to achieve consensus regarding the most important aspects of biologic treatment in Poland, with particular concern of biosimilars. Ten final statements were discussed and voted upon. The statements cover general aspects of biosimilars including expected cost-benefit ratios, extrapolation of clinical indications, interchange switching, patient information and requirement of patient consent. The state of post marketing pharmacovigilance of biologics (innovative ones as well as biosimilars) was

  20. Comparative assessment of the recognition of domain-specific CD163 monoclonal antibodies in human monocytes explains wide discrepancy in reported levels of cellular surface CD163 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2011-01-01

    . Materials and Methods The cellular distribution of CD163 on human peripheral blood monocytes in freshly drawn blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from buffy-coats was investigated by flow cytometry using CD163 monoclonal antibodies recognizing scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain......Background CD163 is expressed exclusively on cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage and is widely used as a marker of human macrophages. Further, it has been suggested as a diagnostic marker of monocyte/macrophage activity in inflammatory conditions and as a therapeutic target. However, studies...... 1 (MAC2-158), domain 4 (R-20), domain 7 (GHI/61), and domain 9 (RM3/1). The CD163 monoclonal antibodies were characterized in binding and endocytosis experiments in human macrophages and CD163-transfected Flp-In CHO cells. Calcium-dependent ligand binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance...

  1. High polymeric IgA content facilitates recognition of microbial polysaccharide-natural serum antibody immune complexes by immobilized human galectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anu; Antony, Molly; Mathai, Jaisy; Appukuttan, Padinjaradath S

    2011-04-30

    Dextran-binding immunoglobulin (DIg) and anti-β-glucan antibody (ABG) are naturally occurring human serum antibodies specific to α- and β-glucoside epitopes respectively of polysaccharide antigens and heavily enriched in IgA. ABG and DIg are shown here to have much more of their IgA in polymeric form than does serum IgA in general. Cell wall β-glucans and glycoproteins of the widely consumed yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) offered several hundred fold better ligands for ABG than did small β-glucosides. Candida albicans cell wall antigen (CCA), a commonly encountered polysaccharide-rich fungal antigen was recognized by normal human serum anti-carbohydrate antibodies to precipitate maximally at a definite stoichiometry typical of immune complexes (IC). IC formed in serum in vitro on addition of CCA contained a significantly higher percentage of IgA than did either naturally occurring IC or serum. Polymeric IgA was far better ligand than monomeric IgA for both anti-IgA antibody and the most widely expressed human tissue lectin galectin-1 which recognizes O-linked oligosaccharides characteristic of IgA, in contrast to N-linked oligosaccharides present in all immunoglobulins. Moreover, desialylation by neuraminidase, an enzyme released into circulation during many microbial infections and diabetes, increased lectin-binding activity of polymeric IgA much more than that of monomeric IgA. Human galectin-1 immobilized in active form in vitro sugar-specifically captured IgA and IgA-containing IC formed by CCA in serum but not IgG. Results suggest that while high IgA content especially in polymeric form may render polysaccharide IC more susceptible to tissue uptake, desialylation of IgA in IC could enhance the process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure and Recognition of a Novel HIV-1 gp120-gp41 Interface Antibody that Caused MPER Exposure through Viral Escape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Bhiman, Jinal N.; Sheward, Daniel J.; Elliott, Debra H.; Rouelle, Julie; Smira, Ashley; Joyce, M. Gordon; Ndabambi, Nonkululeko; Druz, Aliaksandr; Asokan, Mangai; Burton, Dennis R.; Connors, Mark; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mascola, John R.; Robinson, James E.; Ward, Andrew B.; Williamson, Carolyn; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn; Moore, Penny L.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2017-01-11

    A comprehensive understanding of the regions on HIV-1 envelope trimers targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies may contribute to rational design of an HIV-1 vaccine. We previously identified a participant in the CAPRISA cohort, CAP248, who developed trimer-specific antibodies capable of neutralizing 60% of heterologous viruses at three years post-infection. Here, we report the isolation by B cell culture of monoclonal antibody CAP248-2B, which targets a novel membrane proximal epitope including elements of gp120 and gp41. Despite low maximum inhibition plateaus, often below 50% inhibitory concentrations, the breadth of CAP248-2B significantly correlated with donor plasma. Site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and negative-stain electron microscopy 3D reconstructions revealed how CAP248-2B recognizes a cleavage-dependent epitope that includes the gp120 C terminus. While this epitope is distinct, it overlapped in parts of gp41 with the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT151, VRC34, 35O22, 3BC315, and 10E8. CAP248-2B has a conformationally variable paratope with an unusually long 19 amino acid light chain third complementarity determining region. Two phenylalanines at the loop apex were predicted by docking and mutagenesis data to interact with the viral membrane. Neutralization by CAP248-2B is not dependent on any single glycan proximal to its epitope, and low neutralization plateaus could not be completely explained by N- or O-linked glycosylation pathway inhibitors, furin co-transfection, or pre-incubation with soluble CD4. Viral escape from CAP248-2B involved a cluster of rare mutations in the gp120-gp41 cleavage sites. Simultaneous introduction of these mutations into heterologous viruses abrogated neutralization by CAP248-2B, but enhanced neutralization sensitivity to 35O22, 4E10, and 10E8 by 10-100-fold. Altogether, this study expands the region of the HIV-1 gp120-gp41 quaternary interface that is a target for broadly neutralizing

  3. Structure and Recognition of a Novel HIV-1 gp120-gp41 Interface Antibody that Caused MPER Exposure through Viral Escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Bhiman, Jinal N; Sheward, Daniel J; Elliott, Debra H; Rouelle, Julie; Smira, Ashley; Joyce, M Gordon; Ndabambi, Nonkululeko; Druz, Aliaksandr; Asokan, Mangai; Burton, Dennis R; Connors, Mark; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Mascola, John R; Robinson, James E; Ward, Andrew B; Williamson, Carolyn; Kwong, Peter D; Morris, Lynn; Moore, Penny L

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the regions on HIV-1 envelope trimers targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies may contribute to rational design of an HIV-1 vaccine. We previously identified a participant in the CAPRISA cohort, CAP248, who developed trimer-specific antibodies capable of neutralizing 60% of heterologous viruses at three years post-infection. Here, we report the isolation by B cell culture of monoclonal antibody CAP248-2B, which targets a novel membrane proximal epitope including elements of gp120 and gp41. Despite low maximum inhibition plateaus, often below 50% inhibitory concentrations, the breadth of CAP248-2B significantly correlated with donor plasma. Site-directed mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography, and negative-stain electron microscopy 3D reconstructions revealed how CAP248-2B recognizes a cleavage-dependent epitope that includes the gp120 C terminus. While this epitope is distinct, it overlapped in parts of gp41 with the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies PGT151, VRC34, 35O22, 3BC315, and 10E8. CAP248-2B has a conformationally variable paratope with an unusually long 19 amino acid light chain third complementarity determining region. Two phenylalanines at the loop apex were predicted by docking and mutagenesis data to interact with the viral membrane. Neutralization by CAP248-2B is not dependent on any single glycan proximal to its epitope, and low neutralization plateaus could not be completely explained by N- or O-linked glycosylation pathway inhibitors, furin co-transfection, or pre-incubation with soluble CD4. Viral escape from CAP248-2B involved a cluster of rare mutations in the gp120-gp41 cleavage sites. Simultaneous introduction of these mutations into heterologous viruses abrogated neutralization by CAP248-2B, but enhanced neutralization sensitivity to 35O22, 4E10, and 10E8 by 10-100-fold. Altogether, this study expands the region of the HIV-1 gp120-gp41 quaternary interface that is a target for broadly neutralizing

  4. Mapping out the structural changes of natural and pretreated plant cell wall surfaces by atomic force microscopy single molecular recognition imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass (mainly plant cell walls) is a critical process for biofuel production. This process is greatly hindered by the natural complexity of plant cell walls and limited accessibility of surface cellulose by enzymes. Little is known about the plant cell wall structural and molecular level component changes after pretreatments, especially on the outer surface. Therefore, a more profound understanding of surface cellulose distributions before and after pretreatments at single-molecule level is in great need. In this study, we determined the structural changes, specifically on crystalline cellulose, of natural, dilute sulfuric acid pretreated and delignified cell wall surfaces of poplar, switchgrass, and corn stover using single molecular atomic force microscopy (AFM) recognition imaging. Results The AFM tip was first functionalized by a family 3 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM3a) (Clostridium thermocellum Scaffoldin) which specifically recognizes crystalline cellulose by selectively binding to it. The surface structural changes were studied at single molecule level based on the recognition area percentage (RAP) of exposed crystalline cellulose over the imaged cell wall surface. Our results show that the cell wall surface crystalline cellulose coverage increased from 17-20% to 18-40% after dilute acid pretreatment at 135°C under different acid concentrations and reached to 40-70% after delignification. Pretreated with 0.5% sulfuric acid, the crystalline cellulose surface distributions of 23% on poplar, 28% on switchgrass and, 38% on corn stover were determined as an optimized result. Corn stover cell walls also show less recalcitrance due to more effective pretreatments and delignification compared to poplar and switchgrass. Conclusions The dilute acid pretreatment can effectively increase the cellulose accessibility on plant cell wall surfaces. The optimal acid concentration was determined to be 0.5% acid at 135

  5. Human antibody recognition of xenogeneic antigens (NeuGc and Gal) on porcine heart valves: could genetically modified pig heart valves reduce structural valve deterioration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whayoung; Long, Cassandra; Ramsoondar, Jagdeece; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K C; Manji, Rizwan A; Hara, Hidetaka

    2016-09-01

    Glutaraldehyde-fixed bioprosthetic heart valves (GBHVs) derived from wild-type (WT, genetically unmodified) pigs are widely used clinically for heart valve replacement. There is evidence that their failure is related to an immune response. The use of valves from genetically engineered pigs that do not express specific pig antigens may prolong GBHV survival. Our aims were to determine (i) expression of Gal and NeuGc on heart (aortic and pulmonary) valves and pericardium of WT, α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene knockout (GTKO) and GTKO/N-glycolylneuraminic acid gene-knockout (GTKO/NeuGcKO) pigs in comparison with three different commercially available GBHVs and (ii) to determine human antibody binding to these tissues. Wild-type, GTKO/CD46, and GTKO/CD46/NeuGcKO pig valves and pericardium were tested (i) fresh and (ii) after fixation with glutaraldehyde (0.02%, 0.2%, 2%). Sections of GBHVs, fresh and fixed valves, and pericardium were stained for Gal and NeuGc expression, and for human IgM and IgG antibody binding. Gal and NeuGc expression was high on all GBHVs and WT pig valves/pericardium, but was absent after antigen-specific-knockout. There was no difference in antigen expression or antibody binding among WT aortic, pulmonary valves, and pericardium as well as GBHVs. Glutaraldehyde fixation did not alter expression of Gal or NeuGc. After incubation with human serum, human IgM and IgG bound to all GBHVs and WT pig valves/pericardium. Valves from GTKO/CD46 pigs and, particularly, GTKO/CD46/NeuGcKO pigs (with/without glutaraldehyde fixation) showed less IgM and IgG binding. Compared to WT pigs, GTKO/CD46/NeuGcKO pigs would be preferable sources of GBHVs, because the absence of Gal/NeuGc expression reduces human antibody binding. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Bifunctional atomic force microscopy probes for molecular screening applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, Lisa M.; Allen, Stephanie; Davies, Martyn C.; Tendler, Saul J.B.; Williams, Philip M.; Roberts, Clive J

    2003-03-05

    Force mapping with the atomic force microscope (AFM) allows the simultaneous acquisition of topography and probe-sample interaction data. For example, AFM probes functionalised with an antigen can be employed to map the spatial distribution of recognition events on a substrate functionalised with its specific antibody. However, to date this method has been limited to the detection of single receptor-ligand species. Were the detection of multiple receptor-ligand interactions possible, force mapping would offer great scope as a sensitive tool for bioassay and screening applications. We have developed an immobilisation strategy, which allows two different molecular species (in this case human serum albumin and the {beta} subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin) to be present simultaneously on an AFM probe. Single point force spectroscopy results have revealed the ability of such probes to discriminate between their corresponding recognition points (anti-HSA and anti-{beta}hCG IgG antibodies). As a control, force measurements were re-recorded in the presence of the known antigen (free in solution) for each antibody species and a marked decrease in the frequency of specific interaction is observed. As an additional control interactions between anti-{beta}hCG IgG and the multifunctional probe are taken in the presence of free {beta}hCG ('true' antigen) and free HSA ('false' antigen). It is shown that measurements recorded in the presence of a non-related protein species results in no change in either the force observed or the frequency of specific interactions, further confirmation that the specificity of force observed is due to the separation of antibody-antigen complex.

  7. Probing the stereoselective interaction of ofloxacin enantiomers with corresponding monoclonal antibodies by multiple spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hongtao; Xu, Zhenlin; Liu, Yingju; Sun, Yuanming; Wang, Baoling; Sun, Xiulan; Wang, Zhanhui; Eremin, Sergei; Zherdev, Anatoly V.; Dzantiev, Boris B.; Lei, Hongtao

    2018-04-01

    Although stereoselective antibody has immense potential in chiral compounds detection and separation, the interaction traits between stereoselective antibody and the corresponding antigenic enantiomers are not yet fully exploited. In this study, the stereospecific interactions between ofloxacin isomers and corresponding monoclonal antibodies (McAb-WR1 and McAb-MS1) were investigated using time-resolved fluorescence, steady-state fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. The chiral recognition discrepancies of antibodies with ofloxacin isomers were reflected through binding constant, number of binding sites, driving forces and conformational changes. The major interacting forces of McAb-WR1 and McAb-MS1 chiral interaction systems were hydrophobic force and van der Waals forces joined up with hydrogen bonds, respectively. Synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD spectra results showed that the disturbing of tyrosine and tryptophan micro-environments were so slightly that no obvious secondary structure changes were found during the chiral hapten binding. Clarification of stereospecific interaction of antibody will facilitate the application of immunoassay to analyze chiral contaminants in food and other areas.

  8. Pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Theodoridis, Sergios

    2003-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a scientific discipline that is becoming increasingly important in the age of automation and information handling and retrieval. Patter Recognition, 2e covers the entire spectrum of pattern recognition applications, from image analysis to speech recognition and communications. This book presents cutting-edge material on neural networks, - a set of linked microprocessors that can form associations and uses pattern recognition to ""learn"" -and enhances student motivation by approaching pattern recognition from the designer's point of view. A direct result of more than 10

  9. Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Morariu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of speech recognition by pattern recognition techniques. Learning consists in determining the unique characteristics of a word (cepstral coefficients by eliminating those characteristics that are different from one word to another. For learning and recognition, the system will build a dictionary of words by determining the characteristics of each word to be used in the recognition. Determining the characteristics of an audio signal consists in the following steps: noise removal, sampling it, applying Hamming window, switching to frequency domain through Fourier transform, calculating the magnitude spectrum, filtering data, determining cepstral coefficients.

  10. On accurate calculation of the potential of mean force between antigen and antibody: A case of the HyHEL-10-hen egg white lysozyme system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takefumi; Fujitani, Hideaki

    2014-08-01

    We study several free energy calculation methods in the dissociation process of lysozyme and its antibody. We introduce the multi-step targeted molecular dynamics (mTMD) method to determine the dissociation pathway. The dissociation free energy calculated along the mTMD dissociation pathway is significantly lower than that along the dissociation pathway determined by the steered molecular dynamics (SMD) method. This indicates that SMD leads to a meta-stable dissociation state. While the SMD restrains the distance between the two proteins, the mTMD restrains the internal structures additionally. We discuss the effect of fragility of the protein structures on the free energy calculations.

  11. Impact of short range hydrophobic interactions and long range electrostatic forces on the aggregation kinetics of a monoclonal antibody and a dual-variable domain immunoglobulin at low and high concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vineet; Dixit, Nitin; Zhou, Liqiang Lisa; Fraunhofer, Wolfgang

    2011-12-12

    The purpose of this work was to determine the nature of long and short-range forces governing protein aggregation kinetics at low and high concentrations for a monoclonal antibody (IgG1) and a dual-variable-domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig). Protein-protein interactions (PPI) were studied under dilute conditions by utilizing the methods of static (B(22)) and dynamic light scattering (k(D)). PPI in solutions containing minimal ionic strengths were characterized to get detailed insights into the impact of ionic strength on aggregation. Microcalorimetry and susceptibility to denature at air-liquid interface were used to assess the tertiary structure and quiescent stability studies were conducted to study aggregation characteristics. Results for IgG1 showed that electrostatic interactions governed protein aggregation kinetics both under dilute and concentrated conditions (i.e., 5 mg/mL and 150 mg/mL). For DVD-Ig molecules, on the other hand, although electrostatic interactions governed protein aggregation under dilute conditions, hydrophobic forces clearly determined the kinetics at high concentrations. This manuscript shows for the first time that short-range hydrophobic interactions can outweigh electrostatic forces and play an important role in determining protein aggregation at high concentrations. Additionally, results show that although higher-order virial coefficients become significant under low ionic strength conditions, removal of added charges may be used to enhance the aggregation stability of dilute protein formulations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  13. H-2 restriction: Independent recognition of H-2 and foreign antigen by a single receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siliciano, Robert F.; Zacharchuk, Charles M.; Shin, Hyun S.

    1980-01-01

    We describe two situations in which the recognition of hapten can compensate for the lack of recognition of appropriate H-2 gene products in hapten-specific, H-2 restricted, T lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis. First, we show that although recognition of appropriate H-2 gene products is essential for the lysis of target cells bearing a low hapten density, significant hapten-specific lysis of H-2 inappropriate target cells is observed at high levels of target cell derivatization. Secondly, we show that hapten-conjugated anti-H-2 antibody inhibits cytolysis poorly even though its binding to target cell H-2 antigens is equivalent to that of underivatized antibody. These results suggest that hapten and H-2 are recognized independently and are therefore inconsistent with the altered-self model. Although our data do not exclude the dual-recognition model, we prefer to interpret them within the framework of a single-receptor model in which hapten and H-2 are recognized independently by receptors of identical idiotype on the T cell. We postulate that the affinity of these receptors for the relevant H-2 gene product is low enough so that the T cell is not activated by encounters with normal-self cells expressing that H-2 gene product. However, when self cells express in addition a foreign antigen that can also be recognized by the same receptor, then the force of T cell-target cell interaction may be increased sufficiently to activate T cell effector function. PMID:6966404

  14. Speaker Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Lasse Lohilahti; Jørgensen, Kasper Winther

    2005-01-01

    Speaker recognition is basically divided into speaker identification and speaker verification. Verification is the task of automatically determining if a person really is the person he or she claims to be. This technology can be used as a biometric feature for verifying the identity of a person...

  15. Bacteriophages as recognition and identification agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodorescu, M.C.; Gaspar, Alexandre.

    1987-01-01

    Bacteriophages are employed as agents for recognition and identification of molecules and cellular materials, using their ability to recognize their bacterial host, by coating them with antibodies or by selecting them to perform in a manner analogous to antibodies. Visibility for identification is effected by incorporating a fluorescent agent, a radioisotope, a metal, an enzyme, or other staining material. The method of this invention may be utilized in selected clinical procedures, and is adaptable to use in an assay kit. (author)

  16. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... and automated, the hybrid cells can be stored for many years in liquid nitrogen and antibodies production is homogeneous. The hybridoma method .... they may be modified to vehicle active molecules such as radio-isotopes, toxins, cytokines, enzyme etc. In these cases, the therapeutic effect is due to ...

  17. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ability of the highly evolved machinery of immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex ... to Pauling, if the structure of the antigen binding site of antibodies were to be produced in a random ..... where the immune system of the body is destructive, as in autoimmune disorders or after organ transplant.

  18. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While chemistry provides the framework for understanding the structure and function of biomolecules, the immune sys- tem provides a highly evolved natural process to generate one class of complex biomolecules – the antibodies. A combination of the two could be exploited to generate new classes of molecules with novel ...

  19. Pattern Recognition Control Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambone, Elisabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft control algorithms must know the expected vehicle response to any command to the available control effectors, such as reaction thrusters or torque devices. Spacecraft control system design approaches have traditionally relied on the estimated vehicle mass properties to determine the desired force and moment, as well as knowledge of the effector performance to efficiently control the spacecraft. A pattern recognition approach was used to investigate the relationship between the control effector commands and spacecraft responses. Instead of supplying the approximated vehicle properties and the thruster performance characteristics, a database of information relating the thruster ring commands and the desired vehicle response was used for closed-loop control. A Monte Carlo simulation data set of the spacecraft dynamic response to effector commands was analyzed to establish the influence a command has on the behavior of the spacecraft. A tool developed at NASA Johnson Space Center to analyze flight dynamics Monte Carlo data sets through pattern recognition methods was used to perform this analysis. Once a comprehensive data set relating spacecraft responses with commands was established, it was used in place of traditional control methods and gains set. This pattern recognition approach was compared with traditional control algorithms to determine the potential benefits and uses.

  20. Plastic antibody based surface plasmon resonance nanosensors for selective atrazine detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yılmaz, Erkut; Özgür, Erdoğan; Bereli, Nilay; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2017-01-01

    This study reports a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based affinity sensor system with the use of molecular imprinted nanoparticles (plastic antibodies) to enhance the pesticide detection. Molecular imprinting based affinity sensor is prepared by the attachment of atrazine (chosen as model pesticide) imprinted nanoparticles onto the gold surface of SPR chip. Recognition element of the affinity sensor is polymerizable form of aspartic acid. The imprinted nanoparticles were characterized via FTIR and zeta-sizer measurements. SPR sensors are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) and contact angle measurements. The imprinted nanoparticles showed more sensitivity to atrazine than the non-imprinted ones. Different concentrations of atrazine solutions are applied to SPR system to determine the adsorption kinetics. Langmuir adsorption model is found as the most suitable model for this affinity nanosensor system. In order to show the selectivity of the atrazine-imprinted nanoparticles, competitive adsorption of atrazine, simazine and amitrole is investigated. The results showed that the imprinted nanosensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for atrazine. - Highlights: • SPR based affinity sensor system was developed via molecular imprinting. • Recognition element of the affinity sensor is polymerizable form of an amino acid. • Combination of SPR and MIP offers highly selective sensor with long shelf-life. • Plastic antibody based biomimetic sensors offer relatively cheaper production. • Plastic antibody based biomimetic sensors offer high physical, chemical stability.

  1. The Circassian Revival: A Quest for Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Funch

    of the Circassians were forced into exile under such conditions that hundreds of thousands died. Recognition of the forced exile as an act of genocide has been a key question that many – often relatively recently upstarted – Circassian organizations cooperate in promoting. An increasingly transnational cooperation...

  2. Recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  3. Recognition tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Sankey, Otto [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 1862 53, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-02

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  4. Indirect recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Christian; Rachman, Noer Fauzi

    2018-01-01

    Government institutions and local people in Indonesia have entrenched, resurrected, and reinvented space through their different territorial and property claims. From colonial times, onward, government institutions have dissolved local political orders and territorialized and reordered spatial...... categories are struggled over, and groups of actors seek to legitimate their presence, their activities, and their resource use by occupation, mapping, and construction of "public" infrastructure. In the case of conservation in the Mount Halimun-Salak National Park, we find that rather than one overarching...... important legal and political work. After the authoritarian New Order regime, in particular, claims to citizenship worked as indirect property claims, and indirect recognition of such claims are important because they serve as pragmatic proxies for formal property rights. Two case studies examine how people...

  5. Force Protection Common Operational Picture/Common Tactical Picture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter, Russell

    1998-01-01

    ... has taken an integrated approach to Force Protection. There is a recognition that Force Protection is not a Security Police operation; but is a Security Force oDeration. This exemplifies a mindset change and a movement away from pure.

  6. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  7. The Chikungunya Virus Capsid Protein Contains Linear B Cell Epitopes in the N- and C-Terminal Regions that are Dependent on an Intact C-Terminus for Antibody Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Y. H. Goh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an arthropod-borne agent that causes severe arthritic disease in humans and is considered a serious health threat in areas where competent mosquito vectors are prevalent. CHIKV has recently been responsible for several millions of cases of disease, involving over 40 countries. The recent re-emergence of CHIKV and its potential threat to human health has stimulated interest in better understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of the virus, and requirement for improved treatment, prevention and control measures. In this study, we mapped the binding sites of a panel of eleven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs previously generated towards the capsid protein (CP of CHIKV. Using N- and C-terminally truncated recombinant forms of the CHIKV CP, two putative binding regions, between residues 1–35 and 140–210, were identified. Competitive binding also revealed that five of the CP-specific mAbs recognized a series of overlapping epitopes in the latter domain. We also identified a smaller, N-terminally truncated product of native CP that may represent an alternative translation product of the CHIKV 26S RNA and have potential functional significance during CHIKV replication. Our data also provides evidence that the C-terminus of CP is required for authentic antigenic structure of CP. This study shows that these anti-CP mAbs will be valuable research tools for further investigating the structure and function of the CHIKV CP.

  8. Docking of Antibodies into Cavities in DNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quyang, X; Stefano, Mattia De; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart

    2017-01-01

    -selective immobilization of antibodies in designed cavities in 2D and 3D DNA origami structures. Two tris(NTA) modified strands are inserted into the cavity to form NTA-metal complexes with histidine clusters on the Fc domain. Subsequent covalent linkage to the antibody was achieved by coupling to lysines. Atomic force...... microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) validated efficient antibody immobilization in the origami structures. The increased ability to control the orientation of antibodies in nanostructures and at surfaces has potential for directing the interactions of antibodies with targets...

  9. Face Detection and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jain, Anil K

    2004-01-01

    This report describes research efforts towards developing algorithms for a robust face recognition system to overcome many of the limitations found in existing two-dimensional facial recognition systems...

  10. Graphical symbol recognition

    OpenAIRE

    K.C. , Santosh; Wendling , Laurent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The chapter focuses on one of the key issues in document image processing i.e., graphical symbol recognition. Graphical symbol recognition is a sub-field of a larger research domain: pattern recognition. The chapter covers several approaches (i.e., statistical, structural and syntactic) and specially designed symbol recognition techniques inspired by real-world industrial problems. It, in general, contains research problems, state-of-the-art methods that convey basic s...

  11. Non-antibody protein-based biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrigno, Paul?Ko

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors that depend on a physical or chemical measurement can be adversely affected by non-specific interactions. For example, a biosensor designed to measure specifically the levels of a rare analyte can give false positive results if there is even a small amount of interaction with a highly abundant but irrelevant molecule. To overcome this limitation, the biosensor community has frequently turned to antibody molecules as recognition elements because they are renowned for their exquisite...

  12. Antibody-Conjugated Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Arruebo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have found their way into the fields of Biotechnology and Medicine. Nanoparticles by themselves offer specific physicochemical properties that they do not exhibit in bulk form, where materials show constant physical properties regardless of size. Antibodies are nanosize biological products that are part of the specific immune system. In addition to their own properties as pathogens or toxin neutralizers, as well as in the recruitment of immune elements (complement, improving phagocytosis, cytotoxicity antibody dependent by natural killer cells, etc., they could carry several elements (toxins, drugs, fluorochroms, or even nanoparticles, etc. and be used in several diagnostic procedures, or even in therapy to destroy a specific target. The conjugation of antibodies to nanoparticles can generate a product that combines the properties of both. For example, they can combine the small size of nanoparticles and their special thermal, imaging, drug carrier, or magnetic characteristics with the abilities of antibodies, such as specific and selective recognition. The hybrid product will show versatility and specificity. In this review, we analyse both antibodies and nanoparticles, focusing especially on the recent developments for antibody-conjugated nanoparticles, offering the researcher an overview of the different applications and possibilities of these hybrid carriers.

  13. Recognition and Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Recognition and toleration are ways of relating to the diversity characteristic of multicultural societies. The article concerns the possible meanings of toleration and recognition, and the conflict that is often claimed to exist between these two approaches to diversity. Different forms...... or interpretations of recognition and toleration are considered, confusing and problematic uses of the terms are noted, and the compatibility of toleration and recognition is discussed. The article argues that there is a range of legitimate and importantly different conceptions of both toleration and recognition...

  14. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  15. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  16. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  17. Human antibody recognition of Anisakidae and Trichinella spp. in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, L N; Krause, T Grove; Koch, A

    2007-01-01

    . Enterobius vermicularis was found in one sample and Blastocystis hominis in 32 samples, but no other intestinal parasites were identified. In total, 304 children had elevated total IgE levels. There was a significant association between Trichinella seropositivity and high levels of total IgE, but not between...

  18. The Francisella tularensis proteome and its recognition by antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L.N. Kilmury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. The extreme virulence of the pathogen in humans, combined with the low infectious dose and the ease of dissemination by aerosol have led to concerns about its abuse as a bioweapon. Until recently, nothing was known about the virulence mechanisms and even now, there is still a relatively poor understanding of pathogen virulence. Completion of increasing numbers of Francisella genome sequences, combined with comparative genomics and proteomics studies, are contributing to the knowledge in this area. Tularemia may be treated with antibiotics, but there is currently no licensed vaccine. An attenuated strain, the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS has been used to vaccinate military and at risk laboratory personnel, but safety concerns mean that it is unlikely to be licensed by the FDA for general use. Little is known about the protective immunity induced by vaccination with LVS, in humans or animals models. Immunoproteomics studies with sera from infected humans or vaccinated mouse strains, are being used in gel based or proteome microarray approaches to give insight into the humoral immune response. In addition, these data have the potential to be exploited in the identification of new diagnostic or protective antigens, the design of next generation live vaccine strains, and the development of subunit vaccines. Herein, we briefly review the current knowledge from Francisella comparative proteomics studies and then focus upon the findings from immunoproteomics approaches.

  19. Multimodal eye recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  20. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  1. Pattern recognition & machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Anzai, Y

    1992-01-01

    This is the first text to provide a unified and self-contained introduction to visual pattern recognition and machine learning. It is useful as a general introduction to artifical intelligence and knowledge engineering, and no previous knowledge of pattern recognition or machine learning is necessary. Basic for various pattern recognition and machine learning methods. Translated from Japanese, the book also features chapter exercises, keywords, and summaries.

  2. Pattern Recognition of the Multiple Sclerosis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana K. Zabad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During recent decades, the autoimmune disease neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD, once broadly classified under the umbrella of multiple sclerosis (MS, has been extended to include autoimmune inflammatory conditions of the central nervous system (CNS, which are now diagnosable with serum serological tests. These antibody-mediated inflammatory diseases of the CNS share a clinical presentation to MS. A number of practical learning points emerge in this review, which is geared toward the pattern recognition of optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, brainstem/cerebellar and hemispheric tumefactive demyelinating lesion (TDL-associated MS, aquaporin-4-antibody and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-antibody NMOSD, overlap syndrome, and some yet-to-be-defined/classified demyelinating disease, all unspecifically labeled under MS syndrome. The goal of this review is to increase clinicians’ awareness of the clinical nuances of the autoimmune conditions for MS and NMSOD, and to highlight highly suggestive patterns of clinical, paraclinical or imaging presentations in order to improve differentiation. With overlay in clinical manifestations between MS and NMOSD, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain, orbits and spinal cord, serology, and most importantly, high index of suspicion based on pattern recognition, will help lead to the final diagnosis.

  3. Statistical Pattern Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Statistical pattern recognition relates to the use of statistical techniques for analysing data measurements in order to extract information and make justified decisions.  It is a very active area of study and research, which has seen many advances in recent years. Applications such as data mining, web searching, multimedia data retrieval, face recognition, and cursive handwriting recognition, all require robust and efficient pattern recognition techniques. This third edition provides an introduction to statistical pattern theory and techniques, with material drawn from a wide range of fields,

  4. Contribution of peptide backbone to Anti-citrulline-dependent antibody reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Dam, Catharina; Olsen, Dorthe

    2015-01-01

    . As ACPAs have been suggested to be involved in the development of RA, knowledge about these antibodies may be crucial. In this study, we examined the influence of peptide backbone for ACPA reactivity in immunoassays. The antibodies were found to be reactive with a central Cit-Gly motif being essential...... is essential for antibody reactivity. Based on these findings it was speculated that any amino acid sequence, which brings the peptide into a properly folded structure for antibody recognition is sufficient for antibody reactivity. These findings are in accordance with the current hypothesis that structural...

  5. Disgust and fear recognition in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Atkinson, Anthony P; Sprengelmeyer, Anke; Mair-Walther, Johanna; Jacobi, Christian; Wildemann, Brigitte; Dittrich, Winand H; Hacke, Werner

    2010-05-01

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PNLE) affects limbic portions of the brain associated with recognition of social signals of emotions. Yet it is not known whether this perceptual ability is impaired in individuals with PNLE. We therefore conducted a single case study to explore possible impairments in recognising facially, vocally and bodily expressed emotions, using standardised emotion recognition tests. Facial expression recognition was tested with two forced-choice emotion-labelling tasks using static faces with either prototypical or morphed blends of basic emotions. Recognition of vocally and bodily expressed emotions was also tested with forced-choice labelling tasks, one based on prosodic cues, the other on whole-body movement cues. We found a deficit in fear and disgust recognition from both face and voice, while recognition of bodily expressed emotions was unaffected. These findings are consistent with data from previous studies demonstrating critical roles for certain brain regions - particularly the amygdala and insular cortex - in processing facially and vocally displayed basic emotions, and furthermore, suggest that recognition of bodily expressed emotions may not depend on neural structures involved in facial and vocal emotion recognition. Impaired facial and vocal emotion recognition may form a further neuropsychological marker of limbic encephalitis, in addition to the already well-described mnestic deficits. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  7. Specificity of rabbit antibodies elicited by related synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Houghten, R A; Chillemi, F; Zito, R; Centis, D

    1986-01-01

    Three 17-residue peptides, presenting from 65% to 70% sequence homology, and one endecapeptide, with no apparent homology with the first three, were chemically synthesized and investigated in their ability to elicit rabbit antipeptide antibodies. The complex cross reactivities of the antisera were investigated by testing the binding of the antibodies to the intact peptides, to their enzymatic fragments, and by the use of specific immunoadsorbents. Antipeptide antibodies may or may not crossreact with related "parent" peptides, this depending upon number, distribution, and localization of amino acid differences in low or high antigenicity regions of the immunogen. Related peptides may elicit antibodies that crossreact almost completely, and therefore not specific for one or the other "parent" peptide. Those antibodies may therefore be of little use for the selective recognition of closely related structures.

