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Sample records for antibody mediated rejection

  1. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunctio...

  2. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  3. Treatment Options and Strategies for Antibody Mediated Rejection after Renal Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Matthew H.; Abt, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection is a significant clinical problem encountered in a subset of renal transplant recipients. This type of rejection has a variable pathogenesis from the presence of donor specific antibodies with no overt disease to immediate hyperacute rejection and many variations between. Antibody mediated rejection is more common in human leukocyte antigen sensitized patients. In general, transplant graft survival after antibody mediated rejection is jeopardized, with less than 50...

  4. Current perspectives on antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witt CA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chad A Witt, Ramsey R Hachem Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA Abstract: The role of donor-specific antibodies (DSA to human leukocyte antigens and the burden of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR in lung transplantation remain enigmatic. Over the past several years, evidence has been emerging that humoral immunity plays an important role in the development of both acute and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD. Multiple case reports and case series have identified lung allograft recipients with clinical findings consistent with acute AMR. However, there is currently no widely accepted definition for AMR in lung transplantation, and this has been a significant barrier to furthering our understanding of this form of rejection. Nonetheless, the development of DSA after transplantation has consistently been identified as an independent risk factor for persistent and high-grade acute cellular rejection and CLAD. This has raised the possibility that chronic AMR may be a distinct phenotype of CLAD although evidence supporting this paradigm is still lacking. Additionally, antibodies to lung-restricted self-antigens (collagen V and K-α 1 tubulin have been associated with primary graft dysfunction early and the development of CLAD late after transplantation, and emerging evidence underscores significant interactions between autoimmunity and alloimmunity after transplantation. There is currently an active International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working group that is developing an operational definition for AMR in lung transplantation. This will be critical to improve our understanding of this form of rejection and conduct clinical trials to identify optimal treatment strategies. This review will summarize the literature on DSA and AMR in lung transplantation and discuss the impact of antibodies to self-antigens on lung

  5. Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Durlik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a relatively rare but severe complication in kidney transplantation associated with increased risk of graft loss. Diagnosis of acute and chronic AMR is based on typical histological hallmarks, deposition of C4d in peritubular capillaries and presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA. Many novel and attractive treatment options have become available in recent years: antibody removal and production inhibition (plasmapheresis, IVIg, B cell depletion (rituximab, plasma cell depletion and apoptosis (bortezomib, and complement activation inhibition (eculizumab. Standard therapy is based on PP and IVIg. Preliminary results with new agents are encouraging but require randomised clinical trials and long-term follow-up.

  6. Antibody-Mediated Rejection: Pathogenesis, Prevention, Treatment, and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia R. Blume

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a major cause of late kidney transplant failure. It is important to have an understanding of human-leukocyte antigen (HLA typing including well-designed studies to determine anti-MHC-class-I-related chain A (MICA and antibody rejection pathogenesis. This can allow for more specific diagnosis and treatment which may improve long-term graft function. HLA-specific antibody detection prior to transplantation allows one to help determine the risk for AMR while detection of DSA along with a biopsy confirms it. It is now appreciated that biopsy for AMR does not have to include diffuse C4d, but does require a closer look at peritubular capillary microvasculature. Although plasmapheresis (PP is effective in removing alloantibodies (DSAs from the circulation, rebound synthesis of alloantibodies can occur. Splenectomy is used in desensitization protocols for ABO incompatible transplants as well as being found to treat AMR refractory to conventional treatment. Also used are agents targeted for plasma cells, B cells, and the complement cascade which are bortezomib rituximab and eculizumab, respectively.

  7. Posttransplantation antibody mediated rejection: new insights into mechanism, treatment and protective strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO You-ying; CHEN Jiang-hua

    2011-01-01

    @@ Acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) is receiving more and more attention, which is mediated by different mechanisms from T cell mediated rejection, thereby requiring other approaches to prevention and treatment. Preexisting alloantibodies and pre-transplant sensitization are important risk factors for development of acute AMR early after renal transplantation.

  8. Prevention trumps treatment of antibody-mediated transplant rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Stuart J.; Kwun, Jean; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Belying the spectacular success of solid organ transplantation and improvements in immunosuppressive therapy is the reality that long-term graft survival rates remain relatively unchanged, in large part due to chronic and insidious alloantibody-mediated graft injury. Half of heart transplant recipients develop chronic rejection within 10 years — a daunting statistic, particularly for young patients expecting to achieve longevity by enduring the rigors of a transplant. The current immunosuppressive pharmacopeia is relatively ineffective in preventing late alloantibody-associated chronic rejection. In this issue of the JCI, Kelishadi et al. report that preemptive deletion of B cells prior to heart transplantation in cynomolgus monkeys, in addition to conventional posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine, markedly attenuated not only acute graft rejection but also alloantibody elaboration and chronic graft rejection. The success of this preemptive strike implies a central role for B cells in graft rejection, and this approach may help to delay or prevent chronic rejection after solid organ transplantation. PMID:20335653

  9. Prevention trumps treatment of antibody-mediated transplant rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Knechtle, Stuart J; Kwun, Jean; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Belying the spectacular success of solid organ transplantation and improvements in immunosuppressive therapy is the reality that long-term graft survival rates remain relatively unchanged, in large part due to chronic and insidious alloantibody-mediated graft injury. Half of heart transplant recipients develop chronic rejection within 10 years — a daunting statistic, particularly for young patients expecting to achieve longevity by enduring the rigors of a transplant. The current immunosuppre...

  10. Disappearance of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Despite Continued Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Late Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, Philip F; Chang, Jessica; Famulski, Konrad; Hidalgo, Luis G; Salazar, Israel D R; Merino Lopez, Maribel; Matas, Arthur; Picton, Michael; de Freitas, Declan; Bromberg, Jonathan; Serón, Daniel; Sellarés, Joana; Einecke, Gunilla; Reeve, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent renal transplant population presents an opportunity to observe the adaptive changes in the alloimmune response over time, but such studies have been limited by uncertainties in the conventional biopsy diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). To circumvent these limitations, we used microarrays and conventional methods to investigate rejection in 703 unselected biopsies taken 3 days to 35 years post-transplant from North American and European centers. Using conventional methods, we diagnosed rejection in 205 biopsy specimens (28%): 67 pure TCMR, 110 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (89 designated borderline). Using microarrays, we diagnosed rejection in 228 biopsy specimens (32%): 76 pure TCMR, 124 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (no borderline). Molecular assessment confirmed most conventional diagnoses (agreement was 90% for TCMR and 83% for ABMR) but revealed some errors, particularly in mixed rejection, and improved prediction of failure. ABMR was strongly associated with increased graft loss, but TCMR was not. ABMR became common in biopsy specimens obtained >1 year post-transplant and continued to appear in all subsequent intervals. TCMR was common early but progressively disappeared over time. In 108 biopsy specimens obtained 10.2-35 years post-transplant, TCMR defined by molecular and conventional features was never observed. We conclude that the main cause of kidney transplant failure is ABMR, which can present even decades after transplantation. In contrast, TCMR disappears by 10 years post-transplant, implying that a state of partial adaptive tolerance emerges over time in the kidney transplant population. PMID:25377077

  11. Low-Dose Rituximab Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Highly Sensitized Heart-Transplant Recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Aggarwal, Ashim; Pyle, Joseph; Hamilton, John; Bhat, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the B-cell–mediated production of immunoglobulin G antibody against the transplanted heart. The currently available therapies for antibody-mediated rejection have had marginal success, and chronic manifestations of rejection can result in an increased risk of graft vasculopathy and perhaps require repeat transplantation. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 receptor of B-lymphocytes and approved as therapy for lymphoma, can be used in heart...

  12. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs. PMID:26637661

  13. Coincidence of cellular and antibody mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients – preliminary report

    OpenAIRE

    Zakliczyński, Michał; Nożyński, Jerzy; Konecka-Mrówka, Dominika; Babińska, Agnieszka; Flak, Bożena; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) can significantly influence the results of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). However, AMR and cellular rejection (CR) coexistence is poorly described. Therefore we performed a prospective pilot study to assess AMR/CR concomitance in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) obtained electively in 27 OHT recipients (21 M/6 F, 45.4 ± 14.4 y/o). Biopsy samples were paraffin embedded and processed typically with hematoxylin/eosin staining to assess CR, and, if a suffi...

  14. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Kidney after Simultaneous Pancreas-Kidney Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, Julio; Samaniego, Milagros D.; Torrealba, José R.; Odorico, Jon S.; Djamali, Arjang; Becker, Yolanda T.; Voss, Barbara; Leverson, Glen E.; Knechtle, Stuart J.; Sollinger, Hans W.; Pirsch, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence, risk factors, and outcome of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of the kidney after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation are unknown. In 136 simultaneous pancreas-kidney recipients who were followed for an average of 3.1 yr, 21 episodes of AMR of the kidney allograft were identified. Eight episodes occurred early (≤90 d) after transplantation, and 13 occurred later. Histologic evidence of concomitant acute cellular rejection was noted in 12 cases; the other nine had evi...

  15. Long-term experience of plasmapheresis in antibody-mediated rejection in renal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brown, C M

    2009-11-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to pose a serious challenge in renal transplantation with potentially devastating consequences. Treatment options for this condition include plasmapheresis, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis with low-dose IVIG, and the use of rituximab (anti-CD20 chimeric antibody). We previously reported on the short-term outcome of plasmapheresis as a rescue therapy for AMR in our centre. We now report on the long-term follow up.

  16. Late antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation during Gram-negative sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The major challenge in ABO-incompatible transplantation is to minimize antibody-mediated rejection. Effective reduction of the anti-ABO blood group antibodies at the time of transplantation has made ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation a growing practice in our hospital and in centers worldwide. ABO antibodies result from contact with A- and B-like antigens in the intestines via nutrients and bacteria. We demonstrate a patient with fulminant antibody-mediated rejection late after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation, whose anti-A antibody titers rose dramatically following Serratia marcescens sepsis. Case presentation A 58-year-old woman underwent an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation for end-stage renal disease secondary to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. It concerned a blood group A1 to O donation. Pre-desensitization titers were 64 for anti-blood group A IgM and 32 for anti-blood group A IgG titers. Desensitization treatment consisted of rituximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids, immunoadsorption and intravenous immunoglobulines. She was readmitted to our hospital 11 weeks after transplantation for S. marcescens urosepsis. Her anti-A IgM titer rose to >5000 and she developed a fulminant antibody-mediated rejection. We hypothesized that the (overwhelming) presence in the blood of S. marcescens stimulated anti-A antibody formation, as S. marcescens might share epitopes with blood group A antigen. Unfortunately we could not demonstrate interaction between blood group A and S. marcescens in incubation experiments. Conclusion Two features of this post-transplant course are remarkably different from other reports of acute rejection in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation: first, the late occurrence 12 weeks after kidney transplantation and second, the very high anti-A IgM titers (>5000), suggesting recent boosting of anti-A antibody formation by S. marcescens. PMID:24517251

  17. Low-Dose Rituximab Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Highly Sensitized Heart-Transplant Recipient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ashim; Pyle, Joseph; Hamilton, John; Bhat, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the B-cell–mediated production of immunoglobulin G antibody against the transplanted heart. The currently available therapies for antibody-mediated rejection have had marginal success, and chronic manifestations of rejection can result in an increased risk of graft vasculopathy and perhaps require repeat transplantation. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 receptor of B-lymphocytes and approved as therapy for lymphoma, can be used in heart-transplant patients for the management of antibody-mediated rejection. We present the case of a 52-year-old woman with high allosensitization (pre-transplantation panel reactive antibody level, 72%) who underwent successful orthotopic heart transplantation. Postoperatively, her acute antibody-mediated rejection with concomitant cellular rejection was successfully treated with low-dose rituximab. The patient died 5 months later because of multiple other medical problems. The present case suggests a role for low-dose rituximab as therapy for antibody-mediated rejection in heart-transplant patients. PMID:23304051

  18. Chronic alloantibody mediated rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R. Neal; Colvin, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Alloantibodies clearly cause acute antibody mediated rejection, and all available evidence supports their pathogenic etiology in the development of chronic alloantibody mediated rejection (CAMR). But the slow evolution of this disease, the on-going immunosuppression, the variations in titer of alloantibodies, and variation in antigenic targets all complicate identifying which dynamic factors are most important clinically and pathologically. This review highlights the pathological factors rela...

  19. Antibody-mediated rejection: Importance of lactate dehydrogenase and neutrophilia in early diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taqi Toufeeq Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the importance of elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and neutrophilia (NT in two renal transplant recipients who developed renal impairment in the early post-operative period. One of our recipients developed oliguria and increased serum creatinine with unexplained elevation of LDH and NT. The biopsy was C4d positive with platelet and fibrin thrombi in the glomerular capillaries and arterioles and interpreted as acute vasculitis or thrombotic form of antibody-mediated rejection (VAMR with positive donor-specific antibodies (DSA. Despite intensive treatment, this graft was lost. When another patient developed a similar picture, prompt immunoadsorption was started without waiting for a confirmatory biopsy or DSA, and both were later reported as positive. Improvement in renal function was associated with decreasing levels of LDH and NT. Neither of these was elevated in cases of acute cellular rejection (ACR or antibody mediated rejection (AMR with isolated tubular injury (TAMR. It may therefore be reasonable to assume that LDH and NT are potential diagnostic and prognostic markers of VAMR.

  20. INTRAVENOUS IMMUNOGLOBULIN ADMINISTRATION FOR DESENSITIZATION BEFORE RENAL TRANSPLANTATION AND MANAGING ANTIBODY-MEDIATED REJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Sushkov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Much attention has been placed recently in transplantation in highly HLA-sensitized patients. In attempts to remove these antibodies and enable successful renal transplantation, several approaches have been developed. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG was found to be effective in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders (e. g. Kawasaki disease, Guillain-Barre syndrome. Recently, a beneficial effect of IVIG on the reduc- tion of anti-HLA antibodies was described. The anti-inflammatory effect of IVIG provides hopeful opportunities in antibody-mediated rejection (AMR management. There are several protocols of IVIG administration for pre-transplant desensitization and AMR treatment: high-dose IVIG, low-dose IVIG + plasmapheresis, IVIG + plasmapheresis + rituximab. These advancements have enabled transplantation in patients previously considered untransplantable and in concert with new diagnostic techniques has resulted in new approaches to management of AMR. 

  1. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Koefoed-Nielsen, Pernille; Bistrup, Claus

    2010-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated reje...... that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime.......ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody......-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest...

  2. Acute antibody-mediated rejection after AB0-incomptible kidney transplantation treated successfully with antigen-specific immunoadsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Søren Andreas; Marcussen, Niels; Sprogøe, Ulrik; Kofoed-Nielsen, Pernille Bundgaard; Bistrup, Claus

    2009-01-01

    ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody-mediated reje...... that ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation complicated by acute antibody-mediated rejection, caused by ABO antibodies, may successfully be treated with this regime.......ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is possible after pre-treatment with rituximab, intravenous immunoglobulin and basiliximab combined with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. We report on the first patient treated with this protocol who developed acute antibody......-mediated rejection (Banff grade II with IgG deposits) caused by ABO antibodies (anti-B). Anti-rejection treatment with anti-B-specific immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone efficiently cleared deposited IgG from the kidney allograft and re-established normal kidney function. We suggest...

  3. CHALLENGES IN TREATMENT OF RENAL GRAFT ACUTE ANTIBODY-MEDIATED REJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Sushkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic criteria and treatment protocols for acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR of kidney allograft remain controversial. We report the case of early severe AMR after primary kidney transplantation. The graft removal was considered in the absence of treatment efficacy and in the presence of systemic infl ammatory response syndrome. However, at surgery the graft looked normal and it was not removed. The repeated treatment course (plasmapheresis, antithymocyte globulin, intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab was effective. The patient has good and stable graft function in 1 year after transplantation. 

  4. Utility of Double Filtration Plasmapheresis in Acute Antibody Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection: Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın SOLAK

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasmapheresis is an extracorporeal procedure, which is often employed to rapidly lower circulating titers of autoantibodies, immune complexes or toxins. There are two types of plasmapheresis namely, regular plasmapheresis (RPP by centrifugation and membrane filtration, and double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP which is a special form of membrane filtration in which two membranes called as plasma separator and plasma fractionator are employed to filter macromolecules more selectively. DFPP have several advantages over RP. Despite widespread utilization of DFPP in the setting of ABO blood group incompatible kidney transplantation, there is no report regarding DFPP in patients with antibody mediated acute renal allograft rejection who are good candidates for beneficial effects of DFPP. Here we report three renal transplant recipients in whom DFPP was applied as a component of anti-rejection treatment regimen.

  5. De novo donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies mediated rejection in liver-transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Arnaud; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Danjoux, Marie; Muscari, Fabrice; Lavayssière, Laurence; Esposito, Laure; Cardeau-Desangles, Isabelle; Guitard, Joëlle; Dörr, Gaëlle; Milongo, David; Suc, Bertrand; Duffas, Jean Pierre; Alric, Laurent; Bureau, Christophe; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Rostaing, Lionel; Kamar, Nassim

    2015-12-01

    The incidence and consequences of de novo donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) after liver transplantation (LT) are not well known. We investigated the incidence, risk factors, and complications associated with de novo DSAs in this setting. A total of 152 de novo liver-transplant patients, without preformed anti-HLA DSAs, were tested for anti-HLA antibodies, with single-antigen bead technology, before, at transplantation, at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after transplantation, and thereafter annually and at each time they presented with increased liver-enzyme levels until the last follow-up, that is, 34 (1.5-77) months. Twenty-one patients (14%) developed de novo DSAs. Of these, five patients had C1q-binding DSAs (24%). Younger age, low exposure to calcineurin inhibitors, and noncompliance were predictive factors for de novo DSA formation. Nine of the 21 patients (43%) with de novo DSAs experienced an acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Positive C4d staining was more frequently observed in liver biopsies of patients with AMR (9/9 vs. 1/12, P < 0.0001). Eight patients received a B-cell targeting therapy, and one patient received polyclonal antibodies. Only one patient required retransplantation. Patient- and graft-survival rates did not differ between patients with and without DSAs. In conclusion, liver-transplant patients with liver abnormalities should be screened for DSAs and AMR. PMID:26303035

  6. The Diagnostic Value of Transcription Factors T-bet/GATA3 Ratio in Predicting Antibody-Mediated Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Xue Li; Qiquan Sun; Mingchao Zhang; Jinsong Chen; Zhihong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Background. Previous data showed that the predominance of intraglomerular T-bet or GATA3 is correlated with different mechanisms of rejection, suggesting that the ratio of T-bet/GATA3 might be used to distinguish antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) and T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). Methods. We compared the intraglomerular T-bet/GATA3 ratio in ABMR and TCMR. The intragraft expression of T-bet and GATA3 was studied via immunohistochemistry. The correlation of the diagnosis of AMR with the ra...

  7. Complement Inhibition for Prevention and Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Allograft Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic interventions aimed at the human complement system are recognized as potentially important strategies for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases because there is often evidence of complement-mediated injury according to pathologic assessments. In addition, there are a large number of potential targets, both soluble and cell bound, that might offer potential for new drug development, but progress in this area has met with significant challenges. Currently, 2 drugs are approved aimed at inhibition of complement activation. The first option is eculizumab (anti-C5), which is approved for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab has also been studied in human transplantation for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Initial data from uncontrolled studies suggested a significant benefit of eculizumab for the prevention of ABMR in highly HLA-sensitized patients, but a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled trial failed to meet its primary endpoint. Anecdotal data, primarily from case studies, showed benefits in treating complement-mediated ABMR. A second approved complement-inhibiting therapy is C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is approved for use in patients with hereditary angioedema, a condition caused by mutations in the gene that codes for C1-INH. A recent placebo-controlled trial of C1-INH for prevention of ABMR in HLA-sensitized patients found that the drug was safe, with evidence for inhibition of systemic complement activation and complement-activating donor-specific antibodies. Other drugs are now under development. PMID:27234741

  8. Better understanding of transplant glomerulopathy secondary to chronic antibody-mediated rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remport, Adam; Ivanyi, Bela; Mathe, Zoltan; Tinckam, Kathryn; Mucsi, Istvan; Molnar, Miklos Z

    2015-11-01

    Transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is generally accepted to result from repeated episodes of endothelial activation, injury and repair, leading to pathological abnormalities of double contouring or multi-layering of the glomerular basement membrane. TG is a major sequel of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (cABMR), from pre-existing or de novo anti-HLA antibodies. Hepatitis C infection, thrombotic microangiopathy or other factors may also contribute to TG development. TG prevalence is 5-20% in most series, reaching 55%, in some high-risk cohorts, and is associated with worse allograft outcomes. Despite its prevalence and clinical significance, few well-studied treatment options have been proposed. Similar to desensitization protocols, plasmapheresis with or without immunoabsorption, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, bortezomib and eculizumab have been proposed in the treatment of TG due to cABMR individually or in various combinations. Robust clinical trials are urgently needed to address this major cause of allograft loss. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, pathology, and the preventive and treatment options for TG secondary to cABMR. PMID:25473123

  9. Molecular microscope strategy to improve risk stratification in early antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Chang, Jessica; Hidalgo, Luis G; Beuscart, Thibaut; Verine, Jerome; Aubert, Olivier; Dubleumortier, Sébastien; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Halloran, Philip F

    2014-10-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the leading cause of kidney allograft loss. We investigated whether the addition of gene expression measurements to conventional methods could serve as a molecular microscope to identify kidneys with ABMR that are at high risk for failure. We studied 939 consecutive kidney recipients at Necker Hospital (2004-2010; principal cohort) and 321 kidney recipients at Saint Louis Hospital (2006-2010; validation cohort) and assessed patients with ABMR in the first 1 year post-transplant. In addition to conventional features, we assessed microarray-based gene expression in transplant biopsy specimens using relevant molecular measurements: the ABMR Molecular Score and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcript set. The main outcomes were kidney transplant loss and progression to chronic transplant injury. We identified 74 patients with ABMR in the principal cohort and 54 patients with ABMR in the validation cohort. Conventional features independently associated with failure were donor age and humoral histologic score (g+ptc+v+cg+C4d). Adjusting for conventional features, ABMR Molecular Score (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 3.58; P=0.001) and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcripts (HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 9.16; Pimproved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.46; Pimprovement, 0.16; Pimproves stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss. PMID:24700874

  10. Coincidence of cellular and antibody mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients – preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nożyński, Jerzy; Konecka-Mrówka, Dominika; Babińska, Agnieszka; Flak, Bożena; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) can significantly influence the results of orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). However, AMR and cellular rejection (CR) coexistence is poorly described. Therefore we performed a prospective pilot study to assess AMR/CR concomitance in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) obtained electively in 27 OHT recipients (21 M/6 F, 45.4 ± 14.4 y/o). Biopsy samples were paraffin embedded and processed typically with hematoxylin/eosin staining to assess CR, and, if a sufficient amount of material remained, treated with immunohistochemical methods to localize particles C3d and C4d as markers of antibody dependent complement activation. With this approach 80 EMBs, including 41 (51%) harvested within the first month after OHT, were qualified for the study. Among them 14 (18%) were C3d+, 37 (46%) were C4d+, and 12 (15%) were both C3d and C4d positive. At least one C3d+, C4d+, and C3d/C4d+ EMB was found in 10 (37%), 17 (63%), and 8 (30%) patients, respectively. Among 37 CR0 EMBs C3d was observed in 4 (11%), C4d in 17 (46%), and both C3d/C4d in 3 (8%) cases. Among 28 CR1 EMBs C3d was observed in 3 (11%), C4d in 11 (39%), and C3d/C4d in 3 (11%) cases. Among 15 CR2 EMBs C3d was observed in 7 (47%), C4d in 9 (60%), and C3d/C4d in 6 (40%) cases. Differences in C3d and C3d/C4d occurrence between grouped CR0-1 EMBs and CR2 EMBs (7/65 – 11% vs. 7/15 – 47%; 6/65 – 9% vs. 6/15 – 40%) were significant (p = 0.0035 and p = 0.0091, respectively, χ2 test). In conclusion, apparently frequent CR and AMR coexistence demonstrated in this preliminary study warrants further investigation in this field. PMID:26336395

  11. Effectiveness of Intravenous Immunoglobulin Plus Plasmapheresis on Antibody-mediated Rejection or Thrombotic Microangiopathy in Iranian Kidney Transplant Recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Shojaie, Lida; Hosni, Amin; Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Atefeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibody mediated rejection (AMR) and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after kidney transplantation are difficult to differentiate most of the times and both play important roles in kidney allograft loss. Common treatment strategies of these two conditions include plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and rituximab. Objectives: This study was designed to assess the efficacy of routine treatment of AMR/TMA in Iranian kidney transplant recipients, which comprises of plas...

  12. Outcome of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with preformed donor-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupy, A; Suberbielle-Boissel, C; Hill, G S; Lefaucheur, C; Anglicheau, D; Zuber, J; Martinez, F; Thervet, E; Méjean, A; Charron, D; Duong van Huyen, J P; Bruneval, P; Legendre, C; Nochy, D

    2009-11-01

    This study describes clinical relevance of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (SAMR) in a cohort of 54 DSA-positive kidney transplant recipients receiving a deceased donor. In 3 months screening biopsies, 31.1% of patients met the criteria of SAMR. A total of 48.9% had an incomplete form of SAMR (g+/ptc+/C4d-negative) whereas 20% had no humoral lesions. Patients with SAMR at 3 months had at 1 year: a higher C4d score, ptc score, and arteriosclerosis score, higher rate of IFTA (100% vs. 33.3%, p SAMR. Patients with SAMR at 3 months exhibited at 1 year a higher class II MFImax-DSA and a lower mGFR compared to patients without SAMR (39.2 +/- 13.9 vs. 61.9 +/- 19.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) respectively, p SAMR at 3 months developed more ptc and IFTA lesions, and lower GFR at 1 year in comparison to biopsies without humoral lesions. SAMR is a frequent entity in KTR with preexisting DSAs and promotes subsequent GFR impairment and development of chronic AMR. C4d-negative SAMR patients displayed an intermediate course between the no-SAMR group and the C4d+ SAMR group. Screening biopsies may be useful to recognize patients more likely to develop SAMR. PMID:19775320

  13. A refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Toshinari; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Yamada, Hiroki; Miki, Jun; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We herein report a refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient. A 45-year-old man was admitted for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 1.8 mg/dL 3 years following primary kidney transplantation. Histological examination revealed moderate to severe inflammatory cell infiltration in the peritubular capillaries. Thorough laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to DR9 and DQ9. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed acute antibody-mediated rejection. The patient underwent 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange. We also administered rituximab (200 mg/body). Six months after the treatment, a second allograft biopsy revealed the progression of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and persistence of mild peritubular capillaritis. Further analysis showed that the anti-DR9 antibodies had disappeared, but that the mean fluorescence intensity value of the anti-DQ9 antibodies had increased. Therefore, we repeated the plasma exchange and IVIG. Allograft function was stable throughout the course of treatment, and the S-Cr level remained at 1.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of treating AMR due to the presence of anti-DQ DSAbs and the necessity for subsequent therapies in refractory cases. PMID:26031594

  14. Eculizumab Salvage Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Desensitization-Resistant Intestinal Re-Transplant Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Tryphonopoulos, P; Tekin, A; Nishida, S; Selvaggi, G; Amador, A; Jebrock, J; Weppler, D; Levi, D; Vianna, R; Ruiz, P; Tzakis, A

    2015-07-01

    The presence of elevated calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) and anti-HLA donor specific antibodies (DSA) are high risk factors for acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR) in intestinal transplantation that may lead to graft loss. Eculizumab has been used for the treatment of AAMR in kidney transplantation of sensitized patients that do not respond to other treatment. Here, we report a case where eculizumab was used to treat AAMR in a desensitization-resistant intestinal re-transplant patient. A male patient lost his intestinal graft to AAMR 8.14 years after his primary transplant. He received a second intestinal graft that had to be explanted a month later due to refractory AAMR. The patient remained highly sensitized despite multiple treatments. He received a multivisceral graft and presented with severe AAMR on day 3 posttransplantation. The AAMR was successfully treated with eculizumab. The patient presently maintains an elevated cPRA level above 90% but his DSAs have decreased from 18 000 MFI (mean fluorescent intensity) to below the positive cut-off value of 3000 MFI and remains rejection free with a 2-year follow-up since his multivisceral transplant. Eculizumab offers an alternative to treat AAMR in intestinal transplantation in desensitization-resistant patients. PMID:25649227

  15. Bortezomib in late antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (BORTEJECT Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite major advances in transplant medicine, improvements in long-term kidney allograft survival have not been commensurate with those observed shortly after transplantation. The formation of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and ongoing antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) processes may critically contribute to late graft loss. However, appropriate treatment for late AMR has not yet been defined. There is accumulating evidence that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may substantially affect the function and integrity of alloantibody-secreting plasma cells. The impact of this agent on the course of late AMR has not so far been systematically investigated. Methods/design The BORTEJECT Study is a randomized controlled trial designed to clarify the impact of intravenous bortezomib on the course of late AMR. In this single-center study (nephrological outpatient service, Medical University Vienna) we plan an initial cross-sectional DSA screening of 1,000 kidney transplant recipients (functioning graft at ≥180 days; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >20 ml/minute/1.73 m2). DSA-positive recipients will be subjected to kidney allograft biopsy to detect morphological features consistent with AMR. Forty-four patients with biopsy-proven AMR will then be included in a double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial (1:1 randomization stratified for eGFR and the presence of T-cell-mediated rejection). Patients in the active group will receive two cycles of bortezomib (4 × 1.3 mg/m2 over 2 weeks; 3-month interval between cycles). The primary end point will be the course of eGFR over 24 months (intention-to-treat analysis). The sample size was calculated according to the assumption of a 5 ml/minute/1.73 m2 difference in eGFR slope (per year) between the two groups (alpha: 0.05; power: 0.8). Secondary endpoints will be DSA levels, protein excretion, measured glomerular filtration rate, transplant and patient survival, and the development of

  16. The 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Working Formulation for the standardization of nomenclature in the pathologic diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berry, Gerald J; Burke, Margaret M; Andersen, Claus Yding;

    2013-01-01

    During the last 25 years, antibody-mediated rejection of the cardiac allograft has evolved from a relatively obscure concept to a recognized clinical complication in the management of heart transplant patients. Herein we report the consensus findings from a series of meetings held between 2010...

  17. Rapid Reduction in Donor-Specific Anti-Human Leukocyte Antigen Antibodies and Reversal of Antibody-Mediated Rejection With Bortezomib in Pediatric Heart Transplant Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, William Robert; Frazier, Elizabeth A.; Mahle, William T.; Harville, Terry O.; Pye, Sherry E.; Knecht, Kenneth R.; Howard, Emily L.; Smith, R. Neal; Saylors, Robert L.; Garcia, Xiomara; Jaquiss, Robert D.B.; Woodle, E. Steve

    2013-01-01

    Background High titer donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and positive crossmatch in cardiac transplant recipients is associated with increased mortality from antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Although treatment to reduce antihuman leukocyte antigen antibodies using plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab has been reported to be beneficial, in practice these are often ineffective. Moreover, these interventions do not affect the mature antibody producing plasma cell. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor active against plasma cells, has been shown to reduce DSA in renal transplant patients with AMR. We report here the first use of bortezomib for cardiac transplant recipients in four pediatric heart recipients with biopsy-proven AMR, hemodynamic compromise, positive crossmatch, and high titer class I DSA. Methods Patients received four intravenous dose of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2) over 2 weeks with plasmapheresis and rituximab. DSA specificity and strength (mean fluorescence intensity) was determined with Luminex. All had received previous treatment with plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab that was ineffective. Results AMR resolved in all patients treated with bortezomib with improvement in systolic function, conversion of biopsy to C4d negative in three patients and IgG negative in one patient, and a prompt, precipitous reduction in DSAs. In three patients who received plasmapheresis before bortezomib, plasmapheresis failed to reduce DSA. In one case, DSA increased after bortezomib but decreased after retreatment. Conclusions Bortezomib reduces DSA and may be an important adjunct to treatment of AMR in cardiac transplant recipients. Bortezomib may also be useful in desensitization protocols and in prevention of AMR in sensitized patients with positive crossmatch and elevated DSA. PMID:22179403

  18. Persistent strong anti-HLA antibody at high titer is complement binding and associated with increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplant recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, Adriana; Lunz, John; Feingold, Brian; Shullo, Michael; Bermudez, Christian; Teuteberg, Jeffery; Webber, Steven

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sensitized heart transplant candidates are evaluated for donor-specific anti-HLA IgG antibody (DSA) by Luminex single-antigen bead (SAB) testing (SAB-IgG) to determine donor suitability and help predict a positive complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDC-XM) by virtual crossmatching (VXM). However, SAB testing used for VXM does not correlate perfectly with CDC-XM results and individual transplant programs have center-specific permissible thresholds to predict crossmatch positivity. A novel Luminex SAB-based assay detecting C1q-binding HLA antibodies (SAB-C1q) contributes functional information to SAB testing, but the relationship between SAB strength and complement-binding ability is unclear. METHODS In this retrospective study, we identified 15 pediatric and adult heart allograft candidates with calculated panel-reactive antibody (cPRA) >50% by SAB-IgG and compared conventional SAB-IgG results with SAB-C1q testing. RESULTS Pre- and post-transplant DSA by SAB-C1q correlated with DSA by SAB-IgG and also with CDC-XM results and early post-transplant endomyocardial biopsy findings. Individual HLA antibodies by SAB-IgG in undiluted sera correlated poorly with SAB-C1q; however, when sera were diluted 1:16, SAB-IgG results were well correlated with SAB-C1q. In some sera, HLA antibodies with low mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) by SAB-IgG exhibited high SAB-C1q MFIs for the same HLA antigens. Diluting or heat-treating these sera increased SAB-IgG MFI, consistent with SAB-C1q results. In 13 recipients, SAB-C1q–positive DSA was associated with positive CDC-XM and with early clinical post-transplant antibody-mediated rejection (cAMR). CONCLUSIONS Risk assessment for positive CDC-XM and early cAMR in sensitized heart allograft recipients are correlated with SAB-C1q reactivity. PMID:23142561

  19. C1 Inhibitor in Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection Nonresponsive to Conventional Therapy in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglietti, D; Gosset, C; Loupy, A; Deville, L; Verine, J; Zeevi, A; Glotz, D; Lefaucheur, C

    2016-05-01

    Complement inhibitors have not been thoroughly evaluated in the treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). We performed a prospective, single-arm pilot study to investigate the potential effects and safety of C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) Berinert added to high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the treatment of acute ABMR that is nonresponsive to conventional therapy. Kidney recipients with nonresponsive active ABMR and acute allograft dysfunction were enrolled between April 2013 and July 2014 and received C1-INH and IVIG for 6 months (six patients). The primary end point was the change in eGFR at 6 months after inclusion (M+6). Secondary end points included the changes in histology and DSA characteristics and adverse events as evaluated at M+6. All patients showed an improvement in eGFR between inclusion and M+6: from 38.7 ± 17.9 to 45.2 ± 21.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.0277). There was no change in histological features, except a decrease in the C4d deposition rate from 5/6 to 1/6 (p = 0.0455). There was a change in DSA C1q status from 6/6 to 1/6 positive (p = 0.0253). One deep venous thrombosis was observed. In a secondary analysis, C1-INH patients were compared with a similar historical control group (21 patients). C1-INH added to IVIG is safe and may improve allograft function in kidney recipients with nonresponsive acute ABMR. PMID:26693703

  20. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Presence of MICA-DSA and Successful Renal Re-Transplant with Negative-MICA Virtual Crossmatch

    OpenAIRE

    MING, YINGZI; Hu, Juan; Luo, Qizhi; Ding, Xiang; Luo, Weiguang; Zhuang, Quan; Zou, Yizhou

    2015-01-01

    The presence of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) against the MICA antigen results in high risk for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of a transplanted kidney, especially in patients receiving a re-transplant. We describe the incidence of acute C4d+ AMR in a patient who had received a first kidney transplant with a zero HLA antigen mismatch. Retrospective analysis of post-transplant T and B cell crossmatches were negative, but a high level of MICA alloantibody was detected in sera collecte...

  1. Post-Transplant Membranous Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Active Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Hepatitis C Infection after Deceased Donor Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doke, Tomohito; Sato, Waichi; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Sigehisa; Sasaki, Hitomi; Kusaka, Mamoru; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Hoshinaga, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Asami; Yuzawa, Yukio; Hasegawa, Midori

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone deceased donor kidney transplantation twice, at 35 and 43 years of age, presented with renal impairment. She was infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The histology of the graft kidney revealed post-transplant membranous nephropathy (MN) with podocytic infolding and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). IgG subclass staining showed fine granular deposits of IgG1 and IgG3, but not IgG4, in the glomerular capillary walls. Panel reactive antibody scores for human leukocyte antigen class I and class II were 92.67% and 66.68%, respectively. Thus, this case of post-transplanted MN was considered to be associated with AMR and HCV infection. PMID:26875963

  2. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Heart in the Setting of Autoimmune Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J. Lindley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is caused by the production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA which lead to allograft injury in part via complement activation. The inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (IDP are inflammatory disorders of the nervous system, involving both cellular and humoral immune mechanisms directed against myelin. Case Report. A 58-year-old man five years after heart transplant presented with progressive dyspnea, imbalance, dysphagia, and weakness. Nerve conduction studies and electromyogram were consistent with IDP. Plasmapheresis and high-dose steroids resulted in improvement in neurologic symptoms. Within two weeks, he was readmitted with anasarca and acute renal failure, requiring intravenous furosemide and inotropic support. Echocardiogram and right heart catheterization revealed reduced cardiac function and elevated filling pressures. DSA was positive against HLA DR53, and endomyocardial biopsy revealed grade 1R chronic inflammation, with strong capillary endothelial immunostaining for C4d. Plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG were initiated. His anasarca and renal failure subsequently resolved, echocardiogram showed improved function off inotropes, and anti-DR53 MFI was reduced by 57%. Conclusions. This is an example of a single immune-mediated process causing concurrent IDP and AMR. The improvement in cardiac function and neurologic symptoms with plasmapheresis, IVIG, and high-dose steroids argues for a unifying antibody-mediated mechanism.

  3. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  4. HLA-C antibodies in women with recurrent miscarriage suggests that antibody mediated rejection is one of the mechanisms leading to recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuleman, T; van Beelen, E; Kaaja, R J; van Lith, J M M; Claas, F H J; Bloemenkamp, K W M

    2016-08-01

    HLA-C is the only polymorphic classical HLA I antigen expressed on trophoblast cells. It is known that higher incidence of C4d deposition on trophoblast cells is present in women with recurrent miscarriage. C4d is a footprint of antibody-mediated classical complement activation. Therefore, this study hypothesize that antibodies against HLA-C may play a role in the occurrence of unexplained consecutive recurrent miscarriage. Present case control study compared the incidence of HLA-C specific antibodies in 95 women with at least three consecutive miscarriages and 105 women with uneventful pregnancy. In the first trimester of the next pregnancy, presence and specificity of HLA antibodies were determined and their complement fixing ability. The incidence of HLA antibodies was compared with uni- and multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for possible confounders. Although in general a higher incidence of HLA antibodies was found in women with recurrent miscarriage 31.6% vs. in control subjects 9.5% (adjusted OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.0-9.5), the contribution of antibodies against HLA-C was significantly higher in women with recurrent miscarriage (9.5%) compared to women with uneventful pregnancy (1%) (adjusted OR 11.0, 95% CI 1.3-89.0). In contrast to the control group, HLA-C antibodies in the recurrent miscarriage group were more often able to bind complement. The higher incidence of antibodies specific for HLA-C in women with recurrent miscarriage suggests that HLA-C antibodies may be involved in the aetiology of unexplained consecutive recurrent miscarriage. PMID:27172837

  5. Expression of miR-142-5p in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Renal Transplant Patients with Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danger, Richard; Paul, Chloé; Giral, Magali; Lavault, Amélie; Foucher, Yohann; Degauque, Nicolas; Pallier, Annaïck; Durand, Maxim; Castagnet, Stéphanie; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Delahousse, Michel; Renaudin, Karine; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    In renal transplantation, the unresponsiveness of patients undergoing chronic antibody mediated rejection (CAMR) to classical treatment stress on the need for accurate biomarkers to improve its diagnosis. We aim to determine whether microRNA expression patterns may be associated with a diagnosis of CAMR. We performed expression profiling of miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of kidney transplant recipients with CAMR or stable graft function. Among 257 expressed miRNAs, 10 miRNAs associated with CAMR were selected. Among them, miR-142-5p was increased in PBMC and biopsies of patients with CAMR as well as in a rodent model of CAMR. The lack of modulation of miR-142-5p in PBMC of patients with renal failure, suggests that its over-expression in CAMR was associated with immunological disorders rather than renal dysfunction. A ROC curve analysis performed on independent samples showed that miR-142-5p is a potential biomarker of CAMR allowing a very good discrimination of the patients with CAMR (AUC = 0.74; p = 0.0056). Moreover, its expression was decreased in PHA-activated blood cells and was not modulated in PBMC from patients with acute rejection, excluding a non-specific T cell activation expression. The absence of modulation of this miRNA in immunosuppressed patients suggests that its expression was not influenced by treatment. Finally, the analysis of miR-142-5p predicted targets under-expressed in CAMR PBMC in a published microarray dataset revealed an enrichment of immune-related genes. Altogether, these data suggest that miR-142-5p could be used as a biomarker in CAMR and these finding may improve our understanding of chronic rejection mechanisms. PMID:23577151

  6. SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION OF PERIPHERAL VENO-ARTERIAL EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION FOR CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT ANTIBODY-MEDIATED REJECTION WITH SEVERE HEMODYNAMIC COMPROMISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is one of the severe complications of early and late period after heart transplantation (HT. Only few case reports and studies presented of mechanical circulatory support (MCS application for refractory acute rejection causing hemodynamic compromise. Aim. We report the case of a woman with cardiogenic shock caused by severe AMR that was successfully treatment by peripheral venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO. Material and methods. In december 2014, a 60-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy was operated for HT. The patient had a good initial cardiac allograft function and no and was discharged from ICU on the 4th day after HT. 1st endomyocardial biopsy (EMB (the 7th day after HT showed absence of acute cellular and antibody-mediated rejection. On the 11th day after HT patient aggravated and presented clinical signs of life-threatening acute cardiac allograft dysfunction: arterial blood pressure 78/49/38 mm Hg, HR 111 in min, CVP 20 mm Hg, PAP 47/34/25 mm Hg, PCWP 25 mm Hg, CI 1.5 l/min/m2, adrenalin 110 ng/kg/min, dopamine 15 mcg/kg/min. ECG showed impairment of systolic left (LVEF 25% and right (RVEF 15% ventricle function, left and right ventricle diffuse hypokinesis, thickness of IVS, LV and RV wall 1.7, 1.4 and 0.8 cm, tricuspid and mitral valve regurgitation 2–3 degrees. EMB presented AMR. In conscience peripheral VA ECMO was installed. We used peripheral transcutaneous cannulation technique via femoral vessels – arterial cannula 15 F, venous cannula – 23 F, vascular catheter 14 G for anterograde leg’s perfusion. ACT 130–150 sec. AMR therapy included: methylprednisolon pulse-therapy (10 mg/kg for 5 day, IgG, plasmapheresis (No 7, rituximab. Results. Under MCS by VA ECMO we noted quick improvement of hemodynamic, metabolic homeostasis and organ functions. On the 6th day of VA ECMO (blood flow 1.8 l/min: arterial blood pressure 133/81/54 mm Hg, CVP 5 mm

  7. INCREASED ERYTHROCYTE C4D IS ASSOCIATED WITH KNOWN ALLOANTIBODY AND AUTOANTIBODY MARKERS OF ANTIBODY MEDIATED REJECTION IN HUMAN LUNG TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golocheikine, Angali; Nath, Dilip S.; Basha, Haseeb Ilias; Saini, Deepti; Phelan, Donna; Aloush, Aviva; Trulock, Elbert P.; Hachem, Ramsey R.; Patterson, G.Alexander; Ahearn, Joseph M.; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour

    2009-01-01

    Background Immune responses to mismatched donor HLA antigens play a significant role in the pathogenesis of chronic rejection. The study objective was to evaluate whether erythrocyte bound C4d (E-C4d) is associated with known alloimmune and autoimmune markers of antibody mediated rejection (AMR) following human lung transplantation (LTx). Methods 22 LTx recipients and 15 normal subjects were analyzed for E-C4d using flow cytometry. Development of antibodies (Abs) to donor mismatched HLA (DSA) and Abs to HLA were determined using solid phase method by Luminex. Development of Abs to self-antigens, K-alpha-1-tubulin (KA1T) and collagen V (Col-V) were measured by ELISA. C3d deposition in lung biopsies was determined by immunohistochemical staining. Results Percent E-C4d (%E-C4d) levels in LTx patients were higher compared to normal subjects (19.9% vs. 3.7%, p = 0.02). DSA+ patients had higher E-C4d levels compared to DSA- patients (34.1% vs. 16.7%, p = 0.02). In 5 patients with preformed anti-HLA, E-C4d levels were not significantly different compared to 13 patients with no detectable anti-HLA (p=0.1). Higher E-C4d levels were noted in patients who developed Abs to KA1T (p = 0.02) and Col-V (p = 0.03). Recipients with C3d tissue deposition had higher E-C4d levels compared to patients with C3d negative biopsy results (p = 0.01). Conclusions Increased % E-C4d levels are found in patients with positive DSA, high Abs titers to KA1T and Col-V, and have C3d positive lung biopsy findings. Therefore, % E-C4d can serve as a potential marker for AMR following LTx. PMID:20022265

  8. Early Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection of a Negative Flow Crossmatch 3rd Kidney Transplant with Exclusive Disparity at HLA-DP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewska, Beata; Schroder, Paul M.; Baum, Caitlin E.; Blair, Annette; Smith, Connie; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Marrari, Marilyn; Gohara, Amira; Malhotra, Deepak; Kaw, Dinkar; Liwski, Robert; Rees, Michael A.; Stepkowski, Stanislaw

    2014-01-01

    Donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) to HLA-DP may cause antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), especially in re-transplants. We describe the immunization history of a patient who received 3 kidney transplants; the 3rd kidney was completely matched except at DPA1 and DPB1. Prior to the 3rd transplant, single antigen bead analysis (SAB) showed DSA reactivity against DPA1 shared by the 1st and 3rd donors, but B and T flow crossmatch (FXM) results were negative. Within 11 days the 3rd transplant underwent acute C4d+ AMR which coincided with the presence of complement (C1q)-binding IgG1 DSA against donor DPA1 and DPB1. Using HLAMatchmaker and SAB, we provide evidence that eplet (epitope) spreading on DPA1 and eplet sharing on differing DPB1 alleles of the 1st and 3rd transplants was associated with AMR. Since weak DSA to DPA1/DPB1 may induce acute AMR with negative FXM, donor DPA1/DPB1 high resolution typing should be considered in sensitized patients with DP-directed DSA. PMID:24755353

  9. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Presence of MICA-DSA and Successful Renal Re-Transplant with Negative-MICA Virtual Crossmatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yingzi; Hu, Juan; Luo, Qizhi; Ding, Xiang; Luo, Weiguang; Zhuang, Quan; Zou, Yizhou

    2015-01-01

    The presence of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs) against the MICA antigen results in high risk for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of a transplanted kidney, especially in patients receiving a re-transplant. We describe the incidence of acute C4d+ AMR in a patient who had received a first kidney transplant with a zero HLA antigen mismatch. Retrospective analysis of post-transplant T and B cell crossmatches were negative, but a high level of MICA alloantibody was detected in sera collected both before and after transplant. The DSA against the first allograft mismatched MICA*018 was in the recipient. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests with five samples of freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells demonstrated the alloantibody nature of patient’s MICA-DSA. Prior to the second transplant, a MICA virtual crossmatch and T and B cell crossmatches were used to identify a suitable donor. The patient received a second kidney transplant, and allograft was functioning well at one-year follow-up. Our study indicates that MICA virtual crossmatch is important in selection of a kidney donor if the recipient has been sensitized with MICA antigens. PMID:26024219

  10. Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Presence of MICA-DSA and Successful Renal Re-Transplant with Negative-MICA Virtual Crossmatch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzi Ming

    Full Text Available The presence of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSAs against the MICA antigen results in high risk for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR of a transplanted kidney, especially in patients receiving a re-transplant. We describe the incidence of acute C4d+ AMR in a patient who had received a first kidney transplant with a zero HLA antigen mismatch. Retrospective analysis of post-transplant T and B cell crossmatches were negative, but a high level of MICA alloantibody was detected in sera collected both before and after transplant. The DSA against the first allograft mismatched MICA*018 was in the recipient. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity tests with five samples of freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells demonstrated the alloantibody nature of patient's MICA-DSA. Prior to the second transplant, a MICA virtual crossmatch and T and B cell crossmatches were used to identify a suitable donor. The patient received a second kidney transplant, and allograft was functioning well at one-year follow-up. Our study indicates that MICA virtual crossmatch is important in selection of a kidney donor if the recipient has been sensitized with MICA antigens.

  11. Antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible pediatric living donor liver transplantation for propionic acidemia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masaki; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Sakamoto, Rieko; Matsumoto, Shirou; Irie, Tomoaki; Uchida, Koushi; Shimata, Keita; Kawabata, Seiichi; Isono, Kaori; Hayashida, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Endo, Fumio; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2016-09-01

    We herein present the case of a four-yr-old boy with PA who developed AMR after ABO-incompatible LDLT despite undergoing B cell desensitization using rituximab. Although the CD19+ lymphocyte count decreased to 0.1% nine days after the administration of rituximab, he developed a high fever which was accompanied by arthralgia due to a streptococcal infection 13 days after rituximab prophylaxis. After the clearance of the infection, he underwent ABO-incompatible LDLT 36 days after the administration of rituximab. The CD19+ lymphocyte count just prior to LDLT was 1.2%. He developed AMR five days after LDLT, and the antidonor-type IgM and IgG antibody titers increased to 1:1024 and 1:1024, respectively. He was treated by plasma exchange, IVIG, steroid pulse therapy, and rituximab re-administration; however, his liver dysfunction continued. Despite intensive treatment, he died due to complicated abdominal hernia, acute renal failure, and ARDS. This case suggests that a streptococcal infection may induce the activation of innate immune responses; thus, additional desensitization therapy should be considered prior to ABO-incompatible LDLT if B cell reactivation is suspected. PMID:27436684

  12. The Effect of Combination Therapy with Rituximab and Intravenous Immunoglobulin on the Progression of Chronic Antibody Mediated Rejection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jintak; Khvan, Marina; Park, Cheol Whee; Choi, Yeong Jin; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo

    2014-01-01

    The treatment for chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR) remains controversial. We investigated the efficacy of rituximab (RTX) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) for CAMR. Eighteen patients with CAMR were treated with RTX (375 mg/m2) and IVIg (0.4 g/kg) for 4 days. The efficacy of RTX/IVIg combination therapy (RIT) was assessed by decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate per month (ΔeGFR) before and after RIT. Patients were divided into responder and nonresponder groups based on decrease and no decrease in ΔeGFR, respectively, and their clinical and histological characteristics were compared. Response rate to RIT was 66.7% (12/18), and overall ΔeGFR decreased significantly to 0.4 ± 1.7 mL·min−1·1.73 m−2 per month 6 months after RIT compared to that observed 6 months before RIT (1.8 ± 1.0, P < 0.05). Clinical and histological features between the 12 responders and the 6 nonresponders were not significantly different, but nonresponders had a significantly higher proteinuria levels at the time of RIT (2.5 ± 2.5 versus 7.0 ± 3.5 protein/creatinine (g/g), P < 0.001). The effect of the RIT on ΔeGFR had dissipated in all patients by 1 year post-RIT. Thus, RIT delayed CAMR progression, and baseline proteinuria level was a prognostic factor for response to RIT. PMID:24741626

  13. The Perfect Storm: HLA Antibodies, Complement, FcγRs and Endothelium in Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kimberly A.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in solid organ transplants is multi-faceted and predominantly caused by antibodies directed against polymorphic donor human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Despite the clearly detrimental impact of HLA antibodies (HLA-Ab) on graft function and survival, the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of AMR remain a challenge. Histological manifestations of AMR reflect signatures of HLA-Ab-triggered injury, specifically endothelial changes, recipient leukocytic infiltrate, and complement deposition. We review the interconnected mechanisms of HLA-Ab-mediated injury that might synergize in a “perfect storm” of inflammation. Characterization of antibody features that are critical for effector functions may help identify HLA-Ab more likely to cause rejection. We also highlight recent advancements that may pave the way for new, more effective therapeutics. PMID:25801125

  14. Chronic Renal Allograft Dysfunction Antibody-Mediated: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Salvadori,

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the most important studies on chronic antibody-mediated rejection (cABMR, which is an important cause of late graft dysfunction after renal transplantation. Several antibodies seem to be responsible for chronic rejection; new techniques have allowed us to identify these antibodies in circulation. The pathogenetic role of the antibodies generally includes the complement pathway, but may also be complement-independent. This paper also examines the pathogenesis of chronic endothelial lesions, as well as the histopathological aspects. Antibodies responsible for chronic rejection may preexist before transplantation or may develop after transplantation. The possible therapeutic approaches are poor and principally based on early identification and desensitisation techniques. New B cell targeting drugs are aimed at an improved control of the relevant condition.

  15. Acute Rejection Associated with Donor-Specific Anti-MICA Antibody in a Highly Sensitized Pediatric Renal Transplant Recipient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Shoba; Tsai, Eileen W.; Zhang, Qiuheng; Wallace, William D.; Reed, Elaine F.; Ettenger, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Allograft rejection in HLA identical transplant recipients and in patients without detectable donor specific anti-HLA antibodies has lead to the identification of non-HLA antigens as targets of the alloimmune response. Major Histocompatibility Complex class I-related chain A (MICA) antigen has been recognized as an important non-HLA target in renal transplantation. Recent studies have shown that anti-MICA antibodies are associated with acute renal allograft rejection and failure. Current cross match procedures using donor lymphocytes fail to detect MICA antibodies. Transplant candidates are not routinely tested for pre-sensitization to MICA antigens nor are transplant donors typed for MICA alleles. Optimal classification and treatment of acute rejection associated with MICA antibody remains unknown. In this case report, we are the first to describe the clinical course and treatment of donor specific MICA antibody associated with both Banff type II A acute cellular rejection (ACR) and antibody mediated rejection (AMR) in a highly sensitized pediatric renal re-transplant recipient. This case also emphasizes the importance of pre-transplant screening for donor specific MICA antibody especially in highly sensitized renal transplant patients.. PMID:21199204

  16. Molecular phenotyping of T cell-mediated rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Anita S.; Perkins, David L.

    2014-01-01

    A new study has reported a molecular signature of T cell-mediated rejection in human kidney transplant biopsy samples that is enriched for effector T cells, interferon-γ and macrophages. Inhibitors of T cell activation, such as CTLA4 and PDL1, were also prominent, raising the possibility that these immunological constrains could be harnessed by therapies for treating rejection.

  17. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy does not Abrogate Rejection Risk in Renal Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are being increasingly used as therapeutic agents in medicine. Rituximab (anti-CD20) and Daclizumab (anti-IL2Rα) are two such monoclonal antibodies used to prevent organ rejection, but are not fail-safe. We have analyzed the pre and post-transplant antibody profile in serum of renal transplant recipients receiving Rituximab and /or Daclizumab. Study Group: Kidney recipients with acute rejection and having PRA > 10% pre-transplant were selected for the study (n=11). Those...

  18. Harmful Effect of Anti-Class II Antibodies in Kidney Transplant Patients who Experienced an Acute Rejection Episode

    OpenAIRE

    Berthou, F.; Absi, L.; Mariat, C; Alamartine, E.; M. Phayphet

    2006-01-01

    The presence of anti-lymphocytes antibodies is associated with the occurrence of acute rejection after kidney transplantation but few is known on their role after the rejection episode. We conducted a retrospective study in kidney transplant recipients who experienced a biopsy proven acute rejection episode to analyse the influence of anti-lymphocytes antibodies on clinical outcome. Anti-lymphocytes antibodies were detected before and after transplantation and characterized for isotype, class...

  19. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. PMID:26104192

  20. Cutting edge: membrane lymphotoxin regulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated intestinal allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z; Wang, J; Meng, L; Wu, Q; Kim, O; Hart, J; He, G; Zhou, P; Thistlethwaite, J R; Alegre, M L; Fu, Y X; Newell, K A

    2001-11-01

    Blocking the CD28/B7 and/or CD154/CD40 costimulatory pathways promotes long-term allograft survival in many transplant models where CD4(+) T cells are necessary for rejection. When CD8(+) T cells are sufficient to mediate rejection, these approaches fail, resulting in costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. To address this problem we examined the role of lymphotoxin-related molecules in CD8(+) T cell-mediated rejection of murine intestinal allografts. Targeting membrane lymphotoxin by means of a fusion protein, mAb, or genetic mutation inhibited rejection of intestinal allografts by CD8(+) T cells. This effect was associated with decreased monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig) and secondary lymphoid chemokine (SLC) gene expression within allografts and spleens respectively. Blocking membrane lymphotoxin did not inhibit rejection mediated by CD4(+) T cells. Combining disruption of membrane lymphotoxin and treatment with CTLA4-Ig inhibited rejection in wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that membrane lymphotoxin is an important regulatory molecule for CD8(+) T cells mediating rejection and suggest a strategy to avoid costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. PMID:11673481

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pancreas Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Redfield, R. R.; Kaufman, D. B.; Odorico, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant improvement in pancreas allograft survival, rejection of the pancreas remains a major clinical problem. In addition to cellular rejection of the pancreas, antibody-mediated rejection of the pancreas is now a well-described entity. The 2011 Banff update established comprehensive guidelines for the diagnosis of acute and chronic AMR. The pancreas biopsy is critical in order to accurately diagnose and treat pancreas rejection. Other modes of monitoring pancreas rejection we f...

  2. Macrophage mediated endothelial injury and proliferation in renal transplant rejection.

    OpenAIRE

    Adair, Anya

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages (Mφ) have previously been implicated in both acute and chronic renal allograft rejection however the mechanisms remain unclear. In this thesis I set out to explore the effect of the Mφ on the endothelium in the context of renal graft rejection. Initial studies focussed upon human renal allograft tissue from transplant nephrectomies performed because of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Immunostaining was carried out on these tissues (n=29) and control kidne...

