WorldWideScience

Sample records for antibody induced autoimmunity

  1. Presence of Autoimmune Antibody in Chikungunya Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirach Maek-a-nantawat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya infection has recently re-emerged as an important arthropod-borne disease in Thailand. Recently, Southern Thailand was identified as a potentially endemic area for the chikungunya virus. Here, we report a case of severe musculoskeletal complication, presenting with muscle weakness and swelling of the limbs. During the investigation to exclude autoimmune muscular inflammation, high titers of antinuclear antibody were detected. This is the report of autoimmunity detection associated with an arbovirus infection. The symptoms can mimic autoimmune polymyositis disease, and the condition requires close monitoring before deciding to embark upon prolonged specific treatment with immunomodulators.

  2. Drug-Induced Bullous Sweet Syndrome with Multiple Autoimmune Features

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Sweet syndrome (SS) (Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis) has been reported in association with autoimmune phenomena including relapsing polychondritis, drug-induced lupus, and the development of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs). However, a combination of these autoimmune features has not been reported. Herein, we report a case of drug-induced bullous SS with ocular and mucosal involvement, glomerulonephritis, and multiple autoimmune features including clinical polychondritis w...

  3. Drug-Induced Bullous Sweet Syndrome with Multiple Autoimmune Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared J. Lund

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet syndrome (SS (Acute Febrile Neutrophilic Dermatosis has been reported in association with autoimmune phenomena including relapsing polychondritis, drug-induced lupus, and the development of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs. However, a combination of these autoimmune features has not been reported. Herein, we report a case of drug-induced bullous SS with ocular and mucosal involvement, glomerulonephritis, and multiple autoimmune features including clinical polychondritis with antitype II collagen antibodies, ANCAs, antinuclear (HEp-2, and antihistone antibodies in a patient on hydralazine and carbamazepine.

  4. The Effect of CD3-Specific Monoclonal Antibody on Treating Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruonan Xu; Jianan Wang; Guojiang Chen; Gencheng Han; Renxi Wang; Beffen Shen; Yan Li

    2005-01-01

    CD3-specific monoclonal antibody was the first one used for clinical practice in field of transplantation. Recently,renewed interests have elicited in its capacity to prevent autoimmune diabetes by inducing immune tolerance. In this study, we tested whether this antibody can also be used to treat another kind of autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis (MG) and explored the possible mechanisms. MG is caused by an autoimmune damage mediated by antibody- and complement-mediated destruction of AChR at the neuromuscular junction. We found that administration of CD3-specific antibody (Fab)2 to an animal model with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) (B6 mice received 3 times of AChR/CFA immunization) could not significantly improve the clinical signs and clinical score. When the possible mechanisms were tested, we found that CD3 antibody treatment slightly down-regulated the T-cell response to AChR, modestly up-regulation the muscle strength. And no significant difference in the titers of IgG2b was found between CD3 antibody treated and control groups. These data indicated that CD3-specific antibody was not suitable for treating MG, an antibody- and complementmediated autoimmune disease, after this disease has been established. The role of CD3-specific antibody in treating this kind of disease remains to be determined.

  5. [Autoimmune hepatitis induced by isotretionine].

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    Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos Lopez, Roxana; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Scavino, Yolanda; Morales, Alejandro; Tagle, Martín

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a teenage patient with the diagnosis of drug induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient is a 16 years old female, with the past medical history of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism controlled with levothyroxine, who started treatment with Isotretionin (®Accutane) 20 mg q/12 hours for a total of 3 months for the treatment of severe acne. The physical examination was within normal limits and the results of the laboratory exams are: Baseline values of ALT 28 U/L, AST 28 U/L. Three months later: AST 756 U/L, ALT 1199U/L, alkaline phosphatase 114 U/L, with normal bilirrubin levels throughout the process. The serology studies were negative for all viral hepatitis; ANA titers were positive (1/160) and igG levels were also elevated. A liver biopsy was performed, and was compatible with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Corticosteroid therapy was started with Prednisone 40 mg per day one week after stopping the treatment with isotretionin, observing an improvement in the laboratory values. We describe this case and review the world literature since there are no reported cases of Isotretinoin-induced autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27131947

  6. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

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    Santosh Paiaulla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality.

  7. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  8. Delineating liver events in trichloroethylene-induced autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Przybyla, Beata; Pumford, Neil R; Han, Tao; Fuscoe, James; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Holland, Ricky D; Doss, Jason C; Macmillan-Crow, Lee Ann; Blossom, Sarah J

    2009-04-01

    Exposure to the environmental pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) has been linked to autoimmune disease development in humans. Chronic (32-week) low-level exposure to TCE has been shown to promote autoimmune hepatitis in association with CD4(+) T cell activation in autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice. MRL+/+ mice are usually thought of as a model of systemic lupus rather than an organ-specific disease such as autoimmune hepatitis. Consequently, the present study examined gene expression and metabolites to delineate the liver events that skewed the autoimmune response toward that organ in TCE-treated mice. Female MRL+/+ mice were treated with 0.5 mg/mL TCE in their drinking water. The results showed that TCE-induced autoimmune hepatitis could be detected in as little as 26 weeks. TCE exposure also generated a time-dependent increase in the number of antibodies specific for liver proteins. The gene expression correlated with the metabolite analysis to show that TCE upregulated the methionine/homocysteine pathway in the liver after 26 weeks of exposure. The results also showed that TCE exposure altered the expression of selective hepatic genes associated with immunity and inflammation. On the basis of these results, future mechanistic studies will focus on how alterations in genes associated with immunity and inflammation, in conjunction with protein alterations in the liver, promote liver immunogenicity in TCE-treated MRL+/+ mice.

  9. Non-HLA antibodies against endothelial targets bridging allo- and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragun, Duska; Catar, Rusan; Philippe, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    Detrimental actions of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) directed against both major histocompatibility antigens (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]) and specific non-HLA antigens expressed on the allograft endothelium are a flourishing research area in kidney transplantation. Newly developed solid-phase assays enabling detection of functional non-HLA antibodies targeting G protein-coupled receptors such as angiotensin type I receptor and endothelin type A receptor were instrumental in providing long-awaited confirmation of their broad clinical relevance. Numerous recent clinical studies implicate angiotensin type I receptor and endothelin type A receptor antibodies as prognostic biomarkers for earlier occurrence and severity of acute and chronic immunologic complications in solid organ transplantation, stem cell transplantation, and systemic autoimmune vascular disease. Angiotensin type 1 receptor and endothelin type A receptor antibodies exert their pathophysiologic effects alone and in synergy with HLA-DSA. Recently identified antiperlecan antibodies are also implicated in accelerated allograft vascular pathology. In parallel, protein array technology platforms enabled recognition of new endothelial surface antigens implicated in endothelial cell activation. Upon target antigen recognition, non-HLA antibodies act as powerful inducers of phenotypic perturbations in endothelial cells via activation of distinct intracellular cell-signaling cascades. Comprehensive diagnostic assessment strategies focusing on both HLA-DSA and non-HLA antibody responses could substantially improve immunologic risk stratification before transplantation, help to better define subphenotypes of antibody-mediated rejection, and lead to timely initiation of targeted therapies. Better understanding of similarities and dissimilarities in HLA-DSA and distinct non-HLA antibody-related mechanisms of endothelial damage should facilitate discovery of common downstream signaling targets and pave the

  10. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the Central Nervous System (CNS), and it is crucially needed for numerous key neuronal functions. Yet, excess glutamate causes massive neuronal death and brain damage by excitotoxicity--detrimental over activation of glutamate receptors. Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is the main pathological process taking place in many types of acute and chronic CNS diseases and injuries. In recent years, it became clear that not only excess glutamate can cause massive brain damage, but that several types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies, that are present in the serum and CSF of subpopulations of patients with a kaleidoscope of human neurological diseases, can undoubtedly do so too, by inducing several very potent pathological effects in the CNS. Collectively, the family of anti-glutamate receptor autoimmune antibodies seem to be the most widespread, potent, dangerous and interesting anti-brain autoimmune antibodies discovered up to now. This impression stems from taking together the presence of various types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies in a kaleidoscope of human neurological and autoimmune diseases, their high levels in the CNS due to intrathecal production, their multiple pathological effects in the brain, and the unique and diverse mechanisms of action by which they can affect glutamate receptors, signaling and effects, and subsequently impair neuronal signaling and induce brain damage. The two main families of autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies that were already found in patients with neurological and/or autoimmune diseases, and that were already shown to be detrimental to the CNS, include the antibodies directed against ionotorpic glutamate receptors: the anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies and anti-NMDA-NR2 antibodies, and the antibodies directed against Metabotropic glutamate receptors: the anti-mGluR1 antibodies and the anti-mGluR5 antibodies. Each type of these anti

  11. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the Central Nervous System (CNS), and it is crucially needed for numerous key neuronal functions. Yet, excess glutamate causes massive neuronal death and brain damage by excitotoxicity--detrimental over activation of glutamate receptors. Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is the main pathological process taking place in many types of acute and chronic CNS diseases and injuries. In recent years, it became clear that not only excess glutamate can cause massive brain damage, but that several types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies, that are present in the serum and CSF of subpopulations of patients with a kaleidoscope of human neurological diseases, can undoubtedly do so too, by inducing several very potent pathological effects in the CNS. Collectively, the family of anti-glutamate receptor autoimmune antibodies seem to be the most widespread, potent, dangerous and interesting anti-brain autoimmune antibodies discovered up to now. This impression stems from taking together the presence of various types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies in a kaleidoscope of human neurological and autoimmune diseases, their high levels in the CNS due to intrathecal production, their multiple pathological effects in the brain, and the unique and diverse mechanisms of action by which they can affect glutamate receptors, signaling and effects, and subsequently impair neuronal signaling and induce brain damage. The two main families of autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies that were already found in patients with neurological and/or autoimmune diseases, and that were already shown to be detrimental to the CNS, include the antibodies directed against ionotorpic glutamate receptors: the anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies and anti-NMDA-NR2 antibodies, and the antibodies directed against Metabotropic glutamate receptors: the anti-mGluR1 antibodies and the anti-mGluR5 antibodies. Each type of these anti

  12. Expression of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Duan, F; Liu, P; Wang, P F; Wang, M X

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to determine the expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies in muscle tissues of autoimmune necrotizing myopathy patients. Results demonstrated that anti-SRP19 antibody was expressed in 71.4% (20/28) of muscle tissue specimens from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Anti-SRP19 antibody expression was mainly localized in cytoplasm of necrotic muscle fibers surrounding the small blood vessels and interstitial cells. There were no significant differences in the age, course of disease, muscle, and creatine kinase levels between patients with positive or negative expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies. The expression levels of anti-SRP19, serum anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as anti-Ro-52, anti- SSA, anti-Sm, and anti-Jo-1 antibodies were not significantly different among groups. This study demonstrates that anti-SRP19 antibody is highly expressed in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy, and suggests that this protein may be involved in the origin and progression of the disease. PMID:27525944

  13. Pendrin and NIS antibodies are absent in healthy individuals and are rare in autoimmune thyroid disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Thomas H; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Weetman, Anthony P;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antibodies against thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase and the TSH receptor are accepted as pathophysiological and diagnostic biomarkers in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). In contrast, the prevalence, aetiology and clinical relevance of autoantibodies against the human sodium-iodine s......OBJECTIVE: Antibodies against thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase and the TSH receptor are accepted as pathophysiological and diagnostic biomarkers in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). In contrast, the prevalence, aetiology and clinical relevance of autoantibodies against the human sodium...... prevalence than the controls: NISAb: 17% vs 0% (P disease (GD) and 14% (5/37) of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) had NISAb, (P

  14. Budesonide induces complete remission in autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antal Csepregi; Christoph R(o)cken; Gerhard Treiber; Peter Malfertheiner

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Prednisone and azathioprine represent the standard treatment for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). However, only 65% of the patients enter complete histological remission. Recently, budesonide (BUD) was reported to be a promising alternative. In this study we assessed the efficacy and safety of BUD in AIH.METHODS: Eighteen patients (12 women, 6 men; mean age 45.4±21 years) with AIH were treated with BUD (Budenofalk(R)) 3 mg thrice daily and followed up for at least 24 wk. Seven patients also had features of primary biliary cirrhosis (n = 5) or primary sclerosing cholangitis (n = 2). Advanced liver fibrosis or cirrhosis was present in 6 patients.RESULTS: Fifteen (83%) patients had a complete clinical and biochemical remission. Ten patients, including five with acute hepatitis, were given BUD as first-line therapy, of which seven enter remission. Three patients,two with liver cirrhosis, did not improve. All patients with second-line therapy experienced long-term remission.A histological remission was also seen in three patients.Clinically relevant BUD-induced side effects were recorded only in patients with liver cirrhosis (n = 4).CONCLUSION: BUD is effective in remission induction in the majority of our patients with AIH. Side effects and treatment failure was mainly observed in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  15. Activation-Induced Cell Death in T Cells and Autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Xuemei Xu; Yong Liu

    2004-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD), which results from the interaction between Fas and Fas ligand, is responsible for maintaining tolerance to self-antigen. A defect in AICD may lead to development of autoimmunity. During the last several years, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism(s) of AICD and its potential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the most recent progress on the regulation of the susceptibility of T cells to AICD and its possible involvement in autoimmune diseases.

  16. Novel Phospholipid-Protein Conjugates Allow Improved Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Simone V; Maity, Arindam; Nybo, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    structural features of biologically active antigens into account and leads to low reliability and poor scientific test value. Here we describe novel phospholipid-protein conjugates for specific detection of human autoimmune antibodies. Our synthetic approach includes mild oxidation of synthetic phospholipid......Reliable measurement of clinically relevant autoimmune antibodies toward phospholipid-protein conjugates is highly desirable in research and clinical assays. To date, the development in this field has been limited to the use of natural heterogeneous antigens. However, this approach does not take...... in Denmark (n = 34) and the USA (n = 27 and n = 14). Afterwards we analyzed correlation of the obtained autoantibody titers with clinical parameters for each patient. Our results prove that using novel antigens clinically relevant autoantibodies can be detected with high repeatability, sensitivity...

  17. Toxin-Induced Autoimmune Hepatitis Caused by Raw Cashew Nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueck, Ashley; Bansal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with no past medical history presented with abnormally elevated liver enzymes 1 year after developing a diffuse rash thought to be related to eating large quantities of raw cashew nuts. Liver biopsy was performed, which revealed features concerning for drug- or toxin-induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient began treatment with azathioprine and prednisone, and liver enzymes normalized. We describe a unique case of a toxin-induced autoimmune hepatitis precipitated not by a drug or dietary supplement but by a food product.

  18. Burkitt Lymphoma Preceded by Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia due to Anti-D Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yoshimi; Shimura, Yuji; Horiike, Shigeo; Takimoto, Tomoko; Maegawa, Saori; Tanba, Kazuna; Matsumura-Kimoto, Yayoi; Sumida, Yukari; Tatekawa, Shotaro; Tsukamoto, Taku; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Yamamoto-Sugitani, Mio; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Kuroda, Junya; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a rare case of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) preceded by autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) caused by autoantibodies against D antigen. After a partial response to AIHA with prednisolone (PSL) treatment for 7 months, the patient developed BL with a t(8;22)(q24;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. Intensive immunochemotherapy, including rituximab, led to a complete response (CR) of BL; however, anti-D antibody remained detectable in the plasma and antibody-dissociated solution from erythrocytes, thus continuous therapy with PSL was necessary even after achievement of the CR. BL with AIHA is extremely rare, with only one previously reported case in the literature. PMID:27523004

  19. Pulse labeling of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins in vivo reveals distinct patterns of antigen recognition by human autoimmune antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, D E; Reeves, W H; Conner, G E; Blobel, G; Kunkel, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies directed against small nuclear ribonucleoprotein ( snRNP ) particles are found in the Sm and RNP autoimmune sera from numerous patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). These two reactivities differ in disease distribution as well as antigen specificity. Although sera from both of these autoimmune syndromes contain snRNP reactive antibodies, distinction in antigen binding specificity have been difficult to define because of the par...

  20. A therapeutic anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody inhibits T cell receptor signal transduction in mouse autoimmune cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhao-hui; LIAO Yu-hua; YUAN Jing; ZHANG Li; WANG Min; ZHANG Jing-hui; LIU Zhong-ping; DONG Ji-hua

    2007-01-01

    Background T cell immune abnormalities in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) has been intensively studied over the past 10 years. Our previous study has suggested that immunization of mice with the peptides derived from human adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) result in the production of autoantibodies against the ANT and histopathological changes similar to those in human DCM. The ANT peptides can induce autoimmune cardiomyopathy like DCM in Balb/c mice. In this study we aimed to focus on the molecular mechanism of T cells in the autoimmune cardiomyopathy mouse model by detecting the expression of the two T cell signaling molecules.Methods The ANT peptides were used to cause autoimmune cardiomyopathy in Balb/c mice. Anti-L3T4 or rat anti-mouse IgG was administered to the mice (n=6 in each group) simultaneously immunized with ANT. ELISA analysis was used to detect autoantibodies against the ANT peptides and the percentages of interferon-Y and interleukin-4 producing cells among splenic CD4+ lymphocytes was determined by using flow cytometry analysis. The expression of CD45 in spleen T cells was determined by immunohistochemistry and the mRNAs of T cell signaling molecules were detected by real-time PCR.Results Treatment of ANT immunized Balb/c mice with anti-CD4 mAb caused a reduction in the gene expression of P56lck and Zap-70 and a lower level of CD45 expression by spleen T cells. Aiso, a reverse of the Th1/Th2 ratio that results in the reduced production of antibodies against ANT was found in the anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAb)group. Whereas irrelevant antibody (rat anti-mouse IgG) did not suppress T cell signaling molecules nor inhibit CD45 expression, and control-antibody mice did not show any significant differences compared with the DCM group.Conclusion The results show that anti-CD4 mAb is a powerful inhibitor of the early initiating events of T cell receptor(TCR) signal transduction in mouse autoimmune dilated cardiomyopathy.

  1. A region of the insulin receptor important for ligand binding (residues 450-601) is recognized by patients' autoimmune antibodies and inhibitory monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, B; Roth, R A

    1991-01-01

    Chimeric receptors containing different portions of the homologous human insulin receptor, insulin-like growth factor I receptor, and insulin receptor-related receptor were utilized to identify the epitopes recognized by various anti-insulin receptor antibodies. The antibodies studied included 12 monoclonal antibodies to the extracellular domain of the human insulin receptor as well as 15 patients' sera with autoimmune anti-insulin receptor antibodies. All of the patients' sera and all 8 mono...

  2. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α and Autoimmune Lupus, Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zu-Cheng; Liu, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxia elicits an orchestrated response in cells, tissues, and entire organisms to survive a hypoxic challenge. On a molecular level, this response can be controlled by oxygen-dependent stabilization of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Recently, studies have shown that HIF-1α plays an important role in the development and function of T helper (Th) cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells, and dendritic cells (DCs). Because these cells are critical in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, the roles of HIF-1α in these autoimmune disorders cannot be neglected. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the important roles of HIF-1α in immune cells and the possible pathologic roles of HIF-1α in autoimmune diseases. The obtained information may lead to deeper insights into the roles of HIF-1α in these disorders. PMID:27032396

  3. A case of autoimmune epilepsy associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 antibodies manifesting electrical shock-like sensations and transparent sadness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Murata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune epilepsy is an isolated phenotype of autoimmune encephalitis, which may be suspected in patients with unexplained adult-onset seizure disorders or resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs. Antibodies against leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC complex, recently termed anti-LGI-1 antibodies, are one of the causes of autoimmune epilepsies. Bizarre symptoms with extremely short duration and high frequency are clues to the possible presence of autoimmune epilepsy with anti-LGI-1 antibodies. Precise diagnosis is important because autoimmune epilepsy is treatable and the prognosis can be predicted.

  4. A case of autoimmune epilepsy associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 antibodies manifesting electrical shock-like sensations and transparent sadness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Osamu; Taniguchi, Go; Sone, Daichi; Fujioka, Mao; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Watanabe, Yutaka; Watanabe, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune epilepsy is an isolated phenotype of autoimmune encephalitis, which may be suspected in patients with unexplained adult-onset seizure disorders or resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Antibodies against leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, recently termed anti-LGI-1 antibodies, are one of the causes of autoimmune epilepsies. Bizarre symptoms with extremely short duration and high frequency are clues to the possible presence of autoimmune epilepsy with anti-LGI-1 antibodies. Precise diagnosis is important because autoimmune epilepsy is treatable and the prognosis can be predicted.

  5. A case of autoimmune epilepsy associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 antibodies manifesting electrical shock-like sensations and transparent sadness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Osamu; Taniguchi, Go; Sone, Daichi; Fujioka, Mao; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Watanabe, Yutaka; Watanabe, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune epilepsy is an isolated phenotype of autoimmune encephalitis, which may be suspected in patients with unexplained adult-onset seizure disorders or resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Antibodies against leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, recently termed anti-LGI-1 antibodies, are one of the causes of autoimmune epilepsies. Bizarre symptoms with extremely short duration and high frequency are clues to the possible presence of autoimmune epilepsy with anti-LGI-1 antibodies. Precise diagnosis is important because autoimmune epilepsy is treatable and the prognosis can be predicted. PMID:26543815

  6. A case of autoimmune epilepsy associated with anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 antibodies manifesting electrical shock-like sensations and transparent sadness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Osamu; Taniguchi, Go; Sone, Daichi; Fujioka, Mao; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Nakagawa, Eiji; Watanabe, Yutaka; Watanabe, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune epilepsy is an isolated phenotype of autoimmune encephalitis, which may be suspected in patients with unexplained adult-onset seizure disorders or resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Antibodies against leucine-rich glioma inactivated subunit 1 of the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex, recently termed anti-LGI-1 antibodies, are one of the causes of autoimmune epilepsies. Bizarre symptoms with extremely short duration and high frequency are clues to the possible presence of autoimmune epilepsy with anti-LGI-1 antibodies. Precise diagnosis is important because autoimmune epilepsy is treatable and the prognosis can be predicted. PMID:26543815

  7. Evidence of Borrelia autoimmunity-induced component of Lyme carditis and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveche, Elizabeth S; Schutzer, Steven E; Fernandes, Helen; Bateman, Helen; McCarthy, Brian A; Nickell, Steven P; Cunningham, Madeleine W

    2005-02-01

    We investigated the possibility that manifestations of Lyme disease in certain hosts, such as arthritis and carditis, may be autoimmunity mediated due to molecular mimicry between the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and self-components. We first compared amino acid sequences of Streptococcus pyogenes M protein, a known inducer of antibodies that are cross-reactive with myosin, and B. burgdorferi and found significant homologies with OspA protein. We found that S. pyogenes M5-specific antibodies and sera from B. burgdorferi-infected mice reacted with both myosin and B. burgdorferi proteins by Western blots and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To investigate the relationship between self-reactivity and the response to B. burgdorferi, NZB mice, models of autoimmunity, were infected. NZB mice infected with B. burgdorferi developed higher degrees of joint swelling and higher anti-B. burgdorferi immunoglobulin M cross-reactive responses than other strains with identical major histocompatibility complex (DBA/2 and BALB/c). These studies reveal immunological cross-reactivity and suggest that B. burgdorferi may share common epitopes which mimic self-proteins. These implications could be important for certain autoimmunity-susceptible individuals or animals who become infected with B. burgdorferi.