  8. DISTINCT ANTIBODY SPECIES: STRUCTURAL DIFFERENCES CREATING THERAPEUTIC OPPORTUNITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyldermans, Serge; Smider, Vaughn V.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have been a remarkably successful class of molecules for binding a large number of antigens in therapeutic, diagnostic, and research applications. Typical antibodies derived from mouse or human sources use the surface formed by complementarity determining regions (CDRs) on the variable regions of the heavy chain/light chain heterodimer, which typically forms a relatively flat binding surface. Alternative species, particularly camelids and bovines, provide a unique paradigm for antigen recognition through novel domains which form the antigen binding paratope. For camelids, heavy chain antibodies bind antigen with only a single heavy chain variable region, in the absence of light chains. In bovines, ultralong CDR-H3 regions form an independently folding minidomain, which protrudes from the surface of the antibody and is diverse in both its sequence and disulfide patterns. The atypical paratopes of camelids and bovines potentially provide the ability to interact with different epitopes, particularly recessed or concave surfaces, compared to traditional antibodies. PMID:26922135

  9. Antibody Fragments as Probe in Biosensor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Muyldermans

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Today’s proteomic analyses are generating increasing numbers of biomarkers, making it essential to possess highly specific probes able to recognize those targets. Antibodies are considered to be the first choice as molecular recognition units due to their target specificity and affinity, which make them excellent probes in biosensor development. However several problems such as difficult directional immobilization, unstable behavior, loss of specificity and steric hindrance, may arise from using these large molecules. Luckily, protein engineering techniques offer designed antibody formats suitable for biomarker analysis. Minimization strategies of antibodies into Fab fragments, scFv or even single-domain antibody fragments like VH, VL or VHHs are reviewed. Not only the size of the probe but also other issues like choice of immobilization tag, type of solid support and probe stability are of critical importance in assay development for biosensing. In this respect, multiple approaches to specifically orient and couple antibody fragments in a generic one-step procedure directly on a biosensor substrate are discussed.

  10. Relationship between natural and heme-mediated antibody polyreactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadzhieva, Maya; Vassilev, Tchavdar [Stephan Angelov Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Dimitrov, Jordan D., E-mail: jordan.dimitrov@crc.jussieu.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France)

    2016-03-25

    Polyreactive antibodies represent a considerable fraction of the immune repertoires. Some antibodies acquire polyreactivity post-translationally after interaction with various redox-active substances, including heme. Recently we have demonstrated that heme binding to a naturally polyreactive antibody (SPE7) results in a considerable broadening of the repertoire of recognized antigens. A question remains whether the presence of certain level of natural polyreactivity of antibodies is a prerequisite for heme-induced further extension of antigen binding potential. Here we used a second monoclonal antibody (Hg32) with unknown specificity and absence of intrinsic polyreactivity as a model to study the potential of heme to induce polyreactivity of antibodies. We demonstrated that exposure to heme greatly extends the antigen binding potential of Hg32, suggesting that the intrinsic binding promiscuity is not a prerequisite for the induction of polyreactivity by heme. In addition we compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction of heme-exposed antibodies with a panel of unrelated antigens. These analyses revealed that the two heme-sensitive antibodies adopt different mechanisms of binding to the same set of antigens. This study contributes to understanding the phenomenon of induced antibody polyreactivity. The data may also be of importance for understanding of physiological and pathological roles of polyreactive antibodies. - Highlights: • Exposure of certain monoclonal IgE antibodies to heme results in gain of antigen binding polyreactivity. • Natural polyreactivity of antibodies is dispensable for acquisition of polyreactivity through interaction with heme. • Heme-induced monoclonal IgE antibodies differ in their thermodynamic mechanisms of antigen recognition.

  11. Adaptive mutations alter antibody structure and dynamics during affinity maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Walker, Ross C; Chen, Tingjian; Stanfield, Robyn L; Wilson, Ian A; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2015-03-24

    While adaptive mutations can bestow new functions on proteins via the introduction or optimization of reactive centers, or other structural changes, a role for the optimization of protein dynamics also seems likely but has been more difficult to evaluate. Antibody (Ab) affinity maturation is an example of adaptive evolution wherein the adaptive mutations may be identified and Abs may be raised to specific targets that facilitate the characterization of protein dynamics. Here, we report the characterization of three affinity matured Abs that evolved from a common germline precursor to bind the chromophoric antigen (Ag), 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). In addition to characterizing the sequence, molecular recognition, and structure of each Ab, we characterized the dynamics of each complex by determining their mechanical response to an applied force via three-pulse photon echo peak shift (3PEPS) spectroscopy and deconvoluting the response into elastic, anelastic, and plastic components. We find that for one Ab, affinity maturation was accomplished via the introduction of a single functional group that mediates a direct contact with MPTS and results in a complex with little anelasticity or plasticity. In the other two cases, more mutations were introduced but none directly contact MPTS, and while their effects on structure are subtle, their effects on anelasticity and plasticity are significant, with the level of plasticity correlated with specificity, suggesting that the optimization of protein dynamics may have contributed to affinity maturation. A similar optimization of structure and dynamics may contribute to the evolution of other proteins.

  12. Pattern recognition principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, J. T.; Gonzalez, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The present work gives an account of basic principles and available techniques for the analysis and design of pattern processing and recognition systems. Areas covered include decision functions, pattern classification by distance functions, pattern classification by likelihood functions, the perceptron and the potential function approaches to trainable pattern classifiers, statistical approach to trainable classifiers, pattern preprocessing and feature selection, and syntactic pattern recognition.

  13. Paradigms in object recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutihac, R.; Mutihac, R.C.

    1999-09-01

    A broad range of approaches has been proposed and applied for the complex and rather difficult task of object recognition that involves the determination of object characteristics and object classification into one of many a priori object types. Our paper revises briefly the three main different paradigms in pattern recognition, namely Bayesian statistics, neural networks, and expert systems. (author)

  14. Challenging ocular image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauca, V. Paúl; Forkin, Michael; Xu, Xiao; Plemmons, Robert; Ross, Arun A.

    2011-06-01

    Ocular recognition is a new area of biometric investigation targeted at overcoming the limitations of iris recognition performance in the presence of non-ideal data. There are several advantages for increasing the area beyond the iris, yet there are also key issues that must be addressed such as size of the ocular region, factors affecting performance, and appropriate corpora to study these factors in isolation. In this paper, we explore and identify some of these issues with the goal of better defining parameters for ocular recognition. An empirical study is performed where iris recognition methods are contrasted with texture and point operators on existing iris and face datasets. The experimental results show a dramatic recognition performance gain when additional features are considered in the presence of poor quality iris data, offering strong evidence for extending interest beyond the iris. The experiments also highlight the need for the direct collection of additional ocular imagery.

  15. Recognition and Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Reagan

    2016-01-01

    The complexities of the meanings of “to recognize” and “recognition” are important in their roles in the realm of justice. I include in the concept of justice, the judiciary, both civil and criminal; distributive justice; and, social and political justice. For each one of these, there are multiple meanings of recognition that are important to understanding their foundation and their scope. There are meanings of recognition that are relevant to other aspects of social justice as the recognition of marginal, oppressed, devalued, groups as deserving of being treated as equals. The structure of my paper is to go through the various meanings and categories of meanings of “to recognize” and “recognition.” I give an account of each of the types of justice and show how various kinds of recognition are relevant to each kind of justice.

  16. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Research Task Force Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkan, D.; Derksen, R.; Levy, R.; Machin, S.; Ortel, T.; Pierangeli, S.; Roubey, R.; Lockshin, M.

    The Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) Clinical Research Task Force (CRTF) was one of six Task Forces developed by the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL) organization committee with the purpose of: a) evaluating the limitations of APS clinical research and developing

  17. Forced marriage as a crime against humanity

    OpenAIRE

    Czelusniak, Tanja Erika Andersen

    2016-01-01

    Forced marriage is one of the newest crimes against humanity adjudicated at international criminal tribunals. This thesis shall discuss the evolution of this new crime, asking: Has international jurisprudence come to a point of recognition of forced marriage as a separate crime against humanity and if so, is it viable?

  18. P-fimbriae in the presence of anti-PapA antibodies: new insight of antibodies action against pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezaei, Narges; Singh, Bhupender; Bullitt, Esther; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Andersson, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli establish urinary tract infections by attaching to host epithelial cells using adhesive organelles called fimbriae. Fimbriae are helix-like structures with a remarkable adaptability, offering safeguarding for bacteria exposed to changing fluid forces in the urinary tract. We challenged this property of P-fimbriae by cross-linking their subunits with shaft-specific antibodies and measuring the corresponding force response at a single organelle level. Our data show compromised extension and rewinding of P-fimbriae in the presence of antibodies and reduced fimbrial elasticity, which are important properties of fimbriae contributing to the ability of bacteria to cause urinary tract infections. The reduced elasticity found by cross-linking fimbrial subunits could thus be another assignment for antibodies; in addition to marking bacteria as foreign, antibodies physically compromise fimbrial function. We suggest that our assay and results will be a starting point for further investigations aimed at inhibiting sustained bacterial adhesion by antibodies.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  20. Spectrum of antibody profiles in tuberculous elephants, cervids, and cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Gortázar, Christian; Miller, Michele A; Waters, W Ray

    2018-02-01

    Using multi-antigen print immunoassay and DPP ® VetTB Assay approved in the United States for testing captive cervids and elephants, we analyzed antibody recognition of MPB83 and CFP10/ESAT-6 antigens in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), fallow deer (Dama dama), elk (Cervus elaphus), and cattle (Bos taurus) infected with Mycobacterium bovis. Serum IgG reactivity to MPB83 was found in the vast majority of tuberculous cattle and cervid species among which white-tailed deer and elk also showed significant CFP10/ESAT-6 recognition rates with added serodiagnostic value. In contrast, the infected elephants developed antibody responses mainly to CFP10/ESAT-6 with MPB83 reactivity being relatively low. The findings demonstrate distinct patterns of predominant antigen recognition by different animal hosts in tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  2. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  3. Cell-Free Synthesis Meets Antibody Production: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlitt Stech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered antibodies are key players in therapy, diagnostics and research. In addition to full size immunoglobulin gamma (IgG molecules, smaller formats of recombinant antibodies, such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv and antigen binding fragments (Fab, have emerged as promising alternatives since they possess different advantageous properties. Cell-based production technologies of antibodies and antibody fragments are well-established, allowing researchers to design and manufacture highly specific molecular recognition tools. However, as these technologies are accompanied by the drawbacks of being rather time-consuming and cost-intensive, efficient and powerful cell-free protein synthesis systems have been developed over the last decade as alternatives. So far, prokaryotic cell-free systems have been the focus of interest. Recently, eukaryotic in vitro translation systems have enriched the antibody production pipeline, as these systems are able to mimic the natural pathway of antibody synthesis in eukaryotic cells. This review aims to overview and summarize the advances made in the production of antibodies and antibody fragments in cell-free systems.

  4. Contextual modulation of biases in face recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Maria Felisberti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to recognize the faces of potential cooperators and cheaters is fundamental to social exchanges, given that cooperation for mutual benefit is expected. Studies addressing biases in face recognition have so far proved inconclusive, with reports of biases towards faces of cheaters, biases towards faces of cooperators, or no biases at all. This study attempts to uncover possible causes underlying such discrepancies. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Four experiments were designed to investigate biases in face recognition during social exchanges when behavioral descriptors (prosocial, antisocial or neutral embedded in different scenarios were tagged to faces during memorization. Face recognition, measured as accuracy and response latency, was tested with modified yes-no, forced-choice and recall tasks (N = 174. An enhanced recognition of faces tagged with prosocial descriptors was observed when the encoding scenario involved financial transactions and the rules of the social contract were not explicit (experiments 1 and 2. Such bias was eliminated or attenuated by making participants explicitly aware of "cooperative", "cheating" and "neutral/indifferent" behaviors via a pre-test questionnaire and then adding such tags to behavioral descriptors (experiment 3. Further, in a social judgment scenario with descriptors of salient moral behaviors, recognition of antisocial and prosocial faces was similar, but significantly better than neutral faces (experiment 4. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the relevance of descriptors and scenarios of social exchange in face recognition, when the frequency of prosocial and antisocial individuals in a group is similar. Recognition biases towards prosocial faces emerged when descriptors did not state the rules of a social contract or the moral status of a behavior, and they point to the existence of broad and flexible cognitive abilities finely tuned to minor changes in social context.

  5. Contextual modulation of biases in face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisberti, Fatima Maria; Pavey, Louisa

    2010-09-23

    The ability to recognize the faces of potential cooperators and cheaters is fundamental to social exchanges, given that cooperation for mutual benefit is expected. Studies addressing biases in face recognition have so far proved inconclusive, with reports of biases towards faces of cheaters, biases towards faces of cooperators, or no biases at all. This study attempts to uncover possible causes underlying such discrepancies. Four experiments were designed to investigate biases in face recognition during social exchanges when behavioral descriptors (prosocial, antisocial or neutral) embedded in different scenarios were tagged to faces during memorization. Face recognition, measured as accuracy and response latency, was tested with modified yes-no, forced-choice and recall tasks (N = 174). An enhanced recognition of faces tagged with prosocial descriptors was observed when the encoding scenario involved financial transactions and the rules of the social contract were not explicit (experiments 1 and 2). Such bias was eliminated or attenuated by making participants explicitly aware of "cooperative", "cheating" and "neutral/indifferent" behaviors via a pre-test questionnaire and then adding such tags to behavioral descriptors (experiment 3). Further, in a social judgment scenario with descriptors of salient moral behaviors, recognition of antisocial and prosocial faces was similar, but significantly better than neutral faces (experiment 4). The results highlight the relevance of descriptors and scenarios of social exchange in face recognition, when the frequency of prosocial and antisocial individuals in a group is similar. Recognition biases towards prosocial faces emerged when descriptors did not state the rules of a social contract or the moral status of a behavior, and they point to the existence of broad and flexible cognitive abilities finely tuned to minor changes in social context.

  6. Work and Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willig, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    individual and collective identity formation and has led to an increase in social pathological illnesses such as stress and depression. By juxtaposing these analyses with Honneth’s theory on recognition, we conclude that the contemporary logic of work is unable to provide adequate forms of recognition......The article deals with the relationship between work and recognition, taking Axel Honneth’s social-philosophical theory of the struggle for recognition as its point of departure. In order to give sociological substance to Honneth’s theory, we turn to three contemporary social theorists - Jean......-Pierre Le Goff, Christophe Dejours and Emmanuel Renault. In spite of many differences, their work is united by a critical description of the logic of work and its consequences for individual individuation. These theorists agree that the growth of autonomy, flexibility and mobility has destabilised...

  7. Forensic speaker recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwly, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The aim of forensic speaker recognition is to establish links between individuals and criminal activities, through audio speech recordings. This field is multidisciplinary, combining predominantly phonetics, linguistics, speech signal processing, and forensic statistics. On these bases, expert-based

  8. Antibodies Against Melanin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... Departments of Internal Medicine and Anatomical Pathology, University of Stellenbosch and MRC. Pigment Metabolism Research Unit, ... at the production of antibodies against natural melanoprotein. and a consideration of our negative .... the random polymerization of several monomers, antibody formed ...

  9. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  10. The Recognition Of Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsass, Peter; Jensen, Bodil; Mørup, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    Elsass P., Jensen B., Morup R., Thogersen M.H. (2007). The Recognition Of Fatigue: A qualitative study of life-stories from rehabilitation clients. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 11 (2), 75-87......Elsass P., Jensen B., Morup R., Thogersen M.H. (2007). The Recognition Of Fatigue: A qualitative study of life-stories from rehabilitation clients. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 11 (2), 75-87...

  11. Wood Species Recognition System

    OpenAIRE

    Bremananth R; Nithya B; Saipriya R

    2009-01-01

    The proposed system identifies the species of the wood using the textural features present in its barks. Each species of a wood has its own unique patterns in its bark, which enabled the proposed system to identify it accurately. Automatic wood recognition system has not yet been well established mainly due to lack of research in this area and the difficulty in obtaining the wood database. In our work, a wood recognition system has been designed based on pre-processing te...

  12. Evaluating music emotion recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do...... not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER system, and conclude with recommendations....

  13. Single Domain Antibodies as New Biomarker Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Katja; Leow, Chiuan Yee; Chuah, Candy; McCarthy, James

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers are defined as indicators of biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacological responses to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers have been widely used for early detection, prediction of response after treatment, and for monitoring the progression of diseases. Antibodies represent promising tools for recognition of biomarkers, and are widely deployed as analytical tools in clinical settings. For immunodiagnostics, antibodies are now exploited as binders for antigens of interest across a range of platforms. More recently, the discovery of antibody surface display and combinatorial chemistry techniques has allowed the exploration of new binders from a range of animals, for instance variable domains of new antigen receptors (VNAR) from shark and variable heavy chain domains (VHH) or nanobodies from camelids. These single domain antibodies (sdAbs) have some advantages over conventional murine immunoglobulin owing to the lack of a light chain, making them the smallest natural biomarker binders thus far identified. In this review, we will discuss several biomarkers used as a means to validate diseases progress. The potential functionality of modern singe domain antigen binders derived from phylogenetically early animals as new biomarker detectors for current diagnostic and research platforms development will be described. PMID:29039819

  14. Single Domain Antibodies as New Biomarker Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiuan Herng Leow

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are defined as indicators of biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacological responses to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers have been widely used for early detection, prediction of response after treatment, and for monitoring the progression of diseases. Antibodies represent promising tools for recognition of biomarkers, and are widely deployed as analytical tools in clinical settings. For immunodiagnostics, antibodies are now exploited as binders for antigens of interest across a range of platforms. More recently, the discovery of antibody surface display and combinatorial chemistry techniques has allowed the exploration of new binders from a range of animals, for instance variable domains of new antigen receptors (VNAR from shark and variable heavy chain domains (VHH or nanobodies from camelids. These single domain antibodies (sdAbs have some advantages over conventional murine immunoglobulin owing to the lack of a light chain, making them the smallest natural biomarker binders thus far identified. In this review, we will discuss several biomarkers used as a means to validate diseases progress. The potential functionality of modern singe domain antigen binders derived from phylogenetically early animals as new biomarker detectors for current diagnostic and research platforms development will be described.

  15. Why recognition is rational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clintin P. Davis-Stober

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Recognition Heuristic (Gigerenzer and Goldstein, 1996; Goldstein and Gigerenzer, 2002 makes the counter-intuitive prediction that a decision maker utilizing less information may do as well as, or outperform, an idealized decision maker utilizing more information. We lay a theoretical foundation for the use of single-variable heuristics such as the Recognition Heuristic as an optimal decision strategy within a linear modeling framework. We identify conditions under which over-weighting a single predictor is a mini-max strategy among a class of a priori chosen weights based on decision heuristics with respect to a measure of statistical lack of fit we call ``risk''. These strategies, in turn, outperform standard multiple regression as long as the amount of data available is limited. We also show that, under related conditions, weighting only one variable and ignoring all others produces the same risk as ignoring the single variable and weighting all others. This approach has the advantage of generalizing beyond the original environment of the Recognition Heuristic to situations with more than two choice options, binary or continuous representations of recognition, and to other single variable heuristics. We analyze the structure of data used in some prior recognition tasks and find that it matches the sufficient conditions for optimality in our results. Rather than being a poor or adequate substitute for a compensatory model, the Recognition Heuristic closely approximates an optimal strategy when a decision maker has finite data about the world.

  16. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  17. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  18. Forced marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Guidelines to help A&E staff and other healthcare professionals who suspect cases of forced marriage were launched this month by the government. The guidelines provide practical advice on how to recognise the warning signs, and what to do if patients disclose that they have been, or are about to be, forced to marry. The guidelines, Dealing with Cases of Forced Marriage, are available at www.fco.gov.uk/forcedmarriage.

  19. Antibody structural modeling with prediction of immunoglobulin structure (PIGS)

    KAUST Repository

    Marcatili, Paolo

    2014-11-06

    © 2014 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved. Antibodies (or immunoglobulins) are crucial for defending organisms from pathogens, but they are also key players in many medical, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. The ability to predict their structure and the specific residues involved in antigen recognition has several useful applications in all of these areas. Over the years, we have developed or collaborated in developing a strategy that enables researchers to predict the 3D structure of antibodies with a very satisfactory accuracy. The strategy is completely automated and extremely fast, requiring only a few minutes (~10 min on average) to build a structural model of an antibody. It is based on the concept of canonical structures of antibody loops and on our understanding of the way light and heavy chains pack together.

  20. Page Recognition: Quantum Leap In Recognition Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry

    1989-07-01

    No milestone has proven as elusive as the always-approaching "year of the LAN," but the "year of the scanner" might claim the silver medal. Desktop scanners have been around almost as long as personal computers. And everyone thinks they are used for obvious desktop-publishing and business tasks like scanning business documents, magazine articles and other pages, and translating those words into files your computer understands. But, until now, the reality fell far short of the promise. Because it's true that scanners deliver an accurate image of the page to your computer, but the software to recognize this text has been woefully disappointing. Old optical-character recognition (OCR) software recognized such a limited range of pages as to be virtually useless to real users. (For example, one OCR vendor specified 12-point Courier font from an IBM Selectric typewriter: the same font in 10-point, or from a Diablo printer, was unrecognizable!) Computer dealers have told me the chasm between OCR expectations and reality is so broad and deep that nine out of ten prospects leave their stores in disgust when they learn the limitations. And this is a very important, very unfortunate gap. Because the promise of recognition -- what people want it to do -- carries with it tremendous improvements in our productivity and ability to get tons of written documents into our computers where we can do real work with it. The good news is that a revolutionary new development effort has led to the new technology of "page recognition," which actually does deliver the promise we've always wanted from OCR. I'm sure every reader appreciates the breakthrough represented by the laser printer and page-makeup software, a combination so powerful it created new reasons for buying a computer. A similar breakthrough is happening right now in page recognition: the Macintosh (and, I must admit, other personal computers) equipped with a moderately priced scanner and OmniPage software (from Caere

  1. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  2. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide......-antibody interface and the antibody intraface.the microenvironment and ecology of Acaryochloris and Prochloron, and in this thesis we attempted to further describe the distribution, growth characteristics and adaptive/regulatory mechanisms of these two cyanobacteria, both in their natural habitat and under defined...

  3. Different forces

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    The different forces, together with a pictorial analogy of how the exchange of particles works. The table lists the relative strength of the couplings, the quanta associated with the force fields and the bodies or phenomena in which they have a dominant role.

  4. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  5. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  6. Bifunctional antibodies for radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Bardies, M; Peltier, P; Gautherot, E; Barbet, J

    1995-04-01

    In two-step targeting technique using bifunctional antibodies, a nonradiolabeled immunoconjugate with slow uptake kinetics (several days) is initially injected, followed by a small radiolabeled hapten with fast kinetics (several hours) that binds to the bispecific immunoconjugate already taken up by the tumor target. In patients with colorectal or medullary thyroid cancer, clinical studies performed with an anti-CEA/anti-DTPA-indium bifunctional antibody and an indium-111-labeled di-DTPA-TL bivalent hapten showed that tumor uptake was not modified compared to results for F(ab')2 fragments of the same anti-CEA antibody directly labeled with indium-111, whereas the radioactivity of normal tissues was significantly reduced (3- to 6-fold). The fast tumor uptake kinetics (several hours) and high or very high tumor-to-normal tissue ratios obtained with the bifunctional antibody technique are favorable parameters for efficient radioimmunotherapy.

  7. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibody Blood Tests Researchers have discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of ... do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? ...

  8. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E

    1996-01-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might ...

  9. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E

    1996-01-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might...... peptide/MHC complexes....

  10. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEAKER RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen ERTAŞ

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available The explosive growth of information technology in the last decade has made a considerable impact on the design and construction of systems for human-machine communication, which is becoming increasingly important in many aspects of life. Amongst other speech processing tasks, a great deal of attention has been devoted to developing procedures that identify people from their voices, and the design and construction of speaker recognition systems has been a fascinating enterprise pursued over many decades. This paper introduces speaker recognition in general and discusses its relevant parameters in relation to system performance.

  11. Touchless palmprint recognition systems

    CERN Document Server

    Genovese, Angelo; Scotti, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    This book examines the context, motivation and current status of biometric systems based on the palmprint, with a specific focus on touchless and less-constrained systems. It covers new technologies in this rapidly evolving field and is one of the first comprehensive books on palmprint recognition systems.It discusses the research literature and the most relevant industrial applications of palmprint biometrics, including the low-cost solutions based on webcams. The steps of biometric recognition are described in detail, including acquisition setups, algorithms, and evaluation procedures. Const

  12. Direct measurements of intermolecular forces by chemical force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezenov, Dmitri Vitalievich

    1999-12-01

    Detailed description of intermolecular forces is key to understanding a wide range of phenomena from molecular recognition to materials failure. The unique features of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to make point contact force measurements with ultra high sensitivity and to generate spatial maps of surface topography and forces have been extended to include measurements between well-defined organic molecular groups. Chemical modification of AFM probes with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was used to make them sensitive to specific molecular interactions. This novel chemical force microscopy (CFM) technique was used to probe forces between different molecular groups in a range of environments (vacuum, organic liquids and aqueous solutions); measure surface energetics on a nanometer scale; determine pK values of the surface acid and base groups; measure forces to stretch and unbind a short synthetic DNA duplex and map the spatial distribution of specific functional groups and their ionization state. Studies of adhesion forces demonstrated the important contribution of hydrogen bonding to interactions between simple organic functionalities. The chemical identity of the tip and substrate surfaces as well as the medium had a dramatic effect on adhesion between model monolayers. A direct correlation between surface free energy and adhesion forces was established. The adhesion between epoxy polymer and model mixed SAMs varied with the amount of hydrogen bonding component in the monolayers. A consistent interpretation of CFM measurements in polar solvents was provided by contact mechanics models and intermolecular force components theory. Forces between tips and surfaces functionalized with SAMs terminating in acid or base groups depended on their ionization state. A novel method of force titration was introduced for highly local characterization of the pK's of surface functional groups. The pH-dependent changes in friction forces were exploited to map spatially the

  13. Galeotti on recognition as inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2008-01-01

    Anna Elisabetta Galeotti's theory of 'toleration as recognition' has been criticised by Peter Jones for being conceptually incoherent, since liberal toleration presupposes a negative attitude to differences, whereas multicultural recognition requires positive affirmation hereof. The paper spells...... out Galeotti's justification for recognition as a requirement of liberal justice in detail and asks in what sense the policies supported by Galeotti are policies of recognition. It is argued that Jones misrepresents Galeotti's theory, insofar as this sense of recognition actually is compatible...... in respects that need to be filled out in order to secure compatibility with liberalism, and that this may prove problematic. Keywords: liberalism; multiculturalism; recognition; toleration...

  14. Recognition of fractal graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perepelitsa, VA; Sergienko, [No Value; Kochkarov, AM

    1999-01-01

    Definitions of prefractal and fractal graphs are introduced, and they are used to formulate mathematical models in different fields of knowledge. The topicality of fractal-graph recognition from the point of view, of fundamental improvement in the efficiency of the solution of algorithmic problems

  15. Optical Character Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  16. Tolerance and recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Marius Hansteen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though “toleration” and “recognition” designate opposing attitudes (to tolerate something, implies a negative stance towards it, whereas recognition seems to imply a positive one, the concepts do not constitute mutually exclusive alternatives. However, “toleration” is often associated with liberal universalism, focusing on individual rights, whereas “recognition” often connotes communitarian perspectives, focusing on relations and identity. This paper argues that toleration may be founded on recognition, and that recognition may imply toleration. In outlining a differentiated understanding of the relationship between toleration and recognition, it seems apt to avoid an all-to-general dichotomy between universalism and particularism or, in other words, to reach beyond the debate between liberalism and communitarianism in political philosophy.The paper takes as its starting point the view that the discussion on toleration and diversity in intercultural communication is one of the contexts where it seems important to get beyond the liberal/communitarian dichotomy. Some basic features of Rainer Forst’s theory of toleration and Axel Honneth’s theory of the struggle for recognition are presented, in order to develop a more substantial understanding of the relationship between the concepts of toleration and recognition. One lesson from Forst is that toleration is a normatively dependent concept, i.e., that it is impossible to deduce principles for toleration and its limits from a theory of toleration as such. A central lesson from Honneth is that recognition – understood as a basic human need – is always conflictual and therefore dynamic.Accordingly, a main point in the paper is that the theory of struggles for and about recognition (where struggles for designates struggles within an established order of recognition, and struggles about designates struggles that challenge established orders of recognition may clarify what

  17. Importance of ECM recognition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Importance of ECM recognition. Leishmaniasis transmitted by parasite injection into blood during blood meal of insect vector. Parasites home in macrophages of liver and spleen - adhere, penetrate, transform and replicate. Macrophage lysis - attack of neighbouring ...

  18. Facial Expression Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial

  19. Molecular recognition by gold, silver and copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauran, Yannick; Brioude, Arnaud; Coleman, Anthony W; Rhimi, Moez; Kim, Beonjoom

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic physical properties of the noble metal nanoparticles, which are highly sensitive to the nature of their local molecular environment, make such systems ideal for the detection of molecular recognition events. The current review describes the state of the art concerning molecular recognition of Noble metal nanoparticles. In the first part the preparation of such nanoparticles is discussed along with methods of capping and stabilization. A brief discussion of the three common methods of functionalization: Electrostatic adsorption; Chemisorption; Affinity-based coordination is given. In the second section a discussion of the optical and electrical properties of nanoparticles is given to aid the reader in understanding the use of such properties in molecular recognition. In the main section the various types of capping agents for molecular recognition; nucleic acid coatings, protein coatings and molecules from the family of supramolecular chemistry are described along with their numerous applications. Emphasis for the nucleic acids is on complementary oligonucleotide and aptamer recognition. For the proteins the recognition properties of antibodies form the core of the section. With respect to the supramolecular systems the cyclodextrins, calix[n]arenes, dendrimers, crown ethers and the cucurbitales are treated in depth. Finally a short section deals with the possible toxicity of the nanoparticles, a concern in public health. PMID:23977421

  20. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  1. A Recombinant Antibody with the Antigen-Specific, Major Histocompatibility Complex-Restricted Specificity of T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Peter S.; Stryhn, Anette; Hansen, Bjarke E.; Fugger, Lars; Engberg, Jan; Buus, Soren

    1996-03-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might lead to novel approaches in immunotherapy. However, it has proven difficult to generate antibodies with the specificity of T cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. Here we report that the phage display technology is a feasible alternative to generate antibodies recognizing specific, predetermined peptide/MHC complexes.

  2. Personalized Medicine for Crops? Opportunities for the Application of Molecular Recognition in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, Emily; Monreal, Carlos; DeRosa, Maria C

    2017-10-20

    This perspective examines the detection of rhizosphere biomarkers, namely, root exudates and microbial metabolites, using molecular recognition elements, such as molecularly imprinted polymers, antibodies, and aptamers. Tracking these compounds in the rhizosphere could provide valuable insight into the status of the crop and soil in a highly localized way. The outlook and potential impact of the combination of molecular recognition and other innovations, such as nanotechnology and precision agriculture, and the comparison to advances in personalized medicine are considered.

  3. School IPM Recognition and Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools and school districts can get support and recognition for implementation of school IPM. EPA is developing a program to provide recognition for school districts that are working towards or have achieved a level of success with school IPM programs.

  4. Replacing antibodies with modified DNA aptamers in vaccine potency assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trausch, Jeremiah J; Shank-Retzlaff, Mary; Verch, Thorsten

    2017-10-04

    Vaccine in vitro potency assays are vital regulatory tests that are used to confirm the presence and concentration of an antigen of interest in a form that directly or indirectly relates to protective activity in patients. Current assays come in many forms, but they almost exclusively use antibody reagents for selective detection of the target antigen. Antibodies provide specific recognition of vaccine antigens but also exhibit drawbacks such as stability limitations, cost, and lot-to-lot variation, which can make it challenging to maintain the reagent throughout the lifetime of the vaccine. We explored replacing antibodies with aptamers. Aptamers are macromolecules, such as nucleic acids, which can bind to their targets with high specificity and affinity, similar to that of antibodies. Some of the advantages of using aptamers over antibodies is that aptamers can be more stable, smaller, less expensive to produce, synthesized in vitro, and logistically easier to supply throughout the multi-decade lifespan of a commercial vaccine. We created modified DNA aptamers against the common vaccine carrier protein, CRM 197 . Several aptamers were discovered and one was chosen for further characterization. The binding kinetics of the aptamer revealed an off-rate 16-fold slower than anti-CRM 197 antibodies used for comparison. The aptamers were more sensitive than available antibodies in some assay formats and comparable in others. The aptamer epitope was mapped to the receptor-binding domain of CRM 197 , a site adjacent to a known antibody binding site. These data address some key aspects for a path forward in replacing antibodies with aptamers for use as critical reagents in vaccine assays. We further highlight the possibility of using nucleic acid reagents to develop next generation potency assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  6. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial Intelligence 17(1): 41–62. Hu M K 1962 Visual pattern recognition by moment invariants. IRE Trans. on Information Theory, IT-8,. 179–187. Huang F T, Zhou Z, Zhang H-J and Chen T 2000 Pose invariant face recognition, Proc. Fourth IEEE. International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, ...

  7. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Quaglia, Adamo; Epifano, Calogera M.