  3. Increased C4d in post-reperfusion biopsies and increased donor specific antibodies at one-week post transplant are risk factors for acute rejection in mild to moderately sensitized kidney transplant recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamali, Arjang; Muth, Brenda; Ellis, Thomas M.; Mohamed, Maha; Fernandez, Luis; Miller, Karen; Bellingham, Janet; Odorico, Jon; Mezrich, Joshua; Pirsch, John; D’Alessandro, Tony; Vidyasagar, Vijay; Hofmann, R. Michael; Torrealba, Jose; Kaufman, Dixon; Foley, David

    2013-01-01

    In order to define the intensity of immunosuppression, we examined risk factors for acute rejection in desensitization protocols that use baseline donor specific antibody levels measured as mean fluorescence intensity (MFImax). The study included 146 patients transplanted with a negative flow crossmatch and a mean follow-up of 18 months with the majority (83%) followed for at least 1 year. At the time of transplant, mean calculated panel reactive antibody and MFImax ranged from 10.3% to 57.2%, and 262 to 1691, respectively, between low and high-risk protocols. Mean MFImax increased significantly from transplant to one-week and one-year. The incidence of acute rejection (mean 1.65 months) as a combination of clinical and subclinical rejection was 32% including 14% cellular, 12% antibody-mediated and 6% mixed rejection. In regression analyses, only C4d staining in post-reperfusion biopsies (hazard ratio 3.3, confidence interval 1.71 to 6.45) and increased donor specific antibodies at 1 week post-transplant were significant predictors of rejection. A rise in MFImax by 500 was associated with a 2.8-fold risk of rejection. Thus, C4d staining in post-reperfusion biopsies and an early rise in donor specific antibodies after transplantation are risk factors for rejection in moderately sensitized patients. PMID:23447068

  4. Diagnostic challenges in chronic antibody-mediated rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Farkash, Evan A; Colvin, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of glomerular and peritubular capillaritis in kidney transplant biopsy samples identifies allograft dysfunction associated with alloantibodies. Sis et al. show that this technique has a higher sensitivity but lower specificity than the current diagnostic criteria using peritubular capillary C4d deposition, and that capillaritis is an independent predictor of progression to graft failure.

  5. Gender as predictor of social rejection: the mediating/moderating role of effortful control and parenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Ato

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to analyze the gender differences found in a sample of 474 Spanish children aged between 6 and 8 years with respect to peer rejection using a sociometric status technique. Thus, we analyzed how temperament (Effortful Control and parenting practices (Parental support and Discipline were involved in this relation. To measure social rejection we used the nominations method in the classroom context, while for temperament and parenting practices, parents were given a TMCQ (Temperament in Middle Childhood Questionnaire; Simmonds and Rothbart, 2004 and the Spanish version of the PCRI (Parent-Child Relationship Inventory; Gerard, 1994. Using an statistical modeling approach, we tested various mediation/moderation models until the best one with selected variables was found to explain the relation between these variables. The results confirmed gender differences in social rejection, with boys being rejected more than girls. The model that gave the best fit was the one that placed effortful control latent variable mediating the relation between gender and social rejection and parenting practices as a latent explanatory variable of effortful control. In conclusion, differences between girls and boys in social rejection are to a large extent explained by the significantly lower scores for boys in effortful control construct and, in turn, these lowest scores are explained by negative parental practices, with low levels of support and discipline.

  6. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  7. High Mean Fluorescence Intensity Donor-Specific Anti-HLA Antibodies Associated With Chronic Rejection Postliver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Leary, J. G.; Kaneku, H.; Susskind, B. M.; Jennings, L. W.; Neri, M. A.; Davis, G. L.; Klintmalm, G. B.; Terasaki, P. I.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to kidney transplantation where donorspecific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) negatively impact graft survival, correlation of DSA with clinical outcomes in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has not been clearly established. We hypothesized that DSA are present in patients who develop chronic rejection after OLT. Prospectively collected serial serum samples on 39 primary OLT patients with biopsy-proven chronic rejection and 39 comparator patients were blinded and analyzed for DSA using LABScreen single antigen beads test, where a 1000 mean fluorescence value was considered positive. In study patients, the median graft survival was 15 months, 74% received ≥ one retransplant, 20% remain alive and 87% had ≥ one episode of acute rejection. This is in contrast to comparator patients where 69% remain alive, and no patient needed retransplant or experienced rejection. Thirty-six chronic rejection patients (92%) and 24 (61%) comparator patients had DSA (p = 0.003). Chronic rejection versus comparator patients had higher mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) DSA. Although a further study with larger numbers of patients is needed to identify clinically significant thresholds, there is an association of high-MFI DSA with chronic rejection after OLT. PMID:21672151

  8. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  9. Antibody-mediated Prevention of Fusarium Mycotoxins in the Field

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Cai Liao; Elena Glinka; Jing-Bo Zhang; He-Ping Li; Zu-Quan Hu

    2008-01-01

    Fusarium mycotoxins directly accumulated in grains during the infection of wheat and other cereal crops by Fusarium head blight (FHB) pathogens are detrimental to humans and domesticated animals. Prevention of the mycotoxins via the development of FHB-resistant varieties has been a challenge due to the scarcity of natural resistance against FHB pathogens. Various antibodies specific to Fusarium fungi and mycotoxins are widely used in immunoassays and antibody-mediated resistance in planta aga...

  10. Existence of circulating anti-endothelial cell antibodies after heart transplantation is associated with post-transplant acute allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehle, Karla; Kroher, Johannes; Kolat, Philipp; von Süßkind-Schwendi, Marietta; Schmid, Christof; Haneya, Assad; Rupprecht, Leopold; Hirt, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) may be involved in the development of heart allograft rejection. Its detection might be a cheap and noninvasive method to identify high-risk patients. An indirect immunofluorescence method on human umbilical vein endothelial cells was used to investigate the presence of AECAs in 260 pre- and post-transplant serum samples sequentially collected from 34 patients within the first year after heart transplantation (HTX). The presence of AECAs before (23.5 %) and early after HTX (14.7 %) was associated with a significantly increased risk of early acute rejection (75 and 60 %, respectively) compared to 33 % in AECA-negative patients (p = 0.049). Moreover, rejections from AECA-positive patients were more severe (p = 0.057) with a significantly increased incidence of multiple (p = 0.025). The mean number of the sum of rejection episodes was significantly higher in AECA-positive patients (p ≤ 0.05). Patients free of AECAs mainly received mycophenolate mofetil as primary immunosuppression (p = 0.067). Nevertheless, the presence of AECAs did not affect long-term outcome and mortality of HTX patients. Despite a low number of patient samples, the detection of AECAs before and early after HTX could be used as a biomarker for an increased risk of early acute rejection in high-risk patients. This easy method might be a valuable tool to support screening procedures to improve individualized immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:25820657

  11. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taner, Timucin; Heimbach, Julie K; Rosen, Charles B; Nyberg, Scott L; Park, Walter D; Stegall, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    In simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation (SLK), the liver can protect the kidney from hyperacute rejection and may also decrease acute cellular rejection rates. Whether the liver protects against chronic injury is unknown. To answer this we studied renal allograft surveillance biopsies in 68 consecutive SLK recipients (14 with donor-specific alloantibodies at transplantation [DSA+], 54 with low or no DSA, [DSA-]). These were compared with biopsies of a matched cohort of kidney transplant alone (KTA) recipients (28 DSA+, 108 DSA-). Overall 5-year patient and graft survival was not different: 93.8% and 91.2% in SLK, and 91.9% and 77.1% in KTA. In DSA+ recipients, KTA had a significantly higher incidence of acute antibody-mediated rejection (46.4% vs. 7.1%) and chronic transplant glomerulopathy (53.6% vs. 0%). In DSA- recipients at 5 years, KTA had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of T cell-mediated rejection (clinical plus subclinical, 30.6% vs. 7.4%). By 5 years, DSA+ KTA had a 44% decline in mean GFR while DSA+SLK had stable GFR. In DSA- KTA, the incidence of a combined endpoint of renal allograft loss or over a 50% decline in GFR was significantly higher (20.4% vs. 7.4%). Simultaneously transplanted liver allograft was the most predictive factor for a significantly lower incidence of cellular (odds ratio 0.13, 95% confidence interval 0.06-0.27) and antibody-mediated injury (odds ratio 0.11, confidence interval 0.03-0.32), as well as graft functional decline (odds ratio 0.22, confidence interval 0.06-0.59). Thus, SLK is associated with reduced chronic cellular and antibody-mediated alloimmune injury in the kidney allograft. PMID:26924059

  12. A suspected case of plasma cell-rich acute renal transplant rejection associated with de novo donor-specific antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Mikiko; Kitamura, Ken; Ishimura, Takeshi; Hara, Shigeo; Fujisawa, Masato; Nishi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    A kidney transplant case with de novo donor-specific antibody showed monoclonal plasma cell infiltration into the graft with ABO incompatibility. Three years after transplantation, the patient's graft function suddenly deteriorated. Interstitial edema and the predominant infiltration of inflammatory plasma cells with kappa chain monoclonality were observed in biopsy specimens. The in situ hybridization of Epstein-Barr virus was negative and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder was not evident from radiological examinations. On laboratory examination, the patient had de novo donor-specific antibody for HLA-DQ. We suspected plasma cell-rich acute rejection for which methylprednisolone pulse therapy, plasma exchange, rituximab, and 15-deoxyspergualin were given. In the ensuing biopsy, the degree of plasma cell infiltration was similar to the first biopsy; however, kappa chain monoclonality relatively weakened. Owing to resistance to these treatments, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) (0.5 g/kg/day) was added. The serum creatinine level gradually declined to 3.1 mg/dL; however, it increased up to 3.6 mg/dL again. In the final biopsy, the infiltrated plasma cells disappeared but severe interstitial fibrosis developed. This case showed difficulty in the diagnosis and treatment of plasma cell-rich acute rejection. A detailed consideration of this case may be helpful in understanding the clinical features and pathogenesis of this condition. PMID:26031590

  13. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kapur

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Di

  14. ICOS Promotes the Function of CD4+ Effector T Cells during Anti-OX40-Mediated Tumor Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Todd C; Long, Hua; Potluri, Shobha; Pertel, Thomas; Bailey-Bucktrout, Samantha L; Lin, John C; Fu, Tihui; Sharma, Padmanee; Allison, James P; Feldman, Reid M R

    2016-07-01

    ICOS is a T-cell coregulatory receptor that provides a costimulatory signal to T cells during antigen-mediated activation. Antitumor immunity can be improved by ICOS-targeting therapies, but their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we define the role of ICOS signaling in antitumor immunity using a blocking, nondepleting antibody against ICOS ligand (ICOS-L). ICOS signaling provided critical support for the effector function of CD4(+) Foxp3(-) T cells during anti-OX40-driven tumor immune responses. By itself, ICOS-L blockade reduced accumulation of intratumoral T regulatory cells (Treg), but it was insufficient to substantially inhibit tumor growth. Furthermore, it did not impede antitumor responses mediated by anti-4-1BB-driven CD8(+) T cells. We found that anti-OX40 efficacy, which is based on Treg depletion and to a large degree on CD4(+) effector T cell (Teff) responses, was impaired with ICOS-L blockade. In contrast, the provision of additional ICOS signaling through direct ICOS-L expression by tumor cells enhanced tumor rejection and survival when administered along with anti-OX40 therapy. Taken together, our results showed that ICOS signaling during antitumor responses acts on both Teff and Treg cells, which have opposing roles in promoting immune activation. Thus, effective therapies targeting the ICOS pathway should seek to promote ICOS signaling specifically in effector CD4(+) T cells by combining ICOS agonism and Treg depletion. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3684-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197182

  15. Association between the presence of anti-HLA antibodies with acute rejection and chronic allograft nephropathy in the first year after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toresan, R; Manfro, R C; Proença, M C C; Veronese, F J V; Salim, P H; da Silva, D M; Ribeiro, A R; Edelweiss, M I A; Pegas, K L; Jobim, L F J

    2008-04-01

    The clinical relevance of anti-HLA antibodies following kidney transplantation has been a recent focus of research. Patients who present anti-HLA antibodies in the posttransplantation period have shown higher incidences of acute rejection episodes (ARE) and chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of anti-HLA antibodies during the first year after kidney transplantation and their association with the occurrence of ARE and CAN. Eighty-eight kidney transplant recipients were evaluated for the presence of IgG anti-HLA antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (LAT-M and LAT-1240, One Lambda Inc, Calif, United States). Protocol kidney biopsies were performed in consenting patients. ARE and CAN were diagnosed by clinical, laboratory, and histopathological criteria. Anti-HLA antibodies were observed in 20 (22.7%) patients. At 1 year follow-up, 26.1% presented ARE and 51.2% developed CAN. Nine patients (45%) with antibodies developed ARE as opposed to 20.6% without antibodies and 64.7% developed CAN as opposed to 47.8% of those without antibodies. In the histological analysis, the anti-HLA antibodies were associated with Banff IIA ARE (P = .001) and Banff grade II CAN (P = .012). Routine posttransplantation search for antibodies may identify cases at higher risk for acute and chronic rejection, and perhaps help to tailor the immunosuppressive regimen. PMID:18454996

  16. Multifactorial aspects of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction

    OpenAIRE

    Schoot, van der, B.H.; Vidarsson, G.; Kapur, R.

    2014-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on diseases of antibody-mediated blood cell destruction via FcγRs on phagocytes, in particular regarding platelets in fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and red blood cells (RBC) in hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). Diagnostically, for HDFN laboratory tests are in place in order to predict risk for severe fetal RBC destruction and thereby initiate appropriate treatments. This test is sensitive, but has relativel...

  17. Indium-111 myosin-specific antibodies and technetium-99m pyrophosphate in the detection of acute cardiac rejection of transplanted hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    111In-labelled myosin-specific antibodies were evaluated as an indicator of early changes in acute rejection in a rat heart heterotopic transplant model. Uptake of antibodies was measured in allograft and isograft hearts of animals undergoing different regimens of cyclosporine treatment and compared with the uptake of technetium 99m pyrophosphate. The data were correlated with histological estimation of the severity of myocyte necrosis and sign of early rejection (venous cuffing and endocardial inflammation, indicators of perivascular infiltrate and intermyocyte extension, respectively). Myocyte necrosis in transplanted hearts was reflected by increases in technetium 99m pyrophosphate accumulation (r=0.88) but was poorly correlated with labelled antibody uptake (r=0.58). There was no positive correlation between the degree of early cardiac rejection and uptake of either of the radiopharmaceuticals: accumulation of the labeled antibodies paradoxically declined with increased histological severity scores, whereas that of technetium 99m pyrophosphate remained unchanged. Cyclosporine treatment augmented the uptake of labelled antibodies in transplanted hearts. This may be due to alterations in plasma membrane permeability brought about by the drug, resulting in a rise in antibody binding to intracellular myosin. (orig.)

  18. Novel antimalarial antibodies highlight the importance of the antibody Fc region in mediating protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleass, Richard J; Ogun, Solabomi A; McGuinness, David H; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Holder, Anthony A; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-12-15

    Parasite drug resistance and difficulties in developing effective vaccines have precipitated the search for alternative therapies for malaria. The success of passive immunization suggests that immunoglobulin (Ig)-based therapies are effective. To further explore the mechanism(s) by which antibody mediates its protective effect, we generated human chimeric IgG1 and IgA1 and a single-chain diabody specific for the C-terminal 19-kDa region of Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119), a major target of protective immune responses. These novel human reagents triggered in vitro phagocytosis of merozoites but, unlike their parental mouse IgG2b, failed to protect against parasite challenge in vivo. Therefore, the Fc region appears critical for mediating protection in vivo, at least for this MSP119 epitope. Such antibodies may serve as prototype therapeutic agents, and as useful tools in the development of in vitro neutralization assays with Plasmodium parasites. PMID:12855589

  19. MicroRNA-10b downregulation mediates acute rejection of renal allografts by derepressing BCL2L11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidney transplantation is the major therapeutic option for end-stage kidney diseases. However, acute rejection could cause allograft loss in some of these patients. Emerging evidence supports that microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is implicated in acute allograft rejection. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to profile miRNA expression in normal and acutely rejected kidney allografts. Among 75 identified dysregulated miRNAs, miR-10b was the most significantly downregulated miRNAs in rejected allografts. Transfecting miR-10b inhibitor into human renal glomerular endothelial cells recapitulated key features of acute allograft rejection, including endothelial cell apoptosis, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α, interferon-γ, and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2) and chemotaxis of macrophages whereas transfection of miR-10b mimics had opposite effects. Downregulation of miR-10b directly derepressed the expression of BCL2L11 (an apoptosis inducer) as revealed by luciferase reporter assay. Taken together, miR-10b downregulation mediates many aspects of disease pathogenicity of acute kidney allograft rejection. Restoring miR-10b expression in glomerular endothelial cells could be a novel therapeutic approach to reduce acute renal allograft loss. - Highlights: • miR-10b was the most downregulated microRNAs in acutely rejected renal allografts. • miR-10b downregulation triggered glomerular endothelial cell apoptosis. • miR-10b downregulation induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • miR-10b downregulation derepressed its pro-apoptotic target BCL2L11

  20. MicroRNA-10b downregulation mediates acute rejection of renal allografts by derepressing BCL2L11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoyou [Department of Organ Transplantation, Zhujiang Hospital, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Dong, Changgui [Institute of Molecular Ecology and Evolution, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Jiang, Zhengyao [Department of Organ Transplantation, Zhujiang Hospital, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Wu, William K.K. [Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory of Digestive Diseases, LKS Institute of Health Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Chan, Matthew T.V. [Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Jie [Department of Organ Transplantation, Zhujiang Hospital, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Li, Haibin; Qin, Ke [Guangxi Key Laboratory for Transplantation Medicine Department of Organ Transplantation in Guangzhou Military Region, Institute of Transplant Medicine, 303 Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Nanning, Guangxi 530021 (China); Sun, Xuyong, E-mail: sunxuyong0528@163.com [Guangxi Key Laboratory for Transplantation Medicine Department of Organ Transplantation in Guangzhou Military Region, Institute of Transplant Medicine, 303 Hospital of People' s Liberation Army, Nanning, Guangxi 530021 (China)

    2015-04-10

    Kidney transplantation is the major therapeutic option for end-stage kidney diseases. However, acute rejection could cause allograft loss in some of these patients. Emerging evidence supports that microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is implicated in acute allograft rejection. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to profile miRNA expression in normal and acutely rejected kidney allografts. Among 75 identified dysregulated miRNAs, miR-10b was the most significantly downregulated miRNAs in rejected allografts. Transfecting miR-10b inhibitor into human renal glomerular endothelial cells recapitulated key features of acute allograft rejection, including endothelial cell apoptosis, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α, interferon-γ, and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2) and chemotaxis of macrophages whereas transfection of miR-10b mimics had opposite effects. Downregulation of miR-10b directly derepressed the expression of BCL2L11 (an apoptosis inducer) as revealed by luciferase reporter assay. Taken together, miR-10b downregulation mediates many aspects of disease pathogenicity of acute kidney allograft rejection. Restoring miR-10b expression in glomerular endothelial cells could be a novel therapeutic approach to reduce acute renal allograft loss. - Highlights: • miR-10b was the most downregulated microRNAs in acutely rejected renal allografts. • miR-10b downregulation triggered glomerular endothelial cell apoptosis. • miR-10b downregulation induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • miR-10b downregulation derepressed its pro-apoptotic target BCL2L11.

  1. A laboratory-based examination of responses to social rejection in borderline personality disorder: the mediating role of emotion dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L; Gratz, Kim L; Breetz, Alisa; Tull, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    This study sought to build upon existing research on interpersonal sensitivity in borderline personality disorder (BPD) by examining whether emotion dysregulation mediates the relationship between BPD and cognitive and emotional responses to social rejection. Participants with (n = 53) and without (n = 34) BPD reported on levels of negative affect and threat to four social needs (perceived control, belonging, selfesteem, and meaningful existence) in response to a laboratory-based social ostracism task (Cyberball). Results revealed heightened interpersonal (rejection) sensitivity among BPD (vs. non-BPD) participants, as evidenced by heightened threat to all social needs and nonspecific distress (although not overall negative affect) in response to the task. Furthermore, both overall emotion dysregulation and the specific dimensions involving emotion modulation strategies, emotional clarity, and the control of behaviors when distressed mediated the relationship between BPD status and several cognitive (threats to meaningful existence, belonging, and self-esteem) and emotional (nonspecific distress) responses to the task. PMID:23514181

  2. T10B9 monoclonal antibody: A short-acting nonstimulating monoclonal antibody that spares γδ T-cells and treats and prevents cellular rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H Waid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thomas H Waid1, John S Thompson1, Maria Siemionow2, Stephen A Brown1 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA; 2Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: T10B9.1A-31/MEDI-500 is a nonmitogenic immunoglobulin M kappa murine monoclonal antibody (mAb directed against the alpha-beta (αβ heterodimer of the T-lymphocyte receptor complex. The hybridoma was first produced by fusing spleen cells from BALB/C mice immunized with human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes with SP2/O-Ag14 mutant myeloma cells. The mAb is produced and purified using multistep ion exchange and molecular sieve chromatography protocols. T10B9 has been used successfully to treat acute cellular rejection in renal transplantation and as an immunosuppression induction agent in heart and simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation. Because T10B9 is nonmitogenic and causes minimal cytokine release, both treatment of rejection and induction of immunosuppression were accomplished with significantly fewer and milder untoward effects (cytokine release syndrome than its comparator OKT3. Since T10B9 is directed against the αβ heterodimer of the CD3 epitope, it spares the gamma delta (γδ region. These gamma delta (γδ T cells have a unique role in the immune response controlling many serious human diseases and perhaps facilitating the development of immunologic tolerance. T10B9 has a relatively short duration of action, depleting T cells for only 10 to 14 days, unlike the protracted depletion seen with thymoglobulin and Campath-1H. There is no B-lymphocyte depletion with T10B9 as there is with both of the aforementioned reagents. The lack of prolonged lymphocyte depletion may account for less infection observed with T10B9 treatment.Keywords: T10B9.1A-31, γδ T-cell, monoclonal antibody, Campath-1H, thymoglobulin, OKT3

  3. Antibody Response Against Perlecan and Collagen Types IV and VI in Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Joosten, Simone A.; van Dixhoorn, Mieneke G. A.; Borrias, Maria C.; Benediktsson, Hallgrimur; van Veelen, Peter A.; van Kooten, Cees; Paul, Leendert C.

    2002-01-01

    Chronic rejection is the leading cause of late renal transplant failure. Various structural lesions are observed in grafts undergoing chronic rejection including glomerular basement membrane (GBM) duplications. The well-established Fisher (F344) to Lewis (LEW) rat renal transplant model for chronic rejection was used to assess the presence and role of the humoral immune response against graft antigens during chronic rejection. LEW recipients of F344 allografts develop transplant glomerulopath...

  4. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  5. Depression of Complement Regulatory Factors in Rat and Human Renal Grafts Is Associated with the Progress of Acute T-Cell Mediated Rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available The association of complement with the progression of acute T cell mediated rejection (ATCMR is not well understood. We investigated the production of complement components and the expression of complement regulatory proteins (Cregs in acute T-cell mediated rejection using rat and human renal allografts.We prepared rat allograft and syngeneic graft models of renal transplantation. The expression of Complement components and Cregs was assessed in the rat grafts using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and immunofluorescent staining. We also administered anti-Crry and anti-CD59 antibodies to the rat allograft model. Further, we assessed the relationship between the expression of membrane cofactor protein (MCP by immunohistochemical staining in human renal grafts and their clinical course.qRT-PCR results showed that the expression of Cregs, CD59 and rodent-specific complement regulator complement receptor 1-related gene/protein-y (Crry, was diminished in the rat allograft model especially on day 5 after transplantation in comparison with the syngeneic model. In contrast, the expression of complement components and receptors: C3, C3a receptor, C5a receptor, Factor B, C9, C1q, was increased, but not the expression of C4 and C5, indicating a possible activation of the alternative pathway. When anti-Crry and anti-CD59 mAbs were administered to the allograft, the survival period for each group was shortened. In the human ATCMR cases, the group with higher MCP expression in the grafts showed improved serum creatinine levels after the ATCMR treatment as well as a better 5-year graft survival rate.We conclude that the expression of Cregs in allografts is connected with ATCMR. Our results suggest that controlling complement activation in renal grafts can be a new strategy for the treatment of ATCMR.

  6. Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of bacteriophage lambda-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sapinoro, Ramil; Volcy, Ketna; Shanaka, W.W.; Rodrigo, I.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Lambda phage vectors mediate gene transfer in cultured mammalian cells and in live mice, and in vivo phage-mediated gene expression is increased when mice are pre-immunized with bacteriophage lambda. We now show that, like eukaryotic viruses, bacteriophage vectors are subject to Fc receptor-mediated, antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in mammalian cells. Antibody-dependent enhancement of phage gene transfer required FcγRI, but not its associated γ chain, and was not supported by othe...

  7. An Essential Role for Tumor Necrosis Factor in Natural Killer Cell–mediated Tumor Rejection in the Peritoneum

    OpenAIRE

    Smyth, Mark J.; Kelly, Janice M.; Baxter, Alan G.; Körner, Heinrich; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.

    1998-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are thought to provide the first line of defence against tumors, particularly major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I− variants. We have confirmed in C57BL/6 (B6) mice lacking perforin that peritoneal growth of MHC class I− RMA-S tumor cells in unprimed mice is controlled by perforin-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by CD3− NK1.1+ cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that B6 mice lacking tumor necrosis factor (TNF) are also significantly defective in their reject...

  8. Lipid raft facilitated ligation of K-α1-tubulin by specific antibodies on epithelial cells: Role in pathogenesis of chronic rejection following human lung transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Addition of KAT Abs (+) sera to NHBE culture causes upregulation of growth factors. → Cholesterol depletion causes down regulation of growth factor expression. → Cholesterol depletion is accompanied by loss of membrane bound caveolin. → Thus, we demonstrate lipid raft are critical for efficient ligation of the KAT Abs. -- Abstract: Long term function of human lung allografts is hindered by development of chronic rejection manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS). We have previously identified the development of antibodies (Abs) following lung transplantation to K-α1-tubulin (KAT), an epithelial surface gap junction cytoskeletal protein, in patients who develop BOS. However, the biochemical and molecular basis of the interactions and signaling cascades mediated by KAT Abs are yet to be defined. In this report, we investigated the biophysical basis of the epithelial cell membrane surface interaction between KAT and its specific Abs. Towards this, we analyzed the role of the lipid raft-domains in the membrane interactions which lead to cell signaling and ultimately increased growth factor expression. Normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, upon specific ligation with Abs to KAT obtained either from the serum of BOS(+) patients or monoclonal KAT Abs, resulted in upregulation of growth factors VEGF, PDGF, and bFGF (6.4 ± 1.1-, 3.2 ± 0.9-, and 3.4 ± 1.1-fold increase, respectively) all of which are important in the pathogenesis of BOS. To define the role for lipid raft in augmenting surface interactions, we analyzed the changes in the growth factor expression pattern upon depletion and enrichment with lipid raft following the ligation of the epithelial cell membranes with Abs specific for KAT. NHBE cells cultured in the presence of β-methyl cyclodextran (βMCD) had significantly reduced growth factor expression (1.3 ± 0.3, vs βMCD untreated being 6.4 ± 1.1-fold increase) upon stimulation with KAT Abs. Depletion

  9. The Natural History of Biopsy-Negative Rejection after Heart Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaoyi Tang; Jon Kobashigawa; Matthew Rafiei; Lily Kagan Stern; Michele Hamilton

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The most recent International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) biopsy scale classifies cellular and antibody-mediated rejections. However, there are cases with acute decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤ 45%) but no evidence of rejection on biopsy. Characteristics and treatment response of this biopsy negative rejection (BNR) have yet to be elucidated. Methods. Between 2002 and 2012, we found 12 cases of BNR in 11 heart transplant patients as previou...

  10. Antibody-mediated neutralization of African swine fever virus: myths and facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, José M; Galindo, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2013-04-01

    Almost all viruses can be neutralized by antibodies. However, there is some controversy about antibody-mediated neutralization of African swine fever virus (ASFV) with sera from convalescent pigs and about the protective relevance of antibodies in experimentally vaccinated pigs. At present, there is no vaccine available for this highly lethal and economically relevant virus and all classical attempts to generate a vaccine have been unsuccessful. This failure has been attributed, in part, to what many authors describe as the absence of neutralizing antibodies. The findings of some studies clearly contradict the paradigm of the impossibility to neutralize ASFV by means of monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. This review discusses scientific evidence of these types of antibodies in convalescent and experimentally immunized animals, the nature of their specificity, the neutralization-mediated mechanisms demonstrated, and the potential relevance of antibodies in protection. PMID:23159730

  11. Bortezomib in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Antibody Mediated Rejection: Three Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Waichi; Lee, Ruth-Ann; Saidman, Susan L.; Smith, Rex Neal; Zorn, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Here, we report our experience on three patients with AMR who were treated with bortezomib after other therapeutic interventions had failed. Bortezomib was well tolerated by two of the three patients. The third patient developed worsening thrombocytopenia following the second dose. Despite a low adverse event profile, none of the three patients conclusively responded to the bortezomib treatment. As a result of the difference in our results from that of other centers we feel that a larger pros...

  12. Utility of Double Filtration Plasmapheresis in Acute Antibody Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection: Report of Three Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın SOLAK; Hüseyin ATALAY; İlker POLAT; Melih ANIL; Türkmen, Kültigin; Biyik, Zeynep; Yeksan, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Plasmapheresis is an extracorporeal procedure, which is often employed to rapidly lower circulating titers of autoantibodies, immune complexes or toxins. There are two types of plasmapheresis namely, regular plasmapheresis (RPP) by centrifugation and membrane filtration, and double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) which is a special form of membrane filtration in which two membranes called as plasma separator and plasma fractionator are employed to filter macromolecules more selectively. DFPP...

  13. A web-based pilot study of inter-pathologist reproducibility using the ISHLT 2004 working formulation for biopsy diagnosis of cardiac allograft rejection: the European experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelini, Annalisa; Andersen, Claus Boegelund; Bartoloni, Giovanni; Black, Fiona; Bishop, Paul; Doran, Helen; Fedrigo, Marny; Fries, Jochen W U; Goddard, Martin; Goebel, Heike; Neil, Desley; Leone, Ornella; Marzullo, Andrea; Ortmann, Monika; Paraf, Francois; Rotman, Samuel; Turhan, Nesrin; Bruneval, Patrick; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Grigoletto, Francesco; Gasparetto, Alessio; Mencarelli, Roberto; Thiene, Gaetano; Burke, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, at the European level and using digital technology, the inter-pathologist reproducibility of the ISHLT 2004 system and to compare it with the 1990 system We also assessed the reproducibility of the morphologic criteria for diagnosis of antibody-mediated reject......-mediated rejection detailed in the 2004 grading system....

  14. Indium-111-monoclonal antimyosin antibody studies after the first year of heart transplantation. Identification of risk groups for developing rejection during long-term follow-up and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term clinical course and results of biopsies in 21 patients studied with monoclonal antimyosin antibodies more than 12 months after heart transplantation according to the presence and degree of antimyosin-antibody uptake is described. Eighteen men and three women aged 20-52 years (39 +/- 9 years) were studied with antimyosin antibodies 12-40 months (mean, 22 +/- 9 months) after heart transplantation, and followed for a mean of 18 months (10-28 months). The number of biopsies performed during follow-up was 102. Results showed normal antimyosin-antibody studies in nine patients and abnormal studies in 12 patients. Myocyte damage was identified in 18 of the 102 biopsies (17.6%), one in the normal antimyosin-antibody group of patients and 17 in those patients with myocardial antimyosin-antibody uptake. Patients who developed rejection comprised 11% and 67% of each respective group; the mean number of rejection episodes per patient was 0.11 +/- 0.33 and 1.41 +/- 1.41, respectively (p less than 0.01). A trend was noted by which higher heart-to-lung ratios were associated with greater probability of rejection. Conclusively, (1) antimyosin-antibody studies performed after more than 1 year after heart transplantation indicate the presence and level of rejection activity, (2) groups of patients at risk for developing rejection at biopsy during long-term follow-up may be detected by antimyosin-antibody study, and (3) surveillance for rejection and the degree of immunosuppression should be tailored to meet individual patient needs

  15. Pathogenesis of non-antibody mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Anna L; van Hezel, Maike E; Juffermans, Nicole P; Vlaar, Alexander P J

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major cause of transfusion-related mortality. Causative factors are divided in antibody mediated TRALI and non-antibody mediated TRALI. Antibody mediated TRALI is caused by passive transfusion of cognate antibodies and non-antibody mediated TRALI is caused by transfusion of aged cellular blood products. This review focuses on mechanisms in non-antibody mediated TRALI which includes soluble mediators accumulating during storage of red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets (PLTs), as well as changes in morphology and function of aged PLTs and RBCs. These mediators cause TRALI in two-hit animal models and have been implicated in TRALI onset in clinical studies. Pre-clinical studies show a clear relation between TRALI and increased storage time of cellular blood products. Observational clinical studies however report conflicting data. Knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms of TRALI is necessary to improve storage conditions of blood products, develop prevention strategies and develop a therapy for TRALI. PMID:25277811

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi: antigen-receptor mediated endocytosis of antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Abelha

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Trypanomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi were derived from tissue culture and incubated with immune and non-immune human sera. All immune sera showed high titers of specific humoral antibodies of the IgM or the IgG type. Agglutination and swelling of parasites were observed after incubation at 37ºC, but many trypomastigotes remained free-swimming in the sera for two to three days. The quantitiy of immune serum capable of lysing a maximum of 10 x 10 [raised to the power of 6] sensitized red cells was not capable of lysing 4 x 10 [raised to the power of 3] tripomastigotes. Typically, the parasites underwent cyclical changes with the formation of clumps of amastigotes and the appearance of epimastigote forms. Multiplication of the parasites was observed in immune sera. Further, the infectivity of the parasites to susceptible mice was not lost. All sera used produced similar general effects on the growth of the parasite. The antibody bound to T. cruzi appeard to enter cells by antigen-receptor mediated endocytosis. The ferritin-conjugated antibody was internalized and delivered to phagolysosomes where they might be completely degraded to amino-acids. This seemed to be a coupled process by which the immunoglobulin is first bound to specific parasite surface receptor and then rapidly endocytosed by the cell.Formas tripomastigotas de Trypanosoma cruzi derivadas de cultura de tecido foram encubadas com soros humanos imunes e não-imunes.Todos os soros humanos usados tinham títulos elevados de anticorpos das classes IgM ou IgG. Aglutinação e entumescimento dos parasitos eram observados apos encubação a 37ºC mas muitos tripomastigotas permaneceram circulando livremente nos soros por dois a três dias. A quantidade de soro imune capaz de lisar um máximo de 10 x 10 [elevado a 6] hemácias sensibilizadas não foi capaz de lisar 4 x 10 [elevado a 3] tripomastigotas. Tipicamente, os parasitos apresentavam alterações cíclicas com formação de

  17. Targeting CD47-SIRPα interactions for potentiating therapeutic antibody-mediated tumor cell destruction by phagocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of the studies described in this thesis was to investigate the role of CD47-SIRPα interactions in therapeutic antibody-dependent tumor cell destruction by human phagocytes and also explore the killing mechanism(s) by which human phagocytes, and in particular human neutrophils, mediate therapeutic antibody-dependent cytotoxicity towards cancer cells.

  18. A game of numbers: the stoichiometry of antibody-mediated neutralization of flavivirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response contributes to the protection against viral pathogens. Although antibodies have the potential to inhibit viral infections via several mechanisms, an ability to neutralize viruses directly may be particularly important. Neutralizing antibody titers are commonly used as predictors of protection from infection, especially in the context of vaccine responses and immunity. Despite the simplicity of the concept, how antibody binding results in virus inactivation is incompletely understood despite decades of research. Flaviviruses have been an attractive system in which to seek a structural and quantitative understanding of how antibody interactions with virions modulate infection because of the contribution of antibodies to both protection and pathogenesis. This review will present a stoichiometric model of antibody-mediated neutralization of flaviviruses and discuss how these concepts can inform the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:25595803

  19. Chimeric mouse-human IgG1 antibody that can mediate lysis of cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chimeric mouse-human antibody has been created that recognizes an antigen found on the surface of cells from many carcinomas. Immunoglobulin constant (C) domains of the mouse monoclonal antibody L6, C/sub γ2a/ and C/sub kappa/, were substituted by the human C/sub γ1/ and C/sub kappa/ by recombining cDNA modules encoding variable or C domains. The cDNA constructs were transfected into lymphoid cells for antibody production. The chimeric antibody and mouse L6 antibody bound to carcinoma cells with equal affinity and mediated complement-dependent cytolysis. In the presence of human effector cells, the chimeric antibody gave antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity at 100 times lower concentration than that needed for the mouse L6 antibody. The assay for lysis was carried out with 51Cr-labeled target calls. The chimeric antibody, but not the mouse L6 antibody, is effective against a melanoma line expressing small amounts of the L6 antigen. The findings point to the usefulness of the chimeric antibody approach for obtaining agents with strong antitumor activity for possible therapeutic use in man

  20. Antibody-mediated neutralization of virus is abrogated by mycoplasma.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, C; Elkington, J; Hales, A.; Weiss, R.

    1980-01-01

    The ability of a mouse mammary tumor cell line to abrogate antibody neutralization of vesicular stomatitis virus was shown to be due to the presence of mycoplasma. The mycoplasma was isolated from the cell line and typed as Mycoplasma orale. Colonies of this mycoplasma were used to deliberately infect cell cultures which then gained the capacity to reactivate antibody-neutralized virus. The extent of the reactivation depended on the source of neutralizing antiserum. Other species of mycoplasm...

  1. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) toward human O+ red cells coated with anti-D antibody: comparison between lymphocyte and monocyte ADCC activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Sunada,Mitsutoshi; Suzuki, Shinya; Ota, Zensuke

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of lymphocytes and monocytes toward human O+ red cells coated with anti-D antibody using a 51Cr release assay. Lysis of sensitized red cells by lymphocytes occurred rapidly, but monocyte-mediated lysis occurred slowly. This difference might be due to postphagocytic 51Cr release by monocytes. ADCC of lymphocytes increased in proportion to the effector cell number, but large amounts of antibodies were required. In contrast...

  2. In vivo imaging and quantitation of renal transplant rejection using indium-111 labelled anti-lymphocyte and anti-MHC class I and II monoclonal antibodies in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been described in this report, non-invasive and specific method for imaging and assessment of acute kidney transplant rejection in rat model. This model can serve as a basis for application in man using a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies with different specificities starting with monoclonal antibodies labelled with indium-111 which have been used in this technique. 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  3. Increased C4d in post-reperfusion biopsies and increased donor specific antibodies at one-week post transplant are risk factors for acute rejection in mild to moderately sensitized kidney transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Djamali, Arjang; Muth, Brenda; Ellis, Thomas M.; Mohamed, Maha; Fernandez, Luis; Miller, Karen; Bellingham, Janet; Odorico, Jon; Mezrich, Joshua; Pirsch, John; D’Alessandro, Tony; Vidyasagar, Vijay; Hofmann, R. Michael; Torrealba, Jose; Kaufman, Dixon

    2013-01-01

    In order to define the intensity of immunosuppression, we examined risk factors for acute rejection in desensitization protocols that use baseline donor specific antibody levels measured as mean fluorescence intensity (MFImax). The study included 146 patients transplanted with a negative flow crossmatch and a mean follow-up of 18 months with the majority (83%) followed for at least 1 year. At the time of transplant, mean calculated panel reactive antibody and MFImax ranged from 10.3% to 57.2%...

  4. Neutralization of lymphokine-mediated antirickettsial activity of fibroblasts and macrophages with monoclonal antibody specific for murine interferon gamma.

    OpenAIRE

    Jerrells, T R; Turco, J; Winkler, H H; Spitalny, G L

    1986-01-01

    Lymphokine-mediated inhibition of Rickettsia prowazekii multiplication in L929 fibroblasts was eliminated by treatment of the lymphokine with a monoclonal antibody specific for interferon-gamma. Soluble monoclonal antibody and antibody conjugated to Sepharose beads were equally effective. Macrophage activation to limit the multiplication of Rickettsia conorii was eliminated with antibody-conjugated beads; however, neutralization of the ability to activate macrophages with soluble antibody was...

  5. Iron as the Key Modulator of Hepcidin Expression in Erythroid Antibody-Mediated Hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythroid hypoplasia (EH is a rare complication associated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO therapies, due to development of anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly clarified. Our aim was to manage a rat model of antibody-mediated EH induced by rHuEPO and study the impact on iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Wistar rats treated during 9 weeks with a high rHuEPO dose (200 IU developed EH, as shown by anemia, reduced erythroblasts, reticulocytopenia, and plasmatic anti-rHuEPO antibodies. Serum iron was increased and associated with mRNA overexpression of hepatic hepcidin and other iron regulatory mediators and downregulation of matriptase-2; overexpression of divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin was observed in duodenum and liver. Decreased EPO expression was observed in kidney and liver, while EPO receptor was overexpressed in liver. Endogenous EPO levels were normal, suggesting that anti-rHuEPO antibodies blunted EPO function. Our results suggest that anti-rHuEPO antibodies inhibit erythropoiesis causing anemia. This leads to a serum iron increase, which seems to stimulate hepcidin expression despite no evidence of inflammation, thus suggesting iron as the key modulator of hepcidin synthesis. These findings might contribute to improving new therapeutic strategies against rHuEPO resistance and/or development of antibody-mediated EH in patients under rHuEPO therapy.

  6. Non-IgE antibody mediated mechanisms in food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, G M; Scott, J R

    1987-01-01

    Food sensitivity or intolerance is not necessarily based on the Type I allergic reaction. Non-IgE antibody reactions, complement-dependent reactions, enzyme deficiencies such as lactase and non-immunologic histamine release (such as with some sea foods) have been described. Even the detection of specific antibodies on their own does not necessarily indicate that a given symptom is due to that antibody. Food allergy nevertheless exists. It is important that those observers fortunate enough to see many cases document their observations carefully and eventually publish them for the education of their less fortunate colleagues. Is food allergy more common in infants and young children? What happens as they grow older? How often is atopic eczema due to food allergy? Why are some foods more likely to be implicated than others? Does a negative RAST result eliminate the diagnosis or a positive one confirm it? Until the answers to these and other questions are known, the mainstay of diagnosis will be the history, and that of treatment will be the elimination diet. PMID:3099610

  7. Disturbance Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This interactive tutorial reviews the disturbance rejection capabilities of different feedback control schemes. The interactions in this tutorial involve students analyzing 4 cases of step-like disturbance rejection. ME2801 Introduction to Engineering System Dynamics

  8. Modalities for treatment of antisperm antibody mediated infertility: novel perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Rajesh K

    2004-05-01

    Immunoinfertility because of antisperm antibodies (ASA) is an important cause of infertility in humans. The incidence of ASA in infertile couples is 9-36% depending on the reporting center. Early claims regarding the incidence and involvement of ASA in involuntary infertility were probably overemphasized, which has resulted in subsequent confusion, doubt, and underestimation of their clinical significance. No immunoglobulin that binds to sperm should be called an antisperm antibody in a strict sense unless it is directed against a sperm antigen that plays a role in fertilization and fertility. ASA directed against the fertilization-related antigens are more relevant to infertility than the immunoglobulins that bind to sperm associated antigens. Several methods have been reported for treatment of immunoinfertility. These include: immunosuppressive therapies using corticosteroids or cyclosporine; assisted reproductive technologies such as intrauterine insemination, gamete intrafallopian transfer, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection; laboratory techniques such as sperm washing, immunomagnetic sperm separation, proteolytic enzyme treatment, and use of immunobeads. Most of the available techniques have side effects, are invasive and expensive, have low efficacy, or provide conflicting results. Recent findings using defined sperm antigens that have a role in fertilization/fertility have provided animal models and innovative novel perspectives for studying the mechanism of immunoinfertility and possible modalities for treatment. The better understanding of local immunity and latest advances in hybridoma and recombinant technologies, proteomics and genomics leading to characterization of sperm antigens relevant to fertility will help to clarify the controversy and to establish the significance of ASA in infertility. PMID:15212677

  9. Antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from discovery to prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Anna L; Van Stein, Danielle; Vlaar, Alexander P J

    2015-09-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a syndrome of respiratory distress caused by blood transfusion, is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. The majority of TRALI cases have been related to passive infusion of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and human neutrophil antigen (HNA) antibodies in donor blood. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo animal models have provided insight in TRALI pathogenesis. The various classes of antibodies implicated in TRALI appear to have different pathophysiological mechanisms for the induction of TRALI involving endothelial cells, neutrophils, monocytes and, as very recently has been discovered, lymphocytes. The HLA and HNA-antibodies are found mainly in blood from multiparous women as they have become sensitized during pregnancy. The incidence of TRALI has decreased rapidly following the introduction of a male-only strategy for plasma donation. This review focuses on pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the pathophysiology of antibody-mediated TRALI. PMID:25921271

  10. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating antibodies from an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial target multiple epitopes and preferentially use the VH1 gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Pollara, Justin; Moody, M Anthony; Alpert, Michael D; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kozink, Daniel M; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Lewis, George K; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2012-11-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs. PMID:22896626

  11. Studies related to antibody-mediated boron delivery for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the many methods of selective boron delivery to tumor presently under consideration the use of boron-labeled tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) and their immunoreactive fragments appears to offer the most general, but complex, approach. Assuming that tumor cells generally carry 106 characteristic antigenic sites of any one type and that there are approximately 109 cells per gram of tumor, one calculates that about 600 10B atoms must be attached to each individual Mab molecule (if all antigenic sites are complexed) for each 10 ppm of 10B supplied to tumor. Rather than randomly attack IgG Mab molecules with a large number of relatively small boron-containing conjugation reagent molecules the authors have chosen to assemble a series of discrete, precisely synthesized oligomeric reagents ('trailers') each of which contains a fixed number of B-atoms up to approximately 200. These oligomeric reagents would carry a radioactive or fluorescent group for analytical purposes attached to a terminal-NH2 group of their chain and the remaining -COOH terminus would be free for conjugation with the lysine var-epsilon-NH2 groups of Mab protein. Two types of oligomeric trailer reagents are envisioned; hydrophilic peptides and polyamides

  12. Increasing the sensitivity of reverse phase protein arrays by antibody-mediated signal amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brase Jan C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA emerged as a useful experimental platform to analyze biological samples in a high-throughput format. Different signal detection methods have been described to generate a quantitative readout on RPPA including the use of fluorescently labeled antibodies. Increasing the sensitivity of RPPA approaches is important since many signaling proteins or posttranslational modifications are present at a low level. Results A new antibody-mediated signal amplification (AMSA strategy relying on sequential incubation steps with fluorescently-labeled secondary antibodies reactive against each other is introduced here. The signal quantification is performed in the near-infrared range. The RPPA-based analysis of 14 endogenous proteins in seven different cell lines demonstrated a strong correlation (r = 0.89 between AMSA and standard NIR detection. Probing serial dilutions of human cancer cell lines with different primary antibodies demonstrated that the new amplification approach improved the limit of detection especially for low abundant target proteins. Conclusions Antibody-mediated signal amplification is a convenient and cost-effective approach for the robust and specific quantification of low abundant proteins on RPPAs. Contrasting other amplification approaches it allows target protein detection over a large linear range.

  13. Integrin Receptors on Tumor Cells Facilitate NK cell-mediated Antibody-dependent Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J.; Powers, Gordon D.; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S.; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high anti...

  14. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  15. Rejecting Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KERRY; BROWN

    2011-01-01

    British voters overwhelmingly reject an alternative voting system The British electorate,in only the second ever national referendum held in their history (the first was on joining the EU,over 35 years ago) rejected alterations to their voting system from the current first-past-the-post system to a form of alternative voting similar to that used

  16. C-reactive protein enhances murine antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Rick; Kim, Michael; Shanmugabhavananthan, Shanjeevan; Liu, Jonathan; Li, Yuan; Semple, John W

    2015-12-17

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome of respiratory distress triggered by blood transfusions and is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. TRALI has primarily been attributed to passive infusion of HLA and/or human neutrophil antigen antibodies present in transfused blood products, and predisposing factors such as inflammation are known to be important for TRALI initiation. Because the acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) is highly upregulated during infections and inflammation and can also enhance antibody-mediated responses such as in vitro phagocytosis, respiratory burst, and in vivo thrombocytopenia, we investigated whether CRP affects murine antibody-mediated TRALI induced by the anti-major histocompatibility complex antibody 34-1-2s. We found that BALB/c mice injected with 34-1-2s or CRP alone were resistant to TRALI, however mice injected with 34-1-2s together with CRP had significantly enhanced lung damage and pulmonary edema. Mechanistically, 34-1-2s injection with CRP resulted in a significant synergistic increase in plasma levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and pulmonary neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, murine MIP-2 is the functional homolog of human interleukin-8, a known risk factor for human TRALI. These results suggest that elevated in vivo CRP levels, like those observed during infections, may significantly predispose recipients to antibody-mediated TRALI reactions and support the notion that modulating CRP levels is an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce TRALI severity. PMID:26453659

  17. Impaired antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by herceptin in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Koji; Takahashi, Akihiro; Ichihara, Fumiko; Sugai, Hidemitsu; Fujii, Hideki; Matsumoto, Yoshirou

    2002-10-15

    The humanized monoclonal antibody Herceptin, which specifically targets HER-2/neu, exhibits growth inhibitory activity against HER-2/neu-overexpressing tumors and is approved for therapeutic use with proved survival benefit in patients with HER-2/neu-positive breast cancer. In the present study, we investigated whether Herceptin could affect the HER-2/neu-overexpressing gastric cancer cells based on antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and compared immune effector cells from gastric cancer patients with normal individuals on ADCC. HER-2/neu-expressing gastric cancer cells could be killed by Herceptin-mediated ADCC and the Herceptin-induced ADCC correlated with the degree of HER-2/neu expression on the gastric cancer cells. However, the Herceptin-mediated ADCC was significantly impaired in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from advanced disease patients (n = 10) compared with that in early disease (n = 12; P = 0.04) or healthy individuals (n = 10, P = 0.02). Moreover, natural killer (NK) cells purified from patients with advanced disease indicated less Herceptin-mediated ADCC in comparison with that from healthy donors (P = 0.04), whereas monocytes purified from the patients showed an almost equal amount of Herceptin-mediated ADCC in comparison with that from healthy individuals, indicating that NK cell dysfunction contributed to the impaired Herceptin-mediated ADCC in gastric cancer patients. Furthermore, the NK-cell dysfunction on Herceptin-mediated ADCC correlated with the down-regulation of CD16zeta expression in the patients, and interleukin 2 ex vivo treatment of NK cells could restore the impairment of Herceptin-mediated ADCC, concomitant to the normalization of the expression of CD16zeta molecules. Thus, some modalities such as interleukin 2 treatment aimed at reversing NK dysfunction may be necessary for successful Herceptin treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:12384543

  18. The importance of non-HLA antibodies in transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuheng; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-08-01

    The development of post-transplantation antibodies against non-HLA autoantigens is associated with rejection and decreased long-term graft survival. Although our knowledge of non-HLA antibodies is incomplete, compelling experimental and clinical findings demonstrate that antibodies directed against autoantigens such as angiotensin type 1 receptor, perlecan and collagen, contribute to the process of antibody-mediated acute and chronic rejection. The mechanisms that underlie the production of autoantibodies in the setting of organ transplantation is an important area of ongoing investigation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury, surgical trauma and/or alloimmune responses can result in the release of organ-derived autoantigens (such as soluble antigens, extracellular vesicles or apoptotic bodies) that are presented to B cells in the context of the transplant recipient's antigen presenting cells and stimulate autoantibody production. Type 17 T helper cells orchestrate autoantibody production by supporting the proliferation and maturation of autoreactive B cells within ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Conversely, autoantibody-mediated graft damage can trigger alloimmunity and the development of donor-specific HLA antibodies that can act in synergy to promote allograft rejection. Identification of the immunologic phenotypes of transplant recipients at risk of non-HLA antibody-mediated rejection, and the development of targeted therapies to treat such rejection, are sorely needed to improve both graft and patient survival. PMID:27345243

  19. Mechanistic studies of antibody mediated clearance of tau aggregates using an ex vivo brain slice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan eKrishnamurthy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that immunotherapy clears amyloid beta (A plaques and reduces A levels in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, as well as in AD patients. Tangle pathology is also relevant for the neurodegeneration in AD, and our studies have shown that active immunization with an AD related phospho-tau peptide reduces aggregated tau within the brain and slows the progression of tauopathy-induced behavioural impairments. Thus, clearance of neurofibrillary tangles and/or their precursors may reduce synaptic and neuronal loss associated with AD and other tauopathies. So far the mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated clearance of tau pathology are yet to be elucidated. In this study we have used a mouse brain slice model to examine the uptake and localization of FITC labeled anti-tau antibodies. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that the FITC labelled anti-tau antibody co-stained with phosphorylated tau, had a perinuclear appearance and co-localised with markers of the endosomal/lysosomal pathway. Additionally, tau and FITC IgG were found together in an enriched lysosome fraction. In summary, antibody-mediated clearance of intracellular tau aggregates appears to occur via the lysosomal pathway.

  20. Oxygen dependence of human alveolar macrophage-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Conkling, P.; Papermaster-Bender, G; Whitcomb, M; Sagone, A L

    1982-01-01

    We studied the metabolic characteristics of the human alveolar macrophage-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC) reaction, using an anti-D sensitized human erythrocyte target system. Metabolic experiments demonstrated a high resting rate of glucose metabolism in macrophages, but no oxidative metabolic burst was found to accompany the ADCC reaction. These findings were confirmed by oxygen consumption studies, showing a high resting rate of oxygen consumption by macrophages, but no cha...

  1. Integrin receptors on tumor cells facilitate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J; Powers, Gordon D; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high antibody concentration, revealing a dose limiting effect. A similar effect was also observed with primary human NK cells. The effect was erased after IFN-γ treatment of tumor cells resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1. Furthermore, killing of the same tumor cells induced by Herceptin antibody was significantly impaired in the presence of CNTO 95Ala-Ala antibody variant that blocks αV integrins but is incapable of binding to CD16. These data suggest that αV integrins on tumor cells could compensate for the loss of ICAM-1 molecules, thereby facilitating ADCC by NK cells. Thus, NK cells could exercise cytolytic activity against ICAM-1 deficient tumor cells in the absence of proinflammatory cytokines, emphasizing the importance of NK cells in tumor-specific immunity at early stages of cancer. PMID:24810893

  2. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Jensen, Sanne; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated...... the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion......, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (<350 cells/μl blood) and the ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating...

  3. Transplant rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is usually not perfect. No two people, except identical twins, have identical tissue antigens. Doctors use medicines to ... has no blood supply. Also, transplants from one identical twin to another are almost never rejected. There are ...

  4. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes. PMID:27330002

  5. CXCL9 and CXCL10 accelerate acute transplant rejection mediated by alloreactive memory T cells in a mouse retransplantation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHUANG, JIAWEI; SHAN, ZHONGGUI; MA, TENG; LI, CHUN; QIU, SHUIWEI; ZHOU, XIAOBIAO; LIN, LIANFENG; QI, ZHONGQUAN

    2014-01-01

    C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL) 9 and CXCL10 play key roles in the initiation and development of acute transplant rejection. Previously, higher levels of RANTES expression and secretion were demonstrated in retransplantation or T-cell memory-transfer models. In the present study, the effect of the chemokines, CXCL9 and CXCL10, were investigated in a mouse retransplantation model. BALB/c mice were used as donors, while C57BL/6 mice were used as recipients. In the experimental groups, a heterotopic heart transplantation was performed six weeks following skin grafting. In the control groups, a heterotopic heart transplantation was performed without skin grafting. Untreated mice served as blank controls. The mean graft survival time of the heterotopic heart transplantations was 7.7 days in the experimental group (n=6), as compared with 3.25 days in the control group (n=6; P<0.001). On day three following cardiac transplantation, histological evaluation of the grafts revealed a higher International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation grade in the experimental group as compared with the control group. In addition, gene expression and serum concentrations of CXCL9, CXCL10, interferon-γ, and interleukin-2 were markedly higher in the experimental group when compared with the control group. Differences between the levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in the pre- and post-transplant mice indicated that the chemokines may serve as possible biomarkers to predict acute rejection. The results of the present study demonstrated that CXCL9 and CXCL10 play a critical role in transplantation and retransplantation. High levels of these cytokines during the pre-transplant period may lead to extensive acute rejection. Thus, the observations enhance the understanding of the mechanism underlying the increased expression and secretion of CXCL9 and CXCL10 by alloreactive memory T cells. PMID:24944628

  6. Cross-neutralization of influenza A viruses mediated by a single antibody loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekiert, Damian C; Kashyap, Arun K; Steel, John; Rubrum, Adam; Bhabha, Gira; Khayat, Reza; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Dillon, Michael A; O'Neil, Ryann E; Faynboym, Aleksandr M; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B; Palese, Peter; Webby, Richard; Lerner, Richard A; Bhatt, Ramesh R; Wilson, Ian A

    2012-09-27

    Immune recognition of protein antigens relies on the combined interaction of multiple antibody loops, which provide a fairly large footprint and constrain the size and shape of protein surfaces that can be targeted. Single protein loops can mediate extremely high-affinity binding, but it is unclear whether such a mechanism is available to antibodies. Here we report the isolation and characterization of an antibody called C05, which neutralizes strains from multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1, H2 and H3. X-ray and electron microscopy structures show that C05 recognizes conserved elements of the receptor-binding site on the haemagglutinin surface glycoprotein. Recognition of the haemagglutinin receptor-binding site is dominated by a single heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 3 loop, with minor contacts from heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 1, and is sufficient to achieve nanomolar binding with a minimal footprint. Thus, binding predominantly with a single loop can allow antibodies to target small, conserved functional sites on otherwise hypervariable antigens. PMID:22982990

  7. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Roit, F.; Engelberts, P. J.; Taylor, R. P.;

    2015-01-01

    The novel Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-delta inhibitor idelalisib are promising drugs for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, either alone or in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. We investigated...... the possible positive or negative impact of these drugs on all known mechanisms of action of both type I and type II anti-CD20 antibodies. Pretreatment with ibrutinib for 1 hour did not increase direct cell death of cell lines or chronic lymphocytic leukemia samples mediated by anti-CD20 antibodies....... Pre-treatment with ibrutinib did not inhibit complement activation or complement-mediated lysis. In contrast, ibrutinib strongly inhibited all cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies rituximab, ofatumumab or obinutuzumab, either in purified systems or whole blood assays. Activation of...