  8. Anti-asialo GM1 antibodies prevents guanethidine-induced sympathectomy in athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Hougen, H P; Christensen, H B;

    1992-01-01

    Guanethidine sulphate induces destruction of peripheral sympathetic neurons and infiltration of mononuclear cells in rat sympathetic ganglia. The effect of guanethidine is believed to be an autoimmune reaction. In order to determine the effect of anti-asialo GM1, an antibody that binds to the gly......Guanethidine sulphate induces destruction of peripheral sympathetic neurons and infiltration of mononuclear cells in rat sympathetic ganglia. The effect of guanethidine is believed to be an autoimmune reaction. In order to determine the effect of anti-asialo GM1, an antibody that binds...

  9. Acute exacerbation of autoimmune hepatitis induced by Twinrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antal Csepregi; Gerhard Treiber; Christoph R(o)cken; Peter Malfertheiner

    2005-01-01

    We report on a 26-year-old man who presented with severe jaundice and elevated serum liver enzyme activities after having received a dose of Twinrix(○R). In his past medical history, jaundice or abnormal liver function tests were never recorded. Following admission, an elevated immunoglobulin G level and antinuclear antibodies at a titer of 320 with a homogenous pattern were found. Histology of a liver biopsy showed marked bridging liver fibrosis and a chronic inflammation, compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. Treatment was started with budesonide and ursodeoxycholic acid,and led to complete normalization of the pathological liver function tests. We believe that Twinrix(○R) led to an acute exacerbation of an unrecognized autoimmune hepatitis in our patient. The pathogenesis remains to be clarified. It is tempting to speculate that inactivated hepatitis A virus and/or recombinant surface antigen of the hepatitis B virus -as seen in patients with chronic hepatitis C and unrecognized autoimmune hepatitis who were treated with interferon alpha-might have been responsible for disease exacerbation.

  10. Antibodies to Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in Young Children with Different Propensity to Develop Islet Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ija Talja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota is essential to the maturation and homeostasis of the immune system. Immunoblot assays were used to establish the prevalence of serum IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies specific for Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium longum, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG proteins in young children presenting with or without type 1 diabetes (T1D. We demonstrated that children between the ages of 6 and 12 months had a substantial increase in the frequency of IgG antibodies specific for L. rhamnosus GG proteins. We measured IgG, IgM, and IgA class antibody reactivity against B. adolescentis DSM 20083, B. adolescentis DSM 20086, and B. longum DSM 20088 proteins demonstrating significantly higher IgA responses against B. adolescentis DSM 20083 strain proteins in children who developed islet autoimmunity and T1D later in life. B. adolescentis strains showed more IgM type antibodies in children who developed T1D later in life, but the difference was not statistically significant. B. longum proteins were recognized by IgG and IgA antibodies to a higher extent compared to other bacteria studied. These results confirm that differences in immune reactivity against some commensal strains in young children may represent a different risk factor for developing T1D.

  11. Antibodies to Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in young children with different propensity to develop islet autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talja, Ija; Kubo, Anna-Liisa; Veijola, Riitta; Knip, Mikael; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Vähä-Mäkilä, Mari; Sepp, Epp; Mikelsaar, Marika; Utt, Meeme; Uibo, Raivo

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential to the maturation and homeostasis of the immune system. Immunoblot assays were used to establish the prevalence of serum IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies specific for Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium longum, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG proteins in young children presenting with or without type 1 diabetes (T1D). We demonstrated that children between the ages of 6 and 12 months had a substantial increase in the frequency of IgG antibodies specific for L. rhamnosus GG proteins. We measured IgG, IgM, and IgA class antibody reactivity against B. adolescentis DSM 20083, B. adolescentis DSM 20086, and B. longum DSM 20088 proteins demonstrating significantly higher IgA responses against B. adolescentis DSM 20083 strain proteins in children who developed islet autoimmunity and T1D later in life. B. adolescentis strains showed more IgM type antibodies in children who developed T1D later in life, but the difference was not statistically significant. B. longum proteins were recognized by IgG and IgA antibodies to a higher extent compared to other bacteria studied. These results confirm that differences in immune reactivity against some commensal strains in young children may represent a different risk factor for developing T1D. PMID:24741589

  12. Use of monoclonal antibodies for the characterization of novel DNA- binding proteins recognized by human autoimmune sera

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Autoantibodies to a DNA-binding heterodimer consisting of 70,000 and 80,000 dalton subunits were identified in 30-50% of human autoimmune sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and scleroderma. Three murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against the heterodimer were produced in BALB/c mice by immunizing with isolated human B cell nuclei. By immunofluorescence, the mAb and autoimmune sera demonstrated both speckled nucleoplasmic stainin...

  13. LINGO-1 antibody ameliorates myelin impairment and spatial memory deficits in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Jun; Ren, Qing-Guo; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-09-18

    More than 50% of multiple sclerosis patients develop cognitive impairment. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear, and there is no effective treatment. LINGO-1 (LRR and Ig domain containing NOGO receptor interacting protein 1) has been identified as an inhibitor of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, we assessed cognitive function at early and late stages of EAE, determined brain expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and investigated whether the LINGO-1 antibody could restore deficits in learning and memory and ameliorate any loss of MBP. We found that deficits in learning and memory occurred in late EAE and identified decreased expression of MBP in the parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and fimbria-fornix. Moreover, the LINGO-1 antibody significantly improved learning and memory in EAE and partially restored MBP in PHC. Furthermore, the LINGO-1 antibody activated the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway regulating myelin growth. Our results suggest that demyelination in the PHC and fimbria-fornix might contribute to cognitive deficits and the LINGO-1 antibody could ameliorate these deficits by promoting myelin growth in the PHC. Our research demonstrates that LINGO-1 antagonism may be an effective approach to the treatment of the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis patients.

  14. Aromatase inhibitors induced autoimmune disorders in patients with breast cancer: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Zarkavelis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE is characterized by particular cutaneous manifestations such as non-scaring plaques mainly in sunlight exposed parts of the body along with specific serum autoantibodies (i.e. antinuclear antibodies (ANA, Ro/SSa, La/SSb. It is considered either idiopathic or drug induced. The role of chemotherapeutic agents in causing SCLE has been investigated with the taxanes being the most common anticancer agents. However, recent data emerging point toward antiestrogen therapies as a causative factor not only for SCLE but also for a variety of autoimmune disorders. This is a report of a case of a 42 year old woman who developed clinical manifestations of SCLE after letrozole treatment in whom remission of the cutaneous manifestations was noticed upon discontinuation of the drug. In addition, an extensive review of the English literature has been performed regarding the association of antiestrogen therapy with autoimmune disorders. In conclusion, Oncologists should be aware of the potential development of autoimmune reactions in breast cancer patients treated with aromatase inhibitors.

  15. Diagnosis of autoimmune neutropenia by neutrophil-bound IgG and IgM antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Taichi; Taniuchi, Shoichiro; Tsuji, Shoji; Iharada, Anna; Hasui, Masafumi; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune neutropenia (AIN) in infancy is caused by antineutrophil (granulocyte-specific) autoantibodies. These antibodies are rarely found in circulation because their serum levels are extremely low. We hypothesized that a direct granulocyte immunofluorescence test (D-GIFT) that enables us to detect neutrophil-bound autoantibodies consisting of both immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM has better diagnostic value than the detection of circulating autoantibodies. Whole blood (100 μL) was obtained from 50 infants with AIN, 12 infants with transient neutropenia, and 37 control infants. D-GIFT was performed using both fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antihuman IgG Fc portion monoclonal antibodies and fluorescein isothiocyanate antihuman IgM monoclonal antibodies. Results were assessed as relative fluorescence intensity (RFI). The RFIs of antineutrophil IgG-bound and antineutrophil IgM-bound cells in patients with AIN were significantly higher than those in patients with transient neutropenia and in controls. Positive results, as assessed by RFI scores of more than 1.81 in either antineutrophil IgG-bound or antineutrophil IgM-bound cells, showed the sensitivity and specificity of D-GIFT, and the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.98, 0.98, and 0.997, respectively) in the diagnosis of AIN. D-GIFT detecting both neutrophil-bound IgG autoantibodies and IgM autoantibodies has discriminatory power for identifying patients with AIN and, therefore, can be a useful diagnostic test. PMID:21941149

  16. Pertinence of kappa and lambda recombinant antibodies directed against thyroid peroxidase in thyroid autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresson, D; Chardès, T; Chapal, N; Bès, C; Cerutti, M; Devauchelle, G; Bouanani, M; Mani, J C; Péraldi-Roux, S

    2001-01-01

    Forty-one single-chain variable region fragments (scFvs) directed against thyroid peroxidase (TPO) were obtained by phage display libraries constructed from thyroid-infiltrating B cells of Graves' disease patients. Among these scFvs, 24.4% used a Vkappa light chain whereas 75.6% shows a light chain of Vlamda origin. Study of light chain gene usage in the TPO antibody repertoire demonstrated a dominance of the Vkappa 1-39 and Vlambda 1-51 genes. Thyroid peroxidase probing of overlapping peptides covering the amino acid sequences of anti-TPO T2/kappa and T13/lambda variable regions demonstrated a more restricted antigen recognition on T13/lambda than on T2/kappa. These two recombinant antibodies, expressed as whole IgG1 in the baculovirus/insect cell system, inhibited the binding to TPO of serum TPO autoantibodies whatever the light chain. Our study indicates that lambda as well as kappa light chain usage are found in the TPO antibody repertoire of thyroid-infiltrating B cells and are pertinent in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  17. Absence of cross-reactivity to myeloperoxidase of anti-thyroid microsomal antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freire, BA; Paula, ID; Paula, F; Kallenberg, GGM; Limburg, PC; Queluz, TT

    2001-01-01

    Background: Thyroperoxidase is the major antigen of the thyroid microsomal antibodies (TMA) detected in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Its amino acid sequence has 44% homology with myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme present in the primary granules of neutrophils and one of the major antineutrophil cytop

  18. Identification of antigenic proteins associated with trichloroethylene-induced autoimmune disease by serological proteome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many studies indicated that trichloroethylene (TCE) could induce autoimmune diseases and some protein adducts were detected, the proteins were not identified and mechanisms remain unknown. To screen and identify autoantigens which might be involved in TCE-induced autoimmune diseases, three groups of sera were collected from healthy donors (I), patients suffering from TCE-induced exfoliative dermatitis (ED) (II), and the healed ones (III). Serological proteome analysis (SERPA) was performed with total proteins of TCE-treated L-02 liver cells as antigen sources and immunoglobins of the above sera as probes. Highly immunogenic spots (2-fold or above increase compared with group I) in group II and III were submitted to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing. Western blot analysis was followed using commercial antibodies and individual serum. Six proteins were identified. Among them, Enoyl Coenzyme A hydratase peroxisoma 1 and lactate dehydrogenase B only showed stronger immunogenicity for group II sera, while Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, ribosomal protein P0 and proteasome activator subunit1 isoform1 also showed stronger immunogenicity for group III sera. Noteworthy, NM23 reacted only with group II sera. Western blot analysis of NM23 expression indicated that all of the individual serum of group II showed immune activity, which confirmed the validity of SERPA result. These findings revealed that there exist autoantibodies in group II and III sera. Besides, autoantibodies of the two stages of disease course were different. These autoantigens might serve as biomarkers to elucidate mechanisms underlying TCE toxicity and are helpful for diagnosis, therapy and prognosis of TCE-induced autoimmune diseases.

  19. Drug-induced hepatitis superimposed on the presence of anti-SLA antibody: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etxagibel Aitziber

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autoimmune hepatitis is a necroinflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the presence of circulating antibodies, hypergammaglobulinemia, and response to immunosuppression. It has the histological features of chronic hepatitis. The onset is usually insidious, but in some patients the presentation may be acute and occasionally severe. Certain drugs can induce chronic hepatitis mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Different autoantibodies have been associated with this process but they are not detectable after drug withdrawal and clinical resolution. Case presentation We describe a case of drug-induced acute hepatitis associated with antinuclear, antisoluble liver-pancreas and anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies in a 66-year-old woman. Abnormal clinical and biochemical parameters resolved after drug withdrawal, but six months later anti-soluble liver-pancreas antibodies remained positive and liver biopsy showed chronic hepatitis and septal fibrosis. Furthermore, our patient has a HLA genotype associated with autoimmune hepatitis. Conclusion Patient follow-up will disclose whether our patient suffers from an autoimmune disease and if the presence of anti-soluble liver antigens could precede the development of an autoimmune hepatitis, as the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies can precede primary biliary cirrhosis.

  20. Azathioprine Induced Pancreatitis in a Patient with Co-Existing Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi GK Venkatesh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Azathioprine induced pancreatitis usually runs a benign self limited course with rapid disappearance of signs and symptoms upon with drawl of the drug. Azathioprine is used in treating relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and maintenance of remission in autoimmune hepatitis. Acute pancreatitis complicated by symptomatic pseudocysts requiring drainage is not usually associated with drug induced pancreatitis. The risk of azathioprine use in patients with underlying disease of pancreas including autoimmune pancreatitis is unclear. Case report We report here a case of an African American patient with co-existing autoimmune pancreatitis and autoimmune hepatitis who developed azathioprine induced acute pancreatitis complicated by a large symptomatic pseudocyst compressing the duodenum requiring a cystoduodenostomy. Conclusions Future studies to investigate the risk of azathioprine induced pancreatitis in the presence of underlying disease of the pancreas including autoimmune pancreatitis are required to further understand the safety of azathioprine in this sub group of patients.

  1. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role.

  2. Aberrant O-glycosylation and anti-glycan antibodies in an autoimmune disease IgA nephropathy and breast adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuchlová Horynová, Milada; Raška, Milan; Clausen, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    -glycosylation, although different for MUC1 and IgA1, include dysregulation in glycosyltransferase expression, stability, and/or intracellular localization. Moreover, these aberrant glycoproteins are recognized by antibodies, although with different consequences. In breast cancer, elevated levels of antibodies recognizing......Glycosylation abnormalities have been observed in autoimmune diseases and cancer. Here, we compare mechanisms of aberrant O-glycosylation, i.e., formation of Tn and sialyl-Tn structures, on MUC1 in breast cancer, and on IgA1 in an autoimmune disease, IgA nephropathy. The pathways of aberrant O...... aberrant MUC1 are associated with better outcome, whereas in IgA nephropathy, the antibodies recognizing aberrant IgA1 are part of the pathogenetic process....

  3. Synthetic LNA/DNA nano-scaffolds for highly efficient diagnostics of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, Irina Kira

    2014-01-01

    Herein novel fluorescent oligonucleotides for homogeneous (all-in-solution) detection of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies (autoantibodies) are described. The probes are prepared by highly efficient copper-catalyzed click chemistry between novel alkyne-modified locked nucleic acid (LNA...... of the monoclonal human autoantibody is achieved. It makes the novel "clickable" LNA/DNA complexes a very promising tool in molecular diagnostics of both nucleic acids and autoantibodies against DNA. The latter are produced under several autoimmune conditions including antiphospholipide syndrome and systemic lupus...

  4. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Rajko

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is an unresolving, hepatocellular inflammation of unknown cause that is characterized by the presence of periportal hepatitis on histologic examination, tissue autoantibodies in serum, and hypergammaglobulinemia. By international consensus, the designation autoimmune hepatitis has replaced alternative terms for the condition. Three types of autoimmune hepatitis have been proposed based on immunoserologic findings. Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) (or both) in serum. Seventy percent of patients with type 1 of autoimmune hepatitis are women. This type is the most common form and accounts for at least 80% of cases. Type 2 is characterized by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) in serum. Patients with this type of autoimmune hepatitis are predominantly children. Type 3 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antibodies to soluble liver antigen (anti-SLA) in serum. There are no individual features that are pathognomonic of autoimmune hepatitis, and its diagnosis requires the confident exclusion of other conditions. The large majority of patients show satisfactory response to corticosteroid (usually prednisone or prednisolone) therapy. For the past 30 years it has been customary to add azathioprine as a "steroid sparing" agent to allow lower doses of steroids to be used and remission, once achieved, can be sustained in many patients with azathioprine alone after steroid withdrawal. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis who have decompensated during or after corticosteroid therapy are candidates for liver transplantation.

  5. The Roles of the TSH Receptor Antibodies in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical and pathogenetic roles of TSH receptor antibodies in autoimmune thyroid diseases, TBII were measured by TSH-radioreceptor assay methods in 352 patients with Graves disease, 108 patients with other thyroid diseases and 69 normal persons. The normal range of TBII activity was less than 15%. The frequencies of detectable TBIl in 169 patients with untreated Graves disease, 31 patients with hyperthyroidism under treatment and 70 patients with euthyroidism under treatment were 92.4%, 87.1% and 54.3% respectively. However 12 (21.8%) out of 55 patients who have been in remission more than one year after discontinuation of antithyroid drugs treatment had detectable TBII activities in their sera. In 196 patients with untreated Graves disease, the frequency of TBII increased by increasing size of goiter and the frequency of proptosis was significantly high in patients whose TBII activities were more than 60%. TBll activities were roughly correlated with total T3,T4 and free T4, index but low γ2 value(less than 0.1). In 67 patients with Graves' disease who were positive TB1I before antithyroid drugs treatment, TBII activities began to decrease from the third months and it was converted to negative in 35.8% of patients at 12 months after treatment. There were no significant differences of the declining and disappearing rates of TBII activities between high dose and conventional dose groups. TBII activities were significantly increased initially (2-4 months) and then began to decrease from 5-9 months after 131I treatment. There were two groups, one whose TBII activities decreased gradually and the other did not change until 12 months after subtotal thyroidectomy. Although preoperative clinical and laboratory findings of both groups were not different, TBII activities of non-decreasing group were significantly higher than those of decreasing group(74.6+18.6% vs 39.2+15.2%; P(0.01). Thirty three(55.9%) out of 59 patients with Graves disease relapsed

  6. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  7. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient. PMID:26626229

  8. Repulsive Guidance Molecule-a Is Involved in Th17-Cell-Induced Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Tanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration in the CNS. Although it is important to prevent neurodegeneration for alleviating neurological disability, the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration remains largely unknown. Here, we report that repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa, known to regulate axonal growth, is associated with neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS. RGMa is highly expressed in interleukin-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells. We induced EAE by adoptive transfer of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-specific Th17 cells and then inhibited RGMa with a neutralizing antibody. Inhibition of RGMa improves EAE scores and reduces neuronal degeneration without altering immune or glial responses. Th17 cells induce cultured cortical neuron death through RGMa-neogenin and Akt dephosphorylation. Our results demonstrate that RGMa is involved in Th17-cell-mediated neurodegeneration and that RGMa-specific antibody may have a therapeutic effect in MS.

  9. Autoimmune antibodies and recurrence-free interval in melanoma patients treated with adjuvant interferon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwhuis, Marna G; Suciu, Stefan; Collette, Sandra;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Appearance of autoantibodies and clinical manifestations of autoimmunity in melanoma patients treated with adjuvant interferon (IFN)-alpha2b was reported to be associated with improved prognosis. We assessed the association of the appearance of autoantibodies after initiation of treat......BACKGROUND: Appearance of autoantibodies and clinical manifestations of autoimmunity in melanoma patients treated with adjuvant interferon (IFN)-alpha2b was reported to be associated with improved prognosis. We assessed the association of the appearance of autoantibodies after initiation...

  10. Simultaneous measurements of auto-immune and infectious disease specific antibodies using a high throughput multiplexing tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Asati

    Full Text Available Considering importance of ganglioside antibodies as biomarkers in various immune-mediated neuropathies and neurological disorders, we developed a high throughput multiplexing tool for the assessment of gangliosides-specific antibodies based on Biolpex/Luminex platform. In this report, we demonstrate that the ganglioside high throughput multiplexing tool is robust, highly specific and demonstrating ∼100-fold higher concentration sensitivity for IgG detection than ELISA. In addition to the ganglioside-coated array, the high throughput multiplexing tool contains beads coated with influenza hemagglutinins derived from H1N1 A/Brisbane/59/07 and H1N1 A/California/07/09 strains. Influenza beads provided an added advantage of simultaneous detection of ganglioside- and influenza-specific antibodies, a capacity important for the assay of both infectious antigen-specific and autoimmune antibodies following vaccination or disease. Taken together, these results support the potential adoption of the ganglioside high throughput multiplexing tool for measuring ganglioside antibodies in various neuropathic and neurological disorders.

  11. Autosomal Recessive Chronic Granulomatous Disease, IgA Deficiency and Refractory Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia Responding to Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Shamsian Bibi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease may occur concomitantly in the same individual. Some of the immunodeficiency syndromes, especially humoral defects are associated with autoimmune disorders. Hematological manifestations such as thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia are the most common presentations. Persistent antigen stimulation due to an inherent defect in the ability of the immune system to eradicate pathogens is the primary cause leading to autoimmunity in patients with primary immunodeficiency states.We describe a 10 year old Iranian girl with chronic granulomatous disease -the autosomal recessive type with mutation of NCF1 gene P47- associated with selective IgA deficiency, refractory immune thrombocytopenia that showed an excellent response to Rituximab (Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.Patients with primary immunodeficiencies may have variable autoimmune manifestations. So for early detection and appropriate treatment, autoimmune diseases should always be suspected in such patients.