    2012-01-01

    The improvements of automatic face recognition during the last 2 decades have disclosed new applications like border control and camera surveillance. A new application field is forensic face recognition. Traditionally, face recognition by human experts has been used in forensics, but now there is a

  8. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  9. Platelet antibody: review of detection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, K.A.

    1988-10-01

    The driving force behind development of in vitro methods for platelet antibodies is identification of plasma factors causing platelet destruction. Early methods relied on measurement of platelet activation. Current methods are more specific and use a purified antibody against immunoglobulin or complement, which is usually labeled with /sup 125/I or tagged with an enzyme or fluorescein. Comparisons of quantitation of platelet-associated IgG show wide variability between different methods. The disparate results can be related both to differences in binding of secondary antibodies to immunoglobulin in solution compared to immunoglobulins attached to platelets and to the improper assumption that the binding ratio between the secondary detecting and primary antiplatelet antibody is one. Most assays can 1) identify neonatal isoimmune thrombocytopenia and posttransfusion purpura, 2) help to differentiate between immune and nonimmune thrombocytopenias, 3) help to sort out the offending drug when drug-induced thrombocytopenia is suspected, and 4) identify platelet alloantibodies and potential platelet donors via a cross match assay for refractory patients. However, the advantages of quantitative assays over qualitative methods with respect to predictions of patients clinical course and response to different treatments remain to be investigated. 61 references.

  10. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  11. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook

    1979-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  12. Utility of HLA Antibody Testing in Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalinka, Ana

    2015-01-01

    HLA antigens are polymorphic proteins expressed on donor kidney allograft endothelium and are critical targets for recipient immune recognition. HLA antibodies are risk factors for acute and chronic rejection and allograft loss. Solid-phase immunoassays for HLA antibody detection represent a major advance in sensitivity and specificity over cell-based methods and are widely used in organ allocation and pretransplant risk assessment. Post-transplant, development of de novo donor–specific HLA antibodies and/or increase in donor-specific antibodies from pretransplant levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Although single antigen bead assays have allowed sensitive detection of recipient HLA antibodies and their specificities, a number of interpretive considerations must be appreciated to understand test results in clinical and research contexts. This review, which is especially relevant for clinicians caring for transplant patients, discusses the technical aspects of single antigen bead assays, emphasizes their quantitative limitations, and explores the utility of HLA antibody testing in identifying and managing important pre- and post-transplant clinical outcomes. PMID:25804279

  13. Secondary Mechanisms of Affinity Maturation in the Human Antibody Repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan S. Briney

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available V(DJ recombination and somatic hypermutation (SHM are the primary mechanisms for diversification of the human antibody repertoire. These mechanisms allow for rapid humoral immune responses to a wide range of pathogenic challenges. V(DJ recombination efficiently generate a virtually limitless diversity through random recombination of variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J genes with diverse nontemplated junctions between the selected gene segments. Following antigen stimulation, affinity maturation by SHM produces antibodies with refined specificity mediated by mutations typically focused in complementarity determining regions (CDRs, which form the bulk of the antigen recognition site. While V(DJ recombination and SHM are responsible for much of the diversity of the antibody repertoire, there are several secondary mechanisms that, while less frequent, make substantial contributions to antibody diversity including V(DDJ recombination (or D-D fusion, somatic-hypermutation-associated insertions and deletions, and affinity maturation and antigen contact by non-CDR regions of the antibody. In addition to enhanced diversity, these mechanisms allow the production of antibodies that are critical to response to a variety of viral and bacterial pathogens but that would be difficult to generate using only the primary mechanisms of diversification.

  14. CNS syndromes associated with antibodies against metabotropic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Autoantibodies to Central nervous system (CNS) metabotropic receptors are associated with a growing family of autoimmune brain diseases, including encephalitis, basal ganglia encephalitis, Ophelia syndrome, and cerebellitis. The purpose of this review is to summarize the state of knowledge regarding the target receptors, the neurological autoimmune disorders, and the pathogenic mechanisms. Antibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor are associate with limbic encephalitis and severe seizures, often with small cell lung cancers. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antibodies associate with Ophelia syndrome, a relatively mild form of encephalitis linked to Hodgkin lymphoma. mGluR1 antibodies associate with a form of cerebellar degeneration, and also Hodgkin lymphoma. Antibodies to Homer 3, a protein associated with mGluR1, have also been reported in two patients with cerebellar syndromes. Dopamine-2 receptor antibodies have been reported by one group in children with basal ganglia encephalitis and other disorders. CNS metabotropic receptor antibodies may exert direct inhibitory effects on their target receptors, but the evidence is more limited than with autoantibodies to ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the future, improved recognition of these patients may lead to better outcomes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the diseases may uncover novel treatment strategies.

  15. Pattern recognition in calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Negra, M.

    1980-07-01

    It is probable that LEP detectors will often include 4π calorimeters. Since this is a novel technique, not much expertise exists yet in the field of pattern recognition for large calorimeter systems. A fast method to simulate calorimeter signals, based on an analytical parametrization of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, developped by the UAl software group on calorimetry, is presented. Some reconstruction problems are discussed, in particular the question of disentangling individual showers within an energetic jet

  16. Harmonization versus Mutual Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Guldager; Schröder, Philipp

    with the opportunity to start export sales. In contrast, harmonization, in particular the prospect that one’s own national (but not the foreign) standard becomes the only globally accepted standard, opens the foreign market without balancing entry at home. We study these scenarios in a reduced form lobby game with two......, harmonized standards may fail to harvest the full pro-competitive effects from trade liberalization compared to mutual recognition; moreover, the issue is most pronounced in markets featuring price competition....

  17. [Effect of opioid receptors on acute stress-induced changes in recognition memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Yu-Wei; Qian, Zhao-Qiang; Yan, Cai-Fang; Fan, Ka-Min; Xu, Jin-Hui; Li, Xiao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-12-25

    Although ample evidence has shown that acute stress impairs memory, the influences of acute stress on different phases of memory, such as acquisition, consolidation and retrieval, are different. Experimental data from both human and animals support that endogenous opioid system plays a role in stress, as endogenous opioid release is increased and opioid receptors are activated during stress experience. On the other hand, endogenous opioid system mediates learning and memory. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute forced swimming stress on recognition memory of C57 mice and the role of opioid receptors in this process by using a three-day pattern of new object recognition task. The results showed that 15-min acute forced swimming damaged the retrieval of recognition memory, but had no effect on acquisition and consolidation of recognition memory. No significant change of object recognition memory was found in mice that were given naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, by intraperitoneal injection. But intraperitoneal injection of naloxone before forced swimming stress could inhibit the impairment of recognition memory retrieval caused by forced swimming stress. The results of real-time PCR showed that acute forced swimming decreased the μ opioid receptor mRNA levels in whole brain and hippocampus, while the injection of naloxone before stress could reverse this change. These results suggest that acute stress may impair recognition memory retrieval via opioid receptors.

  18. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  19. Audio-visual gender recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Xun; Huang, Thomas S.

    2007-11-01

    Combining different modalities for pattern recognition task is a very promising field. Basically, human always fuse information from different modalities to recognize object and perform inference, etc. Audio-Visual gender recognition is one of the most common task in human social communication. Human can identify the gender by facial appearance, by speech and also by body gait. Indeed, human gender recognition is a multi-modal data acquisition and processing procedure. However, computational multimodal gender recognition has not been extensively investigated in the literature. In this paper, speech and facial image are fused to perform a mutli-modal gender recognition for exploring the improvement of combining different modalities.

  20. Antibodies recognizing both IgM isotypes in Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedfors, Ida Aagård; Bakke, Hege; Skjødt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    these molecules. The present study aimed at identifying tools to separate IgM positive (IgM(+)) B cells from IgM negative (IgM(-)) non-B cell populations using flow cytometry. Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and one polyclonal antibody (pAb) to both rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Atlantic salmon...... (Salmo salar) IgM, either commercially available or locally produced were tested for their recognition of Atlantic salmon IgM(+) cells. Leukocytes were isolated from peripheral blood (PB), spleen (S) and head kidney (HK) and stained with all mAbs and the pAb, to possibly verify the approximate number...... of IgM(+) cells in the respective tissues in salmon. To our surprise, this seemingly simple task did not reveal similar staining patterns for all antibodies as expected, but rather large differences in the number of positively stained cells were discovered. In short, positively stained cells by each...

  1. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you have a higher chance of developing thyroid disease in the future. Antithyroid microsomal antibodies may be ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11. Weiss RE, Refetoff S. Thyroid function testing. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and ... Lupus Read more ...

  2. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    determine their targets on the cell. The newly discovered antibodies will then be engineered for utility as new highly specific drugs and diagnostics in...are from the aldo-keto reductase family (AKRs). Remarkably, 3 of the top 10 genes with induction in the mesenchymal TES2b cells Figure 1. Amino

  3. Monoclonal antibodies in haematopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignani, F.; Martelli, M.F.; Mason, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Oncogene (c-myc, c-myb) amplification in acute myelogenous leukaemia; Ultrastructural characterization of leukaemic cells with monoloclonal antibodies; Origin of B-cell malignancies; Immunohistology of gut lymphomas; and Spurious evidence of lineage infidelity in monocytic leukaemia.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  5. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  6. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mimitopes for Characterization of CRF01_AE HIV-1 Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse V. Schoen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mapping humoral immune responses to HIV-1 over the course of natural infection is important in understanding epitope exposure in relation to elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, which is considered imperative for effective vaccine design. When analyzing HIV-specific immune responses, the antibody binding profiles may be a correlate for functional antibody activity. In this study, we utilized phage display technology to identify novel mimitopes that may represent Env epitope structures bound by bNAbs directed at V1V2 and V3 domains, CD4 binding site (CD4bs and the membrane proximal external region (MPER of Env. Mimitope sequence motifs were determined for each bNAb epitope. Given the ongoing vaccine development efforts in Thailand, these mimitopes that represent CD4bs and MPER epitopes were used to map immune responses of HIV-1 CRF01_AE-infected individuals with known neutralizing responses from two distinct time periods, 1996-98 and 2012-15. The more contemporary cohort showed an increase in binding breadth with binding observed for all MPER and CD4bs mimitopes, while the older cohort showed only 75% recognition of the CD4bs mimitopes and no MPER mimotope binding. Furthermore, mimitope binding profiles correlated significantly with magnitude (p=0.0036 and breadth (p=0.0358 of neutralization of a multi-subtype Tier 1 panel of pseudoviruses. These results highlight the utility of this mimitope mapping approach for detecting human plasma IgG-specificities that target known neutralizing antibody epitopes, and may also provide an indication of the plasticity of antibody binding within HIV-1 Env neutralization determinants.

  7. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  8. Nanobodies and Nanobody-Based Human Heavy Chain Antibodies As Antitumor Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bannas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized cancer therapy. However, delivery to tumor cells in vivo is hampered by the large size (150 kDa of conventional antibodies. The minimal target recognition module of a conventional antibody is composed of two non-covalently associated variable domains (VH and VL. The proper orientation of these domains is mediated by their hydrophobic interface and is stabilized by their linkage to disulfide-linked constant domains (CH1 and CL. VH and VL domains can be fused via a genetic linker into a single-chain variable fragment (scFv. scFv modules in turn can be fused to one another, e.g., to generate a bispecific T-cell engager, or they can be fused in various orientations to antibody hinge and Fc domains to generate bi- and multispecific antibodies. However, the inherent hydrophobic interaction of VH and VL domains limits the stability and solubility of engineered antibodies, often causing aggregation and/or mispairing of V-domains. Nanobodies (15 kDa and nanobody-based human heavy chain antibodies (75 kDa can overcome these limitations. Camelids naturally produce antibodies composed only of heavy chains in which the target recognition module is composed of a single variable domain (VHH or Nb. Advantageous features of nanobodies include their small size, high solubility, high stability, and excellent tissue penetration in vivo. Nanobodies can readily be linked genetically to Fc-domains, other nanobodies, peptide tags, or toxins and can be conjugated chemically at a specific site to drugs, radionuclides, photosensitizers, and nanoparticles. These properties make them particularly suited for specific and efficient targeting of tumors in vivo. Chimeric nanobody-heavy chain antibodies combine advantageous features of nanobodies and human Fc domains in about half the size of a conventional antibody. In this review, we discuss recent developments and perspectives for applications of nanobodies and nanobody

  9. Nanobodies and Nanobody-Based Human Heavy Chain Antibodies As Antitumor Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannas, Peter; Hambach, Julia; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized cancer therapy. However, delivery to tumor cells in vivo is hampered by the large size (150 kDa) of conventional antibodies. The minimal target recognition module of a conventional antibody is composed of two non-covalently associated variable domains (VH and VL). The proper orientation of these domains is mediated by their hydrophobic interface and is stabilized by their linkage to disulfide-linked constant domains (CH1 and CL). VH and VL domains can be fused via a genetic linker into a single-chain variable fragment (scFv). scFv modules in turn can be fused to one another, e.g., to generate a bispecific T-cell engager, or they can be fused in various orientations to antibody hinge and Fc domains to generate bi- and multispecific antibodies. However, the inherent hydrophobic interaction of VH and VL domains limits the stability and solubility of engineered antibodies, often causing aggregation and/or mispairing of V-domains. Nanobodies (15 kDa) and nanobody-based human heavy chain antibodies (75 kDa) can overcome these limitations. Camelids naturally produce antibodies composed only of heavy chains in which the target recognition module is composed of a single variable domain (VHH or Nb). Advantageous features of nanobodies include their small size, high solubility, high stability, and excellent tissue penetration in vivo . Nanobodies can readily be linked genetically to Fc-domains, other nanobodies, peptide tags, or toxins and can be conjugated chemically at a specific site to drugs, radionuclides, photosensitizers, and nanoparticles. These properties make them particularly suited for specific and efficient targeting of tumors in vivo . Chimeric nanobody-heavy chain antibodies combine advantageous features of nanobodies and human Fc domains in about half the size of a conventional antibody. In this review, we discuss recent developments and perspectives for applications of nanobodies and nanobody-based human heavy

  10. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    , Portugal and New Zealand have adopted the concept. Public sector interventions that aim to support cluster development in industries most often focus upon economic policy goals such as enhanced employment and improved productivity, but rarely emphasise broader societal policy goals relating to e.......g. sustainability or quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how and to what extent public sector interventions that aim at forcing cluster development in industries can support sustainable development as defined in the Brundtland tradition and more recently elaborated in such concepts as eco...... in 2000 by the Welsh Automotive Task Force under the Welsh Assembly Government. The Accelerate programme takes basically different two directions: The first one, which was the first to be launched, is concerned with the upgrading of existing supply chains in the automotive industry in Wales. The programme...

  11. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  12. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  13. Multimodal approaches for emotion recognition: a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebe, Nicu; Cohen, Ira; Gevers, Theo; Huang, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled human users to interact with computers in ways previously unimaginable. Beyond the confines of the keyboard and mouse, new modalities for human-computer interaction such as voice, gesture, and force-feedback are emerging. Despite important advances, one necessary ingredient for natural interaction is still missing-emotions. Emotions play an important role in human-to-human communication and interaction, allowing people to express themselves beyond the verbal domain. The ability to understand human emotions is desirable for the computer in several applications. This paper explores new ways of human-computer interaction that enable the computer to be more aware of the user's emotional and attentional expressions. We present the basic research in the field and the recent advances into the emotion recognition from facial, voice, and physiological signals, where the different modalities are treated independently. We then describe the challenging problem of multimodal emotion recognition and we advocate the use of probabilistic graphical models when fusing the different modalities. We also discuss the difficult issues of obtaining reliable affective data, obtaining ground truth for emotion recognition, and the use of unlabeled data.

  14. Re-thinking employee recognition: understanding employee experiences of recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread acceptance of the importance of employee recognition for both individuals and organisations and evidence of its increasing use in organisations, employee recognition has received relatively little focused attention from academic researchers. Particularly lacking is research exploring the lived experience of employee recognition and the interpretations and meanings which individuals give to these experiences. Drawing on qualitative interviews conducted as part of my PhD rese...

  15. Magnetic Purification of Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar Laxman

    This work aimed at the development of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody purification and at the evaluation of their performance in Magnetic fishing and in a newly developed hybrid technology Magnetic Aqueous Two Phase Systems. Magnetic materials were produced by coprecipitation and solvothermal approaches. Natural polymers such as dextran, extracellular polysaccharide and gum Arabic were employed for coating of iron oxide magnetic supports. Polymer coated magnetic supports were then modified with synthetic antibody specific ligands,namely boronic acid, a triazine ligand (named 22/8) and an Ugi ligand (named A2C7I1). To optimize the efficacy of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody magnetic fishing, various solutions of pure and crude antibody solutions along with BSA as a non-specific binding protein were tested. The selectivity of magnetic nanoparticle for antibody, IgG, was found effective with boronic acid and ligand 22/8. Magnetic supports were then studied for their performance in high gradient magnetic separator for effective separation capability as well as higher volume handling capability. The magnetic materials were also supplemented to aqueous two phase systems, devising a new purification technology. For this purpose, magnetic particles modified with boronic acid were more effective. This alternative strategy reduced the time of operation,maximized separation capability (yield and purity), while reducing the amount of salt required. Boronic acid coated magnetic particles bound 170 +/- 10 mg hIgG/g MP and eluted 160 +/- 5 mg hIgG/g MP, while binding only 15 +/- 5 mg BSA/g MP. The affinity constant for the interaction between hIgG and APBA_MP was estimated as 4.9 x 105 M-1 (Ka) with a theoretical maximum capacity of 492 mg hIgG adsorbed/g MP (Qmax). APBA_MPs were also tested for antibody purification directly from CHO cell supernatants. The particles were able to bind 98% of IgG loaded and to recover 95% of pure IgG (purity greater than 98%) at extremely

  16. Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiao-Yu; Yu, Jun-Tao; Hu, Shui-Yi; Li, Jian-Nan; Wang, Miao; Wang, Chen; Chen, Min; Cui, Zhao; Zhao, Ming-Hui

    2017-09-01

    In a substantial number of patients with crescentic glomerulonephritis, both anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are detected simultaneously. ANCA is presumed to be the initial event but the mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen in sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, aiming to reveal the mechanisms of the coexistence of the two kinds of autoantibodies. Thirty-one patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis were enrolled in this study. Twenty-four overlapping linear peptides were synthesized across the whole sequence of Goodpasture autoantigen. Serum antibodies against linear peptides were detected by ELISA and their associations with clinical features were further analyzed. Twenty-five out of the thirty-one (80.6%) sera from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis possessed antibodies against linear peptides on Goodpasture autoantigen. These antibodies could be detected in 50% of patients with normal renal function (Scr ≤ 133 μmol/L), 70% of patients with moderate renal dysfunction (133 μmol/L  600 μmol/L) (P = 0.032). The highest recognition frequencies were found for peptides P4 (51.6%), P14 (54.8%), and P24 (54.8%), which contained the sequences that constitute the conformational epitopes of E A (P4) and E B (P14) recognized by anti-GBM antibodies. The level of anti-P4 antibodies was positively correlated with the percentage of crescents in glomeruli (r = 0.764, P = 0.027). Patients with anti-P24 antibodies had a significantly higher prevalence of renal dysfunction on diagnosis (88.2 vs. 42.9%, P = 0.018). Antibodies against linear epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen could be detected in sera of patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, which might mediate the production of antibodies towards the conformational epitopes on Goodpasture autoantigen, namely, the anti-GBM antibodies.

  17. Antibody orientation on biosensor surfaces: a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, Anke K; Beekwilder, Jules; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-03-21

    Detection elements play a key role in analyte recognition in biosensors. Therefore, detection elements with high analyte specificity and binding strength are required. While antibodies (Abs) have been increasingly used as detection elements in biosensors, a key challenge remains - the immobilization on the biosensor surface. This minireview highlights recent approaches to immobilize and study Abs on surfaces. We first introduce Ab species used as detection elements, and discuss techniques recently used to elucidate Ab orientation by determination of layer thickness or surface topology. Then, several immobilization methods will be presented: non-covalent and covalent surface attachment, yielding oriented or random coupled Abs. Finally, protein modification methods applicable for oriented Ab immobilization are reviewed with an eye to future application.

  18. Diversity in the Danish Armed Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John; Pradhan-Blach, Flemming; Larsen, Esben Salling

    The Danish Armed Forces face the functional imperative of becoming a smaller, professional expeditionary force and the societal imperative of including women and ethnic minorities. It currently lags behind its NATO partners in gender and ethnic diversity. Lessons to be learned from NATO members...... with more diverse militaries, such as the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, include recognition of diversity as a societal imperative to sustain the legitimacy of the armed forces, the necessity of systematically collecting and reporting personnel data to guide policy, the necessity of patience...

  19. Interactions of the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 with the complement system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doni, Andrea; Garlanda, Cecilia; Bottazzi, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system comprises a cellular and a humoral arm. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a fluid phase pattern recognition molecule, which acts as an essential component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PTX3 has antibody-like properties including interactions with complement components...

  20. Clinical use of antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Hoer, Gustav; Cox, P.H.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies as tumour specific carrier molecules for therapeutic agents or as in vivo diagnostic reagents when labelled with radionuclides or NMR signal enhancers is attracting more and more attention. The potential is enormous but the technical problems are also considerable requiring the concerted action of many different scientific disciplines. This volume is based upon a symposium organised in Frankfurt in 1990 under the auspices of the European Association of Nuclear Medicines' Specialist Task Groups on Cardiology and the Utility of Labelled Antibodies. It gives a multidisciplinary review of the state of the art and of problems to be solved as well as recording the not inconsiderable successes which have been booked to date. The book will be of value as a reference to both clinicians and research scientists. refs.; figs.; tabs

  1. Human activity recognition and prediction

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a unique view of human activity recognition, especially fine-grained human activity structure learning, human-interaction recognition, RGB-D data based action recognition, temporal decomposition, and causality learning in unconstrained human activity videos. The techniques discussed give readers tools that provide a significant improvement over existing methodologies of video content understanding by taking advantage of activity recognition. It links multiple popular research fields in computer vision, machine learning, human-centered computing, human-computer interaction, image classification, and pattern recognition. In addition, the book includes several key chapters covering multiple emerging topics in the field. Contributed by top experts and practitioners, the chapters present key topics from different angles and blend both methodology and application, composing a solid overview of the human activity recognition techniques. .

  2. ALGORITHM OF OBJECT RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loktev Alexey Alexeevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The second important problem to be resolved to the algorithm and its software, that comprises an automatic design of a complex closed circuit television system, represents object recognition, by virtue of which an image is transmitted by the video camera. Since imaging of almost any object is dependent on many factors, including its orientation in respect of the camera, lighting conditions, parameters of the registering system, static and dynamic parameters of the object itself, it is quite difficult to formalize the image and represent it in the form of a certain mathematical model. Therefore, methods of computer-aided visualization depend substantially on the problems to be solved. They can be rarely generalized. The majority of these methods are non-linear; therefore, there is a need to increase the computing power and complexity of algorithms to be able to process the image. This paper covers the research of visual object recognition and implementation of the algorithm in the view of the software application that operates in the real-time mode

  3. Xerostomia: recognition and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Philip C

    2008-01-01

    Awareness and recognition of xerostomia are essential in order to help patients minimize dryness symptoms, to institute preventive measures and to limit oral complications. The dental professional has the opportunity to ask every patient if they are experiencing dry mouth. In particular, complaints of dryness while eating, or difficulty swallowing dry foods, or the necessity of using liquids to ease swallowing are important clues that salivary function may be impaired. As part of a routine oral examination, one should examine the oral cavity carefully for signs of salivary gland dysfunction. Findings such as an increase in caries activity, mucosal alterations, infection or salivary gland enlargement may indicate salivary dysfunction. Evaluation should be conducted proactively at each patient visit. Early recognition will minimize damage and dysfunction and allow appropriate management to begin. Although the salivary dysfunction may be irreversible, preventive measures and conservative treatments can avoid or limit mucosal breakdown, infections and permanent damage to teeth. Adequate symptomatic relief is possible with local palliative and systemic measures in many patients. Appropriate management of symptoms and increasing saliva output may help patients feel more comfortable and improve their quality of life.

  4. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  5. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  6. Murine carcinoma expressing carcinoembryonic antigen-like protein is restricted by antibody against neem leaf glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arnab; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Roy, Soumyabrata; Biswas, Jaydip; Baral, Rathindranath; Pal, Smarajit

    2014-11-01

    We have generated a polyclonal antibody against a novel immunomodulator, neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP) that can react to a specific 47 kDa subunit of NLGP. Generated anti-NLGP antibody (primarily IgG2a) was tested for its anti-tumor activity in murine carcinoma (EC, CT-26), sarcoma (S180) and melanoma (B16Mel) tumor models. Surprisingly, tumor growth restriction was only observed in CT-26 carcinoma models, without any alteration in other tumor systems. Comparative examination of antigenicity between four different tumor models revealed high expression of CEA-like protein on the surface of CT-26 tumors. Subsequent examination of the cross-reactivity of anti-NLGP antibody with purified or cell bound CEA revealed prominent recognition of CEA by anti-NLGP antibody, as detected by ELISA, Western Blotting and immunohistochemistry. This recognition seems to be responsible for anti-tumor function of anti-NLGP antibody only on CEA-like protein expressing CT-26 tumor models, as confirmed by ADCC reaction in CEA(+) tumor systems where dependency to anti-NLGP antibody is equivalent to anti-CEA antibody. Obtained result with enormous therapeutic potential for CEA(+) tumors may be explained in view of the epitope spreading concept, however, further investigation is crucial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column.

  8. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingqian; Wang, Jiongkun; Cai, Jiye; Wu, Yangzhe; Wang, Xiaoping

    2008-09-12

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4(+) T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4(+) T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4(+) T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity.

  9. Markov Models for Handwriting Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Plotz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Since their first inception, automatic reading systems have evolved substantially, yet the recognition of handwriting remains an open research problem due to its substantial variation in appearance. With the introduction of Markovian models to the field, a promising modeling and recognition paradigm was established for automatic handwriting recognition. However, no standard procedures for building Markov model-based recognizers have yet been established. This text provides a comprehensive overview of the application of Markov models in the field of handwriting recognition, covering both hidden

  10. Speech Recognition on Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Zheng-Hua; Lindberg, Børge

    2010-01-01

    The enthusiasm of deploying automatic speech recognition (ASR) on mobile devices is driven both by remarkable advances in ASR technology and by the demand for efficient user interfaces on such devices as mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). This chapter presents an overview of ASR...... in the mobile context covering motivations, challenges, fundamental techniques and applications. Three ASR architectures are introduced: embedded speech recognition, distributed speech recognition and network speech recognition. Their pros and cons and implementation issues are discussed. Applications within...... command and control, text entry and search are presented with an emphasis on mobile text entry....

  11. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Asyraf Zulkifley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1 the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2 frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3 the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4 various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Odor Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anholt, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... We characterized the transduction pathway for the recognition of pheromones in the vomeronasal organ and also characterized subpopulations of olfactory neurons expressing different axonal G proteins...

  13. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriani, Nor Surayahani; Hussain, Aini; Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf

    2013-01-01

    Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1) the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2) frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3) the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4) various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition. PMID:23921828

  14. Focusing antibody responses against distraction and loss in diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    Pathogens are complex and evolving fast. They have developed full ranges of disguises to divert immune responses and often manage to escape recognition and thereby outpace natural immunity. A prominent example is the scarce and staggered development of broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly mutable viruses. It remains unclear under what evolutionary conditions these exceptional antibodies could emerge and dominate the response. To address this challenge, we construct an individual-based stochastic model of the Darwinian evolution of antibody-producing immune cells. We consider complexity of viral epitopes, vary seeding diversity of the immune cell population, and allow a time varying population size and extinction - new aspects essential for designing a realistic vaccine. We show that various temporal statistics of antigenic environments would select distinct evolutionary paths that lead to predominantly non-neutralizing, strain-specific or broadly neutralizing antibody responses. We suggest strategies to focus antibody responses on the targeted vulnerability of the virus and confer selective advantage to cross-reactive lineages. This implies a new step toward an effective vaccine against rapidly mutating complex pathogens. This work is supported by NIH.

  15. Plastic antibody based surface plasmon resonance nanosensors for selective atrazine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Erkut; Özgür, Erdoğan; Bereli, Nilay; Türkmen, Deniz; Denizli, Adil

    2017-04-01

    This study reports a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based affinity sensor system with the use of molecular imprinted nanoparticles (plastic antibodies) to enhance the pesticide detection. Molecular imprinting based affinity sensor is prepared by the attachment of atrazine (chosen as model pesticide) imprinted nanoparticles onto the gold surface of SPR chip. Recognition element of the affinity sensor is polymerizable form of aspartic acid. The imprinted nanoparticles were characterized via FTIR and zeta-sizer measurements. SPR sensors are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) and contact angle measurements. The imprinted nanoparticles showed more sensitivity to atrazine than the non-imprinted ones. Different concentrations of atrazine solutions are applied to SPR system to determine the adsorption kinetics. Langmuir adsorption model is found as the most suitable model for this affinity nanosensor system. In order to show the selectivity of the atrazine-imprinted nanoparticles, competitive adsorption of atrazine, simazine and amitrole is investigated. The results showed that the imprinted nanosensor has high selectivity and sensitivity for atrazine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibodies to Orientia tsutsugamushi in Thai soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamsila, C; Singsawat, P; Duangvaraporn, A; Strickman, D

    1996-11-01

    Thai soldiers who were conscripted, Royal Thai Army forces, professional Border Patrol Police, or local militia (Thai Rangers) located in any of seven provinces of Thailand were bled in April and again, four months later, in July 1989. In 1991, soldiers from five different locations in southern Thailand were bled once, in July. Serum samples were tested by indirect fluorescent antibody assay for antibody to Orientia (formerly Rickettsia) tsutsugamushi, etiologic agent of scrub typhus, with any titer > or = 1:50 considered positive. Prior to field exercises, prevalence of antibody varied significantly between different types of units, ranging between 18.6% for Thai Rangers and 6.8% for the Royal Thai Army. The April prevalence, July prevalence, and incidence varied significantly by province in 1989, with highest incidence being 14.5% in Kanchanaburi and the lowest 0% in Utraladit. The prevalence in southern Thailand in 1991 varied between 1.6% and 6.8%. The data demonstrate that O. tsutsugamushi is widely distributed in Thailand and that military activity consisting of field exercises that simulate combat conditions significantly expose soldiers to infection.

  17. DNA-mediated strand displacement facilitates sensitive electronic detection of antibodies in human serums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Shi, Kai; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-09-15

    We describe here the development of a sensitive and convenient electronic sensor for the detection of antibodies in human serums. The sensor is constructed by self-assembly formation of a mixed monolayer containing the small molecule epitope conjugated double stranded DNA probes on gold electrode. The target antibody binds the epitope on the dsDNA probe and lowers the melting temperature of the duplex, which facilitates the displacement of the antibody-linked strand of the duplex probe by an invading methylene blue-tagged single stranded DNA (MB-ssDNA) through the strand displacement reaction and leads to the capture of many MB-ssDNA on the sensor surface. Subsequent electrochemical oxidation of the methylene blue labels results in amplified current response for sensitive monitoring of the antibodies. The antibody assay conditions are optimized and the sensor exhibits a linear range between 1.0 and 25.0nM with a detection limit of 0.67nM for the target antibody. The sensor is also selective and can be employed to detect the target antibodies in human serum samples. With the advantages of using small molecule epitope as the antibody recognition element over traditional antigen, the versatile manipulability of the DNA probes and the unique properties of the electrochemical transduction technique, the developed sensor thus hold great potential for simple and sensitive detection of different antibodies and other proteins in real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. When blood transfusion medicine becomes complicated due to interference by monoclonal antibody therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, Marlies; Lammerts Van Bueren, Jeroen J.; Doshi, Parul; Khan, Imran; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Parren, Paul W H I; Van Solinge, Wouter W.; De Vooght, Karen M K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) are increasingly integrated in the standard of care. The notion that therapeutic MoAbs can interfere with clinical laboratory tests is an emerging concern that requires immediate recognition and the development of appropriate solutions. Here, we describe that

  19. Complexes of DNA with fluorescent dyes are effective reagents for detection of autoimmune antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domljanovic, Ivana; Carstens, Annika; Okholm, Anders Hauge

    2017-01-01

    that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We tested the most potent non-covalent pairs of DNA and fluorescent dyes. Several complexes showed specific recognition of autoimmune antibodies in human samples of lupus patients using a simple one...

  20. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  1. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  2. Chemical recognition software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  3. Iris Recognition Using Wavelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaliq Masood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biometric systems are getting more attention in the present era. Iris recognition is one of the most secure and authentic among the other biometrics and this field demands more authentic, reliable and fast algorithms to implement these biometric systems in real time. In this paper, an efficient localization technique is presented to identify pupil and iris boundaries using histogram of the iris image. Two small portions of iris have been used for polar transformation to reduce computational time and to increase the efficiency of the system. Wavelet transform is used for feature vector generation. Rotation of iris is compensated without shifts in the iris code. System is tested on Multimedia University Iris Database and results show that proposed system has encouraging performance.

  4. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizao, E-mail: chenw3@mail.nih.gov [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Feng, Yang [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Wang, Yanping [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); The Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S. [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  6. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. ► We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. ► CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. ► CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  7. Coriolis Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciuc, Daly; Solschi, Viorel

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the Coriolis effect is essential for explaining the movement of air masses and ocean currents. The lesson we propose aims to familiarize students with the manifestation of the Coriolis effect. Students are guided to build, using the GeoGebra software, a simulation of the motion of a body, related to a rotating reference system. The mathematical expression of the Coriolis force is deduced, for particular cases, and the Foucault's pendulum is presented and explained. Students have the opportunity to deepen the subject, by developing materials related to topics such as: • Global Wind Pattern • Ocean Currents • Coriolis Effect in Long Range Shooting • Finding the latitude with a Foucault Pendulum

  8. Joining Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anne Mette

    2013-01-01

    The interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has grown dramatically over the last three years in Greenland. A vast geographical area with a tiny population, Greenland has recently obtained self-government status and is going through a rapid development economically and socially...... as the country moves towards embracing extractive industries (oil, gas and mining) as a path to development. Both government, civil society and business are increasingly looking for new and innovative ways of joining forces across sectors to solve some of the country's many critical social issues. Greenlandic...... companies have over the last 23 years embraced the concept of strategic CSR and are increasingly engaging in cross-sector partnerships as part of their CSR strategy. The partnerships take different forms both in regards to number of partners, focus areas and level of strategic engagement. In the article...