  8. Metabolic requirements for hormone-induced resistance to antibody-complement mediated killing of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Line-1 guinea pig hepatoma cells are susceptible to killing by anti-Forssman IgM antibody plus guinea pig complement (GPC). When these tumor cells are incubated with insulin, epinephrine, hydrocortisone, or prednisolone, the cells show a marked reduction in their susceptibility to antibody-C-mediated killing. If the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA, RNA, and protein is impaired by pretreatment with metabolic inhibitors, x-irradiation, or culture in nutrient-deficient media, the hormones are no longer effective in rendering the cells resistant to killing. If only DNA synthesis is impaired, but not RNA and protein synthesis, the hormones are effective. The inability of cells inhibited in their macromolecular synthesis to be rendered resistant to killing after hormone treatment is not due to an inability of the cells to bind hormone

  9. Transfusion Induced Bone Marrow Transplant Rejection Due to Minor Histocompatibility Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema R; Zimring, James C

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, alloimmunization to transfused blood products has focused exclusively upon recipient antibodies recognizing donor alloantigens present on the cell surface. Accordingly, the immunological sequelae of alloimmunization have been antibody mediated effects (i.e. hemolytic transfusion reactions, platelet refractoriness, anti-HLA and anti-HNA effects, etc.). However, in addition to the above sequelae, there is also a correlation between the number of antecedent transfusions in humans and the rate of bone marrow transplant (BMT) rejection - under reduced intensity conditioning with HLA matched or HLA identical marrow. BMT of this nature is the only existing cure for a series of non-malignant hematological diseases (e.g. sickle cell disease, thalassemias, etc.); however, rejection remains a clinical problem. It has been hypothesized that transfusion induces subsequent BMT rejection through immunization. Studies in animal models have observed the same effect and have demonstrated that transfusion induced BMT rejection can occur in response to alloimmunization. However, unlike traditional antibody responses, sensitization in this case results in cellular immune effects, involving populations such as T cell or NK cells. In this case, rejection occurs in the absence of alloantibodies, and would not be detected by existing immune-hematological methods. We review human and animal studies in light of the hypothesis that, for distinct clinical populations, enhanced rejection of BMT may be an unappreciated adverse consequence of transfusion which current blood bank methodologies are unable to detect. PMID:24090731

  10. Renal and urinary levels of endothelial protein C receptor correlate with acute renal allograft rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Lattenist

    Full Text Available The Endothelial Protein C Receptor (EPCR is expressed on leukocytes, on endothelium of large blood vessels and to a lesser extent on capillaries. Membrane bound EPCR plays an important role in the activation of protein C which has anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects. After cleavage by a protease EPCR is also found as a soluble protein. Acute rejection of kidney allografts can be divided in T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR and antibody-mediated (ABMR rejection. The latter is characterized by strong activation of coagulation. Currently no reliable non-invasive biomarkers are available to monitor rejection. Renal biopsies were available from 81 renal transplant patients (33 without rejection, 26 TCMR and 22 ABMR, we had access to mRNA material, matched plasma and urine samples for a portion of this cohort. Renal EPCR expression was assessed by RT-PCR and immunostaining. Plasma and urine sEPCR levels were measured by ELISA. ABMR patients showed higher levels of EPCR mRNA than TCMR patients. EPCR expression on glomeruli was significantly elevated in ABMR patients than in TCMR or control patients. In the peritubular capillaries EPCR expression was higher in ABMR patients than in control patients. EPCR expression was higher in tubules and arteries of rejection patients than in control patients. Plasma sEPCR levels did not differ. Urine sEPCR levels were more elevated in the ABMR group than in patients with TCMR or without rejection. ROC analysis demonstrated that urinary sEPCR is appropriate to discriminate between ABMR patients and TCMR or control patients. We conclude that urinary sEPCR could be a novel non-invasive biomarker of antibody mediated rejection in renal transplantation.

  11. Antibody-mediated neutralization of myelin-associated EphrinB3 accelerates CNS remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Yasir A; Zhao, Chao; Mahad, Don; Möbius, Wiebke; Altmann, Friedrich; Foss, Franziska; Sentürk, Aycan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Lubec, Gert; Lilley, Kathryn; Franklin, Robin J M; Nave, Klaus-A; Kotter, Mark R N

    2016-02-01

    Remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions often remains incomplete despite the presence of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Amongst other factors, successful remyelination depends on the phagocytic clearance of myelin debris. However, the proteins in myelin debris that act as potent and selective inhibitors on OPC differentiation and inhibit CNS remyelination remain unknown. Here, we identify the transmembrane signalling protein EphrinB3 as important mediator of this inhibition, using a protein analytical approach in combination with a primary rodent OPC assay. In the presence of EphrinB3, OPCs fail to differentiate. In a rat model of remyelination, infusion of EphrinB3 inhibits remyelination. In contrast, masking EphrinB3 epitopes using antibodies promotes remyelination. Finally, we identify EphrinB3 in MS lesions and demonstrate that MS lesion extracts inhibit OPC differentiation while antibody-mediated masking of EphrinB3 epitopes promotes it. Our findings suggest that EphrinB3 could be a target for therapies aiming at promoting remyelination in demyelinating disease. PMID:26687980

  12. Antibody penetration into living cells. V. Interference between two fc gamma receptor-mediated functions: antibody penetration and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, J M; Ruíz-Argüelles, A; Alarcón-Segovia, D; Llorente, L; Díaz-Jouanen, E

    1981-01-01

    The same Fc gamma receptor appears to be shared for two important phenomena: antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody penetration into living cells. ADCC is inhibited through interaction with the Fc gamma receptor during the antibody penetration process, indicating that both mechanisms may modulate each other in vitro. PMID:6972908

  13. Resolution of acute malarial infections by T cell-dependent non-antibody-mediated mechanisms of immunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Cavacini, L A; Parke, L A; Weidanz, W P

    1990-01-01

    While it is generally accepted that acute blood stage malarial infections are resolved through the actions of protective antibodies, we observed that resistance to acute infection with Plasmodium chabaudi adami was mediated by T cell-dependent cellular immune mechanisms independent of antibody. We now report that acute blood stage infections caused by three additional murine hemoprotozoan parasites, Plasmodium vinckei petteri, Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi, and Babesia microti, appear to be co...

  14. Emotional responses to interpersonal rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    A great deal of human emotion arises in response to real, anticipated, remembered, or imagined rejection by other people. Because acceptance by other people improved evolutionary fitness, human beings developed biopsychological mechanisms to apprise them of threats to acceptance and belonging, along with emotional systems to deal with threats to acceptance. This article examines seven emotions that often arise when people perceive that their relational value to other people is low or in potential jeopardy, including hurt feelings, jealousy, loneliness, shame, guilt, social anxiety, and embarrassment. Other emotions, such as sadness and anger, may occur during rejection episodes, but are reactions to features of the situation other than low relational value. The article discusses the evolutionary functions of rejection-related emotions, neuroscience evidence regarding the brain regions that mediate reactions to rejection, and behavioral research from social, developmental, and clinical psychology regarding psychological and behavioral concomitants of interpersonal rejection. PMID:26869844

  15. Emotional responses to interpersonal rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of human emotion arises in response to real, anticipated, remembered, or imagined rejection by other people. Because acceptance by other people improved evolutionary fitness, human beings developed biopsychological mechanisms to apprise them of threats to acceptance and belonging, along with emotional systems to deal with threats to acceptance. This article examines seven emotions that often arise when people perceive that their relational value to other people is low or in potential jeopardy, including hurt feelings, jealousy, loneliness, shame, guilt, social anxiety, and embarrassment. Other emotions, such as sadness and anger, may occur during rejection episodes, but are reactions to features of the situation other than low relational value. The article discusses the evolutionary functions of rejection-related emotions, neuroscience evidence regarding the brain regions that mediate reactions to rejection, and behavioral research from social, developmental, and clinical psychology regarding psychological and behavioral concomitants of interpersonal rejection. PMID:26869844

  16. Subclinical Rejection Phenotypes at 1 Year Post-Transplant and Outcome of Kidney Allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupy, Alexandre; Vernerey, Dewi; Tinel, Claire; Aubert, Olivier; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Rabant, Marion; Verine, Jérôme; Nochy, Dominique; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Martinez, Frank; Glotz, Denis; Jouven, Xavier; Legendre, Christophe; Lefaucheur, Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Kidney allograft rejection can occur in clinically stable patients, but long-term significance is unknown. We determined whether early recognition of subclinical rejection has long-term consequences for kidney allograft survival in an observational prospective cohort study of 1307 consecutive nonselected patients who underwent ABO-compatible, complement-dependent cytotoxicity-negative crossmatch kidney transplantation in Paris (2000-2010). Participants underwent prospective screening biopsies at 1 year post-transplant, with concurrent evaluations of graft complement deposition and circulating anti-HLA antibodies. The main analysis included 1001 patients. Three distinct groups of patients were identified at the 1-year screening: 727 (73%) patients without rejection, 132 (13%) patients with subclinical T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR), and 142 (14%) patients with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Patients with subclinical ABMR had the poorest graft survival at 8 years post-transplant (56%) compared with subclinical TCMR (88%) and nonrejection (90%) groups (P<0.001). In a multivariate Cox model, subclinical ABMR at 1 year was independently associated with a 3.5-fold increase in graft loss (95% confidence interval, 2.1 to 5.7) along with eGFR and proteinuria (P<0.001). Subclinical ABMR was associated with more rapid progression to transplant glomerulopathy. Of patients with subclinical TCMR at 1 year, only those who further developed de novo donor-specific antibodies and transplant glomerulopathy showed higher risk of graft loss compared with patients without rejection. Our findings suggest that subclinical TCMR and subclinical ABMR have distinct effects on long-term graft loss. Subclinical ABMR detected at the 1-year screening biopsy carries a prognostic value independent of initial donor-specific antibody status, previous immunologic events, current eGFR, and proteinuria. PMID:25556173

  17. Lung injury mediated by antibodies to endothelium. II. Study of the effect of repeated antigen-antibody interactions in rabbits tolerant to heterologous antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Camussi, G.; Caldwell, P. R.; Andres, G.; Brentjens, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of repeated interactions of antibodies with cell surface antigens have been examined in in vitro, but not in in vivo systems. In this study are described the results of multiple antibody-cell surface antigen interactions in vivo. Rabbits were given repeated intravenous injections of goat antibodies to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), an antigen expressed on the surface of lung endothelial cells. For prevention of anaphylactic reactions, which would have been induced by multiple...

  18. Virus-Specific Antibody, in the Absence of T Cells, Mediates Demyelination in Mice Infected with a Neurotropic Coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Taeg S.; Perlman, Stanley

    2005-01-01

    Mice infected with mouse hepatitis virus strain JHM develop an inflammatory demyelinating disease in the central nervous system with many similarities to human multiple sclerosis. The mouse disease is primarily immune-mediated because demyelination is not detected in JHM-infected mice lacking T or B cells but does occur after transfer of JHM-specific T cells. Although less is known about the ability of antibodies to mediate demyelination, the presence of oligoclonally expanded B cells and hig...

  19. RNAi-mediated silencing of HLA A2 suppressed acute rejection against human fibroblast xenografts in the striatum of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Caixia; Xu, Yunzhi; Zheng, Deyu; Sun, Xiaohong; Xu, Qunyuan; Duan, Deyi

    2016-08-15

    Major histocompatibility complex class l (MHC I) molecules play a role in determining whether transplanted cells will be accepted or rejected, and masking of MHC I on donor cells has been found useful for immunoprotection of neural xenografts. In the present study, primary human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF), HELF treated with lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting human leukocyte antigen A2 (HLA A2, MHC I in humans) (siHELF), and rat embryonic lung fibroblasts (RELF) were stereotaxically grafted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats to explore whether knockdown of HLA A2 could reduce host immune responses against xenografts. Before lentiviral infection, the cells were transduced with retroviruses harboring tyrosine hydroxylase cDNA. Knockdown of HLA A2 protein was examined by Western blotting. The immune responses (the number of CD4 and CD8 T-cells in the brain and peripheral blood), glial reaction, and survival of human fibroblasts were quantitatively evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry at 4d, 2w, and 6w post-graft. Animal behaviors were assessed by counting apomorphine-induced rotations pre- and post-grafts. It was shown that a lower level of HLA A2 was observed in siHELF grafts than in HELF grafts, and knockdown of HLA A2 decreased rat immune responses, as indicated by less remarkable increases in the number of CD8 and CD4 T-cells in the brain and the ratio of CD4:CD8 T-cells in the peripheral blood in rats grafted with siHELF. Rats grafted with siHELF exhibited a significant improvement in motor asymmetry post-transplantation and a better survival of human fibroblasts at 2w. The increasing number of activated microglia and the decreasing number of astrocytes were found in three groups of rats post-implantation. These data suggested that RNAi-mediated knockdown of HLA A2 could suppress acute rejection against xenogeneic human cell transplants in the rat brain. PMID:27397073

  20. Separation of effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) to erythrocyte targets from those mediating ADC to tumor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S B; Nelson, K; Grausz, J D

    1976-04-01

    Murine spleen cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) both to erythrocyte targets in a 51Cr release assay and to syngeneic tumor targets in a microcytotoxicity assay. The effector cells active in the two ADC assays can be separated by passage of the spleen cells through columns of Sephadex G-10 at 37 degrees C. Cells mediating ADC to sarcoma cells did not adhere to the G-10 and were recovered in the column effluent. These nonadherent cells were not cytotoxic to antibody-coated chicken red blood cells. Spleen cells which mediated ADC in a 51Cr release assay to the red cell targets adhered to G-10. Adherent effector cells could subsequently be recovered from the columns by elution with 5 X 10(-4) M EDTA. PMID:815438

  1. Mechanism of antibody-mediated viral clearance in immunotherapy of respiratory syncytial virus infection of cotton rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, G A; Hemming, V G; Horswood, R L; Baron, P A; Murphy, B R; Chanock, R M

    1990-01-01

    Antibody-mediated clearance of respiratory syncytial virus from cotton rat pulmonary tissues occurs in the absence of complement and in the absence of the Fc portion of the immunoglobulin G molecule, suggesting that complement-independent, cell-independent neutralization is the major mechanism of clearance.

  2. CARDIAC TRANSPLANT REJECTION AND NON-INVASIVE COMON CAROTID ARTERY WALL FUNCTIONAL INDICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Shevchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allograft rejection would entail an increase in certain blood biomarkers and active substances derived from activated inflammatory cells which could influence entire vascular endothelial function and deteriorate arterial wall stiffness. We propose that carotid wall functional indices measured with non-invasive ultrasound could we valuable markers of the subclinical cardiac allograft rejection. Aim. Our goal was to analyze the clinical utility of functional common carotid wall (CCW variables measured with high-resolution Doppler ultrasound as a non-invasive screening tool for allograft rejection in cardiac transplant patients (pts. Methods. One hundred and seventy one pts included 93 cardiac recipients, 30 dilated cardiomyopathy waiting list pts, and 48 stable coronary artery disease (SCAD pts without decompensated heart failure were included. Along with resistive index (Ri, pulsative index (Pi, and CCW intima-media thickness (IMT, CCW rigidity index (iRIG was estimated using empirical equation. Non-invasive evaluation was performed in cardiac transplant recipients prior the endomyo- cardial biopsy. Results. Neither of Ri, Pi, or CCW IMT were different in studied subgroups. iRIG was signifi- cantly lower in SCAD pts when compared to the dilated cardiomyopathy subgroup. The later had similar values with cardiac transplant recipients without rejection. Antibody-mediated and cellular rejection were found in 22 (23.7% and 17 (18.3% cardiac recipients, respectively. Mean iRIG in pts without rejection was significantly lower in comparison to antibody-mediated rejection and cell-mediated (5514.7 ± 2404.0 vs 11856.1 ± 6643.5 and 16071.9 ± 10029.1 cm/sec2, respectively, p = 0.001. Area under ROC for iRIG was 0.90 ± 0.03 units2. Analysis showed that iRIG values above estimated treshold 7172 cm/sec2 suggested relative risk of any type of rejection 17.7 (95%CI = 6.3–49.9 sensitivity 80.5%, specificity – 81.1%, negative predictive value – 84

  3. Site-specific targeting of antibody activity in vivo mediated by disease-associated proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Erster, Oran; Thomas, Jerry M; Hamzah, Juliana; Jabaiah, Abeer M.; Getz, Jennifer A.; Schoep, Tobias; Hall, Sejal S.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Daugherty, Patrick S.

    2012-01-01

    As a general strategy to selectively target antibody activity in vivo, a molecular architecture was designed to render binding activity dependent upon proteases in disease tissues. A protease-activated antibody (pro-antibody) targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), a marker of atherosclerotic plaques, was constructed by tethering a binding site-masking peptide to the antibody via a matrix metalloprotease (MMP) susceptible linker. Pro-antibody activation in vitro by MMP-1 yielded...

  4. Renal Contrast-Enhanced Sonography Findings in a Model of Acute Cellular Allograft Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, A; Kentrup, D; Pawelski, H; Mühlmeister, M; Biermann, C; Edemir, B; Heitplatz, B; Van Marck, V; Bettinger, T; Pavenstädt, H; Schlatter, E; Stypmann, J; Tiemann, K; Reuter, S

    2016-05-01

    Noninvasive methods to diagnose and differentiate acute cellular rejection from acute tubular necrosis or acute calcineurin inhibitor toxicity are still missing. Because T lymphocytes play a decisive role in early states of rejection, we investigated the suitability and feasibility of antibody-mediated contrast-enhanced ultrasound by using microbubbles targeted to CD3(+) , CD4(+) , or CD8(+) T cells in different models of renal disease. In an established rat renal transplantation model, CD3-mediated ultrasound allows the detection of acute rejection as early as on postoperative day 2. Ultrasound signal intensities increased with the severity of inflammation. Further, an early response to therapy could be monitored by using contrast-enhanced sonography. Notably, acute tubular necrosis occurring after ischemia-reperfusion injury as well as acute calcineurin inhibitor toxicity could easily be differentiated. Finally, the quantified ultrasound signal correlated significantly with the number of infiltrating T cells obtained by histology and with CD3 mRNA levels, as well as with chemokine CXCL9, CXCL11, and CCL19 mRNA but not with KIM-1 mRNA expression, thereby representing the severity of graft inflammation but not the degree of kidney injury. In summary, we demonstrate that antibody-mediated contrast-enhanced ultrasound targeting T lymphocytes could be a promising tool for an easy and reproducible assessment of acute rejection after renal transplantation. PMID:26613381

  5. A web-based pilot study of inter-pathologist reproducibility using the ISHLT 2004 working formulation for biopsy diagnosis of cardiac allograft rejection: the European experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelini, Annalisa; Andersen, Claus Boegelund; Bartoloni, Giovanni;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, at the European level and using digital technology, the inter-pathologist reproducibility of the ISHLT 2004 system and to compare it with the 1990 system We also assessed the reproducibility of the morphologic criteria for diagnosis of antibody-mediated reject...

  6. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing

  7. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekaran N

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Narendiran Rajasekaran,1,* Cariad Chester,1,* Atsushi Yonezawa,1,2 Xing Zhao,1,3 Holbrook E Kohrt1 1Division of Oncology, Stanford School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; 3Tissue Engineering and Stem Cells Research Center, Department of Immunology, Guiyang Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics. Keywords: ADCC, NK cell, reovirus, TLR, CD137

  8. Naturally occurring anti-band-3 antibodies and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of erythrocytes with the thiol-specific oxidant azodicarboxylic acid bis(dimethylamide) (diamide) enhances their phagocytosis by adherent monocytes. Phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes required that the cells were opsonized with whole serum, since complement inactivation abolished phagocytosis. Opsonization with whole serum containing 20-100 times the physiological concentration of naturally occurring anti-band-3- antibodies enhanced phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes. High inputs of anti-band-3 also restored phagocytosis of erythrocytes that had been incubated with complement-inactivated serum. Elevated concentrations of anti-spectrin antibodies were ineffective in whole and complement-inactivated serum. Specific recognition of diamide-treated erythrocytes by anti-band-3 antibodies may be due to generation of anti-band-3 reactive protein oligomers on intact diamide-treated erythrocytes. Generation of such oligomers was dose-dependent with respect to diamide. Bound anti-band-3 alone was not sufficient to mediate phagocytosis. It resulted in deposition of complement component C3b on the cells through activation of the alternative complement pathway in amounts exceeding that of bound antibodies by two orders of magnitude. Thus, anti-band-3 and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed erythrocytes, which simulate senescent erythrocytes with respect to bound antibody and complement

  9. Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity to Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Viruses After Influenza Vaccination in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weimin; Liu, Feng; Wilson, Jason R.; Holiday, Crystal; Li, Zhu-Nan; Bai, Yaohui; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Stevens, James; York, Ian A.; Levine, Min Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Detection of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) to influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) antigens by conventional serological assays is currently the main immune correlate of protection for influenza vaccines However, current prepandemic avian influenza vaccines are poorly immunogenic in inducing nAbs despite considerable protection conferred. Recent studies show that Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to HA antigens are readily detectable in the sera of healthy individuals and patients with influenza infection. Methods. Virus neutralization and ADCC activities of serum samples from individuals who received either seasonal or a stock-piled H5N1 avian influenza vaccine were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition assay, microneutralization assay, and an improved ADCC natural killer (NK) cell activation assay. Results. Immunization with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine led to strong expansion of both nAbs and ADCC-mediating antibodies (adccAbs) to H3 antigen of the vaccine virus in 24 postvaccination human sera. In sharp contrast, 18 individuals vaccinated with the adjuvanted H5N1 avian influenza vaccine mounted H5-specific antibodies with strong ADCC activities despite moderate virus neutralization capacity. Strength of HA-specific ADCC activities is largely associated with the titers of HA-binding antibodies and not with the fine antigenic specificity of anti-HA nAbs. Conclusions. Detection of both nAbs and adccAbs may better reflect protective capacity of HA-specific antibodies induced by avian influenza vaccines.

  10. Cefditoren and ceftriaxone enhance complement-mediated immunity in the presence of specific antibodies against antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Specific antibodies mediate humoral and cellular protection against invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae by activating complement mediated immunity, promoting phagocytosis and stimulating bacterial clearance. The emergence of pneumococcal strains with high levels of antibiotic resistance is of great concern worldwide and a serious threat for public health. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Flow cytometry was used to determine whether complement-mediated immunity against three antibiotic-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates is enhanced in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone. The binding of acute phase proteins such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component, and of complement component C1q, to pneumococci was enhanced in the presence of serum plus either of these antibiotics. Both antibiotics therefore trigger the activation of the classical complement pathway against S. pneumoniae. C3b deposition was also increased in the presence of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies and sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone confirming that the presence of these antibiotics enhances complement-mediated immunity to S. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using cefditoren and ceftriaxone to promote the binding of acute phase proteins and C1q to pneumococci, and to increase C3b deposition, when anti-pneumococcal antibodies are present, might help reduce the impact of antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae infections.

  11. Immune mediated mechanism for thrombosis: antiphospholipid antibody binding to platelet membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Khamashta; Harris, E N; Gharavi, A E; Derue, G; Gil, A.; Vázquez, J. J.; Hughes, G R

    1988-01-01

    Because thrombocytopenia occurs frequently in patients with anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies and thrombosis, some investigators have proposed that aCL antibodies may play a direct part in thrombosis by binding and activating platelets. To test this proposal experiments were performed to determine whether aCL antibodies can bind platelets. Preincubation of aCL positive sera with freeze-thawed platelets caused significant inhibition of aCL activity in four serum samples tested. Antibodies with ...

  12. Development of IgG Mediated Antibody Dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity (ADCC) in the Serum and Genital Mucosa of HIV Seroconverters

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Mariam; Mahmood, Fareeha; Mata, Mariana; Durkin, Helen G.; Liu, Chenglong; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Nowicki, Marek; Elizabeth T Golub; Anastos, Kathryn; French, Audrey L.; Baum, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    Background We measured antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity in serum and genital fluids of heterosexually exposed women during HIV seroconversion. Methods Plasma and cervico-vaginal lavage (CVL) fluid from 11 seroconverters (SC) were analyzed biannually from one year pre- to 6 year post-seroconversion using a 51Cr-release assay to measure HIV-1 gp120 specific ADCC. Results No SC had significant HIV specific CVL ADCC activity before seroconversion or until 1.5 yr after...

  13. Osthole prevents anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis in mice by affecting the caspase-3-mediated apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Toru; Hino, Okio

    2003-02-15

    Fas (Apo-1/CD95) ligand, which is a type II membrane protein, is a major inducer of apoptosis. Osthole is a coumarin derivative present in medicinal plants. The effect of osthole on hepatitis induced by anti-Fas antibody in mice was studied. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented the elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) caused by anti-Fas antibody (175 microg/kg, i.v.). Administration of osthole to mice even at a dose of 10 mg/kg significantly inhibited of anti-Fas antibody-induced elevation of plasma ALT. Capase-3 is a cysteine protease, and treatment of mice with anti-Fas antibody caused an elevation of caspase-3 activity at 3.5 and 6 hr. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (100 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited the elevation of caspase-3 activity caused by anti-Fas antibody. However, the addition of osthole (up to 10(-4)M) to a liver cytosol fraction isolated from mice treated with anti-Fas antibody did not inhibit caspase-3 activity in vitro. Thus, treatment of mice with osthole inhibited caspase-3 activity by an effect upstream of caspase-3 activation. The livers of mice treated with anti-Fas antibody contained apoptotic and dead cells; osthole attenuated the development of this apoptosis and cell death. The present results show that osthole prevented anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis by inhibiting the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway. PMID:12566097

  14. Conformational Masking and Receptor-Dependent Unmasking of Highly Conserved Env Epitopes Recognized by Non-Neutralizing Antibodies That Mediate Potent ADCC against HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, George K; Finzi, Andrés; DeVico, Anthony L; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-09-01

    The mechanism of antibody-mediated protection is a major focus of HIV-1 vaccine development and a significant issue in the control of viremia. Virus neutralization, Fc-mediated effector function, or both, are major mechanisms of antibody-mediated protection against HIV-1, although other mechanisms, such as virus aggregation, are known. The interplay between virus neutralization and Fc-mediated effector function in protection against HIV-1 is complex and only partially understood. Passive immunization studies using potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) show that both neutralization and Fc-mediated effector function provides the widest dynamic range of protection; however, a vaccine to elicit these responses remains elusive. By contrast, active immunization studies in both humans and non-human primates using HIV-1 vaccine candidates suggest that weakly neutralizing or non-neutralizing antibodies can protect by Fc-mediated effector function, albeit with a much lower dynamic range seen for passive immunization with bnAbs. HIV-1 has evolved mechanisms to evade each type of antibody-mediated protection that must be countered by a successful AIDS vaccine. Overcoming the hurdles required to elicit bnAbs has become a major focus of HIV-1 vaccine development. Here, we discuss a less studied problem, the structural basis of protection (and its evasion) by antibodies that protect only by potent Fc-mediated effector function. PMID:26393642

  15. Profile of the Pleximmune blood test for transplant rejection risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhi, Rakesh; Ashokkumar, Chethan; Higgs, Brandon W; Levy, Samantha; Soltys, Kyle; Bond, Geoffrey; Mazariegos, George; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Zeevi, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    The Pleximmune(TM) test (Plexision Inc., Pittsburgh, PA, USA) is the first cell-based test approved by the US FDA, which predicts acute cellular rejection in children with liver- or intestine transplantation. The test addresses an unmet need to improve management of immunosuppression, which incurs greater risks of opportunistic infections and Epstein-Barr virus-induced malignancy during childhood. High-dose immunosuppression and recurrent rejection after intestine transplantation also result in a 5-year graft loss rate of up to 50%. Such outcomes seem increasingly unacceptable because children can experience rejection-free survival with reduced immunosuppression. Pleximmune test sensitivity and specificity for predicting acute cellular rejection is 84% and 80% respectively in training set-validation set testing of 214 children. Among existing gold standards, the biopsy detects but cannot predict rejection. Anti-donor antibodies, which presage antibody-mediated injury, reflect late-stage allosensitization as a downstream effect of engagement between recipient and donor cells. Therefore, durable graft and patient outcomes also require accurate management of cellular immune responses in clinical practice. PMID:26760313

  16. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  17. DISTURBANCE OF THE CARDIOMYOCYTE’S MACROMOLECULAR STRUCTURE IN HEART ALLOGRAFTS AS A SIGN OF CHRONIC REJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Kupriyanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic rejection, especially cardiac allograft vasculopathy, is a major limiting factor for long-term transplant survival. This process affects not only the blood vessels, but also cardiomyocytes. However, there are extremely few reports on the evaluation of their macromolecular structure state. The aim of the study was to evaluate the structural proteins of cardiomyocytes (actin, myosin, troponin I, titin, desmin, vinculin of heart allografts in different periods after the operation (from 6 days to 15 years. Major changes of macromolecular structure were revealed in late period after transplantation (6 months – 15 years. The contribution of humoral immune response in the process of chronic cardiac allograft rejection was observed: in eight of twelve recipients episodes of acute humoral rejection had been repeatedly registered; disorders of the expression of 5 proteins out of 6 characterized were found in recipients with recurrent and persistent antibody-mediated rejection

  18. CXCR3 and Its Ligand CXCL10 Are Expressed by Inflammatory Cells Infiltrating Lung Allografts and Mediate Chemotaxis of T Cells at Sites of Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Agostini, Carlo; Calabrese, Fiorella; Rea, Federico; Facco, Monica; Tosoni, Alicia; Loy, Monica; Binotto, Gianni; VALENTE, MARIALUISA; Trentin, Livio; Semenzato, Gianpietro

    2001-01-01

    The attraction of T lymphocytes into the pulmonary parenchyma represents an essential step in mechanisms ultimately leading to lung allograft rejection. In this study we evaluated whether IP-10 (CXCL10), a chemokine that is induced by interferon-γ and stimulates the directional migration of activated T cells, plays a role in regulating the trafficking of effector T cells during lung allograft rejection episodes. Immunohistochemical examination showed that areas characterized by acute cellular...

  19. Cxcr3 and its ligand CXCL10 are expressed by inflammatory cells infiltrating lung allografts and mediate chemotaxis of T cells at sites of rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, C; Calabrese, F; Rea, F; Facco, M; Tosoni, A; Loy, M; Binotto, G; Valente, M; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G

    2001-05-01

    The attraction of T lymphocytes into the pulmonary parenchyma represents an essential step in mechanisms ultimately leading to lung allograft rejection. In this study we evaluated whether IP-10 (CXCL10), a chemokine that is induced by interferon-gamma and stimulates the directional migration of activated T cells, plays a role in regulating the trafficking of effector T cells during lung allograft rejection episodes. Immunohistochemical examination showed that areas characterized by acute cellular rejection (grades 1 to 4) and active obliterative bronchiolitis (chronic rejection, Ca) were infiltrated by T cells expressing CXCR3, i.e., the specific receptor for CXCL10. In parallel, T cells accumulating in the bronchoalveolar lavage of lung transplant recipients with rejection episodes were CXCR3+ and exhibited a strong in vitro migratory capability in response to CXCL10. In lung biopsies, CXCL10 was abundantly expressed by graft-infiltrating macrophages and occasionally by epithelial cells. Alveolar macrophages expressed and secreted definite levels of CXCL10 capable of inducing chemotaxis of the CXCR3+ T-cell line 300-19; the secretory capability of alveolar macrophages was up-regulated by preincubation with interferon-gamma. Interestingly, striking levels of CXCR3 ligands could be demonstrated in the fluid component of the bronchoalveolar lavage in individuals with rejection episodes. These data indicate the role of the CXCR3/CXCL10 interactions in the recruitment of lymphocytes at sites of lung rejection and provide a rationale for the use of agents that block the CXCR3/CXCL10 axis in the treatment of lung allograft rejection. PMID:11337368

  20. Role of mobile passenger lymphocytes in the rejection of renal and cardiac allografts in the rat. A passenger lymphocyte-mediated graft-versus-host reaction amplifies the host response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated that passenger lymphocytes migrate out of rat renal allografts into host spleens in a radioresistant fashion. These mobile passenger lymphocytes within BN kidney and heart transplants are immunocompetent, since they elicit a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction in the spleens of (LEW x BN)F2 hybrid hosts. The greater GVH reaction in (LEW x BN)F1 recipients of BN kidneys reflects the greater number of mobile passenger lymphocytes in the kidney when compared to the heart. The mobile passenger lymphocytes within BN renal allografts also cause a proliferative response in the spleens of the LEW hosts as well as an accelerated rejection of BN renal allografts when compared to BN cardiac allografts, for the differences between BN kidney and heart, both in terms of splenomegaly elicited in LEW as well as tempo of rejection, are abolished by total body x-irradiation of the donor with 900 rad. Results indicate that a mobile passenger lymphocyte mediated GVH reaction in the central lymphoid organs of the host augments the host response to allogenic kidneys and contributes materially to first-set renal allograft rejection; this GVH reaction on the other hand is not conspicuously present in LEW recipients of BN cardiac allografts and has therefore little effect on first-set cardiac allograft rejection

  1. DNA-mediated strand displacement facilitates sensitive electronic detection of antibodies in human serums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Shi, Kai; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-09-15

    We describe here the development of a sensitive and convenient electronic sensor for the detection of antibodies in human serums. The sensor is constructed by self-assembly formation of a mixed monolayer containing the small molecule epitope conjugated double stranded DNA probes on gold electrode. The target antibody binds the epitope on the dsDNA probe and lowers the melting temperature of the duplex, which facilitates the displacement of the antibody-linked strand of the duplex probe by an invading methylene blue-tagged single stranded DNA (MB-ssDNA) through the strand displacement reaction and leads to the capture of many MB-ssDNA on the sensor surface. Subsequent electrochemical oxidation of the methylene blue labels results in amplified current response for sensitive monitoring of the antibodies. The antibody assay conditions are optimized and the sensor exhibits a linear range between 1.0 and 25.0nM with a detection limit of 0.67nM for the target antibody. The sensor is also selective and can be employed to detect the target antibodies in human serum samples. With the advantages of using small molecule epitope as the antibody recognition element over traditional antigen, the versatile manipulability of the DNA probes and the unique properties of the electrochemical transduction technique, the developed sensor thus hold great potential for simple and sensitive detection of different antibodies and other proteins in real samples. PMID:27111124

  2. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  3. Predominance of Intraglomerular T-bet or GATA3 May Determine Mechanism of Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiquan; Cheng, Dongrui; Zhang, Mingchao; He, Qunpeng; Chen, Zhaohong

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factors T-bet and GATA3 determine the differentiation of helper T cells into Th1 or Th2 cells, respectively. An altered ratio of their relative expression promotes the pathogenesis of certain immunological diseases, but whether this may also contribute to the pathogenesis of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) versus T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) is unknown. Here, we characterized the intragraft expression of T-bet and GATA3 and determined the correlation of their levels with the presence of typical lesions of ABMR and TCMR. We found a predominant intraglomerular expression of T-bet in patients with ABMR, which was distinct from that in patients with TCMR. In ABMR, interstitial T-bet expression was typically located in peritubular capillaries, although the overall quantity of interstitial T-bet was less than that observed in TCMR. The expression of intraglomerular T-bet correlated with infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes, which express T-bet, as well as intraglomerular CD68+ monocyte/macrophages, which do not express T-bet. The predominance of intraglomerular T-bet expression relative to GATA3 expression associated with poor response to treatment with bolus steroid. In summary, predominance of intraglomerular T-bet expression correlates with antibody-mediated rejection and resistance to steroid treatment. PMID:21289214

  4. C-C chemokine receptor-7 mediated endocytosis of antibody cargoes into intact cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FrançoisMarceau

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7 is a G protein coupled receptor that has a role in leukocyte homing, but that is also expressed in aggressive tumor cells. Preclinical research supports that CCR7 is a valid target in oncology. In view of the increasing availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that carry cytotoxic cargoes, we studied the feasibility of forcing intact cells to internalize known monoclonal antibodies by exploiting the cycle of endocytosis and recycling triggered by the CCR7 agonist CCL19. Firstly, an anti-CCR7 antibody (CD197; clone 150503 labeled surface recombinant CCR7 expressed in intact HEK 293a cells and the fluorescent antibody was internalized following CCL19 treatment. Secondly, a recombinant myc-tagged CCL19 construction was exploited along the anti-myc monoclonal antibody 4A6. The myc-tagged ligand was produced as a conditioned medium of transfected HEK 293a cells that contained the equivalent of 430 ng/ml of immunoreactive CCL19 (average value, ELISA determination. CCL19-myc, but not authentic CCL19, carried the fluorophore-labeled antibody 4A6 into other recipient cells that expressed recombinant CCR7 (microscopy, cytofluorometry. The immune complexes were apparent in endosomal structures, colocalized well with the small GTPase Rab5 and progressed toward Rab7-positive endosomes. A dominant negative form of Rab5 (GDP-locked inhibited this endocytosis. Further, endosomes in CCL19-myc- or CCL19-stimulated cells were positive for β-arrestin2, but rarely for β-arrestin1. Following treatment with CCL19-myc and the 4A6 antibody, the melanoma cell line A375 that expresses endogenous CCR7 was specifically stained using a secondary peroxidase-conjugated antibody. Agonist-stimulated CCR7 can transport antibody-based cargoes, with possible therapeutic applications in oncology.

  5. AAVrh.10-Mediated Expression of an Anti-Cocaine Antibody Mediates Persistent Passive Immunization That Suppresses Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Jonathan B; Hicks, Martin J.; De, Bishnu P.; Pagovich, Odelya; Frenk, Esther; Kim D. Janda; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F.; Hackett, Neil R.; KaMinSky, Stephen M.; Worgall, Stefan; Tignor, Nicole; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major problem affecting all societal and economic classes for which there is no effective therapy. We hypothesized an effective anti-cocaine vaccine could be developed by using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vector as the delivery vehicle to persistently express an anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody in vivo, which would sequester cocaine in the blood, preventing access to cognate receptors in the brain. To accomplish this, we constructed AAVrh.10antiCoc.Mab...

  6. De-Novo anti-HLA Antibodies After Renal Transplantation: Prevalance and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak SUVAK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Development of de-novo anti-HLA antibodies in the post-transplant period might be the earliest finding of later chronic antibody mediated rejection. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence and risk factors of de-novo anti-HLA antibodies in our kidney allograft recipients. MATERIAL and METHODS: After exclusion, 91 (64M/27F patients having functional graft and negative HLA antibody before the transplantation were taken into the analysis. Anti-HLA antibodies were evaluated by the Luminex method. RESULTS: Duration of posttransplantation time was 38±31 months and the mean age was 38±10. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR was 68±19 ml/min, and the biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 15.2 %. Anti- HLA antibody was observed in 12 patients (13.1%. When the anti-HLA antibody positive group was compared with the negative group, estimated GFR (58±26 ml/min vs. 69±18 ml/ min, (p=0.05, living donor/cadaveric donor (5/7 vs. 66/13 (p=0.004, and acute rejection (6/12 (%50 vs. 8/79 (%10.1 (p=0.002 were significantly different between the groups. Deceased donor and acute rejection were independent risk factors for development of anti-HLA antibody (p=0.008 and p= 0.004, respectively on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, anti-HLA antibody can be seen after renal transplantation even in stable patients. Acute rejection and deceased donor transplantation are the major risk factors for development of anti-HLA antibodies.

  7. Development of an edema factor-mediated cAMP-induction bioassay for detecting antibody-mediated neutralization of anthrax protective antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuda, Jonathan F; Zhang, Linyi; Richards, Terri; Pham, Quyen; Zukauskas, David; Pierre, Jennifer L; Laird, Michael W; Askins, Janine; Choi, Gil H

    2005-03-01

    Intoxication of mammalian cells by Bacillus anthracis requires the coordinate activity of three distinct bacterial proteins: protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF), and lethal factor (LF). Among these proteins, PA has become the major focus of work on monoclonal antibodies and vaccines designed to treat or prevent anthrax infection since neither EF nor LF is capable of inducing cellular toxicity in its absence. Here, we present the development of a sensitive, precise, and biologically relevant bioassay platform capable of quantifying antibody-mediated PA neutralization. This bioassay is based on the ability of PA to bind and shuttle EF, a bacterial adenylate cyclase, into mammalian cells leading to an increase in cAMP that can be quantified using a sensitive chemiluminescent ELISA. The results of this study indicate that the cAMP-induction assay possesses the necessary performance characteristics for use as both a potency-indicating release assay in a quality control setting and as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker for ensuring the continued bioactivity of therapeutic antibodies against PA during clinical trials. PMID:15847796

  8. TRADITIONAL AND CASCADE PLASMAPHERESIS IN ANTIBODY TITERS’ REDUCTION IN RENAL TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Vatazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the current tasks of transplantology is to overcome «graft-host» immune confl ict. Partially this confl ict is caused by the presence of circulating pre-existing antibodies. Highly sensitized patients have a greater risk of rejection and subsequent graft loss. There are several methods to remove the antibodies, one of which is a double fi ltration plasmapheresis (DFPF. This report presents our experience of DFPF in recipients of high immunologic risk.Aim: to compare the effectiveness of traditional and double filtration plasmapheresis in desensitization of patients with high risk of immunological complications.Methods. The study included 30 patients after kidney transplantation. All patients were classifi ed as high-immunologic risk group. In 15 patients of study group we performed DFPF, in 15 patients of comparison group – traditional plasmapheresis. We monitored the immune status: markers of humoral immunity activation – IgG, IgM, IgA before and after the procedures. DFPF procedure was performed on OctoNova (MeSys, Germany with a plasmafi lter and plasma components separator. Protocol biopsies were performed on days 30 and 90.Results. The concentration of antibodies may be effectively reduced with DFPF. Total IgM and IgG antibodies were reduced by 30–55% of the original level. There was a less albumin loss in case of DFPF application. There is 1 patient with antibody-mediated rejection with graft dysfunction in study group. There are no signs of rejection in 30- and 90-day biopsy in study group. But there were three patients with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection in the comparison group.Conclusion. DFPF can safely and effectively reduce the high titers of antibodies that are responsible for humoral rejection of renal allograft. Reduction of antibodies in sensitized patients immediately after transplantation may improve graft function.

  9. γδ T cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity with CD19 antibodies assessed by an impedance-based label-free real-time cytotoxicity assay

    OpenAIRE

    Ursula Jördis Eva Seidel; Fabian eVogt; Ludger eGrosse-Hovest; Gundram eJung; Rupert eHandgretinger; Peter eLang

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are not MHC restricted, elicit cytotoxicity against various malignancies, are present in early post-transplant phases in novel stem cell transplantation (SCT) strategies and have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These features make γδ T cells promising effector cells for antibody-based immunotherapy in pediatric patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To evaluate combination of human γδ T ce...

  10. γδ T Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity with CD19 Antibodies Assessed by an Impedance-Based Label-Free Real-Time Cytotoxicity Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Ursula Jördis Eva; Vogt, Fabian; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram; Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are not MHC restricted, elicit cytotoxicity against various malignancies, are present in early post-transplant phases in novel stem cell transplantation strategies and have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These features make γδ T cells promising effector cells for antibody-based immunotherapy in pediatric patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To evaluate combination of human γδ T cells wi...

  11. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses. PMID:25124037

  12. Prospective Evaluation of Cetuximab-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Predicts Treatment Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Anna Maria; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Romano, Carmela; Nasti, Guglielmo; Nappi, Anna; De Divitiis, Chiara; Napolitano, Maria; Zanotta, Serena; Casaretti, Rossana; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Avallone, Antonio; Califano, Daniela; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody to the EGFR that induces antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) through Fcγ receptors on immune cells. Although SNPs in genes encoding Fcγ receptors are functionally relevant to cetuximab-mediated ADCC in colorectal cancer, a direct correlation betweenin vitroADCC and clinical response to cetuximab is not defined. We therefore enrolled 96 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients at diagnosis in a study that assessed FcγR status and cetuximab-mediated ADCC. Patients carrying the FcγRIIaHalleles 131H/Hand 131H/Rhad significantly higher ADCC compared with patients with the 131R/Ralleles (P= 0.013). Patients carrying FcγRIIIa genotypes with theValleles 158V/Vand 158V/Fdisplayed higher ADCC compared with patients carrying the 158F/Fgenotype (P= 0.001). Progression-free survival of patients with an FcγRIIIa 158Vallele was significantly longer compared with patients carrying 158F/F(P= 0.05), whereas no significant difference was observed for overall survival. Twenty-eight of 50 mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS received cetuximab. The average ADCC-mediated killing was 30% of assay targets for patients who experienced cetuximab complete or partial response, 21% in patients with stable disease and 9% in patients with progressive disease. To characterize basal natural killer (NK) activity, cytotoxicity was evaluated in 39 of 96 mCRC patients. Patients who responded to first-line treatment had higher NK-cell cytotoxicity. Thus, although limited to this cohort of patients,in vitrocetuximab-mediated ADCC correlated with FcγR polymorphisms and predicted cetuximab responsiveness.Cancer Immunol Res; 4(4); 366-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26817995

  13. Dashboard systems: Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic mediated dose optimization for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R; Dubinsky, Marla C

    2015-03-01

    Many marketed drugs exhibit high variability in exposure and response. While these drugs are efficacious in their approved indications, finding appropriate dose regimens for individual patients is not straightforward. Similar dose adjustment problems are also seen with drugs that have a complex relationship between exposure and response and/or a narrow therapeutic window. This is particularly true for monoclonal antibodies, where prolonged dosing at a sub-therapeutic dose can also elicit anti-drug antibodies which will further compromise safety and efficacy. Thus, finding appropriate doses quickly would represent a substantial improvement in healthcare. Dashboard systems, which are decision-support tools, offer an improved, convenient means of tailoring treatment for individual patients. This article reviews the clinical need for this approach, particularly with monoclonal antibodies, the design, development, and testing of such systems, and the likely benefits of dashboard systems in clinical practice. We focus on infliximab for reference. PMID:25707964

  14. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of the Exotoxin Mycolactone, the Main Virulence Factor Produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Dangy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycolactone, the macrolide exotoxin produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans, causes extensive tissue destruction by inducing apoptosis of host cells. In this study, we aimed at the production of antibodies that could neutralize the cytotoxic activities of mycolactone.Using the B cell hybridoma technology, we generated a series of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for mycolactone from spleen cells of mice immunized with the protein conjugate of a truncated synthetic mycolactone derivative. L929 fibroblasts were used as a model system to investigate whether these antibodies can inhibit the biological effects of mycolactone. By measuring the metabolic activity of the fibroblasts, we found that anti-mycolactone mAbs can completely neutralize the cytotoxic activity of mycolactone.The toxin neutralizing capacity of anti-mycolactone mAbs supports the concept of evaluating the macrolide toxin as vaccine target.

  15. Chronic Renal Transplant Rejection and Possible Anti-Proliferative Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of renal transplants is increasing with time, and renal transplantation is the only definite treatment for end-stage renal disease. We have limited the acute and late acute rejection of kidney allografts, but the long-term survival of renal tissues still remains a difficult and unanswered question as most of the renal transplants undergo failure within a decade of their transplantation. Among various histopathological changes that signify chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), tubular atrophy, fibrous thickening of the arteries, fibrosis of the kidney interstitium, and glomerulosclerosis are the most important. Moreover, these structural changes are followed by a decline in the kidney function as well. The underlying mechanism that triggers the long-term rejection of renal transplants involves both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. T cells, with their related cytokines, cause tissue damage. In addition, CD 20+ B cells and their antibodies play an important role in the long-term graft rejection. Other risk factors that predispose a recipient to long-term graft rejection include HLA-mismatching, acute episodes of graft rejection, mismatch in donor-recipient age, and smoking. The purpose of this review article is the analyze current literature and find different anti-proliferative agents that can suppress the immune system and can thus contribute to the long-term survival of renal transplants. The findings of this review paper can be helpful in understanding the long-term survival of renal transplants and various ways to improve it. PMID:26677426

  16. The Natural History of Biopsy-Negative Rejection after Heart Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyi Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The most recent International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT biopsy scale classifies cellular and antibody-mediated rejections. However, there are cases with acute decline in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≤ 45% but no evidence of rejection on biopsy. Characteristics and treatment response of this biopsy negative rejection (BNR have yet to be elucidated. Methods. Between 2002 and 2012, we found 12 cases of BNR in 11 heart transplant patients as previously defined. One of the 11 patients was treated a second time for BNR. Characteristics and response to treatment were noted. Results. 12 cases (of 11 patients were reviewed and 11 occurred during the first year after transplant. 8 cases without heart failure symptoms were treated with an oral corticosteroids bolus and taper or intravenous immunoglobulin. Four cases with heart failure symptoms were treated with thymoglobulin, intravenous immunoglobulin, and intravenous methylprednisolone followed by an oral corticosteroids bolus and taper. Overall, 7 cases resulted in return to normal left ventricular function within a mean of 14 ± 10 days from the initial biopsy. Conclusion. BNR includes cardiac dysfunction and can be a severe form of rejection. Characteristics of these cases of rejection are described with most cases responding to appropriate therapy.

  17. Vascularized composite allotransplantation: current standards and novel approaches to prevent acute rejection and chronic allograft deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Fischer, Sebastian; Seyda, Midas; Bueno, Ericka M; Aycart, Mario A; Alhefzi, Muayyad; ElKhal, Abdallah; Pomahac, Bohdan; Tullius, Stefan G

    2016-06-01

    The advent of more potent immunosuppressants led to the first successful human upper extremity transplantation in 1998. At this time, >100 upper extremity transplants, 30 face transplants, and a variety of other vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) procedures have been performed around the world. VCA recipients present unique challenges for transplantation. The incidence of acute rejection exceeds 80% in hand and face transplantation and is well documented, whereas reports about antibody-mediated rejection and chronic rejection remain scarce. Immunosuppression protocols commonly used at US centers are derived from solid organ transplantation protocols. Novel approaches to minimize rejections in VCA may include improved HLA matching and considerations toward cytomegalovirus infection status. New graft preservation techniques may decrease immunogenicity prior to transplant. Novel monitoring methods such as valid biomarkers, ultrasound biomicroscopy, and sentinel flaps may enable earlier diagnosis of rejection. Cell-based therapies are being explored to achieve immunosuppressive regimen minimization or even tolerance induction. The efficacy of local immunosuppression in clinical VCA remains controversial. In conclusion, although immunosuppressive strategies adapted from SOT have demonstrated good midterm results, focusing on the unique features of VCA grafts may enable additional, more specific treatment strategies in the future and improved long-term graft outcomes. PMID:26265179

  18. Impact of donor-specific antibodies on the outcomes of kidney graft: Pathophysiology, clinical, therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2014-03-24

    Allo-antibodies, particularly when donor specific, are one of the most important factors that cause both early and late graft dysfunction. The authors review the current state of the art concerning this important issue in renal transplantation. Many antibodies have been recognized as mediators of renal injury. In particular donor-specific-Human Leukocyte Antigens antibodies appear to play a major role. New techniques, such as solid phase techniques and Luminex, have revealed these antibodies from patient sera. Other new techniques have uncovered alloantibodies and signs of complement activation in renal biopsy specimens. It has been acknowledged that the old concept of chronic renal injury caused by calcineurine inhibitors toxicity should be replaced in many cases by alloantibodies acting against the graft. In addition, the number of patients on waiting lists with preformed anti-human leukocyte antigens (HLA) antibodies is increasing, primarily from patients with a history of renal transplant failure already been sensitized. We should distinguish early and late acute antibody-mediated rejection from chronic antibody-mediated rejection. The latter often manifets late during the course of the post-transplant period and may be difficult to recognize if specific techniques are not applied. Different therapeutic strategies are used to control antibody-induced damage. These strategies may be applied prior to transplantation or, in the case of acute antibody-mediated rejection, after transplantation. Many new drugs are appearing at the horizon; however, these drugs are far from the clinic because they are in phase I-II of clinical trials. Thus the pipeline for the near future appears almost empty. PMID:24669363

  19. The strong in vivo anti-tumor effect of the UIC2 monoclonal antibody is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Szalóki

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein (Pgp extrudes a large variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cells, causing multidrug resistance (MDR. The UIC2 monoclonal antibody recognizes human Pgp and inhibits its drug transport activity. However, this inhibition is partial, since UIC2 binds only to 10-40% of cell surface Pgps, while the rest becomes accessible to this antibody only in the presence of certain substrates or modulators (e.g. cyclosporine A (CsA. The combined addition of UIC2 and 10 times lower concentrations of CsA than what is necessary for Pgp inhibition when the modulator is applied alone, decreased the EC50 of doxorubicin (DOX in KB-V1 (Pgp+ cells in vitro almost to the level of KB-3-1 (Pgp- cells. At the same time, UIC2 alone did not affect the EC50 value of DOX significantly. In xenotransplanted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mice co-treated with DOX, UIC2 and CsA, the average weight of Pgp+ tumors was only ∼10% of the untreated control and in 52% of these animals we could not detect tumors at all, while DOX treatment alone did not decrease the weight of Pgp+ tumors. These data were confirmed by visualizing the tumors in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET based on their increased 18FDG accumulation. Unexpectedly, UIC2+DOX treatment also decreased the size of tumors compared to the DOX only treated animals, as opposed to the results of our in vitro cytotoxicity assays, suggesting that immunological factors are also involved in the antitumor effect of in vivo UIC2 treatment. Since UIC2 binding itself did not affect the viability of Pgp expressing cells, but it triggered in vitro cell killing by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, it is concluded that the impressive in vivo anti-tumor effect of the DOX-UIC2-CsA treatment is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC.

  20. The strong in vivo anti-tumor effect of the UIC2 monoclonal antibody is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalóki, Gábor; Krasznai, Zoárd T; Tóth, Ágnes; Vízkeleti, Laura; Szöllősi, Attila G; Trencsényi, György; Lajtos, Imre; Juhász, István; Krasznai, Zoltán; Márián, Teréz; Balázs, Margit; Szabó, Gábor; Goda, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) extrudes a large variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cells, causing multidrug resistance (MDR). The UIC2 monoclonal antibody recognizes human Pgp and inhibits its drug transport activity. However, this inhibition is partial, since UIC2 binds only to 10-40% of cell surface Pgps, while the rest becomes accessible to this antibody only in the presence of certain substrates or modulators (e.g. cyclosporine A (CsA)). The combined addition of UIC2 and 10 times lower concentrations of CsA than what is necessary for Pgp inhibition when the modulator is applied alone, decreased the EC50 of doxorubicin (DOX) in KB-V1 (Pgp+) cells in vitro almost to the level of KB-3-1 (Pgp-) cells. At the same time, UIC2 alone did not affect the EC50 value of DOX significantly. In xenotransplanted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice co-treated with DOX, UIC2 and CsA, the average weight of Pgp+ tumors was only ∼10% of the untreated control and in 52% of these animals we could not detect tumors at all, while DOX treatment alone did not decrease the weight of Pgp+ tumors. These data were confirmed by visualizing the tumors in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) based on their increased 18FDG accumulation. Unexpectedly, UIC2+DOX treatment also decreased the size of tumors compared to the DOX only treated animals, as opposed to the results of our in vitro cytotoxicity assays, suggesting that immunological factors are also involved in the antitumor effect of in vivo UIC2 treatment. Since UIC2 binding itself did not affect the viability of Pgp expressing cells, but it triggered in vitro cell killing by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), it is concluded that the impressive in vivo anti-tumor effect of the DOX-UIC2-CsA treatment is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). PMID:25238617

  1. Investigation of anti-WI-1 adhesin antibody-mediated protection in experimental pulmonary blastomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, M; Klein, B S

    2000-05-01

    Infection with Blastomyces dermatitidis elicits strong antibody responses to the surface adhesin WI-1. The antibodies are directed chiefly against the adhesive domain, a 25-amino-acid repeat. Tandem-repeat-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were studied for their opsonic activity in vitro and their capacity to adoptively transfer protection in murine experimental blastomycosis. mAbs to WI-1 enhanced binding and entry of B. dermatitidis yeasts into J774. 16 cells but did not enhance killing or growth inhibition of the yeast. Passive transfer of 8 mAbs to WI-1 into 3 different inbred strains of mice also did not improve the course of experimental infection and sometimes worsened it. mu-deficient mice were more resistant to experimental blastomycosis than were intact littermates, and passive transfer of the mAbs into these mice did not protect them against experimental infection. Thus, antibody to WI-1 does not appear to improve the outcome of murine blastomycosis and may enhance the infection. PMID:10823774

  2. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E;

    1999-01-01

    Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance or...

  3. Opsonization of Treponema pallidum is mediated by immunoglobulin G antibodies induced only by pathogenic treponemes.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaffer, J M; Baker-Zander, S A; Lukehart, S A

    1993-01-01

    Rabbit antisera to Leptospira interrogans, Borrelia hermsii, and Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter, reactive to shared spirochetal antigens, failed to enhance phagocytosis of Treponema pallidum by macrophages, while immunoglobulin G to Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue and Treponema paraluiscuniculi promoted phagocytosis. Opsonic antibodies are directed to pathogen-restricted, not shared spirochetal, antigens.

  4. HVR1-mediated antibody evasion of highly infectious in vivo adapted HCV in humanised mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentoe, Jannick; Verhoye, Lieven; Velázquez Moctezuma, Rodrigo;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: HCV is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, but the role of neutralising antibodies (nAbs) in its natural history remains poorly defined. We analysed the in vivo role of hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) for HCV virion properties, including nAb susceptibility. DESIGN: Analysis...... using HVR1-deleted viruses as vaccine antigens to boost broadly reactive protective nAb responses....

  5. Characterization of antibody-mediated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, M; Reen, D J

    1992-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system was developed and used to study adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to human epithelial cells and the abilities of specific antibodies to inhibit this process. Human buccal epithelial cells coated onto microtiter plates were incubated with P. aeruginosa suspensions, and adherent bacteria were detected by using anti-P. aeruginosa serum and a horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antiserum. Adhesion, quantitated as an increase in A405, varied lin...

  6. Suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 expression inhibits cytokine-mediated destruction of primary mouse and rat pancreatic islets and delays allograft rejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, S G; Börjesson, A; Bruun, C; Heding, P E; Frobøse, H; Mandrup-Poulsen, T; Karlsen, A E; Rasschaert, J; Sandler, S; Billestrup, Nils

    2008-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and IFNgamma are critical molecules in immune-mediated beta cell destruction leading to type 1 diabetes mellitus. Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 inhibits the cytokine-mediated destruction of insulinoma-1 cells. Here we investigate the effect of SOCS...

  7. Complement and Antibody-mediated Enhancement of Red Blood Cell Invasion and Growth of Malaria Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, Sergei; Angov, Evelina; Landmesser, Mary E; Spring, Michele D; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Stoute, José A

    2016-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a deadly pathogen. The invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by merozoites is a target for vaccine development. Although anti-merozoite antibodies can block invasion in vitro, there is no efficacy in vivo. To explain this discrepancy we hypothesized that complement activation could enhance RBC invasion by binding to the complement receptor 1 (CR1). Here we show that a monoclonal antibody directed against the merozoite and human polyclonal IgG from merozoite vaccine recipients enhanced RBC invasion in a complement-dependent manner and that soluble CR1 inhibited this enhancement. Sialic acid-independent strains, that presumably are able to bind to CR1 via a native ligand, showed less complement-dependent enhancement of RBC invasion than sialic acid-dependent strains that do not utilize native CR1 ligands. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that complement-dependent invasion resulted in aggregation of CR1 at the RBC surface in contact with the merozoite. Finally, total anti-P. berghei IgG enhanced parasite growth and C3 deficiency decreased parasite growth in mice. These results demonstrate, contrary to current views, that complement activation in conjunction with antibodies can paradoxically aid parasites invade RBCs and should be considered in future design and testing of merozoite vaccines. PMID:27333049

  8. Antibody-mediated neutralization of Ebola virus can occur by two distinct mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever disease with high mortality and there is no vaccine or treatment. Antibodies in survivors occur early, are sustained, and can delay infection when transferred into nonhuman primates. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from survivors exhibit potent neutralizing activity in vitro and are protective in rodents. To better understand targets and mechanisms of neutralization, we investigated a panel of mAbs shown previously to react with the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While one non-neutralizing mAb recognized a GP epitope in the nonessential mucin-like domain, the rest were specific for GP1, were neutralizing, and could be further distinguished by reactivity with secreted GP. We show that survivor antibodies, human KZ52 and monkey JP3K11, were specific for conformation-dependent epitopes comprising residues in GP1 and GP2 and that neutralization occurred by two distinct mechanisms; KZ52 inhibited cathepsin cleavage of GP whereas JP3K11 recognized the cleaved, fusion-active form of GP.