  12. Voltage gated potassium channel antibodies positive autoimmune encephalopathy in a child: A case report and literature review of an under-recognized condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Ganesan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune limbic encephalitis (LE associated with voltage gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC-Abs in children is more common than previously thought and is not always paraneoplastic. Non-neoplastic, autoimmune LE associated with VGKC-Abs has been described recently. However, only few case reports in children as the disease is predominantly described in the adult population. It is likely that this type of autoimmune encephalitis is currently under-diagnosed and hence, under-treated, especially in children. We present a 13-year-old previously fit and healthy African girl diagnosed with LE and we reviewed the literature for its current management.

  13. Extraction of Ku antigen and anti-Ku antibody assay in various autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To extract Ku antigen and to detect anti-Ku antibody in connective tissue diseases (CTDs). Methods: Ku antigen was prepared from rabbit thymus acetone powder. Anti-Ku antibodies were tested in 50 normal controls and 438 patients

  14. Clinical implications of a new TSH-receptor-antibody-assay (DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman) in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Conventional radioreceptor-antibody-assays (RAAs) fail in the detection of TSH-receptor antibodies (TRAKs) in 10-30% of patients with Graves' disease (GD). The aim of this study was the evaluation of the diagnostic and clinical impact of a new RRA (DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman) which uses the human recombinant TSH-Receptor in the diagnosis of autoimmune thyroid disease. Methods: Sera from 142 consecutive patients (GD: n=50, autoimmune thyroiditis/AIT: n=92) and from 55 controls (31 patients without any thyroid disease and 14 with euthyroid goiter) were evaluated both with the DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman-assay and a conventional RRA (TRAK-Assay trademark). Thyroid in vitro parameters and thyroid sonography were performed in all patients. Results: The DYNOtest trademark TRAK-assay was significantly superior to the conventional RRA in the diagnosis of GD (ptrademark as well as in the DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman-Assay. Therefore the specifity of the DYNOtest trademark TRAKhuman was not inferior compared with the conventional assay. Conclusion: The DYNOtest trademark TRAK-assay is superior in the diagnostic work up of Graves' disease compared with a conventional TRAK-assay and offers an equal specifity. (orig.)

  15. Novel autoimmune phenomena induced in vivo by a new DNA binding protein Nuc: a study on MRL/n mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Y; Takeda, O; Kanai, Y; Miura, K; Kurosawa, Y

    1993-12-01

    We previously purified a 55 kDa protein that preferentially expands anti-DNA antibody production both in vitro and in vivo across the H-2 barrier from culture supernatants of KML1-7 cells, cloned from a lupus-prone MRL/lpr mouse. By using the purified protein, termed nucleobindin (Nuc), we cloned cDNA and produced recombinant(r) Nuc in Escherichia coli. To elucidate the function of rNuc in vivo, we initially injected intraperitoneally 5 micrograms of rNuc without adjuvant into female MRL/n mice at 8 weeks of age and continued injection twice a week. As early as 5 weeks after administration, all mice treated showed an increase in IgG anti-double stranded (ds) DNA antibodies accompanied by IgG hypergammaglobulinemia (HG). Of particular interest was that these mice also produced anti-U1RNP antibodies and rheumatoid factor (RF) of IgG class, but not anti-Sm antibodies. Histopathologically, hypercellularity with occasional crescents in the glomeruli was observed, but evidence for lupus nephritis was lacking, indicating that some factors other than Nuc are necessary for the development of a lupus syndrome observed in MRL/lpr mice. Similar administration of lipopolysaccharide into MRL/n mice failed to induce autoantibodies except for a slight increase in serum IgG, suggesting that these autoimmune responses are not due simply to polyclonal B-cell activation. The presence of rNuc will give us a clue for further understanding of autoimmunity.

  16. Clearance of a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody following administration of DNA in normal and autoimmune mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, F.S.; Pisetsky, D.S.; Kurlander, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    To study the assembly of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in vivo, we have measured the clearance from blood and organ localization of a murine IgG2a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody, called 6/0, following the infusion of DNA intravenously or intraperitoneally. Intraperitoneal DNA caused a profound acceleration of 6/0 anti-DNA clearance that was dose dependent and demonstrable after the infusion of as little as 1.9 microgram per gram of body weight of single-stranded DNA. The antibody was cleared primarily in the liver without increased deposition in the kidney. Intraperitoneal infusions of DNA also accelerated the clearance of 6/0 in autoimmune MRL-lpr/lpr mice. In contrast, intravenous DNA given in comparable doses caused only a slight increase in 6/0 antibody clearance; this accelerated clearance was seen only at low antigen doses and only during the first 10 min following DNA infusion. Using double-radiolabeling techniques, 6/0 and Cl.18, an IgG2ak myeloma protein without anti-DNA activity, were found to disappear from blood at a comparable rate in both B6D2 mice and MRL-lpr/lpr mice. These results suggest that the DNA-anti-DNA immune complexes can form in vivo but that this process is profoundly affected by the manner in which DNA enters the circulation. In addition, the results suggest that DNA-dependent clearance is not a major pathway for anti-DNA metabolism in normal or at least one strain of autoimmune mice.

  17. Autoimmune disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005164 Optimal cut-point of glutamic acid decar-boxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). LI Xia(李霞), et al. Dept Endocrinol, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Central South Univ, Changsha, 410011. Chin J Diabetes, 2005;13(1) :34-38. Objective: To investigate the optimal cut-point of glutamate decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) for differentiating two subtypes of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (I. ADA). Methods: The frequency

  18. Selective loss of Purkinje cells in a patient with anti-gliadin-antibody-positive autoimmune cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasegawa Akira

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had the onset of truncal ataxia at age 77 and a history of Basedow's disease. Her ataxic gait gradually deteriorated. She could not walk without support at age 81 and she was admitted to our hospital at age 83. Gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysarthria were observed. Mild ataxia was observed in all limbs. Her deep tendon reflex and sense of position were normal. IgA anti-gliadin antibody, IgG anti-gliadin antibody, anti-SS-A/Ro antibody, anti-SS-B/La antibody and anti-TPO antibody were positive. A conventional brain MRI did not show obvious cerebellar atrophy. However, MRI voxel based morphometry (VBM and SPECT-eZIS revealed cortical cerebellar atrophy and reduced cerebellar blood flow. IVIg treatment was performed and was moderately effective. After her death at age 85, the patient was autopsied. Neuropathological findings were as follows: selective loss of Purkinje cells; no apparent degenerative change in the efferent pathways, such as the dentate nuclei or vestibular nuclei; no prominent inflammatory reaction. From these findings, we diagnosed this case as autoimmune cerebellar atrophy associated with gluten ataxia. All 3 autopsies previously reported on gluten ataxia have noted infiltration of inflammatory cells in the cerebellum. In this case, we postulated that the infiltration of inflammatory cells was not found because the patient's condition was based on humoral immunity. The clinical conditions of gluten ataxia have not yet been properly elucidated, but are expected to be revealed as the number of autopsied cases increases.

  19. Review on Autoimmune Reactions in Female Infertility: Antibodies to Follicle Stimulating Hormone

    OpenAIRE

    Raivo Uibo; Kadri Haller-Kikkatalo; Andres Salumets

    2012-01-01

    Female fertility can be affected by diseases or dysfunctions of reproductive tract, neuroendocrine system, and immune system. Reproductive autoimmune failure can be associated with overall activation of immune system or with immune system reactions specifically directed against ovarian antigens. Majority of the antiovarian autoantibodies are directed against β -subunit of follicle stimulating hormone (anti-FSH). This paper summarizes a current clinical classification of female infertility in ...

  20. Prevalence and clinical significance of nonorgan specific antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis as predictor markers for rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnady, Basant M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Shaker, Raneyah H M; Soliman, Amal F; Hasan, Waleed A; Alghamdi, Hamed A; Algethami, Mohammed M; Jajah, Mohamed Bilal

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune diseases are considered the 3rd leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are associated with high prevalence of nonorgan-specific autoantibodies, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antidouble-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA), antiextractable-nuclear antigens (anti-ENAs), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anticyclic-citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) whose clinical significance is unknown.We aimed to assess the prevalence of various nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in patients with ATD, and to investigate the possible association between these autoantibodies and occurrence of rheumatic diseases and, if these autoantibodies could be considered as predictor markers for autoimmune rheumatic diseases in the future.This study had 2 phases: phase 1; in which 61 ATD patients free from rheumatic manifestations were assessed for the presence of these nonorgan-specific autoantibodies against healthy 61 control group, followed by 2nd phase longitudinal clinical follow-up in which cases are monitored systematically to establish occurrence and progression of any rheumatic disease in association to these autoantibodies with its influences and prognosis.Regarding ATD patients, ANA, anti-dsDNA, Anti-ENA, and RF were present in a percentage of (50.8%), (18%), (21.3%), and (34.4%), respectively, with statistically significance difference (P controls. Nearly one third of the studied group (32.8%) developed the rheumatic diseases, over 2 years follow-up. It was obvious that those with positive anti-dsDNA had higher risk (2.45 times) to develop rheumatic diseases than those without. There was a statistically significant positive linear relationship between occurrence of disease in months and (age, anti-dsDNA, anti-CCP, RF, and duration of thyroiditis). Anti-dsDNA and RF are the most significant predictors (P management of the disease, as early disease control will allow better quality of life. PMID

  1. Induced Foxp3+ regulatory T cells: a potential new weapon to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Lan; Huimin Fan; Valerie Quesniaux; Bernhard Ryffel; Zhongmin Liu; Song Guo Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Foxp3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) consisting of natural and induced Treg subsets play a crucial role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis against self-antigen.The actions designed to correct defects in numbers or functions of Tregs may be therapeutic in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.While recent studies demonstrated that natural Tregs are instable and dysfunctional in the inflammatory condition,induced Tregs (iTregs) may have a different feature.Here we review the progress of iTregs,particularly focus on their stability and function in the established autoimmune diseases.The advantage of iTregs as therapeutics used under inflammatory conditions is highlighted.Proper generation and manipulation of iTregs used for cellular therapy may provide a promise for the treatment of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  2. Treatment with anti-interferon-gamma monoclonal antibodies modifies experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in interferon-gamma receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C; Penkowa, M; Sáez-Torres, I;

    2001-01-01

    The role of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is still controversial. We have studied the function of IFN-gamma and its receptor in the EAE model using two different IFN-gamma receptor knockout (IFN-gamma R......(-/-)) mouse types: C57Bl/6x129Sv, with a disruption of the IFN-gamma receptor cytoplasmic domain, and 129Sv, homozygous for a disrupted IFN-gamma receptor gene. Mice were immunized with peptide 40-55 from rat myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. A subgroup of mice was treated with anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal...... antibodies (mAb) on day 8 postimmunization. Clinical scoring and both histological and immunohistochemical studies were undertaken for all groups. We hereby show that treatment with anti-IFN-gamma mAb worsened the disease course of 129Sv wild-type mice. However, it decreased the mean daily score in IFN...

  3. Study on serum thyroid peroxidase antibody levels in autoimmune thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) in patients with hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and simple goiter. Methods: Serum TPO-Ab, TMA,TGA and FT3, FT4, TSH levels were measured with radioimmunoassay(RIA) in 69 patients with hyperthyroidism, 53 patients with hypothyroidism, 45 patients with simple goiter and 20 controls. Results: The positive rate of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab) (82%-92.5%) was higher than that of thyroidglobulim antibody(TGA) (44.2%) and thyroid microsome antibody(TMA) (60.4-69.8%) in all patients with AICD. Conclusion: TPO-Ab could be taken as an important indicator in assessment of treatment and prognosis in patients with auto- immune thyroid diseases. (authors)

  4. Antibodies against Ku protein in sera from patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneva, M; Arnett, F C

    1989-01-01

    Immunoaffinity-purified Ku protein was used to screen sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, myositis and Sjögren's syndrome for anti-Ku antibodies in a quantitative immunoblot assay. Sixteen percent of the 159 studied sera were reactive with the Ku protein; significantly increased frequencies of anti-Ku antibodies were found in SLE (19%) and scleroderma (14%) sera. Patients with myositis and Sjögren's syndrome showed similar frequencies. All positive sera had antibodies to the 86 kD subunit of Ku protein; only one serum did not react with 70 kD subunit. Frequencies of other autoantibodies were compared in anti-Ku positive and negative patients. Only anti-Sm antibodies, especially in the absence of anti-nRNP, appear to be associated with the presence of anti-Ku antibodies. A strong correlation between anti-Ku antibodies and the class II HLA antigen DQw1 (89% of the positive sera) was observed, suggesting participation of MHC genes in the mounting of the anti-Ku immune response. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2665976

  5. Prevalence and clinical significance of nonorgan specific antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis as predictor markers for rheumatic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnady, Basant M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Shaker, Raneyah H.M.; Soliman, Amal F.; Hasan, Waleed A.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Algethami, Mohammed M.; Jajah, Mohamed Bilal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune diseases are considered the 3rd leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized countries. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are associated with high prevalence of nonorgan-specific autoantibodies, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), antidouble-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA), antiextractable-nuclear antigens (anti-ENAs), rheumatoid factor (RF), and anticyclic-citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) whose clinical significance is unknown. We aimed to assess the prevalence of various nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in patients with ATD, and to investigate the possible association between these autoantibodies and occurrence of rheumatic diseases and, if these autoantibodies could be considered as predictor markers for autoimmune rheumatic diseases in the future. This study had 2 phases: phase 1; in which 61 ATD patients free from rheumatic manifestations were assessed for the presence of these nonorgan-specific autoantibodies against healthy 61 control group, followed by 2nd phase longitudinal clinical follow-up in which cases are monitored systematically to establish occurrence and progression of any rheumatic disease in association to these autoantibodies with its influences and prognosis. Regarding ATD patients, ANA, anti-dsDNA, Anti-ENA, and RF were present in a percentage of (50.8%), (18%), (21.3%), and (34.4%), respectively, with statistically significance difference (P < 0.5) rather than controls. Nearly one third of the studied group (32.8%) developed the rheumatic diseases, over 2 years follow-up. It was obvious that those with positive anti-dsDNA had higher risk (2.45 times) to develop rheumatic diseases than those without. There was a statistically significant positive linear relationship between occurrence of disease in months and (age, anti-dsDNA, anti-CCP, RF, and duration of thyroiditis). Anti-dsDNA and RF are the most significant predictors (P < 0.0001). ATD is more associated with rheumatic

  6. Role of Peritoneal Macrophages in Cytomegalovirus-induced Acceleration of Autoimmune Diabetes in BB-rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Luuk Hillebrands

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As one of the natural perturbants, infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV is believed to play a role in the development of Type I diabetes. Using the DP-BB rat model for autoimmune diabetes, we here report about possible mechanisms responsible for R(atCMV-induced accelerated onset of diabetes.

  7. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase deficiency causes organ-specific autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hase

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID expressed by germinal center B cells is a central regulator of somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR. Humans with AID mutations develop not only the autosomal recessive form of hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM2 associated with B cell hyperplasia, but also autoimmune disorders by unknown mechanisms. We report here that AID-/- mice spontaneously develop tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs in non-lymphoid tissues including the stomach at around 6 months of age. At a later stage, AID-/- mice develop a severe gastritis characterized by loss of gastric glands and epithelial hyperplasia. The disease development was not attenuated even under germ-free (GF conditions. Gastric autoantigen -specific serum IgM was elevated in AID-/- mice, and the serum levels correlated with the gastritis pathological score. Adoptive transfer experiments suggest that autoimmune CD4+ T cells mediate gastritis development as terminal effector cells. These results suggest that abnormal B-cell expansion due to AID deficiency can drive B-cell autoimmunity, and in turn promote TLO formation, which ultimately leads to the propagation of organ-specific autoimmune effector CD4+ T cells. Thus, AID plays an important role in the containment of autoimmune diseases by negative regulation of autoreactive B cells.

  8. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AUTOIMMUNE ANTIBODIES AND HCG TREATMENT 1N HABITUAL ABORTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGPei-Zhong; WUJin-Zhi; BAOChun-De; CHENShun-Le

    1989-01-01

    The antibodies to cardiolipin (aCL), double stranded DNA (aDNA) and to nuclear axttigcns(Sm, SSA, SSB, Ribonucleoprotein) were prospe, ctivcly investigated in 86 patients of habitual abortion without abilormaiity in their reprodutive system and karyotypes. All

  9. Detection of GAD65 antibodies in diabetes and other autoimmune diseases using a simple radioligand assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, J S; Hejnaes, K R; Moody, A; Karlsen, A E; Marshall, M O; Høier-Madsen, M; Boel, E; Michelsen, B K; Dyrberg, T

    1994-03-01

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) are frequent at or before the onset of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We have developed a simple, reproducible, and quantitative immunoprecipitation radioligand assay using as antigen in vitro transcribed and translated [35S]methionine-labeled human islet GAD65. By using this assay, 77% (77 of 100) of serum samples from recent-onset IDDM patients were positive for GAD65 antibodies compared with 4% (4 of 100) of serum samples from healthy control subjects. In competition analysis with unlabeled purified recombinant human islet GAD65, binding to tracer was inhibited in 74% (74 of 100) of the GAD65-positive IDDM serum samples compared with 2% of the control samples. The levels of GAD antibodies expressed as an index value relative to a standard serum, analyzed with or without competition, were almost identical (r = 0.991). The intra- and interassay variations of a positive control serum sample were 2.9 and 7.6%, respectively (n = 4). The frequency of GAD antibodies was significantly higher with IDDM onset before the age of 30 (80%, 59 of 74) than after the age of 30 (48%, 10 of 21) (P DNA autoantibodies (8% [2 of 25] and 4% [1 of 25] in competition analysis) or rheuma factor autoantibodies [12% (4 of 35) and 3% (1 of 35) in competition analysis] was not different from that in control samples. In contrast, in sera positive for ribonucleoprotein antibodies the frequency of GAD antibodies was significantly increased (73% [51 of 70] and 10% [7 of 70] in competition analysis [P history of IDDM for the presence of this marker. PMID:8314020

  10. Frequency-specific association of antibodies against heat shock proteins 60 and 70 with noise-induced hearing loss in Chinese workers

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Miao; Zheng, Jianru; Yang, Qiaoling; Yao, Huiling; Chen, Yongwen; Tan, Hao; Jiang, Changzheng; Wang, Feng; He, Meian; Chen, Sheng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M.; Wu, Tangchun

    2004-01-01

    Noise exposure may result in production of auto-antibodies against heat shock proteins (Hsps), which might be of significance in the pathogenesis or prognosis (or both) of auto-immune ear diseases. However, it is not known whether these antibodies are associated with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in workers exposed to noise in occupational settings. Using immunoblotting with human recombinant Hsps, audiological assessment, and multivariate logistic regression models, we investigated the p...

  11. Intrathecal-specific glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies at low titers in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Chu, Kon; Byun, Jung-Ick; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Park, Kyung-Il; Jeon, Daejong; Jung, Ki-Young; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-15

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (Gad-Abs) are implicated in various neurological syndromes. The present study aims to identify intrathecal-specific GAD-Abs and to determine clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes. Nineteen patients had GAD-Abs in cerebrospinal fluid but not in paired serum samples. Neurological syndromes included limbic encephalitis, temporal lobe epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stiff-person syndrome. Immunotherapy had beneficial effects in 57.1% of patients, and the patients with limbic encephalitis responded especially well to immunotherapy. Intrathecal-specific antibodies to GAD at low titers may appear as nonspecific markers of immune activation within the central nervous system rather than pathogenic antibodies causing neuronal dysfunction. PMID:26711563

  12. The role of anti-phospholipid antibodies in autoimmune reproductive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantham, Priyadarshini; Abrahams, Vikki M; Chamley, Lawrence W

    2016-05-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) are autoantibodies that are associated with thrombosis and a range of pregnancy complications including recurrent pregnancy loss and pre-eclampsia. The three clinically relevant, well-characterized aPL are anti-cardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant and anti-beta-2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) antibodies. aPL do not bind directly to phospholipids but instead bind to a plasma-binding 'cofactor'. The most extensively studied cofactor is β2GPI, whose role in pregnancy is not fully elucidated. Although the pathogenicity of aPL in recurrent pregnancy loss is well established in humans and animal models, the association of aPL with infertility does not appear to be causative. aPL may exert their detrimental effects during pregnancy by directly binding trophoblast cells of the placenta, altering trophoblast signalling, proliferation, invasion and secretion of hormones and cytokines, and by increasing apoptosis. Heparin is commonly used to treat pregnant women with aPL; however, as thrombotic events do not occur in the placentae of all women with aPL, it may exert a protective effect by preventing the binding of aPL to β2GPI or by acting through non-thrombotic pathways. The aim of this review is to present evidence summarizing the current understanding of this field. PMID:26884418

  13. Rituximab induces sustained reduction of pathogenic B cells in patients with peripheral nervous system autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Michael A.; Rakocevic, Goran; Leung, Carol S.; Quast, Isaak; Lukačišin, Martin; Goebels, Norbert; Münz, Christian; Wardemann, Hedda; Dalakas, Marinos; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    The B cell–depleting IgG1 monoclonal antibody rituximab can persistently suppress disease progression in some patients with autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanism underlying these long-term beneficial effects has remained unclear. Here, we evaluated Ig gene usage in patients with anti–myelin-associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) neuropathy, an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system that is mediated by IgM autoantibodies binding to MAG antigen. Patients with anti-MAG neuropathy showed substantial clonal expansions of blood IgM memory B cells that recognized MAG antigen. The group of patients showing no clinical improvement after rituximab therapy were distinguished from clinical responders by a higher load of clonal IgM memory B cell expansions before and after therapy, by persistence of clonal expansions despite efficient peripheral B cell depletion, and by a lack of substantial changes in somatic hypermutation frequencies of IgM memory B cells. We infer from these data that the effectiveness of rituximab therapy depends on efficient depletion of noncirculating B cells and is associated with qualitative immunological changes that indicate reconfiguration of B cell memory through sustained reduction of autoreactive clonal expansions. These findings support the continued development of B cell–depleting therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:22426210

  14. Interferin with thyroid scintigraphy: the effects of interferon alpha induced thyroid gland autoimmunity and dysfunction upon thyroid scintigraphy in patients with the hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is increasing. Interferon alpha therapy is often used to treat patients who are HCV positive. Thyroid gland autoimmunity and dysfunction has been reported to occur with variable frequency during INF-alpha therapy in patients with the HCV. This study reviews the scintigraphic findings of thyroid scans in such patients in order to assess for the effects on thyroid scintigraphy. To our knowledge, there has been no comprehensive study of this important occurrence to date. There were a number of patients with the HCV being treated at our institution between 23/09/1996 and 09/08/2000. Some of them received INF-alpha therapy, certain were subsequently diagnosed with thyroid gland autoimmunity and/or dysfunction. Eight were imaged with thyroid scintigraphy and reviewed. The scintigraphic findings in the 8 patients fell into two broad categories; 4 demonstrated changes of Graves' disease, and 3 changes of thyroiditis (1 of these was sub-acute). One hypothyroid patient with anti-thyroglobulin antibodies had normal thyroid scintigraphy. Six patients were found to have antithyroid antibodies. One patient with thyroiditis tested negative to antithyroid antibodies. One patient was not tested for antithyroid antibodies. Interferon alpha induced thyroid gland autoimmunity and/or dysfunction can markedly affect the thyroid scintigraphic findings of patients with the hepatitis C virus. This hitherto undescribed occurrence on thyroid scintigraphy has important practical implications of which Nuclear Medicine Specialists need to be aware in order to correctly interpret thyroid scintigraphy studies in such patients. The clinical presentation and effects on imaging appearances are varied. The Nuclear Medicine Specialist can play a central role in establishing the causal link. Awareness of this occurrence enables the Nuclear Medicine Specialist to add value to the referral. This occurrence will become an increasingly common

  15. Complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies distinguish drug-induced lupus from systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, R L; Teodorescu, M; Beutner, E H; Plunkett, R W

    2004-01-01

    The immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody (ANA) test has been widely used to monitor autoimmune disease, but its value for diagnostic purposes is compromised by low specificity and high prevalence in disease-free individuals. The capacity of autoantibodies to fix serum complement proteins when bound to antigen is an important effector function because this property is associated with acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The current study evaluates the complement-fixing properties of antinuclear antibodies (CANA) in three well-defined and clinically-related patient groups: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), drug-induced lupus (DIL) and drug-induced autoimmunity (DIA). Of 20 patients diagnosed with SLE, 90% displayed complement-fixing ANA while this feature was present in only two of 18 patients with DIL and no patients with DIA without associated disease even though the mean ANA titres were similar among these patient groups. CANA was significantly correlated with anti-Sm activity. Because SLE but not DIL or DIA can be a life-threatening disease associated with complement consumption in vivo, these results demonstrate that measurement of CANA is a diagnostically useful tool and may have immunopathologic implications.