  9. The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meulder, Maartje

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an analytical overview of the different types of explicit legal recognition of sign languages. Five categories are distinguished: constitutional recognition, recognition by means of general language legislation, recognition by means of a sign language law or act, recognition by means of a sign language law or act including…

  10. Methods of Teaching Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Martha H.; Bailey, Glenn A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces the history and development of speech recognition, addresses its role in the business curriculum, outlines related national and state standards, describes instructional strategies, and discusses the assessment of student achievement in speech recognition classes. Methods: Research methods included a synthesis of…

  11. Iris Recognition - Beyond One Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matey, James R.; Kennell, Lauren R.

    Iris recognition Iris recognition is, arguably, the most robust form of biometric Biometrics identification. It has been deployed in large-scale systems that have been very effective. The systems deployed to date make use of iris Remote Biometric cameras that require significant user cooperation; that in turn imposes significant constraints on the deployment scenarios that are practical.

  12. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; van den Biggelaar, Olivier

    As a widely used biometrics, face recognition has many advantages such as being non-intrusive, natural and passive. On the other hand, in real-life scenarios with uncontrolled environment, pose variation up to side-view positions makes face recognition a challenging work. In this paper we discuss

  13. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Beside a few papers which focus on the forensic aspects of automatic face recognition, there is not much published about it in contrast to the literature on developing new techniques and methodologies for biometric face recognition. In this report, we review forensic facial identification which is

  14. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Side-view face recognition is a challenging problem with many applications. Especially in real-life scenarios where the environment is uncontrolled, coping with pose variations up to side-view positions is an important task for face recognition. In this paper we discuss the use of side view face

  15. Computer image processing and recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the concepts and techniques of computer image processing and recognition is presented. Consideration is given to such topics as image formation and perception; computer representation of images; image enhancement and restoration; reconstruction from projections; digital television, encoding, and data compression; scene understanding; scene matching and recognition; and processing techniques for linear systems.

  16. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  17. Antibody molecules discriminate between crystalline facets of a gallium arsenide semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzy Schnirman, Arbel; Zahavi, Efrat; Yeger, Hadas; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Benhar, Itai; Reiter, Yoram; Sivan, Uri

    2006-09-01

    Seamless integration of biomolecules with manmade materials will most likely rely on molecular recognition and specific binding. In the following we show that combinatorial antibody libraries, based on the vast repertoire of the human immune system, can be harnessed to generate such binders. As a demonstration, we isolate antibody fragments that discriminate and bind selectively GaAs (111A) facets as opposed to GaAs (100). The isolated antibodies are utilized for exclusive localization of a fluorescent dye on (111A) surfaces in a structure comprising a mixture of (100) and (111A) surfaces. The potential importance of structure rigidity to facet recognition is suggested vis-a-vis published experiments with short and longer peptides.

  18. Recognition memory impairments caused by false recognition of novel objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Lok-Kin; Ryan, Jennifer D; Cowell, Rosemary A; Barense, Morgan D

    2013-11-01

    A fundamental assumption underlying most current theories of amnesia is that memory impairments arise because previously studied information either is lost rapidly or is made inaccessible (i.e., the old information appears to be new). Recent studies in rodents have challenged this view, suggesting instead that under conditions of high interference, recognition memory impairments following medial temporal lobe damage arise because novel information appears as though it has been previously seen. Here, we developed a new object recognition memory paradigm that distinguished whether object recognition memory impairments were driven by previously viewed objects being treated as if they were novel or by novel objects falsely recognized as though they were previously seen. In this indirect, eyetracking-based passive viewing task, older adults at risk for mild cognitive impairment showed false recognition to high-interference novel items (with a significant degree of feature overlap with previously studied items) but normal novelty responses to low-interference novel items (with a lower degree of feature overlap). The indirect nature of the task minimized the effects of response bias and other memory-based decision processes, suggesting that these factors cannot solely account for false recognition. These findings support the counterintuitive notion that recognition memory impairments in this memory-impaired population are not characterized by forgetting but rather are driven by the failure to differentiate perceptually similar objects, leading to the false recognition of novel objects as having been seen before. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Pathogen Recognition by the Long Pentraxin PTX3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Moalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity represents the first line of defence against pathogens and plays key roles in activation and orientation of the adaptive immune response. The innate immune system comprises both a cellular and a humoral arm. Components of the humoral arm include soluble pattern recognition molecules (PRMs that recognise pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and initiate the immune response in coordination with the cellular arm, therefore acting as functional ancestors of antibodies. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a prototypic soluble PRM that is produced at sites of infection and inflammation by both somatic and immune cells. Gene targeting of this evolutionarily conserved protein has revealed a nonredundant role in resistance to selected pathogens. Moreover, PTX3 exerts important functions at the cross-road between innate immunity, inflammation, and female fertility. Here, we review the studies on PTX3, with emphasis on pathogen recognition and cross-talk with other components of the innate immune system.

  20. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zider, Alexander; Drakeman, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commer...

  1. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  2. Associative Pattern Recognition Through Macro-molecular Self-Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weishun; Schwab, David J.; Murugan, Arvind

    2017-05-01

    We show that macro-molecular self-assembly can recognize and classify high-dimensional patterns in the concentrations of N distinct molecular species. Similar to associative neural networks, the recognition here leverages dynamical attractors to recognize and reconstruct partially corrupted patterns. Traditional parameters of pattern recognition theory, such as sparsity, fidelity, and capacity are related to physical parameters, such as nucleation barriers, interaction range, and non-equilibrium assembly forces. Notably, we find that self-assembly bears greater similarity to continuous attractor neural networks, such as place cell networks that store spatial memories, rather than discrete memory networks. This relationship suggests that features and trade-offs seen here are not tied to details of self-assembly or neural network models but are instead intrinsic to associative pattern recognition carried out through short-ranged interactions.

  3. Administrative Circular No. 26 (Rev.10) - Recognition of merit

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 26 (Rev. 10) entitled “Recognition of Merit”, approved by the Director-General following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 5 December 2013 and entering into force on 1 January 2014, is available on the intranet site of the Human Resources Department (see here).   This circular is applicable to staff members. It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 26 (Rev. 9) entitled “Recognition of Merit” of December 2011. The circular was revised in order to take into account the work performed in the framework of an elective mandate during the exercise of merit recognition of staff members. In addition, the circular was revised to provide that, in the case of staff members on special leave for professional reasons for a period equal to or longer than half a year, it will no longer be possible to grant an exceptional advancement. Department Head Office HR Department

  4. Effects of orienting tasks on recognition of chess positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, S E

    1978-12-01

    Two experiments using a levels-of-processing paradigm were performed to demonstrate the existence and usefulness of a semantic component in chess knowledge. Experiment I compared forced-choice recognition of chess positions after a structural task (piece counting) as opposed to a semantic task (choosing a move). Recognition accuracy, confidence, and familiarity ratings all showed a facilitation effect in the semantic condition. By including an orienting task that did not encourage semantic processing but still allowed pattern-matching operations to occur (copying a board), Experiment II demonstrated that this task effect was a genuine enhancement of memory due to meaningful processing. One again, the processing of meaningful relations in the semantic task (positional evaluation) produced a higher level of recognition performance than did the more structural processing. These results suggest that aspects of meaning have some input into the processes that generate the memory representation of a chess position.

  5. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...... of the humanization experiment protocol....

  6. Speech Recognition: How Do We Teach It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barksdale, Karl

    2002-01-01

    States that growing use of speech recognition software has made voice writing an essential computer skill. Describes how to present the topic, develop basic speech recognition skills, and teach speech recognition outlining, writing, proofreading, and editing. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  7. Theranostics Using Antibodies and Antibody-Related Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moek, Kirsten L; Giesen, Danique; Kok, Iris C; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Jalving, Mathilde; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Brouwers, Adrienne H; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    In theranostics, radiolabeled compounds are used to determine a treatment strategy by combining therapeutics and diagnostics in the same agent. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody-related therapeutics represent a rapidly expanding group of cancer medicines. Theranostic approaches using these

  8. Autonomy, recognition and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Vitório Cenci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses Honneth’s concept of autonomy from two dimensions of his work, distinct, though inseparable. The first one is suggested through the subject’s positive practical self-relation linked to the patterns of reciprocal recognition of love, right and social esteem; the second is formulated as non-centered autonomy opposed to the present-day criticism of the modern autonomous subject encompassing three levels, namely: the capacity of linguistic articulation, the narrative coherence of life and the complementation of being guided by principles with some criteria of moral sensitivity to the context. We defend the position that, by metaphysically anchoring the concept of autonomy onto the intersubjective assumptions of his/her theory of the subject, and exploring it linked to the subject’s positive practical self-relation and to a non-centered meaning, Honneth has managed to renew it, which allows drawing important consequences of such effort to the field of education.

  9. Pattern recognition in spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebran, M.; Paletou, F.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity ve sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones.

  10. Pattern recognition in spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebran, M; Paletou, F

    2017-01-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature T eff , surface gravity log g , metallicity [ Fe/H ], and equatorial projected rotational velocity v e sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones. (paper)

  11. Recognition Using Classification and Segmentation Scoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kimball, Owen; Ostendorf, Mari; Rohlicek, Robin

    1992-01-01

    .... We describe an approach to connected word recognition that allows the use of segmental information through an explicit decomposition of the recognition criterion into classification and segmentation scoring...

  12. Vision-Based Navigation and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    .... (4) Invariants -- both geometric and other types. (5) Human faces: Analysis of images of human faces, including feature extraction, face recognition, compression, and recognition of facial expressions...

  13. Vision-Based Navigation and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1998-01-01

    .... (4) Invariants: both geometric and other types. (5) Human faces: Analysis of images of human faces, including feature extraction, face recognition, compression, and recognition of facial expressions...

  14. Kernel learning algorithms for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Kernel Learning Algorithms for Face Recognition covers the framework of kernel based face recognition. This book discusses the advanced kernel learning algorithms and its application on face recognition. This book also focuses on the theoretical deviation, the system framework and experiments involving kernel based face recognition. Included within are algorithms of kernel based face recognition, and also the feasibility of the kernel based face recognition method. This book provides researchers in pattern recognition and machine learning area with advanced face recognition methods and its new

  15. Facial recognition in education system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krithika, L. B.; Venkatesh, K.; Rathore, S.; Kumar, M. Harish

    2017-11-01

    Human beings exploit emotions comprehensively for conveying messages and their resolution. Emotion detection and face recognition can provide an interface between the individuals and technologies. The most successful applications of recognition analysis are recognition of faces. Many different techniques have been used to recognize the facial expressions and emotion detection handle varying poses. In this paper, we approach an efficient method to recognize the facial expressions to track face points and distances. This can automatically identify observer face movements and face expression in image. This can capture different aspects of emotion and facial expressions.

  16. Iris recognition via plenoptic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J.; Boehnen, Chris Bensing; Bolme, David S.

    2017-11-07

    Iris recognition can be accomplished for a wide variety of eye images by using plenoptic imaging. Using plenoptic technology, it is possible to correct focus after image acquisition. One example technology reconstructs images having different focus depths and stitches them together, resulting in a fully focused image, even in an off-angle gaze scenario. Another example technology determines three-dimensional data for an eye and incorporates it into an eye model used for iris recognition processing. Another example technology detects contact lenses. Application of the technologies can result in improved iris recognition under a wide variety of scenarios.

  17. Evaluating music emotion recognition:Lessons from music genre recognition?

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER syste...

  18. Potent Human Monoclonal Antibodies against SARS CoV, Nipah and Hendra Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakaran, Ponraj; Zhongyu, Zhu; Xiao, Xiaodong; Biragyn, Arya; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Broder, Christopher C.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2009-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies have a century-old history of being effective against some viruses; recently, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have also shown success. The humanized mAb Synagis (palivizumab) remains still the only mAb against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Recently, several potent human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) targeting the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Associated coronavirus (SARS CoV) S glycoproteins were developed quickly after the virus was identified in 2003. Among these antibodies, m396 and S230.15 exhibit exceptional potency and cross-reactivity as they neutralize isolates from the first and second outbreaks and from palm civets both in vitroand in mice. Similarly, the first fully hmAbs against two other paramyxoviruses, Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV), which can cause up to 75% mortality, were recently developed; one of them, m102.4, shows exceptional cross-reactive potency against both NiV and HeV. Three-dimensional molecular structures of envelope glycoproteins from these viruses in complexes with antibodies and/or receptors were recently determined. Structural analyses along with other experiments have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of receptor recognition and antibody neutralization, and suggested that these antibodies alone or in combination could successfully fight the viruses’ heterogeneity and mutability which is a major problem in the development of effective therapeutic agents against viruses, including therapeutic antibodies. PMID:19216624

  19. Protective roles of natural IgM antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eGrönwall

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are a vital part of the armentarium of the adaptive immune system for the fine-tuning of the recognition and response to foreign threats. However, in health there are some types of antibodies that instead recognize self-antigens for the enhancement of primitive innate functions. The repertoire of natural IgM antibodies is postulated to have been selected during immune evolution for their contributions to critical immunoregulatory and housekeeping properties. The clearance of dying cells is one of the most essential responsibilities of the immune system, which is essential to prevent uncontrolled inflammation and autoimmunity. In the murine immune system, natural IgM antibodies that recognize apoptotic cells have been shown to enhance the phagocytic clearance of dead and dying cells and to suppress innate immune signaling pathways. In the mouse, natural IgM are often the products of B-1 cell clones that arise during immune development without an absolute requirement for exogenous antigenic stimulation. In patients with systemic lupus erythemtosus, IgM autoantibodies, which bind to neo-epitopes on apoptotic cells, have been demonstrated to be present at significantly higher levels in patients with lower disease activity and with less severe organ damage. While certain specificities of IgM autoantibodies correlate with protection from lupus renal disease, others may convey protective properties from lupus-associated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. New unexpected insights into the functional roles of IgM antibodies are still emerging, especially regarding the functions of natural antibodies. Herein, we review recent progress in our understanding of the potential roles of natural IgM autoantibodies in the regulation of immune homeostasis and for protection from autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  20. Cascaded automatic target recognition (Cascaded ATR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Bradley

    2010-04-01

    The global war on terror has plunged US and coalition forces into a battle space requiring the continuous adaptation of tactics and technologies to cope with an elusive enemy. As a result, technologies that enhance the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) mission making the warfighter more effective are experiencing increased interest. In this paper we show how a new generation of smart cameras built around foveated sensing makes possible a powerful ISR technique termed Cascaded ATR. Foveated sensing is an innovative optical concept in which a single aperture captures two distinct fields of view. In Cascaded ATR, foveated sensing is used to provide a coarse resolution, persistent surveillance, wide field of view (WFOV) detector to accomplish detection level perception. At the same time, within the foveated sensor, these detection locations are passed as a cue to a steerable, high fidelity, narrow field of view (NFOV) detector to perform recognition level perception. Two new ISR mission scenarios, utilizing Cascaded ATR, are proposed.

  1. Antigen antibody interactions

    CERN Document Server

    DeLisi, Charles

    1976-01-01

    1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognition­ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope m...

  2. Seizure semiology of anti-LGI1 antibody encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beimer, Nicholas J; Selwa, Linda M

    2017-12-01

    Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-LGI1 antibody (LGI1 encephalitis) presents with a variety of features, the most prominent of which include seizures and progressive disturbance of memory and behaviour. Although varied in semiology, recognition of the pattern of seizures in LGI1 encephalitis is important, as early diagnosis and definitive treatment may prevent subsequent development of cognitive impairment. We present a patient with LGI1 encephalitis and "faciobrachial dystonic seizures-plus", which began as classic faciobrachial dystonic seizures and progressed to focal seizures with impaired awareness, dacrystic/gelastic-like outbursts, ictal speech, manual automatisms, and autonomic signs (tachycardia). Recognition of the broad range of seizure types associated with LGI1 encephalitis is crucial for early diagnosis and definitive treatment. [Published with video sequence on www.epilepticdisorders.com].

  3. Improving Speaker Recognition by Biometric Voice Deconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel eMazaira-Fernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Person identification, especially in critical environments, has always been a subject of great interest. However, it has gained a new dimension in a world threatened by a new kind of terrorism that uses social networks (e.g. YouTube to broadcast its message. In this new scenario, classical identification methods (such fingerprints or face recognition have been forcedly replaced by alternative biometric characteristics such as voice, as sometimes this is the only feature available. Through the present paper, a new methodology to characterize speakers will be shown. This methodology is benefiting from the advances achieved during the last years in understanding and modelling voice production. The paper hypothesizes that a gender dependent characterization of speakers combined with the use of a new set of biometric parameters extracted from the components resulting from the deconstruction of the voice into its glottal source and vocal tract estimates, will enhance recognition rates when compared to classical approaches. A general description about the main hypothesis and the methodology followed to extract gender-dependent extended biometric parameters are given. Experimental validation is carried out both on a highly controlled acoustic condition database, and on a mobile phone network recorded under non-controlled acoustic conditions.

  4. Antibodies and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Ramasamy, M; Yasawardena, S

    There is considerable interest in using merozoite proteins in a vaccine against falciparum malaria. Observations that antibodies to merozoite surface proteins block invasion are a basis for optimism. This article draws attention to important and varied aspects of how antibodies to Plasmodium

  5. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  6. Antiphospholipid antibodies: standardization and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R S; Friedline, J; Rogers, J S

    1997-09-01

    A phenomenon originally scorned as a laboratory nuisance has turned out to be an important cause of thromboembolism, fetal death, and other forms of human disease. Investigations of this inaptly named "lupus anticoagulant" has led to the discovery of at least two distinct types of autoimmune antibodies. In spite of recent discoveries regarding the pathophysiology of these antibodies, their clinical significance is still controversial.

  7. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA

  8. Adjustment of gripping force by optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, C. K.; Barz, C.

    2018-01-01

    With increasing automation, robotics also requires ever more intelligent solutions in the handling of various tasks. In this context, many grippers must also be re-designed. For this, they must always be adapted for different requirements. The equipment of the gripper systems with sensors should help to make the gripping process more intelligent. In order to achieve such objectives, optical systems can also be used. This work analyzes how the gripping force can be adjusted by means of an optical recognition. The result of this work is the creation of a connection between optical recognition, tolerances, gripping force and real-time control. In this way, algorithms can be created, with the aid of which robot grippers as well as other gripping systems become more intelligent.

  9. [Antibody induction after intrauterine interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, J; Giers, G; Bald, R; Hansmann, M; Hanfland, P

    1993-06-01

    Immunohematologic and clinical data, i.e., antibody profile, location of the placenta, mode of cordocentesis, obtained from 48 pregnant patients with irregular erythrocyte antibodies during the last 2 years have been retrospectively evaluated. All fetuses of the patients received intrauterine transfusions for the treatment of fetal erythroblastosis. In 16 (33%) patients (group I) a secondarily induced antibody was detected after the onset of intrauterine transfusion therapy. 32 (67%) patients (group II) did not further develop new antibody specificities. Group I exhibited a significantly different distribution in the location of the placenta (p pregnant women. In group I a 5-fold higher rate of anterior than posterior placenta location was found. The mode of cordocentesis differed significantly (p antibodies by invasive intrauterine interventions in our patients depended indirectly on the location of the placenta and directly on the mode of the puncture (trans- vs. paraplacental access).

  10. Indoor navigation by image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Io Teng; Leong, Chi Chong; Hong, Ka Wo; Pun, Chi-Man

    2017-07-01

    With the progress of smartphones hardware, it is simple on smartphone using image recognition technique such as face detection. In addition, indoor navigation system development is much slower than outdoor navigation system. Hence, this research proves a usage of image recognition technique for navigation in indoor environment. In this paper, we introduced an indoor navigation application that uses the indoor environment features to locate user's location and a route calculating algorithm to generate an appropriate path for user. The application is implemented on Android smartphone rather than iPhone. Yet, the application design can also be applied on iOS because the design is implemented without using special features only for Android. We found that digital navigation system provides better and clearer location information than paper map. Also, the indoor environment is ideal for Image recognition processing. Hence, the results motivate us to design an indoor navigation system using image recognition.

  11. Pattern recognition and string matching

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xiuzhen

    2002-01-01

    The research and development of pattern recognition have proven to be of importance in science, technology, and human activity. Many useful concepts and tools from different disciplines have been employed in pattern recognition. Among them is string matching, which receives much theoretical and practical attention. String matching is also an important topic in combinatorial optimization. This book is devoted to recent advances in pattern recognition and string matching. It consists of twenty eight chapters written by different authors, addressing a broad range of topics such as those from classifica­ tion, matching, mining, feature selection, and applications. Each chapter is self-contained, and presents either novel methodological approaches or applications of existing theories and techniques. The aim, intent, and motivation for publishing this book is to pro­ vide a reference tool for the increasing number of readers who depend upon pattern recognition or string matching in some way. This includes student...

  12. Similarity measures for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vezzetti, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Face recognition has several applications, including security, such as (authentication and identification of device users and criminal suspects), and in medicine (corrective surgery and diagnosis). Facial recognition programs rely on algorithms that can compare and compute the similarity between two sets of images. This eBook explains some of the similarity measures used in facial recognition systems in a single volume. Readers will learn about various measures including Minkowski distances, Mahalanobis distances, Hansdorff distances, cosine-based distances, among other methods. The book also summarizes errors that may occur in face recognition methods. Computer scientists "facing face" and looking to select and test different methods of computing similarities will benefit from this book. The book is also useful tool for students undertaking computer vision courses.

  13. License plate recognition (phase B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    License Plate Recognition (LPR) technology has been used for off-line automobile enforcement purposes. The technology has seen mixed success with correct reading rate as high as 60 to 80% depending on the specific application and environment. This li...

  14. Effective indexing for face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochenkov, I.; Sochenkova, A.; Vokhmintsev, A.; Makovetskii, A.; Melnikov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Face recognition is one of the most important tasks in computer vision and pattern recognition. Face recognition is useful for security systems to provide safety. In some situations it is necessary to identify the person among many others. In this case this work presents new approach in data indexing, which provides fast retrieval in big image collections. Data indexing in this research consists of five steps. First, we detect the area containing face, second we align face, and then we detect areas containing eyes and eyebrows, nose, mouth. After that we find key points of each area using different descriptors and finally index these descriptors with help of quantization procedure. The experimental analysis of this method is performed. This paper shows that performing method has results at the level of state-of-the-art face recognition methods, but it is also gives results fast that is important for the systems that provide safety.

  15. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  16. Language Recognition via Sparse Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    exploiting variation of the nonzero locations and magnitude, we can build a discrimi- native pipeline for language recognition. Figure 1 describes a...classify each language as a target within six predefined language clusters. The language clusters are Ara- bic, Chinese, English , French, Slavic, and... Language Recognition via Sparse Coding† Youngjune L. Gwon1, William M. Campbell1, Douglas Sturim1, H. T. Kung2 1MIT Lincoln Laboratory 2Harvard

  17. An automatic image recognition approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Barbu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Our paper focuses on the graphical analysis domain. We propose an automatic image recognition technique. This approach consists of two main pattern recognition steps. First, it performs an image feature extraction operation on an input image set, using statistical dispersion features. Then, an unsupervised classification process is performed on the previously obtained graphical feature vectors. An automatic region-growing based clustering procedure is proposed and utilized in the classification stage.

  18. Backpropagation neural networks: pattern recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Studenikin, Oleg

    2005-01-01

    In this Master’s degree work artificial neural networks and back propagation learning algorithm for human faces and pattern recognition are analyzed. In the second part of work artificial neural networks and their architecture and structures models are analyzed. In the third part of article the backpropagation procedure and procedures theoretical learning principle are analyzed. In the fourth part different kinds of ANN methods and patterns extracting methods in recognition, learning and ...

  19. Activity Recognition in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0044 Activity Recognition in Social Media Subhasis Chaudhuri INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY Final Report 05/09/2016...DATES COVERED (From - To) 12 Aug 2013 to 30 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Activity Recognition in Social Media 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER...15. SUBJECT TERMS Social Media , AOARD, social interactions 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 15 19a

  20. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeanu, Sandra; Craik, Fergus I M; Alain, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent) varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  1. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Campeanu

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  2. Structural Basis for Broad and Potent Neutralization of HIV-1 by Antibody VRC01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Tongqing; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dai, Kaifan; Finzi, Andrés; Kwon, Young Do; Scheid, Johannes F.; Shi, Wei; Xu, Ling; Yang, Yongping; Zhu, Jiang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Sodroski, Joseph; Shapiro, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D. (NIH); (Rockefeller); (DFCI)

    2010-08-26

    During HIV-1 infection, antibodies are generated against the region of the viral gp120 envelope glycoprotein that binds CD4, the primary receptor for HIV-1. Among these antibodies, VRC01 achieves broad neutralization of diverse viral strains. We determined the crystal structure of VRC01 in complex with a human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 gp120 core. VRC01 partially mimics CD4 interaction with gp120. A shift from the CD4-defined orientation, however, focuses VRC01 onto the vulnerable site of initial CD4 attachment, allowing it to overcome the glycan and conformational masking that diminishes the neutralization potency of most CD4-binding-site antibodies. To achieve this recognition, VRC01 contacts gp120 mainly through immunoglobulin V-gene regions substantially altered from their genomic precursors. Partial receptor mimicry and extensive affinity maturation thus facilitate neutralization of HIV-1 by natural human antibodies.

  3. Towards On-site Pathogen Detection Using Antibody-based Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the recent progress within biosensors for plant pathogen detection will be reviewed. Bio-recognition layers on sensors can be designed in various ways, however the most popular approach is to immobilise antibodies for specific capture of analytes. Focus will be put on antibody surface......-immobilisation strategies as well as the use of antibodies in the widely used sensors, quartz crystal microbalance, surface plasmon resonance and cantilevers. We will describe the available data on antibody-based plant pathogen detection and furthermore use examples from detection of the pathogens Salmonella, Listeria...... monocytogenes, Streptococcus mutans, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter and Escherichia coli. We will touch upon optimal assay design and further discuss the strengths and limitations of current sensor technologies for detection of viruses, bacteria and fungi....

  4. SINGLE DOMAIN ANTIBODIES AND BIOENGINEERING DRUGS ON THEIR BASIS: NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Gorshkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost 20 years ago, a unique class of antibodies devoid of L chains was discovered in Camelidae blood serum. Only one variable domain is responsible for antigen recognition in these unusual antibodies. A recombinant protein, which is analogue to such antigen-recognizing variable domain was called the single domain antibody (sdAb, “nanobody” or “nanoantibody”. The single-domain antibodies and their derivatives have been widely used in the field of biology, toxicology and medicine offering new opportunities for diagnosis and treatment of cancer, autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and for toxin neutralization. This review focuses on latest researches in the field and concerns some prospectives for creation of nanoantibody-based diagnostic and therapeutic drugs.

  5. Structure and immune recognition of trimeric prefusion HIV-1 Env

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancera, Marie; Zhou, Tongqing; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Soto, Cinque; Gorman, Jason; Huang, Jinghe; Acharya, Priyamvada; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Ofek, Gilad; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Stuckey, Jonathan; Bailer, Robert T.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Louder, Mark K.; Tumba, Nancy; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Cohen, Myron S.; Haynes, Barton F.; Mascola, John R.; Morris, Lynn; Munro, James B.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Mothes, Walther; Connors, Mark; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1-envelope (Env) spike, comprising three gp120 and three gp41 subunits, is a conformational machine that facilitates HIV-1 entry by rearranging from a mature unliganded state, through receptor-bound intermediates, to a postfusion state. As the sole viral antigen on the HIV-1-virion surface, Env is both the target of neutralizing antibodies and a focus of vaccine efforts. Here we report the structure at 3.5-Å resolution for an HIV-1-Env trimer captured in a mature closed state by antibodies PGT122 and 35O22. This structure reveals the prefusion conformation of gp41, indicates rearrangements needed for fusion activation, and defines parameters of immune evasion and immune recognition. Prefusion gp41 encircles N- and C-terminal strands of gp120 with four helices that form a membrane-proximal collar, fastened by insertion of a fusion peptide-proximal methionine into a gp41-tryptophan clasp. Spike rearrangements required for entry likely involve opening the clasp and expelling the termini. N-linked glycosylation and sequence-variable regions cover the prefusion closed spike: we used chronic cohorts to map the prevalence and location of effective HIV-1-neutralizing responses, which were distinguished by their recognition of N-linked glycan and tolerance for epitope-sequence variation. PMID:25296255

  6. Effect of Vowel Context on the Recognition of Initial Consonants in Kannada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaiah, Mohan Kumar; Bhat, Jayashree S

    2017-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of vowel context on the recognition of Kannada consonants in quiet for young adults. A total of 17 young adults with normal hearing in both ears participated in the study. The stimuli included consonant-vowel syllables, spoken by 12 native speakers of Kannada. Consonant recognition task was carried out as a closed-set (fourteen-alternative forced-choice). The present study showed an effect of vowel context on the perception of consonants. Maximum consonant recognition score was obtained in the /o/ vowel context, followed by the /a/ and /u/ vowel contexts, and then the /e/ context. Poorest consonant recognition score was obtained in the vowel context /i/. Vowel context has an effect on the recognition of Kannada consonants, and the vowel effect was unique for Kannada consonants.

  7. Distinct medial temporal contributions to different forms of recognition in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Carmen; Mayes, Andrew; Florczak, Susan M.; Chen, Yufen; Creery, Jessica; Parrish, Todd; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; Reber, Paul J.; Paller, Ken A.

    2013-01-01

    The simplest expression of episodic memory is the experience of familiarity, the isolated recognition that something has been encountered previously. Brain structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) make essential contributions to episodic memory, but the distinct contributions from each MTL structure to familiarity are debatable. Here we used specialized tests to assess recognition impairments and their relationship to MTL integrity in people with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, n=19), people with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD; n=10), and age-matched individuals without any neurological disorder (n=20). Recognition of previously presented silhouette objects was tested in two formats—forced-choice recognition with four concurrent choices (one target and three foils) and yes/no recognition with individually presented targets and foils. Every foil was extremely similar to a corresponding target, such that forced-choice recognition could be based on differential familiarity among the choices, whereas yes/no recognition necessitated additional memory and decision factors. Only yes/no recognition was impaired in the aMCI group, whereas both forced-choice and yes/no recognition were impaired in the AD group. Magnetic resonance imaging showed differential brain atrophy, as MTL volume was reduced in the AD group but not in the aMCI group. Pulsed arterial spin-labeled scans demonstrated that MTL blood flow was abnormally increased in aMCI, which could indicate physiological dysfunction prior to the emergence of significant atrophy. Regression analyses with data from all patients revealed that regional patterns of MTL integrity were differentially related to forced-choice and yes/no recognition. Smaller perirhinal cortex volume was associated with lower forced-choice recognition accuracy, but not with lower yes/no recognition accuracy. Instead, smaller hippocampal volumes were associated with lower yes/no recognition accuracy. In sum, familiarity memory can

  8. Characterization of fully functional spray-on antibody thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Jhon [Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620-5250 (United States); Magaña, Sonia; Lim, Daniel V. [Department of Cell Biology, Microbiology and Molecular Biology, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620-7115 (United States); Schlaf, Rudy, E-mail: schlaf@eng.usf.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Ave., Tampa, FL 33620-5101 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The authors recently demonstrated that fully functional Escherichia coli O157:H7 antibody thin films can be prepared using a simple pneumatic nebulizer on glass surface [1]. This paper focuses on the investigation of the morphology and physical properties of these films with the aim to better understand their performance. A series of E. coli O157:H7 antibody spray-on thin films were investigated by ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), immunoassays, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscope (AFM) and contact angle analysis. These data were compared to measurements on films prepared with the biotin–avidin covalent bonding scheme. The investigation showed that films created by a 2 min pneumatic spray deposition time can capture antigens similar as the avidin–biotin wet-chemical method. The results also suggests that an influential factor for the comparable capture cell ability between sprayed and covalent films is an increased antibody surface coverage for the sprayed films (non-equilibrium technique), which compensates for the lack of its antibody orientation. There was no significant antibody denaturation detected on any of the sprayed films. Both techniques led to the formation of cluster-aggregates, a factor that seems unavoidable due to the natural tendency of protein to cluster. The avidin–biotin bridge films generally had a higher roughness, which manifested itself in a higher wettability compared to the sprayed films.

  9. Characterization of fully functional spray-on antibody thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Jhon; Magaña, Sonia; Lim, Daniel V.; Schlaf, Rudy

    2014-02-01

    The authors recently demonstrated that fully functional Escherichia coli O157:H7 antibody thin films can be prepared using a simple pneumatic nebulizer on glass surface [1]. This paper focuses on the investigation of the morphology and physical properties of these films with the aim to better understand their performance. A series of E. coli O157:H7 antibody spray-on thin films were investigated by ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), immunoassays, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscope (AFM) and contact angle analysis. These data were compared to measurements on films prepared with the biotin-avidin covalent bonding scheme. The investigation showed that films created by a 2 min pneumatic spray deposition time can capture antigens similar as the avidin-biotin wet-chemical method. The results also suggests that an influential factor for the comparable capture cell ability between sprayed and covalent films is an increased antibody surface coverage for the sprayed films (non-equilibrium technique), which compensates for the lack of its antibody orientation. There was no significant antibody denaturation detected on any of the sprayed films. Both techniques led to the formation of cluster-aggregates, a factor that seems unavoidable due to the natural tendency of protein to cluster. The avidin-biotin bridge films generally had a higher roughness, which manifested itself in a higher wettability compared to the sprayed films.