  9. Rationale and design of the RIACT–study: a multi-center placebo controlled double blind study to test the efficacy of RItuximab in Acute Cellular tubulointerstitial rejection with B-cell infiltrates in renal Transplant patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute kidney allograft rejection is a major cause for declining graft function and has a negative impact on the long-term graft survival. The majority (90%) of acute rejections are T-cell mediated and, therefore, the anti-rejection therapy targets T-cell-mediated mechanisms of the rejection process. However, there is increasing evidence that intragraft B-cells are also important in the T-cell-mediated rejections. First, a significant proportion of patients with acute T-cell-mediated rejection have B-cells present in the infiltrates. Second, the outcome of these patients is inferior, which has been related to an inferior response to the conventional anti-rejection therapy. Third, treatment of these patients with an anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) improves the allograft outcome as reported in single case observations and in one small study. Despite the promise of these observations, solid evidence is required before incorporating this treatment option into a general treatment recommendation. Methods/Design The RIACT study is designed as a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group multicenter Phase III study. The study examines whether rituximab, in addition to the standard treatment with steroid-boli, leads to an improved one-year kidney allograft function, compared to the standard treatment alone in patients with acute T-cell mediated tubulointerstitial rejection and significant B-cell infiltrates in their biopsies. A total of 180 patients will be recruited. Discussion It is important to clarify the relevance of anti-B cell targeting in T-cell mediated rejection and answer the question whether this novel concept should be incorporated in the conventional anti-rejection therapy. Trial registration Clinical trials gov. number: NCT01117662 PMID:23101480

  10. Rationale and design of the RIACT–study: a multi-center placebo controlled double blind study to test the efficacy of RItuximab in Acute Cellular tubulointerstitial rejection with B-cell infiltrates in renal Transplant patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiffer Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute kidney allograft rejection is a major cause for declining graft function and has a negative impact on the long-term graft survival. The majority (90% of acute rejections are T-cell mediated and, therefore, the anti-rejection therapy targets T-cell-mediated mechanisms of the rejection process. However, there is increasing evidence that intragraft B-cells are also important in the T-cell-mediated rejections. First, a significant proportion of patients with acute T-cell-mediated rejection have B-cells present in the infiltrates. Second, the outcome of these patients is inferior, which has been related to an inferior response to the conventional anti-rejection therapy. Third, treatment of these patients with an anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab improves the allograft outcome as reported in single case observations and in one small study. Despite the promise of these observations, solid evidence is required before incorporating this treatment option into a general treatment recommendation. Methods/Design The RIACT study is designed as a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group multicenter Phase III study. The study examines whether rituximab, in addition to the standard treatment with steroid-boli, leads to an improved one-year kidney allograft function, compared to the standard treatment alone in patients with acute T-cell mediated tubulointerstitial rejection and significant B-cell infiltrates in their biopsies. A total of 180 patients will be recruited. Discussion It is important to clarify the relevance of anti-B cell targeting in T-cell mediated rejection and answer the question whether this novel concept should be incorporated in the conventional anti-rejection therapy. Trial registration Clinical trials gov. number: NCT01117662

  11. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ. Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848, respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs.

  12. Potential for Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity for Control of Human Cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J. Aicheler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is an important pathogen that infects the majority of the population worldwide, yet, currently, there is no licensed vaccine. Despite HCMV encoding at least seven Natural Killer (NK cell evasion genes, NK cells remain critical for the control of infection in vivo. Classically Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC is mediated by CD16, which is found on the surface of the NK cell in a complex with FcεRI-γ chains and/or CD3ζ chains. Ninety percent of NK cells express the Fc receptor CD16; thus, they have the potential to initiate ADCC. HCMV has a profound effect on the NK cell repertoire, such that up to 10-fold expansions of NKG2C+ cells can be seen in HCMV seropositive individuals. These NKG2C+ cells are reported to be FcεRI-γ deficient and possess variable levels of CD16+, yet have striking ADCC functions. A subset of HCMV cell surface proteins will induce robust antibody responses that could render cells susceptible to ADCC. We will consider how the strong anti-HCMV function of NKG2C+ FcεRI-γ-deficient NK cells could potentially be harnessed in the clinic to treat patients suffering from HCMV disease and in the development of an efficacious HCMV vaccine.

  13. B7h-expressing dendritic cells and plasma B cells mediate distinct outcomes of ICOS costimulation in T cell-dependent antibody responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimore Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ICOS-B7h costimulatory receptor-ligand pair is required for germinal center formation, the production of isotype-switched antibodies, and antibody affinity maturation in response to T cell-dependent antigens. However, the potentially distinct roles of regulated B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in T cell-dependent antibody responses have not been defined. Results We generated transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression to assess the cell-type specific roles of B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in regulating T cell-dependent antibody responses. Our results show that endogenous B7h expression is reduced on B cells after activation in vitro and is also reduced in vivo on antibody-secreting plasma B cells in comparison to both naïve and germinal center B cells from which they are derived. Increasing the level of B7h expression on activated and plasma B cells in B-B7hTg mice led to an increase in the number of antibody-secreting plasma cells generated after immunization and a corresponding increase in the concentration of antigen-specific high affinity serum IgG antibodies of all isotypes, without affecting the number of responding germinal center B cells. In contrast, ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells in DC-B7hTg mice contributed to germinal center formation and selectively increased IgG2a production without affecting the overall magnitude of antibody responses. Conclusions Using transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression, we have revealed distinct roles of ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells and B cells in the regulation of T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  14. Antimyosin imaging in cardiac transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.L.; Cannon, P.J. (Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Fab fragments of antibodies specific for cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 and injected intravenously into animals and into patients with heart transplants. The antibodies, developed by Khaw, Haber, and co-workers, localize in cardiac myocytes that have been damaged irreversibly by ischemia, myocarditis, or the rejection process. After clearance of the labeled antibody from the cardiac blood pool, planar imaging or single photon emission computed tomography is performed. Scintigrams reveal the uptake of the labeled antimyosin in areas of myocardium undergoing transplant rejection. In animal studies, the degree of antimyosin uptake appears to correlate significantly with the degree of rejection assessed at necropsy. In patients, the correlation between scans and pathologic findings from endomyocardial biopsy is not as good, possibly because of sampling error in the endomyocardial biopsy technique. The scan results at 1 year correlate with either late complications (positive) or benign course (negative). Current limitations of the method include slow blood clearance, long half-life of indium-111, and hepatic uptake. Overcoming these limitations represents a direction for current research. It is possible that from these efforts a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiac transplantation may evolve that will decrease the number of endomyocardial biopsies required to evaluate rejection. This would be particularly useful in infants and children. 31 references.

  15. Antimyosin imaging in cardiac transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fab fragments of antibodies specific for cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 and injected intravenously into animals and into patients with heart transplants. The antibodies, developed by Khaw, Haber, and co-workers, localize in cardiac myocytes that have been damaged irreversibly by ischemia, myocarditis, or the rejection process. After clearance of the labeled antibody from the cardiac blood pool, planar imaging or single photon emission computed tomography is performed. Scintigrams reveal the uptake of the labeled antimyosin in areas of myocardium undergoing transplant rejection. In animal studies, the degree of antimyosin uptake appears to correlate significantly with the degree of rejection assessed at necropsy. In patients, the correlation between scans and pathologic findings from endomyocardial biopsy is not as good, possibly because of sampling error in the endomyocardial biopsy technique. The scan results at 1 year correlate with either late complications (positive) or benign course (negative). Current limitations of the method include slow blood clearance, long half-life of indium-111, and hepatic uptake. Overcoming these limitations represents a direction for current research. It is possible that from these efforts a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiac transplantation may evolve that will decrease the number of endomyocardial biopsies required to evaluate rejection. This would be particularly useful in infants and children. 31 references

  16. Antibody-mediated red blood cell agglutination resulting in spontaneous echocardiographic contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M R; Thompson, W R; Casella, J F; Spevak, P J

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous echocardiographic contrast is well reported in states of low flow and low shear stress, and the primary blood component involved has been reported as red blood cells via rouleaux formation. This report describes the occurrence of spontaneous echocardiographic contrast from a unique mechanism of IgM-mediated red blood cell agglutination and describes the clinical sequelae. PMID:10368455

  17. Long antibody HCDR3s from HIV-naïve donors presented on a PG9 neutralizing antibody background mediate HIV neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jordan R; Finn, Jessica A; Briney, Bryan; Sapparapu, Gopal; Singh, Vidisha; King, Hannah; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Meiler, Jens; Crowe, James E

    2016-04-19

    Development of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV-1 usually requires prolonged infection and induction of Abs with unusual features, such as long heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) loops. Here we sought to determine whether the repertoires of HIV-1-naïve individuals contain Abs with long HCDR3 loops that could mediate HIV-1 neutralization. We interrogated at massive scale the structural properties of long Ab HCDR3 loops in HIV-1-naïve donors, searching for structured HCDR3s similar to those of the HIV-1 bnAb PG9. We determined the nucleotide sequences encoding 2.3 × 10(7)unique HCDR3 amino acid regions from 70 different HIV-1-naïve donors. Of the 26,917 HCDR3 loops with 30-amino acid length identified, we tested 30 for further study that were predicted to have PG9-like structure when chimerized onto PG9. Three of these 30 PG9 chimeras bound to the HIV-1 gp120 monomer, and two were neutralizing. In addition, we found 14 naturally occurring HCDR3 sequences that acquired the ability to bind to the HIV-1 gp120 monomer when adding 2- to 7-amino acid mutations via computational design. Of those 14 designed Abs, 8 neutralized HIV-1, with IC50values ranging from 0.7 to 98 µg/mL. These data suggest that the repertoire of HIV-1-naïve individuals contains rare B cells that encode HCDR3 loops that bind or neutralize HIV-1 when presented on a PG9 background with relatively few or no additional mutations. Long HCDR3 sequences are present in the HIV-naïve B-cell repertoire, suggesting that this class of bnAbs is a favorable target for rationally designed preventative vaccine efforts. PMID:27044078

  18. Mediation of cytotoxic functions by classes and subclasses of sheep antibody reactive with cell surface immunoglobulin idiotypic and constant region determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheep antibodies, reactive with either the idiotypic or constant region antigenic determinants of the immunoglobulin light chain in guinea-pig L2C leukaemic cells, were separated into IgM and into the two subclasses of IgG, IgG1 and IgG2. Antibody of both IgG subclasses inhibited the migration of L2C cells along plastic surfaces; IgM was only weakly inhibitory. Antibody of class IgM and of subclass IgG1 mediated complement cytotoxicity against the L2C cells whereas only that of subclass IgG2 mediated K-cell cytotoxicity; the effector arms were rabbit complement and sheep peripheral leucocytes, respectively. (author)

  19. Continuous reject analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of continuous film reject analysis conducted within the Medical Imaging Department of the Prince Charles Hospital over a thirty month period are reported. A computer program to record reject films was installed as part of normal computerized operations of the Department. This required discarded films to be recorded according to site, reason and operator. Repeat/reject rates in chest examinations that differ significantly from reported acceptable reject rates are described. It is suggested that previously reported overall repeat rates of 10% to 14%, which are heavily influenced by the frequency of chest examinations, should not be regarded as normal. The findings from the survey provide data that is both consistent and inconsistent with previous studies. The implications of the results with respect to costs, radiation exposure, student training and the need to monitor continuously reject rates to maintain suitable standards are commented on. 8 figs

  20. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB)

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory ePancari; Hongxia eFan; Sharon eSmith; Amita eJoshi; Robin eHaimbach; Desmond eClark; Yingzhe eLi; Jin eHua; Troy eMcKelvey; Yangsi eOu; James eDrummond; Leslie eCope; Donna eMontgomery; Tessie eMcNeely

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1) with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB) of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17), not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. Th...

  1. Complement-mediated bactericidal activity of human antibodies to poly alpha 2-->8 N-acetylneuraminic acid, the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrell, R E; Azmi, F H; Granoff, D M

    1995-11-01

    Serum antibodies to Neisseria meningitidis group B (MenB) polysaccharide are reported not to elicit bacteriolysis in the presence of human complement. To reexamine this question, we evaluated the ability of two human IgM anti-MenB polysaccharide monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and seven human MenB polysaccharide-reactive human IgM paraproteins to elicit bacteriolysis. In the presence of human complement, both MAbs and five of the seven paraproteins were bactericidal at antibody concentrations of 0.25-9.6 micrograms/mL (50% killing). Activity of the respective antibodies was enhanced 200- to > 10,000-fold when rabbit complement was used instead of human complement. With rabbit complement, the bactericidal activity of human IgM polyclonal antibody or MAb to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) polysaccharide but not human IgG polyclonal antibody or MAb to Hib polysaccharide was similarly augmented. Thus, for both MenB and Hib, IgM antipolysaccharide antibodies elicit complement-mediated bactericidal activity in the presence of human complement, and the use of rabbit complement yields spuriously high activity. PMID:7594665

  2. Vascular Endothelium as a Target of Immune Response in Renal Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotti, Giovanni; Palmisano, Alessandra; Maggiore, Umberto; Buzio, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    This review of clinical and experimental studies aims at analyzing the interplay between graft endothelium and host immune system in renal transplantation, and how it affects the survival of the graft. Graft endothelium is indeed the first barrier between self and non-self that is encountered by host lymphocytes upon reperfusion of vascularized solid transplants. Endothelial cells (EC) express all the major sets of antigens (Ag) that elicit host immune response, and therefore represent a preferential target in organ rejection. Some of the Ag expressed by EC are target of the antibody-mediated response, such as the AB0 blood group system, the human leukocyte antigens (HLA), and MHC class I related chain A antigens (MICA) systems, and the endothelial cell-restricted Ag; for each of these systems, the mechanisms of interaction and damage of both preformed and de novo donor-specific antibodies are reviewed along with their impact on renal graft survival. Moreover, the rejection process can force injured EC to expose cryptic self-Ag, toward which an autoimmune response mounts, overlapping to the allo-immune response in the damaging of the graft. Not only are EC a passive target of the host immune response but also an active player in lymphocyte activation; therefore, their interaction with allogenic T-cells is analyzed on the basis of experimental in vitro and in vivo studies, according to the patterns of expression of the HLA class I and II and the co-stimulatory molecules specific for cytotoxic and helper T-cells. Finally, as the response that follows transplantation has proven to be not necessarily destructive, the factors that foster graft endothelium functioning in spite of rejection, and how they could be therapeutically harnessed to promote long-term graft acceptance, are described: accommodation that is resistance of EC to donor-specific antibodies, and endothelial cell ability to induce Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells, that are crucial mediators of tolerance. PMID

  3. HVR1-mediated antibody evasion of highly infectious in vivo adapted HCV in humanised mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentoe, Jannick; Verhoye, Lieven; Velázquez Moctezuma, Rodrigo; Buysschaert, Caroline; Farhoudi, Ali; Wang, Richard; Alter, Harvey; Meuleman, Philip; Bukh, Jens

    2016-01-01

    of HCV from human liver chimeric mice infected with cell-culture-derived prototype genotype 2a recombinant J6/JFH1 or HVR1-deleted variant J6/JFH1ΔHVR1 identified adaptive mutations, which were analysed by reverse genetics in Huh7.5 and CD81-deficient S29 cells. The increased in vivo genomic......OBJECTIVE: HCV is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, but the role of neutralising antibodies (nAbs) in its natural history remains poorly defined. We analysed the in vivo role of hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) for HCV virion properties, including nAb susceptibility. DESIGN: Analysis...... identified A876P-substitution resulted in a 4.7-fold increase in genomic stability. In vitro, NS2 substitutions enhanced infectivity 5-10-fold by increasing virus assembly. Mouse-derived mJ6/JFH1A876P and mJ6/JFH1ΔHVR1/A876P viruses displayed similar heterogeneous densities of 1.02-1.1 g/mL. Human liver...

  4. Mechanisms mediating enhanced neutralization efficacy of staphylococcal enterotoxin B by combinations of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Kaushik; Varshney, Avanish K; Franklin, Matthew C; Goger, Michael; Wang, Xiaobo; Fries, Bettina C

    2015-03-13

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a superantigen that cross-links the major histocompatibility complex class II and specific V-β chains of the T-cell receptor, thus forming a ternary complex. Developing neutralizing mAb to disrupt the ternary complex and abrogate the resulting toxicity is a major therapeutic challenge because SEB is effective at very low concentrations. We show that combining two SEB-specific mAbs enhances their efficacy, even though one of the two mAbs by itself has no effect on neutralization. Crystallography was employed for fine-mapping conformational epitopes in binary and ternary complexes between SEB and Fab fragments. NMR spectroscopy was used to validate and identify subtle allosteric changes induced by mAbs binding to SEB. The mapping of epitopes established that a combination of different mAbs can enhance efficacy of mAb-mediated protection from SEB induced lethal shock by two different mechanisms: one mAb mixture promoted clearance of the toxin both in vitro and in vivo by FcR-mediated cross-linking and clearance, whereas the other mAb mixture induced subtle allosteric conformational changes in SEB that perturbed formation of the SEB·T-cell receptor·major histocompatibility complex class II trimer. Finally structural information accurately predicted mAb binding to other superantigens that share conformational epitopes with SEB. Fine mapping of conformational epitopes is a powerful tool to establish the mechanism and optimize the action of synergistic mAb combinations. PMID:25572397

  5. Elevated ST2 Distinguishes Incidences of Pediatric Heart and Small Bowel Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, L R; Lott, J M; Isse, K; Lesniak, A; Landsittel, D; Demetris, A J; Sun, Y; Mercer, D F; Webber, S A; Zeevi, A; Fischer, R T; Feingold, B; Turnquist, H R

    2016-03-01

    Elevated serum soluble (s) suppressor of tumorigenicity-2 is observed during cardiovascular and inflammatory bowel diseases. To ascertain whether modulated ST2 levels signify heart (HTx) or small bowel transplant (SBTx) rejection, we quantified sST2 in serially obtained pediatric HTx (n = 41) and SBTx recipient (n = 18) sera. At times of biopsy-diagnosed HTx rejection (cellular and/or antibody-mediated), serum sST2 was elevated compared to rejection-free time points (1714 ± 329 vs. 546.5 ± 141.6 pg/mL; p = 0.0002). SBTx recipients also displayed increased serum sST2 during incidences of rejection (7536 ± 1561 vs. 2662 ± 543.8 pg/mL; p = 0.0347). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that serum sST2 > 600 pg/mL could discriminate time points of HTx rejection and nonrejection (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.724 ± 0.053; p = 0.0003). ROC analysis of SBTx measures revealed a similar discriminative capacity (AUC = 0.6921 ± 0.0820; p = 0.0349). Quantitative evaluation of both HTx and SBTx biopsies revealed that rejection significantly increased allograft ST2 expression. Pathway and Network Analysis of biopsy data pinpointed ST2 in the dominant pathway modulated by rejection and predicted tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β as upstream activators. In total, our data indicate that alloimmune-associated pro-inflammatory cytokines increase ST2 during rejection. They also demonstrate that routine serum sST2 quantification, potentially combined with other biomarkers, should be investigated further to aid in the noninvasive diagnosis of rejection. PMID:26663613

  6. Rejection in the cardiac transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard chest radiography remains the most frequent applied method for monitoring post surgical cardiac transplant patients. Evidence suggests that after the 1st month cardiac enlargement is indeed a useful indicator of rejection, sometimes being caused by pericardial effusion and/or changes in left ventricular mass. Opportunistic infections, either pulmonary lesions or mediastinal abscesses, as well as malignant tumours may all occur and require evaluation or exclusion. Conventional computed transmission tomography is an excellent technique for surveying the entire thorax relatively non-invasively and is recommended whenever pulmonary, cardiac or mediastinal changes are unexplained. Coronary arteriography with or without digital subtraction remains the definitive method for examining the coronary arteries. Left ventricular function can be evaluated with either angiography or other non-invasive methods including such techniques as echocardiography and nuclear medicine. More recently monoclonal antibody labels for antimyosin show promise for identifying rejection. Ultrafast CT scanning is now available in a number of centres. It allows millisecond cross-sectional cine-tomography of the heart as well as of the whole chest, and also provides 3-D quantitative analyses of end-diastolic and systolic function including regional wall thickening dynamics and estimations of myocardial mass. Right, as well as left-sided cardiac chambers, are demonstrated routinely during the same ultrafast CT procedure. MRI, like ultrafast CT, is a new technique still being explored. MRI as well as MR spectroscopy are regarded as diagnostic radiology procedures. (author). 32 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Daratumumab-mediated lysis of primary multiple myeloma cells is enhanced in combination with the human anti-KIR antibody IPH2102 and lenalidomide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Inger S.; van Bueren, Jeroen J. Lammerts; van Kessel, Berris; Andre, Pascale; Morel, Yannis; Lokhorst, Henk M.; van de Donk, Niels W.C.J.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Mutis, Tuna

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent treatment improvements, multiple myeloma remains an incurable disease. Since antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity is an important effector mechanism of daratumumab, we explored the possibility of improving daratumumab-mediated cell-mediated cytotoxicity by blocking natural killer cell inhibitory receptors with the human monoclonal anti-KIR antibody IPH2102, next to activation of natural killer cells with the immune modulatory drug lenalidomide. In 4-hour antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, IPH2102 did not induce lysis of multiple myeloma cell lines, but it did significantly augment daratumumab-induced myeloma cell lysis. Also in an ex vivo setting, IPH2102 synergistically improved daratumumab-dependent lysis of primary myeloma cells in bone marrow mononuclear cells (n=21), especially in patients carrying the FcγRIIIa-158F allele or the FcγRIIa-131R allele, who bind IgG1 with lower affinity than patients carrying the FcγRIIIa-158V allele or the FcγRIIa-131H allele. Finally, a further synergistically improved myeloma cell lysis with the daratumumab-IPH2102 combination was observed by adding lenalidomide, which suggests that more effective treatment strategies can be designed for multiple myeloma by combining daratumumab with agents that independently modulate natural killer cell function. PMID:25510242

  8. Countering Rejection Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanselman, Peggy Riley

    1989-01-01

    Outlines a step-by-step approach for guidance counselors in holding a preliminary college planning conference with high school juniors and their families in order to help students subsequently deal with possible rejection from a college. (TE)

  9. Quantum rejection sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Ozols, Maris; Roland, Jérémie

    2011-01-01

    Rejection sampling is a well-known technique to sample from a target distribution, given the ability to sample from another distribution. The method has been first formalized by von Neumann (1951) and has many applications in classical computing. We define a quantum analogue of rejection sampling: given a black box producing a coherent superposition of quantum states with some amplitudes, the problem is to prepare a coherent superposition of the same states with different target amplitudes. The main result of this paper is a tight characterization of the query complexity of this quantum state generation problem. We exhibit an algorithm, which we call quantum rejection sampling, and analyze its cost using semidefinite programming. We prove a matching lower bound based on symmetrizing over the automorphism group of the problem and using a hybrid argument. Perhaps interestingly, the automorphism group turns out to be continuous in this case. Furthermore, we illustrate how quantum rejection sampling may be used a...

  10. Blockade of 4-1BB/4-1BB ligand interactions prevents acute rejection in rat liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Lei; GUAN Hong-geng; ZHOU Xiao-jun; YIN Jun; LAN Jing; QIAN Hai-xin

    2010-01-01

    Background Blocking the 4-1BB/4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL) signal may modulate the secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines and prolong the survival of the grafts, which play a key role in organ transplantation tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of blockade of the 4-1BB/4-1BBL co-stimulatory pathway with 4-1 BBL monoclonal antibody (mAB) in acute rejection of rat orthotopic liver transplantation. Methods The orthotopic liver transplantation model was set up, while male Lewis rats were used as liver donors and Brown-Norway rats as recipients. The recipient rats were intravenously injected with anti 4-1BBL mAB or isotype control antibody. Groups were monitored for graft survival after transplantation. Plasma chemistry, including aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and bilirubin (BIL), was assayed. The concentrations of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and interferon (IFN)- γ in plasma were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Allograft histology images were collected under light microscope and electron microscope. Results Isotype antibody treated recipients exhibited elevated plasma levels of liver injury markers including AST, ALT and BIL, progressive portal and venous inflammation and cellular infiltration of the liver allografts, and a mean graft survival time (MST) of 10.9 days. Administration of anti 4-1 BBL mAB resulted in a decrease in plasma levels of liver injury markers and the concentrations of IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ. The histological grade of rejection on day 7 decreased and MST (17.3 days) increased substantially.Conclusions These results demonstrate that attenuation of acute rejection follows the blockade of the 4-1BB/4-1BBL co-stimulatory pathway with 4-1BBL monoclonal antibody and strongly suggest it is a promising strategy to prevent progression of graft rejection by suppressing T cell-mediated immunity.

  11. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) Mediates IL-1β Induction by Primary Human Monocytes during Antibody-enhanced Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Justin B; Smith, Scott A; McKinnon, Karen P; de Silva, Aravinda M; Crowe, James E; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2015-07-10

    Approximately 500,000 people are hospitalized with severe dengue illness annually. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus (DENV) infection is believed to contribute to the pathogenic cytokine storm described in severe dengue patients, but the precise signaling pathways contributing to elevated cytokine production are not elucidated. IL-1β is a potent inflammatory cytokine that is frequently elevated during severe dengue, and the unique dual regulation of IL-1β provides an informative model to study ADE-induced cytokines. This work utilizes patient-derived anti-DENV mAbs and primary human monocytes to study ADE-induced IL-1β and other cytokines. ADE of DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2) elevates mature IL-1β secretion by monocytes independent of DENV replication by 4 h postinoculation (hpi). Prior to this, DENV immune complexes activate spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) within 1 hpi. Syk induces elevated IL1B, TNF, and IL6 mRNA by 2 hpi. Syk mediates elevated IL-1β secretion by activating ERK1/2, and both Syk and ERK1/2 inhibitors ablated ADE-induced IL-1β secretion. Maturation of pro-IL-1β during ADE requires caspase-1 and NLRP3, but caspase-1 is suboptimally increased by ADE and can be significantly enhanced by a typical inflammasome agonist, ATP. Importantly, this inflammatory Syk-ERK signaling axis requires DENV immune complexes, because DENV-2 in the presence of serotype-matched anti-DENV-2 mAb, but not anti-DENV-1 mAb, activates Syk, ERK, and IL-1β secretion. This study provides evidence that DENV-2 immune complexes activate Syk to mediate elevated expression of inflammatory cytokines. Syk and ERK may serve as new therapeutic targets for interfering with ADE-induced cytokine expression during severe dengue. PMID:26032420

  12. Early membrane rupture events during neutrophil-mediated antibody-dependent tumor cell cytolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindzelskii, A L; Petty, H R

    1999-03-15

    Although cell-mediated cytolysis is a fundamental immune effector response, its mechanism remains poorly understood at the cellular level. In this report, we image for the first time transient ruptures, as inferred by cytoplasmic marker release, in tumor cell membranes during Ab-dependent cellular cytolysis. The cytosol of IgG-opsonized YAC tumor cells was labeled with tetra-methylrhodamine diacetate followed by the formation of tumor cell-neutrophil conjugates. We hypothesized that tumor cell cytolysis proceeds via a series of discrete membrane rupture/resealing events that contribute to marker release. To test this hypothesis, we occluded the fluorescence image of the labeled tumor cells by passing an opaque disk into a field-conjugated plane between the light source and the sample. Multiple small bursts of fluorescent label release from tumor cells could be detected using a photomultiplier tube. Similarly, multiple fluorescent plumes were observed at various sites around the perimeter of a target. These findings support a multihit model of target cytolysis and suggest that cytolytic release is not focused at specific sites. Cytolytic bursts were generally observed at 20-s intervals, which match the previously described reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and superoxide release oscillation periods for neutrophils; we speculate that metabolic oscillations of the effector cell drive the membrane damage of the target. PMID:10092769

  13. Fab-mediated binding of drug-dependent antibodies to platelets in quinidine- and quinine-induced thrombocytopenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Christie, D J; Mullen, P C; Aster, R H

    1985-01-01

    Platelets coated with quinine- or quinidine-induced antibodies form rosettes around protein A-Sepharose beads and normal platelets form rosettes about protein A-Sepharose beads coated with these antibodies. These reactions occurred only in the presence of sensitizing drug. Platelets also formed rosettes about protein A-Sepharose beads coated with an anti-PIA1 antibody, but drug was not required. Formation of rosettes between antibody-coated platelets and protein A-Sepharose was inhibited by F...

  14. Corneal allograft rejection: Risk factors, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dua Harminder

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in corneal graft technology, including donor tissue retrieval, storage and surgical techniques, have greatly improved the clinical outcome of corneal grafts. Despite these advances, immune mediated corneal graft rejection remains the single most important cause of corneal graft failure. Several host factors have been identified as conferring a "high risk" status to the host. These include: more than two quadrant vascularisation, with associated lymphatics, which augment the afferent and efferent arc of the immune response; herpes simplex keratitis; uveitis; silicone oil keratopathy; previous failed (rejected grafts; "hot eyes"; young recipient age; and multiple surgical procedures at the time of grafting. Large grafts, by virtue of being closer to the host limbus, with its complement of vessels and antigen-presenting Langerhans cells, also are more susceptible to rejection. The diagnosis of graft rejection is entirely clinical and in its early stages the clinical signs could be subtle. Graft rejection is largely mediated by the major histocompatibility antigens, minor antigens and perhaps blood group ABO antigens and some cornea-specific antigens. Just as rejection is mediated by active immune mediated events, the lack of rejection (tolerance is also sustained by active immune regulatory mechanisms. The anterior chamber associated immune deviation (ACAID and probably, conjunctiva associated lymphoid tissue (CALT induced mucosal tolerance, besides others, play an important role. Although graft rejection can lead to graft failure, most rejections can be readily controlled if appropriate management is commenced at the proper time. Topical steroids are the mainstay of graft rejection management. In the high-risk situations however, systemic steroids, and other immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin and tacrolimus (FK506 are of proven benefit, both for treatment and prevention of rejection.

  15. ApoE Receptor 2 mediates trophoblast dysfunction and pregnancy complications induced by antiphospholipid antibodies in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Victoria; Gelber, Shari E.; Vukelic, Milena; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Herz, Joachim; Urbanus, Rolf T.; de Groot, Philip G.; Natale, David R.; Harihara, Anirudha; Redecha, Patricia; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Shaul, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pregnancies in women with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are frequently complicated by fetal loss and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). How circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) cause pregnancy complications in APS is poorly understood. We sought to determine if the LDL receptor family member apoE receptor 2 (apoER2) mediates trophoblast dysfunction and pregnancy complications induced by aPL. Methods Placental and trophoblast apoER2 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Normal human IgG (NHIgG) and aPL were purified from healthy individuals and APS patients, respectively. The role of apoER2 in aPL-induced changes in trophoblast proliferation, migration and kinase activation was assessed using RNA interference in HTR-8/SVneo cells. The participation of apoER2 in aPL-induced pregnancy loss and IUGR was evaluated in pregnant apoER2+/+ and apoER2−/− mice injected with aPL or NHIgG. Results We found that apoER2 is abundant in human and mouse placental trophoblasts, and in multiple trophoblast-derived cell lines including HTR-8/SVneo cells. ApoER2 and its interaction with the cell surface protein β2-glycoprotein I were required for aPL-induced inhibition of cultured trophoblast proliferation and migration. In parallel, aPL antagonism of Akt kinase activation by EGF in trophoblasts was mediated by apoER2. Furthermore, in a murine passive transfer model of pregnancy complications of APS, apoER2−/− mice were protected from both aPL-induced fetal loss and aPL-induced IUGR. Conclusion ApoER2 plays a major role in the attenuation of trophoblast function by aPL, and the receptor mediates aPL-induced pregnancy complications in vivo in mice. ApoER2-directed interventions can now potentially be developed to combat the pregnancy complications associated with APS. PMID:26474194

  16. Transgenic mice designed to express human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase in combination of human DAF and CD59 to avoid xenograft rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The expression of human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (HT) or complement regulatory proteins has been proved as an strategy to overcome hypercute rejection in discordant xenogeneic organ transplantation. In this study, we examined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from polytransgenic mice expressing the human HT, and complement regulatory proteins (DAF and CD59), can provide more effective protection against xenograft rejection. Transgenic mice were produced by co-injection of gene constructs for human HT, DAF and/or CD59. Flow Cytometry (FCM) was used to screen the positive transgenic mice. PBMCs from transgenic mice were incubated with 15% human serum to evaluate natural antibody binding, complement activation and expression of adhesion molecules. Three transgenes were strongly expressed in PBMCs of transgenic mice, and HT expression signifi- cantly reduced expression of the major xenoepitope galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal). Functional studies with PBMCs showed that co-expression of HT and DAF or CD59 markedly increased their re- sistance to human serum-mediated cytolysis when compared with single transgenic PBMCs. Moreover, the combined expression of triple transgenes in PBMCs led to the greatest protection against human serum-mediated cytolysis, avoided hyperacute rejection and reduced expression of adhesion mole- cules. Strong co-expression of triple transgenes was completely protected from xenograft hyperacute rejection and partially inhibited acute vascular rejection. The studies suggest that engineering mice to express triple molecules represents an critical step toward prolonging xenograft survival and might be more suitable for xenotransplantation.

  17. Hyperacute Rejection of a Living Unrelated Kidney Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietlind Tittelbach-Helmrich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case report of a 59-year-old man, who received a blood group identical living unrelated kidney graft. This was his second kidney transplantation. Pretransplant T-cell crossmatch resulted negative. B-cell crossmatch, which is not considered a strict contraindication for transplantation, resulted positive. During surgery no abnormalities occurred. Four hours after the transplantation diuresis suddenly decreased. In an immediately performed relaparotomy the transplanted kidney showed signs of hyperacute rejection and had to be removed. Pathological examination was consistent with hyperacute rejection. Depositions of IgM or IgG antibodies were not present in pathologic evaluation of the rejected kidney, suggesting that no irregular endothelial specific antibodies had been involved in the rejection. We recommend examining more closely recipients of second allografts, considering not only a positive T-cell crossmatch but also a positive B-cell crossmatch as exclusion criteria for transplantation.

  18. Anti-Glycoprotein G Antibodies of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Contribute to Complete Protection after Vaccination in Mice and Induce Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Mediated Cytolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Görander

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2 of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials.

  19. Heterosexual Rejection and Mate Choice: A Sociometer Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin eZHANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies about the effects of social rejection on individuals’ social behaviors have produced mixed results and tend to study mating behaviors from a static point of view. However, mate selection in essence is a dynamic process, and therefore sociometer theory opens up a new perspective for studying mating and its underlying practices. Based on this theory and using self-perceived mate value in the relationship between heterosexual rejection and mate choice as a mediating role, this current study examined the effects of heterosexual rejection on mate choice in two experiments. Results showed that heterosexual rejection significantly reduced self-perceived mate value, expectation, and behavioral tendencies, while heterosexual acceptance indistinctively increased these measures. Self-perceived mate value did not serve as a mediator in the relationship between heterosexual rejection and mate expectation, but it mediated the relationship between heterosexual rejection and mating behavior tendencies towards potential objects. Moreover, individuals evaded both rejection and irrelevant people when suffering from rejection.

  20. Immunologically mediated abortion (IMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomucci, E; Bulletti, C; Polli, V; Prefetto, R A; Flamigni, C

    1994-06-01

    Roughly 20% of all clinical pregnancies evolve into "spontaneous abortions". The causes of spontaneous abortion have been determined in under 60% of the total and comprise genetic, infectious, hormonal and immunological factors. In some cases the immune tolerance mechanism may be impaired and the foetus immunologically rejected (IMA, immunologically mediated abortion). The immunological mechanism implicated depends on the time in which pregnancy loss takes place. During preimplantation and up to the end of implantation (13th day) the cell-mediated immune mechanism (potential alloimmune etiologies) is responsible for early abortion. This mechanism involves immunocompetent decidual cells (eGL, endometrial granulated lymphocytes) already present during pre-decidualization (late luteal phase) and their production of soluble factors or cytokines. Once the implantation process is over, after blastocyst penetration of the stroma and the decidual reaction of uterine tissue, IMA could be caused by cell-mediated and humoral mechanism (anti-paternal cytotoxic antibodies or autoantibody etiology), by the production of paternal anti major histocompatibility complex antibodies, or even by an autoimmune disorder leading to the production of autoantibodies (antiphospholipid antibodies, antinuclear antibodies or polyclonal B cell activation). The diagnostic work-up adopted to select IMA patients is crucial and includes primary (karyotype of both partners, toxo-test, hysterosalpingography, endometrial biopsy, thyroid function tests, serum hprolactin, luteal phase dating) and secondary (full hemochromocytometric test, search for LE cells, lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, antinuclear antibodies, Rheumatoid factor, blood complement VDRL) investigations. Therapeutical approaches vary. If autoimmune disorders are demonstrated therapies with different combinations of corticosteroids, aspirin and heparin or intravenous immunoglobulin are administered. Otherwise, therapy with paternal

  1. γδ T cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity with CD19 antibodies assessed by an impedance-based label-free real-time cytotoxicity assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Jördis Eva Seidel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available γδ T cells are not MHC restricted, elicit cytotoxicity against various malignancies, are present in early post-transplant phases in novel stem cell transplantation (SCT strategies and have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. These features make γδ T cells promising effector cells for antibody-based immunotherapy in pediatric patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. To evaluate combination of human γδ T cells with CD19 antibodies for immunotherapy of B-lineage ALL, γδ T cells were expanded after a GMP-compliant protocol and ADCC of both primary and expanded γδ T cells with an Fc optimized CD19 antibody (4G7SDIE and a bispecific antibody with the specificities CD19 and CD16 (N19-C16 was evaluated in CD107a degranulation assays and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS. CD107a, TNF-α and IFN-γ expression of primary γδ T cells were significantly increased and correlated with CD16-expression of γδ T cells. γδ T cells highly expressed CD107a after expansion and no further increased expression by 4G7SDIE and N19-C16 was measured. Cytotoxicity of purified expanded γδ T cells targeting CD19-expressing cells was assessed in both europium-TDA release and in an impedance-based label-free method (using the xCELLigence system measuring γδ T cell lysis in real-time. Albeit in the 2 h end-point europium-TDA release assay no increased lysis was observed, in real-time xCELLigence assays both significant antibody-independent cytotoxicity and ADCC of γδ T cells were observed. The xCELLigence system outperformed the end-point europium-TDA release assay in sensitivity and allows drawing of conclusions to lysis kinetics of γδ T cells over prolonged periods of time periods. Combination of CD19 antibodies with primary as well as expanded γδ T cells exhibits an promising approach, which may enhance clinical outcome of patients with pediatric B-lineage ALL and

  2. γδ T Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity with CD19 Antibodies Assessed by an Impedance-Based Label-Free Real-Time Cytotoxicity Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Ursula Jördis Eva; Vogt, Fabian; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram; Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are not MHC restricted, elicit cytotoxicity against various malignancies, are present in early post-transplant phases in novel stem cell transplantation strategies and have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These features make γδ T cells promising effector cells for antibody-based immunotherapy in pediatric patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To evaluate combination of human γδ T cells with CD19 antibodies for immunotherapy of B-lineage ALL, γδ T cells were expanded after a GMP-compliant protocol and ADCC of both primary and expanded γδ T cells with an Fc-optimized CD19 antibody (4G7SDIE) and a bi-specific antibody with the specificities CD19 and CD16 (N19-C16) was evaluated in CD107a-degranulation assays and intracellular cytokine staining. CD107a, TNFα, and IFNγ expression of primary γδ T cells were significantly increased and correlated with CD16-expression of γδ T cells. γδ T cells highly expressed CD107a after expansion and no further increased expression by 4G7SDIE and N19-C16 was measured. Cytotoxicity of purified expanded γδ T cells targeting CD19-expressing cells was assessed in both europium-TDA release and in an impedance-based label-free method (using the xCELLigence system) measuring γδ T cell lysis in real-time. Albeit in the 2 h end-point europium-TDA release assay no increased lysis was observed, in real-time xCELLigence assays both significant antibody-independent cytotoxicity and ADCC of γδ T cells were observed. The xCELLigence system outperformed the end-point europium-TDA release assay in sensitivity and allows drawing of conclusions to lysis kinetics of γδ T cells over prolonged periods of time periods. Combination of CD19 antibodies with primary as well as expanded γδ T cells exhibits a promising approach, which may enhance clinical outcome of patients with pediatric B-lineage ALL and requires clinical

  3. SOC REJECTION BY NANOFILTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the rejection of six synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) from a potable water source by a nanofiltration membrane process. The S0Cs were ethylene dibromide (EDB), dibromochloropropane (DBCP), chlordane, heptachlor, methoxychlor and alachlor. To in...

  4. 抗MICA抗体的产生途径及其对肾移植后急性排斥反应治疗效果的影响%Anti-MICA antibodies: production path and impact on therapeutic efficacy after renal transplantation with acute rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于立新; 刘如敏; 罗敏; 肖露露; 付绍杰; 王亦斌; 张新科

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨抗多态性主要组织相容性复合体Ⅰ类相关链A(MICA)抗体的产生途径及其对肾移植后急性排斥反应(AR)治疗效果的影响.方法 随机抽取等待肾移植者157例,采用Luminex200液相芯片分析技术检测抗MICA抗体及其特异性,并采集临床资料,分析抗MICA抗体的产生途径及其免疫球蛋白类型,进而探讨IgM型抗MICA抗体与IgM和IgG复合型抗MICA抗体对肾移植后急性排斥反应(AR)发生率和治疗效果的影响.结果 157例中,既往有输血、妊娠、移植史者68例,移植前抗MICA抗体阳性者19例(27.9%);既往没有致敏经历者89例,移植前抗MICA抗体阳性者26例(29.2%),二者间抗MICA抗体阳性率的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).抗MICA抗体阳性者45例,其中26例(57.8%)既往无致敏经历,其抗MICA抗体类型为IgM;另19例(42.2%)有已知的一种或多种致敏经历,其抗MICA抗体类型为IgG和IgM复合型.抗MICA抗体阳性的45例,有38例接受了肾移植,其中22例IgM型抗MICA抗体者,有7例(31.8%)发生AR,经甲泼尼龙冲击治疗均获得逆转,另16例IgM和IgG复合型抗MICA抗体者亦有7例(43.8%)发生AR,经甲泼尼龙等治疗,3例(42.9%)逆转,4例移植肾功能丧失;两种免疫球蛋白类型抗MICA抗体阳性者间肾移植后AR发生率的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),但AR逆转率的差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 对于无致敏史者其抗MICA抗体的产生可能存在经典的“天然抗体”的产生途径,其免疫球蛋白类型为IgM,肾移植后若发生AR,治疗转归较好;而对于移植前预存IgG和IgM复合型抗MICA抗体者,因其AR治疗的转归不佳,需予以足够重视.%Objective To investigate the production path of major histocompatibility complex class Ⅰ chain-related gene A(MICA) antibodies and the impact on the therapeutic efficacy after acute rejection in renal transplantation recipients.Methods Luminex flow cytometry was used to

  5. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwata, Takeo; Kaori, Takaki; Enomoto, Ikumi; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2013-01-01

    The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of non-human primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb) B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7,900-, 1,000-, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody. PMID:23717307

  6. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo eKuwata

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of nonhuman primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7900-fold, 1000-fold, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody.

  7. Control of culture environment for improved polyethylenimine-mediated transient production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Douglas J; Tait, Andrew S; Racher, Andrew J; Birch, John R; James, David C

    2006-01-01

    In this study we describe optimization of polyethylenimine (PEI)-mediated transient production of recombinant protein by CHO cells by facile manipulation of a chemically defined culture environment to limit accumulation of nonproductive cell biomass, increase the duration of recombinant protein production from transfected plasmid DNA, and increase cell-specific production. The optimal conditions for transient transfection of suspension-adapted CHO cells using branched, 25 kDa PEI as a gene delivery vehicle were experimentally determined by production of secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter in static cultures and recombinant IgG4 monoclonal antibody (Mab) production in agitated shake flask cultures to be a DNA concentration of 1.25 microg 10(6) cells(-1) mL(-1) at a PEI nitrogen:DNA phosphate ratio of 20:1. These conditions represented the optimal compromise between PEI cytotoxicity and product yield with most efficient recombinant DNA utilization. Separately, both addition of recombinant insulin-like growth factor (LR3-IGF) and a reduction in culture temperature to 32 degrees C were found to increase product titer 2- and 3-fold, respectively. However, mild hypothermia and LR3-IGF acted synergistically to increase product titer 11-fold. Although increased product titer in the presence of LR3-IGF alone was solely a consequence of increased culture duration, a reduction in culture temperature post-transfection increased both the integral of viable cell concentration (IVC) and cell-specific Mab production rate. For cultures maintained at 32 degrees C in the presence of LR3-IGF, IVC and qMab were increased 4- and 2.5-fold, respectively. To further increase product yield from transfected DNA, the duration of transgene expression in cell populations maintained at 32 degrees C in the presence of LR3-IGF was doubled by periodic resuspension of transfected cells in fresh media, leading to a 3-fold increase in accumulated Mab titer from approximately 13 to approximately 39

  8. Action against Kruemmel rejected

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its verdict dated September 2nd, 1976 - 10 A 211/74 -, the administrative court of Schleswig-Holstein at Schleswig has rejected with costs the action of a plaintiff resident in Hessen concerning the contestation of the 2nd partial licence for the erection of a nuclear power station at Kruemmel near Hamburg. The verdict is not subject to appeal. Furthermore, the administrative court of Schleswig-Holstein at Schleswig, in its verdict dated September 2nd, 1976 - 10 A 214/74 - has rejected with costs the actions of eight plaintiffs living in Hamburg and surroundings, concerning the contestation of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd partial licence for the erection of a nuclear power station at Kruemmel near Hamburg. An appeal against this verdict has been lodged at the higher administrative court at Lueneburg. The main gounds for the two judgments are given in full text. (orig./HP)

  9. Cells of the J774 macrophage cell line are primed for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity following exposure to γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation of macrophages (M phi) for host defense against tumor cells follows a sequence of priming events followed by an initiating stimulus that results in production and release of cytotoxic molecules that mediate target cell killing. The authors have developed a model to study specific macrophage cytotoxicity in vitro utilizing a cultured murine M phi cell line, J774. Specific cytotoxicity of cultured human gastrointestinal tumor cells is achieved in the presence of murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 17-1-A. The ability of these cells to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is greatly enhanced following gamma-irradiation. ADCC can be demonstrated at mAb 17-1-A concentrations greater than or equal to 1 microgram/ml and effector/target cell ratios greater than or equal to 2. Exposure to doses greater than or equal to 10 Gy of gamma-irradiation increases ADCC threefold. Varying the duration from J774 M phi exposure to γ-irradiation until addition of antibody-coated target cells showed that the primed state for ADCC is stable for at least 8 days but approximately 24 hr is required for complete development of the primed state. mAb-dependent target cell death begins 8 hr after addition of mAb and labeled target cells to primed effector cells and is complete by 24 hr. Incubation of unirradiated J774 M phi effector cells with recombinant murine interferon-γ (rmIFN-γ) also results in enhanced ADCC, but the extent of target cell killing achieved is less than that following priming by γ-irradiation. Concomitant priming of γ-irradiated J774 M phi with rmIFN-γ increases the extent of ADCC. Further study of irradiated J774 cells may elucidate the molecular pathways utilized by M phi for achieving and maintaining the primed state for ADCC

  10. Cells of the J774 macrophage cell line are primed for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity following exposure to. gamma. -irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerst, R.; Werberig, K. (University of Rochester Medical Center, New York (USA))

    1991-09-01

    Activation of macrophages (M phi) for host defense against tumor cells follows a sequence of priming events followed by an initiating stimulus that results in production and release of cytotoxic molecules that mediate target cell killing. The authors have developed a model to study specific macrophage cytotoxicity in vitro utilizing a cultured murine M phi cell line, J774. Specific cytotoxicity of cultured human gastrointestinal tumor cells is achieved in the presence of murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody (mAb) 17-1-A. The ability of these cells to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is greatly enhanced following gamma-irradiation. ADCC can be demonstrated at mAb 17-1-A concentrations greater than or equal to 1 microgram/ml and effector/target cell ratios greater than or equal to 2. Exposure to doses greater than or equal to 10 Gy of gamma-irradiation increases ADCC threefold. Varying the duration from J774 M phi exposure to {gamma}-irradiation until addition of antibody-coated target cells showed that the primed state for ADCC is stable for at least 8 days but approximately 24 hr is required for complete development of the primed state. mAb-dependent target cell death begins 8 hr after addition of mAb and labeled target cells to primed effector cells and is complete by 24 hr. Incubation of unirradiated J774 M phi effector cells with recombinant murine interferon-{gamma} (rmIFN-{gamma}) also results in enhanced ADCC, but the extent of target cell killing achieved is less than that following priming by {gamma}-irradiation. Concomitant priming of {gamma}-irradiated J774 M phi with rmIFN-{gamma} increases the extent of ADCC. Further study of irradiated J774 cells may elucidate the molecular pathways utilized by M phi for achieving and maintaining the primed state for ADCC.

  11. Polymorphisms in the lectin pathway of complement activation influence the incidence of acute rejection and graft outcome after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshayan, Déla; Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Bibert, Stéphanie; Pyndiah, Nitisha; Manuel, Oriol; Binet, Isabelle; Buhler, Leo H; Huynh-Do, Uyen; Mueller, Thomas; Steiger, Jürg; Pascual, Manuel; Meylan, Pascal; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2016-04-01

    There are conflicting data on the role of the lectin pathway of complement activation and its recognition molecules in acute rejection and outcome after transplantation. To help resolve this we analyzed polymorphisms and serum levels of lectin pathway components in 710 consecutive kidney transplant recipients enrolled in the nationwide Swiss Transplant Cohort Study, together with all biopsy-proven rejection episodes and 1-year graft and patient survival. Functional mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels were determined in serum samples, and previously described MBL2, ficolin 2, and MBL-associated serine protease 2 polymorphisms were genotyped. Low MBL serum levels and deficient MBL2 diplotypes were associated with a higher incidence of acute cellular rejection during the first year, in particular in recipients of deceased-donor kidneys. This association remained significant (hazard ratio 1.75, 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.60) in a Cox regression model after adjustment for relevant covariates. In contrast, there was no significant association with rates of antibody-mediated rejection, patient death, early graft dysfunction or loss. Thus, results in a prospective multicenter contemporary cohort suggest that MBL2 polymorphisms result in low MBL serum levels and are associated with acute cellular rejection after kidney transplantation. Since MBL deficiency is a relatively frequent trait in the normal population, our findings may lead to individual risk stratification and customized immunosuppression. PMID:26924055

  12. Structure and function of broadly reactive antibody PG16 reveal an H3 subdomain that mediates potent neutralization of HIV-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejchal, Robert; Walker, Laura M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Phogat, Sanjay K.; Koff, Wayne C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps); (IAVI)

    2010-11-15

    Development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 will likely require elicitation of broad and potent neutralizing antibodies against the trimeric surface envelope glycoprotein (Env). Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) PG9 and PG16 neutralize {approx}80% of HIV-1 isolates across all clades with extraordinary potency and target novel epitopes preferentially expressed on Env trimers. As these neutralization properties are ideal for a vaccine-elicited antibody response to HIV-1, their structural basis was investigated. The crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of PG16 at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution revealed its unusually long, 28-residue, complementarity determining region (CDR) H3 forms a unique, stable subdomain that towers above the antibody surface. A 7-residue 'specificity loop' on the 'hammerhead' subdomain was identified that, when transplanted from PG16 to PG9 and vice versa, accounted for differences in the fine specificity and neutralization of these two mAbs. The PG16 electron density maps also revealed that a CDR H3 tyrosine was sulfated, which was confirmed for both PG9 (doubly) and PG16 (singly) by mass spectral analysis. We further showed that tyrosine sulfation plays a role in binding and neutralization. An N-linked glycan modification is observed in the variable light chain, but not required for antigen recognition. Further, the crystal structure of the PG9 light chain at 3.0 {angstrom} facilitated homology modeling to support the presence of these unusual features in PG9. Thus, PG9 and PG16 use unique structural features to mediate potent neutralization of HIV-1 that may be of utility in antibody engineering and for high-affinity recognition of a variety of therapeutic targets.

  13. Noninvasive detection of human cardiac transplant rejection with indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis of rejection after cardiac transplantation is currently made by right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. To evaluate antimyosin imaging as a noninvasive means of detecting human cardiac rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies was labeled with indium-111 and given intravenously to 18 patients (age 45 +/- 12 years) in 20 studies 7 days to 9 years after transplantation. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained at the time of each imaging study. Eight patients had positive scans confirmed by biopsy as rejection, and eight patients had negative scans and no evidence of rejection on biopsy. Discordance was observed in four studies, two with positive scans and no rejection on biopsy and two with negative scans and positive biopsy. The sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy of the technique were each 80%. Imaging with radiolabeled antimyosin antibody Fab fragments may be of value in the noninvasive identification of rejection in the cardiac transplant recipient

  14. Noninvasive detection of human cardiac transplant rejection with indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frist, W.; Yasuda, T.; Segall, G.; Khaw, B.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Gold, H.; Stinson, E.; Oyer, P.; Baldwin, J.; Billingham, M.

    1987-11-01

    Diagnosis of rejection after cardiac transplantation is currently made by right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. To evaluate antimyosin imaging as a noninvasive means of detecting human cardiac rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies was labeled with indium-111 and given intravenously to 18 patients (age 45 +/- 12 years) in 20 studies 7 days to 9 years after transplantation. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained at the time of each imaging study. Eight patients had positive scans confirmed by biopsy as rejection, and eight patients had negative scans and no evidence of rejection on biopsy. Discordance was observed in four studies, two with positive scans and no rejection on biopsy and two with negative scans and positive biopsy. The sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy of the technique were each 80%. Imaging with radiolabeled antimyosin antibody Fab fragments may be of value in the noninvasive identification of rejection in the cardiac transplant recipient.

  15. CYP3A-mediated drug-drug interaction potential and excretion of brentuximab vedotin, an antibody-drug conjugate, in patients with CD30-positive hematologic malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Tae H.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Goy, Andre; Chen, Robert; Matous, Jeffrey V.; Cooper, Maureen; Grove, Laurie E.; Alley, Stephen C.; Lynch, Carmel M.; O’Connor, Owen A.

    2013-01-01

    Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that selectively delivers monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) into CD30-expressing cells. This study evaluated the CYP3A-mediated drug-drug interaction potential of brentuximab vedotin and the excretion of MMAE. Two 21-day cycles of brentuximab vedotin (1.2 or 1.8 mg/kg intravenously) were administered to 56 patients with CD30-positive hematologic malignancies. Each patient also received either a sensitive CYP3A substrate (midazolam), an effe...

  16. HLA Class II Antibody Activation of Endothelial Cells Promotes Th17 and Disrupts Regulatory T Lymphocyte Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, J; Taflin, C; Cross, A R; Robledo-Sarmiento, M; Mariotto, E; Savenay, A; Carmagnat, M; Suberbielle, C; Charron, D; Haziot, A; Glotz, D; Mooney, N

    2016-05-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most successful treatment option for patients with end-stage renal disease, and chronic antibody-mediated rejection is the principal cause of allograft loss. Predictive factors for chronic rejection include high levels of HLA alloantibodies (particularly HLA class II) and activation of graft endothelial cells (ECs). The mechanistic basis for this association is unresolved. We used an experimental model of HLA-DR antibody stimulation of microvascular ECs to examine the mechanisms underlying the association between HLA class II antibodies, EC activation and allograft damage. Activation of ECs with the F(Ab')2 fragment of HLA-DR antibody led to phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and MEK and increased IL-6 production by ECs cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in an Akt-dependent manner. We previously showed that HLA-DR-expressing ECs induce polarization of Th17 and FoxP3(bright) regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets. Preactivation of ECs with anti-HLA-DR antibody redirected EC allogenicity toward a proinflammatory response by decreasing amplification of functional Treg and by further increasing IL-6-dependent Th17 expansion. Alloimmunized patient serum containing relevant HLA-DR alloantibodies selectively bound and increased EC secretion of IL-6 in cocultures with PBMCs. These data contribute to understanding of potential mechanisms of antibody-mediated endothelial damage independent of complement activation and FcR-expressing effector cells. PMID:26614587

  17. Molecular determinants of dengue virus 2 envelope protein important for virus entry in FcγRIIA-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection may cause severe illness in patients suffering a secondary infection by a heterologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype. During ADE of infection, cross-reactive non- or poorly-neutralizing antibodies form infectious virus-Ab complexes with the newly infecting serotype and enhance virus infection by binding to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) on FcγR-bearing cells. In this study, we determined that molecular determinants of DENV2 envelope protein critical for virus entry during non-ADE infection are also required for ADE infection mediated by FcγRIIA, and binding of virus-Ab complexes with FcγRIIA alone is not sufficient for ADE of infection. The FcγRIIA mainly plays an auxiliary role in concentrating the virus–Ab complex to the cell surface, and other primary cellular receptors are required for virus entry. Understanding the viral entry pathway in ADE of DENV infection will greatly facilitate rational designs of anti-viral therapeutics against severe dengue disease associated with ADE. - Highlights: • KKK305/307/310 in DENV2 E-DIII is critical for virus attachment in ADE and non-ADE infection. • Binding of DENV2–Ab complex with FcγRII alone is not sufficient for virus entry in ADE infection. • Other primary receptors were required for DENV2 internalization during FcγRII–mediated ADE. • G104 and L135 of DENV2 E are critical for virus-mediated membrane fusion. • DENV2 virus-mediated membrane fusion is required for both ADE and non-ADE infection

  18. Molecular determinants of dengue virus 2 envelope protein important for virus entry in FcγRIIA-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chotiwan, Nunya; Roehrig, John T. [Arboviral Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Schlesinger, Jacob J. [Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Blair, Carol D. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Huang, Claire Y.-H., E-mail: yxh0@cdc.gov [Arboviral Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection may cause severe illness in patients suffering a secondary infection by a heterologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype. During ADE of infection, cross-reactive non- or poorly-neutralizing antibodies form infectious virus-Ab complexes with the newly infecting serotype and enhance virus infection by binding to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) on FcγR-bearing cells. In this study, we determined that molecular determinants of DENV2 envelope protein critical for virus entry during non-ADE infection are also required for ADE infection mediated by FcγRIIA, and binding of virus-Ab complexes with FcγRIIA alone is not sufficient for ADE of infection. The FcγRIIA mainly plays an auxiliary role in concentrating the virus–Ab complex to the cell surface, and other primary cellular receptors are required for virus entry. Understanding the viral entry pathway in ADE of DENV infection will greatly facilitate rational designs of anti-viral therapeutics against severe dengue disease associated with ADE. - Highlights: • KKK305/307/310 in DENV2 E-DIII is critical for virus attachment in ADE and non-ADE infection. • Binding of DENV2–Ab complex with FcγRII alone is not sufficient for virus entry in ADE infection. • Other primary receptors were required for DENV2 internalization during FcγRII–mediated ADE. • G104 and L135 of DENV2 E are critical for virus-mediated membrane fusion. • DENV2 virus-mediated membrane fusion is required for both ADE and non-ADE infection.