  16. Generation and characterization of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with autoimmune disease

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Mi-Young; Lee, Mi-Ok; Jeon, Hyejin; Seol, Binna; Kim, Jung Hwa; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs), a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated disorders, are a major and growing health problem. Although AIDs are currently treated primarily with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs, the use of stem cell transplantation in patients with AIDs is becoming increasingly common. However, stem cell transplantation therapy has limitations, including a shortage of available stem cells and immune rejection of cells from nonautologous sources. Induced pluripotent stem...

  17. The paracrine effect of mesenchymal human stem cells restored hearing in β-tubulin induced autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, T J; Du, Xiaoping; Zhou, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the activities of hASCs (Human Adipose tissue Derived Stem Cells) on experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) and how human stem cells regenerated mouse cochlea cells. We have restored hearing in 19 years old white female with autoimmune hearing loss with autologous adipose tissue derived stem cells and we wish to understand the mechanism of restoration of hearing in animal model. BALB/c mice underwent to develop EAHL; mice with EAHL were given hASCs intraperitoneally once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. ABR were examined over time. The helper type 1 autoreactive responses and T-reg cells were examined. H&E staining or immunostaining with APC conjugated anti-HLA-ABC antibody were conducted. The organ of Corti, stria vascularis, spira ligament and spiral ganglion in stem cell group are normal. In control group, without receiving stem cells, the organ of Corti is replaced by a single layer of cells, atrophy of stria vascularis. Systemic infusion of hASCs significantly improved hearing function and protected hair cells in established EAHL. The hASCs decreased the proliferation of antigen specific Th1/Th17 cells and induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin10 in splenocytes. They also induced the generation of antigen specific CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T-reg cells. The experiment showed the restoration is due to the paracrine activities of human stem cells, since there are newly regenerated mice spiral ganglion cells, not human mesenchymal stem cells derived tissue given by intraperitoneally.

  18. High Prevalence of Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibodies in Infants with Food Protein-Induced Proctitis/Proctocolitis: Autoimmunity Involvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Sekerkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis (FPIP is the most common noninfectious colitis in children in the first year of life. Along with the overall clinical symptoms, diarrhoea and rectal bleeding are the main manifestations of the disease. There is no routine noninvasive test that would be specific for this type of colitis. The aim of our study was to find a noninvasive laboratory test or tests that may be helpful in differential diagnosis of food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis. Methods. ANA, ANCA, ASCA, a-EMA, a-tTg, specific IgE, total IgE, IgG, IgA, IgM, and concentration of serum calprotectin were measured in a group of 25 patients with colitis and 18 children with other diagnoses. Results. Atypical-pANCA antibodies of IgG isotype were detected in the sera of 24 patients by the method of indirect immunofluorescence, and 5 patients showed also the positivity of IgA isotype. In control samples these autoantibodies were not detected. Other autoantibodies were not demonstrated in either patient or control group. Conclusions. Of the parameters tested in noninfectious colitis, atypical-pANCA on ethanol-fixed granulocytes appears to be a suitable serological marker of food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis and suggests a possible involvement of an autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  19. Human parvovirus B19 and autoimmune diseases. Review of the literature and pathophysiological hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Cyril; François, Catherine; Goëb, Vincent; Duverlie, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    A number of arguments support the role played by PVB19 in autoimmunity, in the broad sense of the term essentially derived from numerous clinical case reports and/or small series over the past 20-30 years in the medical literature. PVB19 can induce a very broad spectrum of autoantibody production, especially including: anti-soluble nuclear antigen antibodies, antiphospholipid antibodies anti-native DNA antibodies, antilymphocyte antibody, anticardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. Notably acute PVB19 infection can mimic or stimulate autoimmune systemic diseases as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. However, at the present time, there is no formal scientific evidence demonstrating a direct role of PVB19 in autoimmunity, bearing in mind that there are also no formal arguments against it. Further large studies are needed to understand the eventual role of PVB19 in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26433772

  20. A Distinct Class of Antibodies May Be an Indicator of Gray Matter Autoimmunity in Early and Established Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann J. Ligocki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available * These authors contributed equally to the work in this manuscript.We have previously identified a distinct class of antibodies expressed by B cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of early and established relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients that is not observed in healthy donors. These antibodies contain a unique pattern of mutations in six codons along VH4 antibody genes that we termed the antibody gene signature (AGS. In fact, patients who have such B cells in their CSF are identified as either having RRMS or developing RRMS in the future. As mutations in antibody genes increase antibody affinity for particular antigens, the goal for this study was to investigate whether AGS+ antibodies bind to brain tissue antigens. Single B cells were isolated from the CSF of 10 patients with early or established RRMS. We chose 32 of these B cells that expressed antibodies enriched for the AGS for further study. We generated monoclonal full-length recombinant human antibodies (rhAbs and used both immunological assays and immunohistochemistry to investigate the capacity of these AGS+ rhAbs to bind brain tissue antigens. AGS+ rhAbs did not recognize myelin tracts in the corpus callosum. Instead, AGS+ rhAbs recognized neuronal nuclei and/or astrocytes, which are prevalent in the cortical gray matter. This pattern was unique to the AGS+ antibodies from early and established RRMS patients, as AGS+ antibodies from an early neuromyelitis optica patient did not display the same reactivity. Prevalence of CSF-derived B cells expressing AGS+ antibodies that bind to these cell types may be an indicator of gray matter-directed autoimmunity in early and established RRMS patients.

  1. Autoimmune Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Leypoldt, Frank; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bien, Christian G; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The term autoimmune encephalitis is used to describe a group of disorders characterised by symptoms of limbic and extra-limbic dysfunction occurring in association with antibodies against synaptic antigens and proteins localised on the neuronal cell surface. In recent years there has been a rapidly expanding knowledge of these syndromes resulting in a shift in clinical paradigms and new insights into pathogenic mechanisms. Since many patients respond well to immunosuppressive treatment, the r...

  2. Pregnancy outcomes in patients with autoimmune diseases and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucato, Antonio; Cimaz, Rolando; Caporali, Roberto; Ramoni, Véronique; Buyon, Jill

    2011-02-01

    Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies are associated with neonatal lupus (congenital heart block (CHB), neonatal transient skin rash, hematological and hepatic abnormalities), but do not negatively affects other gestational outcomes, and the general outcome of these pregnancies is now good, when followed by experienced multidisciplinary teams. The prevalence of CHB, defined as an atrioventricular block diagnosed in utero, at birth, or within the neonatal period (0-27 days after birth), in the offspring of an anti-Ro/SSA-positive women is 1-2%, of neonatal lupus rash around 10-20%, while laboratory abnormalities in asymptomatic babies can be detected in up to 27% of cases. The risk of recurrence of CHB is ten times higher. Most of the mothers are asymptomatic at delivery and are identified only by the birth of an affected child. Half of these asymptomatic women develop symptoms of a rheumatic disease, most commonly arthralgias and xerophtalmia, but few develop lupus nephritis. A standard therapy for CHB is still matter of investigation, although fluorinated corticosteroids have been reported to be effective for associated cardiomyopathy. Serial echocardiograms and obstetric sonograms, performed at least every 1-2 weeks starting from the 16th week of gestational age, are recommended in anti-Ro/SSA-positive pregnant women to detect early fetal abnormalities that might be a target of preventive therapy.

  3. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune...... suspected to be caused by inflammation or brain-reactive antibodies associated with the autoimmune diseases. However, the associations could also be caused by shared genetic factors or common etiologic components such as infections. Infections can induce the development of autoimmune diseases...... and autoantibodies, possibly affecting the brain. Autoimmune diseases and brain-reactive antibodies should be considered by clinicians in the treatment of individuals with psychotic symptoms, and even if the association is not causal, treatment would probably still improve quality of life and survival....

  4. [Autoimmune epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeck, M; Zacharia, A; Rossetti, A O

    2010-05-01

    There is increasing recognition of an autoimmune origin of pharmacoresistant epileptic disorders. Besides the paraneoplastic limbic encephalopathies (LE), reports of syndromes of non-paraneoplastic LE are increasingly reported in the last 5-10 years. Three antibodies are now relatively well described: Voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-(NMDA) antibodies. We review clinical syndromes, associated imaging and laboratory findings. While most reports arise from adult populations, children and adolescents are also concerned as evidenced by increasing observations. Early recognition is mandatory, since early immunomodulatory treatment appears to be related to significantly better outcome. PMID:20499581

  5. Celiac anti-type 2 transglutaminase antibodies induce phosphoproteome modification in intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Paolella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2 activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins, three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here

  6. Induced autoimmunity against gonadal proteins affects gonadal development in juvenile zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Presslauer

    Full Text Available A method to mitigate or possibly eliminate reproduction in farmed fish is highly demanded. The existing approaches have certain applicative limitations. So far, no immunization strategies affecting gonadal development in juvenile animals have been developed. We hypothesized that autoimmune mechanisms, occurring spontaneously in a number of diseases, could be induced by targeted immunization. We have asked whether the immunization against specific targets in a juvenile zebrafish gonad will produce an autoimmune response, and, consequently, disturbance in gonadal development. Gonadal soma-derived factor (Gsdf, growth differentiation factor (Gdf9, and lymphocyte antigen 75 (Cd205/Ly75, all essential for early gonad development, were targeted with 5 immunization tests. Zebrafish (n = 329 were injected at 6 weeks post fertilization, a booster injection was applied 15 days later, and fish were sampled at 30 days. We localized transcripts encoding targeted proteins by in situ hybridization, quantified expression of immune-, apoptosis-, and gonad-related genes with quantitative real-time PCR, and performed gonadal histology and whole-mount immunohistochemistry for Bcl2-interacting-killer (Bik pro-apoptotic protein. The treatments resulted in an autoimmune reaction, gonad developmental retardation, intensive apoptosis, cell atresia, and disturbed transcript production. Testes were remarkably underdeveloped after anti-Gsdf treatments. Anti-Gdf9 treatments promoted apoptosis in testes and abnormal development of ovaries. Anti-Cd205 treatment stimulated a strong immune response in both sexes, resulting in oocyte atresia and strong apoptosis in supporting somatic cells. The effect of immunization was FSH-independent. Furthermore, immunization against germ cell proteins disturbed somatic supporting cell development. This is the first report to demonstrate that targeted autoimmunity can disturb gonadal development in a juvenile fish. It shows a

  7. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in trichloroethene-mediated autoimmune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases. Also, increased lipid peroxidation and protein nitration are reported in systemic autoimmune diseases. Lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes (LPDAs) such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) are highly reactive and bind proteins covalently, but their potential to elicit an autoimmune response and contribution to disease pathogenesis remain unclear. Similarly, nitration of protein could also contribute to disease pathogenesis. To assess the status of lipid peroxidation and/or RONS, autoimmune-prone female MRL+/+ mice (5-week old) were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 48 weeks (0.5 mg/ml via drinking water), and formation of antibodies to LPDA-protein adducts was followed in the sera of control and TCE-treated mice. TCE treatment led to greater formation of both anti-MDA- and -HNE-protein adduct antibodies and higher serum iNOS and nitrotyrosine levels. The increase in TCE-induced oxidative stress was associated with increases in anti-nuclear-, anti-ssDNA- and anti-dsDNA-antibodies. These findings suggest that TCE exposure not only leads to oxidative/nitrosative stress, but is also associated with induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response in MRL+/+ mice. Further interventional studies are needed to establish a causal role of RONS in TCE-mediated autoimmunity

  8. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Prinz

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Lack of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS.Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6 mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE. The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT of the spinal cord.B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. Additionally, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation.Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute useful instruments to study the diverse

  9. Prospective investigation of pituitary functions in patients with acute infectious meningitis: is acute meningitis induced pituitary dysfunction associated with autoimmunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, F; De Bellis, A; Teksahin, H; Alp, E; Bizzarro, A; Sinisi, A A; Bellastella, G; Paglionico, V A; Bellastella, A; Unluhizarci, K; Doganay, M; Kelestimur, F

    2012-12-01

    Previous case reports and retrospective studies suggest that pituitary dysfunction may occur after acute bacterial or viral meningitis. In this prospective study we assessed the pituitary functions, lipid profile and anthropometric measures in adults with acute bacterial or viral meningitis. Moreover, in order to investigate whether autoimmune mechanisms could play a role in the pathogenesis of acute meningitis-induced hypopituitarism we also investigated the anti-pituitary antibodies (APA) and anti-hypothalamus antibodies (AHA) prospectively. Sixteen patients (10 males, 6 females; mean ± SD age 40.9 ± 15.9) with acute infectious meningitis were included and the patients were evaluated in the acute phase, and at 6 and 12 months after the acute meningitis. In the acute phase 18.7% of the patients had GH deficiency, 12.5% had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. At 12 months after acute meningitis 6 of 14 patients (42.8%) had GH deficiency, 1 of 14 patients (7.1%) had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. Two of 14 patients (14.3%) had combined hormone deficiencies and four patients (28.6%) had isolated hormone deficiencies at 12 months. Four of 9 (44.4%) hormone deficiencies at 6 months were recovered at 12 months, and 3 of 8 (37.5%) hormone deficiencies at 12 months were new-onset hormone deficiencies. At 12 months there were significant negative correlations between IGF-I level vs. LDL-C, and IGF-I level vs. total cholesterol. The frequency of AHA and APA positivity was substantially high, ranging from 35 to 50% of the patients throughout the 12 months period. However there were no significant correlations between AHA or APA positivity and hypopituitarism. The risk of hypopituitarism, GH deficiency in particular, is substantially high in the acute phase, after 6 and 12 months of the acute infectious meningitis. Moreover we found that 6th month after meningitis is too early to make a decision for pituitary dysfunction and these patients should be screened for at least 12 months

  10. Nuclear antigen expression by ultraviolet light irradiation - a contribution to the UV-induced autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given about nuclear antigen expression due to UVB, UVA, and PUVA. UVB alters DNA resulting in strong immunogenic UVDNA and complementary antibodies. Antibodies to UVDNA cross react with double-stranded DNA. UVDNA plays a (hypothetical) role in the induction of cutaneous lesions in lupus erythematosus (LE). Investigations about SS-A/Ro expression due to UVB seem to be more important under this view. Antibodies against SS-A/Ro are related to an increased photosensitivity in LE. PUVA and UVA are able to induce antinuclear antibodies of unknown specificity. It is likely that PUVA enhances SS-A/Ro expression in vitro. The results are discussed in sense of LE photobiology and unwanted side effects of photo(chemo)therapy in psoriasis. (author)

  11. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution.

  12. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution. PMID:27056852

  13. High throughput screening for antibody induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity in early antibody discovery using homogeneous macroconfocal fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Arnout F.; Bosch, Martijn; de Weers, Michel; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2010-01-01

    Complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) represents an important Fc-mediated effector function of antibodies and is a quality often sought in candidates for therapeutic antibody development in cancer. Antibodies inducing potent CDC are relatively rare as the ability to induce CDC is strongly dependen

  14. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  15. A Tandem Repeat in Decay Accelerating Factor 1 Is Associated with Severity of Murine Mercury-Induced Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Cauvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay accelerating factor (DAF, a complement-regulatory protein, protects cells from bystander complement-mediated lysis and negatively regulates T cells. Reduced expression of DAF occurs in several systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, and DAF deficiency exacerbates disease in several autoimmune models, including murine mercury-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA. Daf1, located within Hmr1, a chromosome 1 locus associated in DBA/2 mice with resistance to mHgIA, could be a candidate. Here we show that reduced Daf1 transcription in lupus-prone mice was not associated with a reduction in the Daf1 transcription factor SP1. Studies of NZB mice congenic for the mHgIA-resistant DBA/2 Hmr1 locus suggested that Daf1 expression was controlled by the host genome and not the Hmr1 locus. A unique pentanucleotide repeat variant in the second intron of Daf1 in DBA/2 mice was identified and shown in F2 intercrosses to be associated with less severe disease; however, analysis of Hmr1 congenics indicated that this most likely reflected the presence of autoimmunity-predisposing genetic variants within the Hmr1 locus or that Daf1 expression is mediated by the tandem repeat in epistasis with other genetic variants present in autoimmune-prone mice. These studies argue that the effect of DAF on autoimmunity is complex and may require multiple genetic elements.

  16. 狼疮肾炎患者血清自身抗体检测及意义%Clinical significance of autoimmune antibody in patients with lupus nephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 王琳

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical significance autoimmune antibody in patients with lupus nephritis(LN).Methods ELISA assay was performed to examine anti-C1q antibody and anti-nucleus antibody;immunoblot assay was performed to examine anti-dsDNA antibody,anti-nucleosome antibody and anti-Sm antibody in sera of 38 patients with LN and 22 patients of system lupus erythemalosus without renal damage.Standard methods were uaed for laboratory testing.Results The positive rate of anti-C1q antibody,anti-dsDNA antibody,anti-nucleosome antibody,anti-Sm antibody and anti-nucleus antibody were significantly higher in LN than in controls(P<0.01).AntiC1q antibody and anti-nucleus antibody were significantty higher in LN than in controls(P<0.01,P<0.05).Serum levels of anti-C1q antibody was positively correlated with SLEDAI score and the level of anti-nucleus antibody,but was negatively oorrelated with C3、 C4.Conclusion Anti-C1q antibody,anti-dsDNA antibody,anti-nucleosome antibody and anti-nucleus antibody are suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of LN and can be used as diagnostic tools and disease activity markers.%目的 探讨狼疮肾炎(LN)患者血清自身抗体检测的临床意义.方法 检测60例系统性红斑狼疮(SLE)患者血清抗Clq抗体、ANA抗体、抗dsDNA、核小体、抗-Sm抗体,并依据有无狼疮肾炎分为狼疮肾炎组(A组)38例和无狼疮肾炎的SLE对照组(B组)22例.结果 A组抗C1q、dsDNA、核小体、抗-Sm和ANA抗体阳性率显著高于B组(均P<0.01),血清中抗C1q抗体水平分别与SLEDAI评分、抗ANA水平呈显著正相关(均P<0.01);与补体C3、C4含量呈显著负相关(P<0.01).结论 抗C1q抗体、dsDNA、核小体和ANA是反映SLE患者并发肾脏损害的重要指标,在LN诊断和判定活动性方面有重要作用.