  10. Fast Radioactive Nuclide Recognition Method Study Based on Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Huo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on pattern recognition method, applied the nuclear radiation digital measurement and analysis system platform, through synthetically making use of the radioactive nuclide’s ray information, selected radiation characteristic information of the radioactive nuclide, established the characteristic arrays database of radioactive nuclides, the recognition method is designed and applied to the identification of radionuclide radiation while using middle or low-resolution detector in this paper. Verified by experiments, when the count value of the traditional low-resolution spectrometer system is not reach single full energy peak’s statistical lower limit value, the three kinds of mixed radioactive nuclides’ true discrimination rate reached more than 90 % in the digital measurement and analysis system using fast radionuclide recognition method. The results show that this method is obviously superior to the traditional methods, and effectively improve the rapid identification ability to radioactive nuclide.

  11. Facial emotion recognition in myotonic dystrophy type 1 correlates with CTG repeat expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Winblad

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the ability of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 to recognise basic facial emotions. We also explored the relationship between facial emotion recognition, neuropsychological data, personality, and CTG repeat expansion data in the DM-1 group. In total, 50 patients with DM-1 (28 women and 22 men participated, with 41 healthy controls. Recognition of facial emotional expressions was assessed using photographs of basic emotions. A set of tests measured cognition and personality dimensions, and CTG repeat size was quantified in blood lymphocytes. Patients with DM-1 showed impaired recognition of facial emotions compared with controls. A significant negative correlation was found between total score of emotion recognition in a forced choice task and CTG repeat size. Furthermore, specific cognitive functions (vocabulary, visuospatial construction ability, and speed and personality dimensions (reward dependence and cooperativeness correlated with scores on the forced choice emotion recognition task.These findings revealed a CTG repeat dependent facial emotion recognition deficit in the DM-1 group, which was associated with specific neuropsychological functions. Furthermore, a correlation was found between facial emotional recognition ability and personality dimensions associated with sociability. This adds a new clinically relevant dimension in the cognitive deficits associated with DM-1.

  12. Characterization of a purified nicotinic receptor from rat brain by using idiotypic and anti-idiotypic antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abood, L.G.; Langone, J.J.; Bjercke, R.; Lu, X.; Banerjee, S.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of an anti-nicotine monoclonal antibody has made it possible to further establish the nature of the nicotine recognition proteins purified from rat brain by affinity chromatography and to provide a highly sensitive assay for determining [ 3 H]nicotine binding to the purified material. An enantiomeric analogue of nicotine. (-)-6-hydroxymethylnicotine, was used to prepare the affinity column. In addition, with the use of an anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody, it was confirmed that the recognition site for nicotine resides on a protein complex composed of two components with molecular masses of 62 and 57 kDa. It was also demonstrated that the same two proteins could be purified by immunoaffinity chromatography with the use of an anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody. With the use of the anti-nicotine antibody to measure [ 3 H]nicotine binding, the purified material was shown to bind 250 pmol/mg of protein. By utilizing a procedure in which the purified receptor protein was conjugated to membranes by disulfide bonds, a binding activity of 80 pmol/mg was obtained. With the availability of sterospecific monoclonal antibodies to (-)-nicotine as well as monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies derived when the anti-nicotine antibodies were used as immunogens, additional procedures became available for the further characterization of the purified nicotine receptor and examining its (-)-[ 3 H]nicotine-binding characteristics

  13. Structures of HIV-1 Env V1V2 with broadly neutralizing antibodies reveal commonalities that enable vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jason; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Max M; Davenport, Thaddeus M; Guttman, Miklos; Bailer, Robert T; Chambers, Michael; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; DeKosky, Brandon J; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Druz, Aliaksandr; Ernandes, Michael J; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Jarosinski, Marissa C; Joyce, M Gordon; Lemmin, Thomas M; Leung, Sherman; Louder, Mark K; McDaniel, Jonathan R; Narpala, Sandeep; Pancera, Marie; Stuckey, Jonathan; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Mullikin, James C; Baxa, Ulrich; Georgiou, George; McDermott, Adrian B; Bonsignori, Mattia; Haynes, Barton F; Moore, Penny L; Morris, Lynn; Lee, Kelly K; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1 Env V1V2 arise in multiple donors. However, atomic-level interactions had previously been determined only with antibodies from a single donor, thus making commonalities in recognition uncertain. Here we report the cocrystal structure of V1V2 with antibody CH03 from a second donor and model Env interactions of antibody CAP256-VRC26 from a third donor. These V1V2-directed bNAbs used strand-strand interactions between a protruding antibody loop and a V1V2 strand but differed in their N-glycan recognition. Ontogeny analysis indicated that protruding loops develop early, and glycan interactions mature over time. Altogether, the multidonor information suggested that V1V2-directed bNAbs form an 'extended class', for which we engineered ontogeny-specific antigens: Env trimers with chimeric V1V2s that interacted with inferred ancestor and intermediate antibodies. The ontogeny-based design of vaccine antigens described here may provide a general means for eliciting antibodies of a desired class.

  14. Eliciting 10E8-like antibodies by the membrane proximal external region peptide of HIV-1 in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongjiao; Fu, Lu; Gong, Xin; Guan, Shanshan; He, Xiaoqiu; Yin, He; Kuai, Ziyu; Kong, Wei; Shi, Yuhua; Shan, Yaming

    2017-03-01

    To develop an immunotherapy for HIV that can elicit 10E8-like broadly-neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs, using a multiple antigen peptide (MAP) system as the platform and 10E8 peptide as the epitope. The immunogen, 10E8-MAP 4 , was synthetized using the MAP system. The synthetic 10E8-MAP 4 was stable, and the epitopes could be exposed for recognition. In addition, the 10E8 epitope was present in an α-helical structure, which was hypothesized to aid in the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In vivo analysis showed that 10E8-MAP 4 could efficiently elicit HIV binding antibodies in guinea pigs, although only weak neutralizing activities were observed. Multiple antigen peptide is an excellent vaccine platform for generating binding antibodies, but may elicit weak neutralizing antibodies for HIV.

  15. NMR Detection of Semi-Specific Antibody Interactions in Serum Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeko Yanaka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although antibody functions are executed in heterogeneous blood streams characterized by molecular crowding and promiscuous intermolecular interaction, detailed structural characterizations of antibody interactions have thus far been performed under homogeneous in vitro conditions. NMR spectroscopy potentially has the ability to study protein structures in heterogeneous environments, assuming that the target protein can be labeled with NMR-active isotopes. Based on our successful development of isotope labeling of antibody glycoproteins, here we apply NMR spectroscopy to characterize antibody interactions in heterogeneous extracellular environments using mouse IgG-Fc as a test molecule. In human serum, many of the HSQC peaks originating from the Fc backbone exhibited attenuation in intensity of various magnitudes. Similar spectral changes were induced by the Fab fragment of polyclonal IgG isolated from the serum, but not by serum albumin, indicating that a subset of antibodies reactive with mouse IgG-Fc exists in human serum without preimmunization. The metaepitopes recognized by serum polyclonal IgG cover the entire molecular surface of Fc, including the binding sites to Fc receptors and C1q. In-serum NMR observation will offer useful tools for the detailed characterization of biopharamaceuticals, including therapeutic antibodies in physiologically relevant heterogeneous environments, also giving deeper insight into molecular recognition by polyclonal antibodies in the immune system.

  16. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  17. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  18. Antisperm antibodies and fertility association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, B; Cardona-Maya, W

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the relation between antisperm antibodies (ASA) and human fertility by reviewing the scientific literature of the last 45 years. We carried out a review of scientific literature about antisperm antibodies and infertility published in spanish or english in databases as Pubmed, Medline, Scielo, some books and another gray literature include information related to this review and that is published in the last 45 years. Infertile couples suffer infertility by immunological mechanisms mainly by the presence of antisperm antibodies ASA in blood, semen or cervicovaginal secretions; the formation of ASA in men and women may be associated with disturbance in immunomodulatory mechanisms that result in functional impairment of sperm and thus its inability to fertilize the oocyte. Immunological infertility caused by ASA is the result of interference of these antibodies in various stages of fertilization process, inhibiting the ability of interaction between sperm and oocyte. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibody Drug Conjugates: Preclinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Gadi G

    2015-05-01

    The development path for antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) is more complex and challenging than for unmodified antibodies. While many of the preclinical considerations for both unmodified and antibody drug conjugates are shared, special considerations must be taken into account when developing an ADC. Unlike unmodified antibodies, an ADC must preferentially bind to tumor cells, internalize, and traffic to the appropriate intracellular compartment to release the payload. Parameters that can impact the pharmacological properties of this class of therapeutics include the selection of the payload, the type of linker, and the methodology for payload drug conjugation. Despite a plethora of in vitro assays and in vivo models to screen and evaluate ADCs, the challenge remains to develop improved preclinical tools that will be more predictive of clinical outcome. This review will focus on preclinical considerations for clinically validated small molecule ADCs. In addition, the lessons learned from Mylotarg®, the first in class FDA-approved ADC, are highlighted.

  20. Development and evaluation of single domain antibodies for vaccinia and the L1 antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Walper

    Full Text Available There is ongoing interest to develop high affinity, thermal stable recognition elements to replace conventional antibodies in biothreat detection assays. As part of this effort, single domain antibodies that target vaccinia virus were developed. Two llamas were immunized with killed viral particles followed by boosts with the recombinant membrane protein, L1, to stimulate the immune response for envelope and membrane proteins of the virus. The variable domains of the induced heavy chain antibodies were selected from M13 phage display libraries developed from isolated RNA. Selection via biopanning on the L1 antigen produced single domain antibodies that were specific and had affinities ranging from 4×10(-9 M to 7.0×10(-10 M, as determined by surface plasmon resonance. Several showed good ability to refold after heat denaturation. These L1-binding single domain antibodies, however, failed to recognize the killed vaccinia antigen. Useful vaccinia binding single domain antibodies were isolated by a second selection using the killed virus as the target. The virus binding single domain antibodies were incorporated in sandwich assays as both capture and tracer using the MAGPIX system yielding limits of detection down to 4×10(5 pfu/ml, a four-fold improvement over the limit obtained using conventional antibodies. This work demonstrates the development of anti-vaccinia single domain antibodies and their incorporation into sandwich assays for viral detection. It also highlights the properties of high affinity and thermal stability that are hallmarks of single domain antibodies.

  1. Handbook of force transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, Dan Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Part I introduces the basic ""Principles and Methods of Force Measurement"" acording to a classification into a dozen of force transducers types: resistive, inductive, capacitive, piezoelectric, electromagnetic, electrodynamic, magnetoelastic, galvanomagnetic (Hall-effect), vibrating wires, (micro)resonators, acoustic and gyroscopic. Two special chapters refer to force balance techniques and to combined methods in force measurement. Part II discusses the ""(Strain Gauge) Force Transducers Components"", evolving from the classical force transducer to the digital / intelligent one, with the inco

  2. Fluid phase recognition molecules in neutrophil-dependent immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillon, Sébastien; Ponzetta, Andrea; Magrini, Elena; Barajon, Isabella; Barbagallo, Marialuisa; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The innate immune system comprises both a cellular and a humoral arm. Neutrophils are key effector cells of the immune and inflammatory responses and have emerged as a major source of humoral pattern recognition molecules (PRMs). These molecules, which include collectins, ficolins, and pentraxins, are specialised in the discrimination of self versus non-self and modified-self and share basic multifunctional properties including recognition and opsonisation of pathogens and apoptotic cells, activation and regulation of the complement cascade and tuning of inflammation. Neutrophils act as a reservoir of ready-made soluble PRMs, such as the long pentraxin PTX3, the peptidoglycan recognition protein PGRP-S, properdin and M-ficolin, which are stored in neutrophil granules and are involved in neutrophil effector functions. In addition, other soluble PRMs, such as members of the collectin family, are not expressed in neutrophils but can modulate neutrophil-dependent immune responses. Therefore, soluble PRMs are an essential part of the innate immune response and retain antibody-like effector functions. Here, we will review the expression and general function of soluble PRMs, focusing our attention on molecules involved in neutrophil effector functions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Engineered antibodies for monitoring of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karu, A.E.; Li, Q.X.; Roberts, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    'The long-term goal of this project is to develop antibodies and antibody-based methods for detection and recovery of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH adducts that are potential biomarkers in environmental and biological samples. The inherent cross-reactivity will be exploited by pattern recognition methods. Dr. Karu''s laboratory uses new haptens representing key PAHs to derive recombinant Fab (rFab) and single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies from hybridoma lines and combinatorial phage display libraries. Computational models of the haptens and combining sites made by Dr. Roberts''s group are used to guide antibody engineering by mutagenesis. Dr. Li''s laboratory develops enzyme immunoassays (EIAs), sensors, and immunoaffinity methods that make use of the novel haptens and antibodies for practical analytical applications in support of DOE''s mission. This report summarizes work completed in one and one-half years of a 3-year project, with close collaboration between the three research groups. Dr. Alexander Karu''s laboratory: the authors proceeded with the two strategies described in the original proposal. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to correct differences in the rFab N-terminal amino acids that were introduced by the degenerate PCR primers used for gene amplification. The binding constants of the rFabs with the corrected sequences will be compared with those of the parent MAbs, and should be very similar. The 4D5 and 10C10 heavy and light chain sequences are being moved to the pCOMB3H phagemid vector to facilitate selection of new engineered mutants.'

  4. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  5. Designing novel nano-immunoassays: antibody orientation versus sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puertas, S; Moros, M; Fernandez-Pacheco, R; Ibarra, M R; Grazu, V; De la Fuente, J M, E-mail: vgrazu@unizar.e, E-mail: jmfuente@unizar.e [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, Campus RIo Ebro, EdifIcio I-D, Mariano Esquillor, s/n, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-12-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for their application in quantitative and highly sensitive biosensors. Their use as labels of biological recognition events and their detection by means of some magnetic method constitute a very promising strategy for quantitative high-sensitive lateral-flow assays. In this paper, we report the importance of nanoparticle functionalization for the improvement of sensitivity for a lateral-flow immunoassay. More precisely, we have found that immobilization of IgG anti-hCG through its polysaccharide moieties on MNPs allows more successful recognition of the hCG hormone. Although we have used the detection of hCG as a model in this work, the strategy of binding antibodies to MNPs through its sugar chains reported here is applicable to other antibodies. It has huge potential as it will be very useful for the development of quantitative and high-sensitive lateral-flow assays for its use on human and veterinary, medicine, food and beverage manufacturing, pharmaceutical, medical biologics and personal care product production, environmental remediation, etc.

  6. Individual Recognition in Ant Queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ettorre, Patrizia; Heinze, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Personal relationships are the cornerstone of vertebrate societies, but insect societies are either too large for individual recognition, or their members were assumed to lack the necessary cognitive abilities 1 and 2 . This paradigm has been challenged by the recent discovery that paper wasps...... recognize each other's unique facial color patterns [3] . Individual recognition is advantageous when dominance hierarchies control the partitioning of work and reproduction 2 and 4 . Here, we show that unrelated founding queens of the ant Pachycondyla villosa use chemical cues to recognize each other...... perception, was prevented and in tests with anaesthetized queens. The cuticular chemical profiles of queens were neither associated with dominance nor fertility and, therefore, do not represent status badges 5 and 6 , and nestmate queens did not share a common odor. Personal recognition facilitates...

  7. Face Recognition using Approximate Arithmetic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marso, Karol

    Face recognition is image processing technique which aims to identify human faces and found its use in various different fields for example in security. Throughout the years this field evolved and there are many approaches and many different algorithms which aim to make the face recognition as effective...... as possible. The use of different approaches such as neural networks and machine learning can lead to fast and efficient solutions however, these solutions are expensive in terms of hardware resources and power consumption. A possible solution to this problem can be use of approximate arithmetic. In many image...... processing applications the results do not need to be completely precise and use of the approximate arithmetic can lead to reduction in terms of delay, space and power consumption. In this paper we examine possible use of approximate arithmetic in face recognition using Eigenfaces algorithm....

  8. Mandarin recognition over the telephone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yuhung

    1996-06-01

    Mandarin Chinese is the official language in China and Taiwan, it is the native language of a quarter of the world population. As the services enabled by speech recognition technology (e.g. telephone voice dialing, information query) become more popular in English, we would like to extend this capability to other languages. Mandarin is one of the major languages under research in our laboratory. This paper describes how we extend our work in English speech recognition into Mandarin. We will described the corpus: Voice Across Taiwan, the training of a complete set of Mandarin syllable models, preliminary performance results and error analysis. A fast prototyping system was built, where a user can write any context free grammar with no restriction of vocabulary, then the grammar can be compiled into recognition models. It enables user to quickly test the performance of a new vocabulary.

  9. Mapping of linear antibody epitopes of the glycoprotein of VHSV, a salmonid rhabdovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Alonso, M.; Lorenzo, G.; Perez, L.

    1998-01-01

    antibodies (MAbs), only 2 non-neutralizing MAbs, I10 (aa 139-153) and IP1H3 (aa 399-413), could be mapped to specific peptides in the pepscan of the gpG. Mapping of these MAbs was confirmed by immunoblotting with recombinant proteins and/or other synthetic peptides covering those sequences. None...... of the neutralizing MAbs tested reacted with any of the gpG peptides. Previously mapped MAb resistant mutants in the gpG did not coincide with any of the Linear epitopes defined by the pepscan strategy, suggesting the complementarity of the 2 methods for the identification of antibody recognition sites....

  10. Assay for the pattern recognition molecule collectin liver 1 (CL-L1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelgaard, Esben; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Jensen, Lisbeth

    Collectin liver 1 (also termed collectin 10 and CL-L1) is a C-type lectin that functions as a pattern recognition molecule (PRM) in the innate immune system1. We have produced antibodies against CL-L1 and have developed a sandwich-type time-resolved immuno-fluorometric assay (TRIFMA) for the meas......Collectin liver 1 (also termed collectin 10 and CL-L1) is a C-type lectin that functions as a pattern recognition molecule (PRM) in the innate immune system1. We have produced antibodies against CL-L1 and have developed a sandwich-type time-resolved immuno-fluorometric assay (TRIFMA...

  11. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  12. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  13. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. Structural insights for engineering binding proteins based on non-antibody scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Ryan N; Koide, Shohei

    2012-08-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these 'alternative' scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering strategies. Furthermore, the structural features of these synthetic proteins produced under tightly controlled, directed evolution deepen our understanding of the underlying principles governing molecular recognition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous tracking and activity recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina Elena; Fleet, David J.; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    Many tracking problems involve several distinct objects interacting with each other. We develop a framework that takes into account interactions between objects allowing the recognition of complex activities. In contrast to classic approaches that consider distinct phases of tracking and activity...... recognition, our framework performs these two tasks simultaneously. In particular, we adopt a Bayesian standpoint where the system maintains a joint distribution of the positions, the interactions and the possible activities. This turns out to be advantegeous, as information about the ongoing activities can...

  16. Discriminative learning for speech recognition

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiadong

    2008-01-01

    In this book, we introduce the background and mainstream methods of probabilistic modeling and discriminative parameter optimization for speech recognition. The specific models treated in depth include the widely used exponential-family distributions and the hidden Markov model. A detailed study is presented on unifying the common objective functions for discriminative learning in speech recognition, namely maximum mutual information (MMI), minimum classification error, and minimum phone/word error. The unification is presented, with rigorous mathematical analysis, in a common rational-functio

  17. Iris Recognition for Human Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alandkar, Lajari; Gengaje, Sachin

    2010-11-01

    Iris recognition system is the biometric identification system. Iris has an intricate structure, uniqueness, stability, and natural protection. Due to these features of the iris it can be used for biometric identification. This system gives better performance than other biometric identification systems. A novel eyelash removal method for preprocessing of human iris images in a human iris recognition system is presented.. Discrete cosine transform (DCT) method is used for feature extraction. For matching of two-iris code Hamming distance calculation is used. EER value must be less for the optimum performance of the system.

  18. Human ear recognition by computer

    CERN Document Server

    Bhanu, Bir; Chen, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Biometrics deals with recognition of individuals based on their physiological or behavioral characteristics. The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. Unlike the fingerprint and iris, it can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject, although sometimes it may be hidden with hair, scarf and jewellery. Also, unlike a face, the ear is a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. ""Human Ear Recognition by Computer"" is the first book o

  19. Unequal recognition, misrecognition and injustice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2012-01-01

    Euro-multiculturalism is (1) concerned with religiously defined immigrant minorities; (2) sees policies of recognition as a means to secure multicultural equality between groups; (3) endorses the moderate secularism of European states; and (4) adopts a contextualist approach to answering the norm......Euro-multiculturalism is (1) concerned with religiously defined immigrant minorities; (2) sees policies of recognition as a means to secure multicultural equality between groups; (3) endorses the moderate secularism of European states; and (4) adopts a contextualist approach to answering...

  20. Familiar Person Recognition: Is Autonoetic Consciousness More Likely to Accompany Face Recognition Than Voice Recognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsics, Catherine; Brédart, Serge

    2010-11-01

    Autonoetic consciousness is a fundamental property of human memory, enabling us to experience mental time travel, to recollect past events with a feeling of self-involvement, and to project ourselves in the future. Autonoetic consciousness is a characteristic of episodic memory. By contrast, awareness of the past associated with a mere feeling of familiarity or knowing relies on noetic consciousness, depending on semantic memory integrity. Present research was aimed at evaluating whether conscious recollection of episodic memories is more likely to occur following the recognition of a familiar face than following the recognition of a familiar voice. Recall of semantic information (biographical information) was also assessed. Previous studies that investigated the recall of biographical information following person recognition used faces and voices of famous people as stimuli. In this study, the participants were presented with personally familiar people's voices and faces, thus avoiding the presence of identity cues in the spoken extracts and allowing a stricter control of frequency exposure with both types of stimuli (voices and faces). In the present study, the rate of retrieved episodic memories, associated with autonoetic awareness, was significantly higher from familiar faces than familiar voices even though the level of overall recognition was similar for both these stimuli domains. The same pattern was observed regarding semantic information retrieval. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed.

  1. Military personnel recognition system using texture, colour, and SURF features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irhebhude, Martins E.; Edirisinghe, Eran A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an automatic, machine vision based, military personnel identification and classification system. Classification is done using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) on sets of Army, Air Force and Navy camouflage uniform personnel datasets. In the proposed system, the arm of service of personnel is recognised by the camouflage of a persons uniform, type of cap and the type of badge/logo. The detailed analysis done include; camouflage cap and plain cap differentiation using gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture feature; classification on Army, Air Force and Navy camouflaged uniforms using GLCM texture and colour histogram bin features; plain cap badge classification into Army, Air Force and Navy using Speed Up Robust Feature (SURF). The proposed method recognised camouflage personnel arm of service on sets of data retrieved from google images and selected military websites. Correlation-based Feature Selection (CFS) was used to improve recognition and reduce dimensionality, thereby speeding the classification process. With this method success rates recorded during the analysis include 93.8% for camouflage appearance category, 100%, 90% and 100% rates of plain cap and camouflage cap categories for Army, Air Force and Navy categories, respectively. Accurate recognition was recorded using SURF for the plain cap badge category. Substantial analysis has been carried out and results prove that the proposed method can correctly classify military personnel into various arms of service. We show that the proposed method can be integrated into a face recognition system, which will recognise personnel in addition to determining the arm of service which the personnel belong. Such a system can be used to enhance the security of a military base or facility.

  2. Missing Links in Antibody Assembly Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Anelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fidelity of the humoral immune response requires that quiescent B lymphocytes display membrane bound immunoglobulin M (IgM on B lymphocytes surface as part of the B cell receptor, whose function is to recognize an antigen. At the same time B lymphocytes should not secrete IgM until recognition of the antigen has occurred. The heavy chains of the secretory IgM have a C-terminal tail with a cysteine instead of a membrane anchor, which serves to covalently link the IgM subunits by disulfide bonds to form “pentamers” or “hexamers.” By virtue of the same cysteine, unassembled secretory IgM subunits are recognized and retained (via mixed disulfide bonds by members of the protein disulfide isomerase family, in particular ERp44. This so-called “thiol-mediated retention” bars assembly intermediates from prematurely leaving the cell and thereby exerts quality control on the humoral immune response. In this essay we discuss recent findings on how ERp44 governs such assembly control in a pH-dependent manner, shuttling between the cisGolgi and endoplasmic reticulum, and finally on how pERp1/MZB1, possibly as a co-chaperone of GRP94, may help to overrule the thiol-mediated retention in the activated B cell to give way to antibody secretion.

  3. Epitope recognition patterns of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies in healthy individuals and patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Brix, Thomas H; Gardas, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) are markers of autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), but naturally occurring TPOAb are also detectable in healthy, euthyroid individuals. In AITD, circulating TPOAb react mainly with two immunodominant regions (IDR), IDR-A......-A and IDR-B. The present study was undertaken in order to compare the epitope recognition pattern of TPOAb in HT patients and healthy subjects....

  4. Timely loss recognition and termination of unprofitable projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Srivastava

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ideally, firms should discontinue projects that become unprofitable. Managers, however, continue to operate such projects because of their limited employment horizons and empire-building motivations (Jensen, 1986; Ball, 2001. Prior studies suggest that timely loss recognition in accounting earnings enables lenders, shareholders, and boards of directors to identify unprofitable projects; thereby, enabling them to force managers to discontinue such projects before large value erosion occurs. However, this conjecture has not been tested empirically. Consistent with this notion, we find that timely loss recognition increases the likelihood of timely closures of unprofitable projects. Moreover, managers, by announcing late discontinuations of such projects, reveal their inability to select good projects and/or to contain losses, when projects turn unprofitable. Accordingly, thereafter, the fund providers and board of directors are likely to demand improved timeliness of loss recognition and stringent scrutiny of firms’ capital expenditure plans. Consistently, we find that firms that announce large discontinuation losses reduce capital expenditures and improve timeliness of loss recognition in subsequent years. Our study provides evidence that timely loss reporting affects “real” economic decisions and creates economic benefits.

  5. Replacing reprogramming factors with antibodies selected from combinatorial antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Joel W; Xie, Jia; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Gross, Simon; Lee, Sohyon; Lerner, Richard A; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2017-10-01

    The reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is usually achieved by exogenous induction of transcription by factors acting in the nucleus. In contrast, during development, signaling pathways initiated at the membrane induce differentiation. The central idea of this study is to identify antibodies that can catalyze cellular de-differentiation and nuclear reprogramming by acting at the cell surface. We screen a lentiviral library encoding ∼100 million secreted and membrane-bound single-chain antibodies and identify antibodies that can replace either Sox2 and Myc (c-Myc) or Oct4 during reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into iPSCs. We show that one Sox2-replacing antibody antagonizes the membrane-associated protein Basp1, thereby de-repressing nuclear factors WT1, Esrrb and Lin28a (Lin28) independent of Sox2. By manipulating this pathway, we identify three methods to generate iPSCs. Our results establish unbiased selection from autocrine combinatorial antibody libraries as a robust method to discover new biologics and uncover membrane-to-nucleus signaling pathways that regulate pluripotency and cell fate.

  6. Pattern recognition in speech and language processing

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Wu

    2003-01-01

    Minimum Classification Error (MSE) Approach in Pattern Recognition, Wu ChouMinimum Bayes-Risk Methods in Automatic Speech Recognition, Vaibhava Goel and William ByrneA Decision Theoretic Formulation for Adaptive and Robust Automatic Speech Recognition, Qiang HuoSpeech Pattern Recognition Using Neural Networks, Shigeru KatagiriLarge Vocabulary Speech Recognition Based on Statistical Methods, Jean-Luc GauvainToward Spontaneous Speech Recognition and Understanding, Sadaoki FuruiSpeaker Authentication, Qi Li and Biing-Hwang JuangHMMs for Language Processing Problems, Ri

  7. Radioiodination of antibodies for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the great potential of radioiodinated antibody for the detection and treatment of cancer, the present article deals with the various techniques of radioiodination of antibody and their uses. Topics include methods of iodination of antibody, advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and effects of radioiodination on the antibody molecules with respect to their physiochemical and immunologic reactivity. In addition, the clinical usefulness of radioiodinated antibodies is discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Synthetic peptides for efficient discrimination of anti-enterovirus antibodies at the serotype level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routsias, John G; Mavrouli, Maria D; Antonaki, Georgia; Spanakis, Nikolaos; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2014-08-01

    Enteroviruses are important human pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases from minor common colds to fatal myocarditis. However, certain disease syndromes are caused by one or few serotypes. Serotype identification is difficult due to the laborious neutralization tests that lack of sensitivity, while in commercial ELISAs homotypic antibodies' activities are largely masked by the recognition of genera-specific epitopes by heterotypic antibodies. In the present study homotypic assays were developed with the ability to discriminate different enterovirus serotypes. Seventy-three children sera, positive for IgM antibodies against enterovirus genus and 49 healthy children were examined for the presence of antibodies against 14 synthetic peptides derived from a non-conserved region of the VP1 protein of coxsackieviruses B2, B3, B4, B5, A9, A16, A24, echoviruses 6, 7, 9, 11, 30, enterovirus 71 and parechovirus 1. 50% of the anti-enterovirus IgM positive sera (>150 BU) reacted with the peptides with the majority of them to preferentially recognize one of them, supporting the homotypic nature of our assay. Inhibition studies yielded homologous inhibition rates 67-95% suggesting that specific peptide recognition actually occurred. The diagnostic value of our assay was tested in blood samples drawn over a 1.5-year period from a 5-year old patient. The anti-enterovirus reactivity was clearly attributed to echovirus serotype 11. The IgM/IgG antibody ratio was reversed 4 months later and subsequently IgM antibodies dropped below the cutoff point. In this paper we demonstrate that our assay can be used to discriminate between antibodies targeting different enterovirus serotypes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgue, Gueven; Twyman, Richard M; Beiss, Veronique; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as 'green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of antibodies, ranging from laboratory-scale expression to industrial-scale manufacturing. The key features of plant-based production include safety, speed, low cost, and convenience, allowing newcomers to rapidly master the technology and use it to its full advantage. Manufacturing in plants has recently achieved significant milestones and offers more than just an alternative to established microbial and mammalian cell platforms. The use of plants for product development in particular offers the power and flexibility to easily coexpress many different genes, allowing the plug-and-play construction of novel bionanomaterials, perfectly complementing existing approaches based on plant virus-like particles. As well as producing single antibodies for applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry, plants can be used to produce antibody-based supramolecular structures and scaffolds as a new generation of green bionanomaterials that promise a bright future based on clean and renewable nanotechnology applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1462. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1462 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  11. Antibody Validation by Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Michele; Manganelli, Valeria; Hodge, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Validation of antibodies is an integral part of translational research, particularly for biomarker discovery. Assaying the specificity of the reagent (antibody) and confirming the identity of the protein biomarker is of critical importance prior to implementing any biomarker in clinical studies, and the lack of such quality control tests may result in unexpected and/or misleading results.Antibody validation is the procedure in which a single antibody is thoroughly assayed for sensitivity and specificity. Although a plethora of commercial antibodies exist, antibody specificity must be extensively demonstrated using diverse complex biological samples, rather than purified recombinant proteins, prior to use in clinical translational research. In the simplest iteration, antibody specificity is determined by the presence of a single band in a complex biological sample, at the expected molecular weight, on a Western blot.To date, numerous Western blotting procedures are available, based on either manual or automated systems and spanning the spectrum of single blots to multiplex blots. X-ray film is still employed in many research laboratories, but digital imaging has become a gold standard in immunoblotting. The basic principles of Western blotting are (a) separation of protein mixtures by gel electrophoresis, (b) transfer of the proteins to a blot, (c) probing the blot for a protein or proteins of interest, and (d) subsequent detection of the protein by chemiluminescent, fluorescent, or colorimetric methods. This chapter focuses on the chemiluminescent detection of proteins using a manual Western blotting system and a vacuum-enhanced detection system (SNAP i.d.™, Millipore).

  12. The Army word recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  13. Action Recognition using Motion Primitives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeslund, Thomas B.; Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft

    The number of potential applications has made automatic recognition of human actions a very active research area. Different approaches have been followed based on trajectories through some state space. In this paper we also model an action as a trajectory through a state space, but we represent...

  14. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next ...

  15. Mobile Visual Recognition on Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwen Gui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the recognition of large-scale outdoor scenes on smartphones by fusing outputs of inertial sensors and computer vision techniques. The main contributions can be summarized as follows. Firstly, we propose an ORD (overlap region divide method to plot image position area, which is fast enough to find the nearest visiting area and can also reduce the search range compared with the traditional approaches. Secondly, the vocabulary tree-based approach is improved by introducing GAGCC (gravity-aligned geometric consistency constraint. Our method involves no operation in the high-dimensional feature space and does not assume a global transform between a pair of images. Thus, it substantially reduces the computational complexity and memory usage, which makes the city scale image recognition feasible on the smartphone. Experiments on a collected database including 0.16 million images show that the proposed method demonstrates excellent recognition performance, while maintaining the average recognition time about 1 s.

  16. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction in face ...

  17. Target recognition by wavelet transform

    CERN Document Server

    Li Zheng Dong; He Wu Liang; Pei Chun Lan; Peng Wen; SongChen; Zheng Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Wavelet transform has an important character of multi-resolution power, which presents pyramid structure, and this character coincides the way by which people distinguish object from coarse to fineness and from large to tiny. In addition to it, wavelet transform benefits to reducing image noise, simplifying calculation, and embodying target image characteristic point. A method of target recognition by wavelet transform is provided

  18. Face recognition, a landmarks tale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Face recognition is a technology that appeals to the imagination of many people. This is particularly reflected in the popularity of science-fiction films and forensic detective series such as CSI, CSI New York, CSI Miami, Bones and NCIS. Although these series tend to be set in the present, their

  19. Phosphate Recognition in Structural Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, Anna K.H.; Fischer, Felix R.; Diederich, François

    2007-01-01

    Drug-discovery research in the past decade has seen an increased selection of targets with phosphate recognition sites, such as protein kinases and phosphatases, in the past decade. This review attempts, with the help of database-mining tools, to give an overview of the most important principles in

  20. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next, the frequency ...