  19. Heat rejection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory C.; Tokarz, Richard D.; Parry, Jr., Harvey L.; Braun, Daniel J.

    1980-01-01

    A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

  20. An anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody expressed as an endocytotic transmembrane protein mediates internalization of HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we used HIV-1 as a model to demonstrate a novel approach for receptor-independent cell entry of virus. The heavy chain of an anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody was engineered with endocytotic and transmembrane motifs from either the cation-independent mannose 6-phospate receptor or the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence studies showed that the chimeric antibodies were expressed on the cell surface and can undergo rapid internalization. Furthermore, one of the chimeric antibodies was able to bind and internalize HIV-1. Using a luciferase reporter HIV-1, we further showed that internalized viruses could undergo replication. Therefore, we have demonstrated a proof-of-principle of a novel method that can be used to internalize virus into cells, without prior knowledge of the cellular receptor for the virus. We propose that this approach would be particularly useful for studying viruses whose cellular receptor(s) is not known

  1. The role of CD154 in organ transplant rejection and acceptance.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk, A D; Blair, P.J.; Tadaki, D K; Xu, H; Harlan, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    CD154 plays a critical role in determining the outcome of a transplanted organ. This simple statement is amply supported by experimental evidence demonstrating that anti-CD154 antibodies are potent inhibitors of allograft rejection in many rigorous transplant models. Unfortunately, despite intensive investigation over the past ten years, the precise mechanisms by which antibodies against CD154 exert their anti-rejection effects have remained less obvious. Though originally classified with ref...

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP......-specific IgG antibodies were found more frequently (43.2 versus 13.5%), and the antibody levels were higher in the TFI cases than in the controls (P < 0.001). C. trachomatis EB-induced lymphocyte responses were positive in 81.8% of the TFI cases and 58.9% of the controls (P < 0.001). Similarly, CHSP60-induced...... lymphocyte responses were found in 45.5% of the TFI cases and 30.7% of the controls (P < 0.001). CHSP60 antibody test was the best single test predicting TFI. Compared to cases with all four markers negative, the estimated risk for TFI was 4.1 (95% CI 1.4-11.9) among those with one positive marker and 19...

  3. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Roit, Fabio Da; Patrick J Engelberts; Taylor, Ronald P.; Breij, Esther C.W.; Gritti, Giuseppe; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Introna, Martino; Parren, Paul W H I; Beurskens, Frank J; Golay, Josée

    2015-01-01

    The novel Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib are promising drugs for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, either alone or in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. We investigated the possible positive or negative impact of these drugs on all known mechanisms of action of both type I and type II anti-CD20 antibodies. Pretreatment with ibrutinib for 1 hour did not increase direct ...

  4. Chronic allograft rejection: A significant hurdle to transplant success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Kloc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art immunosuppression drugs do not ensure indefinite transplant survival, and most transplants are continuously lost to chronic rejection even years posttransplantation. This form of rejection is responsible for long-term failure of transplanted organs. The mechanisms involved in development of chronic rejection are not well-understood. One of the main features of chronic rejection is progressive luminal narrowing of graft vessels, which results in compromised blood flow, ischemia, cell death, and finally graft failure. All the existing immunosuppressive regimens are targeting acute rejection, and at present there is no available therapy for prevention of chronic rejection. Chronic rejection involves two major, but interrelated responses: The first is the host immune response against the transplant mediated primarily by alloreactive T and B cells, and the second is injury and repair of the graft (vasculopathy of graft vessels. Here we focus on recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular aspects of chronic transplant vasculopathy and function of macrophages, topics pivotal for development of novel antichronic rejection therapies.

  5. Endothelial activation, lymphangiogenesis, and humoral rejection of kidney transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sharon; Kapp, Meghan; Crowe, Deborah; Garces, Jorge; Fogo, Agnes B; Giannico, Giovanna A

    2016-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is implicated in 45% of renal allograft failure and 57% of late allograft dysfunction. Peritubular capillary C4d is a specific but insensitive marker of ABMR. The 2013 Banff Conference ABMR revised criteria included C4d-negative ABMR with evidence of endothelial-antibody interaction. We hypothesized that endothelial activation and lymphangiogenesis are increased with C4d-negative ABMR and correlate with intragraft T-regulatory cells and T-helper 17. Seventy-four renal transplant biopsies were selected to include (a) ABMR with C4d Banff scores ≥2 (n = 35), (b) variable microvascular injury and C4d score 0-1 (n = 24), and (c) variable microvascular injury and C4d score = 0 (n = 15). Controls included normal preimplantation donor kidneys (n = 5). Immunohistochemistry for endothelial activation (P- and E-selectins [SEL]), lymphangiogenesis (D2-40), T-regulatory cells (FOXP3), and T-helper 17 (STAT3) was performed. Microvessel and inflammatory infiltrate density was assessed morphometrically in interstitium and peritubular capillaries. All transplants had significantly higher microvessel and lymph vessel density compared with normal. Increased expression of markers of endothelial activation predicted transplant glomerulopathy (P-SEL, P = .003). Increased P-SEL and D2-40 were associated with longer interval from transplant to biopsy (P = .005). All 3 markers were associated with increased interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophy, and graft failure (P-SEL, P < .001; E-SEL, P = .0011; D2-40, P = .012). There was no association with the intragraft FOXP3/STAT3 ratio. We conclude that endothelial activation and lymphangiogenesis could represent a late response to injury leading to fibrosis and progression of kidney damage, and are independent of the intragraft FOXP3/STAT3 ratio. Our findings support the therapeutic potential of specifically targeting endothelial activation. PMID:27067786

  6. Rejected by peers-attracted to antisocial media content: rejection-based anger impairs moral judgment among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisier, Xanthe S; Konijn, Elly A

    2013-06-01

    Adolescence is an important developmental stage during which both peers and the media have a strong influence. Both peer rejection and the use of morally adverse media are associated with negative developmental outcomes. This study examines processes by which peer rejection might drive adolescents to select antisocial media content by tying together developmental research on peer rejection and research on media effects. Assumed underlying mechanisms are rejection-based anger and frustration and the adolescent's moral judgment. A between-participants experimental design manipulated peer rejection versus acceptance in adolescents (Mage = 13.88 years; N = 74) and young adults (Mage = 21.37 years; N = 75), applying the Cyberball paradigm. Measures included the State Anger Inventory (STAXI) to assess feelings of rejection and the newly devised Media, Morals, and Youth Questionnaire (MMaYQue) to assess media preferences and moral judgment of media content. Using bootstrapping analyses, a double mediation was established: Higher levels of state anger in peer-rejected adolescents induced more tolerable moral judgments of antisocial media content, subsequently instigating a preference for antisocial media content. In contrast, the young adult sample showed no relations between peer rejection and antisocial media preference. Results are discussed within a downward spiral framework of combined peer and media influences. PMID:22799588

  7. Transplant rejection in terrestrial molluscs

    OpenAIRE

    E Furuta; Yamaguchi, K

    2011-01-01

    To know whether or not molluscs are capable of recognizing tissue allo-antigens, dorsal skin-allografts were exchanged between adult terrestrial slug, Incilaria fruhstorferi. We succeeded for the first time in orthotopic transplantation of allografts and observed chronic rejection of allografts. Cellular changes in the rejection process continued over for 40 days. Two functional types of “effector” cells were recognized at the rejection site, but they were observed to be macrophages possessin...

  8. Sustained Remission of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Mediated Glomerulonephritis and Nephrotic Syndrome in Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinov, Konstantin N.; Harris, Alexis A.; Barry, Marc; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H.

    2013-01-01

    A woman diagnosed with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) developed an anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) and nephrotic syndrome with normal serum creatinine. Percutaneous kidney biopsy showed pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with superimposed immune complex deposition. After treatment with cyclophophamide and prednisone, proteinuria decreased progressively to a level of 0.4 g/g creatinine, ANCA became undetectable, while serum creatinine remained normal ...

  9. HPV16/18 L1 VLP Vaccine Induces Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies that May Mediate Cross-Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Troy J; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Dauner, Joseph G.; Pan, Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 VLP-based vaccines are protective against HPV vaccine-related types; however, the correlates of protection have not been defined. We observed that vaccination with Cervarix™ induced cross-neutralizing antibodies for HPV types for which evidence of vaccine efficacy has been demonstrated (HPV31/45) but not for other types (HPV52/58). In addition, HPV31/45 cross-neutralizing titers showed a significant increase with number of doses (HPV31, p

  10. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory ePancari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1 with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17, not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. The mAb was examined to determine if it blocked heme binding to IsdB in vitro. The mAb was not found to have heme blocking activity, nor did it prevent bacterial growth under in vivo conditions, in an implanted growth chamber. To assess the role of the mAb Fc a point mutation was introduced at aa 297 (CS-D7●N297A. This point mutation removes Fc effector functions. In vitro analysis of the mutein confirmed that it lacked measurable binding to FcγR, and that it did not fix complement. The mutein had dramatically reduced in vitro opsonic OP activity compared to CS-D7. Nonetheless, the mutein conferred protection equivalent to the wild type mAb in the murine sepsis model. Both wild type and mutein mAbs were efficacious in FcγR deletion mice (including both FcγRII-/- mice and FcγRIII-/- mice, indicating that these receptors were not essential for mAb mediated protection in vivo. Protection mediated by CS-D7 was lost in Balb/c mice depleted of C3 with cobra venom factor (CFV, was lost in mice depleted of superoxide dismutase (SOD in P47phox deletion mice, and was absent in SCID mice. Enhanced clearance of S. aureus in the liver of CS-D7 treated mice and enhanced production of INF-γ, but not of IL17, may play a role in the mechanism of protection mediated by the mAb. CS-D7 apparently mediates survival in challenged mice through a mechanism involving complement, phagocytes, and lymphocytes, but which does not depend on interaction with FcγR, or on blocking heme

  11. A novel noninvasive method to detect rejection after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Prompt and accurate detection of rejection prior to pathological changes after organ transplantation is vital for monitoring rejections. Although biopsy remains the current gold standard for rejection diagnosis, it is an invasive method and cannot be repeated daily. Thus, noninvasive monitoring methods are needed. In this study, by introducing an IL-2 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (IL-2 N-mAb and immunosuppressants into the culture with the presence of specific stimulators and activated lymphocytes, an activated lymphocyte-specific assay (ALSA system was established to detect the specific activated lymphocytes. This assay demonstrated that the suppression in the ALSA test was closely related to the existence of specific activated lymphocytes. The ALSA test was applied to 47 heart graft recipients and the proliferation of activated lymphocytes from all rejection recipients proven by endomyocardial biopsies was found to be inhibited by spleen cells from the corresponding donors, suggesting that this suppression could reflect the existence of activated lymphocytes against donor antigens, and thus the rejection of a heart graft. The sensitivity of the ALSA test in these 47 heart graft recipients was 100%; however, the specificity was only 37.5%. It was also demonstrated that IL-2 N-mAb was indispensible, and the proper culture time courses and concentrations of stimulators were essential for the ALSA test. This preliminary study with 47 grafts revealed that the ALSA test was a promising noninvasive tool, which could be used in vitro to assist with the diagnosis of rejection post-heart transplantation.

  12. Transplant rejection and paradigms lost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Terry B.

    2013-01-01

    During transplant rejection, migrating T cells infiltrate the grafted organ, but the signals that direct this migration are incompletely understood. In this issue of the JCI, Walch et al. debunk two classical paradigms concerning transplant rejection, with important consequences for the design of antirejection therapeutics. PMID:23676457

  13. Transplant rejection and paradigms lost

    OpenAIRE

    Strom, Terry B.

    2013-01-01

    During transplant rejection, migrating T cells infiltrate the grafted organ, but the signals that direct this migration are incompletely understood. In this issue of the JCI, Walch et al. debunk two classical paradigms concerning transplant rejection, with important consequences for the design of antirejection therapeutics.

  14. Rejection sampling in demand systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ley, Eduardo; Mark F.J. Steel

    1992-01-01

    We illustrate the method of rejection sampling in a Bayesian application of a new approach toı estimating Demand Systems. This approach, suggested by Varian (1990), is based on a generalization of Afriat's (1967) efficiency index. Rejection sampling is applied to the prior-to-posterior mapping enabling us to obtain posterior results in a nonstandard model.

  15. Transplantation tolerance mediated by suppressor T cells and suppressive antibody in a recipient of a renal transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S; Mizuochi, I; Sada, M; Amemiya, H

    1985-10-01

    This is a report of a patient who underwent cadaveric renal transplantation in spite of the presence of three HLA-A, B and two DR antigen mismatches between the recipient and donor. The recipient received more than 20 units of blood before transplantation. The crossmatch between the recipient's serum and the T and B cells of the donor was negative. The patient exhibited hepatic dysfunction from the early posttransplant period, which eventually led to discontinuation of azathioprine or Bredinin at one year posttransplantation. Thereafter, only betamethasone was administered once every 3 days. The patients has maintained good renal function for more than one year following withdrawal of the immunosuppressants. It appeared that transplantation tolerance was established in this patient. Therefore, we examined the mechanisms sustaining the tolerance. Both nylon-wool-adherent, alloantigen-specific suppressor T cells and nonadherent, nonspecific suppressor T cells were observed in the lymphocytes of the patient after transplantation. It was also shown that suppressive antibody was present in the serum directed toward the clone of autologous lymphocytes that reacted with the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) antigen of the donor. In the inhibition test against various types of MLR antigens using this suppressive antibody, it was found that the reaction against the donor cells was suppressed when the responding cells shared the same class I antigen with the recipient. When the stimulating cells had the class II antigen of the donor, the reaction of the specific responding cells was also inhibited. These inhibiting effects were only seen when the responding cells were pretreated with the antibody, but not when stimulating cells were pretreated. PMID:2413592

  16. Interaction of human IgG chimeric antibodies with the human FcRI and FcRII receptors: requirements for antibody-mediated host cell-target cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M R; Woof, J M; Brüggemann, M; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1989-04-01

    Chimeric monoclonal antibodies (McAb), specific for the hapten 5-iodo-4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenacetyl (NIP), expressing human IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 subclass constant domains, have been examined for their ability to interact with the human FcRII receptor. Human red blood cells (RBC) sensitized by each of these McAbs have been assayed for their ability to form rosettes with the human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cell line, human B cell line Daudi and erythroblastoid K562 cell line. IgG1 and IgG3 sensitized RBC formed significant rosettes with the FcR- and FcRII+ Daudi and K562 cell lines, the percentage of cells forming rosettes being directly proportional to the degree of sensitization of the RBC. Bromelin treating Daudi cells did not alter this pattern of reactivity, whereas bromelin treated FcRI+ and FcRII+ U937 cells formed significant resettes with IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 sensitized RBC, demonstrating a difference in the IgG subclass specificity between human FcRI and FcRII. Murine IgG2b anti-NIP sensitized RBC did not form rosettes with any cell line tested; however, RBC sensitized by some members of a panel of murine IgG1 McAb, specific for the glycophorin A molecule, were able to form rosettes with Daudi, U937 and K562 cells. This interaction was enhanced by bromelin treating the Daudi or U937 cells and can be correlated to the disposition of the epitopes recognized, relative to the target cell membrane, those McAbs recognizing epitopes furthest from the RBC surface being most effective in interacting with FcRII. The data are interpreted in terms of a simple model for antibody-mediated cell--cell interaction. PMID:2716734

  17. Anti-Sclerostin antibody inhibits internalization of Sclerostin and Sclerostin-mediated antagonism of Wnt/LRP6 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten van Dinther

    Full Text Available Sclerosteosis is a rare high bone mass disease that is caused by inactivating mutations in the SOST gene. Its gene product, Sclerostin, is a key negative regulator of bone formation and might therefore serve as a target for the anabolic treatment of osteoporosis. The exact molecular mechanism by which Sclerostin exerts its antagonistic effects on Wnt signaling in bone forming osteoblasts remains unclear. Here we show that Wnt3a-induced transcriptional responses and induction of alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast differentiation, require the Wnt co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6. Unlike Dickkopf1 (DKK1, Sclerostin does not inhibit Wnt-3a-induced phosphorylation of LRP5 at serine 1503 or LRP6 at serine 1490. Affinity labeling of cell surface proteins with [(125I]Sclerostin identified LRP6 as the main specific Sclerostin receptor in multiple mesenchymal cell lines. When cells were challenged with Sclerostin fused to recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP this was internalized, likely via a Clathrin-dependent process, and subsequently degraded in a temperature and proteasome-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of LRP6 greatly enhanced binding and cellular uptake of Sclerostin-GFP, which was reduced by the addition of an excess of non-GFP-fused Sclerostin. Finally, an anti-Sclerostin antibody inhibited the internalization of Sclerostin-GFP and binding of Sclerostin to LRP6. Moreover, this antibody attenuated the antagonistic activity of Sclerostin on canonical Wnt-induced responses.

  18. Anti-HMGB1 Neutralizing Antibody Ameliorates Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation by Suppressing Dendritic Cell-Mediated Th17 Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 directs Th17 skewing by regulating dendritic cell (DC function. First, our in vitro studies reveal that recombinant HMGB1 (rHMGB1 activates myeloid DCs to produce IL-23 in vitro, and rHMGB1-activated DCs prime naïve lymphocytes to produce the Th17 cytokine IL-17A. Second, we demonstrate that anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody attenuates HMGB1 expression, neutrophilic inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and Th17-related cytokine secretion in vivo by using a murine model of neutrophilic asthma induced by ovalbumin (OVA plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Furthermore, anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody decreases the number of Th17 cells in lung cells and suppresses the production of IL-23 by lung CD11C+ APCs. Finally, we show that intranasal adoptive transfer of rHMGB1-activated DCs was sufficient to restore lung neutrophilic inflammation and the Th17 response in a DC-driven model of asthma, whereas the transfer of rHMGB1 plus anti-HMGB1-treated mDCs significantly reduced these inflammation phenotypes. These data suggest, for the first time, that HMGB1 drives the DC-polarized Th17-type response in allergic lung inflammation and that blocking HMGB1 may benefit the attenuation of neutrophilic airway inflammation in asthma.

  19. Rapid alternative to the clonogenic assay for measuring antibody and complement-mediated killing of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the methods used to quantitate killing of tumor cells by antibody and complement has highlighted a number of problems. Using leukemia as a model, the authors have found that the release of 51Cr from labeled tumor cells treated with antibody and complement can be an equivocal measure of cell viability. Combined with its restricted sensitivity (less than a 2 log range of cell killing) this makes this widely used assay of questionable value for detecting small numbers of viable cells, or for identifying subpopulations of complement-resistant cells. As an alternative a [125I]iododeoxyuridine uptake assay has been developed, that combines the simplicity and rapidity of the 51Cr release technique with the sensitivity of a clonogenic assay. This method eliminates the problem of spontaneous isotope release, inherent in prelabeling assays, and variability from experiment to experiment can be avoided by including a viable cell standard curve within each assay. The sensitivity of the 125IUdR uptake method, which can be completed within a day, is similar to that of a 10 day methylcellulose cloning assay and was capable of detecting the presence of a minor subpopulation of complement-resistant tumor cells

  20. Mannan oligosaccharide increases serum concentrations of antibodies and inflammatory mediators in weanling pigs experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, T M; Song, M; Liu, Y; Johnson, R W; Kelley, K W; Van Alstine, W G; Dawson, K A; Pettigrew, J E

    2012-08-01

    Mannan-containing products are capable of modulating immune responses in animals. However, different products may have diverse immunomodulation. The experiment was conducted to examine effects of mannan oligosaccharide (Actigen; ACT) on growth performance and serum concentrations of antibodies and inflammatory mediators in weanling pigs (Sus scrofa) experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). A total of 32 PRRSV-negative pigs (3 wk old) were randomly assigned from within blocks to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 by 2 factorial arrangement [2 types of diet: control (0%) and ACT addition (0.04%); and with and without PRRSV] in a randomized complete block design. Pigs were blocked by initial BW within sex. Ancestry was equalized across treatments. Pigs (8/treatment) were kept individually in each pen. After 2 wk of an 8-wk period of feeding the treatments, pigs received an intranasal inoculation of PRRSV or sham medium at 5 wk of age. Infection by PRRSV decreased ADG, ADFI, and G:F throughout the experiment (P infected pigs but not in sham controls (interaction, P = 0.009). Dietary ACT did not affect viremia in infected pigs (P > 0.05), but increased PRRSV-specific antibody titer at 35 DPI (P = 0.042). Infection with PRRSV induced the febrile responses of pigs from 3 to 10 DPI (P pigs was found slightly elevated by ACT (P = 0.045). Infected pigs had greater serum concentrations of IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-12, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-10, and haptoglobin (Hp) than sham controls (P serum TNF-α concentration regardless of PRRSV (P = 0.058). The ACT × PRRSV interaction was significant for IL-1β (P = 0.016), IL-12 (P = 0.026), and Hp (P = 0.047), suggesting that infected pigs fed ACT had greater serum concentrations of these mediators than those fed the control. The increases in IL-1β and IL-12 may favorably promote innate and T-cell immune functions in infected pigs fed ACT. Feeding ACT may be useful as ACT is

  1. Immune-mediated adverse events of anticytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 antibody therapy in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Shannon K; Shure, Anna K; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-11-01

    Ipilimumab, an antibody that blocks cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4; CD152), was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2011 for the treatment of unresectable stage III or IV malignant melanoma. Although the addition of this particular immunotherapy has broadened treatment options, immune-related adverse events (irAEs) are associated with ipilimumab therapy, including dermatologic effects, colitis and diarrhea, endocrine effects, hepatotoxicity, ocular effects, renal effects, neurologic effects, and others. In this article, a critical evaluation of the underlying mechanisms of irAEs associated with anti-CTLA-4 therapy is presented. Additionally, potentially beneficial effects of combinational therapies to alleviate ipilimumab-induced irAEs in malignant melanoma are discussed. Future research is warranted to elucidate the efficacy of such combination therapies and specific biomarkers that would help to predict a clinical response to ipilimumab in patients with malignant melanoma. PMID:26118951

  2. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; ...

  3. Delayed hyperacute rejection in a patient who developed clostridium difficile infection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald S Lipshutz

    2010-11-01

    the surface of bacterial cell wall occurring before the firm establishment of accommodation can trigger the onset of acute antibody-mediated rejection. We herein report a case of delayed hyperacute rejection in an A1 to O, ABO incompatible transplant recipient following an episode of Clostridium difficile infection.Keywords: ABO incompatible transplantation, delayed hyperacute rejection, kidney transplantation, Clostridium difficile infection

  4. Variable Heat Rejection (VHR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop advanced technologies to enable a variable heat rejection Thermal Control System (TCS) capable of operating through a wide range of thermal environments...

  5. The antitumor efficacy of a novel adenovirus-mediated anti-p21Ras single chain fragment variable antibody on human cancers in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ju-Lun; Pan, Xin-Yan; Zhao, Wen-Xing; Hu, Qi-Chan; Ding, Feng; Feng, Qiang; Li, Gui-Yun; Luo, Ying

    2016-03-01

    Activated ras genes are found in a large number of human tumors, and therefore are one of important targets for cancer therapy. This study investigated the antitumor effects of a novel single chain fragment variable antibody (scFv) against ras protein, p21Ras. The anti-p21Ras scFv gene was constructed by phage display library from hybridoma KGHR1, and then subcloned into replication-defective adenovirus vector to obtain recombinant adenovirus KGHV100. Human tumor cell lines with high expression of p21Ras SW480, MDA-MB‑231, OVCAR-3, BEL-7402, as well as tumor cell line with low expression of p21Ras, SKOV3, were employed to investigate antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that KGHV100 was able to express intracellularly anti-p21Ras scFv antibody in cultured tumor cells and in transplantation tumor cells. MTT, Transwell, colony formation, and flow cytometry analysis showed that KGHV100 led to significant growth arrest in tumor cells with high p21Ras expression, and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in the studied tumor cell lines. In vivo, KGHV100 significantly inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection, and the survival rates of the mice were higher than the control group. These results indicate that the adenovirus-mediated intracellular expression of the novel anti-p21Ras scFv exerted strong antitumoral effects, and may be a potential method for therapy of cancers with p21Ras overexpression. PMID:26780944

  6. Antibody-mediated targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles to the folate receptor alpha increases tumor cell association in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndong C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Christian Ndong,1 Seiko Toraya-Brown,2 Katsiaryna Kekalo,1 Ian Baker,1 Tillman U Gerngross,1,3,4 Steven N Fiering,2,5,6 Karl E Griswold1,3,6 1Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 3Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 4Department of Chemistry, Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 5Department of Genetics, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA; 6Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, NH, USA Abstract: Active molecular targeting has become an important aspect of nanoparticle development for oncology indications. Here, we describe molecular targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs to the folate receptor alpha (FOLRα using an engineered antibody fragment (Ffab. Compared to control nanoparticles targeting the non-relevant botulinum toxin, the Ffab-IONP constructs selectively accumulated on FOLRα-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro, where they exhibited the capacity to internalize into intracellular vesicles. Similarly, Ffab-IONPs homed to FOLRα-positive tumors upon intraperitoneal administration in an orthotopic murine xenograft model of ovarian cancer, whereas negative control particles showed no detectable tumor accumulation. Interestingly, Ffab-IONPs built with custom 120 nm nanoparticles exhibited lower in vitro targeting efficiency when compared to those built with commercially sourced 180 nm nanoparticles. In vivo, however, the two Ffab-IONP platforms achieved equivalent tumor homing, although the smaller 120 nm IONPs were more prone to liver sequestration. Overall, the results show that Ffab-mediated targeting of IONPs yields specific, high-level accumulation within cancer cells, and this fact suggests that Ffab-IONPs could have future utility in ovarian cancer diagnostics and therapy. Keywords: nanoparticle targeting, antibody fragment, biodistribution, ovarian cancer

  7. A Developmental Perspective on Peer Rejection, Deviant Peer Affiliation, and Conduct Problems Among Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Diane; Drabick, Deborah A G; Burgers, Darcy E

    2015-12-01

    Peer rejection and deviant peer affiliation are linked consistently to the development and maintenance of conduct problems. Two proposed models may account for longitudinal relations among these peer processes and conduct problems: the (a) sequential mediation model, in which peer rejection in childhood and deviant peer affiliation in adolescence mediate the link between early externalizing behaviors and more serious adolescent conduct problems; and (b) parallel process model, in which peer rejection and deviant peer affiliation are considered independent processes that operate simultaneously to increment risk for conduct problems. In this review, we evaluate theoretical models and evidence for associations among conduct problems and (a) peer rejection and (b) deviant peer affiliation. We then consider support for the sequential mediation and parallel process models. Next, we propose an integrated model incorporating both the sequential mediation and parallel process models. Future research directions and implications for prevention and intervention efforts are discussed. PMID:25410430

  8. Treatment with anti-RANKL antibody reduces infarct size and attenuates dysfunction impacting on neutrophil-mediated injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Federico; Crowe, Lindsey A; Roth, Aline; Burger, Fabienne; Lenglet, Sébastien; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Brandt, Karim J; Quercioli, Alessandra; Mach, François; Vallée, Jean-Paul; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Selective pharmacological treatments targeting reperfusion injury produced modest protective effects and might be associated with immunosuppression. In order to identify novel and better-tolerated approaches, we focused on the neutralization of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand [RANKL], a cytokine recently shown to activate inflammatory cells (i.e. neutrophils) orchestrating post-infarction injury and repair. Myocardial ischemia (60min) and reperfusion injury was surgically induced in C57Bl/6 mice. In hearts and serum, RANKL was early upregulated during reperfusion. A "one-shot" injection with neutralizing anti-RANKL IgG during ischemia ameliorated myocardial infarct size and function, but not adverse remodeling (determined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging [MRI]) as compared to Vehicle or control IgG. These beneficial effects were accompanied in vivo by reduction in cardiac neutrophil infiltration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and MMP-9 release. Anti-RANKL IgG treatment suppressed sudden peak of neutrophil granule products in mouse serum early after reperfusion onset. In vitro, RANK mRNA expression was detected in isolated mouse neutrophils. Co-incubation with neutralizing anti-RANKL IgG abrogated RANKL-induced mouse neutrophil degranulation and migration, suggesting a critical role of RANKL in neutrophil-mediated injury. Conversely, anti-RANKL IgG did not affect salvage pathways in cardiac cells (i.e. ERK p42/p44, Akt and STAT-3) or macrophage cardiac infiltration. Finally, treatment with anti-RANKL IgG showed no effect on B and T lymphocyte polarization (in serum, spleen and infarcted myocardium) and circulating chemokines as compared with Vehicle or control IgG. In conclusion, acute treatment with anti-RANKL IgG improved cardiac infarct size and function by potentially impacting on neutrophil-mediated injury and repair. PMID:27056420

  9. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of siRNA Via the Human Insulin Receptor Using Avidin-Biotin Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chun-Fang; Boado, Ruben J.; Pardridge, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) to cells in culture, and in vivo, is possible with combined use of a receptor-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) and avidin-biotin technology. In the present studies, the luciferase gene is transiently expressed in human 293 epithelial cells. The siRNA delivery system is comprised of the siRNA, mono-biotinylated on the 3′-terminus of the sense strand, and a conjugate of streptavidin (SA) and a MAb to the human insulin receptor (HIR). Exposure of cells to 3′-biotinyl-siRNA bound to the HIRMAb/SA conjugate, but not to unconjugated SA, avidin, or the HIRMAb, causes a >90% reduction in luciferase gene expression. The receptor-targeted siRNA effect is maximal at 48 hours after delivery of the siRNA to the cells, and the effect is lost by 7 days after a single application of the targeted siRNA in culture. The KI of the receptor-targeted siRNA inhibition of gene expresssion is 30.5 ± 11.7 nM, and significant inhibition is observed with siRNA concentrations as low as 3 nM. In conclusion, the combination of a receptor-specific targeting ligand, such as the HIRMAb, and avidin-biotin technology, allows for high affinity capture of the mono-biotinylated siRNA by the targeting MAb. The siRNA is effectively delivered to the cytosol of cells and knockdown of gene expression with the HIRMAb/SA delivery system is comparable to RNA interference effects obtained with cationic polyplexes. Whereas the use of cationic polyplexes in vivo is problematic, the bond between the targeting MAb and the siRNA is stable with avidin-biotin technology, and RNAi effects at distant sites such as brain are observed in vivo following an intravenous administration of the targeted siRNA. PMID:19093871

  10. Antibody-Mediated Inhibition of the FGFR1c Isoform Induces a Catabolic Lean State in Siberian Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samms, Ricardo J; Lewis, Jo E; Lory, Alex; Fowler, Maxine J; Cooper, Scott; Warner, Amy; Emmerson, Paul; Adams, Andrew C; Luckett, Jeni C; Perkins, Alan C; Wilson, Dana; Barrett, Perry; Tsintzas, Kostas; Ebling, Francis J P

    2015-11-16

    Hypothalamic tanycytes are considered to function as sensors of peripheral metabolism. To facilitate this role, they express a wide range of receptors, including fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). Using a monoclonal antibody (IMC-H7) that selectively antagonizes the FGFR1c isoform, we investigated possible actions of FGFR1c in a natural animal model of adiposity, the Siberian hamster. Infusion of IMC-H7 into the third ventricle suppressed appetite and increased energy expenditure. Likewise, peripheral treatment with IMC-H7 decreased appetite and body weight and increased energy expenditure and fat oxidation. A greater reduction in body weight and caloric intake was observed in response to IMC-H7 during the long-day fat state as compared to the short-day lean state. This enhanced response to IMC-H7 was also observed in calorically restricted hamsters maintained in long days, suggesting that it is the central photoperiodic state rather than the peripheral adiposity that determines the response to FGFR1c antagonism. Hypothalamic thyroid hormone availability is controlled by deiodinase enzymes (DIO2 and DIO3) expressed in tanycytes and is the key regulator of seasonal cycles of energy balance. Therefore, we determined the effect of IMC-H7 on hypothalamic expression of these deiodinase enzymes. The reductions in food intake and body weight were always associated with decreased expression of DIO2 in the hypothalamic ependymal cell layer containing tanycytes. These data provide further support for the notion the tanycytes are an important component of the mechanism by which the hypothalamus integrates central and peripheral signals to regulate energy intake and expenditure. PMID:26549257

  11. The herpes virus Fc receptor gE-gI mediates antibody bipolar bridging to clear viral antigens from the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaise Ndjamen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1 glycoprotein gE-gI is a transmembrane Fc receptor found on the surface of infected cells and virions that binds human immunoglobulin G (hIgG. gE-gI can also participate in antibody bipolar bridging (ABB, a process by which the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs of the IgG bind a viral antigen while the Fc binds to gE-gI. IgG Fc binds gE-gI at basic, but not acidic, pH, suggesting that IgG bound at extracellular pH by cell surface gE-gI would dissociate and be degraded in acidic endosomes/lysosomes if endocytosed. The fate of viral antigens associated with gE-gI-bound IgG had been unknown: they could remain at the cell surface or be endocytosed with IgG. Here, we developed an in vitro model system for ABB and investigated the trafficking of ABB complexes using 4-D confocal fluorescence imaging of ABB complexes with transferrin or epidermal growth factor, well-characterized intracellular trafficking markers. Our data showed that cells expressing gE-gI and the viral antigen HSV-1 gD endocytosed anti-gD IgG and gD in a gE-gI-dependent process, resulting in lysosomal localization. These results suggest that gE-gI can mediate clearance of infected cell surfaces of anti-viral host IgG and viral antigens to evade IgG-mediated responses, representing a general mechanism for viral Fc receptors in immune evasion and viral pathogenesis.

  12. Transplant rejection in terrestrial molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Furuta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To know whether or not molluscs are capable of recognizing tissue allo-antigens, dorsal skin-allografts were exchanged between adult terrestrial slug, Incilaria fruhstorferi. We succeeded for the first time in orthotopic transplantation of allografts and observed chronic rejection of allografts. Cellular changes in the rejection process continued over for 40 days. Two functional types of “effector” cells were recognized at the rejection site, but they were observed to be macrophages possessing perforin granules and phagocytosing damaged cells of the allograft. Three days after transplantation, the perforin-positive cells were recognized only in the recipient tissue surrounding the allograft. Five days after transplantation, these cells started to appear in the graft, while they disappeared from the host tissue. However, TUNEL-positive cells (apoptotic cells were not observed throughout the graft-rejection process. Electron microscopic examination of the graft tissue revealed autophagic degeneration of epithelial cells, mucous cells, pigment cells, fibroblasts, and muscle cells. These observations suggest that the slugs have the capability to recognize differences in cell-surface molecules between the allogeneic and recipient tissue, and that an allograft is chronically rejected due to a type of immunocyte (macrophage that can induce perforin-dependent cell death

  13. Successful therapy with rituximab of refractory acute humoral renal transplant rejection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, A; Saglam, F; Cavdar, C; Sifil, A; Atila, K; Sarioglu, S; Bora, S; Gulay, H; Camsari, T

    2008-01-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) is generally less responsive to conventional anti-rejection treatment with consequent allograft losses. Therapeutic options include antilymphocyte antibody (ATG), intravenous immunglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, or immunoadsorption with protein A together with intensification of immunsuppression with a tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil combination. This report describes a transplant recipient who responded to rituximab therapy as treatment for steroid-, ATG-, IVIG-, and plasmapheresis-resistant AHR. PMID:18261611

  14. The push of social pain: Does rejection's sting motivate subsequent social reconnection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, David S; DeWall, C Nathan; Pond, Richard S

    2016-06-01

    Physical pain motivates the healing of somatic injuries, yet it remains unknown whether social pain serves a similarly reparative function toward social injuries. Given the substantial overlap between physical and social pain, we predicted that social pain would mediate the effect of rejection on greater motivation for social reconnection and affiliative behavior toward rejecters. In Study 1, the effect of rejection on an increased need to belong was mediated by reports of more intense social pain. In Study 2, three neural signatures of social pain (i.e., activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, left and right anterior insula during social rejection), each predicted greater behavioral proximity to rejecters. Our findings reify the overlap between social and physical pain. Furthermore, these results are some of the first to demonstrate the reparative nature of social pain and lend insight into how this process may be harnessed to promote postrejection reconnection. PMID:26912270

  15. Antibody-mediated targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles to the folate receptor alpha increases tumor cell association in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndong, Christian; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Baker, Ian; Gerngross, Tillman U; Fiering, Steven N; Griswold, Karl E

    2015-01-01

    Active molecular targeting has become an important aspect of nanoparticle development for oncology indications. Here, we describe molecular targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to the folate receptor alpha (FOLRα) using an engineered antibody fragment (Ffab). Compared to control nanoparticles targeting the non-relevant botulinum toxin, the Ffab-IONP constructs selectively accumulated on FOLRα-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro, where they exhibited the capacity to internalize into intracellular vesicles. Similarly, Ffab-IONPs homed to FOLRα-positive tumors upon intraperitoneal administration in an orthotopic murine xenograft model of ovarian cancer, whereas negative control particles showed no detectable tumor accumulation. Interestingly, Ffab-IONPs built with custom 120 nm nanoparticles exhibited lower in vitro targeting efficiency when compared to those built with commercially sourced 180 nm nanoparticles. In vivo, however, the two Ffab-IONP platforms achieved equivalent tumor homing, although the smaller 120 nm IONPs were more prone to liver sequestration. Overall, the results show that Ffab-mediated targeting of IONPs yields specific, high-level accumulation within cancer cells, and this fact suggests that Ffab-IONPs could have future utility in ovarian cancer diagnostics and therapy. PMID:25878495

  16. CYP3A-mediated drug-drug interaction potential and excretion of brentuximab vedotin, an antibody-drug conjugate, in patients with CD30-positive hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae H; Gopal, Ajay K; Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Goy, Andre; Chen, Robert; Matous, Jeffrey V; Cooper, Maureen; Grove, Laurie E; Alley, Stephen C; Lynch, Carmel M; O'Connor, Owen A

    2013-08-01

    Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that selectively delivers monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) into CD30-expressing cells. This study evaluated the CYP3A-mediated drug-drug interaction potential of brentuximab vedotin and the excretion of MMAE. Two 21-day cycles of brentuximab vedotin (1.2 or 1.8 mg/kg intravenously) were administered to 56 patients with CD30-positive hematologic malignancies. Each patient also received either a sensitive CYP3A substrate (midazolam), an effective inducer (rifampin), or a strong inhibitor (ketoconazole). Brentuximab vedotin did not affect midazolam exposures. ADC exposures were unaffected by concomitant rifampin or ketoconazole; however, MMAE exposures were lower with rifampin and higher with ketoconazole. The short-term safety profile of brentuximab vedotin in this study was generally consistent with historic clinical observations. The most common adverse events were nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, headache, pyrexia, and neutropenia. Over a 1-week period, ∼23.5% of intact MMAE was recovered after administration of brentuximab vedotin; all other species were below the limit of quantitation. The primary excretion route is via feces (median 72% of the recovered MMAE). These results suggest that brentuximab vedotin (1.8 mg/kg) and MMAE are neither inhibitors nor inducers of CYP3A; however, MMAE is a substrate of CYP3A. PMID:23754575

  17. Biosimilars in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: initial lessons from the first approved biosimilar anti-tumour necrosis factor monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, J D; Cutolo, M; Keystone, E C; Park, W; Braun, J

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted biological therapies has revolutionised the management of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. Following treatment with these therapies, many patients experience significant improvements in different aspects of their disease, including symptoms, work productivity and other outcomes relevant for individuals and society. However, due to the complexity of biological drug development and manufacturing processes, the costs of these therapies are relatively high. Indeed, the financial burden on healthcare systems due to biological therapies is considerable and lack of patient access to effective treatment remains a concern in many parts of the world. As many reference biological therapies have now reached or are near to patent expiry, a number of 'biosimilar' drugs have been developed for use in various clinical settings, and some of these drugs are already in use in several countries. While the potential pharmacoeconomic benefits of cost-effective biosimilars seem clear, several issues have been raised regarding, for example, the definition of biosimilarity and the validity of indication extrapolation, as well as the 'switchability' and relative immunogenicity of biosimilars and their reference drugs. In this review, these issues will be discussed with reference to CT-P13, a biosimilar of the anti-tumour necrosis factor monoclonal antibody infliximab, which is approved in Europe and elsewhere for the treatment of various IMIDs. Other important issues, including those related to data collection during nonclinical and clinical development of biosimilars, are also discussed. PMID:26403380

  18. Non-HLA antibodies against endothelial targets bridging allo- and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragun, Duska; Catar, Rusan; Philippe, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    Detrimental actions of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) directed against both major histocompatibility antigens (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]) and specific non-HLA antigens expressed on the allograft endothelium are a flourishing research area in kidney transplantation. Newly developed solid-phase assays enabling detection of functional non-HLA antibodies targeting G protein-coupled receptors such as angiotensin type I receptor and endothelin type A receptor were instrumental in providing long-awaited confirmation of their broad clinical relevance. Numerous recent clinical studies implicate angiotensin type I receptor and endothelin type A receptor antibodies as prognostic biomarkers for earlier occurrence and severity of acute and chronic immunologic complications in solid organ transplantation, stem cell transplantation, and systemic autoimmune vascular disease. Angiotensin type 1 receptor and endothelin type A receptor antibodies exert their pathophysiologic effects alone and in synergy with HLA-DSA. Recently identified antiperlecan antibodies are also implicated in accelerated allograft vascular pathology. In parallel, protein array technology platforms enabled recognition of new endothelial surface antigens implicated in endothelial cell activation. Upon target antigen recognition, non-HLA antibodies act as powerful inducers of phenotypic perturbations in endothelial cells via activation of distinct intracellular cell-signaling cascades. Comprehensive diagnostic assessment strategies focusing on both HLA-DSA and non-HLA antibody responses could substantially improve immunologic risk stratification before transplantation, help to better define subphenotypes of antibody-mediated rejection, and lead to timely initiation of targeted therapies. Better understanding of similarities and dissimilarities in HLA-DSA and distinct non-HLA antibody-related mechanisms of endothelial damage should facilitate discovery of common downstream signaling targets and pave the

  19. Prostanoids modulate inflammation and alloimmune responses during graft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. Rocha

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute rejection of a transplanted organ is characterized by intense inflammation within the graft. Yet, for many years transplant researchers have overlooked the role of classic mediators of inflammation such as prostaglandins and thromboxane (prostanoids in alloimmune responses. It has been demonstrated that local production of prostanoids within the allograft is increased during an episode of acute rejection and that these molecules are able to interfere with graft function by modulating vascular tone, capillary permeability, and platelet aggregation. Experimental data also suggest that prostanoids may participate in alloimmune responses by directly modulating T lymphocyte and antigen-presenting cell function. In the present paper, we provide a brief overview of the alloimmune response, of prostanoid biology, and discuss the available evidence for the role of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2 in graft rejection.

  20. Antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer of helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors to rat neocortical neurons that contain either NMDA receptor 2B or 2A subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Haiyan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Geller, Alfred I.

    2011-01-01

    Because of the numerous types of neurons in the brain, and particularly the forebrain, neuron type-specific expression will benefit many potential applications of direct gene transfer. The two most promising approaches for achieving neuron type-specific expression are targeted gene transfer to a specific type of neuron and using a neuron type-specific promoter. We previously developed antibody-mediated targeted gene transfer with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors by modifying glycoprotein ...

  1. Hyperacute rejection of skin allografts in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The destructive action of alloantiserum and exogenous complement on ingrowing skin allografts was studied. B6AF1 recipients of a B10.D2 skin graft received a single intravenous injection of B6AF1 anti-B10.D2 serum (antiserum to H-2K.31) together with rabbit complement (RC) within the first 10 days after transplantation. Different models were used: recipients without immunosuppression, recipients treated with antilymphocyte serum, x-irradiation, or enhancing antibody. If the injection was given between day 5 and 10 after grafting, hyperacute rejection occurred in all cases. The rejection seemed to be most violent when the injection was given on days 7 or 8. Injections given on days 1, 2, or 3 after grafting could not induce hyperacute rejection, but resulted, on the contrary, in a prolongation of graft survival, probably due to immunological enhancement. Injections on day 4 produced patchy necrosis, but the grafts recovered and the residual tissue showed a prolonged survival. The results suggest that the presence of a functioning vascular network is a prerequisite for the occurrence of hyperacute rejection of skin allografts in the mouse

  2. The γ-radiation induced CD20 expression and anti-CD20 antibodies mediated cell death on hematopoietic cancer cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daudi cells were exposed to sub lethal doses of γ-radiation (0.5 Gy and 1.5 Gy; dose rate 1.8Gy/min, 60CO) and followed by incubation at 37℃. Changes in CD20 expression was measured at different time intervals. In other experiment cells with over expression of CD20 were further treated with either RTX or TST following by incubation at 37℃. Anti-CD20 mediated changes in ROS, MMP and cell death were studied after 24hrs. Exposure of cells to γ-radiation showed increase in CD20 level maximally at 20h. Cells treated with both radiation and AntiCD20 antibodies showed differential responses. Combination of radiation with either RTX or TST showed significant increase in ROS generation. 0.5Gy+TST and 1.5Gy+TST showed sudden decrease in MMP with respect to TST or radiation alone, whereas Rad+RTX was shown to increase of MMP (at 24h) which was reduced with time. Percentage of cell death was significantly high in all combination group with respect to corresponding control groups. However, 1.5Gy+TST have shown high cell death levels as compared to 1.5Gy+RTX. All combination groups have shown increased PARP cleavage with respect to control groups. The combination of anti-CD20 with radiation significantly increased cell death in CD20 over expressing cells. However in vivo studies need to be done to confirm hypothesis

  3. Combined Yeast β-Glucan and Antitumor Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Requires C5a-Mediated Neutrophil Chemotaxis via Regulation of Decay-Accelerating Factor CD55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Allendorf, Daniel J.; Hansen, Richard; Marroquin, Jose; Cramer, Daniel E.; Harris, Claire L.; Yan, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Administration of a combination of yeast-derived β-glucan with antitumor monoclonal antibodies (mAb) has significant therapeutic efficacy in a variety of syngeneic murine tumor models. We have now tested this strategy using human carcinomas implanted in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficient mice. Combined immunotherapy was therapeutically effective in vivo against NCI-H23 human non–small-cell lung carcinomas, but this modality was surprisingly ineffective against SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinomas. Whereas NCI-H23 tumors responded to this combination therapy with increased intratumoral neutrophil infiltration and C5a production, these responses were lacking in treated SKOV-3 tumors. Further results suggested that SKOV-3 tumors were protected by up-regulation of the membrane complement regulatory protein CD55 (decay-accelerating factor). Blockade of CD55 in vitro led to enhanced deposition of C activation product C3b and increased cytotoxicity mediated by β-glucan–primed neutrophils. In vivo, administration of anti-CD55 mAb along with β-glucan and anti–Her-2/neu mAb caused tumor regression and greatly improved long-term survival in animals bearing the previously resistant SKOV-3 tumors. This was accompanied by increased intratumoral neutrophil accumulation and C5a production. We conclude that CD55 suppresses tumor killing by antitumor mAb plus β-glucan therapy (and, perhaps, in other circumstances). These results suggest a critical role for CD55 to regulate iC3b and C5a release and in turn to influence the recruitment of β-glucan–primed neutrophils eliciting killing activity. PMID:17671212

  4. Mediation as Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Holler, M.J.; Lindner, I.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyzes mediation as a signal. Starting from a stylized case, a game theoretical model of one-sided incomplete information, taken from Cho and Kreps (1987), is applied to discuss strategic effects of mediation. It turns out that to reject mediation can be interpreted as a ”negative signal” while the interpretation of accepting or proposing mediation is ambiguous and does not necessarily change the prior beliefs of the uninformed party. This asymmetry suggests that, in equilibrium,...

  5. Chronic cardiac rejection: identification of five upregulated genes in transplanted hearts by differential mRNA display.

    OpenAIRE

    Utans, U; Liang, P; Wyner, L R; Karnovsky, M. J.; Russell, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis, the major manifestation of chronic rejection, develops after allogeneic (Lewis to F344) but not syngeneic (Lewis to Lewis) rat cardiac transplantation. To identify transcriptionally regulated mediators associated with chronic cardiac rejection, we adapted the differential mRNA display technique for in vivo transplant specimens. Gene transcript patterns in four allogeneic hearts showing early signs of chronic rejection were compared with those in two syngeneic hear...

  6. Developmental Pathways from Childhood Aggression-Disruptiveness, Chronic Peer Rejection and Deviant Friendships to Early-Adolescent Rule Breaking

    OpenAIRE

    Ettekal, Idean; Ladd, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood aggression-disruptiveness, chronic peer rejection, and deviant friendships were examined as predictors of early-adolescent rule breaking behaviors. Using a sample of 383 children (193 girls and 190 boys) who were followed from ages 6 to 14, peer rejection trajectories were identified and incorporated into a series of alternative models to assess how chronic peer rejection and deviant friendships mediate the association between stable childhood aggression-disruptiveness and early-ado...

  7. Complement and hyper acute rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Rabia Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation has been a major development in clinical medicine but its success has been marred by the immune system′s capacity to respond to "non-self" cells and tissues. A full molecular understanding of this mechanism and the myriad triggers for immune rejection is yet to be elucidated. Consequently, immunosuppressive drugs remain the mainstay of post-transplant ma-nagement; however, these interventions have side effects such as increased incidence of cancer, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders, susceptibility to infection if not managed appro-priately and the inconvenience to the patient of lifelong treatment. Novel therapeutic approaches based on molecular understanding of immunological processes are thus needed in this field. The notion that factors influencing successful transplants might be of use as therapeutic approaches is both scientifically and medically appealing. Recent developments in the understanding of successful transplants are expected to provide new opportunities for safer transplantation. This article reviews the present understanding of the molecular basis of rejection and the role of complement in this process as well as the possibility of generating "intelligent" therapy that better target crucial components of hyper-acute rejections.

  8. Radiation therapy treatment of acute refractory renal allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of the use of radiotherapy to preserve the renal graft in patients with recurrent graft rejection that failed to respond to medical treatment and identify risk factors to predict the probability of graft loss. Material and Methods: Between June 1989 and December 1995, 53 renal graft recipients were treated at our institution after experiencing several episodes of rejection. Rejection was defined as an unexplained, consecutive, daily rise in serum creatinine. Each episode was confirmed with renal biopsy. Patients who experienced rejection were initially treated with solu medrol bolus and prednisone. Patients with steroid-resistant or recurrent rejection received OKT3, polyclonal antilymphocyte antibody, FK506, or mycophenolate mofetil. Those who failed to respond to medical treatment were referred for radiotherapy. Treatment consisted of a dose of 600 cGy given in 3 or 4 fractions using 6 MV photons, AP or AP/PA. All patients underwent ultrasound kidney localization; a 2 cm margin was given around the kidney. Results: Median follow-up from the date of transplant to the last follow-up was 22 months (range 1-83 months), the median time from the date of transplant to the initiation of radiotherapy was 3 months, and the median time from the initiation of radiotherapy to the last follow up was 10 months (range 0.1 to 64 months). Of these 34 men and 19 women, median age of 3), Ninety-one percent were cadaveric transplant recipients., human leukocyte antigen matching on HLA-A and HLA-B (zero antigens in 26 patients/one or two shared antigens in 27 patients), HLA-DR locus (zero antigens in 34 patients/one or two shared antigens in 19 patients), transplant panel-reactive antibodies at transplantation (median PRA-Curr of 3% and median PRA-Max of 8%), number of acute rejection episodes, interval from the date of the transplant to the first rejection (median 1 month, range 5 days to 68 months), serum creatinine levels at the time of the first

  9. 7 CFR 58.136 - Rejected milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rejected milk. 58.136 Section 58.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Milk § 58.136 Rejected milk. A plant shall reject specific milk from a producer if the milk fails...

  10. Molecular analysis of transplant rejection: marching onward

    OpenAIRE

    Lakkis, Fadi G.; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of organ transplants is increasingly defining the biological pathways responsible for graft rejection at the molecular level and identifying gene transcripts that diagnose or predict rejection. These advances hold significant promise for the treatment of organ rejection and for improving clinical outcomes after transplantation, but hurdles remain.

  11. Molecular analysis of transplant rejection: marching onward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of organ transplants is increasingly defining the biological pathways responsible for graft rejection at the molecular level and identifying gene transcripts that diagnose or predict rejection. These advances hold significant promise for the treatment of organ rejection and for improving clinical outcomes after transplantation, but hurdles remain. PMID:24145950

  12. Antibody induction versus placebo, no induction, or another type of antibody induction for liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Wettergren, André; Wilson, Colin H;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation is an established treatment option for end-stage liver failure. To date, no consensus has been reached on the use of immunosuppressive T-cell antibody induction for preventing rejection after liver transplantation. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of...... immunosuppressive T-cell specific antibody induction compared with placebo, no induction, or another type of T-cell specific antibody induction for prevention of acute rejection in liver transplant recipients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane......-cell specific antibody induction compared with placebo, no induction, or another type of antibody induction in liver transplant recipients. Our inclusion criteria stated that participants within each included trial should have received the same maintenance immunosuppressive therapy. We planned to include trials...

  13. Rejection sensitivity and depressive symptoms: Longitudinal actor-partner effects in adolescent romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norona, Jerika C; Roberson, Patricia N E; Welsh, Deborah P

    2016-08-01

    The present study utilizes the actor-partner interdependence model to examine the longitudinal relationship between rejection sensitivity and one's own and one's partner's depressive symptoms. The sample included adolescent romantic couples from the U.S. (N = 198 adolescents; 50% girls; 90.2% Caucasian) whose rejection sensitivity at Time 1 and depressive symptoms approximately one year later (Time 2) were assessed. Additionally, aggressive behaviors and maintenance behaviors that commonly associated with rejection sensitivity (e.g., self-silencing) are explored as mediators. Results indicate that boyfriends' rejection sensitivity at Time 1 predicted girlfriends' depressive symptoms at Time 2. Additionally, girls' rejection sensitivity predicted their own and their boyfriends' self-silencing. Developmental and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:27254083

  14. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M; Hughes, Andrew D; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Nakao, A; Shufesky, William J; Williams, Amanda L; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Shlomchik, Warren D; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Lakkis, Fadi G; Morelli, Adrian E

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  15. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked to an increased risk ...

  16. Rejection index for pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present study was to establish a set of criteria (or Rejection Index) which could be used to decide whether a zirconium-2 1/2 w/o niobium pressure tube in a CANDU reactor should be removed from service due to in-service degradation. A critique of key issues associated with establishing a realistic rejection index was prepared. Areas of uncertainty in available information were identified and recommendations for further analysis and laboratory testing made. A Rejection Index based on the following limits has been recommended: 1) Limits related to design intent and normal operation: any garter spring must remain within the tolerance band specified for its design location; the annulus gas system must normally be operated in a circulating mode with a procedure in place for purging to prevent accumulation of deuterium. It must remain sensitive to leaks into any part of the systems; and pressure tube dimensions and distortions must be limited to maintain the fuel channels within the original design intent; 2) Limits related to defect tolerance: adequate time margins between occurrence of a leaking crack and unstable failure must be demonstrated for all fuel channels; long lap-type flaws are unacceptable; crack-like defects of any size are unacceptable; and score marks, frat marks and other defects with contoured profiles must fall below certain depth, length and stress intensity limits; and 3) Limits related to property degradation: at operating temperature each pressure tube must be demonstrated to have a critical length in excess of a stipulated value; the maximum equivalent hydrogen level in any pressure tube should not exceed a limit which should be defined taking into account the known history of that tube; the maximum equivalent hydrogen level in any rolled joint should not exceed a limit which is presently recommended as 200 ppm equivalent hydrogen; and the maximum diametral creep strain should be limited to less than 5%

  17. Insights from Computational Modeling in Inflammation and Acute Rejection in Limb Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfram, Dolores; Starzl, Ravi; Hackl, Hubert; Barclay, Derek; Hautz, Theresa; Zelger, Bettina; Brandacher, Gerald; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Eberhart, Nadine; Vodovotz, Yoram; Pratschke, Johann; Pierer, Gerhard; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Acute skin rejection in vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) is the major obstacle for wider adoption in clinical practice. This study utilized computational modeling to identify biomarkers for diagnosis and targets for treatment of skin rejection. Protein levels of 14 inflammatory mediators in skin and muscle biopsies from syngeneic grafts [n = 10], allogeneic transplants without immunosuppression [n = 10] and allografts treated with tacrolimus [n = 10] were assessed by multiplex...

  18. Immunoglobulin G4: an odd antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Aalberse; S.O. Stapel; J. Schuurman; T. Rispens

    2009-01-01

    Despite its well-known association with IgE-mediated allergy, IgG4 antibodies still have several poorly understood characteristics. IgG4 is a very dynamic antibody: the antibody is involved in a continuous process of half-molecules (i.e. a heavy and attached light-chain) exchange. This process, also

  19. Liver transplant rejection and cholestasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on liver transplant biopsies with Tc-99m hepatobiliary scintigraphy in patients with and without rejection (RE) and or cholestasis (CS). The authors reviewed 76 Tc-99m disofenin hepatobiliary studies and corresponding liver biopsies. Uptake was assigned a value of 0 to 3 (0 = normal). Excretion was assigned a value of 0 to 2 (0 = normal). Biopsies were graded on scales of (1) 0 to 12 for findings of CS (0 = normal) and (2) 0 to 2 for RE (0 = normal)

  20. The Early Protective Thymus-Independent Antibody Response to Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Is Mediated by Splenic CD9+ B Lymphocytes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrowski, Matias; Vermeulen, Monica; Zabal, Osvaldo; Zamorano, Patricia I; Sadir, Ana M; Jorge R. Geffner; Lopez, Osvaldo J.

    2007-01-01

    Infection of mice with cytopathic foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) induces a rapid and specific thymus-independent (TI) neutralizing antibody response that promptly clears the virus. Herein, it is shown that FMDV-infected dendritic cells (DCs) directly stimulate splenic innate-like CD9+ B lymphocytes to rapidly (3 days) produce neutralizing anti-FMDV immunoglobulin M antibodies without T-lymphocyte collaboration. In contrast, neither follicular (CD9−) B lymphocytes from the spleen nor B ly...

  1. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  2. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Pei Xuan Lee; Li Ching Ong; Eshele Anak Libau; Sylvie Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upo...