  17. Measurement of anti-DFS70 antibodies in patients with ANA-associated autoimmune rheumatic diseases suspicion is cost-effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundín, Simón; Irure-Ventura, Juan; Asensio, Esther; Ramos, David; Mahler, Michael; Martínez-Taboada, Victor; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2016-12-01

    The presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) is associated with a wide range of ANA-associated autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AARD). The most commonly method used for the detection of ANA is indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) on HEp-2 cells. This method is very sensitive but unspecific. As a consequence, ANA testing on HEp-2 substrates outside a proper clinical specialist framework may lead to inappropriate referrals to tertiary care specialists and, worst case inappropriate and potentially toxic therapy for the patient. Among ANA, isolated anti-DFS70 antibodies represent a potentially important biomarker that can be clinically used to discriminate AARD from non-AARD patients in ANA IIF positive individuals. Therefore, their presence may avoid unnecessary follow-up testing and referrals. In our study, we investigated if the implementation of a new ANA workup algorithm allowing for the identification of anti-DFS70 antibodies is cost-effective through the reduction of both unnecessary follow-up testing and outpatient clinic visits generated by the clinical suspicion of a potential AARD. None of the 181 patients included with a positive monospecific anti-DFS70 antibody result developed SARD during the follow-up period of 10 years. The reduction in number of tests after ANA and anti-DFS70 positive results was significant for anti-ENA (230 vs. 114 tests; p < 0.001) and anti-dsDNA antibodies (448 vs. 114 tests; p < 0.001). In addition, the outpatient clinic visits decreased by 70 % (p < 0.001). In total, the adoption of the new algorithm including anti-DFS70 antibody testing resulted in a cost saving of 60869.53 € for this pilot study. In conclusion, the use of anti-DFS70 antibodies was clearly cost-efficient in our setting. PMID:27473142

  18. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Child with Autoimmune Thyroiditis and Recurrent Hyperthyroidism in the Absence of TSH Receptor Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dunne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashitoxicosis is an initial, transient, hyperthyroid phase that rarely affects patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis. We present here an unusual case of a child with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. A 4 yr 6/12 old male was diagnosed by us with autoimmune subclinical hypothyroidism (normal free T4, slightly elevated TSH, and elevated TG antibody titer. Two years and 6/12 later he experienced increased appetite and poor weight gain; a laboratory evaluation revealed suppressed TSH, elevated free T4, and normal TSI titer. In addition, an I123 thyroid uptake was borderline-low. A month later, the free T4 had normalized. After remaining asymptomatic for 3 years, the patient presented again with increased appetite, and he was found with low TSH and high free T4. Within the following 3 months, his free T4 and TSH normalized. At his most recent evaluation, his TSH was normal and the free T4 was borderline-high; the TG antibody titer was still elevated and the TSI titer was negative. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported with Hashimoto thyroiditis and recurrent hyperthyroidism. This case exemplifies the variability of the manifestations and natural history of Hashimoto thyroiditis and supports the need for a long-term evaluation of patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

  19. 自身抗体检测在自身免疫性疾病中的价值%Detective value of autoimmune antibodies in autoimmune diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃仕锋; 李春美

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨ENA(抗可提取性核抗原抗体)、ANA(抗核抗体)和抗ds-DNA抗体(双链DNA抗体)在AID患者中的相关性及敏感性。方法:分析2013年2月至2014年4月在我院接受治疗的AID患者的临床资料。检测入组患者的ENA、ANA、抗ds-DNA抗体表达情况。比较男性、女性的自身抗体阳性情况差异,并探讨不同荧光模式的ANA对应的ENA各项阳性情况以及ANA表达与ENA、抗ds-DNA表达相关性。结果:本研究共纳入研究对象180例,其中男性患者67例,女性患者113例。女性患者的ANA(χ2=12.23,P<0.01)、抗ds-DNA阳性率(χ2=5.906,P=0.015)均显著高于男性。 nRNP、ss-A阳性标本中的颗粒型ANA比例最高,而Scl-70阳性标本中均质型ANA比例最高;ANA阳性标本的ENA阳性率(χ2=6.406,P=0.011)、抗ds-DNA阳性率(χ2=43.49,P<0.01)显著高于ANA阴性的标本。结论:男性自身抗体阳性率明显低于女性,颗粒型在ANA核型中占据比较高的比率,抗ds-DNA和ENA的阳性检出率与ANA阳性率有着一定的关系。%Objective:To study the sensitivity and correlation between ANA,ENA and anti ds-DNA antibody in the patients with AID.Methods:Clinical data of patients with AID received treatment at our hospital from February 2013 to January 2014 was retro-spectively analyzed.The antibody expressions of ENA, ANA, anti ds-DNA antibody of the patients were detected.The autoantibody positive differences between the males and females were compared.The positive situation of ENA correspond to different fluorescent patterns of ANA and the correlation between the expression of ANA and the expressions of ENA,anti ds-DNA antibody were both dis-cussed.The relationship between the expression of ANA and the expression of ENA,dsDNA was also discussed.Results:A total of 180 patients were retrospective analyzed,including 67 males and 113 females.The positive rates of ANA,anti ds

  20. ROCK2 signaling is required to induce a subset of T follicular helper cells through opposing effects on STATs in autoimmune settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan M; Chen, Wei; Nyuydzefe, Melanie S; Trzeciak, Alissa; Flynn, Ryan; Tonra, James R; Marusic, Suzana; Blazar, Bruce R; Waksal, Samuel D; Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase 2 (ROCK2) determines the balance between human T helper 17 (TH17) cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. We investigated its role in the generation of T follicular helper (TFH) cells, which help to generate antibody-producing B cells under normal and autoimmune conditions. Inhibiting ROCK2 in normal human T cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) decreased the number and function of TFH cells induced by activation ex vivo. Moreover, inhibition of ROCK2 activity decreased the abundance of the transcriptional regulator Bcl6 (B cell lymphoma 6) and increased that of Blimp1 by reducing the binding of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and increasing that of STAT5 to the promoters of the genes Bcl6 and PRDM1, respectively. In the MRL/lpr murine model of SLE, oral administration of the selective ROCK2 inhibitor KD025 resulted in a twofold reduction in the numbers of TFH cells and antibody-producing plasma cells in the spleen, as well as a decrease in the size of splenic germinal centers, which are the sites of interaction between TFH cells and B cells. KD025-treated mice showed a substantial improvement in both histological and clinical scores compared to those of untreated mice and had reduced amounts of Bcl6 and phosphorylated STAT3, as well as increased STAT5 phosphorylation. Together, these data suggest that ROCK2 signaling plays a critical role in controlling the development of TFH cells induced by autoimmune conditions through reciprocal regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 activation. PMID:27436361

  1. A rare presentation of hypopituitarism in hepatic overlap syndrome of autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta V; Singh H.; Talapatra P; Ray S

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune cholangitis is the antimitochondrial antibody-negative autoimmune hepatopathy with clinical and histological features similar to that of primary biliary cirrhosis. Autoimmune cholangitis has a predominant cholestatic phase. However, transaminasemia might be dominant in certain patients, indicating associated autoimmune hepatitis. Such an autoimmune hepatopathy has been termed as hepatic overlap syndrome. Due to the autoimmune nature of the disease, associated diseases of other orga...

  2. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody in patients with wood-smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) without rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigari, Naseh; Moghimi, Nasrin; Shahraki, Farhad Saber; Mohammadi, Shilan; Roshani, Daem

    2015-01-01

    Citrullination, a post-translational modification of proteins, is increased in inflammatory processes and is known to occur in smokers. It can induce anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, the most specific serologic marker for rheumatoid arthritis. Thus far, the incidence of autoimmunity in patients with wood-smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) resulting in anti-CCP production has not been examined. We hypothesise that anti-CCP antibody level in these patients should be higher than that in healthy subjects. A total of 112 non-rheumatoid arthritis patients, including 56 patients with wood-smoke-induced COPD and 56 patients with tobacco-induced COPD, and 56 healthy non-smoker controls were included. The serum anti-CCP antibody levels were measured and compared between the groups and against smoke exposure and clinical characteristics. The mean anti-CCP antibody levels in wood-smoke-induced COPD group were significantly higher than those in tobacco-induced COPD group (p = 0.03) and controls (p = 0.004). Furthermore, 8 (14.2 %) patients with wood-smoke-induced COPD, 4 (7.14 %) with tobacco-induced COPD and 2 (3.57 %) controls exceeded the conventional cut-off of anti-CCP antibody positivity. No relationship was found between the anti-CCP antibody level and age, gender, duration of disease, Pack-years of smoking, and duration of exposure to wood smoke. Moreover, correlations between anti-CCP antibodies and severity of airflow limitation, CAT scores, mMRC scores of dyspnoea, and GOLD staging of COPD severity were not significant. Wood-smoke-induced COPD could significantly increase the anti-CCP antibody level in non-rheumatoid arthritis patients when compared with that in patients with tobacco-induced COPD and healthy controls.

  3. Development of Autoimmune Overt Hypothyroidism Is Highly Associated With Live Births and Induced Abortions but Only in Premenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Buelow; Knudsen, Nils;

    2014-01-01

    Context: The 1-year postpartum period is often accompanied by increased risk for thyroid disease. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the role of reproductive risk factors in the development of autoimmune overt hypothyroidism in the years after the 1-year postpartum period....... Design, Setting, and Subjects: In a population study, we included Danish women with new autoimmune overt hypothyroidism not diagnosed within the first year after a pregnancy (n = 117; median age 53.0 y) and age-andregion-matched euthyroid controls from the same population (n = 468). Main Outcome Measures......: In conditional multivariate logistic regression models, we analyzed the associations between the development of autoimmune hypothyroidism and age at menarche/menopause, years of menstruations, pregnancies, spontaneous and induced abortions, live births, and years on oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormone...

  4. Pathophysiology of autoimmune polyneuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2013-06-01

    The most common autoimmune neuropathies include the acute inflammatory polyneuropathy [the Guillain-Barré Syndrome(s)]; chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated paraproteinemic neuropathy. These neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to peripheral nerve components (myelin, Schwann cell, axon, and motor or ganglionic neurons) is lost. Based on the immunopathologic similarities with experimental allergic neuritis induced after immunization with nerve proteins, disease transfer experiments with the patients' serum or with intraneural injections, and immunocytochemical studies on the patients' nerves, it appears that both cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a role in the cause of these neuropathies. Although in some of them there is direct evidence for autoimmune reactivity mediated by specific antibodies or autoreactive T lymphocytes, in others the underlying immune-mediated mechanisms have not been fully elucidated, in spite of good response to immunotherapies. The review highlights the factors associated with breaking the T-cell tolerance, the T-cell activation and costimulatory molecules, the immunoregulatory T-cells and relevant cytokines and the antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins that seem to be of pathogenic relevance. Antigens in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions are discussed as potentially critical targets in explaining conduction failure and rapid recovery. Based on the immunopathologic network believed to play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of these neuropathies, future therapeutic directions are highlighted using new biological agents against T-cells, cytokines, B-cells, transmigration and transduction molecules.

  5. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against radiation-induced protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtained the 6 monoclonal antibodies against gamma-induced proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans, and these antibodies were designated as Mab-3F, 4B, 4D, 4F, 4G and 12G. Using these antibodies, we investigated the relations between gamma-induced proteins and other stress protein in strain R1, and the induction of proteins were compared among strain R1, resistant mutant (rec1) and radiosensitive mutant (rec30). We found new 6 proteins recognized by these monoclonal antibodies which were induced after gamma-irradiation especially in strain R1 and rec 1, but not induced in strain rec30. We suppose that these proteins participate in repair of DNA damages including double strand breaks caused by gamma-irradiation. One of them was around 46kDa protein band recognized by Mab-12G, and this protein was so induced in a large quantity after irradiation that the protein could detect by gold staining. In addition to this observation, we found some proteins which were induced in R1 and rec 1 by gamma-irradiation and other stress, but not in strain rec30, such as 31kDa protein band recognized by Mab-3F, 4B and 4G, and other 11 proteins which were especially induced in irradiated strain R1. The latter proteins might be reinforcement factor to radioresistance such as GroE and DnaK, or participant in repair of damage by gamma-irradiation in strain R1. (author)

  6. Antibodies and IL-3 support helminth-induced basophil expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Tina; Esser, Julia; Prati, Moira; Kulagin, Manuel; Stettler, Rebecca; Zaiss, Mario M; Hewitson, James P; Merky, Patrick; Verbeek, Joseph S; Bourquin, Carole; Camberis, Mali; Prout, Melanie; Maizels, Rick M; Le Gros, Graham; Harris, Nicola L

    2012-09-11

    Basophils are powerful mediators of Th2 immunity and are present in increased numbers during allergic inflammation and helminth infection. Despite their ability to potentiate Th2 immunity the mechanisms regulating basophil development remain largely unknown. We have found a unique role for isotype-switched antibodies in promoting helminth-induced basophil production following infection of mice with Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri or Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. H. polygyrus bakeri-induced basophil expansion was found to occur within the bone marrow, and to a lesser extent the spleen, and was IL-3 dependent. IL-3 was largely produced by CD4(+)CD49b(+)NK1.1(-) effector T cells at these sites, and required the IL-4Rα chain. However, antibody-deficient mice exhibited defective basophil mobilization despite intact T-cell IL-3 production, and supplementation of mice with immune serum could promote basophilia independently of required IL-4Rα signaling. Helminth-induced eosinophilia was not affected by the deficiency in isotype-switched antibodies, suggesting a direct effect on basophils rather than through priming of Th2 responses. Although normal type 2 immunity occurred in the basopenic mice following primary infection with H. polygyrus bakeri, parasite rejection following challenge infection was impaired. These data reveal a role for isotype-switched antibodies in promoting basophil expansion and effector function following helminth infection. PMID:22930820

  7. Mouse Models of Multiple Sclerosis: Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Theiler’s Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Derrick P.; Richards, Maureen H.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler’s Murine Encephalitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease (TMEV-IDD) are two clinically relevant murine models of multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, both are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the CNS and demyelination. EAE is induced by either the administration of myelin protein or peptide in adjuvant or by the adoptive transfer of encephalitogenic T cell blasts into naïve recipients. The relative merits of each of ...

  8. Anticuerpos anti 21 hidroxilasa séricos en pacientes con anticuerpos antifracción microsomal: Síndrome poliendocrino autoinmune Seric 21- hydroxilase antibodies in patients with anti-microsomal fraction antibodies: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Botta

    2007-04-01

    these are induced by autoantibodies. Alopecia, vitiligo, myasthenia and other manifestations can be minor components. We sought to establish the prevalence of seric a21-OH in patients with positive anti-microsomal fraction autoantibodies, autoimmune thyroid disease and/or non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. We also aimed to diagnose incomplete forms of APS and to follow up patients at risk of progression to complete forms of APS. A population of 72 patients and another of 60 controls with negative anti-microsomal fraction autoantibodies were studied. Elevated seric a21-OH were found in two patients. Patient A with 47 U/ml had autoimmune hypothyroidism and myasthenia; and patient B with 8.75 U/ml had autoimmune hypothyrodism and vitiligo; they both lacked adrenal insufficiency. Seric a21-OH had a prevalence of 2.8%. Regarding the adrenal component, patients A and B had an incomplete and latent APS type 2. Considering a21-OH as markers of latent endocrine autoimmune diseases and taking into account the eventual risk of developing clinical manifestations, periodic biochemical and clinical follow-ups are recommended.

  9. DIABETOGENIC T CELLS INDUCE AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES IN BALB/c MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-lei Zou; Zeng-yu Zhao; Yun-yang Wang; Zhi-qiang Su; Ming Xiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of T cell and its subsets in the induction of insulitis and type 1 diabetes meilitus(T1DM) in BALB/c mice.Methods Autoimmune diabetes mellitus was developed by intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg streptozotocin(STZ) daily for 5 consecutive days in BALB/c mice as sources of donor cells. Spleen cells from diabetic mice were then cultured for 7 days in the stimulation of interleukin-2 ( IL-2 ) to harvest diabetogenic T cells, which were subsequently transferred into normal BALB/c mice recipients. MTr, ELISA, and HE staining were used to analyze the lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine (IL-2, interferon-γ, IL-4, and IL-10) levels, and pathological changes in pancreatic islets.Results As few as 3 × 106 diabetogenic T cells successfully induced diabetes meilitus in recipients pretreated with STZ twice, whereas transfer of equal amount of normal splenocytes, T cell-depleted diabetogenie splenocytes, or diabetogenic CD4+ T cells alone in recipients receiving STZ twice pretreatment was proved not to induce diabetes mellitus either. A markedly increased lymphocyte proliferation, high levels of interferon-γ and IL-2 in the supematants of diabetogenie T cells were observed. In addition, a markedly enhanced lymphocyte proliferation, a high level of interferon-γ secretion in serum, and numerous lymphocytes infiltration in pancreatic islets were detected in the diabetic mice induced by diabetogenic T cells transfer.Conclusions A novel T1DM murine model is established in STZ-pretreated BALB/c mice by adoptive transfer of diabetogenic T cells. CD4M+ T cells with interferon-γ may promote the onset of diabetes mellitus.

  10. Role of antiviral antibodies in resistance against coxsackievirus B3 infection: interaction between preexisting antibodies and an interferon inducer.

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, C T; Feng, K. K.; McCarthy, V P; Lenahan, M F

    1982-01-01

    An experimental model of coxsackievirus B3 infection in newborn mice was utilized to examine the protective role of antiviral antibodies and an interferon inducer, polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)]. Subcutaneous administration to the infected mice of specific antiviral antibodies resulted in significant protection against coxsackievirus B3 infection. Antibody-treated animals had shortened viremia, early clearance of virus from tissues, and a reduced mortality rate. Dose respons...

  11. Enhanced expression of constitutive and inducible forms of nitric oxide synthase in autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Moon, C; Wie, M B; Kim, H; Tanuma, N; Matsumoto, Y; Shin, T

    2000-06-01

    To elucidate the role of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we analyzed the expression of constitutive neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS) in the spinal cords of rats with EAE. We further examined the structural interaction between apoptotic cells and spinal cord cells including neurons and astrocytes, which are potent cell types of nitric oxide (NO) production in the brain. Western blot analysis showed that three forms of NOS significantly increased in the spinal cords of rats at the peak stage of EAE, while small amounts of these enzymes were identified in the spinal cords of rats without EAE. Immunohistochemical study showed that the expression of either nNOS or eNOS increased in the brain cells including neurons and astrocytes during the peak and recovery stages of EAE, while the expression of iNOS was found mainly in the inflammatory macrophages in the perivascular EAE lesions. Double labeling showed that apoptotic cells had intimate contacts with either neurons or astrocytes, which are major cell types to express nNOS and eNOS constitutively. Our results suggest that the three NOS may play an important role in the recovery of EAE. PMID:14612615

  12. Neuropathology of autoimmune encephalitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jan; Bien, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a large number of antibody-associated or antibody-defined encephalitides have been discovered. These conditions are often referred to as autoimmune encephalitides. The clinical features include prominent epileptic seizures, cognitive and psychiatric disturbance. These encephalitides can be divided in those with antibodies against intracellular antigens and those with antibodies against surface antigens. The discovery of new antibodies against targets on the surface of neurons is especially interesting since patients with such antibodies can be successfully treated immunologically. This chapter focuses on the pathology and the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in these encephalitides and discusses some of the questions that are raised in this exciting new field. It is important to realise, however, that because of the use of antibodies to diagnose the patients, and their improvement with treatment, there are relatively few biopsy or postmortem reports, limiting the neuropathological data and conclusions that can be drawn. For this reason we especially focus on the most frequent autoimmune encephalitides, those with antibodies to the NMDA receptor and with antibodies to the known protein components of the VGKC complex. Analysis of these encephalitides show completely different pathogenic mechanisms. In VGKC complex encephalitis, antibodies seem to bind to their target and activate complement, leading to destruction and loss of neurons. On the other hand, in NMDAR encephalitis, complement activation and neuronal degeneration seems to be largely absent. Instead, binding of antibodies leads to a decrease of NMDA receptors resulting in a hypofunction. This hypofunction offers an explanation for some of the clinical features such as psychosis and episodic memory impairment, but not for the frequent seizures. Thus, additional analysis of the few human brain specimens present and the use of specific animal models are needed to further understand the effects

  13. Neuropathology of autoimmune encephalitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jan; Bien, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a large number of antibody-associated or antibody-defined encephalitides have been discovered. These conditions are often referred to as autoimmune encephalitides. The clinical features include prominent epileptic seizures, cognitive and psychiatric disturbance. These encephalitides can be divided in those with antibodies against intracellular antigens and those with antibodies against surface antigens. The discovery of new antibodies against targets on the surface of neurons is especially interesting since patients with such antibodies can be successfully treated immunologically. This chapter focuses on the pathology and the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in these encephalitides and discusses some of the questions that are raised in this exciting new field. It is important to realise, however, that because of the use of antibodies to diagnose the patients, and their improvement with treatment, there are relatively few biopsy or postmortem reports, limiting the neuropathological data and conclusions that can be drawn. For this reason we especially focus on the most frequent autoimmune encephalitides, those with antibodies to the NMDA receptor and with antibodies to the known protein components of the VGKC complex. Analysis of these encephalitides show completely different pathogenic mechanisms. In VGKC complex encephalitis, antibodies seem to bind to their target and activate complement, leading to destruction and loss of neurons. On the other hand, in NMDAR encephalitis, complement activation and neuronal degeneration seems to be largely absent. Instead, binding of antibodies leads to a decrease of NMDA receptors resulting in a hypofunction. This hypofunction offers an explanation for some of the clinical features such as psychosis and episodic memory impairment, but not for the frequent seizures. Thus, additional analysis of the few human brain specimens present and the use of specific animal models are needed to further understand the effects

  14. Suppression of inflammatory responses during MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is regulated by AKT3 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Tsiperson, Vladislav; Gruber, Ross C; Goldberg, Michael; Jordan, Ayana; Weinger, Jason G.; Macian, Fernando; Shafit-Zagardo, Bridget

    2013-01-01

    AKT3, a member of the serine/threonine kinase AKT family, is involved in a variety of biological processes. AKT3 is expressed in immune cells, and is the major AKT isoform in the CNS representing 30% of the total AKT expressed in spinal cord, and 50% in the brain. Myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a mouse model in which lymphocytes and monocytes enter the CNS, resulting in inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury. We hyp...

  15. The innate immune response affects the development of the autoimmune response in Theiler’s virus- induced demyelinating disease

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Julie K.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a human CNS autoimmune demyelinating disease. Epidemiological evidence has suggested a role for virus infection in the initiation and/or exacerbation of MS. Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)- induced demyelinating disease serves as a relevant mouse model for MS. TMEV- infected mice develop a demyelinating disease with clinical symptoms beginning around 35 days post infection which is associated with development of myelin- specific, PLP139–151, CD4+ T c...

  16. Gene Expression in the Spinal Cord in Female Lewis Rats with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Induced with Myelin Basic Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, Hayley R.; Judith M. Greer; Pamela A. McCombe

    2012-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a...