  1. Selective Search for Object Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijlings, J.R.; van de Sande, K.E.A.; Gevers, T.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    This paper addresses the problem of generating possible object locations for use in object recognition. We introduce selective search which combines the strength of both an exhaustive search and segmentation. Like segmentation, we use the image structure to guide our sampling process. Like

  2. Object Recognition by Contour Matching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir Peter Boots; Ir. Dick van Schenk Brill

    2002-01-01

    This article deals with automatic object recognition. The goal is that in a certain grey-level image, possibly containing many objects, a certain object can be recognized and localized, based upon its shape. The assumption is that this shape has no special characteristics on which a dedicated

  3. Speech recognition implementation in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Keith S.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous speech recognition (SR) is an emerging technology that allows direct digital transcription of dictated radiology reports. The SR systems are being widely deployed in the radiology community. This is a review of technical and practical issues that should be considered when implementing an SR system. (orig.)

  4. Non-Intrusive Appliance Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteen, G; Hoogsteen, Gerwin; Krist, J.O.; Bakker, Vincent; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2012-01-01

    Energy conservation becomes more important nowadays. The use of smart meters and, in the near future, smart appliances, are the key to achieve reduction in energy consumption. This research proposes a non-intrusive appliance monitor and recognition system for implementation on an embedded system.

  5. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    automatic recognition of speech (ASR). Instead, likely for historical reasons, envelopes of power spectrum were adopted as main carrier of linguistic information in ASR. However, the relationships between phonetic values of sounds and their short-term spectral envelopes are not straightforward. Consequently, this asks for ...

  6. Matching score based face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, B.J.; Beumer, G.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate face registration is of vital importance to the performance of a face recognition algorithm. We propose a new method: matching score based face registration, which searches for optimal alignment by maximizing the matching score output of a classifier as a function of the different

  7. Motion Primitives for Action Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2007-01-01

    The number of potential applications has made automatic recognition of human actions a very active research area. Different approaches have been followed based on trajectories through some state space. In this paper we also model an action as a trajectory through a state space, but we represent t...

  8. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction ...

  9. Ear recognition: a complete system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaza, Ayman; Harrison, Mary Ann F.

    2013-05-01

    Ear Recognition has recently received significant attention in the literature. Even though current ear recognition systems have reached a certain level of maturity, their success is still limited. This paper presents an efficient complete ear-based biometric system that can process five frames/sec; Hence it can be used for surveillance applications. The ear detection is achieved using Haar features arranged in a cascaded Adaboost classifier. The feature extraction is based on dividing the ear image into several blocks from which Local Binary Pattern feature distributions are extracted. These feature distributions are then fused at the feature level to represent the original ear texture in the classification stage. The contribution of this paper is three fold: (i) Applying a new technique for ear feature extraction, and studying various optimization parameters for that technique; (ii) Presenting a practical ear recognition system and a detailed analysis about error propagation in that system; (iii) Studying the occlusion effect of several ear parts. Detailed experiments show that the proposed ear recognition system achieved better performance (94:34%) compared to other shape-based systems as Scale-invariant feature transform (67:92%). The proposed approach can also handle efficiently hair occlusion. Experimental results show that the proposed system can achieve about (78%) rank-1 identification, even in presence of 60% occlusion.

  10. Towards automatic forensic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology and experimental results for evidence evaluation in the context of forensic face recognition. In forensic applications, the matching score (hereafter referred to as similarity score) from a biometric system must be represented as a Likelihood Ratio (LR). In our

  11. Molecular Recognition in the Colloidal World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elacqua, Elizabeth; Zheng, Xiaolong; Shillingford, Cicely; Liu, Mingzhu; Weck, Marcus

    2017-11-21

    Colloidal self-assembly is a bottom-up technique to fabricate functional nanomaterials, with paramount interest stemming from programmable assembly of smaller building blocks into dynamic crystalline domains and photonic materials. Multiple established colloidal platforms feature diverse shapes and bonding interactions, while achieving specific orientations along with short- and long-range order. A major impediment to their universal use as building blocks for predesigned architectures is the inability to precisely dictate and control particle functionalization and concomitant reversible self-assembly. Progress in colloidal self-assembly necessitates the development of strategies that endow bonding specificity and directionality within assemblies. Methodologies that emulate molecular and polymeric three-dimensional (3D) architectures feature elements of covalent bonding, while high-fidelity molecular recognition events have been installed to realize responsive reconfigurable assemblies. The emergence of anisotropic 'colloidal molecules', coupled with the ability to site-specifically decorate particle surfaces with supramolecular recognition motifs, has facilitated the formation of superstructures via directional interactions and shape recognition. In this Account, we describe supramolecular assembly routes to drive colloidal particles into precisely assembled architectures or crystalline lattices via directional noncovalent molecular interactions. The design principles are based upon the fabrication of colloidal particles bearing surface-exposed functional groups that can undergo programmable conjugation to install recognition motifs with high fidelity. Modular and versatile by design, our strategy allows for the introduction and integration of molecular recognition principles into the colloidal world. We define noncovalent molecular interactions as site-specific forces that are predictable (i.e., feature selective and controllable complementary bonding partners

  12. StringForce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barendregt, Wolmet; Börjesson, Peter; Eriksson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the forced collaborative interaction game StringForce. StringForce is developed for a special education context to support training of collaboration skills, using readily available technologies and avoiding the creation of a "mobile bubble". In order to play StringForce ...

  13. The effects of alcohol on the recognition of facial expressions and microexpressions of emotion: enhanced recognition of disgust and contempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisberti, Fatima; Terry, Philip

    2015-09-01

    The study compared alcohol's effects on the recognition of briefly displayed facial expressions of emotion (so-called microexpressions) with expressions presented for a longer period. Using a repeated-measures design, we tested 18 participants three times (counterbalanced), after (i) a placebo drink, (ii) a low-to-moderate dose of alcohol (0.17 g/kg women; 0.20 g/kg men) and (iii) a moderate-to-high dose of alcohol (0.52 g/kg women; 0.60 g/kg men). On each session, participants were presented with stimuli representing six emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, fear, disgust and contempt) overlaid on a generic avatar in a six-alternative forced-choice paradigm. A neutral expression (1 s) preceded and followed a target expression presented for 200 ms (microexpressions) or 400 ms. Participants mouse clicked the correct answer. The recognition of disgust was significantly better after the high dose of alcohol than after the low dose or placebo drinks at both durations of stimulus presentation. A similar profile of effects was found for the recognition of contempt. There were no effects on response latencies. Alcohol can increase sensitivity to expressions of disgust and contempt. Such effects are not dependent on stimulus duration up to 400 ms and may reflect contextual modulation of alcohol's effects on emotion recognition. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Using llama derived single domain antibodies to target botulinum neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Marla D.; Anderson, George P.; Bernstein, Rachael D.; Liu, Jinny L.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2010-04-01

    Llama serum contains both conventional IgG as well as unique forms of antibody that contain only heavy chains where antigen binding is mediated through a single variable domain. These variable domains can be expressed recombinantly and are referred to as single domain antibodies (sdAb). SdAb are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments, possess good solubility, thermal stability, and can refold after heat and chemical denaturation. Llamas were immunized with either BoNT A or B toxoid and phage display libraries prepared. Single domain antibodies (sdAb) that were able to detect botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B were selected from their respective libraries. Here, the binders obtained by panning the BoNT B library on either BoNT B toxoid or BoNT B complex toxoid coated plates or BoNT B toxin coupled microspheres are described. Using these panning methods, we selected for binders that showed specificity for BoNT B. Phage displayed binders were screened, moved to a protein expression vector and soluble sdAb was produced. Using a Luminex flow cytometer binders were evaluated in direct binding assays. We have exploited the unique properties of sdAb and used them as biological recognition elements in immuno-based sensors that can detect BoNT B.

  15. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases.

  16. Serial position functions for recognition of olfactory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew J; Miles, Christopher

    2007-10-01

    Two experiments examined item recognition memory for sequentially presented odours. Following a sequence of six odours participants were immediately presented with a series of two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) test odours. The test pairs were presented in either the same order as learning or the reverse order of learning. Method of testing was either blocked (Experiment 1) or mixed (Experiment 2). Both experiments demonstrated extended recency, with an absence of primacy, for the reverse testing procedure. In contrast, the forward testing procedure revealed a null effect of serial position. The finding of extended recency is inconsistent with the single-item recency predicted by the two-component duplex theory (Phillips & Christie, 1977). We offer an alternative account of the data in which recognition accuracy is better accommodated by the cumulative number of items presented between item learning and item test.

  17. Research on recognition of ramp angle based on transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhao GU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on the recognition of ramp angle, the relationship between the signal of vehicle transducer and real ramp angle is studied. The force change of vehicle on the ramp, and the relationship between the body tilt angle and front and rear suspension scale is discussed. According to the suspension and tire deformation, error angle of the ramp angle is deduced. A mathematical model is established with Matlab/Simulink and used for simulation to generate error curve of ramp angle. The results show that the error angle increases with the increasing of the ramp angle, and the limit value can reach 6.5%, while the identification method can effectively eliminate this error, and enhance the accuracy of ramp angle recognition.

  18. Versatile protein recognition by the encoded display of multiple chemical elements on a constant macrocyclic scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhou; De Luca, Roberto; Cazzamalli, Samuele; Pretto, Francesca; Bajic, Davor; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2018-03-01

    In nature, specific antibodies can be generated as a result of an adaptive selection and expansion of lymphocytes with suitable protein binding properties. We attempted to mimic antibody-antigen recognition by displaying multiple chemical diversity elements on a defined macrocyclic scaffold. Encoding of the displayed combinations was achieved using distinctive DNA tags, resulting in a library size of 35,393,112. Specific binders could be isolated against a variety of proteins, including carbonic anhydrase IX, horseradish peroxidase, tankyrase 1, human serum albumin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, calmodulin, prostate-specific antigen and tumour necrosis factor. Similar to antibodies, the encoded display of multiple chemical elements on a constant scaffold enabled practical applications, such as fluorescence microscopy procedures or the selective in vivo delivery of payloads to tumours. Furthermore, the versatile structure of the scaffold facilitated the generation of protein-specific chemical probes, as illustrated by photo-crosslinking.

  19. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbreth, Ryan N.; Koide, Shohei

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  20. iBodies: Modular Synthetic Antibody Mimetics Based on Hydrophilic Polymers Decorated with Functional Moieties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šácha, Pavel; Knedlík, Tomáš; Schimer, Jiří; Tykvart, Jan; Parolek, Jan; Navrátil, Václav; Dvořáková, Petra; Sedlák, František; Ulbrich, Karel; Strohalm, Jiří; Majer, Pavel; Šubr, Vladimír; Konvalinka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 7 (2016), s. 2356-2360 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : antibody mimetics * HPMA * molecular recognition * polymer conjugates * protein targeting Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/anie.201508642/full

  1. Speech Recognition: Its Place in Business Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szul, Linda F.; Bouder, Michele

    2003-01-01

    Suggests uses of speech recognition devices in the classroom for students with disabilities. Compares speech recognition software packages and provides guidelines for selection and teaching. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  2. The role of familiarity in associative recognition of unitized compound word pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Fahad N; Hockley, William E

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of unitization and contribution of familiarity in the recognition of word pairs. Compound words were presented as word pairs and were contrasted with noncompound word pairs in an associative recognition task. In Experiments 1 and 2, yes-no recognition hit and false-alarm rates were significantly higher for compound than for noncompound word pairs, with no difference in discrimination in both within- and between-subject comparisons. Experiment 2 also showed that item recognition was reduced for words from compound compared to noncompound word pairs, providing evidence of the unitization of the compound pairs. A two-alternative forced-choice test used in Experiments 3A and 3B provided evidence that the concordant effect for compound word pairs was largely due to familiarity. A discrimination advantage for compound word pairs was also seen in these experiments. Experiment 4A showed that a different pattern of results is seen when repeated noncompound word pairs are compared to compound word pairs. Experiment 4B showed that memory for the individual items of compound word pairs was impaired relative to items in repeated and nonrepeated noncompound word pairs, and Experiment 5 demonstrated that this effect is eliminated when the elements of compound word pairs are not unitized. The concordant pattern seen in yes-no recognition and the discrimination advantage in forced-choice recognition for compound relative to noncompound word pairs is due to greater reliance on familiarity at test when pairs are unitized.

  3. Interfacial force measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, L.

    2018-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can not only image the topography of surfaces at atomic resolution, but can also measure accurately the different interaction forces, like repulsive, adhesive and lateral existing between an AFM tip and the sample surface. Based on AFM, various extended techniques have

  4. Data structures, computer graphics, and pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, A; Kunii, T L

    1977-01-01

    Data Structures, Computer Graphics, and Pattern Recognition focuses on the computer graphics and pattern recognition applications of data structures methodology.This book presents design related principles and research aspects of the computer graphics, system design, data management, and pattern recognition tasks. The topics include the data structure design, concise structuring of geometric data for computer aided design, and data structures for pattern recognition algorithms. The survey of data structures for computer graphics systems, application of relational data structures in computer gr

  5. Recognition of an Independent Self-Consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Henrik Jøker

    2009-01-01

    Hegel's concept in the Phenomenology of the Spirit of the "recognition of an independent self-consciousness" is investigated as a point of separation for contemporary philosophy of recognition. I claim that multiculturalism and the theories of recognition (such as Axel Honneth's) based on empirical...... psychology neglect or deny crucial metaphysical aspects of the Hegelian legacy. Instead, I seek to point at an additional, "spiritual", level of recognition, based on the concept of the subject in Lacanian psychoanalysis....

  6. Recognition of human oncogenic viruses by host pattern recognition receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson C Di Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human oncogenic viruses include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, human papilloma virus (HPV, human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1, Kaposi’s associated sarcoma virus (KSHV, and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. It would be expected that during virus-host interaction, the immune system would recognize these pathogens and eliminate them. However, through evolution, these viruses have developed a number of strategies to avoid such an outcome and successfully establish chronic infections. The persistent nature of the infection caused by these viruses is associated with their oncogenic potential. In this article, we will review the latest information on the interaction between oncogenic viruses and the innate immune system of the host. In particular, we will summarize the available knowledge on the recognition by host pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs present in the incoming viral particle or generated during the virus’ life cycle. We will also review the data on the recognition of cell-derived danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs generated during the virus infection that may impact the outcome of the host-pathogen interaction and the development cancer.

  7. Embedded Face Detection and Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göksel Günlü

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The need to increase security in open or public spaces has in turn given rise to the requirement to monitor these spaces and analyse those images on-site and on-time. At this point, the use of smart cameras – of which the popularity has been increasing – is one step ahead. With sensors and Digital Signal Processors (DSPs, smart cameras generate ad hoc results by analysing the numeric images transmitted from the sensor by means of a variety of image-processing algorithms. Since the images are not transmitted to a distance processing unit but rather are processed inside the camera, it does not necessitate high-bandwidth networks or high processor powered systems; it can instantaneously decide on the required access. Nonetheless, on account of restricted memory, processing power and overall power, image processing algorithms need to be developed and optimized for embedded processors. Among these algorithms, one of the most important is for face detection and recognition. A number of face detection and recognition methods have been proposed recently and many of these methods have been tested on general-purpose processors. In smart cameras – which are real-life applications of such methods – the widest use is on DSPs. In the present study, the Viola-Jones face detection method – which was reported to run faster on PCs – was optimized for DSPs; the face recognition method was combined with the developed sub-region and mask-based DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform. As the employed DSP is a fixed-point processor, the processes were performed with integers insofar as it was possible. To enable face recognition, the image was divided into sub-regions and from each sub-region the robust coefficients against disruptive elements – like face expression, illumination, etc. – were selected as the features. The discrimination of the selected features was enhanced via LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis and then employed for recognition. Thanks to its

  8. Hidden neural networks: application to speech recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1998-01-01

    We evaluate the hidden neural network HMM/NN hybrid on two speech recognition benchmark tasks; (1) task independent isolated word recognition on the Phonebook database, and (2) recognition of broad phoneme classes in continuous speech from the TIMIT database. It is shown how hidden neural networks...

  9. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  10. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vickie S.

    2013-01-01

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  11. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  12. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  13. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  14. A public antibody lineage that potently inhibits malaria infection through dual binding to the circumsporozoite protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Joshua; Sack, Brandon K; Oyen, David; Zenklusen, Isabelle; Piccoli, Luca; Barbieri, Sonia; Foglierini, Mathilde; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Marcandalli, Jessica; Jongo, Said; Abdulla, Salim; Perez, Laurent; Corradin, Giampietro; Varani, Luca; Sallusto, Federica; Sim, Betty Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kappe, Stefan H I; Daubenberger, Claudia; Wilson, Ian A; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2018-03-19

    Immunization with attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites (PfSPZs) has been shown to be protective against malaria, but the features of the antibody response induced by this treatment remain unclear. To investigate this response in detail, we isolated IgM and IgG monoclonal antibodies from Tanzanian volunteers who were immunized with repeated injection of Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine and who were found to be protected from controlled human malaria infection with infectious homologous PfSPZs. All isolated IgG monoclonal antibodies bound to P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) and recognized distinct epitopes in its N terminus, NANP-repeat region, and C terminus. Strikingly, the most effective antibodies, as determined in a humanized mouse model, bound not only to the repeat region, but also to a minimal peptide at the PfCSP N-terminal junction that is not in the RTS,S vaccine. These dual-specific antibodies were isolated from different donors and were encoded by VH3-30 or VH3-33 alleles that encode tryptophan or arginine at position 52. Using structural and mutational data, we describe the elements required for germline recognition and affinity maturation. Our study provides potent neutralizing antibodies and relevant information for lineage-targeted vaccine design and immunization strategies.

  15. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L. DeFranco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1.

  16. Somatic Hypermutation-Induced Changes in the Structure and Dynamics of HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Thaddeus M; Gorman, Jason; Joyce, M Gordon; Zhou, Tongqing; Soto, Cinque; Guttman, Miklos; Moquin, Stephanie; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-08-02

    Antibody somatic hypermutation (SHM) and affinity maturation enhance antigen recognition by modifying antibody paratope structure to improve its complementarity with the target epitope. SHM-induced changes in paratope dynamics may also contribute to antibody maturation, but direct evidence of this is limited. Here, we examine two classes of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for SHM-induced changes in structure and dynamics, and delineate the effects of these changes on interactions with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). In combination with new and existing structures of unmutated and affinity matured antibody Fab fragments, we used hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry to directly measure Fab structural dynamics. Changes in antibody structure and dynamics were positioned to improve complementarity with Env, with changes in dynamics primarily observed at the paratope peripheries. We conclude that SHM optimizes paratope complementarity to conserved HIV-1 epitopes and restricts the mobility of paratope-peripheral residues to minimize clashes with variable features on HIV-1 Env. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hu and Yo antibodies have heterogeneous avidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totland, Cecilie; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2007-04-01

    Onconeural antibodies such as anti-Hu and anti-Yo may be important in the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. The avidity of these antibodies is not known. In this study, we compared the avidity of Hu and Yo antibodies both at single time points and over a time range of 2 months to 6 years. The avidity of Yo and Hu antibodies differed among the patients, but anti-Yo generally had higher avidity than anti-Hu. Whether Yo antibodies are more pathogenic than Hu antibodies are presently unknown.

  18. Visual Sharpness Contingency in Recognition Memory for Orientation: Mnemonic Illusion Suppressed by Sensory Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Maryanne; Jones, Gregory V.

    2006-01-01

    A striking finding about human memory is that people's level of accuracy in remembering the orientation of heads on coins is often not simply at the chance level but significantly below it. However, S. W. Kelly, A. M. Burton, T. Kato, and S. Akamatsu (2001) reported that this is not so when two-alternative forced-choice visual recognition is…

  19. Molecular recognition in homogeneous transition metal catalysis: a biomimetic strategy for high selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siddartha; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2008-01-28

    Traditional methods for selectivity control in homogeneous transition metal catalysis either employ steric effects in a binding pocket or chelate control. In a supramolecular strategy, encapsulation of the substrate can provide useful shape and size selectivity. A fully developed molecular recognition strategy involving hydrogen bonding or solvophobic forces has given almost completely regioselective functionalization of remote, unactivated C-H bonds.

  20. Hemispheric Specialization and Recognition Memory for Abstract and Realistic Pictures: A Comparison of Painters and Laymen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, S.; Magnussen, S.

    2005-01-01

    Recognition memory and hemispheric specialization were assessed for abstract colour/black and white pictures of sport situations in painters and visually naive subjects using a forced choice yes/no tachistoscopic procedure. Reaction times showed a significant three-way interaction of picture type, expertise, and visual field, indicating that…

  1. Education Markets, the New Politics of Recognition and the Increasing Fatalism towards Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Sally; Frandji, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the complex ways in which the marketisation of education and the associated publication of performance data have contributed to the emergence of a new politics of recognition which has paradoxically served further to naturalise educational inequalities. Of all the reforms associated with subjecting education to market forces,…

  2. Cross-recognition of a pit viper (Crotalinae) polyspecific antivenom explored through high-density peptide microarray epitope mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José María

    2017-01-01

    Snakebite antivenom is a 120 years old invention based on polyclonal mixtures of antibodies purified from the blood of hyper-immunized animals. Knowledge on antibody recognition sites (epitopes) on snake venom proteins is limited, but may be used to provide molecular level explanations...... for antivenom cross-reactivity. In turn, this may help guide antivenom development by elucidating immunological biases in existing antivenoms. In this study, we have identified and characterized linear elements of B-cell epitopes from 870 pit viper venom protein sequences by employing a high......-throughput methodology based on custom designed high-density peptide microarrays. By combining data on antibody-peptide interactions with multiple sequence alignments of homologous toxin sequences and protein modelling, we have determined linear elements of antibody binding sites for snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs...

  3. Physical model for recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstić, Predrag; Ashcroft, Brian; Lindsay, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Recognition tunneling (RT) identifies target molecules trapped between tunneling electrodes functionalized with recognition molecules that serve as specific chemical linkages between the metal electrodes and the trapped target molecule. Possible applications include single molecule DNA and protein sequencing. This paper addresses several fundamental aspects of RT by multiscale theory, applying both all-atom and coarse-grained DNA models: (1) we show that the magnitude of the observed currents are consistent with the results of non-equilibrium Green’s function calculations carried out on a solvated all-atom model. (2) Brownian fluctuations in hydrogen bond-lengths lead to current spikes that are similar to what is observed experimentally. (3) The frequency characteristics of these fluctuations can be used to identify the trapped molecules with a machine-learning algorithm, giving a theoretical underpinning to this new method of identifying single molecule signals. (paper)

  4. Slow molecular recognition by RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleitsman, Kristin R; Sengupta, Raghuvir N; Herschlag, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biological processes, function, and specificity. Proteins associate with ligands with a wide range of association rate constants, with maximal values matching the theoretical limit set by the rate of diffusional collision. As less is known about RNA association, we compiled association rate constants for all RNA/ligand complexes that we could find in the literature. Like proteins, RNAs exhibit a wide range of association rate constants. However, the fastest RNA association rates are considerably slower than those of the fastest protein associations and fall well below the diffusional limit. The apparently general observation of slow association with RNAs has implications for evolution and for modern-day biology. Our compilation highlights a quantitative molecular property that can contribute to biological understanding and underscores our need to develop a deeper physical understanding of molecular recognition events. © 2017 Gleitsman et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Physics of Automatic Target Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Sadjadi, Firooz

    2007-01-01

    Physics of Automatic Target Recognition addresses the fundamental physical bases of sensing, and information extraction in the state-of-the art automatic target recognition field. It explores both passive and active multispectral sensing, polarimetric diversity, complex signature exploitation, sensor and processing adaptation, transformation of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in their interactions with targets, background clutter, transmission media, and sensing elements. The general inverse scattering, and advanced signal processing techniques and scientific evaluation methodologies being used in this multi disciplinary field will be part of this exposition. The issues of modeling of target signatures in various spectral modalities, LADAR, IR, SAR, high resolution radar, acoustic, seismic, visible, hyperspectral, in diverse geometric aspects will be addressed. The methods for signal processing and classification will cover concepts such as sensor adaptive and artificial neural networks, time reversal filt...

  6. State Defense Force Monograph Series. Fall 2007, Special Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    plays an important part in advancing public recognition of Canada’s First Nations and Inuit groups. Currently there are 4,000 Rangers in 165...article.php?c= art &id=13702&do=print Ibid26 Swedish Armed Forces, NHG Today, available at 27 http://www.hemvarnet.mil.se/article.php?id=13706&lang=E...Swedish Armed Forces, History, available at http://www.hemvarnet.mil.se/article.php?c= art &id=13702&do=print . Swedish Armed Forces, NHG Today, available at

  7. Automatic Recognition of Road Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuo; Kohashi, Yuuichirou; Ishikawa, Naoto; Nakajima, Masato

    2002-11-01

    The increase in traffic accidents is becoming a serious social problem with the recent rapid traffic increase. In many cases, the driver"s carelessness is the primary factor of traffic accidents, and the driver assistance system is demanded for supporting driver"s safety. In this research, we propose the new method of automatic detection and recognition of road signs by image processing. The purpose of this research is to prevent accidents caused by driver"s carelessness, and call attention to a driver when the driver violates traffic a regulation. In this research, high accuracy and the efficient sign detecting method are realized by removing unnecessary information except for a road sign from an image, and detect a road sign using shape features. At first, the color information that is not used in road signs is removed from an image. Next, edges except for circular and triangle ones are removed to choose sign shape. In the recognition process, normalized cross correlation operation is carried out to the two-dimensional differentiation pattern of a sign, and the accurate and efficient method for detecting the road sign is realized. Moreover, the real-time operation in a software base was realized by holding down calculation cost, maintaining highly precise sign detection and recognition. Specifically, it becomes specifically possible to process by 0.1 sec(s)/frame using a general-purpose PC (CPU: Pentium4 1.7GHz). As a result of in-vehicle experimentation, our system could process on real time and has confirmed that detection and recognition of a sign could be performed correctly.

  8. Automated road marking recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyatdinov, R. R.; Shigabiev, R. R.; Talipov, D. N.

    2017-09-01

    Development of the automated road marking recognition systems in existing and future vehicles control systems is an urgent task. One way to implement such systems is the use of neural networks. To test the possibility of using neural network software has been developed with the use of a single-layer perceptron. The resulting system based on neural network has successfully coped with the task both when driving in the daytime and at night.

  9. Symbol Recognition using Spatial Relations

    OpenAIRE

    K.C., Santosh; Lamiroy, Bart; Wendling, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we present a method for symbol recognition based on the spatio-structural description of a 'vocabulary' of extracted visual elementary parts. It is applied to symbols in electrical wiring diagrams. The method consists of first identifying vocabulary elements into different groups based on their types (e.g., circle, corner ). We then compute spatial relations between the possible pairs of labelled vocabulary types which are further used as a basis for bui...

  10. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A. (UWASH); (Progenics); (ICL); (Weill-Med); (NIH); (JSTA); (Scripps); (Oxford)

    2015-10-15

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man{sub 9} at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short {beta}-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  11. Thermal to visible face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghyun; Hu, Shuowen; Young, S. Susan; Davis, Larry S.

    2012-06-01

    In low light conditions, visible light face identification is infeasible due to the lack of illumination. For nighttime surveillance, thermal imaging is commonly used because of the intrinsic emissivity of thermal radiation from the human body. However, matching thermal images of faces acquired at nighttime to the predominantly visible light face imagery in existing government databases and watch lists is a challenging task. The difficulty arises from the significant difference between the face's thermal signature and its visible signature (i.e. the modality gap). To match the thermal face to the visible face acquired by the two different modalities, we applied face recognition algorithms that reduce the modality gap in each step of face identification, from low-level analysis to machine learning techniques. Specifically, partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based approaches were used to correlate the thermal face signatures to the visible face signatures, yielding a thermal-to-visible face identification rate of 49.9%. While this work makes progress for thermal-to-visible face recognition, more efforts need to be devoted to solving this difficult task. Successful development of a thermal-to-visible face recognition system would significantly enhance the Nation's nighttime surveillance capabilities.

  12. Multithread Face Recognition in Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakshina Ranjan Kisku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faces are highly challenging and dynamic objects that are employed as biometrics evidence in identity verification. Recently, biometrics systems have proven to be an essential security tools, in which bulk matching of enrolled people and watch lists is performed every day. To facilitate this process, organizations with large computing facilities need to maintain these facilities. To minimize the burden of maintaining these costly facilities for enrollment and recognition, multinational companies can transfer this responsibility to third-party vendors who can maintain cloud computing infrastructures for recognition. In this paper, we showcase cloud computing-enabled face recognition, which utilizes PCA-characterized face instances and reduces the number of invariant SIFT points that are extracted from each face. To achieve high interclass and low intraclass variances, a set of six PCA-characterized face instances is computed on columns of each face image by varying the number of principal components. Extracted SIFT keypoints are fused using sum and max fusion rules. A novel cohort selection technique is applied to increase the total performance. The proposed protomodel is tested on BioID and FEI face databases, and the efficacy of the system is proven based on the obtained results. We also compare the proposed method with other well-known methods.

  13. DNA recognition by synthetic constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Elena; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2011-09-05

    The interaction of transcription factors with specific DNA sites is key for the regulation of gene expression. Despite the availability of a large body of structural data on protein-DNA complexes, we are still far from fully understanding the molecular and biophysical bases underlying such interactions. Therefore, the development of non-natural agents that can reproduce the DNA-recognition properties of natural transcription factors remains a major and challenging goal in chemical biology. In this review we summarize the basics of double-stranded DNA recognition by transcription factors, and describe recent developments in the design and preparation of synthetic DNA binders. We mainly focus on synthetic peptides that have been designed by following the DNA interaction of natural proteins, and we discuss how the tools of organic synthesis can be used to make artificial constructs equipped with functionalities that introduce additional properties to the recognition process, such as sensing and controllability. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Fingerprint recognition using image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholay, Surekha; Mishra, Akassh A.

    2011-06-01

    Finger Print Recognition is concerned with the difficult task of matching the images of finger print of a person with the finger print present in the database efficiently. Finger print Recognition is used in forensic science which helps in finding the criminals and also used in authentication of a particular person. Since, Finger print is the only thing which is unique among the people and changes from person to person. The present paper describes finger print recognition methods using various edge detection techniques and also how to detect correct finger print using a camera images. The present paper describes the method that does not require a special device but a simple camera can be used for its processes. Hence, the describe technique can also be using in a simple camera mobile phone. The various factors affecting the process will be poor illumination, noise disturbance, viewpoint-dependence, Climate factors, and Imaging conditions. The described factor has to be considered so we have to perform various image enhancement techniques so as to increase the quality and remove noise disturbance of image. The present paper describe the technique of using contour tracking on the finger print image then using edge detection on the contour and after that matching the edges inside the contour.

  15. Visual recognition of permuted words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Sheikh Faisal; Shafait, Faisal; Breuel, Thomas M.

    2010-02-01

    In current study we examine how letter permutation affects in visual recognition of words for two orthographically dissimilar languages, Urdu and German. We present the hypothesis that recognition or reading of permuted and non-permuted words are two distinct mental level processes, and that people use different strategies in handling permuted words as compared to normal words. A comparison between reading behavior of people in these languages is also presented. We present our study in context of dual route theories of reading and it is observed that the dual-route theory is consistent with explanation of our hypothesis of distinction in underlying cognitive behavior for reading permuted and non-permuted words. We conducted three experiments in lexical decision tasks to analyze how reading is degraded or affected by letter permutation. We performed analysis of variance (ANOVA), distribution free rank test, and t-test to determine the significance differences in response time latencies for two classes of data. Results showed that the recognition accuracy for permuted words is decreased 31% in case of Urdu and 11% in case of German language. We also found a considerable difference in reading behavior for cursive and alphabetic languages and it is observed that reading of Urdu is comparatively slower than reading of German due to characteristics of cursive script.

  16. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD... Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic antigens...

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to Treponema Pallidum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; J.D.A. van Embden; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThree successive fusions of mouse myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes of a mouse immunized with Treponema Pallidum resulted in one hybridoma producing anti T. pallidum antibodies for each fusion. The mice were immunized with live pallidum cells respectively 1, 3 and 5 months before

  18. Labor Force Participation Rate

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This thematic map presents the labor force participation rate of working-age people in the United States in 2010. The 2010 Labor Force Participation Rate shows the...

  19. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  20. Antibody expressing pea seeds as fodder for prevention of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macek Jeanette

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coccidiosis caused by protozoans of genus Eimeria is a chicken parasitic disease of great economical importance. Conventional disease control strategies depend on vaccination and prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs. Alternative solution to prevent and treat coccidiosis could be provided by passive immunization using orally delivered neutralizing antibodies. We investigated the possibility to mitigate the parasitic infection by feeding poultry with antibody expressing transgenic crop seeds. Results Using the phage display antibody library, we generated a panel of anti-Eimeria scFv antibody fragments with high sporozoite-neutralizing activity. These antibodies were expressed either transiently in agrobacteria-infiltrated tobacco leaves or stably in seeds of transgenic pea plants. Comparison of the scFv antibodies purified either from tobacco leaves or from the pea seeds demonstrated no difference in their antigen-binding activity and molecular form compositions. Force-feeding experiments demonstrated that oral delivery of flour prepared from the transgenic pea seeds had higher parasite neutralizing activity in vivo than the purified antibody fragments isolated from tobacco. The pea seed content was found to protect antibodies against degradation by gastrointestinal proteases (>100-fold gain in stability. Ad libitum feeding of chickens demonstrated that the transgenic seeds were well consumed and not shunned. Furthermore, feeding poultry with shred prepared from the antibody expressing pea seeds led to significant mitigation of infection caused both by high and low challenge doses of Eimeria oocysts. Conclusion The results suggest that our strategy offers a general approach to control parasitic infections in production animals using cost-effective antibody expression in crop seeds affordable for the animal health market.