  3. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  4. Pretransplant thymic function predicts acute rejection in antithymocyte globulin-treated renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamoulid, Jamal; Courivaud, Cécile; Crepin, Thomas; Carron, Clémence; Gaiffe, Emilie; Roubiou, Caroline; Laheurte, Caroline; Moulin, Bruno; Frimat, Luc; Rieu, Philippe; Mousson, Christiane; Durrbach, Antoine; Heng, Anne-Elisabeth; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Saas, Philippe; Ducloux, Didier

    2016-05-01

    Lack of clear identification of patients at high risk of acute rejection hampers the ability to individualize immunosuppressive therapy. Here we studied whether thymic function may predict acute rejection in antithymocyte globulin (ATG)-treated renal transplant recipients in 482 patients prospectively studied during the first year post-transplant of which 86 patients experienced acute rejection. Only CD45RA(+)CD31(+)CD4(+) T cell (recent thymic emigrant [RTE]) frequency (RTE%) was marginally associated with acute rejection in the whole population. This T-cell subset accounts for 26% of CD4(+) T cells. Pretransplant RTE% was significantly associated with acute rejection in ATG-treated patients (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.08) for each increased percent in RTE/CD4(+) T cells), but not in anti-CD25 monoclonal (αCD25 mAb)-treated patients. Acute rejection was significantly more frequent in ATG-treated patients with high pretransplant RTE% (31.2% vs. 16.4%) or absolute number of RTE/mm(3) (31.7 vs. 16.1). This difference was not found in αCD25 monclonal antibody-treated patients. Highest values of both RTE% (>31%, hazard ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.74) and RTE/mm(3) (>200/mm(3), hazard ratio, 3.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-8.70) were predictive of acute rejection in ATG-treated patients but not in patients having received αCD25 monoclonal antibody). Results were confirmed in a retrospective cohort using T-cell receptor excision circle levels as a marker of thymic function. Thus, pretransplant thymic function predicts acute rejection in ATG-treated patients. PMID:27083287

  5. Cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma and melanoma cells mediated by IgM antibodies derived from peripheral blood of healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Mamidi, Srinivas; Plöger, Frank; Dill, Othmar; Blixt, Ola; Kirschfink, Michael; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard

    2016-06-15

    A small percentage of healthy donors identified in the Western population carry antibodies in their peripheral blood which convey cytotoxic activity against certain human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. We measured the cytotoxic activity of sera and plasmas from healthy donors on the human neuroblastoma cell line Kelly and various melanoma cell lines. Antibodies of IgM isotype, presumably belonging to the class of naturally occurring antibodies, exerted cytotoxic activity in a complement-dependent fashion. Apart from complement-dependent tumor cell lysis, we observed C3 opsonization in all tumor cell lines upon treatment with cytotoxic plasmas. Cell lines tested primarily expressed membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRP) CD46, CD55 and CD59 to various extents. Blocking of mCRPs by monoclonal antibodies enhanced cell lysis and opsonization, though some melanoma cells remained resistant to complement attack. Epitopes recognized by cytotoxic antibodies were represented by gangliosides such as GD2 and GD3, as evidenced by cellular sialidase pretreatment and enhanced expression of distinct gangliosides. It remains to be clarified why only a small fraction of healthy persons carry these antitumor cytotoxic antibodies. PMID:26830059

  6. Comparing reports of peer rejection: associations with rejection sensitivity, victimization, aggression, and friendship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Nesdale, Drew; McGregor, Leanne; Mastro, Shawna; Goodwin, Belinda; Downey, Geraldine

    2013-12-01

    Perceiving that one is rejected is an important correlate of emotional maladjustment. Yet, self-perceptions can substantially differ from classmate-reports of who is rejected. In this study, discrepancies between self- and classmate-reports of rejection were identified in 359 Australian adolescents (age 10-12 years). As expected, adolescents who overestimated rejection reported more rejection sensitivity and felt more victimized by their peers, but were not seen by peers as more victimized. Adolescents who underestimated rejection identified themselves as high in overt aggression, and their peers identified them as high in overt and relational aggression and low in prosocial behavior. Yet, underestimators' feelings of friendship satisfaction did not seem to suffer and they reported low rejection sensitivity. Results suggest that interventions to promote adolescent health should explicitly recognize the different needs of those who do and do not seem to perceive their high rejection, as well as adolescents who overestimate their rejection. PMID:24215970

  7. Anti-GaL IgG antibodies in sera of newborn humans and baboons and its significance in pig xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minanov, O P; Itescu, S; Neethling, F A; Morgenthau, A S; Kwiatkowski, P; Cooper, D K; Michler, R E

    1997-01-27

    We have previously demonstrated that hyperacute rejection does not occur in a pig-to-newborn baboon heart transplant model, presumably because of low levels of cytotoxic antipig antibodies present in the serum of newborn baboons. Cytotoxic antipig antibodies are primarily directed to alpha-1,3-galactosyl (alpha Gal) residues on endothelial cell surface structures Twenty-one full-term humans and 5 full-term baboons were tested for complement mediated lysis (CML) of pig kidney (PK-15) cells and anti-alpha Gal activity with an ELISA using BSA-conjugated alpha Gal residues as target. To evaluate the significance of the anti-alpha Gal titers in vivo 5 newborn baboons underwent heterotopic pig cardiac xenotransplantation. Six of 21 human samples and 1 of 5 baboon samples demonstrated significant cytotoxicity to PK-15 cells. Twelve of 21 newborn humans had anti-alpha Gal IgG antibodies at titers of 1:80 or greater. None of the samples had anti-alpha Gal IgM. In newborn baboons, 1 of 5 sera had anti-alpha Gal IgG antibodies at titers greater than 1:80 and none of these samples had anti-alpha Gal IgM. Xenografts survived for an average of 3.6 days, even in the baboon with high anti-alpha Gal IgG titers. Analysis of the explanted grafts showed minimal evidence of complement-mediated hyperacute rejection (HAR), but prominent mononuclear cell infiltrates. In serum tested posttransplant there was an induced anti-alpha Gal response with cytotoxicity against PK-15 cells. These results show that anti-alpha Gal IgM is absent in newborn human and baboon sera, allowing pig grafts to avoid HAR. However, the presence of anti-alpha Gal IgG may be associated with mononuclear cell infiltration of the xenograft and its subsequent rejection. PMID:9020315

  8. LATE RENAL GRAFT REJECTION: PATHOLOGY AND PROGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Stolyarevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rejection has always been one of the most important cause of late renal graft dysfunction. Aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of different clinico-pathological variants of rejection that cause late graft dysfunction, and evaluate their impact on long-term outcome. Materials and methods. This is a retrospective study that analyzed 294 needle core biopsy specimens from 265 renal transplant recipients with late (48,8 ± 46,1 months after transplantation allograft dysfunction caused by late acute rejection (LAR, n = 193 or chronic rejection (CR, n = 78 or both (n = 23. C4d staining was performed by immunofl uorescence (IF on frozen sections using a standard protocol. Results. Peritubular capillary C4d deposition was identifi ed in 36% samples with acute rejection and in 62% cases of chronic rejection (including 67% cases of transplant glomerulopathy, and 50% – of isolated chronic vasculopathy. 5-year graft survival for LAR vs CR vs their combination was 47, 13 and 25%, respectively. The outcome of C4d– LAR was (p < 0,01 better than of C4d+ acute rejection: at 60 months graft survival for diffuse C4d+ vs C4d− was 33% vs 53%, respectively. In cases of chronic rejection C4d+ vs C4d– it was not statistically signifi cant (34% vs 36%. Conclusion. In long-term allograft biopsy C4d positivity is more haracteristic for chronic rejection than for acute rejection. Only diffuse C4d staining affects the outcome. C4d– positivity is associated with worse allograft survival in cases of late acute rejection, but not in cases of chronic rejection

  9. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26928516

  10. Efficacy of mycofenolate mofetil for steroid-resistant acute rejection after living donor liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nobuhisa Akamatsu; Yasuhiko Sugawara; Sumihito Tamura; Yuichi Matsui; Junichi Kaneko; Masatoshi Makuuchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as an immunosuppressant in steroid resistant rejection after liver transplantation. METHODS: The clinical records of 260 adult patients who underwent living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) were reviewed. Tacrolimus and methylprednisolone were used for primary immunosuppression. Acute rejection was first treated with steroids. When steroid resistance occurred, the patient was treated with a combination of steroids and MMF. Anti-T-cell monoclonal antibody was administered to patients who were not responsive to steroids in combination with MMF.RESULTS: A total of 90 (35%) patients developed acute rejection. The median interval time from transplantation to the first episode was 15 d. Fifty-four patients were steroid resistant. Forty-four patients were treated with MMF and the remaining 10 required anti-T-cell monoclonal antibody treatment. Progression to chronic rejection was observed in one patient. Bone marrow suppression and gastrointestinal symptoms were the most common side effects associated with MMF use. There was no significant increase in opportunistic infections. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that MMF is a potent and safe immunosuppressive agent for rescue therapy in patients with acute rejection after LDLT.

  11. Comparison of the C-mediating killing activity and C-activating properties of mouse monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Kipnis

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A Mouse polyclonal antiserum against Trypanosoma cruzi or its IgG and IgM fractions and five monoclonal antibodies (two IgM, two IgG1 and one IgG2a recognize and combine with membrane components of trypomastigote forms of the parasite as revealed by immunofluorescence. Although all these antibodies sensitize trypomastigotes and prepare them to activate the complement (C system, as measured by consumption of total C, C4, B and C3, only the polyclonal antiserum or its IgG, IgM and Fabμ fragments were able to induce trypanosome lysis by the alternative C pathway.

  12. Occurrence of Fatal and Nonfatal Adverse Outcomes after Heart Transplantation in Patients with Pretransplant Noncytotoxic HLA Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Potena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA antibodies (HLA ab in transplant candidates have been associated with poor outcome. However, clinical relevance of noncytotoxic antibodies after heart transplant (HT is controversial. By using a Luminex-based HLA screening, we retested pretransplant sera from HT recipients testing negative for cytotoxic HLA ab and for prospective crossmatch. Out of the 173 consecutive patients assayed (52±13y; 16% females; 47% ischemic etiology, 32 (18% showed pretransplant HLA ab, and 12 (7% tested positive against both class I and class II HLA. Recipients with any HLA ab had poorer survival than those without (65±9 versus 82±3%; P=0.02, accounting for a doubled independent mortality risk (P=0.04. In addition, HLA-ab detection was associated with increased prevalence of early graft failure (35 versus 15%; P=0.05 and late cellular rejection (29 versus 11%; P=0.03. Of the subgroup of 37 patients suspected for antibody mediated rejection (AMR, the 9 with pretransplant HLA ab were more likely to display pathological AMR grade 2 (P=0.04. By an inexpensive, luminex-based, HLA-screening assay, we were able to detect non-cytotoxic HLA ab predicting fatal and nonfatal adverse outcomes after heart transplant. Allocation strategies and desensitization protocols need to be developed and prospectively tested in these patients.

  13. Are You Being Rejected or Excluded? Insights from Neuroimaging Studies Using Different Rejection Paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Premkumar, Preethi

    2012-01-01

    Rejection sensitivity is the heightened tendency to perceive or anxiously expect disengagement from others during social interaction. There has been a recent wave of neuroimaging studies of rejection. The aim of the current review was to determine key brain regions involved in social rejection by selectively reviewing neuroimaging studies that employed one of three paradigms of social rejection, namely social exclusion during a ball-tossing game, evaluating feedback about preference from peer...

  14. CD40 agonist antibody mediated improvement of chronic Cryptosporidium infection in patients with X-linked hyper IgM syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHM) is a combined immune deficiency disorder caused by mutations in CD40 ligand. We tested CP-870,893, a human CD40 agonist monoclonal antibody, in the treatment of two XHM patients with biliary Cryptosporidiosis. CP-870,893 activated B cells and APCs in vitro, restori...

  15. Immunization with heat-inactivated Staphylococcus aureus induced an antibody response mediated by IgG1 and IgG2 in patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Romo, Gina Stella; Gonzalez-Ibarra, Misael; Donis-Hernandez, Felipe Raul; Zendejas-Buitron, Victor Manuel; Pedroza-Gonzalez, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Currently Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant pathogen isolated from the respiratory tract of patients with recurrent tonsillitis. Because of an increase in multi-drug resistant strains of S. aureus, there is a pressing need for effective treatments and preventive approaches to reduce the risk of invasive and life-threatening infections. A preventive vaccine against S. aureus would have a tremendous clinical impact. However, multiple clinical trials have failed to identify an agent that can induce protective responses. Most trials have been based on subunit vaccines using one or a few purified antigens, which may not be enough to confer protection. Here, the impact of a whole-cell vaccine comprised of heat-inactivated S. aureus was investigated in patients with RT. The vaccine was well tolerated and had no significant local or systemic reactions. Immunization with heat-inactivated S. aureus elicited a significant antibody response characterized by production of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies and, to a lesser extent, of IgA antibodies. Notably, this response was associated with an important decrease in the incidence of tonsillitis and bacterial colonization of the oropharyngeal mucosa. Our results show that whole-cell inactivated S. aureus is safe and capable of evoking specific antibody responses in patients with recurrent tonsillitis. PMID:25648612

  16. Radiosensitization and growth inhibition of cancer cells mediated by an scFv antibody gene against DNA-PKcs in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Li

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overexpression of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs is commonly occurred in cancers and causes radioresistance and poor prognosis. In present study, the single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv targeting DNA-PKcs was developed for the application of radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo. A humanized semisynthetic scFv library and the phage-display antibodies technology were employed to screen DNA-PKcs scFv antibody. Methods DNA-PKcs epitopes were predicted and cloned. A humanized semisynthetic scFv library and the phage-display antibodies technology were employed to screen DNA-PKcs scFv antibody. DNA damage repair was analyzed by comet assay and immunofluorescence detection of γH2AX foci. The radiosensitization in vivo was determined on Balb/c athymic mice transplanted tumours of HeLa cells. Results Four epitopes of DNA-PKcs have been predicted and expressed as the antigens, and a specific human anti-DNA-PKcs scFv antibody gene, anti-DPK3-scFv, was obtained by screening the phage antibody library using the DNA-PKcs peptide DPK3. The specificity of anti-DPK3-scFv was verified, in vitro. Transfection of HeLa cells with the anti-DPK3-scFv gene resulted in an increased sensitivity to IR, decreased repair capability of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB detected by comet assay and immunofluorescence detection of γH2AX foci. Moreover, the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs was inhibited by anti-DPK3-scFv, which was displayed by the decreased phosphorylation levels of its target Akt/S473 and the autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs on S2056 induced by radiation. Measurement of the growth and apoptosis rates showed that anti-DPK3-scFv enhanced the sensitivity of tumours transplanted in Balb/c athymic mice to radiation therapy. Conclusion The antiproliferation and radiosensitizing effects of anti-DPK3-scFv via targeting DNA-PKcs make it very appealing for the development as a novel biological radiosensitizer for cancer

  17. Radiosensitization and growth inhibition of cancer cells mediated by an scFv antibody gene against DNA-PKcs in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overexpression of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is commonly occurred in cancers and causes radioresistance and poor prognosis. In present study, the single-chain variable antibody fragments (scFv) targeting DNA-PKcs was developed for the application of radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo. A humanized semisynthetic scFv library and the phage-display antibodies technology were employed to screen DNA-PKcs scFv antibody. DNA-PKcs epitopes were predicted and cloned. A humanized semisynthetic scFv library and the phage-display antibodies technology were employed to screen DNA-PKcs scFv antibody. DNA damage repair was analyzed by comet assay and immunofluorescence detection of γH2AX foci. The radiosensitization in vivo was determined on Balb/c athymic mice transplanted tumours of HeLa cells. Four epitopes of DNA-PKcs have been predicted and expressed as the antigens, and a specific human anti-DNA-PKcs scFv antibody gene, anti-DPK3-scFv, was obtained by screening the phage antibody library using the DNA-PKcs peptide DPK3. The specificity of anti-DPK3-scFv was verified, in vitro. Transfection of HeLa cells with the anti-DPK3-scFv gene resulted in an increased sensitivity to IR, decreased repair capability of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) detected by comet assay and immunofluorescence detection of γH2AX foci. Moreover, the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs was inhibited by anti-DPK3-scFv, which was displayed by the decreased phosphorylation levels of its target Akt/S473 and the autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs on S2056 induced by radiation. Measurement of the growth and apoptosis rates showed that anti-DPK3-scFv enhanced the sensitivity of tumours transplanted in Balb/c athymic mice to radiation therapy. The antiproliferation and radiosensitizing effects of anti-DPK3-scFv via targeting DNA-PKcs make it very appealing for the development as a novel biological radiosensitizer for cancer therapeutic potential

  18. Effects of IFNγ administration on allograft rejection in ginbuna crucian carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Hatanaka, Chihiro; Matsuura, Yuta; Miyazawa, Ryuichiro; Yabu, Takeshi; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2016-09-01

    In vertebrates, the rejection of allografts is primarily accomplished by cell-mediated immunity. We recently identified four IFNγ isoforms with antiviral activity in ginbuna crucian carp, Carassius auratus langsdorfii. However, involvement of the IFNγ isoforms in cell-mediated immunity, especially in T cell function remains unknown. Here we investigate expression of the IFNγ isoforms and effects of administration of recombinant IFNγ (rgIFNγ) isoforms in ginbuna scale allograft rejection. All four IFNγ isoforms showed significantly higher expression with the progression of graft rejection. Administration of rgIFNγrel 1 but not rgIFNγrel 2, rgIFNγ1 nor rgIFNγ2 enhanced allograft rejection. The number of CD4(+) and CD8α(+) cells increased in early stages of rejection, while sIgM(+) cells were higher than controls at day 0 and 5 in the rgIFNγrel 1 administrated group. Expression of IFNγ1 and IFNγ2 mRNA was significantly up-regulated by rgIFNγrel 1 administration, while that of IFNγrel 1 and IFNγrel 2 was not. These results suggest different contributions of the four IFNγ isoforms toward the immune responses comprising allograft rejection. PMID:27156851

  19. 21 CFR 1230.47 - Rejected containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rejected containers. 1230.47 Section 1230.47 Food... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Imports § 1230.47 Rejected containers. (a) In all cases where the containers... notification to the importer that the containers must be exported under customs supervision within 3...

  20. MR imaging of renal transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, S.; Helenon, O.; Legendre, C.; Chichie, J.F.; Di Stefano, D.; Kreis, H.; Moreau, J.F. (Hopital Necker, 75 - Paris (France). Dept. of Uro-Radiology Hopital Necker, 75 - Paris (France). Dept. of Renal Transplantation)

    1991-01-01

    The results of 62 consecutive MR examinations were correlated with the subsequent clinical course and histologic results. Twenty-six cases of rejection showed a marked diminution of cortico-medullary differentiation (CMD). The renal parenchymal vascular pattern and visibility of renal sinus fat were not markedly altered in rejection and there was no difference between normal and rejected allograft shape. The ability of MR imaging to diagnose renal transplant rejection is only based on CMD, which, however, is non-specific. In 2 cases of severe rejection, T2 weighted images showed an abnormal signal intensity of the cortex due to renal infarction. Our preliminary results in 8 patients with Gd-DOTA injection showed 2 cases with necrosis seen as areas with absent contrast enhancement. This technique seems to be promising in the detection of perfusion defects. (orig.).

  1. MR imaging of renal transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of 62 consecutive MR examinations were correlated with the subsequent clinical course and histologic results. Twenty-six cases of rejection showed a marked diminution of cortico-medullary differentiation (CMD). The renal parenchymal vascular pattern and visibility of renal sinus fat were not markedly altered in rejection and there was no difference between normal and rejected allograft shape. The ability of MR imaging to diagnose renal transplant rejection is only based on CMD, which, however, is non-specific. In 2 cases of severe rejection, T2 weighted images showed an abnormal signal intensity of the cortex due to renal infarction. Our preliminary results in 8 patients with Gd-DOTA injection showed 2 cases with necrosis seen as areas with absent contrast enhancement. This technique seems to be promising in the detection of perfusion defects. (orig.)

  2. Risk of renal allograft rejection following angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a retrospective study of 173 immediately functioning primary kidney transplants, correlation between angiography and renal allograft rejection was studied during the first 14 days. It was found that rejection was more frequent in kidneys undergoing angiography than in those not undergoing angiography. It was also found that in kidneys undergoing angiography an overwhelming number of the rejections started the day after angiography. These differences in rejection frequency could not be explained by differences in HLA matching or the origin of the kidneys. These findings suggest a possible connection indicating that the angiography might elicit an acute rejection episode. A possible mechanism for starting this reaction might be activation of the complement system which was found in 50 percent of the patients undergoing angiography in peripheral blood and in 100 percent when studied in vitro

  3. Tracing the antibody mediated acquired immunity by Foot and Mouth disease and Rift Valley Fever combined vaccine in pregnant ewes and their lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Mossad Gamal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to provide adequate protection to ewes and their lambs against Foot and Mouth disease (FMD and Rift Valley Fever (RVF. Materials and Methods: A combined inactivated oil vaccine was prepared successfully. Such vaccine was found to be free from foreign contaminants, safe and potent as determined by quality control tests such as challenge protection percentage for FMD and mice ED50 for RVF. Vaccination of pregnant ewes with the prepared combined vaccine and determination of the antibody level via serum neutralization test (SNT and Enzyme Linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA in the vaccinated pregnant ewes and their lambs. Results: Vaccination of pregnant ewes revealed that these ewes exhibited high levels of specific antibodies against the included vaccine antigens (Foot and Mouth disease virus type A Iran O5, O PanAsia and SAT2/EGY/2012 and RVFV-ZH501. FMD antibodies recorded their peaks by the 10th week while those of RVF recorded their peaks by the 12th week post vaccination then all antibodies began to decrease gradually to reach their lowest protective titers for FMD by the 32nd week post vaccination and those for RVF by the 34th week post vaccination. Potency test of the prepared combined vaccine expressed as protection percentage of vaccinated sheep against target virulent FMD virus serotypes reflected a protection percentage of 80% against type O and SAT2 and 100% against A while for RVF, the mice ED50 was found to be 0.009 indicating the potency of the prepared vaccine. The antibody titer in serum and colostrum of vaccinated pregnant ewes at day of parturition (10-12 week post vaccination recorded a high titer against FMD serotype (O, serotype (A, serotype (SAT2 and against RVF. It was noticed that the colostrum antibody titers were slightly higher than those in the sera of vaccinated ewes at time of parturition. The newly born lambs from vaccinated ewes, exhibited good levels of maternal immunity against the

  4. Image rejects/retakes-radiographic challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general held position among radiological personnel prior to digitalisation was that the problem of image rejects/retakes should more or less vanish. However, rejects/retakes still impose several challenges within radiographic imaging; they occupy unnecessary resources, expose patients to unnecessary ionizing radiation and may also indicate suboptimal quality management. The latter is the main objective of this paper, which is based on a survey of international papers published both for screen/film and digital technology. The digital revolution in imaging seems to have reduced the percentage of image rejects/retakes from 10-15 to 3-5%. The major contribution to the decrease appears to be the dramatic reduction of incorrect exposures. At the same time, rejects/retakes due to lack of operator competence (positioning, etc.) are almost unchanged, or perhaps slightly increased (due to lack of proper technical competence, incorrect organ coding, etc.). However, the causes of rejects/retakes are in many cases defined and reported with reference to radiographers' subjective evaluations. Thus, unless radiographers share common views on image quality and acceptance criteria, objective measurements and assessments of reject/retake rates are challenging tasks. Interestingly, none of the investigated papers employs image quality parameters such as 'too much noise' as categories for rejects/retakes. Surprisingly, no reject/retake analysis seems yet to have been conducted for direct digital radiography departments. An increased percentage of rejects/retakes is related to 'digital skills' of radiographers and therefore points to areas for extended education and training. Furthermore, there is a need to investigate the inter subjectivity of radiographers' perception of, and attitude towards, both technical and clinical image quality criteria. Finally, there may be a need to validate whether reject/retake rate analysis is such an effective quality indicator as has been asserted

  5. N-type calcium channel antibody-mediated autoimmune encephalitis: An unlikely cause of a common presentation ☆ ☆☆ ★

    OpenAIRE

    Finkel, Leslie; Koh, Sookyong

    2013-01-01

    We report, to our knowledge, the only known pediatric case with encephalopathy and significantly elevated titers of N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibody (N-type VGCC). The patient, an 8th grader, was previously healthy and presented with a one-week history of confusion, aphasia, transient fever, headaches, and dizziness. An underlying autoimmune process was suspected because of inflammatory changes in the brain MRI and multiple focal electrographic seizures captured in the EEG in the...

  6. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on antibody-mediated immune response and gene expression of pattern recognition receptors and cytokines in broiler chickens immunized with T-cell dependent antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Echeverry, H; Crow, G H; Slominski, B A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on innate and antibody mediated immune response in broiler chickens following immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). One-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were randomly assigned to 6 dietary treatments of 9 replicate cages of 5 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of a Control diet without antibiotic, and diets containing 11 mg/kg of virginiamycin, 0.25% of yeast cell wall (YCW), 0.2% of a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus containing processed yeast and nucleotides, 0.05% of nucleotides, or a diet containing 10% of DDGS. On days 21 and 28 post-hatching, 5 birds per treatment were immunized intramuscularly with both SRBC and BSA. One week after each immunization, blood samples were collected. Serum samples were analyzed by hemagglutination test for antibody response to SRBC, and by ELISA for serum IgM and IgG response to BSA. On d 35, 5 birds per treatment were euthanized and the tissue samples from the cecal tonsils were collected to assess the gene expression of toll-like receptors TLR2b, TLR4, and TLR21, monocyte mannose receptor (MMR), and cytokines IL-10, IL-13, IL-4, IL-12p35, and IFN-γ. The results for gene expression analysis demonstrated that the diet supplemented with YCW increased the expression of TLR2b and T-helper type 2 cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and IL-13 relative to the Control; and the expression of TLR4 and IL-13 was upregulated in the nucleotide-containing diet. However, the diets containing antibiotics or Maxi-Gen Plus downregulated the expression of IFN-γ compared to the control. The primary antibody response to SRBC was not affected by diets. However, the diet containing YCW increased the secondary antibody response to SRBC compared to the antibiotic treatment. Neither primary nor secondary IgG and IgM response against BSA were affected by diets. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with YCW stimulated Th2 cell-mediated

  7. Friendship quantity and quality as predictors of rejection sensitivity in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Šeboková

    2014-12-01

    (greater or lesser contributions to rejection sensitivity. Different types of peer relations can moderate and mediate each other´s influence on specific types of internalizing problems in adolescents. The future research simultaneously examining more types of peer relationship is needed. There has been empirical evidence that girls have more quality friendships which provide them more emotional and instrumental support, than for boys. Our results support this empirical evidence. Regression analysis indicated, that balance (large effect size, help, security and closeness in friendship (small to medium effect size and overall friendship quality (medium effect size are significant unique predictors of rejection sensitivity for adolescent girls, but not for boys. Results suggest that predictors of sensitivity rejection in boys are other than interpersonal factors, for example personal or coping strategies. Further directions in research are discussed.

  8. In-vitro inhibition of IFNγ+ iTreg mediated by monoclonal antibodies against cell surface determinants essential for iTreg function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Volker

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IFNγ-producing CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ PBL represent a subtype of iTreg that are associated with good long-term graft outcome in renal transplant recipients and suppress alloresponses in-vitro. To study the mechanism of immunosuppression, we attempted to block cell surface receptors and thereby inhibited the function of this iTreg subset in-vitro using monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Methods PBL of healthy control individuals were stimulated polyclonally in-vitro in the presence of monoclonal antibodies or recombinant proteins against/of CD178, CD152, CD279, CD28, CD95, and HLA-DR. Induction of IFNγ+ iTreg and proliferation of effector cells was determined using four-color fluorescence flow cytometry. Blockade of iTreg function was analyzed using polyclonally stimulated co-cultures with separated CD4+CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL. Results High monoclonal antibody concentrations inhibited the induction of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+IFNγ+ PBL (anti-CD152, anti-CD279, anti-CD95: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL (anti-CD178, anti-CD152, anti-CD279, anti-CD95: p +CD25+Foxp3+IFNγ+ PBL (rCD152 and rCD95: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL showed lower cell proliferation than co-cultures with CD4+CD25+CD127-IFNγ- PBL (p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ- PBL-containing co-cultures in the presence of monoclonal antibody (anti-CD28, anti-CD152, anti-CD279: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL (with the exception anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ- PBL but do not efficiently block suppressive iTreg function in co-cultures with CD4+CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL. Conclusions CD178, CD152, CD279, CD28, CD95, and HLA-DR determinants are important for induction and suppressive function of IFNγ+ iTreg.

  9. Rejection of pharmaceuticals by forward osmosis membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue; Shan, Junhong; Wang, Can; Wei, Jing; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2012-08-15

    Rejection of four pharmaceutical compounds, carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen and naproxen, by forward osmosis (FO) membranes was investigated in this study. For the first time, the rejection efficiency of the pharmaceutical compounds was compared between commercial cellulose triacetate (CTA) based membranes and thin film composite (TFC) polyamide based membranes. The rejection behavior was related to membrane interfacial properties, physicochemical characteristics of the pharmaceutical molecules and feed solution pH. TFC polyamide membranes exhibited excellent overall performance, with high water flux, excellent pH stability and great rejection of all pharmaceuticals investigated (>94%). For commercial CTA based FO membranes, hydrophobic interaction between the compounds and membranes exhibited strong influence on their rejection under acidic conditions. The pharmaceuticals rejection was well correlated to their hydrophobicity (log D). Under alkaline conditions, both electrostatic repulsion and size exclusion contributed to the removal of deprotonated molecules. The pharmaceuticals rejection by CTA-HW membrane at pH 8 followed the order: diclofenac (99%)>carbamazepine (95%)>ibuprofen (93%) ≈ naproxen (93%). These results can be important for FO membrane synthesis, modification and their application in water purification. PMID:22640821

  10. Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1-Mediated Toxicity Inhibited by Neutralizing Antibodies Late in the Course of Continual in Vivo and in Vitro Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Stich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxic shock syndrome (TSS results from the host’s overwhelming inflammatory response and cytokine storm mainly due to superantigens (SAgs. There is no effective specific therapy. Application of immunoglobulins has been shown to improve the outcome of the disease and to neutralize SAgs both in vivo and in vitro. However, in most experiments that have been performed, antiserum was either pre-incubated with SAg, or both were applied simultaneously. To mirror more closely the clinical situation, we applied a multiple dose (over five days lethal challenge in a rabbit model. Treatment with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1 neutralizing antibody was fully protective, even when administered late in the course of the challenge. Kinetic studies on the effect of superantigen toxins are scarce. We performed in vitro kinetic studies by neutralizing the toxin with antibodies at well-defined time points. T-cell activation was determined by assessing T-cell proliferation (3H-thymidine incorporation, determination of IL-2 release in the cell supernatant (ELISA, and IL-2 gene activation (real-time PCR (RT-PCR. Here we show that T-cell activation occurs continuously. The application of TSST-1 neutralizing antiserum reduced IL-2 and TNFα release into the cell supernatant, even if added at later time points. Interference with the prolonged stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines is likely to be in vivo relevant, as postexposure treatment protected rabbits against the multiple dose lethal SAg challenge. Our results shed new light on the treatment of TSS by specific antibodies even at late stages of exposure.

  11. A Nanoparticle Platform To Evaluate Bioconjugation and Receptor-Mediated Cell Uptake Using Cross-Linked Polyion Complex Micelles Bearing Antibody Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinas, Stelios; Liu, Marc; Fleming, Ryan; Van Vlerken-Ysla, Lilian; Ayriss, Joanne; Gilbreth, Ryan; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Gao, Changshou; Wu, Herren; Xu, Ze-Qi; Chen, Shaoyi; Dirisala, Anjaneyulu; Kataoka, Kazunori; Cabral, Horacio; Christie, R James

    2016-05-01

    Targeted nanomedicines are a promising technology for treatment of disease; however, preparation and characterization of well-defined protein-nanoparticle systems remain challenging. Here, we describe a platform technology to prepare antibody binding fragment (Fab)-bearing nanoparticles and an accompanying real-time cell-based assay to determine their cellular uptake compared to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Fabs. The nanoparticle platform was composed of core-cross-linked polyion complex (PIC) micelles prepared from azide-functionalized PEG-b-poly(amino acids), that is, azido-PEG-b-poly(l-lysine) [N3-PEG-b-PLL] and azido-PEG-b-poly(aspartic acid) [N3-PEG-b-PAsp]. These PIC micelles were 30 nm in size and contained approximately 10 polymers per construct. Fabs were derived from an antibody binding the EphA2 receptor expressed on cancer cells and further engineered to contain a reactive cysteine for site-specific attachment and a cleavable His tag for purification from cell culture expression systems. Azide-functionalized micelles and thiol-containing Fab were linked using a heterobifunctional cross-linker (FPM-PEG4-DBCO) that contained a fluorophenyl-maleimide for stable conjugation to Fabs thiols and a strained alkyne (DBCO) group for coupling to micelle azide groups. Analysis of Fab-PIC micelle conjugates by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, and UV-vis absorbance determined that each nanoparticle contained 2-3 Fabs. Evaluation of cellular uptake in receptor positive cancer cells by real-time fluorescence microscopy revealed that targeted Fab-PIC micelles achieved higher cell uptake than mAbs and Fabs, demonstrating the utility of this approach to identify targeted nanoparticle constructs with unique cellular internalization properties. PMID:27007881

  12. Antibody Titer Threshold Predicts Anti-Candidal Vaccine Efficacy Even though the Mechanism of Protection Is Induction of Cell-Mediated Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Spellberg, Brad; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Lin, Lin; Avanesian, Valentina; Fu, Yue; Lipke, Peter; Otoo, Henry; Ho, Tiffany; Edwards, John E.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that vaccination with Freund’s adjuvant plus the recombinant N-terminus of the candidal adhesin, Als3p (rAls3p-N), protects mice from disseminated candidiasis. Here we report that the rAls3p-N vaccine is effective when combined with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. Antibody titers of ≥1:6400 accurately predicted protection from infection. Nevertheless, neither B lymphocytes nor serum from immunized animals transferred protection to vaccine-naive animals. In contrast, CD3+, ...

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticles in-vivo Detection of Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, E. R.; Bryant, H. C.; Larson, R. S.; Sergatskov, D. A.

    2006-03-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles are being used to develop methodology for the in-vivo detection and imaging of immune system attacks on transplanted organs. The signature for impending rejection of a transplant is enhanced presence of T-cells. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with specific antibodies (CD-2 and CD-3) will target and attach to these T-cells. Approximately 3 .10^5 nanoparticles can attach to each cell. When a pulsed external magnetic field is applied to the decorated cells for a fraction of a second, magnetic moments of the nanoparticles aligned with the field. After the pulse is switched off, the net magnetic moment decays over several seconds by the Nèel mechanism. The resulting magnetic remanence field (typically 10-11 T) is measured using a multi-channel SQUID array. We present the data from live T-cells placed in realistic kidney phantom. The detection sensitivity was ˜2.10^3 T-cells - a small fraction of the number actually invading the rejected transplant. The 7-channel SQUID array allows us to image the cell clusters with a few millimeters resolution.

  14. Computational structural analysis of an anti-l-amino acid antibody and inversion of its stereoselectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ranieri, Daniel I.; Hofstetter, Heike; Hofstetter, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The binding site of a monoclonal anti-l-amino acid antibody was modeled using the program SWISS-MODEL. Docking experiments with the enantiomers of phenylalanine revealed that the antibody interacts with l-phenylalanine via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts, whereas the d-enantiomer is rejected due to steric hindrance. Comparison of the sequences of this antibody and an anti-d-amino acid antibody indicates that both immunoglobulins derived from the same germline progenitor. Substitution ...

  15. Structural Decoupling and Disturbance Rejection in a Distillation Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahar, Mehrdad; Jantzen, Jan; Commault, C.;

    1996-01-01

    Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references.......Introduction, distillation column model, input-output decoupling, disturbance rejection, concluding remarks, references....

  16. Thallium kinetics in rat cardiac transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac transplant rejection is a very complex process involving both cellular and vascular injury. Recently, thallium imaging has been used to assess acute transplant rejection. It has been suggested that changes in thallium kinetics might be a sensitive indicator of transplant rejection. Accordingly, thallium kinetics were assessed in vivo in acute untreated rat heterotopic (cervical) transplant rejection. Male Lewis rats weighing 225-250 g received heterotopic heart transplants from syngeneic Lewis rats (group A; n = 13), or allogeneic Brown Norway rats (group B; n = 11). Rats were imaged serially on the 2nd and the 7th postoperative days. Serial cardiac thallium content was determined utilizing data collected every 150 sec for 2 hr. The data were fit to a monoexponential curve and the decay rate constant (/sec) derived. By day 7 all group B hearts had histological evidence of severe acute rejection, and demonstrated decreased global contraction. Group A hearts showed normal histology and contractility. However, thallium uptakes and washout of the two groups were the same. Peak thallium uptake of group B was +/- 3758 1166 counts compared with 3553 +/- 950 counts in the control group A (P = 0.6395); The 2-hr percentage of washout was 12.1 +/- 1.04 compared with 12.1 +/- 9.3 (P = 1.0000); and the decay constant was -0.00002065 +/- 0.00001799 compared with -0.00002202 +/- 0.00001508 (P = 0.8409). These data indicate that in vivo global thallium kinetics are preserved during mild-to-severe acute transplant rejection. These findings suggest that the complex cellular and extracellular processes of acute rejection limit the usefulness of thallium kinetics in the detection of acute transplant rejection

  17. Thallium kinetics in rat cardiac transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barak, J.H.; LaRaia, P.J.; Boucher, C.A.; Fallon, J.T.; Buckley, M.J.

    1988-04-01

    Cardiac transplant rejection is a very complex process involving both cellular and vascular injury. Recently, thallium imaging has been used to assess acute transplant rejection. It has been suggested that changes in thallium kinetics might be a sensitive indicator of transplant rejection. Accordingly, thallium kinetics were assessed in vivo in acute untreated rat heterotopic (cervical) transplant rejection. Male Lewis rats weighing 225-250 g received heterotopic heart transplants from syngeneic Lewis rats (group A; n = 13), or allogeneic Brown Norway rats (group B; n = 11). Rats were imaged serially on the 2nd and the 7th postoperative days. Serial cardiac thallium content was determined utilizing data collected every 150 sec for 2 hr. The data were fit to a monoexponential curve and the decay rate constant (/sec) derived. By day 7 all group B hearts had histological evidence of severe acute rejection, and demonstrated decreased global contraction. Group A hearts showed normal histology and contractility. However, thallium uptakes and washout of the two groups were the same. Peak thallium uptake of group B was +/- 3758 1166 counts compared with 3553 +/- 950 counts in the control group A (P = 0.6395); The 2-hr percentage of washout was 12.1 +/- 1.04 compared with 12.1 +/- 9.3 (P = 1.0000); and the decay constant was -0.00002065 +/- 0.00001799 compared with -0.00002202 +/- 0.00001508 (P = 0.8409). These data indicate that in vivo global thallium kinetics are preserved during mild-to-severe acute transplant rejection. These findings suggest that the complex cellular and extracellular processes of acute rejection limit the usefulness of thallium kinetics in the detection of acute transplant rejection.

  18. Peer acceptance/rejection and academic achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Spasenović Vera Z.

    2003-01-01

    Considerations of the nature and role of peer relations in child development indicate that peer interaction is an important factor in developing social and cognitive competences. Peer relations not only influence current but also subsequent academic, behavioral and emotional development. Accepted students more often display better academic achievement, whereas the status of rejection is coupled with academic difficulties and lower academic achievement. Peer rejection is a relatively stable ch...

  19. Experimental Quantum Error Rejection for Quantum Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu-Ao; Zhang, An-Ning; Zhao, Zhi; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2005-01-01

    We report an experimental realization of bit-flip error rejection for error-free transfer of quantum information through a noisy quantum channel. In the experiment, an unknown state to be transmitted is encoded into a two-photon entangled state, which is then sent through an engineered noisy quantum channel. At the final stage, the unknown state is decoded by a quantum parity measurement, successfully rejecting the erroneous transmission over the noisy quantum channel.

  20. Rejeição de transplante de córnea Corneal Transplant Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dácio Carvalho Costa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A rejeição do transplante de córnea é um processo imunológico celular de ataque a córnea transplantada que pode resultar em sua descompensação. É a causa mais comum de falência de transplantes. Os fatores de risco mais comuns para rejeição são a vascularização corneana, falência prévia por rejeição, sinéquias anteriores, botão doador grande ou descentrado, inflamação intra-ocular e cirurgias no segmento anterior. O quadro clínico é caracterizado por hiperemia, dor ocular, edema corneano e inflamação na câmara anterior. As rejeições podem ser classificadas em epitelial, subepitelial, estromal, endotelial, mista e em retransplantes. A prevenção de rejeições pode ser realizada através de técnica cirúrgica meticulosa, utilização de transplantes lamelares, histocompatibilidade receptor-doador e estratégias farmacológicas. Os corticosteróides são a terapia de escolha para o tratamento da rejeição de transplante de córnea e podem ser utilizados em diversas vias e dosagens. Os autores propõem protocolo de tratamento para rejeições.Corneal transplant rejection is an immunological cellular process that attacks the donor cornea and may cause its failure. It is the most common cause of corneal transplant failure.The most common factors for rejection are corneal neovascularization, previous graft failure, anterior synechiae, large or descentered graft, intraocular inflammation and previous anterior segment surgeries. It commonly presents with hyperemia, ocular pain, corneal edema, and anterior chamber inflammation. Corneal graft rejection can be classified as epithelial rejection, subepithelial rejection, stromal rejection, endothelial rejection, combined stromal and endothelial rejection, and rejection in a repeat graft. Prevention of immune-mediated graft rejection can be achieved through meticulous surgical technique, lamellar surgery, enhanced compatibility between donor tissue and receptor cornea, and

  1. Integrin antagonists prevent costimulatory blockade-resistant transplant rejection by CD8+ memory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchens, W. H.; Haridas, D.; Wagener, M. E.; Song, M.; Kirk, A. D.; Larsen, C. P.; Ford, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The success of belatacept in late-stage clinical trials inaugurates the arrival of a new class of immunosuppressants based on costimulatory blockade, an immunosuppression strategy that disrupts essential signals required for alloreactive T cell activation. Despite having improved renal function, kidney transplant recipients treated with belatacept experienced increased rates of acute rejection. This finding has renewed focus on costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and specifically the role of alloreactive memory T cells in mediating this resistance. To study mechanisms of costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and enhance the clinical efficacy of costimulatory blockade, we developed an experimental transplant system that models a donor-specific memory CD8+ T cell response. After confirming that graft-specific memory T cells mediate costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection, we characterized the role of integrins in this rejection. The resistance of memory T cells to costimulatory blockade was abrogated when costimulatory blockade was coupled with either anti-VLA-4 or anti-LFA-1. Mechanistic studies revealed that in the presence of costimulatory blockade, anti-VLA-4 impaired T cell trafficking to the graft but not memory T cell recall effector function, whereas anti-LFA-1 attenuated both trafficking and memory recall effector function. As antagonists against these integrins are clinically approved, these findings may have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:21942986

  2. CD57(+) CD4 T Cells Underlie Belatacept-Resistant Allograft Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, J; Herr, F; Tharp, G; Bosinger, S; Song, M; Farris, A B; George, R; Cheeseman, J; Stempora, L; Townsend, R; Durrbach, A; Kirk, A D

    2016-04-01

    Belatacept is a B7-specific fusion protein used to prevent allograft rejection by blocking T cell costimulation. Generally efficacious, it fails to prevent acute rejection in a sizable minority of patients. In experimental models, memory T cells mediate costimulation blockade-resistant rejection (CoBRR), but this remains undefined in humans. To explore relationships between individual patients' immune cell phenotypes and CoBRR, we studied patients receiving belatacept or conventional calcineurin inhibitor-based immunosuppression. We identified a population of CD57(+) PD1(-) CD4 T cells present prior to transplantation that correlated with CoBRR. Contrary to data recognizing CD57 as a marker of senescence on CD8 T cells, we discovered a nonsenescent, cytolytic phenotype associated with CD57 on CD4 T cells. Moreover, CD57(+) CD4 T cells expressed high levels of adhesion molecules implicated in experimental CoBRR, were CD28(-) , expressed a transcriptional phenotype broadly defining allograft rejection and were shown to be present in rejecting human kidney allografts. These data implicate CD57(+) CD4 T cells in clinical CoBRR. If prospectively validated, this characteristic could identify patients at higher risk for acute rejection on belatacept-based therapy. PMID:26603381

  3. Comparative immunohistologic studies in an adoptive transfer model of acute rat cardiac allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that fulminant acute rejection of rat cardiac allografts across a full haplotype disparity may occur as a direct result of adoptive transfer of sensitized W3/25+ MRC OX8- SIg- T helper/DTH syngeneic spleen cells to sublethally irradiated recipients. In order to establish the immunohistologic parameters of this form of rejection, allografts and recipient lymphoid tissue were analyzed using a panel of monoclonal antibodies of known cellular distribution. These data were compared with those obtained following reconstitution of irradiated allograft recipients with unseparated sensitized spleen cells, with unreconstituted irradiated donor recipient pairs, with unmodified first-set rejection, and with induced myocardial infarction of syngeneic heart grafts transplanted to normal and to sublethally irradiated recipients. Rejecting cardiac allografts transplanted to all reconstituted irradiated recipients were characterized by extensive infiltration with MRC OX8+ (T cytotoxic-suppressor, natural killer) cells even when this subset was virtually excluded from the reconstituting inocula. A similar proportional accumulation of MRC OX8+ cells observed at the infarct margins of syngeneic heart grafts transplanted to irradiated unreconstituted recipients greatly exceeded that present in normal nonirradiated controls. These data provide evidence that under conditions of heavy recipient irradiation, MRC OX8+ cells may be sequestered within heart grafts in response to nonspecific injury unrelated to the rejection process

  4. Corneal Graft Rejection: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Baradaran-Rafii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To determine the incidence and risk factors of late corneal graft rejection after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP. METHODS: Records of all patients who had undergone PKP from 2002 to 2004 without immunosuppressive therapy other than systemic steroids and with at least one year of follow up were reviewed. The role of possible risk factors such as demographic factors, other host factors, donor factors, indications for PKP as well as type of rejection were evaluated. RESULTS: During the study period, 295 PKPs were performed on 286 patients (176 male, 110 female. Mean age at the time of keratoplasty was 38±20 (range, 40 days to 90 years and mean follow up period was 20±10 (range 12-43 months. Graft rejection occurred in 94 eyes (31.8% at an average of 7.3±6 months (range, 20 days to 39 months after PKP. The most common type of rejection was endothelial (20.7%. Corneal vascularization, regrafting, anterior synechiae, irritating sutures, active inflammation, additional anterior segment procedures, history of trauma, uncontrolled glaucoma, prior graft rejection, recurrence of herpetic infection and eccentric grafting increased the rate of rejection. Patient age, donor size and bilateral transplantation had no significant influence on graft rejection. CONCLUSION: Significant risk factors for corneal graft rejection include

  5. RNA Sensors Enable Human Mast Cell Anti-Viral Chemokine Production and IFN-Mediated Protection in Response to Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Michael G.; McAlpine, Sarah M.; Huang, Yan Y.; Haidl, Ian D.; Al-Afif, Ayham; Jean S Marshall; Anderson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell rec...

  6. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality

  7. Deficiency of C4 from Donor or Recipient Mouse Fails to Prevent Renal Allograft Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tao; Zhou, Wuding; Farrar, Conrad A.; Hargreaves, Roseanna E.G.; Sheerin, Neil S.; Sacks, Steven H.

    2006-01-01

    Complement effector products generated in the transplanted kidney are known to mediate transplant rejection, but which of the three main activation pathways of complement trigger this response is unclear. Here we assessed the role of the classical and lectin pathways by studying the common component C4 in mouse kidney transplant rejection. We transplanted wild-type or C4-null H-2b donor kidneys into H-2k or H-2d recipients, or vice-versa, to assess the roles of donor kidney and recipient expr...

  8. Bispecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontermann, Roland E; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) combine specificities of two antibodies and simultaneously address different antigens or epitopes. BsAbs with 'two-target' functionality can interfere with multiple surface receptors or ligands associated, for example with cancer, proliferation or inflammatory processes. BsAbs can also place targets into close proximity, either to support protein complex formation on one cell, or to trigger contacts between cells. Examples of 'forced-connection' functionalities are bsAbs that support protein complexation in the clotting cascade, or tumor-targeted immune cell recruiters and/or activators. Following years of research and development (R&D), the first bsAb was approved in 2009. Another bsAb entered the market in December 2014 and several more are in clinical trials. Here, we describe the potentials of bsAbs to become the next wave of antibody-based therapies, focusing on molecules in clinical development. PMID:25728220

  9. A pathogenesis-based transcript signature in donor-specific antibody-positive kidney transplant patients with normal biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ó Broin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0-ST arrays were used to assess the gene expression profiles of kidney transplant patients who presented with donor-specific antibodies (DSAs but showed normal biopsy histopathology and did not develop antibody-mediated rejection (AMR. Biopsy and whole-blood profiles for these DSA-positive, AMR-negative (DSA+/AMR− patients were compared to both DSA-positive, AMR-positive (DSA+/AMR+ patients as well as DSA-negative (DSA− controls. While individual gene expression changes across sample groups were relatively subtle, gene-set enrichment analysis using previously identified pathogenesis-based transcripts (PBTs identified a clear molecular signature involving increased rejection-associated transcripts in AMR− patients. Results from this study have been published in Kidney International (Hayde et al., 2014 [1] and the associated data have been deposited in the GEO archive and are accessible via the following link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE50084

  10. Antibody induction therapy for lung transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Møller, Christian H; Penninga, Ida Elisabeth Irene;

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation has become a valuable and well-accepted treatment option for most end-stage lung diseases. Lung transplant recipients are at risk of transplanted organ rejection, and life-long immunosuppression is necessary. Clear evidence is essential to identify an optimal, safe and effect...... effective immunosuppressive treatment strategy for lung transplant recipients. Consensus has not yet been achieved concerning use of immunosuppressive antibodies against T-cells for induction following lung transplantation....

  11. Rejection of pharmaceuticals by nanofiltration (NF) membranes: Effect of fouling on rejection behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlangu, T. O.; Msagati, T. A. M.; Hoek, E. M. V.; Verliefde, A. R. D.; Mamba, B. B.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of membrane fouling by sodium alginate, latex and a combination of alginate + latex on the rejection behaviour of salts and organics. Sodium chloride and caffeine were selected to represent salts and organics, respectively. The effects of the presence of calcium chloride on the fouling behaviour and rejection of solutes were investigated. The results revealed that the salt rejection by virgin membranes was 47% while that of caffeine was 85%. Fouling by alginate, latex and combined alginate-latex resulted in flux decline of 25%, 37% and 17%, respectively. The addition of Ca2+ aggravated fouling and resulted in further flux decline to 37%. Fouling decreased salt rejection, an observation that was further aggravated by the addition on Ca2+. However, it was also observed that fouling with alginate and calcium and with latex and calcium minimised salt rejection by 30% and 31%, respectively. This reduction in salt rejection was attributed to the decrease in permeate flux (since rejection is a function of flux). There was a slight increase in caffeine rejection when the membrane was fouled with latex particles. Moreover, the presence of foulants on the membrane resulted in a decrease in the surface charge of the membrane. The results of this study have shown that the NF 270 membrane can be used to treat water samples contaminated with caffeine and other organic compounds that have physicochemical properties similar to those of caffeine.

  12. Designing a HER2/neu promoter to drive α1,3galactosyltransferase expression for targeted anti-αGal antibody-mediated tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our goal was to specifically render tumor cells susceptible to natural cytolytic anti-αGal antibodies by using a murine α1,3galactosyltransferase (mαGalT) transgene driven by a designed form of HER2/neu promoter (pNeu), the transcription of which is frequently observed to be above basal in breast tumors. Indeed, the αGalT activity that promotes Galα1,3Galβ1,4GlcNAc-R (αGal) epitope expression has been mutationally disrupted during the course of evolution, starting from Old World primates, and this has led to the counter-production of large amounts of cytotoxic anti-αGal antibodies in recent primates, including man. Expression of the endogenous c-erbB-2 gene was investigated in various cell lines by northern blotting. A mαGalT cDNA was constructed into pcDNA3 vector downstream of the original CMV promoter (pCMV/mαGalT) and various forms of pNeu were prepared by PCR amplification and inserted in the pCMV/mαGalT construct upstream of the mαGalT cDNA, in the place of the CMV promoter. These constructs were transferred into HEK-293 control and breast tumor cell lines. Stably transfected cells were analyzed by northern blotting for their expression of αGalT and c-erbB-2, and by flow cytometry for their binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia/isolectin B4. We show that expression of the mαGalT was up- or down-modulated according to the level of endogenous pNeu activity and the particular form of constructed pNeu. Among several constructs, two particular forms of the promoter, pNeu250 containing the CCAAT box and the PEA3 motif adjacent to the TATAA box, and pNeu664, which has three additional PEA3 motifs upstream of the CCAAT box, were found to promote differential αGalT expression. Our results strengthen current concepts about the crucial role played by the proximal PEA3 motif of pNeu, and may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the development of targeted transgene expression

  13. Anti-CD40 antibody and toll-like receptor 3 ligand restore dendritic cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity suppressed by morphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Li; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Jen, Yu-Wei; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2016-01-01

    The influence of morphine on host immunity and the underlying mechanism are still unclear. In the current study, we investigated the influence of morphine on dendritic cells (DCs), its possible mechanism of action, and the molecules that could reverse these effects. Morphine suppressed DC maturation, antigen presenting abilities, and the ability to activate antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Morphine-treated DCs also secreted higher concentrations of IL-10, but lower IL-6 and TNF-α. Morphine-treated DCs showed decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reduced p38 dephosphorylation. The in vivo administration of immuno-modulators, anti-CD40 Ab and TLR3 ligand-poly(I:C), enhanced antigen-specific immunity, promoted the anti-tumor effects, and prolonged the survival of morphine-treated, tumor-bearing mice by promoting the maturation and function of BMM-derived DCs by enhancing ERK1/2 phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation. We concluded that morphine can inhibit DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity by suppressing DC maturation and function. Immuno-modulators, such as anti-CD40 Abs and TLR agonists, can restore the DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Use of immuno-modulators could serve as a useful approach to overcome the immunocompromised state generated by morphine. PMID:27186393

  14. Video auditing techniques for breaker reject

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, B.M.; Corke, P.I.; O`Brien, G.D.; Waugh, J.M. [CSIRO (Australia). Division of Minerals

    1998-12-31

    Rotary breakers are used by many Australian coal mines to reduce the topsize of run of mine (ROM) coal to a size that can be handled by the processing plant. Coal that does not break to the designated topsize therefore passes out with the rock as breaker rejects. The degree of coal loss can be assessed manually by stop belt auditing of the reject belt, but this method is impractical for long-term monitoring of breaker rejects and breaker performance. Case studies of several open cut coal mines in the Bowen Basin of Central Queensland were made to determine the extent of the problem. The results indicated instances where significant losses did occur, but it was not possible to make an accurate estimate of the total value of the losses. This paper covers work undertaken to develop new auditing techniques for qualitative, quantitative and continuous monitoring of reject belt material which uses relatively low-cost equipment and mature technology. Initial work has concentrated on developing video surveillance techniques suitable for the range of environmental conditions typically encountered in the field. Multi-media methods are being developed for qualitative data presentation, and image analysis techniques are being investigated to extract basic quantitative information from video sequences, such as particle size and shape. Future work includes development of automatic methods using machine vision for 100% on-line inspection. The main attraction of the methodology being adopted is the potential to easily adapt the techniques to diagnostic and control functions. In situations where significant losses occur, this approach could open up many possibilities for reducing coal rejection or allowing its recovery from the rejects stream to improve productivity. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Role of chemokine signaling pathways in pancreatic islet rejection during allo- and xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, S; Ebel, N; Langlois, A; Bosco, D; Toso, C; Kleiss, C; Mandes, K; Berney, T; Pinget, M; Belcourt, A; Kessler, L

    2005-10-01

    During transplantation, pancreatic islets release chemokines promoting macrophage attraction, hampering engraftment of islets. The aim of this work was to examine the mechanism of macrophage-pancreatic islets interaction that mediates islet rejection during transplantation. Human macrophages exposed to supernates of human and porcine pancreatic islets for the allogeneic and xenogeneic models, respectively, were evaluated for chemotaxis and expression of chemokine receptors (CCR-5). To modulate migration and identify the signaling pathway of macrophages, we tested pertussis toxin (PTX) to block Gi protein, and staurosporin and wortmannin to inhibit the protein kinase, and phosphoinositol-3 kinase, respectively. The addition of these agents significantly reduced macrophage migration induced by human islet supernates from 3.2 +/- 0.5 to 1.5 +/- 0.2, 0.9 +/- 0.1, and 1 +/- 0.1, respectively (P rejection even though the chemokine signaling pathways differ between allo- and xenotransplantation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of islet rejection may improve graft survival. PMID:16298647

  16. Belatacept for prevention of acute rejection in adult patients who have had a kidney transplant: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, David; Vincenti, Flavio

    2012-01-01

    In June 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration approved belatacept for the prophylaxis of organ rejection in adult kidney transplant recipients. This review discusses the use of belatacept for the prevention of acute rejection as part of a maintenance immunosuppression regimen. Belatacept is a selective costimulation blocker designed to provide effective immunosuppression while avoiding the toxicities associated with calcineurin inhibitors. Phase III trial data have demonstrated that belatacept is noninferior to cyclosporine in 1-year patient and allograft survival. Three-year data demonstrate an ongoing improvement in mean measured glomerular filtration rate in belatacept-treated versus cyclosporine-treated patients. However, the rate of acute rejection was higher in belatacept-treated patients compared with cyclosporine. Specifically, there was a higher incidence of Banff type II rejections in patients treated with belatacept. Despite the higher Banff grade, rejections on belatacept were not associated with other factors associated with poor outcomes, such as the development of donor-specific antibodies or reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate. One safety issue that must be considered when using belatacept is the potential for increased risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. There were more cases of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in belatacept-treated patients, especially in recipients seronegative for Epstein–Barr virus or patients treated with lymphocyte-depleting agents. Therefore, belatacept can be recommended for use in Epstein–Barr virus antibody-positive recipients. PMID:23152668

  17. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-four renal transplant patients were given radiation therapy for severe rejection phenomena. The 29 patients who had only one course of irradiation had a 52.3% successful function rate. Fifteen patients received from two to four courses of irradiation with an ultimate 60% rate of sustained function. Fifty patients who received only steroid and other medical management but no irradiation had a 60% rate of successful renal function. In the irradiation group, no patient whose creatinine level did not respond to radiation therapy maintained a functioning kidney. The data indicate that the overall successful function rate is maintained by radiation therapy in patients who show severe allograft rejection phenomena

  18. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeples, W.J.; Wombolt, D.G.; El-Mahdi, A.M.; Turalba, C.I.

    1982-01-01

    Forty-four renal transplant patients were given radiation therapy for severe rejection phenomena. The 29 patients who had only one course of irradiation had a 52.3% successful function rate. Fifteen patients received from two to four courses of irradiation with an ultimate 60% rate of sustained function. Fifty patients who received only steroid and other medical management but no irradiation had a 60% rate of successful renal function. In the irradiation group, no patient whose creatinine level did not respond to radiation therapy maintained a functioning kidney. The data indicate that the overall successful function rate is maintained by radiation therapy in patients who show severe allograft rejection phenomena.