  17. Erythropoietin: a potent inducer of peripheral immuno/inflammatory modulation in autoimmune EAE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RuiRong Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Beneficial effects of short-term erythropoietin (EPO therapy have been demonstrated in several animal models of acute neurologic injury, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE--the animal model of multiple sclerosis. We have found that EPO treatment substantially reduces the acute clinical paralysis seen in EAE mice and this improvement is accompanied by a large reduction in the mononuclear cell infiltration and downregulation of glial MHC class II expression within the inflamed CNS. Other reports have recently indicated that peripherally generated anti-inflammatory CD4(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and the IL17-producing CD4+ T helper cell (Th17 subpopulations play key antagonistic roles in EAE pathogenesis. However, no information regarding the effects of EPO therapy on the behavior of the general mononuclear-lymphocyte population, Tregs or Th17 cells in EAE has emerged. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We first determined in vivo that EPO therapy markedly suppressed MOG specific T cell proliferation and sharply reduced the number of reactive dendritic cells (CD11c positive in EAE lymph nodes during both inductive and later symptomatic phases of MOG(35-55 induced EAE. We then determined the effect in vivo of EPO on numbers of peripheral Treg cells and Th17 cells. We found that EPO treatment modulated immune balance in both the periphery and the inflamed spinal cord by promoting a large expansion in Treg cells, inhibiting Th17 polarization and abrogating proliferation of the antigen presenting dendritic cell population. Finally we utilized tissue culture assays to show that exposure to EPO in vitro similarly downregulated MOG-specific T cell proliferation and also greatly suppressed T cell production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our findings reveal an important new locus whereby EPO induces substantial long-term tissue protection in the host through signaling to several critical subsets of

  18. Suppression of proteoglycan-induced autoimmune arthritis by myeloid-derived suppressor cells generated in vitro from murine bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Kurkó

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are innate immune cells capable of suppressing T-cell responses. We previously reported the presence of MDSCs with a granulocytic phenotype in the synovial fluid (SF of mice with proteoglycan (PG-induced arthritis (PGIA, a T cell-dependent autoimmune model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the limited amount of SF-MDSCs precluded investigations into their therapeutic potential. The goals of this study were to develop an in vitro method for generating MDSCs similar to those found in SF and to reveal the therapeutic effect of such cells in PGIA.Murine bone marrow (BM cells were cultured for 3 days in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. The phenotype of cultured cells was analyzed using flow cytometry, microscopy, and biochemical methods. The suppressor activity of BM-MDSCs was tested upon co-culture with activated T cells. To investigate the therapeutic potential of BM-MDSCs, the cells were injected into SCID mice at the early stage of adoptively transferred PGIA, and their effects on the clinical course of arthritis and PG-specific immune responses were determined.BM cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF, IL-6, and G-CSF became enriched in MDSC-like cells that showed greater phenotypic heterogeneity than MDSCs present in SF. BM-MDSCs profoundly inhibited both antigen-specific and polyclonal T-cell proliferation primarily via production of nitric oxide. Injection of BM-MDSCs into mice with PGIA ameliorated arthritis and reduced PG-specific T-cell responses and serum antibody levels.Our in vitro enrichment strategy provides a SF-like, but controlled microenvironment for converting BM myeloid precursors into MDSCs that potently suppress both T-cell responses and the progression of arthritis in a mouse model of RA. Our results also suggest that enrichment of BM in MDSCs could improve the

  19. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  20. B cells as therapeutic targets in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-10-01

    B cells have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune neurological disorders, not only as precursors of antibody-producing cells, but also as important regulators of the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation, cytokine production, and formation of ectopic germinal centers in the intermeningeal spaces. Two B-cell trophic factors-BAFF (B-cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand)-and their receptors are strongly upregulated in many immunological disorders of the CNS and PNS, and these molecules contribute to clonal expansion of B cells in situ. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules and trophic factors provides a rational approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases. This article reviews the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders and summarizes the experience to date with rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody against CD20, for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, autoimmune neuropathies, neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic neurological disorders, myasthenia gravis, and inflammatory myopathies. It is expected that ongoing controlled trials will establish the efficacy and long-term safety profile of anti-B-cell agents in several autoimmune neurological disorders, as well as exploring the possibility of a safe and synergistic effect with other immunosuppressants or immunomodulators.

  1. Psychotic and nonpsychotic mood disorders in autoimmune encephalitis: diagnostic issues and research implications

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Quaranta; Nunzio Bucci; Cristina Toni; Giulio Perugi

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on autoimmune disorders suggests additional links between systemic and central nervous system (CNS) pathophysiology, among which the identification of antibody-induced limbic encephalitis provided the strongest evidence for the potential involvement of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of severe mood and psychotic symptoms. In these illnesses, psychiatric symptoms predominate in the initial phase of the disorder in up to 70% of the cases, and they often lead patients to early p...

  2. Measuring and evaluating interferon beta-induced antibodies in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, C; Clemmesen, K M; Sørensen, P S;

    2006-01-01

    Administration of interferons (IFNs) may induce antibodies that interfere with therapeutic efficacy. We have optimized and validated methods for large-scale economic screening. Sera from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) were investigated for binding antibody (BAb) by prot......Administration of interferons (IFNs) may induce antibodies that interfere with therapeutic efficacy. We have optimized and validated methods for large-scale economic screening. Sera from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) were investigated for binding antibody (BAb...

  3. Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT Cells Prevent Autoimmunity, but Induce Pulmonary Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanna Siegmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammation is a major and critical component of the lung pathology in the hereditary disease cystic fibrosis. The molecular mechanisms of chronic inflammation in cystic fibrosis require definition. Methods: We used several genetic mouse models to test a role of iNKT cells and ceramide in pulmonary inflammation of cystic fibrosis mice. Inflammation was determined by the pulmonary cytokine profil and the abundance of inflammatory cells in the lung. Results: Here we provide a new concept how inflammation in the lung of individuals with cystic fibrosis is initiated. We show that in cystic fibrosis mice the mutation in the Cftr gene provokes a significant up-regulation of iNKT cells in the lung. Accumulation of iNKT cells serves to control autoimmune disease, which is triggered by a ceramide-mediated induction of cell death in CF organs. Autoimmunity becomes in particular overt in cystic fibrosis mice lacking iNKT cells and although suppression of the autoimmune response by iNKT cells is beneficial, IL-17+ iNKT cells attract macrophages and neutrophils to CF lungs resulting in chronic inflammation. Genetic deletion of iNKT cells in cystic fibrosis mice prevents inflammation in CF lungs. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate an important function of iNKT cells in the chronic inflammation affecting cystic fibrosis lungs. iNKT cells suppress the auto-immune response induced by ceramide-mediated death of epithelial cells in CF lungs, but also induce a chronic pulmonary inflammation.

  4. Antinuclear Antibody-Positive Ticlopidine-Induced Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Jo Veldhuyzen van Zanten

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Ticlopidine hydrochloride has been shown to reduce the risk of first or recurrent stroke in patients who have experienced a transient ischemic attack, reversible ischemic neurological deficit, recurrent stroke or first stroke. Severe liver dysfunction is a contraindication for its use. Increase in liver enzymes has been reported with use of this drug, but jaundice is rare. A case of severe ticlopidine-induced hepatitis that was associated with a marked increase in antinuclear antibody (ANA levels is reported. Physicians prescribing ticlopidine hydrochloride should be aware that a potentially severe acute hepatitis associated with ANA positivity can occur. The drug should be discontinued if signs of liver dysfunction occur.

  5. Generation and characterization of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mi-Young; Lee, Mi-Ok; Jeon, Hyejin; Seol, Binna; Kim, Jung Hwa; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs), a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated disorders, are a major and growing health problem. Although AIDs are currently treated primarily with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs, the use of stem cell transplantation in patients with AIDs is becoming increasingly common. However, stem cell transplantation therapy has limitations, including a shortage of available stem cells and immune rejection of cells from nonautologous sources. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, which allows the generation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells, could offer an alternative source for clinical applications of stem cell therapies in AID patients. We used nonintegrating oriP/EBNA-1-based episomal vectors to reprogram dermal fibroblasts from patients with AIDs such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS), Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The pluripotency and multilineage differentiation capacity of each patient-specific iPSC line was validated. The safety of these iPSCs for use in stem cell transplantation is indicated by the fact that all AID-specific iPSCs are integrated transgene free. Finally, all AID-specific iPSCs derived in this study could be differentiated into cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal lineages in vitro as shown by flow cytometric analysis and induction of terminal differentiation potential. Our results demonstrate the successful generation of integration-free iPSCs from patients with AS, SS and SLE. These findings support the possibility of using iPSC technology in autologous and allogeneic cell replacement therapy for various AIDs, including AS, SS and SLE. PMID:27174201

  6. Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome) in commercial sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, Lluís; Pérez, Marta; Salazar, Eider; Álvarez, Neila; Gimeno, Marina; Pinczowski, Pedro; Irusta, Silvia; Santamaría, Jesús; Insausti, Nerea; Cortés, Yerzol; Figueras, Luis; Cuartielles, Isabel; Vila, Miguel; Fantova, Enrique; Chapullé, José Luis Gracia

    2013-07-01

    We describe a form of the autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome) in commercial sheep, linked to the repetitive inoculation of aluminum-containing adjuvants through vaccination. The syndrome shows an acute phase that affects less than 0.5% of animals in a given herd, it appears 2-6 days after an adjuvant-containing inoculation and it is characterized by an acute neurological episode with low response to external stimuli and acute meningoencephalitis, most animals apparently recovering afterward. The chronic phase is seen in a higher proportion of flocks, it can follow the acute phase, and it is triggered by external stimuli, mostly low temperatures. The chronic phase begins with an excitatory phase, followed by weakness, extreme cachexia, tetraplegia and death. Gross lesions are related to a cachectic process with muscular atrophy, and microscopic lesions are mostly linked to a neurodegenerative process in both dorsal and ventral column of the gray matter of the spinal cord. Experimental reproduction of ovine ASIA in a small group of repeatedly vaccinated animals was successful. Detection of Al(III) in tissues indicated the presence of aluminum in the nervous tissue of experimental animals. The present report is the first description of a new sheep syndrome (ovine ASIA syndrome) linked to multiple, repetitive vaccination and that can have devastating consequences as it happened after the compulsory vaccination against bluetongue in 2008. The ovine ASIA syndrome can be used as a model of other similar diseases affecting both human and animals. A major research effort is needed in order to understand its complex pathogenesis.

  7. The possible link between elevated serum levels of epithelial cell-derived neutrophil- activating peptide-78 (ENA-78/CXCL5) and autoimmunity in autistic children

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa, Gehan Ahmed; AL-Ayadhi, Laila Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background In autoimmune disorders, the underlying pathogenic mechanism is the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which trigger an inflammatory response by inducing the infiltration of neutrophils. Epithelial cell-derived neutrophil-activating peptide-78 (ENA-78) is a chemokine that recruits and activates neutrophils, thus it could play a pathogenic role in inflammation and autoimmune disorders. Some autistic children have elevated levels of brain specific auto-antibodies. We are the fir...

  8. Presumed Isotretinoin-Induced, Concomitant Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Ocular Myasthenia Gravis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Gursoy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many adverse effects that have been described for isotretinoin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a possible association of oral isotretinoin intake with autoimmune thyroiditis and ocular myasthenia gravis (OMG. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old Caucasian male, who had used oral isotretinoin for severe acne disease for the previous six months, was referred to our clinic. He had a three-week history of diplopia and variable bilateral ptosis. Physical examination showed moderate periorbital edema and limitations of up- and down-gaze in the left eye. Laboratory findings and thyroid ultrasound were consistent with autoimmune thyroiditis. Antithyroid therapy did not relieve the clinical symptoms. Concomitant OMG was suspected. Variable ptosis and a positive response to oral prednisolone of 40 mg/day and pyridostigmine of 360 mg/day supported the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG. Conclusion: Autoimmune disorders may be triggered by oral isotretinoin treatment. Clinicians prescribing isotretinoin should be aware of the possible association between isotretinoin intake and concomitant autoimmune thyroiditis and OMG.

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sjogren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Thyroiditis Type 1 diabetes Ulcerative colitis Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family members of people with autoimmune diseases. There may be a genetic cause. This disease is most common in young girls ...

  10. 多种自身抗体联合检测对自身免疫性肝病的诊断价值%Diagnosis value of multiple autoimmune antibody detection in autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任妹; 廖永强; 彭可君; 孟芳; 俞丹菁

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析各种肝病患者多种自身抗体的检出率,探讨其对自身免疫性肝病(autoimmune liver diseases,ALD)的诊断价值.方法:根据临床诊断将患者分为ALD组(n=96)、病毒性肝炎组(n=135,包括75例乙型肝炎,65例丙型肝炎),另取62例健康体检者作为健康对照组(n=62);其中,ALD组又分为自身免疫性肝炎组(AIH组,n=36)、原发性胆汁性肝硬化组(PBC组,n=58)、原发性硬化性胆管炎组(PSC组,n=2).用间接免疫荧光法检测上述各组的抗核抗体(antinuclear antibodies,ANA)、抗平滑肌抗体(anti-smooth muscle antibodies,ASMA)、抗线粒体抗体(antimitochondrial ant-ibodies,AMA);用Western印迹法检测抗肝肾微粒体Ⅰ型抗体(anti liver-kidney microsomal antibody Type 1,LKM-1)和抗线粒体Ⅱ型抗体(subtype of AMA,AMA-M2)、抗可溶性肝抗原/胰抗原抗体(soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas,SLA/LP)、抗肝细胞溶质抗原Ⅰ型抗体(antihepatocyte cytosol antigen Type 1,LC-1).结果:AIH组ANA阳性率(69.4%)和PBC组ANA阳性率(87.9%)显著高于病毒性肝炎组(37.3%)和健康对照组(4.8%)(均P<0.01);AIH组ASMA,LKM-1,SLA/LP,LC-1阳性率(44.4%,11.1%,2.8%,8.3%)显著高于病毒性肝炎组(1.3%,1.7%,0,0)和健康对照组(均P<0.01);PBC组AMA-M2阳性率(91.3%)显著高于病毒性肝炎组(1.3%)和健康对照组(0)(均P<0.01).结论:联合检测ANA,ASMA,LKM-1,SLA/LP,LC-1和AMA-M2等自身抗体可提高ALD诊断的灵敏性和特异性,且对ALD分型、诊疗具有重要意义.

  11. Intrapatient Dose Escalation of Anti–CTLA-4 Antibody in Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Maker, Ajay V; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Kammula, Udai S; Royal, Richard E.; Hughes, Marybeth; Yellin, Michael J.; Haworth, Leah R.; Levy, Catherine; Allen, Tamika; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; Attia, Peter; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported our experience in treating 56 patients with metastatic melanoma using a human anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) antibody. Durable tumor regressions were seen that correlated with the induction of autoimmune toxicities. In this study, we treated 46 additional patients using an intrapatient dose escalation schema to test whether higher doses of anti–CTLA-4 antibody would induce increased autoimmunity and concomitant tumor regression. Twenty-three patients sta...

  12. Autoimmunity in visual loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Axel; Wong, Sui; Plant, Gordon T

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of autoimmune disorders which can affect visual function. There are a very large number of mechanisms in the visual pathway which could potentially be the targets of autoimmune attack. In practice it is the retina and the anterior visual pathway (optic nerve and chiasm) that are recognised as being affected in autoimmune disorders. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the commonest causes of visual loss in young adults because of the frequency of attacks of optic neuritis in that condition, however the basis of the inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis and the confirmation of autoimmunity is lacking. The immune process is known to be highly unusual in that it is not systemic and confined to the CNS compartment. Previously an enigmatic partner to Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica is now established to be autoimmune and two antibodies - to Aquaporin4 and to Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein - have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The term Chronic Relapsing Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy is applied to those cases of optic neuritis which require long term immunosuppression and hence are presumed to be autoimmune but where no autoimmune pathogenesis has been confirmed. Optic neuritis occurring post-infection and post vaccination and conditions such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and various vasculitides may cause direct autoimmune attack to visual structures or indirect damage through occlusive vasculopathy. Chronic granulomatous disorders such as Sarcoidosis affect vision commonly by a variety of mechanisms, whether and how these are placed in the autoimmune panoply is unknown. As far as the retina is concerned Cancer Associated Retinopathy and Melanoma Associated Retinopathy are well characterised clinically but a candidate autoantibody (recoverin) is only described in the former disorder. Other, usually monophasic, focal retinal inflammatory disorders (Idiopathic Big Blind Spot Syndrome, Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy and Acute Macular

  13. High salt promotes autoimmunity by TET2-induced DNA demethylation and driving the differentiation of Tfh cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haijing; Huang, Xin; Qiu, Hong; Zhao, Ming; Liao, Wei; Yuan, Shuguang; Xie, Yubing; Dai, Yong; Chang, Christopher; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-01-01

    Follicular helper T cells (Tfh) have been well documented to play a critical role in autoimmunity, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), by helping B cells. In this study, high salt (sodium chloride, NaCl), under physiological conditions, was demonstrated to increase the differentiation of Tfh. A high-salt diet markedly increased lupus features in MRL/lpr mice. The mechanism is NaCl-induced DNA demethylation via the recruitment of the hydroxytransferase Ten-Eleven Translocation 2 (TET2). Gene silencing of TET2 obviously diminished NaCl-induced Tfh cell polarization in vitro. In addition, the gene expression of sh2d1a, map3k1, spn and stat5b was enhanced after NaCl treatment, consistent with the findings in lupus CD4(+)T cells. However, only spn was directly regulated by TET2, and spn was not the sole target for NaCl. Our findings not only explain the epigenetic mechanisms of high-salt induced autoimmunity but also provide an attractive molecular target for intervention strategies of patients. PMID:27325182

  14. Ezrin, maspin, peroxiredoxin 2, and heat shock protein 27: potential targets of a streptococcal-induced autoimmune response in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besgen, Petra; Trommler, Paul; Vollmer, Sigrid; Prinz, Joerg Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Psoriasis is an HLA-Cw6-associated T cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the skin that is often triggered by streptococcal angina. To identify keratinocyte proteins, which may become psoriatic autoantigens as the result of an immune response against streptococci, rabbits were immunized with heat-killed Streptococcus pyogenes. Streptococcal immunization induced Ab formation against various human keratinocyte proteins. Sera from psoriasis patients reacted against several of these proteins as well. Common serologic reactivities of rabbits and patients included the proteins ezrin, maspin, peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), heat shock protein (hsp)27, and keratin 6. When used for stimulation of blood lymphocytes, ezrin, maspin, PRDX2, and hsp27 induced increased T cell activation in psoriasis patients, which was particularly evident for HLA-Cw6(+) individuals. Ag-specific T cell lines generated with these proteins consisted predominantly of CD8(+) T cells and used TCR beta-chain rearrangements, which were highly homologous to those expanded within the corresponding skin lesion. Several immunodominant epitopes on the different proteins could be defined according to sequence alignments with the whole genome of S. pyogenes. Our data indicate that maspin, ezrin, PRDX2, hsp27, and potentially keratin 6 could act as autoantigens of a streptococcal-induced autoimmune response and represent targets of the exaggerated T cell response in psoriasis. Additionally, ezrin and hsp27 might constitute antigenic links between psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease, uveitis, or arteriosclerosis, which are clinically associated.

  15. A Rationally Designed TNF-α Epitope-Scaffold Immunogen Induces Sustained Antibody Response and Alleviates Collagen-Induced Arthritis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Jin; Xu, Aizhang; Zhong, Conghao; Lu, Wuguang; Deng, Li; Li, Rongxiu

    2016-01-01

    The TNF-α biological inhibitors have significantly improved the clinical outcomes of many autoimmune diseases, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. However, the practical uses are limited due to high costs and the risk of anti-drug antibody responses. Attempts to develop anti-TNF-α vaccines have generated encouraging data in animal models, however, data from clinical trials have not met expectations. In present study, we designed a TNF-α epitope-scaffold immunogen DTNF7 using the transmembrane domain of diphtheria toxin, named DTT as a scaffold. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that the grafted TNF-α epitope is entirely surface-exposed and presented in a native-like conformation while the rigid helical structure of DTT is minimally perturbed, thereby rendering the immunogen highly stable. Immunization of mice with alum formulated DTNF7 induced humoral responses against native TNF-α, and the antibody titer was sustained for more than 6 months, which supports a role of the universal CD4 T cell epitopes of DTT in breaking self-immune tolerance. In a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, DTNF7-alum vaccination markedly delayed the onset of collagen-induced arthritis, and reduced incidence as well as clinical score. DTT is presumed safe as an epitope carrier because a catalytic inactive mutant of diphtheria toxin, CRM197 has good clinical safety records as an active vaccine component. Taken all together, we show that DTT-based epitope vaccine is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27658047

  16. The role of autoimmunity in premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbod Ebrahimi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure (POF is a heterogeneous syndrome with several causative factors. Autoimmune mechanisms are involved in pathogenesis of 4-30 % of POF cases. The present review focuses on the role of autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of POF. The evidences for an autoimmune etiology are: demonstration of ovarian autoantibodies, the presence of lymphocytic oophoritis, and association with other autoimmune disorders. Several ovarian antigenic targets have been identified in POF patients. The oocyte seems to be the most often targeted cell. Lymphocytic oophoritis is widely present in POF associated adrenal insufficiency. Addisonۥs disease is one of the most common autoimmune disorders associated with POF. Early detection of this potentially life threatening disease was recommended in several studies. The gold standard for detecting autoimmune POF is ovarian biopsy. This procedure is not recommended due to unknown clinical value, expense, and risks. Several immunoassays have been proposed as substitute diagnostic tools. Nevertheless, there is no clinically proven sensitive and specific serum test to confirm the diagnosis of autoimmune POF or to anticipate the patient’s chance of developing POF or associated diseases. Some authors suggested the possible effects of immuno-modulating therapy on the resumption of ovarian function and fertility in a selected group of autoimmune POF patients. However, in most instances, this treatment fails to reverse the course of the disease. Numerous studies illustrated that standard treatment outcome for infertility is less effective in the presence of ovarian autoimmunity. The antibody-induced damage could be a pathogenic factor. Nevertheless, the precise cause remains obscure.