  1. Antibody expressing pea seeds as fodder for prevention of gastrointestinal parasitic infections in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jana; Saalbach, Isolde; Jahn, Doreen; Giersberg, Martin; Haehnel, Sigrun; Wedel, Julia; Macek, Jeanette; Zoufal, Karen; Glünder, Gerhard; Falkenburg, Dieter; Kipriyanov, Sergey M

    2009-09-11

    Coccidiosis caused by protozoans of genus Eimeria is a chicken parasitic disease of great economical importance. Conventional disease control strategies depend on vaccination and prophylactic use of anticoccidial drugs. Alternative solution to prevent and treat coccidiosis could be provided by passive immunization using orally delivered neutralizing antibodies. We investigated the possibility to mitigate the parasitic infection by feeding poultry with antibody expressing transgenic crop seeds. Using the phage display antibody library, we generated a panel of anti-Eimeria scFv antibody fragments with high sporozoite-neutralizing activity. These antibodies were expressed either transiently in agrobacteria-infiltrated tobacco leaves or stably in seeds of transgenic pea plants. Comparison of the scFv antibodies purified either from tobacco leaves or from the pea seeds demonstrated no difference in their antigen-binding activity and molecular form compositions. Force-feeding experiments demonstrated that oral delivery of flour prepared from the transgenic pea seeds had higher parasite neutralizing activity in vivo than the purified antibody fragments isolated from tobacco. The pea seed content was found to protect antibodies against degradation by gastrointestinal proteases (>100-fold gain in stability). Ad libitum feeding of chickens demonstrated that the transgenic seeds were well consumed and not shunned. Furthermore, feeding poultry with shred prepared from the antibody expressing pea seeds led to significant mitigation of infection caused both by high and low challenge doses of Eimeria oocysts. The results suggest that our strategy offers a general approach to control parasitic infections in production animals using cost-effective antibody expression in crop seeds affordable for the animal health market.

  2. Acoustic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, G.; Kamsma, D.; Thalhammer, G.; Ritsch-Marte, M.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Force spectroscopy has become an indispensable tool to unravel the structural and mechanochemical properties of biomolecules. Here we extend the force spectroscopy toolbox with an acoustic manipulation device that can exert forces from subpiconewtons to hundreds of piconewtons on thousands of

  3. Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  4. Structural basis for the antibody neutralization of Herpes simplex virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Li-Ling [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chan, Woan-Eng [Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan (China); Ko, Tzu-Ping [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Jiann-Shiun [Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan (China); Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China); Wang, Andrew H.-J., E-mail: ahjwang@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    The gD–E317-Fab complex crystal revealed the conformational epitope of human mAb E317 on HSV gD, providing a molecular basis for understanding the viral neutralization mechanism. Glycoprotein D (gD) of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) binds to a host cell surface receptor, which is required to trigger membrane fusion for virion entry into the host cell. gD has become a validated anti-HSV target for therapeutic antibody development. The highly inhibitory human monoclonal antibody E317 (mAb E317) was previously raised against HSV gD for viral neutralization. To understand the structural basis of antibody neutralization, crystals of the gD ectodomain bound to the E317 Fab domain were obtained. The structure of the complex reveals that E317 interacts with gD mainly through the heavy chain, which covers a large area for epitope recognition on gD, with a flexible N-terminal and C-terminal conformation. The epitope core structure maps to the external surface of gD, corresponding to the binding sites of two receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, which mediate HSV infection. E317 directly recognizes the gD–nectin-1 interface and occludes the HVEM contact site of gD to block its binding to either receptor. The binding of E317 to gD also prohibits the formation of the N-terminal hairpin of gD for HVEM recognition. The major E317-binding site on gD overlaps with either the nectin-1-binding residues or the neutralizing antigenic sites identified thus far (Tyr38, Asp215, Arg222 and Phe223). The epitopes of gD for E317 binding are highly conserved between two types of human herpesvirus (HSV-1 and HSV-2). This study enables the virus-neutralizing epitopes to be correlated with the receptor-binding regions. The results further strengthen the previously demonstrated therapeutic and diagnostic potential of the E317 antibody.

  5. Studies for the establishment of a radioimmunoassay for the detection of rubella-specific antibodies in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchow, B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies were undertaken for the development of a solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the recognition of rubella-specific antibodies in human serum. For this a rubella antigen, which can be found on the market for routine serological diagnostics and which is used for the hemagglutinin inhibition test (HAH; Behringwerke, Marburg), was used directly as an antigen in the RIA. A 'direct' RIA was run to establish a competition test as well as an 'indirect' RIA using the sandwich technique. A differentiation between antibody-positive and antibody-free patient serum could not be attained either by the direct or indirect RIA. The reason lay with the unsuitability of the rubella antigen used for the RIA. It is discussed, that the composition of the antigen from the supernatant of rubella-infected cell cultures and foreign protein is responsible for the non-specificity of the antibody bondings. (orig./TRV) [de

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to DNA modified with cis- or trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundquist, W.I.; Lippard, S.J.; Stollar, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies that bind selectively to adducts formed on DNA by the antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), cis-DDP, or to the chemothrapeutically inactive trans isomer trans-DDP were elicited by immunization with calf thymus DNA modified with either cis- or trans-DDP at ratios of bound platinum per nucleotide, (D/N)/sub b/, of 0.06-0.08. The binding of two monoclonal antibodies to cis-DDP-modified DNA was competitively inhibited in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) by 4-6 nM concentrations of cis-DDP bound to DNA. Adducts formed by cis-DDP on other synthetic DNA polymers did not inhibit antibody binding to cis-DDP-DNA. The biologically active compounds [Pt(en)Cl 2 ], [Pt(dach)Cl 2 ], and [Pt(NH 3 ) 2 (cbdca)] (carboplatin) all formed antibody-detectable adducts on DNA, whereas the inactive platinum complexes trans-DDP and [Pt(dien)Cl]Cl (dien, diethylenetriamine) did not. The monoclonal antibodies therefore recognize a bifunctional Pt-DNA adduct with cis stereochemistry in which platinum is coordinated by two adjacent guanines or, to a lesser degree, by adjacent adenine and guanine. A monoclonal antibody raised against trans-DDP-DNA was competitively inhibited in an ELISA by 40 nM trans-DDP bound to DNA. This antibody crossreacted with unmodified, denatured DNA. The recognition of cis- or trans-DDP-modified DNAs by monoclonal antibodies thus parallels the known modes of DNA binding of these compounds and may correlate with their biological activities

  7. Development of a functional antibody by using a green fluorescent protein frame as the template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongzhi; Xiang, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Yonghui; Chen, Qiuyu; Zhong, Yanfang; Wang, Shihua

    2014-07-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies are widely used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents or biosensors for a majority of human disease. However, the limitations of the present scFv antibody in terms of stability, solubility, and affinity are challenging to produce by traditional antibody screening and expression formats. We describe here a feasible strategy for creating the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based antibody. Complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3), which retains the antigen binding activity, was introduced into the structural loops of superfolder GFP, and the result showed that CDR3-inserted GFP displayed almost the same fluorescence intensity as wild-type GFP, and the purified proteins of CDR3 insertion showed the similar binding activity to antigen as the corresponding scFv. Among of all of the CDRs, CDR3s are responsible for antigen recognition, and only the CDR3a insertion is the best format for producing GFP-based antibody binding to specific antigen. The wide versatility of this system was further verified by introducing CDR3 from other scFvs into loop 9 of GFP. We developed a feasible method for rapidly and effectively producing a high-affinity GFP-based antibody by inserting CDR3s into GFP loops. Further, the affinity can be enhanced by specific amino acids scanning and site-directed mutagenesis. Notably, this method had better versatility for creating antibodies to various antigens using GFP as the scaffold, suggesting that a GFP-based antibody with high affinity and specificity may be useful for disease diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. The Main Cognitive Model of Visual Recognition: Contour Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, YongHong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we will study the following pattern recognition problem: Every pattern is a 3-dimensional graph, its surface can be split up into some regions, every region is composed of the pixels with the approximately same colour value and the approximately same depth value that is distance to eyes, and there may also be some contours, e.g., literal contours, on a surface of every pattern. For this problem we reveal the inherent laws. Moreover, we establish a cognitive model to reflect the...

  9. Radioimmunological determination of growth hormone antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracmar, P.; Hnikova, O.

    1979-01-01

    The method is based on the assumption of the presence of antibodies in the serum of the patient and the formation of the complex antibody-tracer ( 125 I-STH). For separation the principle is used of two antibodies and subsequent ultrafiltration with membrane ultrafilters. Clinical experience, reproducibility and the procedure recommended for simple monitoring and the determination of the amount of antibodies in the serum of patients are presented. (author)

  10. Antibody therapeutics - the evolving patent landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Jenny; McManamny, Patrick; Honeyman, Jane

    2011-09-01

    The antibody patent landscape has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years, particularly in areas of technology relating to antibody modification to reduce immunogenicity in humans or improve antibody function. In some cases antibody techniques that were developed in the 1980s are still the subject of patent protection in the United States or Canada. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody resp...... against the infection. On the other hand, immune complexes between the beta-lactamase and corresponding antibodies could play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary injury in CF by mediating hyperimmune reactions....

  12. Radioimmunoassay method for detection of gonorrhea antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A novel radioimmunoassay for the detection of gonorrhea antibodies in serum is described. A radionuclide is bound to gonorrhea antigens produced by a growth culture. In the presence of gonorrhea antibodies in the serum, an antigen-antibody conjugate is formed, the concentration of which can be measured with conventional radiometric methods. The radioimmunoassay is highly specific

  13. Antibodies Against Melanin | Wassermann | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports on unsuccessful attempts to produce antibodies against melanoprotein in rabbits. Available evidence suggests antibodies against melanocytes in the aetiology of vitiligo, but there is no convincing evidence for antibodies against melanin per se. It is suggested that the demonstration of antibodif's against ...

  14. Advanced automatic target recognition for police helicopter missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Christoph; Schoppmann, Paul

    2000-08-01

    The results of a case study about the application of an advanced method for automatic target recognition to infrared imagery taken from police helicopter missions are presented. The method consists of the following steps: preprocessing, classification, fusion, postprocessing and tracking, and combines the three paradigms image pyramids, neural networks and bayesian nets. The technology has been developed using a variety of different scenes typical for military aircraft missions. Infrared cameras have been in use for several years at the Bavarian police helicopter forces and are highly valuable for night missions. Several object classes like 'persons' or 'vehicles' are tested and the possible discrimination between persons and animals is shown. The analysis of complex scenes with hidden objects and clutter shows the potentials and limitations of automatic target recognition for real-world tasks. Several display concepts illustrate the achievable improvement of the situation awareness. The similarities and differences between various mission types concerning object variability, time constraints, consequences of false alarms, etc. are discussed. Typical police actions like searching for missing persons or runaway criminals illustrate the advantages of automatic target recognition. The results demonstrate the possible operational benefits for the helicopter crew. Future work will include performance evaluation issues and a system integration concept for the target platform.

  15. Statistics of force networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Brian

    2009-03-01

    We study the statistics of contact forces in the force network ensemble, a minimal model of jammed granular media that emphasizes the role of vector force balance. We show that the force probability distribution can be calculated analytically by way of an analogy to equilibrium ensemble methods. In two dimensions the large force tail decays asymptotically as a Gaussian, distinct from earlier predictions, due to the existence of a conserved quantity related to the presence of local vector force balance. We confirm our predictions with highly accurate statistical sampling -- we sample the force distribution over more than 40 decades -- permitting unambiguous confrontation of theory with numerics. We show how the conserved quantity arises naturally within the context of any constant stress ensemble.

  16. Quantum fictitious forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bialynicki-Birula, I; Cirone, M.A.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    We present Heisenberg's equation of motion for the radial variable of a free non-relativistic particle in D dimensions. The resulting radial force consists of three contributions: (i) the quantum fictitious force which is either attractive or repulsive depending on the number of dimensions, (ii......) a singular quantum force located at the origin, and (iii) the centrifugal force associated with non-vanishing angular momentum. Moreover, we use Heisenberg's uncertainty relation to introduce a lower bound for the kinetic energy of an ensemble of neutral particles. This bound is quadratic in the number...... of atoms and can be traced back to the repulsive quantum fictitious potential. All three forces arise for a free particle: "Force without force"....

  17. Detection of antibodies to co-trimoxazole (preservative drug interfering with routine red cell antibody screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sachan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-dependent antibodies can rarely cause interference in pretransfusion antibody screening. The diluents for commercial reagent red blood cells contain different antibiotics, such as chloramphenicol, neomycin sulfate, and gentamycin as a preservative. The presence of antibodies to a given drug in patient may lead to positive results when performing antibody identification. We present a rare case of detection of anti-co-trimoxazole antibody during routine antibody screening in a female patient undergoing neurosurgery. These antibodies mimicked as antibody against high-frequency red cell antigens reacting in both saline phase as well as antiglobulin phase. Anti-co-trimoxazole antibody was confirmed by repeating antibody screen using reagent red cells of different manufacturers with and without co-trimoxazole drug as preservative as well as using washed red cell panels. There were no associated clinical or laboratory evidence of hemolysis.

  18. The struggle for recognition online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Holmgaard

    to a consciousness of my identity[...] Individuals can only become conscious of themselves in the object-position."(Honneth 2006) Hence people gain access to themselves in a mediated public space, become conscious of themselves in the object-position and gain personal recognition in mediated spaces. Through mediated...... social interaction people acknowledge themselves and become private individuals in society, or as understood through the words of John Dewey:"the private grows out of the public; personal understanding emerges from shared communication."(Dewey 1954)...

  19. Introduction to radar target recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Tait, P

    2006-01-01

    This new text provides an overview of the radar target recognition process and covers the key techniques being developed for operational systems. It is based on the fundamental scientific principles of high resolution radar, and explains how the techniques can be used in real systems, taking into account the characteristics of practical radar system designs and component limitations. It also addresses operational aspects, such as how high resolution modes would fit in with other functions such as detection and tracking. Mathematics is kept to a minimum and the complex techniques and issues are

  20. Theodicies as Failures of Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Kivistö

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the ethical failure of theodicies by integrating the perspectives of philosophical argumentation and literary reading and analysis. The paper consists of two main parts. In the first part, we propose an ethical critique of metaphysical realism by analyzing its inability to recognize the perspectival plurality and diversity of suffering. As theodicies seek to explain how an omnipotent, omniscient, and absolutely benevolent God could allow the world to contain evil and suffering, it can be argued that metaphysical realism—i.e., the thesis that the world possesses its own fundamental structure independently of human perspectives of conceptualization and inquiry—is a problematic starting point of theodicism. We examine the failure of recognition of others’ suffering inherent in theodicies as a failure based on the search for an overall reductive and objectifying picture (a “God’s-Eye View” that is constitutive of metaphysical realism. The second part of the paper shows why we should include insights from imaginative literature in our attempts to understand the recognition failures of theodicies. Emphasizing the literary, philosophical, and theological relevance of various modern rewritings of the Book of Job, which has been a crucially important sub-text for many later literary works in which the protagonists render a particular kind of human experience—unmerited suffering—we turn more closely to some literary examples, such as Joseph Roth’s novels Hiob and Die Rebellion. The tensions that are created around the moral controversy of the experiences of injustice and suffering and the human and religious reasoning and justification of violence are examined. The ambiguous ending of Hiob that adds an apparently hopeful and almost fairytale-like redemption to the story plays a crucial role in the interpretation provided in the paper. By analyzing some literary examples and their relation to the literary Job tradition

  1. COMMERCIAL FUND, RECOGNITION AND ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIOREL TRIF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the immaterial investments within companies nowadays urges the specialists in accounting to find the ways to present more in the elements. In their studies researchers face the controversy reinvestments, as an asset in the balance sheet or an expense in the profit or loss account. The main goal of this paper is to analyze the difficulties in commercial fund. In the first part we will analyze various definitions of the problems concerning the commercial fund’s recognition and assessment. The paper also suggests that investments are really social and economic problems.

  2. Face Recognition using Gabor Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad MOHSIN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An Elastic Bunch Graph Map (EBGM algorithm is being proposed in this research paper that successfully implements face recognition using Gabor filters. The proposed system applies 40 different Gabor filters on an image. As aresult of which 40 images with different angles and orientation are received. Next, maximum intensity points in each filtered image are calculated and mark them as Fiducial points. The system reduces these points in accordance to distance between them. The next step is calculating the distances between the reduced points using distance formula. At last, the distances are compared with database. If match occurs, it means that the image is recognized.

  3. Modern Atomic Force Microscopy and Its Application to the Study of Genome Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyasu, Kunio; Maruyama, Hugo; Suzuki, Yuki; Hizume, Kohji; Yoshimura, Shige H.

    Recent development of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been accomplished by various technical and instrumental innovation including high-resolution imaging technology in solution, fast-scanning AFM, and general methods for cantilever modification and force measurement. These modern AFM technologies have made it possible to conduct biological studies under physiological conditions. Application of the recognition imaging mode that can simultaneously obtain a topographic image together with a recognition signal is now successful by using protein- (antibody-) coupled cantilever, and revealed the specific protein bindings on the chromatin. AFM can also be combined with biochemical and cytochemical methods. Recent AFM researches involving series of reconstitution experiments have shown that the efficiency of the chromatin reconstitution by salt-dialysis method is drastically increased simply by using longer ( > 100 kb) and supercoiled DNA. This suggests that the physical properties of DNA are critical for the higher-order chromatin folding. Since double-stranded DNA, like other polymer chains, carries certain elasticity and flexibility, the length of DNA could affect the stability of nucleosome and chromatin fiber. This notion is well supported by the fact that in eukaryotic chromosome, the averaged length of a single chromatin loop is ˜ 100 kb. On the contrary, the large-scale structure of chromatin fiber is affected by a local protein binding. Indeed, histone H1 is essential for the reconstitution of 30 nm fibers. Type II topoisomerase (Topo II) has been known as a major component of chromosomal scaffold and an essential protein for mitotic chromosome condensation. AFM has shown that Topo II binds to bear DNA and clamps two DNA strands even in the absence of ATP, and promotes chromatin compaction depending on the existence of histone H1. Namely, H1-induced 30-nm chromatin fibers were converted into large complex by the effect of Topo II. On the basis of these results

  4. Structural correlates of carrier protein recognition in tetanus toxoid-conjugated bacterial polysaccharide vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Kay; Gao, Fang; Derrick, Jeremy P; Bolgiano, Barbara

    2015-03-10

    An analysis of structure-antibody recognition relationships in nine licenced polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccines was performed. The panel of conjugates used included vaccine components to protect against disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis groups A, C, W and Y and Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 18C. Conformation and structural analysis included size exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering to determine size, and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching to evaluate the protein folding and exposure of Trp residues. A capture ELISA measured the recognition of TT epitopes in the conjugates, using four rat monoclonal antibodies: 2 localised to the HC domain, and 2 of which were holotoxoid conformation-dependent. The conjugates had a wide range of average molecular masses ranging from 1.8×10(6) g/mol to larger than 20×10(6) g/mol. The panel of conjugates were found to be well folded, and did not have spectral features typical of aggregated TT. A partial correlation was found between molecular mass and epitope recognition. Recognition of the epitopes either on the HC domain or the whole toxoid was not necessarily hampered by the size of the molecule. Correlation was also found between the accessibility of Trp side chains and polysaccharide loading, suggesting also that a higher level of conjugated PS does not necessarily interfere with toxoid accessibility. There were different levels of carrier protein Trp side-chain and epitope accessibility that were localised to the HC domain; these were related to the saccharide type, despite the conjugates being independently manufactured. These findings extend our understanding of the molecular basis for carrier protein recognition in TT conjugate vaccines. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Solid phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niswender, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is concerned with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for assaying body fluid content of an antigenic substance which may either be an antigen itself or a hapten capable of being converted, such as by means of reaction with a protein, to an antigenic material. The present invention is concerned with a novel and improved modification of a double-antibody RIA technique in which there is a first antibody that is specific to the antigenic substance suspected to be present in a body fluid from which the assay is intended. The second antibody, however, is not specific to the antigenic substance or analyte, but is an antibody against the first antibody

  6. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140?250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  7. Antibody pretargeting advances cancer radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, David M; Sharkey, Robert M; Paganelli, Giovanni; Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François

    2006-02-10

    This article reviews the methods of pretargeting, which involve separating the targeting antibody from the subsequent delivery of an imaging or therapeutic agent that binds to the tumor-localized antibody. This provides enhanced tumor:background ratios and the delivery of a higher therapeutic dose than when antibodies are directly conjugated with radionuclides, as currently practiced in cancer radioimmunotherapy. We describe initial promising clinical results using streptavidin-antibody constructs with biotin-radionuclide conjugates in the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, and of bispecific antibodies with hapten-radionuclides in the therapy of tumors expressing carcinoembryonic antigen, such as medullary thyroid and small-cell lung cancers.

  8. Histone H1(0) mapping using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousson, S; Gorka, C; Gilly, C; Lawrence, J J

    1989-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to ox liver histone H1 degree were produced and characterized. Two sets of mice were immunized either with pure H1(0) or with an H1(0)-yeast tRNA complex. Eleven hybridomas of various clonal origin were selected. Typing of the antibodies indicated that all but three IgM belonged to the IgG1 class and contained kappa light chains. Immunoblotting experiments using peptides derived from H1(0) or H5 treated by various proteolytic agents (trypsin, N-bromosuccinimide, cyanogen bromide, acetic acid), revealed that nine of the mAb reacted with the globular part of H1(0). More advanced characterization of the antigenic determinants allowed us to determine distinct regions within this globular part which are involved in the antigenic recognition. The peptopes could be subdivided into two groups. Three mAb bound to residues 24-27 and were specific for H1(0). Six mAb bound to residues 27-30 and were specific for H1(0) except one of them which strongly cross-reacted with H5 and GH5. Two mAb reacted with the entire histone H1(0) but failed to react with any of the peptides, suggesting that the corresponding epitope is a conformational antigenic determinant. In order to confirm the localization of the two distinct regions which are involved in the antigenic recognition, a synthetic decapeptide corresponding to the beginning of human H1(0) globular part (from residue 19 to residue 28) was synthesized. Inhibition experiments of the reaction between H1(0) and the various IgG1 mAb by increasing amounts of peptide-bovine serum albumin conjugates were then performed.

  9. Serum Antibody Biomarkers for ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    45-56. Singh VK. (2009) Phenotypic expression of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD): A major subset of autism. Ann Clin Psychiat. 21:148-160. 5...spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in communication (verbal and nonverbal), social interactions, and... autoimmunity ; in particular, the generation of antibodies reactive against brain and CNS proteins. The goal of this grant is to identify serum

  10. Antibody Repertoire Development in Swine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Wertz, N.; Šinkora, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, FEB 17 (2017), s. 255-279 ISSN 2165-8102 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09296S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : swine * pre-immune antibody repertoire * ileal Peyer's patches Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.708, year: 2016

  11. Force microscopy imaging of individual protein molecules with sub-pico Newton force sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shivprasad; Martinez, Nicolas F; Lozano, Jose R; Garcia, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    The capability of atomic force microscopes (AFM) to generate atomic or nanoscale resolution images of surfaces has deeply transformed the study of materials. However, high resolution imaging of biological systems has proved more difficult than obtaining atomic resolution images of crystalline surfaces. In many cases, the forces exerted by the tip on the molecules (1-10 nN) either displace them laterally or break the noncovalent bonds that hold the biomolecules together. Here, we apply a force microscope concept based on the simultaneous excitation of the first two flexural modes of the cantilever. The coupling of the modes generated by the tip-molecule forces enables imaging under the application of forces ( approximately 35 pN) which are smaller than those needed to break noncovalent bonds. With this instrument we have resolved the intramolecular structure of antibodies in monomer and pentameric forms. Furthermore, the instrument has a force sensitivity of 0.2 pN which enables the identification of compositional changes along the protein fragments. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Antibody recognizing 4-sulfated chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans restores memory in tauopathy-induced neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sujeong; Hilton, Sam; Alves, João Nuno; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy; Matthews, Russell T; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Kwok, Jessica C F; Fawcett, James W

    2017-11-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are the main active component of perineuronal nets (PNNs). Digestion of the glycosaminoglycan chains of CSPGs with chondroitinase ABC or transgenic attenuation of PNNs leads to prolongation of object recognition memory and activation of various forms of plasticity in the adult central nervous system. The inhibitory properties of the CSPGs depend on the pattern of sulfation of their glycosaminoglycans, with chondroitin 4-sulfate (C4S) being the most inhibitory form. In this study, we tested a number of candidates for functional blocking of C4S, leading to selection of an antibody, Cat316, which specifically recognizes C4S and blocks its inhibitory effects on axon growth. It also partly blocks binding of semaphorin 3A to PNNs and attenuates PNN formation. We asked whether injection of Cat316 into the perirhinal cortex would have the same effects on memory as chondroitinase ABC treatment. We found that masking C4S with the Cat316 antibody extended long-term object recognition memory in normal wild-type mice to 24 hours, similarly to chondroitinase or transgenic PNN attenuation. We then tested Cat316 for restoration of memory in a neurodegeneration model. Mice expressing tau with the P301S mutation showed profound loss of object recognition memory at 4 months of age. Injection of Cat316 into the perirhinal cortex normalized object recognition at 3 hours in P301S mice. These data indicate that Cat316 binding to C4S in the extracellular matrix can restore plasticity and memory in the same way as chondroitinase ABC digestion. Our results suggest that antibodies to C4S could be a useful therapeutic to restore memory function in neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Document recognition serving people with disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchterman, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Document recognition advances have improved the lives of people with print disabilities, by providing accessible documents. This invited paper provides perspectives on the author's career progression from document recognition professional to social entrepreneur applying this technology to help people with disabilities. Starting with initial thoughts about optical character recognition in college, it continues with the creation of accurate omnifont character recognition that did not require training. It was difficult to make a reading machine for the blind in a commercial setting, which led to the creation of a nonprofit social enterprise to deliver these devices around the world. This network of people with disabilities scanning books drove the creation of Bookshare.org, an online library of scanned books. Looking forward, the needs for improved document recognition technology to further lower the barriers to reading are discussed. Document recognition professionals should be proud of the positive impact their work has had on some of society's most disadvantaged communities.

  14. Neurophysiological correlates of word recognition in dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Körne, G; Deimel, W; Bartling, J; Remschmidt, H

    2004-07-01

    The neurobiological basis of learning word spellings and recognition of recently learned words was assessed in a learning experiment in 9 dyslexics and 9 controls male adolescents. In a recognition paradigm previously learned pseudowords and graphic symbols were presented 50 times each interspersed pseudo-randomly between 3 unlearned items which were repeated 50 times and 150 filler pseudowords. The electrophysiological correlate of recognition of learned pseudowords and graphic symbols was a positivity around 600 ms. For pseudowords the amplitude of this ERP component was significantly attenuated in the dyslexic group, no differences between the groups were found for recognition of graphic material. These data suggest that dyslexic children are able to learn the spelling of simple words, however, the neurophysiological correlate of recognition of these learned words is significantly attenuated. This result strengthens the view that dyslexic children are not generally impaired in recognition memory but specific for linguistic material like words.

  15. Machine learning techniques in dialogue act recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Fišel

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This report addresses dialogue acts, their existing applications and techniques of automatically recognizing them, in Estonia as well as elsewhere. Three main applications are described: in dialogue systems to determine the intention of the speaker, in dialogue systems with machine translation to resolve ambiguities in the possible translation variants and in speech recognition to reduce word recognition error rate. Several recognition techniques are described on the surface level: how they work and how they are trained. A summary of the corresponding representation methods is provided for each technique. The paper also includes examples of applying the techniques to dialogue act recognition.The author comes to the conclusion that using the current evaluation metric it is impossible to compare dialogue act recognition techniques when these are applied to different dialogue act tag sets. Dialogue acts remain an open research area, with space and need for developing new recognition techniques and methods of evaluation.

  16. Kannada character recognition system using neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh D. S.; Kamalapuram, Srinivasa K.; Kumar, Ajay B. R.

    2013-03-01

    Handwriting recognition has been one of the active and challenging research areas in the field of pattern recognition. It has numerous applications which include, reading aid for blind, bank cheques and conversion of any hand written document into structural text form. As there is no sufficient number of works on Indian language character recognition especially Kannada script among 15 major scripts in India. In this paper an attempt is made to recognize handwritten Kannada characters using Feed Forward neural networks. A handwritten Kannada character is resized into 20x30 Pixel. The resized character is used for training the neural network. Once the training process is completed the same character is given as input to the neural network with different set of neurons in hidden layer and their recognition accuracy rate for different Kannada characters has been calculated and compared. The results show that the proposed system yields good recognition accuracy rates comparable to that of other handwritten character recognition systems.

  17. Exemplar Based Recognition of Visual Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren I.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an approach of visual shape recognition based on exemplars of attributed keypoints. Training is performed by storing exemplars of keypoints detected in labeled training images. Recognition is made by keypoint matching and voting according to the labels for the matched keypoint....... The matching is insensitive to rotations, limited scalings and small deformations. The recognition is robust to noise, background clutter and partial occlusion. Recognition is possible from few training images and improve with the number of training images.......This paper presents an approach of visual shape recognition based on exemplars of attributed keypoints. Training is performed by storing exemplars of keypoints detected in labeled training images. Recognition is made by keypoint matching and voting according to the labels for the matched keypoints...

  18. Dynamic Features for Iris Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, R M; Gonzaga, A

    2012-08-01

    The human eye is sensitive to visible light. Increasing illumination on the eye causes the pupil of the eye to contract, while decreasing illumination causes the pupil to dilate. Visible light causes specular reflections inside the iris ring. On the other hand, the human retina is less sensitive to near infra-red (NIR) radiation in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1400 nm, but iris detail can still be imaged with NIR illumination. In order to measure the dynamic movement of the human pupil and iris while keeping the light-induced reflexes from affecting the quality of the digitalized image, this paper describes a device based on the consensual reflex. This biological phenomenon contracts and dilates the two pupils synchronously when illuminating one of the eyes by visible light. In this paper, we propose to capture images of the pupil of one eye using NIR illumination while illuminating the other eye using a visible-light pulse. This new approach extracts iris features called "dynamic features (DFs)." This innovative methodology proposes the extraction of information about the way the human eye reacts to light, and to use such information for biometric recognition purposes. The results demonstrate that these features are discriminating features, and, even using the Euclidean distance measure, an average accuracy of recognition of 99.1% was obtained. The proposed methodology has the potential to be "fraud-proof," because these DFs can only be extracted from living irises.

  19. Longitudinal study of fingerprint recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Soweon; Jain, Anil K

    2015-07-14

    Human identification by fingerprints is based on the fundamental premise that ridge patterns from distinct fingers are different (uniqueness) and a fingerprint pattern does not change over time (persistence). Although the uniqueness of fingerprints has been investigated by developing statistical models to estimate the probability of error in comparing two random samples of fingerprints, the persistence of fingerprints has remained a general belief based on only a few case studies. In this study, fingerprint match (similarity) scores are analyzed by multilevel statistical models with covariates such as time interval between two fingerprints in comparison, subject's age, and fingerprint image quality. Longitudinal fingerprint records of 15,597 subjects are sampled from an operational fingerprint database such that each individual has at least five 10-print records over a minimum time span of 5 y. In regard to the persistence of fingerprints, the longitudinal analysis on a single (right index) finger demonstrates that (i) genuine match scores tend to significantly decrease when time interval between two fingerprints in comparison increases, whereas the change in impostor match scores is negligible; and (ii) fingerprint recognition accuracy at operational settings, nevertheless, tends to be stable as the time interval increases up to 12 y, the maximum time span in the dataset. However, the uncertainty of temporal stability of fingerprint recognition accuracy becomes substantially large if either of the two fingerprints being compared is of poor quality. The conclusions drawn from 10-finger fusion analysis coincide with the conclusions from single-finger analysis.

  20. Semi-synthetic vNAR libraries screened against therapeutic antibodies primarily deliver anti-idiotypic binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könning, Doreen; Rhiel, Laura; Empting, Martin; Grzeschik, Julius; Sellmann, Carolin; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Dickgießer, Stephan; Pirzer, Thomas; Yanakieva, Desislava; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald

    2017-08-29

    Anti-idiotypic binders which specifically recognize the variable region of monoclonal antibodies have proven to be robust tools for pharmacokinetic studies of antibody therapeutics and for the development of cancer vaccines. In the present investigation, we focused on the identification of anti-idiotypic, shark-derived IgNAR antibody variable domains (vNARs) targeting the therapeutic antibodies matuzumab and cetuximab for the purpose of developing specific capturing ligands. Using yeast surface display and semi-synthetic, CDR3-randomized libraries, we identified several highly specific binders targeting both therapeutic antibodies in their corresponding variable region, without applying any counter selections during screening. Importantly, anti-idiotypic vNAR binders were not cross-reactive towards cetuximab or matuzumab, respectively, and comprised good target recognition in the presence of human and mouse serum. When coupled to magnetic beads, anti-idiotypic vNAR variants could be used as efficient capturing tools. Moreover, a two-step procedure involving vNAR-functionalized beads was employed for the enrichment of potentially bispecific cetuximab × matuzumab antibody constructs. In conclusion, semi-synthetic and CDR3-randomized vNAR libraries in combination with yeast display enable the fast and facile identification of anti-idiotypic vNAR domains targeting monoclonal antibodies primarily in an anti-idiotypic manner.