  19. On Multiple Hypothesis Testing with Rejection Option

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryan, Naira; Voloshynovskiy, Svyatoslav; Koval, Oleksiy

    2011-01-01

    We extend existing results on multiple hypothesis testing (HT) in view of rejection option. The model has many different applications. Errors in testing of M hypotheses regarding the source distribution with an option of rejecting all those hypotheses are considered. The source is discrete and arbitrarily varying (AVS). The tradeoffs among error probability exponents/reliabilities are investigated and the optimal decision strategies are outlined. Then the main result is specialized for discrete memoryless sources (DMS) and studied further. Geometric interpretations of the optimal decision schemes are given for the current and known bounds in multi-HT for AVS.

  20. Solar dynamic space power system heat rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. W.; Gustafson, E.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    A radiator system concept is described that meets the heat rejection requirements of the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. The heat pipe radiator is a high-reliability, high-performance approach that is capable of erection in space and is maintainable on orbit. Results are present of trade studies that compare the radiator system area and weight estimates for candidate advanced high performance heat pipes. The results indicate the advantages of the dual-slot heat pipe radiator for high temperature applications as well as its weight-reduction potential over the range of temperatures to be encountered in the solar dynamic heat rejection systems.

  1. The HB22.7 Anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody enhances bortezomib-mediated lymphomacidal activity in a sequence dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Shiloh M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL initially respond to chemotherapy, but relapse is common and treatment is often limited by chemotherapy-related toxicity. Bortezomib, is a highly selective proteasome inhibitor with anti-NHL activity; it is currently FDA approved for second-line treatment of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL. Bortezomib exerts its activity in part through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and also by the induction of apoptosis. We previously validated CD22 as a potential target in treating NHL and have shown that the anti-CD22 ligand blocking antibody, HB22.7, has significant independent lymphomacidal properties in NHL xenograft models. We sought to determine whether or not these agents would work synergistically to enhance cytotoxicity. Our results indicate that treatment of NHL cell lines with HB22.7 six hours prior to bortezomib significantly diminished cell viability. These effects were not seen when the agents were administered alone or when bortezomib was administered prior to HB22.7. Additionally, HB22.7 treatment prior to bortezomib increased apoptosis in part through enhanced ROS generation. Finally, in a mouse xenograft model, administration of HB22.7 followed 24 hours later by bortezomib resulted in 23% smaller tumor volumes and 20% enhanced survival compared to treatment with the reverse sequence. Despite the increased efficacy of HB22.7 treatment followed by bortezomib, there was no corresponding decrease in peripheral blood cell counts, indicating no increase in toxicity. Our results suggest that pre-treatment with HB22.7 increases bortezomib cytotoxicity, in part through increased reactive oxygen species and apoptosis, and that this sequential treatment combination has robust efficacy in vivo.

  2. Evaluation of the 99mTc-IOR t3 as a radiotracer of the rejection of the renal transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A formulation of freeze-dried kit with ior t3 (anti-CD3) monoclonal antibody (MoAb) is presented. Once labelled with 99mTc purity higher than 95.0 % was reached. HPLC showed a low proportion of aggregates and fragments. A clinical trial is made with patients without clinical signs of renal graft rejection by means of 99mTc -ior t3. Preliminary results (n=5) showed a rapid and active uptake in the kidney when an acute graft rejection is present. Acute tubular necrosis and other renal complications showed lower concentrations of the radiopharmaceuticals

  3. Beneficial Immune Effects of Myeloid-Related Proteins in Kidney Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekers, N V; Bajema, I M; Mallat, M J K; Petersen, B; Anholts, J D H; Swings, G M J S; van Miert, P P M C; Kerkhoff, C; Roth, J; Popp, D; van Groningen, M C; Baeten, D; Goemaere, N; Kraaij, M D; Zandbergen, M; Heidt, S; van Kooten, C; de Fijter, J W; Claas, F H J; Eikmans, M

    2016-05-01

    Acute rejection is a risk factor for inferior long-term kidney transplant survival. Although T cell immunity is considered the main effector in clinical acute rejection, the role of myeloid cells is less clear. Expression of S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) and S100A9 was evaluated in 303 biopsies before and after transplantation from 190 patients. In two independent cohorts of patients with acute rejection (n = 98 and n = 11; mostly cellular rejections), high expression of S100 calcium-binding protein A8 (S100A8) and A9 (S100A9) was related to improved graft outcome. Mechanisms of action of the S100 molecules were investigated. In the graft and peripheral blood cells, S100A8 and S100A9 expression correlated with myeloid-derived suppressor markers. In line with this finding, recombinant S100A8 and S100A9 proteins inhibited maturation and the allogeneic T cell stimulatory capacity of dendritic cells. S100A9 enhanced the production of reactive oxygen species by macrophages, which suppressed T cell activity at low concentrations in the form of hydrogen peroxide. Intragraft S100A8 and S100A9 expression linked to reduced expression of T cell immunity and tissue injury markers and higher expression of immune regulatory molecules. This study sheds new light on the importance of myeloid cell subsets in directing the outcome of T cell-mediated acute rejection. PMID:26607974

  4. Local graft irradiation in renal transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1977 to 1988, of 142 renal transplantations, seven recipients (4.9%) received local graft irradiation following rejective reaction refractory to antirejection medical managements. Concurrent with the administration of pulsed high dose methylprednisolone and other antirejection medical managements, the graft was irradiated with a total dose of 6.0 Gy-150 cGy per fraction every other day at the midplane of the graft using two opposing portals of 4MX Linac. The fields were defined by palpation and echography. All patients had improvements in serum creatinine on the 10th day after beginning the irradiation. Four patients with peripheral lymphocytosis during the irradiation combined with pulsed high dose methylprednisolone improved in renal functions. On the other hand, out of 3 patients with lymphcytopenic changes, in two the transplanted graft was removed due to deteriorations, and the other patient is currently suffering from chronic rejection. Local graft irradiation can be useful in maintaining a rejective graft and reversing its functions in some patients whose rejective reaction failed to respond to the antirejection medical managements. (author)

  5. Local graft irradiation in renal transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Masashi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Itoh, Hisao (Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    From 1977 to 1988, of 142 renal transplantations, seven recipients (4.9%) received local graft irradiation following rejective reaction refractory to antirejection medical managements. Concurrent with the administration of pulsed high dose methylprednisolone and other antirejection medical managements, the graft was irradiated with a total dose of 6.0 Gy-150 cGy per fraction every other day at the midplane of the graft using two opposing portals of 4MX Linac. The fields were defined by palpation and echography. All patients had improvements in serum creatinine on the 10th day after beginning the irradiation. Four patients with peripheral lymphocytosis during the irradiation combined with pulsed high dose methylprednisolone improved in renal functions. On the other hand, out of 3 patients with lymphcytopenic changes, in two the transplanted graft was removed due to deteriorations, and the other patient is currently suffering from chronic rejection. Local graft irradiation can be useful in maintaining a rejective graft and reversing its functions in some patients whose rejective reaction failed to respond to the antirejection medical managements. (author).

  6. Waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, R.C.

    1978-12-01

    This study of waste heat rejection from geothermal power stations is concerned only with the heat rejected from the power cycle. The heat contained in reinjected or otherwise discharged geothermal fluids is not included with the waste heat considered here. The heat contained in the underflow from the flashtanks in such systems is not considered as part of the heat rejected from the power cycle. By following this definition of the waste heat to be rejected, various methods of waste heat dissipation are discussed without regard for the particular arrangement to obtain heat from the geothermal source. Recent conceptual design studies made for 50-MW(e) geothermal power stations at Heber and Niland, California, are of particular interst. The former uses a flashed-steam system and the latter a binary cycle that uses isopentane. In last-quarter 1976 dollars, the total estimated capital costs were about $750/kW and production costs about 50 mills/kWhr. If wet/dry towers were used to conserve 50% of the water evaporation at Heber, production costs would be about 65 mills/kWhr.

  7. Partial interference subspace rejection in CDMA systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Affes, Sofiene; Mewelstein, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Previously presented interference subspace rejection (ISR) proposed a family of new efficient multiuser detectors for CDMA. We reconsider in this paper the modes of ISR using decision feedback (DF). DF modes share similarities with parallel interference cancellation (PIC) but attempt to cancel...

  8. Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.; Adel, G.T.; Richardson, P.E.

    1996-03-01

    Research at Virginia Tech led to the development of two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from many eastern U.S. coals. These concepts are referred to as Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) and Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) processes. The EESR process uses electrochemical techniques to suppress the formation of hydrophobic oxidation products believed to be responsible for the floatability of coal pyrite. The PESR process uses polymeric reagents that react with pyrite and convert floatable middlings, i.e., composite particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions, into hydrophilic particles. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications to existing coal preparation facilities, thereby enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that these processes can be used simultaneously to maximize the rejection of both well-liberated pyrite and composite coal-pyrite particles. The project was initiated on October 1, 1992 and all technical work has been completed. This report is based on the research carried out under Tasks 2-7 described in the project proposal. These tasks include Characterization, Electrochemical Studies, In Situ Monitoring of Reagent Adsorption on Pyrite, Bench Scale Testing of the EESR Process, Bench Scale Testing of the PESR Process, and Modeling and Simulation.

  9. Haptoglobin activates innate immunity to enhance acute transplant rejection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; Song, Yang; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Wu, Terence; Bruce, Can; Scabia, Gaia; Galan, Anjela; Maffei, Margherita; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Immune tolerance to transplanted organs is impaired when the innate immune system is activated in response to the tissue necrosis that occurs during harvesting and implantation procedures. A key molecule in this immune pathway is the intracellular TLR signal adaptor known as myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). After transplantation, MyD88 induces DC maturation as well as the production of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and TNF-α. However, upstream activators of MyD88 function in response to transplantation have not been identified. Here, we show that haptoglobin, an acute phase protein, is an initiator of this MyD88-dependent inflammatory process in a mouse model of skin transplantation. Necrotic lysates from transplanted skin elicited higher inflammatory responses in DCs than did nontransplanted lysates, suggesting DC-mediated responses are triggered by factors released during transplantation. Analysis of transplanted lysates identified haptoglobin as one of the proteins upregulated during transplantation. Expression of donor haptoglobin enhanced the onset of acute skin transplant rejection, whereas haptoglobin-deficient skin grafts showed delayed acute rejection and antidonor T cell priming in a MyD88-dependent graft rejection model. Thus, our results show that haptoglobin release following skin necrosis contributes to accelerated transplant rejection, with potential implications for the development of localized immunosuppressive therapies. PMID:22156194

  10. History of abuse and risky sex among substance users: The role of rejection sensitivity and the need to belong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerner, Jacqueline; Kopetz, Catalina; Lechner, William V; Lejuez, Carl

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates abuse and rejection sensitivity as important correlates of risky sexual behavior in the context of substance use. Victims of abuse may experience heightened sensitivity to acute social rejection and consequently engage in risky sexual behavior in an attempt to restore belonging. Data were collected from 258 patients at a substance use treatment facility in Washington, D.C. Participants' history of abuse and risky sexual behavior were assessed via self-report. To test the mediating role of rejection sensitivity, participants completed a social rejection task (Cyberball) and responded to a questionnaire assessing their reaction to the rejection experience. General risk-taking propensity was assessed using a computerized lab measure. Abuse was associated with increased rejection sensitivity (B=0.124, SE=0.040, p=0.002), which was in turn associated with increased risky sex (B=0.06, SE=0.028, p=0.03) (indirect effect=0.0075, SE=0.0043; 95% CI [0.0006, 0.0178]), but not with other indices of risk-taking. These findings suggest that rejection sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying the relationship between abuse and risky sexual behavior among substance users. These effects do not extend to other risk behaviors, supporting the notion that risky sex associated with abuse represents a means to interpersonal connection rather than a general tendency toward self-defeating behavior. PMID:27344009

  11. The 20S proteasome core, active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, induces autoantibody production and accelerates rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieudé, Mélanie; Bell, Christina; Turgeon, Julie; Beillevaire, Deborah; Pomerleau, Luc; Yang, Bing; Hamelin, Katia; Qi, Shijie; Pallet, Nicolas; Béland, Chanel; Dhahri, Wahiba; Cailhier, Jean-François; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lévesque, Tania; Lau, Arthur; Rondeau, Christiane; Gingras, Diane; Muruve, Danie; Rivard, Alain; Cardinal, Héloise; Perreault, Claude; Desjardins, Michel; Boilard, Éric; Thibault, Pierre; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2015-12-16

    Autoantibodies to components of apoptotic cells, such as anti-perlecan antibodies, contribute to rejection in organ transplant recipients. However, mechanisms of immunization to apoptotic components remain largely uncharacterized. We used large-scale proteomics, with validation by electron microscopy and biochemical methods, to compare the protein profiles of apoptotic bodies and apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, smaller extracellular vesicles released by endothelial cells downstream of caspase-3 activation. We identified apoptotic exosome-like vesicles as a central trigger for production of anti-perlecan antibodies and acceleration of rejection. Unlike apoptotic bodies, apoptotic exosome-like vesicles triggered the production of anti-perlecan antibodies in naïve mice and enhanced anti-perlecan antibody production and allograft inflammation in mice transplanted with an MHC (major histocompatibility complex)-incompatible aortic graft. The 20S proteasome core was active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles and controlled their immunogenic activity. Finally, we showed that proteasome activity in circulating exosome-like vesicles increased after vascular injury in mice. These findings open new avenues for predicting and controlling maladaptive humoral responses to apoptotic cell components that enhance the risk of rejection after transplantation. PMID:26676607

  12. New scoring system identifies kidney outcome with radiation therapy in acute renal allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of radiation therapy for acute refractory renal rejection after failure of medical intervention, and to identify risk factors that influence graft survival following radiation therapy. Methods: Between June 1989 and December 1995, 53 renal transplant recipients (34 men and 19 women) were treated with localized radiation therapy for acute renal allograft rejection. Graft rejection was defined as an increase in serum creatinine with histologic evidence of rejection on renal biopsy. Ninety-one percent were cadaveric transplant recipients. The majority of patients who experienced acute graft rejection initially received corticosteroid therapy, except for 25% who were referred for radiation therapy and steroids for the first rejection. In more recent years, patients with moderate or severe steroid-resistant or recurrent rejection received OKT3, a polyclonal antilymphocyte antibody (ATGAM), tacrolimus (FK506), or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Patients who failed to respond to medical treatment were then referred for radiation therapy. Ultrasound was performed for kidney localization. Treatment consisted of a dose of 600 cGy given in 3 or 4 fractions using 6 MV photons, delivered AP or AP/PA. Results: The overall actuarial graft survival from the initiation of RT was 83% at 1 month, 60% at 1 year, and 36% at 5 years. The median follow-up from the date of transplant to the last follow-up was 22 months. The median time from the date of transplant to the initiation of radiotherapy was 3 months, and the median time from the initiation of radiotherapy to the last follow-up was 10 months. Variables evaluated were as follows: human leukocyte antigen matching on HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DR, the transplant panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) at transplantation, number of acute rejection episodes, interval from the date of the transplant to the first rejection, serum creatinine levels at the time of the first radiation treatment, number of transplants, and

  13. Antibody-mediated immune suppression of erythrocyte alloimmunization can occur independently from red cell clearance or epitope masking in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Honghui; Stowell, Sean R; Bernardo, Lidice; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Zimring, James C; Amash, Alaa; Uchikawa, Makoto; Lazarus, Alan H

    2014-09-15

    Anti-D can prevent immunization to the RhD Ag on RBCs, a phenomenon commonly termed Ab-mediated immune suppression (AMIS). The most accepted theory to explain this effect has been the rapid clearance of RBCs. In mouse models using SRBC, these xenogeneic cells are always rapidly cleared even without Ab, and involvement of epitope masking of the SRBC Ags by the AMIS-inducing Ab (anti-SRBC) has been suggested. To address these hypotheses, we immunized mice with murine transgenic RBCs expressing the HOD Ag (hen egg lysozyme [HEL], in sequence with ovalbumin, and the human Duffy transmembrane protein) in the presence of polyclonal Abs or mAbs to the HOD molecule. The isotype, specificity, and ability to induce AMIS of these Abs were compared with accelerated clearance as well as steric hindrance of the HOD Ag. Mice made IgM and IgG reactive with the HEL portion of the molecule only. All six of the mAbs could inhibit the response. The HEL-specific Abs (4B7, IgG1; GD7, IgG2b; 2F4, IgG1) did not accelerate clearance of the HOD-RBCs and displayed partial epitope masking. The Duffy-specific Abs (MIMA 29, IgG2a; CBC-512, IgG1; K6, IgG1) all caused rapid clearance of HOD RBCs without steric hindrance. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of AMIS to erythrocytes in an all-murine model and shows that AMIS can occur in the absence of RBC clearance or epitope masking. The AMIS effect was also independent of IgG isotype and epitope specificity of the AMIS-inducing Ab. PMID:25122924

  14. Immunosuppression in cardiac graft rejection: A human in vitro model to study the potential use of new immunomodulatory drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CXCL10-CXCR3 axis plays a pivotal role in cardiac allograft rejection, so that targeting CXCL10 without inducing generalized immunosuppression may be of therapeutic significance in allotransplantation. Since the role of resident cells in cardiac rejection is still unclear, we aimed to establish reliable human cardiomyocyte cultures to investigate Th1 cytokine-mediated response in allograft rejection. We used human fetal cardiomyocytes (Hfcm) isolated from fetal hearts, obtained after legal abortions. Hfcm expressed specific cardiac lineage markers, specific cardiac structural proteins, typical cardiac currents and generated ventricular action potentials. Thus, Hfcm represent a reliable in vitro tool for allograft rejection research, since they resemble the features of mature cells. Hfcm secreted CXCL10 in response to IFNγ and TNFαα; this effect was magnified by cytokine combination. Cytokine synergy was associated to a significant TNFα-induced up-regulation of IFNγR. The response of Hfcm to some currently used immunosuppressive drugs compared to rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist and Th1-mediated response inhibitor, was also evaluated. Only micophenolic acid and rosiglitazone halved CXCL10 secretion by Hfcm. Given the pivotal role of IFNγ-induced chemokines in Th1-mediated allograft rejection, these preliminary results suggest that the combined effects of immunosuppressive agents and rosiglitazone could be potentially beneficial to patients receiving heart transplants

  15. The resistance of delayed xenograft rejection to alpha(1,3)-galactosyltransferase gene inactivation and CD4 depletion in a mouse-to-rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Alastair B; Kirkeby, Svend; Aasted, Bent; Dahl, Kirsten; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Dieperink, Hans; Kemp, Ejvind; Buschard, Karsten; D'Apice, Anthony J F

    2003-01-01

    Critical to the prevention of xenograft loss is the prevention of delayed xenograft rejection (DXR), due to its resistance to conventional immunosuppression. The role of the carbohydrate galactose-alpha1,3-galactose (alpha1,3Gal) has been a matter of great debate and it has been proposed that the......), generated by alpha1,3-galacto-syltransferase gene disruption, were transplanted to anti-alpha1,3Gal antibody-free Lew/Mol rats. This model consists of an alpha1,3Gal/alpha1,3Gal-antibody-free environment, eliminating a possible influence of this specific system on DXR. A subgroup of recipients were...... furthermore CD4 depleted in order to inhibit CD4-dependent B-cell antibody production. Rejected hearts were evaluated by light- and immunofluorescence microscopy. Treatment effects on recipient T-cell subsets and cytokine expression were analyzed by flow cytometry, while antibody production was measured by...

  16. Monitoring of Acute Rejection after Orthotopic Heart Tranplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng chun ying; Huang ke li; Luo bin; Wen ding guo

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To study the monitoring of rejection after orthotopic heart thansplantation.Methods From 1998 to 2005, 10 othotopic heart thansplans were performed, and acute rejection was monitored by endomyocardial biopsy as well as by clinical features, ECG, ultrasonocardiography and blood serum determination of Tropin I, and by the combination of these methods, we analysed the monitoring of acute rejection after the heart transplantation. Results With the combination of clinical features, ECG, ultrasonocardiography and blood serum test, 5 occurences of acute rejection were judged in the postoperative course, which were comfirmed by endomyocardial biopsy to be 2 acute rejections in Ⅰ b degree, 3 acute rejections in Ⅲ a degree. Endomyocardial biopsy were routinely performed 21 times postoperatively in which there were 1 acute rejection in Ⅰ a degree and 5 acute rejections in Ⅰ b degree. Conclusions Acute rejection is an important factor influencing the postoperative course of heart transplantation, so it is imperative to have an intime, effective and planned monitoring procedure for acute rejection. Endomyocardial biopsy is a sensitive and reliable method in diagnosis of acute rejection, but it is invasive and probable for some complications. The noninvasive method such as clinical features, ECG,ultrasonocardiography and blood serum test can be used as additive means in the diagnosis of acute rejection.Endomyocardial biopsy should be combined with some noninvasive methods in monitoring acute rejection after the heart transplantation.

  17. Value of In-111 antimyosin in the diagnosis of cardiac transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have tested the clinical reliability and utility of 111-In antimyosin (IN-AM) in patients with suspected cardiac transplant rejection and in 20 control patients. They have studied 36 patients within 4 days before or after endomyocardial biopsy (EMB). Single-photon emission CT (SPECT) images were obtained 48 hours after injection. The images were interpreted visually and by calculation of a heart-to-lung ratio (H/L). H/L > 1.6 demonstrated various stages of rejection episodes. In six false-negative studies, four patients were treated with a bolus injection of high-dose steroids before IN-AM injection. Two patients developed human antimouse antibodies (HAMA) after repeated injection. A normalizing in EMB finding always correlated with a decrease in the H/L ratio

  18. Developmental pathways from childhood aggression-disruptiveness, chronic peer rejection, and deviant friendships to early-adolescent rule breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettekal, Idean; Ladd, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    Childhood aggression-disruptiveness (AD), chronic peer rejection, and deviant friendships were examined as predictors of early-adolescent rule-breaking behaviors. Using a sample of 383 children (193 girls and 190 boys) who were followed from ages 6 to 14, peer rejection trajectories were identified and incorporated into a series of alternative models to assess how chronic peer rejection and deviant friendships mediate the association between stable childhood AD and early-adolescent rule breaking. There were multiple mediated pathways to rule breaking that included both behavioral and relational risk factors, and findings were consistent for boys and girls. Results have implications for better understanding the influence of multiple social processes in the continuity of antisocial behaviors from middle childhood to early adolescence. PMID:25403544

  19. Characterization of diverse subvariants of the meningococcal factor H (fH) binding protein for their ability to bind fH, to mediate serum resistance, and to induce bactericidal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, Kate L; Brunelli, Brunella; Brogioni, Barbara; Palumbo, Emmanuelle; Bambini, Stefania; Muzzi, Alessandro; DiMarcello, Federica; Marchi, Sara; van der Ende, Arie; Aricó, Beatrice; Savino, Silvana; Scarselli, Maria; Comanducci, Maurizio; Rappuoli, Rino; Giuliani, Marzia M; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2011-02-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a commensal of the human nasopharynx but is also a major cause of septicemia and meningitis. The meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) binds human factor H (fH), enabling downregulation of complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a component of two serogroup B meningococcal vaccines currently in clinical development. Here we characterize 12 fHbp subvariants for their level of surface exposure and ability to bind fH, to mediate serum resistance, and to induce bactericidal antibodies. Flow cytometry and Western analysis revealed that all strains examined expressed fHbp on their surface to different extents and bound fH in an fHbp-dependent manner. However, differences in fH binding did not always correlate with the level of fHbp expression, indicating that this is not the only factor affecting the amount of fH bound. To overcome the issue of strain variability in fHbp expression, the MC58ΔfHbp strain was genetically engineered to express different subvariants from a constitutive heterologous promoter. These recombinant strains were characterized for fH binding, and the data confirmed that each subvariant binds different levels of fH. Surface plasmon resonance revealed differences in the stability of the fHbp-fH complexes that ranged over 2 orders of magnitude, indicating that differences in residues between and within variant groups can influence fH binding. Interestingly, the level of survival in human sera of recombinant MC58 strains expressing diverse subvariants did not correlate with the level of fH binding, suggesting that the interaction of fHbp with fH is not the only function of fHbp that influences serum resistance. Furthermore, cross-reactive bactericidal activity was seen within each variant group, although the degree of activity varied, suggesting that amino acid differences within each variant group influence the bactericidal antibody response. PMID:21149595

  20. Chronic allograft rejection: A significant hurdle to transplant success

    OpenAIRE

    Malgorzata Kloc; Ghobrial, Rafik M.

    2014-01-01

    The state-of-the-art immunosuppression drugs do not ensure indefinite transplant survival, and most transplants are continuously lost to chronic rejection even years posttransplantation. This form of rejection is responsible for long-term failure of transplanted organs. The mechanisms involved in development of chronic rejection are not well-understood. One of the main features of chronic rejection is progressive luminal narrowing of graft vessels, which results in compromised blood flow, isc...

  1. Acute Rejection and Humoral Sensitization in Lung Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Martinu, Tereza; Chen, Dong-Feng; Palmer, Scott M

    2009-01-01

    Despite the recent introduction of many improved immunosuppressive agents for use in transplantation, acute rejection affects up to 55% of lung transplant recipients within the first year after transplant. Acute lung allograft rejection is defined as perivascular or peribronchiolar mononuclear inflammation. Although histopathologic signs of rejection often resolve with treatment, the frequency and severity of acute rejections represent the most important risk factor for the subsequent develop...

  2. Characteristics of cadaveric renal allograft recipients developing chronic rejection.

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, M. C.; Rowe, P. A.; Dennis, M J; Morgan, A G; Burden, R. P.; Blamey, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    As the early results of renal transplantation improve, chronic rejection is increasing in relative importance as a cause of graft loss. The aetiology of the condition is unknown. In order to identify possible predisposing factors, the characteristics of 22 patients with chronic rejection were compared with those of 50 patients with stable graft function 2 years or more after transplantation. Patients with chronic rejection had significantly more acute rejection episodes in the first 6 months ...

  3. Rejection Pathways in Heart Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Besouw, Nicole

    1999-01-01

    textabstractSince the beginning of this century experimental heart transplantations in animal studies were performed.' These studies were started in Rotterdam in the seventies to compare heterotopic and orthotopic heart transplantations, and to study the process of chronic rejection. The history of the first human heart transplantation started in South-Africa and it was carried out by Barnard in 1967. Several cardiac surgeons around the world initiated new transplantation programmes. However,...

  4. Use of a SQUID array to detect T-cells with magnetic nanoparticles in determining transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Edward R. [Senior Scientific, 11109 Country Club NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)]. E-mail: seniorsci@nmia.com; Bryant, H.C. [Senior Scientific, 11109 Country Club NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bergemann, Christian [Chemicell GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Larson, Richard S. [Cancer Research and Treatment Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Lovato, Debbie [Cancer Research and Treatment Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Sergatskov, Dmitri A. [Senior Scientific, 11109 Country Club NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Acute rejection in organ transplant is signaled by the proliferation of T-cells that target and kill the donor cells requiring painful biopsies to detect rejection onset. An alternative non-invasive technique is proposed using a multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to detect T-cell lymphocytes in the transplanted organ labeled with magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specifically attached to lymphocytic ligand receptors. After a magnetic field pulse, the T-cells produce a decaying magnetic signal with a characteristic time of the order of a second. The extreme sensitivity of this technique, 10{sup 5} cells, can provide early warning of impending transplant rejection and monitor immune-suppressive chemotherapy.

  5. Use of a SQUID array to detect T-cells with magnetic nanoparticles in determining transplant rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Edward R.; Bryant, H. C.; Bergemann, Christian; Larson, Richard S.; Lovato, Debbie; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-04-01

    Acute rejection in organ transplant is signaled by the proliferation of T-cells that target and kill the donor cells requiring painful biopsies to detect rejection onset. An alternative non-invasive technique is proposed using a multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to detect T-cell lymphocytes in the transplanted organ labeled with magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specifically attached to lymphocytic ligand receptors. After a magnetic field pulse, the T-cells produce a decaying magnetic signal with a characteristic time of the order of a second. The extreme sensitivity of this technique, 10 5 cells, can provide early warning of impending transplant rejection and monitor immune-suppressive chemotherapy.

  6. Use of a SQUID array to detect T-cells with magnetic nanoparticles in determining transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute rejection in organ transplant is signaled by the proliferation of T-cells that target and kill the donor cells requiring painful biopsies to detect rejection onset. An alternative non-invasive technique is proposed using a multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer to detect T-cell lymphocytes in the transplanted organ labeled with magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specifically attached to lymphocytic ligand receptors. After a magnetic field pulse, the T-cells produce a decaying magnetic signal with a characteristic time of the order of a second. The extreme sensitivity of this technique, 105 cells, can provide early warning of impending transplant rejection and monitor immune-suppressive chemotherapy

  7. Autophagy in allografts rejection: A new direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hukui; Cheng, Dayan; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Huaiquan; Liang, Ting; Hou, Guihua

    2016-03-18

    Despite the introduction of new and effective immunosuppressive drugs, acute cellular graft rejection is still a major risk for graft survival. Modulating the dosage of immunosuppressive drugs is not a good choice for all patients, new rejection mechanisms discovery are crucial to limit the inflammatory process and preserve the function of the transplant. Autophagy, a fundamental cellular process, can be detected in all subsets of lymphocytes and freshly isolated naive T lymphocytes. It is required for the homeostasis and function of T lymphocytes, which lead to cell survival or cell death depending on the context. T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and costimulator signals induce strong autophagy, and autophagy deficient T cells leads to rampant apoptosis upon TCR stimulation. Autophagy has been proved to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and associated with grafts dysfunction. Furthermore, Autophagy has also emerged as a key mechanism in orchestrating innate and adaptive immune response to self-antigens, which relates with negative selection and Foxp3(+) Treg induction. Although, the role of autophagy in allograft rejection is unknown, current data suggest that autophagy indeed sweeps across both in the graft organs and recipients lymphocytes after transplantation. This review presents the rationale for the hypothesis that targeting the autophagy pathway could be beneficial in promoting graft survival after transplantation. PMID:26876576

  8. Allograft renal rejection and chemokine polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Gorgi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines play a major role in the process by which leukocytes are recruited from the bloodstream into the sites of inflammation. Genes for the chemokine receptors CCR5, CCR2 and MCP-1 are characterized by functional polymorphisms implicated in transplant rejection. To investigate this association, we analyzed polymorphisms of CCR5-∆32, CCR5-59029-A/G, CCR2-V64I and MCP-1 G/A (-2518 in 173 renal transplant recipients and 169 healthy blood donors. The patients were classified in two groups: Group-1 (G-1 included 33 HLA-identical recipients and Group-2 (G-2 included 140 (one or more mismatched graft recipients. Forty-two patients had developed acute rejection episodes (ARs: seven in G-1 and 35 in G-2. Thirteen G-2 patients developed chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD. The genotypic and allelic frequencies of all polymorphisms studied did not reveal significant differences between patients and controls and among G-1 and G-2 recipients. However, a significant risk of acute renal transplant rejection was found in G-1 patients who possessed the CCR2-64I allele (odds ratio 0.24, 95% confidence inter-val [CI], 0.05-1.06; P = 0.035. There was no significant association of this polymorphism and CAD. In conclusion, the observed association of CCR2-64I with AR should be added to the spectrum of immunogenetic factors known to be involved in allograft renal loss.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are antibodies having single specificity for a given antigen site (epitope). The development of hybridoma technology and the relative ease by which MAbs can be prepared has revolutionized many aspects of serological applications in diagnosis and differentiation of disease producing agents. The property of monospecificity offers advantages in diagnostic applications over polyclonal sera in that tests can be defined exactly with regard to the antigen detected and the affinity of reaction between the given antigenic site and the monoclonal reagent. In addition, MAbs offer better possibilities for test standardization, because the same reagent can be used in different laboratories. Such an MAb can be supplied by a central laboratory or 'grown' from hybridoma cells, ensuring that the resultant product is identical from laboratory to laboratory and that the part of the test involving the MAb reaction is the same. The methodologies for inoculation regimes, mice, cloning methods, selection of fusion partners, etc., have been validated extensively in developed country laboratories. The decision to establish a MAb production facility must be examined on a strict cost-benefit basis, since it is still expensive to produce a product. There are many MAbs available that should be sought to allow exploitation in developing tests. If a production facility is envisaged, it should produce reagents for national needs, i.e. there should be a clear problem oriented approach whereby exact needs are defined. In the field of veterinary applications, MAbs are the central reagent in many immunoassays based on the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The development of specific tests for diagnosing diseases is dominated by MAbs and has been fuelled by a strong research base, mainly in developed countries allied to developing countries through the study of related diseases. Thus, there are very many assays dependent on MAbs, some of which form the basis of

  10. Successful kidney transplantation after desensitization in a patient with positive flow crossmatching and donor-specific anti-HLA-DP antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seung Hwan; Park, Borae G.; Lee, Juhan; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traditionally, the presence of antibodies against human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C and DP was considered to be associated with only a low risk of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) in kidney transplantation (KT), because the antigenicities of these proteins are weak. However, the clinical effects of HLA-C and -DP donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSHAs) have recently been reevaluated. Methods: Here, we report the case of a retransplant patient with positive flow cytometry crossmatch (FCXM) and high level of HLA-DP DSHA who was desensitized using rituximab, plasmapheresis, and intravenous immunoglobulin. Results: The epitope-based antibody reactivity was identified that the positive B-cell FCXM in our patient was attributable to the specific epitope. The patient underwent a successful retransplantation and has continued to do well for 10 month after KT. Conclusion: If an HLA-DP DSHA is present, it is important to detect any mismatched HLA-DP epitope pretransplantation and to monitor HLA-DP levels carefully. According to previous reports, anti-HLA-DP DSHA can induce ABMR soon after transplantation, but such ABMR can be prevented by pretransplantation desensitization and careful monitoring of DSHA levels. PMID:27512872

  11. The Timing of Middle-Childhood Peer Rejection and Friendship: Linking Early Behavior to Early-Adolescent Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Sara; Vitaro, Frank; Barker, Edward D.; Borge, Anne I. H.

    2007-01-01

    This study used a sample of 551 children surveyed yearly from ages 6 to 13 to examine the longitudinal associations among early behavior, middle-childhood peer rejection and friendedness, and early-adolescent depressive symptoms, loneliness, and delinquency. The study tested a sequential mediation hypothesis in which (a) behavior problems in the…

  12. Effects of Positive Peer Reporting (PPR) on Social Acceptance and Negative Behaviors among Peer-Rejected Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shelia M.; Simon, Joan; Bramlett, Ronald K.

    2009-01-01

    Positive peer reporting (PPR) is a peer-mediated intervention that involves teaching and rewarding peers for providing descriptive praise during structured daily sessions. PPR has been used in residential facilities to improve social acceptance, increase prosocial behaviors, and decrease negative interactions of youth identified as peer rejected.…

  13. Belatacept for prevention of acute rejection in adult patients who have had a kidney transplant: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowski D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available David Wojciechowski, Flavio VincentiKidney Transplant Service, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: In June 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration approved belatacept for the prophylaxis of organ rejection in adult kidney transplant recipients. This review discusses the use of belatacept for the prevention of acute rejection as part of a maintenance immunosuppression regimen. Belatacept is a selective costimulation blocker designed to provide effective immunosuppression while avoiding the toxicities associated with calcineurin inhibitors. Phase III trial data have demonstrated that belatacept is noninferior to cyclosporine in 1-year patient and allograft survival. Three-year data demonstrate an ongoing improvement in mean measured glomerular filtration rate in belatacept-treated versus cyclosporine-treated patients. However, the rate of acute rejection was higher in belatacept-treated patients compared with cyclosporine. Specifically, there was a higher incidence of Banff type II rejections in patients treated with belatacept. Despite the higher Banff grade, rejections on belatacept were not associated with other factors associated with poor outcomes, such as the development of donor-specific antibodies or reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate. One safety issue that must be considered when using belatacept is the potential for increased risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. There were more cases of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in belatacept-treated patients, especially in recipients seronegative for Epstein–Barr virus or patients treated with lymphocyte-depleting agents. Therefore, belatacept can be recommended for use in Epstein–Barr virus antibody-positive recipients.Keywords: belatacept, kidney transplant, acute rejection

  14. Monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  15. Two cases of hepatobiliary scintigraphy of liver transplantation in rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanegawa, Kimio; Nishiyama, Syouji; Muraji, Toshihiro (Kobe Children' s Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)); Ishii, Kazunari; Kouno, Michio

    1992-04-01

    We report two patients with liver transplantation who underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy in rejection. In the first patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed dilatation of bile duct but it showed good clearance from the liver. In the second patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed delayed clearance from the liver. Both patients recovered from rejection. There were four main complications, including vascular and biliary abnormality, infection, and rejection, after liver transplantation. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed almost the same findings except for biliary complication, so it was difficult to distinguish between infection and rejection. But hepatobiliary scintigraphy may be useful to evaluate transplanted liver function in rejection. (author).

  16. Two cases of hepatobiliary scintigraphy of liver transplantation in rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two patients with liver transplantation who underwent hepatobiliary scintigraphy in rejection. In the first patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed dilatation of bile duct but it showed good clearance from the liver. In the second patient, hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed delayed clearance from the liver. Both patients recovered from rejection. There were four main complications, including vascular and biliary abnormality, infection, and rejection, after liver transplantation. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy showed almost the same findings except for biliary complication, so it was difficult to distinguish between infection and rejection. But hepatobiliary scintigraphy may be useful to evaluate transplanted liver function in rejection. (author)

  17. Oedipal shame, rejection, and adolescent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparrotta, Luigi

    2003-12-01

    The definition of oedipal shame, dramatized in Sophocles' tragedy, is the painful affect resulting from accepting the reality of one's origins. A clinical example focusing on shame arising from adoption links oedipal shame to the theme of rejection. Furthermore, in adolescence the revival of the oedipal conflict may reactivate oedipal shame in which unconscious idealized fantasies of personal perfection and the object carried over from childhood have to be renegotiated. This process, illustrated by two clinical vignettes, may reveal entrenched masochistic defenses. An examination of a final scene from a film underscores the significance of oedipal shame in clinical practice. PMID:14703298

  18. USA: California rejects mandatory GMO labelling

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, John

    2012-01-01

    Buying organic remains the best strategy for US consumers to avoid eating GM food. The voters of California have rejected the proposal to label GMO food. The proposition was narrowly lost, 47% to 53% (4,326,770 ‘Yes’ votes vs. 4,884,961 ‘No’ votes). Proposition 47 was supported by the organic sector but opposed by a coalition of GMO companies and US multinational food companies. Californians were invited to vote into law ‘The California Right to Know Genetically Engineered Food Act’. Section ...

  19. Solar Rejection Filter for Large Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James

    2009-01-01

    To reject solar radiation photons at the front aperture for large telescopes, a mosaic of large transmission mode filters is placed in front of the telescope or at the aperture of the dome. Filtering options for effective rejection of sunlight include a smaller filter down-path near the focus of the telescope, and a large-diameter filter located in the front of the main aperture. Two types of large filters are viable: reflectance mode and transmittance mode. In the case of reflectance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (e.g. a low-thermal-expansion glass) is arranged to reflect only a single, narrow wavelength and to efficiently transmit all other wavelengths. These coatings are commonly referred to as notch filter. In this case, the large mirror located in front of the telescope aperture reflects the received (signal and background) light into the telescope. In the case of transmittance mode, a dielectric coating on a suitable substrate (glass, sapphire, clear plastic, membrane, and the like) is arranged to transmit only a single wavelength and to reject all other wavelengths (visible and near IR) of light. The substrate of the large filter will determine its mass. At first glance, a large optical filter with a diameter of up to 10 m, located in front of the main aperture, would require a significant thickness to avoid sagging. However, a segmented filter supported by a structurally rugged grid can support smaller filters. The obscuration introduced by the grid is minimal because the total area can be made insignificant. This configuration can be detrimental to a diffraction- limited telescope due to diffraction effects at the edges of each sub-panel. However, no discernable degradation would result for a 20 diffraction-limit telescope (a photon bucket). Even the small amount of sagging in each subpanel should have minimal effect in the performance of a non-diffraction limited telescope because the part has no appreciable optical power. If the

  20. Anti-interleukin-2 receptor antibodies—basiliximab and daclizumab—for the prevention of acute rejection in renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichiro Sageshima

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Junichiro Sageshima, Gaetano Ciancio, Linda Chen, George W Burke IIIDewitt Daughtry Family Department of Surgery, Division of Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation, The Lillian Jean Kaplan Renal Transplant Center, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: The use of antibody induction after kidney transplantation has increased from 25% to 63% in the past decade and roughly one half of the induction agent used is anti-interleukin-2 receptor antibody (IL-2RA, ie, basiliximab or daclizumab. When combined with calcineurin inhibitor (CNI-based immunosuppression, IL-2RAs have been shown to reduce the incidence of acute rejection, one of the predictors of poor graft survival, without increasing risks of infections and malignancies in kidney transplantation. For low-immunological-risk patients, IL-2RAs, as compared with lymphocyte-depleting antibodies, are equally efficacious and have better safety profiles. For high-risk patients, however, IL-2RAs may be inferior to lymphocyte-depleting antibodies for the prophylaxis of acute rejection. In an effort to reduce toxicities of other immunosuppressive medications without increasing the risk of acute rejection and chronic graft loss, IL-2RAs have often been combined with steroid- and CNI-sparing immunosuppression protocols. More data support the benefits of early steroid withdrawal with IL-2RA in low-risk patients, but preferred induction therapy for high-risk patients has yet to be determined. Although CNI-sparing protocols with IL-2RA may preserve renal function and improve long-term survival in selected patients, further studies are needed to identify those who benefit most from this strategy.Keywords: basiliximab, daclizumab, interleukin-2 receptor antagonist, kidney transplantation, monoclonal antibody

  1. Uremic escape of renal allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated in rats that, in the presence of early postoperative severe but transient uremia, the survival of first set Brown-Norway (BN) renal allografts in Lewis (LEW) recipients is at least three times prolonged when compared to non-uremic controls. This phenomenon is called 'uremic escape of renal allograft rejection'. By means of lethal X-irradiation of donors of BN kidneys transplanted into transiently uremic and non-uremic LEW recipients, the presence of passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence is demonstrated to be obilgatory for this phenomenon to occur. As a result of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence, a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction is elicited in the spleens of LEW recipients of BN kidneys which amplifies the host response. The splenomegaly observed in LEW recipients of BN kidneys is caused not only by this GVH reaction, which is shown to be exquisitely sensitive to even mild uremia. It is also contributed to by a proliferative response of the host against the graft (which latter response is equated with an in vivo equivalent of a unilateral mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR)), since the reduction in spleen weights caused by abrogation of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence brought about by lethal donor X-irradiation is increased significantly by early postoperative severe but transient uremia. It is concluded that in uremic escape of renal allograft rejection both reactions are suppressed by uremia during the early post-operative period. (Auth.)

  2. Novel insights into pretransplant allosensitization in heart transplant recipients in the contemporary era of immunosuppression and rejection surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svobodova, Eva; Gazdic, Tomas; Kubanek, Milos; Vymetalova, Jevgenija; Voska, Ludek; Kment, Martin; Lanska, Vera; Kolesar, Libor; Urban, Marian; Netuka, Ivan; Pirk, Jan; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Kautzner, Josef; Slavcev, Antonij; Malek, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Solid-phase assays (SPA) have facilitated detection and definition of antibodies to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related antigen A (MICA). However, clinical consequences of pretransplant SPA results in heart transplantation have been studied insufficiently in the current era of immunosuppression and rejection surveillance. Pretransplant sera, panel-reactive antibodies (PRA), pretransplant crossmatch, and clinical data were retrospectively analyzed in 264 adult heart transplant recipients. The specificity of HLA and MICA antibodies and C1q-binding activity of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) were defined using SPA. Pretransplant HLA antibodies were detected in 57 (22%) individuals, in 28 individuals (11%); these antibodies were DSA after transplant. Preformed DSA and elevated peak PRA were independent predictors of pathologic AMR, which occurred in 19 individuals (7%). The increasing number of DSA and the cumulative mean fluorescence intensity of DSA were associated with AMR. C1q-binding assay was a suboptimal predictor of AMR in our cohort. Pretransplant allosensitization and MICA antibodies were related neither to impaired graft survival nor to other adverse clinical events during a median follow-up of 39 months. Identification of preformed DSA by SPA, in addition to PRA monitoring, may predict AMR in the contemporary era of heart transplantation. PMID:26340387

  3. Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmas, Tania N; Petersen, Søren L; Madsen, Hans O; Ryder, Lars P; Kornblit, Brian; Svejgaard, Arne; Andersen, Pernille; Dickmeiss, Ebbe; Vindeløv, Lars L

    2008-07-01

    Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with nonmyeloablative conditioning is a rare but serious clinical problem. Graft rejection and salvage therapy in eight patients in a retrospective analysis of 124 consecutive patients is reported. The patients were conditioned with low-dose fludarabine and total body irradiation (TBI). The association of pretransplantation risk factors with rejection and the effect of chimerism and graft-versus-host disease on rejection were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared between patients with and without rejection. Retransplantation was performed with increased TBI conditioning for all patients, and with increased mycophenolate mofetil doses for recipients with HLA-identical sibling donors. No known pretransplantation risk factors were confirmed in this study. Rejection episodes were unevenly distributed over time. The storage temperature of the apheresis products was identified as a risk factor for rejection. Storage of the apheresis products at 5 degrees C diminished the risk of rejection. Low donor T cell chimerism at Day +14 significantly increased the risk of rejection. Seven patients were retransplanted. All but one engrafted successfully, but with decreased OS and PFS. Two patients received pentostatin infusion prior to donor lymphocyte infusions in unsuccessful attempts at reversing rejection. Storage temperature and donor chimerism had a significant effect on rejection. Following rejection, patients are at greater risk of dying from infections and progression/relapse of their malignancy. Retransplantation is feasible and well tolerated after HCT with nonmyeloablative conditioning and should be performed without delay in patients with imminent and manifest graft rejection. PMID:18383319

  4. Role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in lung transplant rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, advances in immunology have led to the recognition that T cell differentiation is not simply Th1 or Th2 but involves differentiation to other subsets, such as T regulatory cells, T follicular helper cells, and Th17 cells. Th17 cells, characterized by production of IL-17, IL-22, and IL-21, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, but also play an important role in host defense and mucosal immunity. IL-17, with its pleiotropic effects on stromal cells, as well as hematopoietic cells, has long been recognized as a possible mediator of rejection after lung transplantation. Recent data have implicated IL-17 and Th17 cells in the development of autoimmunity and chronic rejection after lung transplantation in both animal models and humans. In this review, we will discuss the current data on Th17 and the prospects for the future for lung transplantation. PMID:21279808

  5. Cellular and Functional Imaging of Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijen L.; Ye, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Heart transplantation is now an established treatment for patients suffering from end-stage heart diseases. With the advances in immunosuppressive treatment, the survival rate for transplant patients has improved greatly. However, allograft rejection, both acute and chronic, after heart transplantation is still a limitation leading to morbidity and mortality. The current clinical gold standard for screening rejection is endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), which is not only invasive, but also error-prone, due to the limited sample size and the site location of sampling. It would be highly desirable to have reliable and noninvasive alternatives for EMB in monitoring cardiac allograft rejection. The objective of this review is to highlight how cardiovascular imaging can contribute to noninvasively detecting and to evaluating both acute and chronic allograft rejection after heart transplantation, in particular, cardiovascular MRI (CMRI); and how CMRI can assess both immune cell infiltration at the rejecting organ, and the cardiac dysfunctions resulting from allograft rejection. PMID:21359095

  6. Multivisceral transplantation in pigs: a clinicopathological analysis of tissue rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuoka,Shintaro

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we established the surgical procedure and postoperative care of multivisceral transplantation (MVTX in pigs, and examined the functional changes and rejection pattern of transplanted organs in MVTX. Twenty-two MVTXs were performed without immunosuppression, and nine cases (41% that survived for 5 days or more after MVTX were used for evaluation. Rejection in grafts including the liver, pancreas, and gastrointestinal tract were assessed histopathologically. On day 5 after transplantation, the duodenum and small bowel already showed signs of mild rejection. On the other hand, in the liver, pancreas and stomach, rejection occurred later and was still mild on day 16. Hepatic rejection in MVTX appeared to occur later than in simple liver transplantation (LTX. These results showed that the susceptibility to rejection of individual visceral organs varies.

  7. The Rejection-Rage Contingency in Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, Kathy R.; Downey, Geraldine; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Coifman, Karin; Leventhal, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Though longstanding clinical observation reflected in the DSM-IV suggests that the rage characteristic of borderline personality disorder (BPD) often appears in response to perceived rejection, the role of perceived rejection in triggering rage in BPD has never been empirically tested. Extending basic personality research on rejection sensitivity to a clinical sample, a priming-pronunciation experiment and a 21-day experience-sampling diary examined the contingent relationship between perceived rejection and rage in participants diagnosed with BPD compared to healthy controls. Despite the differences in these two assessment methods, the indices of rejection-contingent rage that they produced were both elevated in the BPD group, and were strongly interrelated. They provide corroborating evidence that reactions to perceived rejection significantly explain the rage seen in BPD. PMID:21500875

  8. Adenoviral-mediated localized CTLA-4Ig gene expression induces long-term allograft pancreas survival and donor-specific immune tolerance in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    T cell activation following alloantigen recognition plays a critical role in the development of the rejection in all solid organ, tissue and cell transplantation. A recombinant molecule, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 antibody (CTLA-4Ig), is known to induce to T-cell into "anergy" by blocking the costimulatory B7-CD28 interaction. Either systemic or localized administration of CTLA-Ig has been shown to prolong allograft survival and induce donor-specific tolerance in some transplant models. In this study, we characterized the expression and immunosuppressive effectiveness of adenoviral-mediated CTLA-4Ig gene transfer. We demonstrated transduction of the allografts with AdCTLA-41g resulted in localized expression, permanent graft survival and stable donor-specific tolerance. In addition, by performing simultaneous dual-organ transplantation, we targeted on immunosuppression through a local expression of CTLA-4Ig via adenoviral-mediated gene transfer into pancreatic allografts.

  9. Adolescent social rejection alters pain processing in a CB1 receptor dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Peggy; Pätz, Monique; Spanagel, Rainer; Schneider, Miriam

    2016-07-01

    Experiences of social rejection represent a major source of distress and in particular peer rejection during adolescence has been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Moreover, experimentally induced acute social rejection alters pain perception in humans, implicating overlapping neurocircuits for social and physical pains. We recently demonstrated that rearing of adolescent Wistar rats with inadequate, less playful play partners (Fischer 344) persistently decreases pain sensitivity, although the detailed mechanisms mediating the aversiveness during the social encounter remained unsettled. With the present study we examined the behavioral performance during acute interaction of female adolescent Wistar rats with either age-matched same-strain partners or rats from the Fischer 344 strain. We here identify the low responsiveness upon playful attacks, which appears to be characteristic for social play in the Fischer 344 strain, as one of the main aversive components for adolescent Wistar animals during cross-strain encounters, which subsequently diminishes thermal pain reactivity. A detailed behavioral analysis further revealed increased ultrasonic vocalization at 50kHz and an increased frequency of playful attacks for adolescent Wistar animals paired with a Fischer 344 rat compared to same-strain control pairs. Finally, an acute injection of a subthreshold dose of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist SR141716 before the social encounter abolished enhanced play-soliciting behavior in Wistar/Fischer 344 pairs as well as the behavioral consequences of the rejection experience in adolescent Wistar rats, further emphasizing an important modulatory role of the endocannabinoid system in mediating the effects of social behavior and social pain. PMID:27157075

  10. MDMA DECREASES THE EFFECTS OF SIMULATED SOCIAL REJECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Frye, Charles G.; Wardle, Margaret C; Norman, Greg J.; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) increases self-reported positive social feelings and decreases the ability to detect social threat in faces, but its effects on experiences of social acceptance and rejection have not been determined. We examined how an acute dose of MDMA affects subjective and autonomic responses to simulated social acceptance and rejection. We predicted that MDMA would decrease subjective responses to rejection. On an exploratory basis, we also examined the effect of...

  11. Bronchoalveolar Immunologic Profile of Acute Human Lung Transplant Allograft Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Gregson, Aric L.; Hoji, Aki; Saggar, Rajan; Ross, David J; Kubak, Bernard M; Jamieson, Beth D.; Weigt, S. Samuel; Lynch, Joseph P.; Ardehali, Abbas; Belperio, John A.; Yang, Otto O

    2008-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) offers a potential means to diagnose acute rejection and could provide insight into the immune mechanisms responsible for lung allograft rejection. Transbronchial biopsies from 29 bronchoscopic procedures were assessed for rejection. Concurrent BALF lymphocyte subsets were examined by flow cytometry, including CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and their activation status via CD38 expression, NK, NK-like T (NT), B, T regulatory (Treg) and invariant receptor NK-T cells (...

  12. LATE ACUTE REJECTION IN LIVER TRANSPLANT: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Nacif, Lucas Souto; Pinheiro, Rafael Soares; PÉCORA, Rafael Antônio de Arruda; Ducatti, Liliana; ROCHA-SANTOS, Vinicius; Andraus, Wellington; D'ALBUQUERQUE, Luiz Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Late acute rejection leads to worse patient and graft survival after liver transplantation. Aim: To analyze the reported results published in recent years by leading transplant centers in evaluating late acute rejection and update the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of liver transplantation. Method: Systematic literature review through Medline-PubMed database with headings related to late acute rejection in articles published until November 2013 was done. Were a...

  13. Regulatory Allospecific T Cell Clones Abrogate Chronic Allograft Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Grimm, Martin R.; Lutz, Jens; Lange, Volkmar; Lenhard, Susanne M.; Aviles, Beatriz; Kist-van Holthe, Joana E; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Samsonov, Dimitry; Meyer, Detlef; Hancock, Wayne W.; Heemann, Uwe; Gasser, Martin; Chandraker, Anil

    2009-01-01

    True alloantigen-specific tolerance is the ultimate goal of solid organ transplantation, eliminating the need for long-term immunosuppression. Recent evidence suggests that Th1-derived cytokines are associated with rejection and Th2-derived cytokines with long-term allograft survival, but the roles of these subsets in rejection and tolerance are incompletely understood. Here, we analyzed the functional and regulatory capacities of T cell clones derived from tolerant and rejecting rats (Wistar...

  14. The private rejection of unfair offers and emotional commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Yamagishi, Toshio; Horita, Yutaka; Takagishi, Haruto; Shinada, Mizuho; Tanida, Shigehito; Cook, Karen S.

    2009-01-01

    In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that certain players of an economic game reject unfair offers even when this behavior increases rather than decreases inequity. A substantial proportion (30–40%, compared with 60–70% in the standard ultimatum game) of those who responded rejected unfair offers even when rejection reduced only their own earnings to 0, while not affecting the earnings of the person who proposed the unfair split (in an impunity game). Furthermore, even when the responde...

  15. Rejection of Organic Micropollutants by Clean and Fouled Nanofiltration Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Lifang Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The rejection of organic micropollutants, including three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and three phthalic acid esters (PAEs), by clean and fouled nanofiltration membranes was investigated in the present study. The rejection of organic micropollutants by clean NF90 membranes varied from 87.9 to more than 99.9%, while that of NF270 membranes ranged from 32.1 to 92.3%. Clear time-dependence was observed for the rejection of hydrophobic micropollutants, which was attributed to the adso...

  16. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1(+) cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  17. Acute pulmonary rejection in heart and lung transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute pulmonary rejection occurs in up to 50% of patients undergoing heart and lung transplant procedures. These patients are also susceptible to volume overload and pneumonia. To evaluate the radiographic and high-resolution CT appearances of acute pulmonary rejection, we compared chest radiographs and high-resolution CT scans with the clinical findings and with histologic and lavage data from 91 serial transbronchial biopsies in 13 patients. The radiographic appearance of acute pulmonary rejection is characterized by prominent septal lines and pleural effusions. The authors conclude that in the appropriate clinical setting, the appearance of new pleural effusions and prominent septal lines is highly suggestive of acute pulmonary rejections

  18. Experimental diabetes exacerbates skin transplant rejection in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Pola dos Reis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of chronic experimental diabetes on skin allografts in rats as a simple model that could clarify some basic aspects and mechanisms involved in transplant rejection in diabetes compared to normal animals. METHODS: Skin grafting was performed with fragments of tail skin from sex matched non diabetic Wistar rats engrafted onto the thoracic area of diabetic and non diabetic recipients. Grafts were scored for rejection every other day and were removed on day 14. Skin grafts were graded according to the following itens: no rejection; or rejection including: acute, chronic and humoral and/or cellular rejection. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP 5.1 software with ANOVA test. Diabetes was induced with IV injection of alloxan 40 mg/kg. RESULTS: Inflammatory vascular infiltrate compromising the endothelium with areas of fibrinoid necrosis and thrombosis characteristics of acute humoral rejection and subendothelial lymphocyte infiltrate typical of acute cellular rejection were significantly (p<0.003 higher in diabetic than in non diabetic recipients as the inflammatory infiltrate in the epidermis (p<0.002. CONCLUSION: Skin transplant acute rejection from chronic alloxan diabetic rats to normal tissue was significantly more intense than the acute rejection between normal rats.

  19. Community rejection following sexual assault as ‘forced migration’

    OpenAIRE

    AJ Morgen

    2013-01-01

    When women are banished from their communities following sexual assault, this rejection should be considered an act of forced migration by the administrators of truth commission reparations programmes.

  20. Efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation for chronic allograft rejection following bilateral lung transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in patients experiencing chronic rejection following bilateral lung transplantation (BLT). Patients and Materials: Eleven patients received TLI for chronic allograft rejection (bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome) refractory to conventional treatment modalities. Radiation therapy (RT) was prescribed as 8 Gy delivered in 10 0.8-Gy fractions, 2 fractions/week, via mantle, paraaortic, and inverted-Y fields. Serial pre- and post-RT pulmonary function values, complete blood counts, and immunosuppressive augmentation requirements [use of methylprednisolone, murine anti-human mature T-cell monoclonal antibody (OKT3), polyclonal antithymocyte globulin (ATG), and tacrolimus] were monitored. Results: In the 3 months preceding TLI, the average decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 34% (range 0-75%) and the median number of immunosuppression augmentations was 3 (range 0-5). Only 4 of 11 patients completed all 10 TLI treatment fractions. Reasons for discontinuation included progressive pulmonary decline (four patients), worsening pulmonary infection (two patients), and persistent thrombocytopenia (one patient). Seven of the 11 patients failed within 8 weeks of treatment cessation. One patient had unabated rejection and received bilateral living related-donor transplants; he is alive and well. Six patients died. Two of these deaths were due to pulmonary infection from organisms isolated prior to the start of RT; the other four deaths were from progressive pulmonary decline. The four remaining patients had durable positive responses to TLI (mean follow-up of 47 weeks; range 24-72). Comparing the 3 months preceding RT to the 3 months following treatment, these four patients had improvements in average FEV1 (40% decline vs. 1% improvement) and fewer median number of immunosuppressive augmentations (3.5 vs. 0). None of these patients has developed lymphoproliferative disease or has died

  1. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K

    2016-06-01

    As the 2014-15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally 'target' virus-infected cells, here called 'cell-targeting antibody', or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  2. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zilian

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (HLA I antibodies (Abs play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation.