  17. The lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici suppresses autoimmune encephalomyelitis by inducing IL-10-producing regulatory T cells.

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    Kazushiro Takata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Certain intestinal microflora are thought to regulate the systemic immune response. Lactic acid bacteria are one of the most studied bacteria in terms of their beneficial effects on health and autoimmune diseases; one of which is Multiple sclerosis (MS which affects the central nervous system. We investigated whether the lactic acid bacterium Pediococcus acidilactici, which comprises human commensal bacteria, has beneficial effects on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model of MS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: P. acidilactici R037 was orally administered to EAE mice to investigate the effects of R037. R037 treatment suppressed clinical EAE severity as prophylaxis and therapy. The antigen-specific production of inflammatory cytokines was inhibited in R037-treated mice. A significant increase in the number of CD4(+ Interleukin (IL-10-producing cells was observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs and spleens isolated from R037-treated naive mice, while no increase was observed in the number of these cells in the lamina propria. Because only a slight increase in the CD4(+Foxp3(+ cells was observed in MLNs, R037 may primarily induce Foxp3(- IL10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1 cells in MLNs, which contribute to the beneficial effect of R037 on EAE. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An orally administered single strain of P. acidilactici R037 ameliorates EAE by inducing IL10-producing Tr1 cells. Our findings indicate the therapeutic potential of the oral administration of R037 for treating multiple sclerosis.

  18. Preparation of Europium Induced Conformation—specific anti—calmodulin Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeiGuoLI; ChaoQI; 等

    2002-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technique was employed to detect the conformational difference of CaM induced by metal ions. A trivalent europium ion induced conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody was successfully prepared with europium-saturated calmodulin as antigen.

  19. Preparation of Europium Induced Conformation-specific anti-calmodulin Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technique was employed to detect the conformational difference of CaM induced by metal ions. A trivalent europium ion induced conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody was successfully prepared with europium-saturated calmodulin as antigen.

  20. Autoimmune diseases induced by TNF-targeted therapies: analysis of 233 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Muñoz, Sandra; Soria, Natalia; Galiana, Diana; Bertolaccini, Laura; Cuadrado, Maria-Jose; Khamashta, Munther A

    2007-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-targeted therapies are increasingly used for a rapidly expanding number of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases. With this use and longer follow-up periods of treatment, there are a growing number of reports of the development of autoimmune processes related to anti-TNF agents. We have analyzed the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and patterns of association with the different anti-TNF agents used in all reports of autoimmune diseases developing after TNF-targeted therapy found through a MEDLINE search of articles published between January 1990 and December 2006. We identified 233 cases of autoimmune diseases (vasculitis in 113, lupus in 92, interstitial lung diseases in 24, and other diseases in 4) secondary to TNF-targeted therapies in 226 patients. The anti-TNF agents were administered for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 187 (83%) patients, Crohn disease in 17, ankylosing spondylitis in 7, psoriatic arthritis in 6, juvenile RA in 5, and other diseases in 3. The anti-TNF agents administered were infliximab in 105 patients, etanercept in 96, adalimumab in 21, and other anti-TNF agents in 3. We found 92 reported cases of lupus following anti-TNF therapy (infliximab in 40 cases, etanercept in 37, and adalimumab in 15). Nearly half the cases fulfilled 4 or more classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which fell to one-third after discarding preexisting lupus-like features. One hundred thirteen patients developed vasculitis after receiving anti-TNF agents (etanercept in 59 cases, infliximab in 47, adalimumab in 5, and other agents in 2). Leukocytoclastic vasculitis was the most frequent type of vasculitis, and purpura was the most frequent cutaneous lesion. A significant finding was that one-quarter of patients with vasculitis related to anti-TNF agents had extracutaneous involvement. Twenty-four cases of interstitial lung disease associated with the use of anti-TNF agents were reported. In these patients, 2 specific

  1. Antigen-specific tolerance induced by IL-10 gene modified immature dendritic cells in experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei-min; LI Yue; LIU Wei; GAO Cheng; ZHOU Bao-guo; YANG Shu-sen; WANG Zheng; ZHANG Rui-hong; GAN Run-tao; KONG Yi-hui

    2006-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rats is a T-cell-mediated disorder. The initiation and maintenance of autoimmune responses in EAM depend on the maturation state of dendritic cells. IL-10 is a pleiotrophic immunomodulatory cytokine that functions at different levels of the immune response, so it has emerged as a promising therapeutic factor for the treatment of autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that IL-10 gene modified bone marrow-derived immature dendritic cells (iDCs) ameliorate EAM and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Methods EAM was induced using the methods of cardiac myosin immunization on day 0 and day 7. Immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were generated without or with the stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the phenotype was analyzed by flow cytometry. Some of the iDCs were transfected by pcDNA3-IL-10 plasmid. 2 × 106/per rat mature DC (mDC), immature DC (iDC), pcDNA3 transfected iDC,pcDNA3-IL-10 transfected iDC or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected intravenously for treatment 5 days after the first immunization. On day 21, HE staining was performed to detect the myocardial inflammation and T lymphocyte proliferation assay was used to determine the effects of IL-10 gene transfected iDC on autoreactive T cell proliferation. Expression of IκB, the inhibitor of NF-κB pathway, was determined by Western blot. Results BMDCs generated in a medium supplemented with granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were relatively immature, as determined by flow cytometry. However, stimulation with LPS induced these cells to become mature (m)DCs with higher levels of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-Ⅱ and costimulatory molecules. Intravenous administration of iDCs, especially pcDNA3-IL-10 transfected iDC,ameliorated the histopathological severity of the myosin induced-EAM, and the effect was lost after the DCs

  2. Silica, Silicosis and Autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Michael Pollard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases SLE, SSc and RA. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However numerous questions remain unanswered.

  3. Evaluation on the detection of anti-nuclear antibody and anti-soluble nuclearantigen antibody for the diagnosis of autoimmune disease%ANA和ENA检测在自身免疫性疾病中的应用评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆慧琦; 李畅; 叶伟民; 杨洁; 何铭珺; 韩焕兴

    2011-01-01

    To evaluating the sensitivity and correlation on anti-nuclear antibody(ANA) and anti-soluble nuclear antigen antibody (ENA) in the diagnosis of autoimmune disease(AID ), the results of auto-antibody detection in serum were retrospectively analyzed for patients visited at Changzheng hospital from Jan, 2007 to Oct, 2009, among which 224 cases were patients with AID and 325 cases were patients with non-autoimmune diseases. For all these patients, the indirect immunofluorescene(IIF)assay based on the cultured human epidermoid carcinoma cells( Hep-2 cell/liver and immunoblot assay were used to detect ANA and ENA respectively. It was demonstrated that 4 different patterns were formed by using these two kinds of detection methods, i.e. ANA+/ENA+、 ANA-/ENA-、 ANA+/ENA- and ANA-/ENA+ respectively. Positive rate of ANA and ENA (63.4% vs 58. 5%) in AID was significantly higher than that of non-AID (16.9% vs 25.2%). Expect in with MCTD and SLE, there were no correlation between ANA and ENA. The ANA-IIF assay appears to be a time-consuming procedure and difficult to standardize owing to subjective interpretation of results. Acting as a screening experimental method, the sensitivity of ANA is higher than that of ENA. Nevertheless. the combined use of both methods would increase the sensitivity and reliability of testing.%探讨抗核抗体和抗可溶性核抗原抗体的不同检测方法对自身免疫性疾病诊断的指导意义.回顾性分析2007年1月至2009年10月间在长征医院就诊的患者血清自身抗体的检测结果,549位患者,其中自身免疫病患者224例,非自身免疫病325例,所有患者血清同时检测ANA和ENA.以Hep-2细胞/肝组织为基质的间接免疫荧光法检测ANA,免疫印迹法检测ENA.两种检测方法产生4种检出模式:ANA+/ENA+、ANA-/ENA-、ANA+/ENA-和ANA-/ENA+.前两种模式共占检测的62.84%.ANA和ENA在自身免疫病患者中的阳性率(63.4%和58.5%)显著高于非自免病患者(16.9%和25

  4. Biologics-induced autoimmune renal disorders in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases: systematic literature review and analysis of a monocentric cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piga, Matteo; Chessa, Elisabetta; Ibba, Valentina; Mura, Valentina; Floris, Alberto; Cauli, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The use of biologic drugs has been linked with the paradoxical development of systemic and organ specific autoimmune processes. The aim of this study was to describe the features of biologics-induced autoimmune renal disorders (AIRD) through a systematic review and a cohort study of 707 adult patients affected with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Ankylosing Spondylitis (SA) and Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA). The literature search identified 2687 articles of which 21 were considered relevant for the present study, accounting for 26 case reports. The cohort analysis retrieved 3 cases. According to clinical manifestations and kidney histology the identified AIRD cases were classified as: a) glomerulonephritis associated with systemic vasculitis (GNSV), b) glomerulonephritis in lupus-like syndrome (GNLS), c) isolated autoimmune renal disorders (IARD). Twenty-two out of 29 cases with AIRD were reported in patients affected by RA, 5 in AS and 2 in PsA. The biologic drug most frequently associated with development of AIRD was Etanercept (15 cases, 51.7%), followed by Adalimumab (9 cases, 31.0%) and Infliximab (3 cases, 10.3%) while Tocilizumab and Abatacept were reported in 1 case (3.4%) for each. Thirteen out of 29 (44.8%) cases were classified as affected by IARD, 12 (41.3%) as GNSV and 4 (13.9%) as GNLS. Worse prognosis was associated with GNSV and lack of biologic withdrawal. Although rare, AIRD may be life-threatening and may lead to renal failure and death. If AIRD occurs, biologic drugs must be stopped and patient should be treated according to clinical manifestations and kidney biopsy findings.

  5. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, M; Chiappini, E; Galli, L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have eradicated or controlled many infectious diseases, saving each year millions of lives and quality of life of many other millions of people. In spite of the success of vaccines over the last two centuries, parents (and also some health care workers) gloss over the devastating consequences of diseases, which are now avoided thanks to vaccines, and direct their attention to possible negative effects of immunization. Three immunological objections are raised: vaccines cause antigenic overload, natural immunity is safer and better than vaccine-induced immunity, and vaccines induce autoimmunity. The last point is examined in this review. Theoretically, vaccines could trigger autoimmunity by means of cytokine production, anti-idiotypic network, expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens, modification of surface antigens and induction of novel antigens, molecular mimicry, bystander activation, epitope spreading, and polyclonal activation of B cells. There is strong evidence that none of these mechanisms is really effective in causing autoimmune diseases. Vaccines are not a source of autoimmune diseases. By contrast, absolute evidence exists that infectious agents can trigger autoimmune mechanisms and that they do cause autoimmune diseases.

  6. Autoimmunity in CD73/Ecto-5'-nucleotidase deficient mice induces renal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Blume

    Full Text Available Extracellular adenosine formed by 5'-ectonucleotidase (CD73 is involved in tubulo-glomerular feedback in the kidney but is also known to be an important immune modulator. Since CD73(-/-mutant mice exhibit a vascular proinflammatory phenotype, we asked whether long term lack of CD73 causes inflammation related kidney pathologies. CD73(-/-mice (13 weeks old showed significantly increased low molecule proteinuria compared to C57BL6 wild type controls (4.8 ≥ 0.52 vs. 2.9 ± 0.54 mg/24 h, p<0.03. Total proteinuria increased to 5.97 ± 0.78 vs. 2.55 ± 0.35 mg/24 h at 30 weeks (p<0.01 whereas creatinine clearance decreased (0.161 ± 0.02 vs. 0.224 ± 0.02 ml/min. We observed autoimmune inflammation in CD73(-/-mice with glomerulitis and peritubular capillaritis, showing glomerular deposition of IgG and C3 and enhanced presence of CD11b, CD8, CD25 as well as GR-1-positive cells in the interstitium. Vascular inflammation was associated with enhanced serum levels of the cytokines IL-18 and TNF-α as well as VEGF and the chemokine MIP-2 (CXCL-2 in CD73(-/-mice, whereas chemokines and cytokines in the kidney tissue were unaltered or reduced. In CD73(-/-mice glomeruli, we found a reduced number of podocytes and endothelial fenestrations, increased capillaries per glomeruli, endotheliosis and enhanced tubular fibrosis. Our results show that adult CD73(-/-mice exhibit spontaneous proteinuria and renal functional deterioration even without exogenous stress factors. We have identified an autoimmune inflammatory phenotype comprising the glomerular endothelium, leading to glomeruli inflammation and injury and to a cellular infiltrate of the renal interstitium. Thus, long term lack of CD73 reduced renal function and is associated with autoimmune inflammation.

  7. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean C. Pfau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA, a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b exposure misclassification, (c latency of clinical disease, (d mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease.

  8. Detection of antinuclear and antilaminin antibodies in autistic children who received thimerosal-containing vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijendra K; Rivas, Wyatt H

    2004-01-01

    Autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder, may involve autoimmune pathogenesis. Since mercury is potentially a risk factor for autoimmunity, we conducted a study of mercury-induced antinuclear and antilaminin antibodies in autistic and normal children who had been pre-administered with thimerosal-containing vaccines. Laboratory analysis by different immunoassays showed that the serum level of these two autoimmune markers did not significantly differ between autistic and normal children. This finding suggests that the mercury as in thimerosal-containing vaccines is likely not related to autoimmune phenomenon in autism.

  9. Nitrosative stress and nitrated proteins in trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangduo Wang

    Full Text Available Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been linked to a variety of autoimmune diseases (ADs including SLE, scleroderma and hepatitis. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ADs are largely unknown. Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggested the contribution of oxidative/nitrosative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC supplementation provided protection by attenuating oxidative stress. This study was undertaken to further evaluate the contribution of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmunity and to identify proteins susceptible to nitrosative stress. Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, ∼ 250 mg/kg/day via drinking water. TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum anti-nuclear and anti-histone antibodies together with significant induction of iNOS and increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT in sera and livers. Proteomic analysis identified 14 additional nitrated proteins in the livers of TCE-treated mice. Furthermore, TCE exposure led to decreased GSH levels and increased activation of NF-κB. Remarkably, NAC supplementation not only ameliorated TCE-induced nitrosative stress as evident from decreased iNOS, NT, nitrated proteins, NF-κB p65 activation and increased GSH levels, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of autoantibodies in the sera. These findings provide support to the role of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmune response and identify specific nitrated proteins which could have autoimmune potential. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for designing therapeutic strategies.

  10. Autoimmunity in Rheumatic Diseases Is Induced by Microbial Infections via Crossreactivity or Molecular Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A general consensus supports fundamental roles for both genetic and environmental, mainly microbial, factors in the development of autoimmune diseases. One form of autoimmune rheumatic diseases is confined to a group of nonpyogenic conditions which are usually preceded by or associated with either explicit or occult infections. A previous history of clinical pharyngitis, gastroenteritis/urethritis, or tick-borne skin manifestation can be obtained from patients with rheumatic fever, reactive arthritis, or Lyme disease, respectively, whilst, other rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and Crohn’s disease (CD are usually lacking such an association with a noticeable microbial infection. A great amount of data supports the notion that RA is most likely caused by Proteus asymptomatic urinary tract infections, whilst AS and CD are caused by subclinical bowel infections with Klebsiella microbes. Molecular mimicry is the main pathogenetic mechanism that can explain these forms of microbe-disease associations, where the causative microbes can initiate the disease with consequent productions of antibacterial and crossreactive autoantibodies which have a great impact in the propagation and the development of these diseases.

  11. [Drug-induced exacerbation of hypoaldosteronism in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2012-01-01

    Hypoaldosteronism is a clinical condition resulting from inadequate stimulation of aIdosterone secretion (hyporeninemic hypoaIdosteronism), defects in adrenal synthesis of aldosterone (hyperreninemic hypoaldosteronism), or resistance to the peripheral action of this hormone (pseudohypoaldosteronism). The disease is characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic hyperkalemia to life-threatening volume depletion, and, if unrecognized and untreated, it increases morbidity and mortality rates. In this paper, we report a case of a woman diagnosed with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2. As a consequence of adrenal cortex destruction, the patient developed subclinical hypoaldosteronism which was effectively treated with small doses of fludrocortisone. Two and fours years later, she required ibuprofen and atenolol treatment and each of these treatments was accompanied by a transient deterioration in mineralocorticoid activity which resolved after drug withdrawal. This case shows for the first time that drugs reducing plasma renin activity may unmask subclinical hypoaldosteronism in subjects with autoimmune polyglandular syndromes, and that they should be avoided in patients with even small disturbances in the hormonal function of the zona glomerulosa.

  12. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease.

  13. Autoimmune paediatric liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgina Mieli-Vergani; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver disorders with a likely autoimmune pathogenesis in childhood include autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC),and de novo AIH after liver transplantation.AIH is divided into two subtypes according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody (SMA/ANA,type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM1,type 2).There is a female predominance in both.LKM1 positive patients tend to present more acutely,at a younger age,and commonly have partial IgA deficiency,while duration of symptoms before diagnosis,clinical signs,family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders,response to treatment,and long-term prognosis are similar in both groups. The most common type of paediatric sclerosing cholangitis is ASC.The clinical,biochemical, immunological,and histological presentation of ASC is often indistinguishable from that of AIH type 1.In both,there are high IgG,non-organ specific autoantibodies,and interface hepatitis.Diagnosis is made by cholangiography.Children with ASC respond to immunosuppression satisfactorily and similarly to AIH in respect to remission and relapse rates,times to normalization of biochemical parameters, and decreased inflammatory activity on follow up liver biopsies. However,the cholangiopathy can progress.There may be evolution from AIH to ASC over the years,despite treatment.De novo AIH after liver transplantation affects patients not transplanted for autoimmune disorders and is strikingly reminiscent of classical AIH,including elevated titres of serum antibodies, hypergammaglobulinaemia,and histological findings of interface hepatitis,bridging fibrosis,and collapse.Like classical AIH,it responds to treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine.De novo AIH post liver transplantation may derive from interference by calcineurin inhibitors with the intrathymic physiological mechanisms of T-cell maturation and selection.Whether this condition is a distinct entity or a form of

  14. Epigenetics of the antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and miRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR), and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and miRNAs modulate the expression of critical elements of that machinery, such as activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), as well as factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks instruct the maturation of antibody responses. Their dysregulation plays an important role in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens, such as those of microbial pathogens, and self-antigens, such as those targeted in autoimmunity, and B cell neoplasia.

  15. Prevalence of antinuclear antibodies in 3 groups of healthy individuals: blood donors, hospital personnel, and relatives of patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Guadalupe G; Cardiel, Mario H; Cornejo, Horacio; Viveros, Martha E

    2009-10-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are frequently found in healthy populations. To define the prevalence, pattern, and titer of ANA in different groups of the healthy Mexican population, we studied 304 individuals, classified into 3 groups: 104 blood donors, 100 hospital personnel working at The State General Hospital, which included doctors, laboratory technicians, and nurses; and 100 relatives of patient diagnosed either with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis, all of them apparently healthy at the time of study. We determined ANA using immunofluorescence microscopy performed on HEp-2 cells. Fluorescence was detected in 165 serum samples (54.3%). The most frequent pattern was the speckled (50.3%). The most frequent dilution was 1:40 (35.4%), followed by 1:80 (13.4%), 1:160 (3.2%), and 1:320 (1.3%).Regarding the results by study group, we found a trend toward higher ANA levels in group 2 (hospital personnel), compared with group 1 (blood donors) and group 3 (relatives of patients), a trend also reflected by the increasing frequency of serum titers of 1:80 and higher (P = 0.074). According to occupation, medical doctors showed a higher incidence of speckled pattern when compared with other occupations (P = 0.022). Medical doctors (n = 75) showed also higher titers of this particular pattern (P = 0.03). In group 3, relatives of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus showed the speckled pattern more frequently than relatives of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in low titers (P = 0.017). We suggest that ANA tests showing speckled pattern should be at a 1:160 titer or higher to be considered positive; other patterns such as homogeneous, peripheral, or centromeric might be considered positive even at low titers (

  16. Enterocolitis induced by autoimmune targeting of enteric glial cells: A possible mechanism in Crohn's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Anne; Savidge, Tor C.; Cabarrocas, Julie; Deng, Wen-Lin; Colombel, Jean-Frederic; Lassmann, Hans; Desreumaux, Pierre; Liblau, Roland S.

    2001-11-01

    Early pathological manifestations of Crohn's disease (CD) include vascular disruption, T cell infiltration of nerve plexi, neuronal degeneration, and induction of T helper 1 cytokine responses. This study demonstrates that disruption of the enteric glial cell network in CD patients represents another early pathological feature that may be modeled after CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune targeting of enteric glia in double transgenic mice. Mice expressing a viral neoself antigen in astrocytes and enteric glia were crossed with specific T cell receptor transgenic mice, resulting in apoptotic depletion of enteric glia to levels comparable in CD patients. Intestinal and mesenteric T cell infiltration, vasculitis, T helper 1 cytokine production, and fulminant bowel inflammation were characteristic hallmarks of disease progression. Immune-mediated damage to enteric glia therefore may participate in the initiation and/or the progression of human inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. Ctla-4 modulates the differentiation of inducible Foxp3+ Treg cells but IL-10 mediates their function in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available In vitro induced Foxp3+ T regulatory (iTreg cells form a novel and promising target for therapeutic tolerance induction. However, the potential of these cells as a target for the treatment of various immune diseases, as well as the factors involved in their development and function, remain debated. Here, we demonstrate in a myelin basic protein (MBP-specific murine model of CNS autoimmune disease that adoptive transfer of antigen-specific iTreg cells ameliorates disease progression. Moreover, we show that the co-stimulatory molecule CTLA-4 mediates in vitro differentiation of iTreg cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the secreted, immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 controls the ability of antigen-specific iTreg cells to suppress autoimmune disease. Overall, we conclude that antigen-specific iTreg cells, which depend on various immune regulatory molecules for their differentiation and function, represent a major target for effective immunotherapy of autoimmune disease.

  18. Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some examples of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, ... Toll-Free: 877-226-4267 National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, HHS Phone: ...