  1. Generation of human scFvs antibodies recognizing a prion protein epitope expressed on the surface of human lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imperiale Valentina

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A hallmark of prion disease is the transformation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc into an infectious disease-associated isoform, (PrPsc. Anti-prion protein monoclonal antibodies are invaluable for structure-function studies of PrP molecules. Furthermore recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies can prevent the incorporation of PrPc into propagating prions. In the present article, we show two new human phage antibodies, isolated on recombinant hamster prion protein (rHaPrP. Results We adopted an antibody phage display strategy to isolate specific human antibodies directed towards rHaPrP which has been used as a bait for panning the synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library. Two phage antibodies clones named MA3.B4 and MA3.G3 were isolated and characterized under genetic biochemical and immunocytochemical aspects. The clones were found to recognize the prion protein in ELISA studies. In flow-cytometry studies, these human single chain Fragment variable (scFv phage-antibodies show a well defined pattern of reactivity on human lymphoblastoid and myeloid cells. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the gene encoding for the antibody fragments and antigen recognition patterns determined by flow-cytometry analysis indicate that the isolated scFvs recognize novel epitopes in the PrPc molecule. These new anti PrPc human antibodies are unique reagents for prion protein detection and may represent a biologic platform to develop new reagents to treat PrPsc associated disease.

  2. Generation of human scFvs antibodies recognizing a prion protein epitope expressed on the surface of human lymphoblastoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flego, Michela; Ascione, Alessandro; Zamboni, Silvia; Dupuis, Maria L; Imperiale, Valentina; Cianfriglia, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    Background A hallmark of prion disease is the transformation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) into an infectious disease-associated isoform, (PrPsc). Anti-prion protein monoclonal antibodies are invaluable for structure-function studies of PrP molecules. Furthermore recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies can prevent the incorporation of PrPc into propagating prions. In the present article, we show two new human phage antibodies, isolated on recombinant hamster prion protein (rHaPrP). Results We adopted an antibody phage display strategy to isolate specific human antibodies directed towards rHaPrP which has been used as a bait for panning the synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library. Two phage antibodies clones named MA3.B4 and MA3.G3 were isolated and characterized under genetic biochemical and immunocytochemical aspects. The clones were found to recognize the prion protein in ELISA studies. In flow-cytometry studies, these human single chain Fragment variable (scFv) phage-antibodies show a well defined pattern of reactivity on human lymphoblastoid and myeloid cells. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the gene encoding for the antibody fragments and antigen recognition patterns determined by flow-cytometry analysis indicate that the isolated scFvs recognize novel epitopes in the PrPc molecule. These new anti PrPc human antibodies are unique reagents for prion protein detection and may represent a biologic platform to develop new reagents to treat PrPsc associated disease. PMID:17605808

  3. Dynamic Programming Algorithms in Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus Felix FURTUNA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In a system of speech recognition containing words, the recognition requires the comparison between the entry signal of the word and the various words of the dictionary. The problem can be solved efficiently by a dynamic comparison algorithm whose goal is to put in optimal correspondence the temporal scales of the two words. An algorithm of this type is Dynamic Time Warping. This paper presents two alternatives for implementation of the algorithm designed for recognition of the isolated words.

  4. Object feature extraction and recognition model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Min; Xiang Rujian; Wan Yongxing

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of objects, especially flying objects, are analyzed, which include characteristics of spectrum, image and motion. Feature extraction is also achieved. To improve the speed of object recognition, a feature database is used to simplify the data in the source database. The feature vs. object relationship maps are stored in the feature database. An object recognition model based on the feature database is presented, and the way to achieve object recognition is also explained

  5. Optical syntactic pattern recognition by fuzzy scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, R.; Kinser, J.; Schamschula, M.; Shamir, J.; Caulfield, H.J. [Center for Applied Optical Sciences, Department of Physics, Alabama A& M University, Normal, Alabama 35762 (United States)

    1996-06-01

    A novel syntactic approach is introduced to treat particular problems in pattern recognition. The procedure is implemented by the use of optical correlation methods for identifying the various primitives that appear in the input pattern, and their importance is determined by fuzzy relational scoring. Robust pattern recognition with tolerance to normal variations is demonstrated, indicating an efficient new approach for optical pattern recognition. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  6. Mathematical symbol hypothesis recognition with rejection option

    OpenAIRE

    Julca-Aguilar , Frank; Hirata , Nina ,; Viard-Gaudin , Christian; Mouchère , Harold; Medjkoune , Sofiane

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In the context of handwritten mathematical expressions recognition, a first step consist on grouping strokes (segmentation) to form symbol hypotheses: groups of strokes that might represent a symbol. Then, the symbol recognition step needs to cope with the identification of wrong segmented symbols (false hypotheses). However, previous works on symbol recognition consider only correctly segmented symbols. In this work, we focus on the problem of mathematical symbol reco...

  7. A Bayesian classifier for symbol recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Barrat , Sabine; Tabbone , Salvatore; Nourrissier , Patrick

    2007-01-01

    URL : http://www.buyans.com/POL/UploadedFile/134_9977.pdf; International audience; We present in this paper an original adaptation of Bayesian networks to symbol recognition problem. More precisely, a descriptor combination method, which enables to improve significantly the recognition rate compared to the recognition rates obtained by each descriptor, is presented. In this perspective, we use a simple Bayesian classifier, called naive Bayes. In fact, probabilistic graphical models, more spec...

  8. Chiral recognition in separation science: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2013-01-01

    Chiral recognition phenomena play an important role in nature as well as analytical separation sciences. In separation sciences such as chromatography and capillary electrophoresis, enantiospecific interactions between the enantiomers of an analyte and the chiral selector are required in order to observe enantioseparations. Due to the large structural variety of chiral selectors applied, different mechanisms and structural features contribute to the chiral recognition process. This chapter briefly illustrates the current models of the enantiospecific recognition on the structural basics of various chiral selectors.

  9. Affinity-based methodologies and ligands for antibody purification: advances and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Ana C A; Silva, Cláudia S O; Taipa, M Angela

    2007-08-10

    Many successful, recent therapies for life-threatening diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis are based on the recognition between native or genetically engineered antibodies and cell-surface receptors. Although naturally produced by the immune system, the need for antibodies with unique specificities and designed for single application, has encouraged the search for novel antibody purification strategies. The availability of these products to the end-consumer is strictly related to manufacture costs, particularly those attributed to downstream processing. Over the last decades, academia and industry have developed different types of interactions and separation techniques for antibody purification, affinity-based strategies being the most common and efficient methodologies. The affinity ligands utilized range from biological to synthetic designed molecules with enhanced resistance and stability. Despite the successes achieved, the purification "paradigm" still moves interests and efforts in the continuous demand for improved separation performances. This review will focus on recent advances and perspectives in antibody purification by affinity interactions using different techniques, with particular emphasis on affinity chromatography.

  10. VNAR single-domain antibodies specific for BAFF inhibit B cell development by molecular mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häsler, Julien; Flajnik, Martin F; Williams, Gareth; Walsh, Frank S; Rutkowski, J Lynn

    2016-07-01

    B cell-activating factor (BAFF) plays a dominant role in the B cell homeostasis. However, excessive BAFF promotes the development of autoreactive B-cells and several antibodies have been developed to block its activity. Bispecific antibodies with added functionality represent the next wave of biologics that may be more effective in the treatment of complex autoimmune disease. The single variable domain from the immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (VNAR) is one of the smallest antibody recognition units that could be combined with monospecific antibodies to develop bispecific agents. We isolated a panel of BAFF-binding VNARs with low nM potency from a semi-synthetic phage display library and examined their functional activity. The anti-BAFF VNARs blocked the binding of BAFF to all three of its receptors (BR3, TACI and BCMA) and the presence of the conserved DXL receptor motif found in the CDR3 regions suggests molecular mimicry as the mechanism of antagonism. One clone was formatted as an Fc fusion for functional testing and it was found to inhibit both mouse and human BAFF with equal potency ex vivo in a splenocyte proliferation assay. In mice, subchronic administration reduced the number of immature and transitional intermediates B cells and mature B cell subsets. These results indicate that VNAR single domain antibodies function as selective B-cell inhibitors and offer an alternative molecular format for targeting B-cell disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantum dot-linked immunosorbent assay (QLISA) using orientation-directed antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miho; Udaka, Hikari; Fukuda, Takeshi

    2017-09-05

    An approach similar to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with the advantage of saving time and effort but exhibiting high performance, was developed using orientation-directed half-part antibodies immobilized on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. ELISA is a widely accepted assay used to detect the presence of a target substance. However, it takes time to quantify the target with specificity and sensitivity owing to signal amplification. In this study, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots are introduced as bright and photobleaching-tolerant fluorescent materials. Since hydrophilic surface coating of quantum dots rendered biocompatibility and functional groups for chemical reactions, the quantum dots were modified with half-sized antibodies after partial reduction. The half-sized antibody could be bound to a quantum dot through a unique thiol site to properly display the recognition domain for the core process of ELISA, which is an antigen-antibody interaction. The reducing conditions were investigated to generate efficient conjugates of quantum dots and half-sized antibodies. This was applied to IL-6 detection, as the quantification of IL-6 is significant owing to its close relationships with various biomedical phenomena that cause different diseases. An ELISA-like assay with CdSe/ZnS quantum dot institution (QLISA; Quantum dot-linked immunosorbent assay) was developed to detect 0.05ng/mL IL-6, which makes it sufficiently sensitive as an immunosorbent assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of rabbit monoclonal antibodies for detection of alpha-dystroglycan in normal and dystrophic tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa J Fortunato

    Full Text Available Alpha-dystroglycan requires a rare O-mannose glycan modification to form its binding epitope for extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin. This functional glycan is disrupted in a cohort of muscular dystrophies, the secondary dystroglycanopathies, and is abnormal in some metastatic cancers. The most commonly used reagent for detection of alpha-dystroglycan is mouse monoclonal antibody IIH6, but it requires the functional O-mannose structure for recognition. Therefore, the ability to detect alpha-dystroglycan protein in disease states where it lacks the full O-mannose glycan has been limited. To overcome this hurdle, rabbit monoclonal antibodies against the alpha-dystroglycan C-terminus were generated. The new antibodies, named 5-2, 29-5, and 45-3, detect alpha-dystroglycan from mouse, rat and pig skeletal muscle by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In a mouse model of fukutin-deficient dystroglycanopathy, all antibodies detected low molecular weight alpha-dystroglycan in disease samples demonstrating a loss of functional glycosylation. Alternately, in a porcine model of Becker muscular dystrophy, relative abundance of alpha-dystroglycan was decreased, consistent with a reduction in expression of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in affected muscle. Therefore, these new rabbit monoclonal antibodies are suitable reagents for alpha-dystroglycan core protein detection and will enhance dystroglycan-related studies.

  13. Physical characteristics of a citrullinated pro-filaggrin epitope recognized by anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis sera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Holm, Bettina Eide; Slot, Ole

    2016-01-01

    whether biotin labelling influence antibody recognition. The full-length cyclic pro-filaggrin peptide and a linear form with a N-terminal biotin, was recognized to the same level, whereas, a notable difference in ACPA reactivity to the linear peptides with a C-terminal biotin was found, probably due...... amino acid in position 4 C-terminal to citrulline. Collectively, peptide structure, length, the presence of charged amino acids and biotin labelling markedly influence antibody reactivity. In relation to the clinical diagnostics of ACPA, these findings may reflect the differences in diagnostic assays...

  14. Man machine interface based on speech recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Carlos A.F.; Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.

    2007-01-01

    This work reports the development of a Man Machine Interface based on speech recognition. The system must recognize spoken commands, and execute the desired tasks, without manual interventions of operators. The range of applications goes from the execution of commands in an industrial plant's control room, to navigation and interaction in virtual environments. Results are reported for isolated word recognition, the isolated words corresponding to the spoken commands. For the pre-processing stage, relevant parameters are extracted from the speech signals, using the cepstral analysis technique, that are used for isolated word recognition, and corresponds to the inputs of an artificial neural network, that performs recognition tasks. (author)

  15. Urban building recognition during significant temporal variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Phuong Giang; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    In literature, existing researches on building recognition mainly concentrate on scales, rotations, and viewpoints variance. In urban environment, large temporal variations of weather and lighting conditions should also be considered as major challenges for robust recognition. For instances...... on constructing a system that deals with the temporal difference factors in recognizing urban buildings. In order to build such a system, two main criteria are raised, namely the efficiency of the recognition algorithm and the speed for interactive search purpose. For recognition purpose, we exploit the MOPS...

  16. Auditory Modeling for Noisy Speech Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ...) has used its existing technology in phonetic speech recognition, audio signal processing, and multilingual language translation to design and demonstrate an advanced audio interface for speech...

  17. End-Stop Exemplar Based Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren I.

    2003-01-01

    An approach to exemplar based recognition of visual shapes is presented. The shape information is described by attributed interest points (keys) detected by an end-stop operator. The attributes describe the statistics of lines and edges local to the interest point, the position of neighboring int...... interest points, and (in the training phase) a list of recognition names. Recognition is made by a simple voting procedure. Preliminary experiments indicate that the recognition is robust to noise, small deformations, background clutter and partial occlusion....

  18. Non Audio-Video gesture recognition system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craciunescu, Razvan; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Kyriazakos, Sofoklis

    2016-01-01

    recognition from the face and hand gesture recognition. Gesture recognition enables humans to communicate with the machine and interact naturally without any mechanical devices. This paper investigates the possibility to use non-audio/video sensors in order to design a low-cost gesture recognition device...... that can be connected to any computer on the market. The paper proposes an equation that relates the distance and voltage for a Sharp GP2Y0A21 and GP2D120 sensors in the situation that a hand is used as the reflective object. In the end, the presented system is compared with other audio/video system...

  19. C-C chemokine receptor-7 mediated endocytosis of antibody cargoes into intact cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eCharest-Morin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7 is a G protein coupled receptor that has a role in leukocyte homing, but that is also expressed in aggressive tumor cells. Preclinical research supports that CCR7 is a valid target in oncology. In view of the increasing availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that carry cytotoxic cargoes, we studied the feasibility of forcing intact cells to internalize known monoclonal antibodies by exploiting the cycle of endocytosis and recycling triggered by the CCR7 agonist CCL19. Firstly, an anti-CCR7 antibody (CD197; clone 150503 labeled surface recombinant CCR7 expressed in intact HEK 293a cells and the fluorescent antibody was internalized following CCL19 treatment. Secondly, a recombinant myc-tagged CCL19 construction was exploited along the anti-myc monoclonal antibody 4A6. The myc-tagged ligand was produced as a conditioned medium of transfected HEK 293a cells that contained the equivalent of 430 ng/ml of immunoreactive CCL19 (average value, ELISA determination. CCL19-myc, but not authentic CCL19, carried the fluorophore-labeled antibody 4A6 into other recipient cells that expressed recombinant CCR7 (microscopy, cytofluorometry. The immune complexes were apparent in endosomal structures, colocalized well with the small GTPase Rab5 and progressed toward Rab7-positive endosomes. A dominant negative form of Rab5 (GDP-locked inhibited this endocytosis. Further, endosomes in CCL19-myc- or CCL19-stimulated cells were positive for β-arrestin2, but rarely for β-arrestin1. Following treatment with CCL19-myc and the 4A6 antibody, the melanoma cell line A375 that expresses endogenous CCR7 was specifically stained using a secondary peroxidase-conjugated antibody. Agonist-stimulated CCR7 can transport antibody-based cargoes, with possible therapeutic applications in oncology.

  20. Vision models for target detection and recognition in memory of Arthur Menendez

    CERN Document Server

    Peli, Eli

    1995-01-01

    This book is an international collection of contributions from academia, industry and the armed forces. It addresses current and emerging Spatial Vision Models and their application to the understanding, prediction and evaluation of the tasks of target detection and recognition. The discussion in many of the chapters is framed in terms of military targets and military vision aids. However, the techniques analyses and problems are by no means limited to this area of application. The detection and recognition of an armored vehicle from a reconnaissance image are performed by the same visual syst

  1. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  2. Protein dynamics and the diversity of an antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2012-08-03

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved.

  3. Protein Dynamics and the Diversity of an Antibody Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved. PMID:22685303

  4. Immunosympathectomy as the first phenotypic knockout with antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Antonino

    2013-03-26

    In a PNAS Classic Article published in 1960, Rita Levi-Montalcini offered formal and conclusive proof that endogenous NGF was responsible for the survival of sympathetic neurons in vivo. Thus ended an experimental tour de force lasting a decade, starting with the demonstration that a humoral factor, produced from a tumor transplanted in a chicken embryo, was responsible for stimulating outgrowth of nerve fibers from sympathetic and sensory neurons. From a more general methodological point of view, this work provided a breakthrough in the quest to achieve targeted loss of function and experimentally validate the function of biological molecules. Finally, this work provided an example of the ablation of a specific neuronal subpopulation in an otherwise intact nervous system, an immunological knife of unsurpassed effectiveness and precision. The novelty and the importance of the PNAS Classic Article is discussed here, collocating it within the context of the particular moment of the NGF discovery saga, of Rita Levi-Montalcini's scientific and academic career, and of the general scientific context of those years. This seminal work, involving the use of antibodies for phenotypic knockout in vivo, planted seeds that were to bear new fruit many years later with the advent of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant antibody technologies.

  5. Eye-Gaze Analysis of Facial Emotion Recognition and Expression in Adolescents with ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieckowski, Andrea Trubanova; White, Susan W

    2017-01-01

    Impaired emotion recognition and expression in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may contribute to observed social impairment. The aim of this study was to examine the role of visual attention directed toward nonsocial aspects of a scene as a possible mechanism underlying recognition and expressive ability deficiency in ASD. One recognition and two expression tasks were administered. Recognition was assessed in force-choice paradigm, and expression was assessed during scripted and free-choice response (in response to emotional stimuli) tasks in youth with ASD (n = 20) and an age-matched sample of typically developing youth (n = 20). During stimulus presentation prior to response in each task, participants' eye gaze was tracked. Youth with ASD were less accurate at identifying disgust and sadness in the recognition task. They fixated less to the eye region of stimuli showing surprise. A group difference was found during the free-choice response task, such that those with ASD expressed emotion less clearly but not during the scripted task. Results suggest altered eye gaze to the mouth region but not the eye region as a candidate mechanism for decreased ability to recognize or express emotion. Findings inform our understanding of the association between social attention and emotion recognition and expression deficits.

  6. The impairment of emotion recognition in Huntington's disease extends to positive emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, Laura; Sauter, Disa A; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Trinkler, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Huntington's Disease (HD) are impaired in the recognition of emotional signals. However, the nature and extent of the impairment is controversial: it has variously been argued to disproportionately affect disgust (e.g., Sprengelmeyer et al., 1996), to be general for negative emotions (Snowden et al., 2008), or to be a consequence of item difficulty (Milders et al., 2003). Yet no study to date has included more than one positive stimulus category in emotion recognition tasks, and most studies have focused on the recognition of emotions from facial stimuli. In this study, we test the hypothesis that patients with HD may be impaired in their recognition of positive as well as negative emotional signals, by examining the recognition of a range of positive emotions from vocal cues. We present a study of 14 Huntington's patients and 15 controls performing a forced-choice task with a previously validated set of negative and positive non-verbal emotional vocalizations (Sauter and Scott, 2007). Although HD patients performed above chance for each emotion, they were found to be impaired in both positive and negative emotions, including pleasure, fear and anger. These findings complement previous work by demonstrating that impairments in emotion recognition in HD extend to positive and negative emotions, which may imply a general deficit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  7. RSOI: Force Deployment Bottleneck

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amato, Mark

    1998-01-01

    This study uses The Theory Of Constraints (TOC) management methodology and recent military missions to show that RSOI operations are generally the limiting constraint to force deployment operations...

  8. Bi-Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Peng; Speicher, Nora K; Röttger, Richard

    2014-01-01

    outperformed existing tools with Bi-Force at least when following the evaluation protocols from Eren et al. Bi-Force is implemented in Java and integrated into the open source software package of BiCluE. The software as well as all used datasets are publicly available at http://biclue.mpi-inf.mpg.de....... of pairwise similarities. We first evaluated the power of Bi-Force to solve dedicated bicluster editing problems by comparing Bi-Force with two existing algorithms in the BiCluE software package. We then followed a biclustering evaluation protocol in a recent review paper from Eren et al. (2013) (A...

  9. Intermolecular and surface forces

    CERN Document Server

    Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-01-01

    This reference describes the role of various intermolecular and interparticle forces in determining the properties of simple systems such as gases, liquids and solids, with a special focus on more complex colloidal, polymeric and biological systems. The book provides a thorough foundation in theories and concepts of intermolecular forces, allowing researchers and students to recognize which forces are important in any particular system, as well as how to control these forces. This third edition is expanded into three sections and contains five new chapters over the previous edition.· starts fr

  10. Macroscopic forces from supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulos, Savas K

    1996-01-01

    We argue that theories in which supersymmetry breaking originates at low energies often contain scalar particles that mediate coherent gravitational strength forces at distances less than a cm. We estimate the strength and range of these forces in several cases. Present limits on such forces are inadequate. However new techniques, such as those based on small cryogenic mechanical oscillators, may improve the present limits by ten orders of magnitude or discover new forces as weak as 1 \\% of gravity at distances down to 40 microns.

  11. Characterization of mechanical properties of transgenic tobacco roots expressing a recombinant monoclonal antibody against tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sally; Liu, Wei; Ma, Julian K-C; Thomas, Colin R; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli

    2008-07-01

    In this article, we describe a new approach that allows the determination of the magnitude of force required to break single plant roots. Roots were taken from transgenic tobacco plants, expressing a secreted monoclonal antibody. They were divided into four key developmental stages. A novel micromanipulation technique was used to pull to breakage, single tobacco roots in buffer in order to determine their breaking force. A characteristic uniform step-wise increase in the force up to a peak force for breakage was observed. The mean breaking force and mean work done were 101mN and 97microJ per root respectively. However, there was a significant increase in breaking force from the youngest white roots to the oldest, dark red-brown roots. We speculate that this was due to increasing lignin deposition with root stage of development (shown by phloroglucinol staining). No significant differences between fresh root mass, original root length, or mean root diameter for any of the root categories were found, displaying their uniformity, which would be beneficial for bioprocessing. In addition, no significant difference in antibody yield from the different root categories was found. These data show that it is possible to characterise the force requirements for root breakage and should assist in the optimisation of recombinant protein extraction from these roots. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Force spectroscopy of hepatocytic extracellular matrix components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsunthon, R., E-mail: YongsuntR@Corning.com [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); Baker, W.A.; Bryhan, M.D.; Baker, D.E.; Chang, T.; Petzold, O.N.; Walczak, W.J.; Liu, J.; Faris, R.A.; Senaratne, W.; Seeley, L.A.; Youngman, R.E. [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We present atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy data of live hepatocytes (HEPG2/C3A liver cell line) grown in Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, a complex solution of salts and amino acids commonly used for cell culture. Contact-mode imaging and force spectroscopy of this system allowed correlation of cell morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) properties with substrate properties. Force spectroscopy analysis of cellular 'footprints' indicated that the cells secrete large polymers (e.g., 3.5 {mu}m contour length and estimated MW 1000 kDa) onto their substrate surface. Although definitive identification of the polymers has not yet been achieved, fluorescent-labeled antibody staining has specified the presence of ECM proteins such as collagen and laminin in the cellular footprints. The stretched polymers appear to be much larger than single molecules of known ECM components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, thus suggesting that the cells create larger entangled, macromolecular structures from smaller components. There is strong evidence which suggests that the composition of the ECM is greatly influenced by the hydrophobicity of the substrate surface, with preferential production and/or adsorption of larger macromolecules on hydrophobic surfaces.

  13. Fast track antibody V-gene rescue, recombinant expression in plants and characterization of a PfMSP4-specific antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelski, Stephanie; Boes, Alexander; Spiegel, Holger; de Almeida, Melanie; Klockenbring, Torsten; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Fendel, Rolf

    2015-02-05

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are essential tools in biological research, diagnosis and therapy, and are conventionally produced in murine hybridoma cell lines. Professional applications of mAbs depend on the steady supply of material. Because hybridoma cultures can stop producing the antibody or even die, preservation of the unique epitope specificity of mAbs by rescue of the sequences encoding the antibody variable domains (V regions) is important. The availability of these sequences enables not only the recombinant expression of the original antibody for further applications, but opens the road for antibody engineering towards innovative diagnostic or therapeutic applications. A time- and cost-efficient production system enabling the detailed analysis of the antibodies is an essential requirement in this context. Sequences were rescued from three hybridoma cell lines, subjected to sequence analysis, subcloned into binary expression vectors and recombinantly expressed as chimeric mAb (constant regions of human IgG1:k1) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The properties of the recombinant and the murine mAbs were compared using competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. The recognition of native PfMSP4 by the recombinant mAb was analysed by immunofluorescence staining of Pf 3D7A schizonts and by western blot analysis of merozoite extract. The rescued sequences of all three hybridoma cell lines were identical. The recombinant mAb was successfully expressed as IgG in plants at moderate levels (45 mg/kg fresh leaf weight). Preservation of the original epitope was demonstrated in a competition ELISA, using recombinant mAb and the three murine mAbs. EGF_PfMSP4-specific affinities were determined by SPR spectroscopy to 8 nM and 10 nM for the murine or recombinant mAb, respectively. Binding to parasite PfMSP4 was confirmed in an immunofluorescence assay showing a characteristic staining pattern and by western blot

  14. Anti-metatype antibodies stabilize the fluorescein single-chain antibody 4-4-20 complex against dissociation by hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Sampaio, T; Voss, E W

    1994-03-18

    Hydrostatic pressure was used to promote dissociation of fluorescein (Fl) from single-chain antibody 4-4-20 (SCA 4-4-20). Fl fluorescence intensity was quenched by 97% upon binding to SCA 4-4-20. Increasing pressure to 2.4 kbar enhanced Fl fluorescence from the remaining 3% to 14-17%. The capacity of anti-metatype antibodies (anti-Met), which specifically recognize liganded anti-Fl antibodies, to protect against pressure-induced Fl dissociation was tested. Both polyclonal and monoclonal anti-Met antibodies protected against Fl dissociation, reducing the fluorescence intensity at 2.4 kbar from 14-17% to 6-8%. Additive effects of anti-Met antibodies in protection against pressure-induced Fl dissociation were suggested by the fact that a 2-fold molar excess polyclonal anti-Met reagent promoted additional protection relative to an equimolar amount. On the other hand, combination of different monoclonal anti-Met antibodies did not promote additive protection, suggesting recognition of overlapping metatopes by these monoclonals. The complex formed by SCA 4-4-20 and the Fl analog HPF was more sensitive to pressure than the Fl-SCA 4-4-20 complex. Addition of both polyclonal and monoclonal anti-Met antibodies reduced the Fl fluorescence recovery at 2.4 kbar from 75% to 40-55%. In order to directly study binding of anti-Met antibodies to mAb 4-4-20, monoclonal anti-Met antibody 3A5-1 was labeled with 2-dimethylaminonaphthalene-5-sulfonyl chloride (2,5-Dns-Cl) and Dns fluorescence anisotropy measured. Unliganded mAb 4-4-20 did not bind to 2,5-Dns-3A5-1 as indicated by the absence of measurable changes in Dns fluorescence anisotropy upon increasing mAb concentration. Addition of mAb 4-4-20 bound to Fl produced a sigmoidal increase in Dns anisotropy, compatible with association of the primary immune complex and 3A5-1. An affinity constant, K0.5, of 1.5 x 10(-7) M and a cooperativity coefficient (n) of 3.1 were calculated for formation of the Fl-mAb 4-4-20 complex. The HPF-mAb 4

  15. Pichia pastoris-Expressed Bivalent Virus-Like Particulate Vaccine Induces Domain III-Focused Bivalent Neutralizing Antibodies without Antibody-Dependent Enhancement in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Shukla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue, a significant public health problem in several countries around the world, is caused by four different serotypes of mosquito-borne dengue viruses (DENV-1, -2, -3, and -4. Antibodies to any one DENV serotype which can protect against homotypic re-infection, do not offer heterotypic cross-protection. In fact, cross-reactive antibodies may augment heterotypic DENV infection through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE. A recently launched live attenuated vaccine (LAV for dengue, which consists of a mixture of four chimeric yellow-fever/dengue vaccine viruses, may be linked to the induction of disease-enhancing antibodies. This is likely related to viral interference among the replicating viral strains, resulting in an unbalanced immune response, as well as to the fact that the LAV encodes prM, a DENV protein documented to elicit ADE-mediating antibodies. This makes it imperative to explore the feasibility of alternate ADE risk-free vaccine candidates. Our quest for a non-replicating vaccine centered on the DENV envelope (E protein which mediates virus entry into the host cell and serves as an important target of the immune response. Serotype-specific neutralizing epitopes and the host receptor recognition function map to E domain III (EDIII. Recently, we found that Pichia pastoris-expressed DENV E protein, of all four serotypes, self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs in the absence of prM. Significantly, these VLPs displayed EDIII and elicited EDIII-focused DENV-neutralizing antibodies in mice. We now report the creation and characterization of a novel non-replicating recombinant particulate vaccine candidate, produced by co-expressing the E proteins of DENV-1 and DENV-2 in P. pastoris. The two E proteins co-assembled into bivalent mosaic VLPs (mVLPs designated as mE1E2bv VLPs. The mVLP, which preserved the serotype-specific antigenic integrity of its two component proteins, elicited predominantly EDIII-focused homotypic virus

  16. Donor-derived HLA antibody production in patients undergoing SCT from HLA antibody-positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Yoshihara, S; Maruya, E; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Hayashi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Onuma, T; Fujii, N; Kusunoki, Y; Soma, T; Saji, H; Ogawa, H

    2012-10-01

    Pre-existing donor-specific HLA antibodies in patients undergoing HLA-mismatched SCT have increasingly been recognized as a risk factor for primary graft failure. However, the clinical implications of the presence of HLA antibodies in donors remain unknown. We prospectively examined 123 related donors for the presence of HLA antibodies by using a Luminex-based single antigen assay. Of these, 1/57 (1.8%) male, 6/27 (22%) parous female and 0/39 (0%) nonparous female donors were HLA antibody-positive. Then, we determined the presence of HLA antibodies in seven patients who received SCT from antibody-positive donors. Of these, four became HLA antibody-positive after SCT. The specificities of the antibodies that emerged in the patients closely resembled those of the antibodies found in the donors, indicating their production by donor-derived plasma cells. Moreover, the kinetics of the HLA antibody levels were similar in all four patients: levels started increasing within 1 week after SCT and peaked at days 10-21, followed by a gradual decrease. These results suggest that donor-derived HLA antibody production frequently occurs in patients undergoing SCT from antibody-positive donors. Further studies are warranted for clarifying the clinical significance of donor-derived HLA antibodies, including the role of these antibodies in post transplant platelet transfusion refractoriness.

  17. Single-Domain Antibodies and the Promise of Modular Targeting in Cancer Imaging and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Iezzi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments have significantly changed the outcome of cancer in the clinic, effectively inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, triggering antibody-dependent immune effector cell activation and complement mediated cell death. Along with a continued expansion in number, diversity, and complexity of validated tumor targets there is an increasing focus on engineering recombinant antibody fragments for lead development. Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs, in particular those engineered from the variable heavy-chain fragment (VHH gene found in Camelidae heavy-chain antibodies (or IgG2 and IgG3, are the smallest fragments that retain the full antigen-binding capacity of the antibody with advantageous properties as drugs. For similar reasons, growing attention is being paid to the yet smaller variable heavy chain new antigen receptor (VNAR fragments found in Squalidae. sdAbs have been selected, mostly from immune VHH libraries, to inhibit or modulate enzyme activity, bind soluble factors, internalize cell membrane receptors, or block cytoplasmic targets. This succinct review is a compilation of recent data documenting the application of engineered, recombinant sdAb in the clinic as epitope recognition “modules” to build monomeric, dimeric and multimeric ligands that target, tag and stall solid tumor growth in vivo. Size, affinity, specificity, and the development profile of sdAbs drugs are seemingly consistent with desirable clinical efficacy and safety requirements. But the hepatotoxicity of the tetrameric anti-DR5-VHH drug in patients with pre-existing anti-drug antibodies halted the phase I clinical trial and called for a thorough pre-screening of the immune and poly-specific reactivities of the sdAb leads.

  18. Construction of Rabbit Immune Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha; Lee, Jong Seo; Shim, Hyunbo

    2018-01-01

    Rabbits have distinct advantages over mice as a source of target-specific antibodies. They produce higher affinity antibodies than mice, and may elicit strong immune response against antigens or epitopes that are poorly immunogenic or tolerated in mice. However, a great majority of currently available monoclonal antibodies are of murine origin because of the wider availability of murine fusion partner cell lines and well-established tools and protocols for fusion and cloning of mouse hybridoma. Phage-display selection of antibody libraries is an alternative method to hybridoma technology for the generation of target-specific monoclonal antibodies. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies from nonmurine species can readily be obtained by constructing immune antibody libraries from B cells of the immunized animal and screening the library by phage display. In this article, we describe the construction of a rabbit immune Fab library for the facile isolation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies. After immunization, B-cell cDNA is obtained from the spleen of the animal, from which antibody variable domain repertoires are amplified and assembled into a Fab repertoire by PCR. The Fab genes are then cloned into a phagemid vector and transformed to E. coli, from which a phage-displayed immune Fab library is rescued. Such a library can be biopanned against the immunization antigen for rapid identification of high-affinity, target-specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies.

  19. Appearance and Reality: Does a Recognition Test Really Improve Subsequent Recall and Recognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandler, George; Rabinowitz, Jan C.

    1981-01-01

    That additional exposure to memorial material improves subsequent retrieval probabilities was explored. The effect of a recognition test on subsequent recall and recognition of categorized lists was studied. Prior recognition tests increased recall of original items, but also increased intrusions. Similarly, prior exposure increased hit rates and…

  20. Variable recognition of Candida albicans strains by TLR4 and lectin recognition receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, M.G.; Gow, N.A.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Verschueren, I.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Kullberg, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The role of TLR4 in the recognition of Candida albicans has been brought into question. In order to assess whether discrepancies in the literature are due to differences in the recognition of various C. albicans strains, we selected 14 different isolates of C. albicans to evaluate their recognition