  3. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  4. Sensitive solid-phase detection of donor-specific antibodies as an aid highly relevant to improving allograft outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaf, Gerald; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Altermann, Wolfgang W

    2014-04-01

    Transplant recipients who have had sensitizing events such as pregnancies, blood transfusions and previous transplants often develop antibodies directed against human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-molecules of the donor tissue. These pre-formed donor-specific antibodies (DSA) represent a high risk of organ failure as a consequence of antibody-mediated hyper-acute or acute allograft rejection. As a first assay to detect DSA, the complement-dependent lymphocytotoxicity assay (CDC) was established more than 40 years ago. However, this assay is characterized by several drawbacks such as a low sensitivity and a high susceptibility to various artificial factors generally not leading to valid and reliable outcomes under several circumstances that are reviewed in this article. Furthermore, only those antibodies that exert complement-fixing activity are detected. As a consequence, novel procedures that act independently of the complement system and that do not represent functional assays were generated in the format of solid phase assays (SPAs) (bead- or ELISA-based). In this article, we review the pros and cons of these sensitive SPA in comparison with the detection of DSA through the use of the traditional methods such as CDC and flow cytometric analyses. Potential drawbacks of the alternative methodological approaches comprising high background reactivity, susceptibility to environmental factors and the possible influence of subjective operators' errors concerning the interpretation of the results are summarized and critically discussed for each method. We provide a forecast on the future role of SPAs reliably excluding highly deleterious DSA, thus leading to an improved graft survival. PMID:24170304

  5. Anti-CD4 abrogates rejection and reestablishes long-term tolerance to syngeneic newborn hearts grafted in mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of autoimmunity in the genesis of chronic Chagas' heart pathology is not clear. In the present study, we show that: (a) BALB/c mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi reject syngeneic newborn hearts; (b) in vivo treatment with anti-CD4 but not anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) abrogates rejection; (c) CD4+ T cells from chronically infected mice proliferate in vitro to syngeneic myocardium antigens and induce heart graft destruction when injected in situ; (d) anti...

  6. Deep sequencing and human antibody repertoire analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Scott D; Crowe, James E

    2016-06-01

    In the past decade, high-throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) methods and improved approaches for isolating antigen-specific B cells and their antibody genes have been applied in many areas of human immunology. This work has greatly increased our understanding of human antibody repertoires and the specific clones responsible for protective immunity or immune-mediated pathogenesis. Although the principles underlying selection of individual B cell clones in the intact immune system are still under investigation, the combination of more powerful genetic tracking of antibody lineage development and functional testing of the encoded proteins promises to transform therapeutic antibody discovery and optimization. Here, we highlight recent advances in this fast-moving field. PMID:27065089

  7. 48 CFR 1419.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. (a) A written justification in support of the CO's... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. 1419.505 Section 1419.505 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT...

  8. 48 CFR 19.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Small Business Administration recommendations. (a) If the contracting officer rejects a recommendation... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. 19.505 Section 19.505 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL...

  9. 48 CFR 219.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Asides for Small Business 219.505 Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. (b) The... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. 219.505 Section 219.505 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  10. 48 CFR 2919.505 - Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Small Business 2919.505 Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. When the SBA... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rejecting Small Business Administration recommendations. 2919.505 Section 2919.505 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT...

  11. Family Rejection Triples Risk for Suicide Attempts by Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contact with their child; there were incidents of domestic violence; children cut off communication; or parents or siblings stopped communicating with the person. In the case of "high" level rejection, the ... study found. A high level of family rejection was tied to a two and a ...

  12. A new molecular approach to the diagnosis of acute rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Chandraker, Anil; Strom, Terry B.

    2013-01-01

    Renal biopsy is the gold standard for detection of rejection in kidney transplant recipients but is not considered until evidence of renal dysfunction is apparent. Now, Suthanthiran and colleagues suggest that mRNA levels in urinary cells from these patients might be diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection.

  13. Rejection Sensitivity in Late Adolescence: Social and Emotional Sequelae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Emily G.; Hare, Amanda; Allen, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    This study used longitudinal, multireporter data, in a community sample, to examine the role of rejection sensitivity in late adolescents' social and emotional development. Rejection sensitivity was linked to a relative increase in adolescent depressive and anxiety symptoms over a 3-year period, even after accounting for teens' baseline level of…

  14. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  15. The role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging as a noninvasive surveillance method of human heart transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of rejection after heart transplantation in patients receiving cyclosporine immunosuppressive therapy requires the endomyocardial biopsy, an invasive method associated with a finite morbidity. To evaluate the role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) scintigraphy as a noninvasive surveillance method of heart transplant rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies labeled with indium-111 was administered intravenously in 30 scintigraphic studies to 10 consecutive heart transplant recipients. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained 72 hours after each scintigraphic study. Nineteen scintigraphic studies had negative findings; no false negative finding was obtained. Eleven antimyosin scintigraphic studies had positive findings, and in these studies endomyocardial biopsy revealed mild rejection in two cases, moderate acute rejection with myocyte necrosis in two cases, myocyte necrosis as a consequence of ischemic injury in six cases, and possibly cytotoxic damage in one case. Antimyosin scintigraphy may represent a reliable screening method for the surveillance of heart transplant patients. In the presence of a negative finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, it may be possible to avoid endomyocardial biopsy. Conversely, in patients who have a positive finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, the endomyocardial biopsy is mandatory to establish the definitive diagnosis by histologic examination of the myocardium

  16. The role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging as a noninvasive surveillance method of human heart transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nardo, D.; Scibilia, G.; Macchiarelli, A.G.; Cassisi, A.; Tonelli, E.; Papalia, U.; Gallo, P.; Antolini, M.; Pitucco, G.; Reale, A. (Universita degli Studi di Roma I La Sapienza Policlinico Umberto I (Italy))

    1989-09-01

    The identification of rejection after heart transplantation in patients receiving cyclosporine immunosuppressive therapy requires the endomyocardial biopsy, an invasive method associated with a finite morbidity. To evaluate the role of indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) scintigraphy as a noninvasive surveillance method of heart transplant rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies labeled with indium-111 was administered intravenously in 30 scintigraphic studies to 10 consecutive heart transplant recipients. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained 72 hours after each scintigraphic study. Nineteen scintigraphic studies had negative findings; no false negative finding was obtained. Eleven antimyosin scintigraphic studies had positive findings, and in these studies endomyocardial biopsy revealed mild rejection in two cases, moderate acute rejection with myocyte necrosis in two cases, myocyte necrosis as a consequence of ischemic injury in six cases, and possibly cytotoxic damage in one case. Antimyosin scintigraphy may represent a reliable screening method for the surveillance of heart transplant patients. In the presence of a negative finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, it may be possible to avoid endomyocardial biopsy. Conversely, in patients who have a positive finding from antimyosin scintigraphy, the endomyocardial biopsy is mandatory to establish the definitive diagnosis by histologic examination of the myocardium.

  17. New approaches for the prevention of rejection and graft-vs.-host disease in clinical bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two major barriers to successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in animals and man are graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) and the risk of graft rejection. GVHD is the result of alloreactivity of mature donor T-lymphocytes present in the graft-vs.-host tissues and can be completely prevented by pregraft depletion of T-lymphocytes. Graft rejection results from residual host immunocompetent lymphocytes that survive heavy chemoradiotherapy prior to allogeneic BMT. Host resistance to allograft cannot be eradicated even by conventional conditioning with high-dose cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and lethal whole body irradiation (1,200 rad). In the present report we have utilized two new techniques to overcome GVHD and graft rejection following allogeneic BMT. GVHD can be prevented by a new monoclonal rat antihuman lymphocyte antibody, CAMPATH-1, which binds human complement, enabling donor serum to serve as the source of complement. Prevention of rejection of T-lymphocyte-depleted marrow allografts can be achieved by the application of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in addition to conventional chemoradiotherapy, prior to allogeneic BMT. TLI causes potent immunosuppression with minimal side effects. A combination of TLI for overcoming host resistance to allograft, and CAMPATH-1 for overcoming GVHD, leads to a relatively smooth posttransplant outcome with no evidence of GVHD and with no need for posttransplant immunosuppression

  18. Local expression of B7-H1 promotes organ-specific autoimmunity and transplant rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Subudhi, Sumit K.; Zhou, Ping; Yerian, Lisa M.; Chin, Robert K.; Lo, James C.; Anders, Robert A.; Sun, Yonglian; Chen, Lieping; Wang, Yang; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2004-01-01

    A number of studies have suggested B7-H1, a B7 family member, inhibits T cell responses. Therefore, its expression on nonlymphoid tissues has been proposed to prevent T cell–mediated tissue destruction. To test this hypothesis, we generated transgenic mice that expressed B7-H1 on pancreatic islet β cells. Surprisingly, we observed accelerated rejection of transplanted allogeneic B7-H1–expressing islet β cells. Furthermore, transgenic B7-H1 expression broke immune tolerance, as some of the mic...

  19. Uptake of myocardial imaging agents by rejected hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, Gallium 67 and Thallium 201 uptakes were measured in heterotopically transplanted rat hearts. Five days after transplantation, Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, and Gallium 67 uptakes were significantly higher in allogeneic grafts than in syngeneic grafts. At an early stage of rejection (three days after transplantation), only Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate uptake in the left ventricle of allogeneic grafts showed a significant difference (p less than 0.04). At five days, Thallium 201 uptake was significantly lower in allo- than syngeneic grafts. There was a positive correlation between radionuclide uptake and histologic degree of rejection for Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate and Gallium 67 while Thallium 201 uptake correlated negatively. Analysis of variance revealed that hearts with no or minimal rejection had statistically different uptakes than hearts with mild to moderate rejection. These results suggest that uptake of imaging agents might be useful in the diagnosis of rejection of the transplanted heart

  20. Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masmas, T.N.; Petersen, S.L.; Madsen, H.O.; Ryder, L.P.; Kornblit, B.; Svejgaard, A.; Andersen, P.; Dickmeiss, E.; Vindelov, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with nonmyeloablative conditioning is a rare but serious clinical problem. Graft rejection and salvage therapy in eight patients in a retrospective analysis of 124 consecutive patients is reported. The patients were conditioned with low......-dose fludarabine and total body irradiation (TBI). The association of pretransplantation risk factors with rejection and the effect of chimerism and graft-versus-host disease on rejection were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared between patients with and without......, patients are at greater risk of dying from infections and progression/relapse of their malignancy. Retransplantation is feasible and well tolerated after HCT with nonmyeloablative conditioning and should be performed without delay in patients with imminent and manifest graft rejection Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  1. Solar dynamic heat rejection technology. Task 1: System concept development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Eric; Carlson, Albert W.

    1987-01-01

    The results are presented of a concept development study of heat rejection systems for Space Station solar dynamic power systems. The heat rejection concepts are based on recent developments in high thermal transport capacity heat pipe radiators. The thermal performance and weights of each of the heat rejection subsystems is addressed in detail, and critical technologies which require development tests and evaluation for successful demonstration are assessed and identified. Baseline and several alternate heat rejection system configurations and optimum designs are developed for both Brayton and Rankine cycles. The thermal performance, mass properties, assembly requirements, reliability, maintenance requirements and life cycle cost are determined for each configuration. A specific design was then selected for each configuration which represents an optimum design for that configuration. The final recommendations of heat rejection system configuration for either the Brayton or Rankine cycles depend on the priorities established for the evaluation criteria.

  2. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  3. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the

  4. Rejection of micropollutants by clean and fouled forward osmosis membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, Rodrigo

    2011-12-01

    As forward osmosis (FO) gains attention as an efficient technology to improve wastewater reclamation processes, it is fundamental to determine the influence of fouling in the rejection of emerging contaminants (micropollutants). This study focuses on the rejection of 13 selected micropollutants, spiked in a secondary wastewater effluent, by a FO membrane, using Red Sea water as draw solution (DS), differentiating the effects on the rejection caused by a clean and fouled membrane. The resulting effluent was then desalinated at low pressure with a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane, to produce a high quality permeate and determine the rejection with a coupled forward osmosis - low pressure reverse osmosis (FO-LPRO) system. When considering only FO with a clean membrane, the rejection of the hydrophilic neutral compounds was between 48.6% and 84.7%, for the hydrophobic neutrals the rejection ranged from 40.0% to 87.5%, and for the ionic compounds the rejections were between 92.9% and 96.5%. With a fouled membrane, the rejections were between 44.6% and 95.2%, 48.7%-91.5% and 96.9%-98.6%, respectively. These results suggest that, except for the hydrophilic neutral compounds, the rejection of the micropollutants is increased by the presence of a fouling layer, possibly due to the higher hydrophilicity of the FO fouled membrane compared to the clean one, the increased adsorption capacity of hydrophilic compounds and reduced mass transport capacity, membrane swelling, and the higher negative charge of the membrane surface, related to the foulants composition, mainly NOM acids (carboxylic radicals) and polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances. However, when coupled with RO, the rejections in both cases increased above 96%. The coupled FO-LPRO system was an effective double barrier against the selected micropollutants. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Rejection of micropollutants by clean and fouled forward osmosis membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares Linares, Rodrigo; Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor; Li, Zhenyu; Amy, Gary

    2011-12-15

    As forward osmosis (FO) gains attention as an efficient technology to improve wastewater reclamation processes, it is fundamental to determine the influence of fouling in the rejection of emerging contaminants (micropollutants). This study focuses on the rejection of 13 selected micropollutants, spiked in a secondary wastewater effluent, by a FO membrane, using Red Sea water as draw solution (DS), differentiating the effects on the rejection caused by a clean and fouled membrane. The resulting effluent was then desalinated at low pressure with a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane, to produce a high quality permeate and determine the rejection with a coupled forward osmosis - low pressure reverse osmosis (FO-LPRO) system. When considering only FO with a clean membrane, the rejection of the hydrophilic neutral compounds was between 48.6% and 84.7%, for the hydrophobic neutrals the rejection ranged from 40.0% to 87.5%, and for the ionic compounds the rejections were between 92.9% and 96.5%. With a fouled membrane, the rejections were between 44.6% and 95.2%, 48.7%-91.5% and 96.9%-98.6%, respectively. These results suggest that, except for the hydrophilic neutral compounds, the rejection of the micropollutants is increased by the presence of a fouling layer, possibly due to the higher hydrophilicity of the FO fouled membrane compared to the clean one, the increased adsorption capacity of hydrophilic compounds and reduced mass transport capacity, membrane swelling, and the higher negative charge of the membrane surface, related to the foulants composition, mainly NOM acids (carboxylic radicals) and polysaccharides or polysaccharide-like substances. However, when coupled with RO, the rejections in both cases increased above 96%. The coupled FO-LPRO system was an effective double barrier against the selected micropollutants. PMID:22055122

  6. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  7. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation. PMID:26335204

  8. AN OVERVIEW ON NON-T CELL PATHWAYS IN TRANSPLANT REJECTION AND TOLERANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wentao; Li, Xian C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent studies have demonstrated unexpected roles for non-T cells, especially innate immune cells, in the regulation of transplant outcomes. In this review, we highlight our recent understanding on the role of NK cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages in the allograft response, and discuss whether such cells can be targeted for the induction of transplant tolerance. Recent findings There are unexpected roles for non-T cells in regulating transplant outcomes, and depending on the models and tolerizing protocols, the innate immune cells contribute significantly to both graft rejection and graft acceptance. Some innate immune cells are potent inflammatory cells directly mediating graft injury, while others regulate effector programs of alloreactive T cells and ultimately determine whether the graft is rejected or accepted. Furthermore, when properly activated, some innate immune cells promote the induction of Foxp3+ Tregs whereas others efficiently kill them, thereby differentially affecting the induction of tolerance. These new findings unravel unexpected complexities of non-T cells in transplant models and may have important clinical implications. Summary The innate immune cells contribute to both graft rejection and acceptance. Thus, a detailed understanding of the exact mechanisms and pathways that govern such opposing effects in transplant models may lead to the design of new tolerance protocols. PMID:20531193

  9. Studies of CTLA4Ig in acute rejection of pancreas transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junbo Yu; Zekuan Xu; Shuguang Han; Yi Miao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of CTLA4Ig in rejection of pancreaticoduodenal transplantation model of rat. Methods: Pancreaticoduodenal transplantion models were established from the donor F344 rats to the Lewis recipients. The models were divided into 2 groups: Group A and B with 12 rats in each group.2 days after transplantation, reciepients in group A were treated with i.p. injection of sailine, and those in group B CTLA4I were injected(200 μg). On day 1,4,7,10after transplantation, the grafts were harvested for histopathological examination. On day 4 after transplantation, the CD4+CD25+Tcells in the grafts were detected by Flow Cytometry. Results: Compared with group A: the degree of the rejection of grafts in group B was lower. The number of CD4+CD25+ T cells of graft was (7.91±1.26)% in group A and (13.81±1.71)% in group B, which had significant difference(P<0.01). Conclusion: CTLA4Ig could inhibit T cell costimulatory pathway, prevent acute rejection, which might be mediated by increasing the number of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

  10. Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deporzio, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the modification of bolometer detectors used in particle searches to veto or otherwise reject alpha radiation background and the statistical advantages of doing so. Several techniques are presented in detail - plastic film scintillator vetoes, metallic film ionization vetoes, and scintillating bolometer vetoes. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles representative of documented detector background. Photomultipliers detect this scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Layered metallic films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased to produce a current signal veto when incident 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Modified Zinc Molybdate Bolometers are used to produce scintillation light when stimulated by alpha background. Calibration of veto signal to background energy is presented. Results are used to quantify the statistical impact of such modifications on bolometer searches.

  11. Solar gains and thermal rejects by ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data recorded between September 1983 and February 1985 were analyzed in detail and the main results are as follows: • Solar radiation covers a large fraction of the daily heat load : in local climatic conditions, between October and June, solar energy provided for nearly 40 % of the heat load of the greenhouse. This amount represents 32 % of the incident radiation. • Thermal excesses that were ventilated during overheating periods (Tint > 24 °C) represent 37 % of the incident solar energy. However, due to the seasonal phase differences between the thermal need and the incident solar power, only half of these rejects could potentially be saved by a short term storage system. • A method was developed for determining the monthy net auxiliary consumption of the greenhouse. Solar gains were evaluated by means of a monthly utilization factor (ratio of the solar energy used divided by the absorbed solar energy in the greenhouse). This factor has been experimentally fitted to a function of the gain load ratio (ratio of absorbed solar energy divided by the daytime heat load). The above representation appears to be valid for any type of climate or greenhouse. • The model also takes into account the effect of wind and radiative heat losses to the sky and calculates the net auxiliary requirements within less than 10%. (author)

  12. Ferrite grade iron oxides from ore rejects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K S Rane; V M S Verenkar; P Y Sawant

    2001-06-01

    Iron oxyhydroxides and hydroxides were synthesized from chemically beneficiated high SiO2/Al2O3 low-grade iron ore (57.49% Fe2O3) rejects and heated to get iron oxides of 96–99.73% purity. The infrared band positions, isothermal weight loss and thermogravimetric and chemical analysis established the chemical formulas of iron-oxyhydroxides as -FeOOH.0.3H2O; -FeOOH.0.2H2O and amorphous FeOOH. The thermal products of all these were -Fe2O3 excepting that of -FeOOH.0.3H2O which gave mainly -Fe2O3 and some admixture of -Fe2O3. The hydrazinated iron hydroxides and oxyhydroxides, on the other hand, decomposed autocatalytically to mainly -Fe2O3. Hydrazine method modifies the thermal decomposition path of the hydroxides. The saturation magnetization, s, values were found to be in the range 60–71 emu g–1 which are close to the reported values for -Fe2O3. Mechanism of the -Fe2O3 formation by hydrazine method is discussed.

  13. Subclinical Rejection in Renal Transplantation: Reappraised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rajil; Sood, Puneet; Hariharan, Sundaram

    2016-08-01

    Short-term outcomes in renal transplantation have improved significantly in the past few years. However, the improvement in long-term outcomes has been modest. The reasons for graft failure beyond the first year of transplantation have been attributed to several different factors. We believe that subclinical rejection (SCR) may be 1 of the factors that contribute to graft loss in the long run. We also believe that there are data to suggest that SCR leads to progressive fibrosis and loss of graft function. This has been demonstrated even in patients who have mild degrees of subclinical inflammation. This review outlines the major studies that have been published on this important topic. It also outlines potential risk factors for the development of SCR. The current approach and diagnostic methods are discussed as well as their pros and cons. Newer noninvasive methods of diagnosis as well as molecular diagnostics and their merits and shortcomings are also discussed in some depth. Thus, the proposed state of the art review on SCR will create a renewed interest at all levels including transplant clinicians, transplant researchers, pharmaceutical industries as well as regulatory organizations. PMID:26985747

  14. Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deporzio, Nicholas; Cuore Collaboration

    This study presents the modification of bolometer detectors used in particle searches to veto or otherwise reject alpha radiation background and the statistical advantages of doing so. Several techniques are presented in detail - plastic film scintillator vetoes, metallic film ionization vetoes, and Cherenkov radiation vetoes. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles representative of documented detector background. Quantum dot based liquid scintillator is similarly bombarded to produce a background induced scintillation light. Photomultipliers detect this scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Layered metallic films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased to produce a current signal veto when incident 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Calibration of veto signal to background energy is presented. These findings are extrapolated to quantify the statistical impact of such modifications to bolometer searches. Effects of these techniques on experiment duration and signal-background ratio are discussed.

  15. Background Assay and Rejection in DRIFT

    CERN Document Server

    Brack, Jeff; Dorofeev, Alexei; Ezeribe, Anthony; Gauvreau, Jean-Luc; Gold, Michael; Harton, John; Lafler, Randy; Lauer, Robert; Lee, Eric R; Loomba, Dinesh; Matthews, John; Miller, Eric H; Monte, Alissa; Murphy, Alex; Paling, Sean; Phan, Nguyen; Sadler, Steve; Scarff, Andrew; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Spooner, Neil; Telfer, Sam; Walker, Daniel; Williams, Matt; Yuriev, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The DRIFT-IId dark matter detector is a m$^3$-scale low-pressure TPC with directional sensitivity to WIMP-induced nuclear recoils. Its primary backgrounds were due to alpha decays from contamination on the central cathode. Efforts to reduce these backgrounds led to replacing the 20 \\mu m wire central cathode with one constructed from 0.9 \\mu m aluminized mylar, which is almost totally transparent to alpha particles. Detailed modeling of the nature and origin of the remaining backgrounds led to an in-situ, ppt-sensitive assay of alpha decay backgrounds from the central cathode. This led to further improvements in the thin-film cathode resulting in over 2 orders of magnitude reduction in backgrounds compared to the wire cathode. Finally, the addition of O$_2$ to CS$_2$ gas was found to produce multiple species of electronegative charge carriers, providing a method to determine the absolute position of nuclear recoils and reject all known remaining backgrounds while retaining a high efficiency for nuclear recoil...

  16. Rejected by Peers--Attracted to Antisocial Media Content: Rejection-Based Anger Impairs Moral Judgment among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisier, Xanthe S.; Konijn, Elly A.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is an important developmental stage during which both peers and the media have a strong influence. Both peer rejection and the use of morally adverse media are associated with negative developmental outcomes. This study examines processes by which peer rejection might drive adolescents to select antisocial media content by tying…

  17. The antibody mining toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew RM; Kiss, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput ...

  18. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  19. Hepatitis A virus antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is presented of a radioimmunoassay designed to prove the presence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus (HA Ab, anti-Ha) using an Abbott HAVAB set. This proof as well as the proof of the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis B virus is based on competition between a normal antibody against hepatitis A virus and a 125I-labelled antibody for the binding sites of a specific antigen spread all over the surface of a tiny ball; this is then indirect proof of the antibody under investigation. The method is described of reading the results from the number of impulses per 60 seconds: the higher the titre of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in the serum examined, the lower the activity of the specimen concerned. The rate is reported of incidence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in a total of 68 convalescents after hepatitis A; the antibody was found in 94.1%. The immunoglobulin made from the convalescents' plasma showed the presence of antibodies in dilutions as high as 1:250 000 while the comparable ratio for normal immunoglobulin Norga was only 1:2500. Differences are discussed in the time incidence of the antibodies against the hepatitis A virus, the antibodies against the surface antigen of hepatitis B, and the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis V virus. (author)

  20. Detection of human leukocyte antigen compatibility and antibodies in liver transplantation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Qin Meng; Xuan Zhang; Jun Fan; Lin Zhou; Bing Hao; Xiao-Ming Chen; Wei-Hang Ma; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The exact roles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility, HLA antibodies and underlying diseases in acute rejection of liver transplants are not clear. Moreover, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, one of the most common infections after transplantation, is related to HLA genotype and the incidence of acute rejection. METHODS: Since there are controversial reports, we analyzed the impact of HLA matching, HLA antibodies and underlying diseases in 38 liver transplant recipients in China, and assessed the association of CMV infection and HLA compatibility. RESULTS: The frequency of no HLA compatibility was high in patients without antigenemia (P=0.019). All 17 patients with HLA-A matching developed antigenemia (P0.05). In patients with acute rejection, no differences were found in the incidence of acute rejection in transplants for hepatitis B, tumors, or combined hepatitis B and tumors (P>0.05).CONCLUSIONS: There are fewer acute rejections in transplants with more HLA compatibilities. Speciifc investigations of underlying diseases and HLA typing may be necessary in liver transplantation. The mechanisms of CMV infection and HLA matching should be further studied. HLA before transplantation should be examined for the prevention of acute rejection and CMV infection.

  1. Immunological tolerance and tumor rejection in embryo-aggregated chimeric mice – Lessons for tumor immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejection of transplanted tumors by the immune system is a rare event in syngeneic hosts, and is considered to be dependent on the local interaction of defensive immune reactions and tumor tolerance mechanisms. Here, we have enlisted the aid of a unique set of embryo-aggregated lineage chimeric mice derived from C57/BL6 and FVB donors to study the interplay between local and systemic tumor immunity and tolerance in rejection of mouse B16 melanoma cells, syngeneic to the C57/BL6 donor strain. Two variants of embryo-aggregated chimeric mice with either variable or no contribution of C57-derived cells to their skin were generated by the fusion of different ratios of morula stage blastomers. Chimeric mice were analyzed for s.c. growth of B16 tumors in comparison to their respective donor strains as well as normal F1 hybrids, and the relative frequencies of cellular components of the immune system by FACS analysis of peripheral blood or lymph node cells. B16 tumors grew significantly faster in mice with full chimerism in their skin as compared to syngeneic C57 or semi-syngeneic C57 × FVB F1 hosts. In contrast, s.c. tumor growth was either absent or significantly reduced in chimeric mice lacking C57-derived cells in their skin, but tolerant to C57 tissue in other organs. Comparison of the relative frequencies of various immune cells in the periphery via FACS-analysis did not reveal any significant differences between the two types of chimeric mice with respect to their donor strains. Our data suggest a complex interplay between mechanisms of local peripheral tolerance and innate antitumor mechanisms possibly involving NK cell allorecognition as a basis for the differential growth or rejection of B16 tumors in these unique chimeric mice, which we suggest to constitute a valuable new model system for the study of immune-mediated tumor rejection

  2. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, 67Ga and 131I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  3. Cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J; Arita, Y; Bystryn, J C

    1993-06-01

    Patients with vitiligo have been found to have circulating antibodies to pigment cells. To evaluate the functional activity of these antibodies, a highly sensitive europium release assay was used to compare complement-mediated cytolysis of human melanocytes by sera of 56 patients with vitiligo (20 with active disease, 25 with inactive disease, 11 with unidentified disease activity) and 47 control individuals. Significant melanocyte lysis was mediated by 32 (57%) of the patients with vitiligo but by only three (6%) of the control sera (p < 0.001), and by 17 (85%) of 20 patients with active vitiligo versus 11 (44%) of 25 patients with inactive disease (p < 0.025). Mean melanocyte lysis by vitiligo sera was 24% versus 6% by control sera (p < 0.0001). A subset of 12 vitiligo sera with high titers of cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes (34% mean cytolysis) reacted minimally (< 2% mean cytolysis) to a panel of control cells that included human and murine melanomas, human fibroblasts, lung carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. These findings indicate that antibodies present in patients with vitiligo have the functional ability to selectively kill melanocytes and are more common in active disease. These observations support, but do not prove, the hypothesis that vitiligo is an autoimmune disease and that anti-pigment cell antibodies have a role in inducing the disease. PMID:8496621

  4. Detection of cardiac transplant rejection with radiolabeled lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether rejections of cardiac transplants could be detected specifically and non-invasively by lymphocytes labeled with indium-111 (111In), we studied 36 allogeneic and 14 isogeneic heterotopic cardiac transplants in rats. Allogeneic grafts accumulated autologous 111In-lymphocytes, detectable scintigraphically 24 hours after i.v. injection of the labeled cells. At the time of peak histologic rejection, the allogeneic grafts accumulated 92. +/- 4.8 times more activity than the native hearts (determined by well counting). The tissue-to-blood ratio in the rejecting transplants was 3.7 +/- 2.2; total uptake by the graft was 2.9 +/- 2.1% of the injected dose. Autoradiography confirmed that graft radioactivity was associated with labeled lymphocytes. In contrast, isogeneic grafts showed no signs of rejection and did not accumulate radioactivity. Because conventionally isolated and labeled lymphocytes are often contaminated with platelets, we prepared both 111In-platelets and purified 111In-lymphocytes for use in additional experiments. Allogeneic grafts accumulated platelets and purified lymphocytes independently. Thus, deposition of immunologically active cells in the rejecting graft representing specific pathophysiologic events can be detected. The results suggest that rejection of cardiac transplants can be detected noninvasively, potentially facilitating objective early clinical detection of rejection and titration of antirejection therapy

  5. Detection of cardiac transplant rejection with radiolabeled lymphocytes. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, S.R.; Lerch, R.A.; Carlson, E.M.; Saffitz, J.E.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-03-01

    To determine whether rejections of cardiac transplants could be detected specifically and non-invasively by lymphocytes labeled with indium-111 (111In), we studied 36 allogeneic and 14 isogeneic heterotopic cardiac transplants in rats. Allogeneic grafts accumulated autologous 111In-lymphocytes, detectable scintigraphically 24 hours after i.v. injection of the labeled cells. At the time of peak histologic rejection, the allogeneic grafts accumulated 92. +/- 4.8 times more activity than the native hearts (determined by well counting). The tissue-to-blood ratio in the rejecting transplants was 3.7 +/- 2.2; total uptake by the graft was 2.9 +/- 2.1% of the injected dose. Autoradiography confirmed that graft radioactivity was associated with labeled lymphocytes. In contrast, isogeneic grafts showed no signs of rejection and did not accumulate radioactivity. Because conventionally isolated and labeled lymphocytes are often contaminated with platelets, we prepared both 111In-platelets and purified 111In-lymphocytes for use in additional experiments. Allogeneic grafts accumulated platelets and purified lymphocytes independently. Thus, deposition of immunologically active cells in the rejecting graft representing specific pathophysiologic events can be detected. The results suggest that rejection of cardiac transplants can be detected noninvasively, potentially facilitating objective early clinical detection of rejection and titration of antirejection therapy.

  6. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective evaluation of In-111 labeled autologous platelet scintigraphy for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection was undertaken. To date, 28 consecutive patients between 7 and 14 days post-op have been injected with 500μCi of In-111 platelets followed by imaging at 24 and 48 hours. Activity within the renal transplant exceeding activity in the adjacent iliac vessels was considered to be evidence of rejection, and both chemical evidence and clinical impression of rejection at 5 days after completion of imaging was accepted as proof of ongoing or incipient rejection at the time of scintigraphy. In addition, to visual inspection, independent quantitative analysis compared the area-normalized activity over the transplant with the adjacent iliac vessels (normal <1.0). For 5 patients, positive In-111 scintigraphy was present before convincing clinical evidence of rejection. In-111 platelet scintigraphy is useful not only to confirm the clinical diagnosis of rejection but also to establish the early, pre-clinical diagnosis of incipient acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

  7. Early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisdale, P.L.; Collier, B.D.; Kauffman, H.M.; Adams, M.B.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Rao, S.A.; Joestgen, T.; Krohn, L.

    1985-05-01

    A prospective evaluation of In-111 labeled autologous platelet scintigraphy for the early diagnosis of acute postoperative renal transplant rejection was undertaken. To date, 28 consecutive patients between 7 and 14 days post-op have been injected with 500..mu..Ci of In-111 platelets followed by imaging at 24 and 48 hours. Activity within the renal transplant exceeding activity in the adjacent iliac vessels was considered to be evidence of rejection, and both chemical evidence and clinical impression of rejection at 5 days after completion of imaging was accepted as proof of ongoing or incipient rejection at the time of scintigraphy. In addition, to visual inspection, independent quantitative analysis compared the area-normalized activity over the transplant with the adjacent iliac vessels (normal <1.0). For 5 patients, positive In-111 scintigraphy was present before convincing clinical evidence of rejection. In-111 platelet scintigraphy is useful not only to confirm the clinical diagnosis of rejection but also to establish the early, pre-clinical diagnosis of incipient acute postoperative renal transplant rejection.

  8. Rejection of Organic Micropollutants by Clean and Fouled Nanofiltration Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rejection of organic micropollutants, including three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and three phthalic acid esters (PAEs, by clean and fouled nanofiltration membranes was investigated in the present study. The rejection of organic micropollutants by clean NF90 membranes varied from 87.9 to more than 99.9%, while that of NF270 membranes ranged from 32.1 to 92.3%. Clear time-dependence was observed for the rejection of hydrophobic micropollutants, which was attributed to the adsorption of micropollutants on the membrane. Fouling with humic acid had a negligible influence on the rejection of organic micropollutants by NF90 membranes, while considerable effects were observed with NF270 membranes, which are significantly looser than NF90 membranes. The observed enhancement in the rejection of organic micropollutants by fouled NF270 membranes was attributed to pore blocking, which was a dominating fouling mechanism for loose NF membranes. Changes in the ionic strength (from 10 to 20 mM reduced micropollutant rejection by both fouled NF membranes, especially for the rejection of dimethyl phthalate and diethyl phthalate by NF270 membranes (from 65.8 to 25.0% for dimethyl phthalate and 75.6 to 33.3% for diethyl phthalate.

  9. Organ transplant tissue rejection: detection and staging by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Whitehead, Peter D.; McManus, Bruce; Zeng, Haishan; Wilson-McManus, Janet; MacKinnon, Nick; Morgan, David C.; Dong, Chunming; Gerla, Paul; Kenyon, Jennifer

    1998-07-01

    Patients receiving heart or other organ transplants usually require some level of anti-rejection drug therapy, most commonly cyclosporine. The rejection status of the organ must be monitored to determine the optimal anti-rejection drug therapy. The current method for monitoring post-transplant rejection status of heart transplant patients consists of taking biopsies from the right ventricle. In this work we have developed a system employing optical and signal-processing techniques that will allow a cardiologist to measure spectral changes associated with tissue rejection using an optical catheter probe. The system employs time gated illumination and detection systems to deal with the dynamic signal acquisition problems associated with in vivo measurements of a beating heart. Spectral data processing software evaluates and processes the data to produce a simple numerical score. Results of measurements made on 100 excised transplanted isograft and allograft rat hearts have demonstrated the ability of the system to detect the presence of rejection and to accurately correlate the spectroscopic results with the ISHLT (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) stage of rejection determined by histopathology. In vivo measurements using a pig transplant model are now in process.

  10. Neutralizing antibodies in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirjam B Zeisel; Samira Fafi-Kremer; Isabel Fofana; Heidi Barth; Fran(c)oise Stoll-Keller; Michel Doffo(e)l; Thomas F Baumert

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of hepatitis world-wide. The majority of infected individuals develop chronic hepatitis which can then progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous viral clearance occurs in about 20%-30% of acutely infected individuals and results in resolution of infection without sequaelae. Both viral and host factors appear to play an important role for resolution of acute infection. A large body of evidence suggests that a strong, multispecific and long-lasting cellular immune response appears to be important for control of viral infection in acute hepatitis C. Due too the lack of convenient neutralization assays,the impact of neutralizing responses for control of viral infection had been less defined. In recent years, the development of robust tissue culture model systems for HCV entry and infection has finally allowed study of antibody-mediated neutralization and to gain further insights into viral targets of host neutralizing responses.In addition, detailed analysis of antibody-mediated neutralization in individual patients as well as cohorts with well defined viral isolates has enabled the study of neutralizing responses in the course of HCV infection and characterization of the impact of neutralizing antibodies for control of viral infection. This review will summarize recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralization and its impact for HCV pathogenesis.(C) 2007 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamida Fethi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute rejection episodes (AREs are a major determinant of renal allograft survival. The incorporation of new immunosuppressive agents explains, at least partially, the improvement seen in the results of transplantation in recent years. The objectives of this study are to analyze the incidence and severity of AREs, their risk factors and their influence on graft and patient survival. We retrospectively studied 280 kidney transplants performed in adults at the Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, between 1986 and 2004. The diagnosis of ARE was based on clinical data and response to treatment. Allograft biopsies were performed in ten cases. The treatment of AREs consisted of pulse methylprednisolone and anti-thymocyte globulin. There were 186 males (66.4% and 94 females (33.6%, and their mean age was 31 ± 8.9 years. Overall, the 280 study patients experienced a total of 113 AREs. Of them, 85 had only one ARE, 28 had two to three and none had more than three AREs. A total of 68 AREs were completely re-versible, 42 were partially reversible while three could not be reversed with treatment. The mean inci-dence of AREs was 40.4%. The incidence was > 45% between 1986 and 1997, decreased to 20.5% between 1998 and 2000 and to 9% between 2001 and 2004. Graft survival rates in patients with and without AREs were respectively 91% and 93% at three years, 82% and 90% at five years and 73% and 83% at 10 years. We found a decrease in the incidence of AREs in recent years in our study patients, and this was related to the introduction of sensitized cross-match and the newer immunosuppressive agents, particularly MMF. Additionally, AREs had a deleterious impact on late graft survival in our study population.

  12. Time elapsed after transplantation influences the relationship between the number of regulatory T cells in lung allograft biopsies and subsequent acute rejection episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Dorrit; Iversen, Martin; Martinussen, Torben;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) play an important role in acute rejection after lung transplantation. However, the importance of the time elapsed after transplantation on the Treg response requires further investigation.We aim to evaluate the change over time in the frequency of Tregs...... in lung allograft biopsies and to assess how Tregs relate to simultaneous and subsequent acute cellular rejection. Materials and methods: A total of 258 biopsy samples obtained 0.5, 1, 3, 12 and 24. months after transplantation from 58 consecutive lung transplant patients were included. The biopsies...... were scored for acute rejection according to the ISHLT criteria (A0-A4) and immunohistochemically stained with antibodies against FoxP3. Results: There was a tendency for a decrease in the number of Tregs/mm2 with time. However, the previous levels of Tregs/mm2 did not have any significant effect on...

  13. Administration of an anti-interleukin 2 receptor monoclonal antibody prolongs cardiac allograft survival in mice

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Administration of the monoclonal antibody M7/20, which binds to the murine interleukin-2 (IL) receptor, significantly prolongs cardiac allograft survival in two H-2-incompatible strain combinations of inbred mice. The results support the important role of the IL-2 receptor in the mechanism of graft rejection, and suggest its suitability as a target for immunosuppressive therapy.

  14. SCHEDULING WITH REJECTION AND NON-IDENTICAL JOB ARRIVALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang CAO; Yuzhong ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we address the scheduling problem with rejection and non-identical job arrivals, in which we may choose not to process certain jobs and each rejected job incurs a penalty.Our goal is to minimize the sum of the total penalties of the rejected jobs and the maximum completion time of the processed ones. For the off-line variant, we prove its NP-hardness and present a PTAS, and for the on-line special case with two job arrivals, we design a best possible algorithm with competitive ratio (√5+1)/2.

  15. Suicide Screening for Prisoners: An Ethical Critique of Research Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, David; Burgermeister, Diane M

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective review of medical records was proposed to examine mental health staff compliance with documentation of a suicide assessment tool according to institutional policy on suicide screening within a U.S. correctional facility. A shift in focus was necessary when the proposed study was rejected by the institutional review board. Reasons for the rejection included low perceived benefit versus greater risk to the correctional facility and the need for prisoner informed consent, albeit the design was a retrospective medical record review. Because of this rejection, ethical issues in the prevention of suicide in prisons were examined with implications for the forensic nurse leading quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26910268

  16. Not self-focused attention but negative beliefs affect poor social performance in social anxiety : An investigation of pathways in the social anxiety-social rejection relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voncken, Marisol J.; Dijk, Corine; de Jong, Peter J.; Roelofs, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) not only fear negative evaluation but are indeed less likeable than people without SAD. Previous research shows social performance to mediate this social anxiety-social rejection relationship. This study studied two pathways hypothesized to lead to poor so

  17. Early detection of rejection and assessment of cyclosporine therapy by 111In antimyosin imaging in mouse heart allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mice (n = 58) with abdominal heterotopic heart transplants were studied to examine the effectiveness of 111In-labeled antimyosin scintigraphy in the detection of rejection and to determine the consequence of cyclosporine therapy on the results. Allografts from B10D2 donors were transplanted into B6AF1 recipients. Of the 49 allografted mice, 19 were treated with cyclosporine (15 mg/kg.day). Nine isografted mice served as controls. Scintigraphy was performed by injecting 100 muCi 111In antimyosin monoclonal antibody 2-15 days after transplantation. An increase in the ratio of percent dose of antimyosin injected per gram (% dose/g) of the grafted heart (G) to that of the autologous heart (A) (G/A) as well as the increasing percent dose per gram of antimyosin in the grafts reflected the severity of histopathological rejection regardless of the presence or absence of cyclosporine. Scintigraphic images demonstrated unequivocally intense accumulation of 111In in rejected allografts as confirmed by histologically demonstrable myocyte necrosis. The G/A ratio in allografted mice with mildly deteriorated mechanical activity (4.2 ± 1.0, mean ± SD) was greater than that in mice with normal contractility (1.8 ± 0.7) (p less than 0.001), and the necrosis correlated with this modest decline in mechanical function could be scintigraphically identified. Of mice with normally contracting allografts, the G/A ratio was greater in animals with demonstrated myocyte necrosis (2.6 ± 0.5) than in those without necrosis (1.5 ± 0.5) (p less than 0.001). In contrast, isografted mice or a subset of allografted mice treated with cyclosporine and not showing evidence of rejection did not manifest any significant change in G/A ratio, nor did they have scintigrams positive for rejection as late as 15 days after transplantation

  18. Diagnosis of Rejection by Analyzing Ventricular Late Potentials in Heart Transplant Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vítor Nogueira Mendes; Telmo Santos Pereira; Vítor Azevedo Matos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart transplant rejection originates slow and fragmented conduction. Signal-averaged ECG (SAECG) is a stratification method in the risk of rejection. Objective: To develop a risk score for rejection, using SAECG variables. Methods: We studied 28 transplant patients. First, we divided the sample into two groups based on the occurrence of acute rejection (5 with rejection and 23 without). In a second phase, we divided the sample considering the existence or not of rejection in at...

  19. Antibody engineering: facing new challenges in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura SANZ; (A)ngel M CUESTA; Marta COMPTE; Luis (A)LVAREZ-VALLINA

    2005-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics are beginning to realize the promise enclosed in their early denomination as "magic bullets". Initial disappointment has turned into clinical and commercial success, and engineered antibodies currently represent over 30% of biopharmaceuticals in clinical trials. Recent structural and functional data have allowed the design of a new generation of therapeutic antibodies, with strategies ranging from complement-mediated and antibody-dependant cellular cytotoxicity enhancement to improved cytotoxic payloads using toxins, drugs,radionucleids and viral delivery. This review considers the structure of different types of recombinant antibodies, their mechanism of action and how their efficacy has been increased using a broad array of approaches. We will also focus on the additional benefits offered by the use of gene therapy methods for the in vivo production of therapeutic antibodies.

  20. Engineering broadly neutralizing antibodies for HIV prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Casey K; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2016-08-01

    A combination of advances spanning from isolation to delivery of potent HIV-specific antibodies has begun to revolutionize understandings of antibody-mediated antiviral activity. As a result, the set of broadly neutralizing and highly protective antibodies has grown in number, diversity, potency, and breadth of viral recognition and neutralization. These antibodies are now being further enhanced by rational engineering of their anti-HIV activities and coupled to cutting edge gene delivery and strategies to optimize their pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. As a result, the prospects for clinical use of HIV-specific antibodies to treat, clear, and prevent HIV infection are gaining momentum. Here we discuss the diverse methods whereby antibodies are being optimized for neutralization potency and breadth, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and effector function with the aim of revolutionizing HIV treatment and prevention options. PMID:26827912

  1. Soluble OX40L favors tumor rejection in CT26 colon carcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrovskaya, Ekaterina O; Yuzhakova, Diana V; Ryumina, Alina P; Druzhkova, Irina N; Sharonov, George V; Kotlobay, Alexey A; Zagaynova, Elena V; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Shirmanova, Marina V

    2016-08-01

    OX40 receptor-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) populate tumors and suppress a variety of immune cells, posing a major obstacle for cancer immunotherapy. Different ways to functionally inactivate Tregs by triggering OX40 receptor have been suggested, including anti-OX40 antibodies and Fc:OX40L fusion proteins. To investigate whether the soluble extracellular domain of OX40L (OX40Lexo) is sufficient to enhance antitumor immune response, we generated an OX40Lexo-expressing CT26 colon carcinoma cell line and studied its tumorigenicity in immunocompetent BALB/c and T cell deficient nu/nu mice. We found that soluble OX40L expressed in CT26 colon carcinoma favors the induction of an antitumor response which is not limited just to cells co-expressing EGFP as an antigenic determinant, but also eliminates CT26 cells expressing another fluorescent protein, KillerRed. Tumor rejection required the presence of T lymphocytes, as indicated by the unhampered tumor growth in nu/nu mice. Subsequent re-challenge of tumor-free BALB/c mice with CT26 EGFP cells resulted in no tumor growth, which is indicative of the formation of immunological memory. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from mice that successfully rejected CT26 OX40Lexo EGFP tumors to naïve mice conferred 100% resistance to subsequent challenge with the CT26 EGFP tumor. PMID:27203665

  2. Non-clairvoyant weighted flow time scheduling with rejection penalty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Ho-Leung; Chan, Sze-Hang; Lam, Tak-Wah;

    2012-01-01

    This paper initiates the study of online scheduling with rejection penalty in the non-clairvoyant setting, i.e., the size (processing time) of a job is not assumed to be known at its release time. In the rejection penalty model, jobs can be rejected with a penalty, and the user cost of a job is...... defined as the weighted flow time of the job plus the penalty if it is rejected before completion. Previous work on minimizing the total user cost focused on the clairvoyant single-processor setting [BBC+03,CLL11] and has produced O(1)-competitive online algorithm for jobs with arbitrary weights and...... results assume a processor running at a fixed speed. This paper shows more interesting results on extending the above study to the dynamic speed scaling model, where the processor can vary the speed dynamically and the rate of energy consumption is an arbitrary increasing function of speed. A scheduling...

  3. Prediction of acute cardiac rejection using radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide scanning of the donor left ventricle using technetium-99m-labelled red cells was used to monitor acute rejection after heterotopic heart transplantation and compared with histopathological evidence of rejection obtained at examination of an endomyocardial biopsy specimen. The ejection fraction and end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes were calculated at each examination; an equation was derived from these data to predict the degree of acute rejection, using histopathological examination of endomyocardial biopsy specimens as criteria of the presence and severity of rejection. A highly significant multiple correlation between radionuclide scanning parameters and endomyocardial biopsy was found. The advantages of non-invasive radionuclide scanning over the invasive procedure of endomyocardial biopsy are discussed

  4. Prediction of acute cardiac rejection using radionuclide techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novitzky, D.; Bonioszczuk, J.; Cooper, D.K.C.; Isaacs, S.; Rose, A.G.; Smith, J.A.; Uys, C.J.; Barnard, C.N.; Fraser, R. (Cape Town Univ. (South Africa))

    1984-01-07

    Radionuclide scanning of the donor left ventricle using technetium-99m-labelled red cells was used to monitor acute rejection after heterotopic heart transplantation and compared with histopathological evidence of rejection obtained at examination of an endomyocardial biopsy specimen. The ejection fraction and end-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes were calculated at each examination; an equation was derived from these data to predict the degree of acute rejection, using histopathological examination of endomyocardial biopsy specimens as criteria of the presence and severity of rejection. A highly significant multiple correlation between radionuclide scanning parameters and endomyocardial biopsy was found. The advantages of non-invasive radionuclide scanning over the invasive procedure of endomyocardial biopsy are discussed.

  5. Community rejection following sexual assault as ‘forced migration’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Morgen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available When women are banished from their communities following sexual assault, this rejection should be considered an act of forced migration by the administrators of truth commission reparations programmes.

  6. The sequential rejection principle of familywise error control

    OpenAIRE

    Goeman, Jelle J.; Solari, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Closed testing and partitioning are recognized as fundamental principles of familywise error control. In this paper, we argue that sequential rejection can be considered equally fundamental as a general principle of multiple testing. We present a general sequentially rejective multiple testing procedure and show that many well-known familywise error controlling methods can be constructed as special cases of this procedure, among which are the procedures of Holm, Shaffer and Hochberg, parallel...

  7. Experimental diabetes exacerbates skin transplant rejection in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Flávio Pola dos Reis; Angelo Sementilli; Antonio Ricardo de Toledo Gagliardi

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of chronic experimental diabetes on skin allografts in rats as a simple model that could clarify some basic aspects and mechanisms involved in transplant rejection in diabetes compared to normal animals. METHODS: Skin grafting was performed with fragments of tail skin from sex matched non diabetic Wistar rats engrafted onto the thoracic area of diabetic and non diabetic recipients. Grafts were scored for rejection every other day and were removed on day 14. ...

  8. Cellular and Functional Imaging of Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yijen L.; Ye, Qing; Ho, Chien

    2011-01-01

    Heart transplantation is now an established treatment for patients suffering from end-stage heart diseases. With the advances in immunosuppressive treatment, the survival rate for transplant patients has improved greatly. However, allograft rejection, both acute and chronic, after heart transplantation is still a limitation leading to morbidity and mortality. The current clinical gold standard for screening rejection is endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), which is not only invasive, but also error-p...

  9. Liver Transplant Rejection: Angiographic Findings in 35 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    White, Robert M.; Zajko, Albert B.; Demetris, A Jake; Bron, Klaus M.; DEKKER, ANDREW; Starzl, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    Rejection, the leading cause of liver allograft dysfunction, is usually detected by liver biopsy. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are angiographic findings that correlate with this posttransplantation complication. In a retrospective study, the angiograms of 35 patients with histologically proven allograft rejection were reviewed. The examinations were done because of suspected posttransplantation vascular complications. Abnormal hepatic arteriograms were observed in 30 (8...

  10. Main feed water pump NPSH control during load rejection transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper introduces the damage to the Main feed water pump because of pump cavitation, analysis the disadvantaged impact of pressure reducing during load rejection transient condition, and the characteristic for Main feedwater pump NPSH during load rejection transient condition; summarizes the characteristics of Main feedwater pump NPSH comparing to NPQJVC. What's more, this paper has a lot for commissioning and running the Main feedwater pump. (author)

  11. On Properties of Update Sequences Based on Causal Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Eiter, T.; Fink, M; Sabbatini, G; Tompits, H.

    2001-01-01

    We consider an approach to update nonmonotonic knowledge bases represented as extended logic programs under answer set semantics. New information is incorporated into the current knowledge base subject to a causal rejection principle enforcing that, in case of conflicts, more recent rules are preferred and older rules are overridden. Such a rejection principle is also exploited in other approaches to update logic programs, e.g., in dynamic logic programming by Alferes et al. We give a thoroug...

  12. Performance Evaluation of Air-Based Heat Rejection Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hannes Fugmann; Björn Nienborg; Gregor Trommler; Antoine Dalibard; Lena Schnabel

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the Number of Transfer Units (NTU) method a functional relation between electric power for fans/pumps and effectiveness in dry coolers and wet cooling towers is developed. Based on this relation, a graphical presentation method of monitoring and simulation data of heat rejection units is introduced. The functional relation allows evaluating the thermodynamic performance of differently sized heat rejection units and comparing performance among them. The method is used to evalua...

  13. Fate of manuscripts rejected for publication in the AJR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, F S

    1991-03-01

    The fate of rejected manuscripts that were originally submitted to the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) during the first 5 months of 1986 was investigated to learn whether, when, and where they had been published. AJR, a peer-reviewed journal of diagnostic radiology with a circulation of over 21,000, annually publishes about 500 papers and receives over 11,500 citations. MEDLINE searches conducted 45 to 54 months after the dates of rejection by AJR located 162 (64%) published papers out of a consecutive series of 254 manuscripts rejected by AJR, including 69% of the rejected major papers and 62% of the rejected case reports. The papers had been published in 30 different radiologic and 27 different nonradiologic journals. Most of these journals published fewer papers, had smaller circulations, and had lower impact factors (a ratio of citations received to papers published) than AJR does. The mean time lapse between rejection by AJR and publication in other journals was 15 months. The delay in publication was greater for papers published in nonradiologic and foreign journals than for papers published in radiologic and American journals. The results of this study indicate that rejection of a manuscript by a peer-reviewed journal such as AJR delays but by no means precludes publication. At least 82% of the major papers and 70% of the case reports that are submitted to AJR are eventually published, either in AJR or elsewhere. Because a scientific paper represents not only many hours of writing and manuscript preparation but also a great investment of research time and resources, authors are reluctant to abandon rejected manuscripts. In the majority of cases, submission to other journals gains acceptance and publication. PMID:1899764

  14. Experimental quantum error rejection for long-distance quantum communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We report an experimental realization of bit-flip error rejection for error-free transfer of quantum information through a noisy quantum channel. In the experiment, an unknown state to be transmitted is encoded into a two- photon entangled state, which is then sent through the engineered noisy quantum channel. At the final stage, the unknown state was decoded by a quantum parity measurement, successfully rejecting the erroneous transmission over the noisy quantum channel. (author)

  15. Maternal Predictors of Rejecting Parenting and Early Adolescent Antisocial Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Trentacosta, Christopher J.; Shaw, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined relations among maternal psychological resources, rejecting parenting, and early adolescent antisocial behavior in a sample of 231 low-income mothers and their sons with longitudinal assessments from age 18 months to 12 years. The maternal resources examined were age at first birth, aggressive personality, and empathy. Each of the maternal resources predicted rejecting parenting during early childhood in structural equation models that controlled for toddler difficu...

  16. Choice, Rejection, and Elaboration on Preference-Inconsistent Alternatives

    OpenAIRE

    Juliano Laran; Keith Wilcox

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that rejecting product alternatives (i.e., choosing which alternatives to give up) may cause preference reversals compared to choosing alternatives. We provide an investigation into the psychological processes underlying this phenomenon. These preference reversals can be caused by increased elaboration on the features of preference-inconsistent alternatives when people reject alternatives. When these features are appealing, increased elaboration increases pr...

  17. The Pathology of Lung Allograft Rejection: A Concise Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anja Roden; Henry Tazelaar

    2012-01-01

    Lung transplantations in humans have been performed for almost 50 years. However, allograft rejection, non-rejection diseases such as harvest/reperfusion injury, infection, drug toxicity, post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases, and recurrent disease are still significant complications. Although the clinical impression might suggest the possibility of any of these conditions, tissue diagnosis is usually necessary to establish a definitive diagnosis. This article mainly focuses on reviewi...

  18. Systemic CD8+ T cell-mediated tumoricidal effects by intratumoral treatment of oncolytic herpes simplex virus with the agonistic monoclonal antibody for murine glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiya Ishihara

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy combined with immunomodulators is a novel noninvasive strategy for cancer treatment. In this study, we examined the tumoricidal effects of oncolytic HF10, a naturally occurring mutant of herpes simplex virus type-1, combined with an agonistic DTA-1 monoclonal antibody specific for the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor. Two murine tumor models were used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacies of HF10 virotherapy combined with DTA-1. The kinetics and immunological mechanisms of DTA-1 in HF10 infection were examined using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Intratumoral administration of HF10 in combination with DTA-1 at a low dose resulted in a more vigorous attenuation of growth of the untreated contralateral as well as the treated tumors than treatment with either HF10 or DTA-1 alone. An accumulation of CD8(+ T cells, including tumor- and herpes simplex virus type-1-specific populations, and a decrease in the number of CD4(+ Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells were seen in both HF10- and DTA-1-treated tumors. Studies using Fc-digested DTA-1 and Fcγ receptor knockout mice demonstrated the direct participation of DTA-1 in regulatory T cell depletion by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity primarily via macrophages. These results indicated the potential therapeutic efficacy of a glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-specific monoclonal antibody in oncolytic virotherapy at local tumor sites.

  19. Higher boron rejection with a new TFC forward osmosis membrane

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, Rodrigo

    2014-07-17

    Due to the stringent limits for boron in drinking and irrigation water, water treatment facilities have to incur additional treatment to remove boron down to a safe concentration. Forward osmosis (FO) is a membrane technology that may reduce the energy required to remove boron present in seawater. In direct FO desalination hybrid systems, fresh water is recovered from seawater using a recoverable draw solution, FO membranes are expected to show high boron rejection. This study focuses on determining the boron rejection capabilities of a new generation thin-film composite (TFC) FO membrane compared to a first generation cellulose triacetate (CTA) FO membrane. The effects of water permeate flux, membrane structure, draw solute charge, and reverse solute flux on boron rejection were determined. For TFC and CTA FO membranes, experiments showed that when similar operating conditions are applied (e.g. membrane type and draw solute type) boron rejection decreases with increase in permeate flux. Reverse draw solute flux and membrane fouling have no significant impact on boron rejection. Compared to the first generation CTA FO membrane operated at the same conditions, the TFC FO membrane showed a 40% higher boron rejection capability and a 20% higher water flux. This demonstrates the potential for boron removal for new generation TFC FO membranes. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  20. The private rejection of unfair offers and emotional commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Toshio; Horita, Yutaka; Takagishi, Haruto; Shinada, Mizuho; Tanida, Shigehito; Cook, Karen S

    2009-07-14

    In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that certain players of an economic game reject unfair offers even when this behavior increases rather than decreases inequity. A substantial proportion (30-40%, compared with 60-70% in the standard ultimatum game) of those who responded rejected unfair offers even when rejection reduced only their own earnings to 0, while not affecting the earnings of the person who proposed the unfair split (in an impunity game). Furthermore, even when the responders were not able to communicate their anger to the proposers by rejecting unfair offers in a private impunity game, a similar rate of rejection was observed. The rejection of unfair offers that increases inequity cannot be explained by the social preference for inequity aversion or reciprocity; however, it does provide support for the model of emotion as a commitment device. In this view, emotions such as anger or moral disgust lead people to disregard the immediate consequences of their behavior, committing them to behave consistently to preserve integrity and maintain a reputation over time as someone who is reliably committed to this behavior. PMID:19564602