  19. Stimulation of antibody synthesis induced by surgical trauma in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaert, P; Mahieu, A; Van Geertruyden, N

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a standard laparatomy on antibody synthesis was studied in Wistar R/A rats recieving an intravenous injection of 10(9) sheep red blood cells (SRBC) during the surgical procedure. Anti-SRBC antibody titres were significantly higher in operated animals than in controls. When SRBC were given 2 hr after the surgical procedure, stimulation of antibody synthesis still persisted, but when the antigen was administered 24 hr after laparotomy, no significant difference could be detected between the operated animals and controls. Surgery also enhances the secondary humoral response. PMID:668200

  20. Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 μg/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired

  1. In vivo expression of a single viral DNA-binding protein generates systemic lupus erythematosus-related autoimmunity to double-stranded DNA and histones.

    OpenAIRE

    Moens, U; Seternes, O M; Hey, A W; Silsand, Y; Traavik, T.; Johansen, B.; Rekvig, O P

    1995-01-01

    Although the origin of autoimmune antibodies to double-stranded DNA is not known, the variable-region structures of such antibodies indicate that they are produced in response to antigen-selective stimulation. In accordance with this, results from experiments using artificial complexes of DNA and DNA-binding polypeptides for immunizations have indicated that DNA may induce these antibodies. Hence, the immunogenicity of DNA in vivo may depend upon other structures or processes that may render ...

  2. Mercury-induced renal autoimmunity: changes in RT6+ T-lymphocytes of susceptible and resistant rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuda, L L; Greiner, D. L.; Bigazzi, P E

    1993-01-01

    The repeated administration of mercury to rats of the Brown Norway (BN) inbred strain results in a self-limiting production of autoantibodies to renal antigens (e.g., laminin) and autoimmune glomerulonephritis. In contrast, rats of the Lewis (LEW) strain do not develop renal autoimmunity after mercury treatment. Suppressor T-cells and/or the idiotype-anti-idiotype network have been implicated in the control of autoimmunity in susceptible (BN) rats as well as the "resistant" state of nonsuscep...

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niraj; Jani; James; Buxbaum

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis(AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4(Ig G4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreaticmanifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG 4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG 4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings.

  4. Adult autoimmune enteropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that autoimmune enteropathy involving the small bowel may occur in adults as well as in children. Apparently, the endoscopic and histological changes are similar to celiac disease before treatment, but these are not altered by any form of dietary restriction, including a gluten-free diet. As in celiac disease, histologic changes in gastric and colonic biopsies have also been recorded. Anti enterocyte antibodies detected with immunofluorescent methods have been reported by a few laboratories, but these antibodies appear not to be specific and may simply represent epiphenomena. A widely available, reproducible and quantitative anti-enterocyte antibody assay is needed that could be applied in small bowel disorders that have the histological appearance of celiac disease, but fail to respond to a gluten-free diet.

  5. Differential inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced phenomena by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, S N; Havell, E A

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) has been implicated as a major mediator of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced phenomena. Administration to mice of a polyclonal, monospecific antibody prepared against recombinant murine TNF alpha abolished detection of LPS-induced TNF alpha activity and significantly reduced levels of LPS-induced colony-stimulating factor but failed to reduce the production of LPS-induced interferon, corticosterone, or LPS-induced hypoglycemia.

  6. Air pollution in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Sylvia C L; Silva, Clovis A; Orione, Maria Angelica M; Campos, Lucia M A; Sallum, Adriana M E; Braga, Alfésio L F

    2011-11-01

    Air pollution consists of a heterogeneous mixture of gasses and particles that include carbon monoxide, nitrates, sulfur dioxide, ozone, lead, toxic by-product of tobacco smoke and particulate matter. Oxidative stress and inflammation induced by inhaled pollutants may result in acute and chronic disorders in the respiratory system, as well as contribute to a state of systemic inflammation and autoimmunity. This paper reviews the mechanisms of air contaminants influencing the immune response and autoimmunity, and it focuses on studies of inhaled pollutants triggering and/or exacerbating rheumatic diseases in cities around the world. Remarkably, environmental factors contribute to the onset of autoimmune diseases, especially smoking and occupational exposure to silica in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Other diseases such as scleroderma may be triggered by the inhalation of chemical solvents, herbicides and silica. Likewise, primary vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) may be triggered by silica exposure. Only few studies showed that air pollutants could trigger or exacerbate juvenile idiopathic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In contrast, no studies of tropospheric pollution triggering inflammatory myopathies and spondyloarthropathies were carried out. In conclusion, air pollution is one of the environmental factors involved in systemic inflammation and autoimmunity. Further studies are needed in order to evaluate air pollutants and their potentially serious effects on autoimmune rheumatic diseases and the mechanisms involved in the onset and the exacerbation of these diseases.

  7. Autoimmunity: Experimental and clinical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, R.S.; Rose, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains five parts and a section of poster papers. Each part contains several papers. Some of the papers are: Molecular Genetics and T Cells in Autoimmunity; Gene Conversion: A Mechanism to Explain HLA-D Region and Disease Association; Genetics of the Complement System; Speculation on the Role of Somatic Mutation in the Generation of Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Monoclonal Anti-DNA Antibodies: The Targets and Origins of SLE.

  8. Rituximab for autoimmune blistering diseases: recent studies, new insights

    OpenAIRE

    Lunardon, Luisa; Payne, Aimee S.

    2012-01-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has been successfully used off-label for treatment of autoimmune blistering diseases. We discuss rituximab mechanisms of action, host factors that may affect response to rituximab, and the efficacy and safety of rituximab in autoimmune blistering diseases, incorporating recent data on the use of rituximab in other autoimmune disease patients.

  9. Amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice by photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeen A Muili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The approved immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS are only partially effective. It is thought that the combination of immunomodulatory and neuroprotective strategies is necessary to prevent or reverse disease progression. Irradiation with far red/near infrared light, termed photobiomodulation, is a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Data suggests that near-infrared light functions through neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. We sought to investigate the clinical effect of photobiomodulation in the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE model of multiple sclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The clinical effect of photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light was investigated in the C57BL/6 mouse model of EAE. Disease was induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG according to standard laboratory protocol. Mice received 670 nm light or no light treatment (sham administered as suppression and treatment protocols. 670 nm light reduced disease severity with both protocols compared to sham treated mice. Disease amelioration was associated with down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α and up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10 in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies document the therapeutic potential of photobiomodulation with 670 nm light in the EAE model, in part through modulation of the immune response.

  10. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Paz, Ziv; Israeli, Eitan; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have been used for over 200 years and are the most effective way of preventing the morbidity and mortality associated with infections. Like other drugs, vaccines can cause adverse events, but unlike conventional medicines, which are prescribed to people who are ill, vaccines are administered to healthy individuals, thus increasing the concern over adverse reactions. Most side effects attributed to vaccines are mild, acute and transient; however, rare reactions such as hypersensitivity, induction of infection, and autoimmunity do occur and can be severe and even fatal. The rarity and subacute presentation of post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena means that ascertaining causality between these events can be difficult. Moreover, the latency period between vaccination and autoimmunity ranges from days to years. In this article, on the basis of published evidence and our own experience, we discuss the various aspects of the causal and temporal interactions between vaccines and autoimmune phenomena, as well as the possible mechanisms by which different components of vaccines might induce autoimmunity.

  11. [Diagnostics of autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleznay, Zsuzsanna; Regenass, Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies play a key role in diagnostic laboratories as markers of autoimmune diseases. In addition to their role as markers they mediate diverse effects in vivo. Autoantibodies with protective effect have been described. Natural protective IgM autoantibodies against tumour-antigens of malignant cells or their precursors may contribute to increased survival rates of carcinoma patients. In a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus it has been shown that anti-dsDNA IgM autoantibodies protect from glomerular damage. In contrast, a direct pathogenic role of autoantibodies has been well established e.g. in myasthenia gravis or in Goodpasture syndrome. Similarly autoantibodies against SSA Ro52 are detrimental in neonatal lupus erythematosus with congenital heart block. Moreover, putatively protective autoantibodies may become pathogenic during the course of the disease such as the onconeuronal autoantibodies whose pathogenicity depends on their compartmentalisation. In patients with paraneoplastic syndromes tumour cells express proteins that are also naturally present in the brain. Anti-tumour autoantibodies which temporarily suppress tumour growth can provoke an autoimmune attack on neurons once having crossed the blood-brain barrier and cause specific neurological symptoms. Only a restricted number of autoantibodies are useful follow-up markers for the effectiveness of treatment in autoimmune diseases. Certain autoantibodies hold prognostic value and appear years or even decades before the diagnosis of disease such as the antimitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis or anti-citrullinated protein (CCP)-antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. It is crucial to know whether the autoantibodies in question recognise linear or conformational epitopes in order to choose the appropriate detection methods. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy remains a very useful tool for confirmation of results of commercially available immunoassays and for detection of

  12. Maternal Antibody Protected Chicks from Growth Retardation and Immunosuppression Induced by Early Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shu-hong; GUI Zhi-zhong; QU Li-xin

    2007-01-01

    To determine if the maternal antibody from breeders vaccinated with cell culture-adapted reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) could protect chicks from early REV infection, one-day-old chicks with or without anti-REV maternal antibodies were inoculated with REV, and then their growth rates and antibody tilers to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and avian influenza virus (AIV), after vaccination with inactivated vaccines, were compared. This study indicated that REV infection could cause growth retardation and severely inhibit immune reactions to inactivated vaccines against NDV and Avian influenza virus (AIV, H9 and H5) in one-day-old broilers without maternal antibodies specific to REV. Maternal antibody from breeders vaccinated with an attenuated REV vaccine effectively protected REV-challenged birds from growth retardation and immunosuppression on antibody reactions to NDV and AIV vaccines. Four weeks after vaccination, the HI liters to NDV, AIV-H9, and AIV-H5 in maternal antibody positive and negative groups were 3.36±2.04 versus 1.58±1.69 (P<0.01), 6.27±3.87 versus 0.71±1.60(P<0.01), and 6.72 versus 0.54±1.44(p<0.01). Maternal antibodies from breeders vaccinated with REV vaccine could successfully protect chicks from REV infection and effectively prevent REV-induced growth retardation and immunosuppression in antibody responses to NDV and AIV.

  13. Autoimmune synaptopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Sarah J; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Vincent, Angela

    2016-02-01

    Autoantibodies targeting proteins at the neuromuscular junction are known to cause several distinct myasthenic syndromes. Recently, autoantibodies targeting neurotransmitter receptors and associated proteins have also emerged as a cause of severe, but potentially treatable, diseases of the CNS. Here, we review the clinical evidence as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence that autoantibodies account for myasthenic syndromes and autoimmune disorders of the CNS by disrupting the functional or structural integrity of synapses. Studying neurological and psychiatric diseases of autoimmune origin may provide new insights into the cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying a broad range of CNS disorders. PMID:26806629

  14. Protective effects of astaxanthin on ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis by the JNK/p-JNK pathway-mediated inhibition of autophagy and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Li

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin, a potent antioxidant, exhibits a wide range of biological activities, including antioxidant, atherosclerosis and antitumor activities. However, its effect on concanavalin A (ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of astaxanthin on ConA-induced hepatitis in mice, and to elucidate the mechanisms of regulation.Autoimmune hepatitis was induced in in Balb/C mice using ConA (25 mg/kg, and astaxanthin was orally administered daily at two doses (20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg for 14 days before ConA injection. Levels of serum liver enzymes and the histopathology of inflammatory cytokines and other maker proteins were determined at three time points (2, 8 and 24 h. Primary hepatocytes were pretreated with astaxanthin (80 μM in vitro 24 h before stimulation with TNF-α (10 ng/ml. The apoptosis rate and related protein expression were determined 24 h after the administration of TNF-α.Astaxanthin attenuated serum liver enzymes and pathological damage by reducing the release of inflammatory factors. It performed anti-apoptotic effects via the descending phosphorylation of Bcl-2 through the down-regulation of the JNK/p-JNK pathway.This research firstly expounded that astaxanthin reduced immune liver injury in ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis. The mode of action appears to be downregulation of JNK/p-JNK-mediated apoptosis and autophagy.

  15. Hepatitis A vaccine associated with autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PA Berry; G Smith-Laing

    2007-01-01

    To describe a case of probable relapsing autoimmune hepatitis associated with vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV). A case report and review of literature were written concerning autoimmune hepatitis in association with hepatitis A and other hepatotropic viruses. Soon after the administration of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A vaccine, a man who had recently recovered from an uncharacterized but self-limiting hepatitic illness,experienced a severe deterioration (AST 1687 U/L, INR 1.4). Anti-nuclear antibodies were detectable, and liver biopsy was compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. The observation supports the role of HAV as a trigger of autoimmune hepatitis. Studies in helper T-cell activity and antibody expression against hepatic proteins in the context of hepatitis A infection are summarized, and the concept of molecular mimicry with regard to other forms of viral hepatitis and autoimmunity is briefly explored.

  16. The Role of Pathogenic Autoantibodies in Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrill J. Rowley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The serological presence of autoantibodies is diagnostic of autoimmunity, and these autoantibodies may be present for many years before the presentation of autoimmune disease (AID. Although a pathogenic role has been demonstrated for various autoantibodies reactive with cell surface and extracellular autoantigens, studies using monoclonal antibodies (mAb show not all antibodies in the polyclonal response are pathogenic. Differences depend on Fab-mediated diversity in epitope specificity, Fc-mediated effects based on immunoglobulin (Ig class and subclass, activation of complement, and the milieu in which the reaction occurs. These autoantibodies often occur in organ-specific AID and this review illustrates their pathogenic and highly specific effects. The role of autoantibodies associated with intracellular antigens is less clear. In vitro they may inhibit or adversely affect well-defined intracellular biochemical pathways, yet, in vivo they are separated from their autoantigens by multiple cellular barriers. Recent evidence that Ig can traverse cell membranes, interact with intracellular proteins, and induce apoptosis has provided new evidence for a pathogenic role for such autoantibodies. An understanding of how autoantibodies behave in the polyclonal response and their role in pathogenesis of AID may help identify populations of culprit B-cells and selection of treatments that suppress or eliminate them.

  17. Idiopathic Granulomatous Mastitis: An Autoimmune Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Altintoprak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the autoimmune basis of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM by determining the anti-nuclear antibody (ANA and extractable nuclear antigen (ENA levels of patients diagnosed with IGM. Material and Methods. Twenty-six IGM patients were evaluated. Serum samples were analyzed for autoantibodies by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF using a substrate kit that induced fluorescein-conjugated goat antibodies to human immunoglobulin G (IgG. IIF patterns were read at serum dilutions of 1 : 40 and 1 : 100 for ANA positivity. Using the immunoblot technique, the sera of patients were assayed at dilutions of 1 : 40 and 1 : 100 for human autoantibodies of the IgG class to 15 lines of highly purified ENAs. Results. In the IIF studies for ANA, positivity was identified for four different patterns in the 1 : 40 diluted preparations, for three different patients in the 1 : 100 diluted preparations and only one pattern was identified at the 1 : 320 dilution. In the ENA studies, positivity was identified for four different pattern in the 1 : 40 dilution, and only one pattern was identified at the 1 : 100 dilution. Conclusion. This study was not able to support the eventual existence of an autoimmune basis for IGM.

  18. Endocrine autoimmunity in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is caused by numeric and structural abnormalities of the X chromosome. An increased frequency of autoimmunity as well as an elevated incidence of autoantibodies was observed in Turner patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective analysis of the incidence of autoimmunity in 66 Italian patients affected by Turner syndrome. Methods Sixty-six unselected and consecutive Italian Turner patients were recruited. The association between age, karyotype and the presence of clinical/pre-clinical autoimmune disorders and of autoantibodies was examined. Results Out of the 66 Turner patients, 26 had thyroid autoimmune disorders (39.4%), 14 patients had Hashimoto’s thyroiditis with clinical or subclinical hypothyroidism (21.2%) and 12 patients had circulating anti-thyroid antibodies, echographic pattern of diffuse hypoechogenicity and normal thyroid hormone levels (18.2%). None were affected by Graves’ disease. We analyzed the overall incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the 3 different age groups 0–9.9, 10–19.9 and 20–29.9 years. No statistically significant difference was observed in the incidence of thyroid autoimmunity within the age-groups (χ2-test p > 0.05). Out of the 66 patients, 31 patients had the 45,X karyotype; within this first group 14 out of 31 patients were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A second group of 29 patients included 19 patients with mosaicism, 5 patients with deletions and 5 patients with ring chromosome; out of these 29 patients 7 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A third group included 6 patients with X isochromosome; 5 out of 6 were affected by autoimmune thyroid disease. A statistically significant difference in the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity within the different karyotype groups was observed (χ2-test p = 0.0173). When comparing the X isochromosome group with the pooled group of other karyotypes, of note, the frequency of thyroid autoimmunity was

  19. Gene expression in the spinal cord in female lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with myelin basic protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley R Inglis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the best available model of multiple sclerosis, can be induced in different animal strains using immunization with central nervous system antigens. EAE is associated with inflammation and demyelination of the nervous system. Micro-array can be used to investigate gene expression and biological pathways that are altered during disease. There are few studies of the changes in gene expression in EAE, and these have mostly been done in a chronic mouse EAE model. EAE induced in the Lewis with myelin basic protein (MBP-EAE is well characterised, making it an ideal candidate for the analysis of gene expression in this disease model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MBP-EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by inoculation with MBP and adjuvants. Total RNA was extracted from the spinal cords and used for micro-array analysis using AffimetrixGeneChip Rat Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Gene expression in the spinal cords was compared between healthy female rats and female rats with MBP-EAE. Gene expression in the spinal cord of rats with MBP-EAE differed from that in the spinal cord of normal rats, and there was regulation of pathways involved with immune function and nervous system function. For selected genes the change in expression was confirmed with real-time PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: EAE leads to modulation of gene expression in the spinal cord. We have identified the genes that are most significantly regulated in MBP-EAE in the Lewis rat and produced a profile of gene expression in the spinal cord at the peak of disease.

  20. Role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning-Li Li; Tong Zhou; Dong-Qing Zhang; Hong Nie; Qi-Wen Yu; Ji-Ying Zhang; An-Lun Ma; Bai-Hua Shen; Li Wang; Jun Bai; Xue-Hua Chen

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of soluble Fas ligand in autoimmune diseases.METHODS: RT-PCR was performed to amplify sFasL cDNA from the total RNA extracted from activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. DNA fragments were cloned into PCR vector. After sequenced, sFasL gene fragments were inserted into pQE-31 vector and expressed in E. Coli M15respectively. Proteins were purified through affinity chromatography column with ligand of 6xHis tag and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Mice were immunized with sFasL protein and specific anti-serum was harvested 6 wk after immunization. Monoclonal anti-human FasL antibody was made from the immunized mice. Serum level of sFasL in different patients was detected using antiFasL antibodies from the immunized mice.RESULTS: The protein expressed was 24 ku by SDS-PAGE electrophrosis. The protein was specially bound to antihuman FasL antibody by Western blot analysis. The sFasL protein could induce Jurket cell apoptosis in vitro. The concentration of serum sFasL in patients with autoimmune diseases was higher than that in normal individuals. sFasL could reduce arthritis in collagen induced arthritis (CIA)mice model by subcutaneous injection.CONCLUSION: sFasL may be involved in either induction of apoptosis or autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, sFasL may have potential application in treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Redistribution and modulation of Gross murine leukemia virus antigens induced by specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioachim, H L; Sabbath, M

    1979-01-01

    Gross murine leukemia virus (G-MuLV)-induced rat leukemia cells in tissue culture replicate G-MuLV, express strong virus-associated membrane antigenicity, and are consistently killed by specific antibodies and complement in cytotoxicity tests. To explore the effect of specific antibodies, rat anti-G-MuLV antisera were added to the cultures of leukemia cells for variable periods of time. Redistribution of virus particles as well as of membrane virus antigens in the form of polar patches and caps was observed by electron microscopy, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy. Substantial decreases in cytotoxicity indexes accompanied these changes. The antigen modulation induced by anti-G-MuLV antibodies in vitro paralleled similar changes obtained in vivo by transplanttion of leukemia cells in rats with high anti-G-MuLV antibody titers. The importance of antigen modulation in this system resides in its direct relationship with the malignant potential of the leukemia cells.

  2. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type 1...

  3. Autoimmun hypophysitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Hagen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    during pregnancy or postpartum, but also occurs in males and children. AH is often associated with other autoimmune diseases, most frequently with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The symptoms are caused by enlargement of the pituitary gland and disturbances of the hormone function. Treatment is either...

  4. Antigens of the basement membranes of the seminiferous tubules induce autoimmunity in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, L; Satz, M L; Sztein, M B; Denduchis, B

    1982-05-01

    A preparation enriched in basement membranes from seminiferous tubules was isolated from rat testes (STBM) and injected with complete Freund's adjuvant into Wistar rats. In 60% of animals a mild multifocal orchitis was observed. In damaged areas, perivascular and peritubular mononuclear cell infiltrates and different degrees of cell sloughing of some seminiferous tubules were observed. Electron microscopy revealed focal thickenings and delamination of the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules as well as vacuolization of Sertoli cell cytoplasm. Using immunofluorescence discontinuous linear deposits of IgG were detected along the seminiferous tubular wall. Moreover, the same pattern of immunofluorescence was observed when the IgG eluted from the testes of the immunized rats was layered on sections of normal rat testis. Circulating antibodies to STBM were detected using passive haemagglutination in approximately 45% of the immunized rats, with titers ranging from 1:20 to 1:80. Leukocyte migration was inhibited when the spleen cells of the immunized rats were incubated with antigens from the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules, whilst a negative reaction was obtained when the soluble fraction of testis homogenate was used. PMID:7050376

  5. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  6. Antibody to eosinophil cationic protein suppresses dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuko Shichijo; Kazuya Makiyama; Chun-Yang Wen; Mutsumi Matsuu; Toshiyuki Nakayama; Masahiro Nakashima; Makoto Ihara; Ichiro Sekine

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To produce an antibody against rat eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and to examine the effects of the antibody in rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis.METHODS: An antibody was raised against rat ECP. Rats were treated with 3% DSS in drinking water for 7 d and received the antibody or normal serum. The colons were exarmined histologically and correlated with clinical symptoms.Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were estimated as a grade of inflammation.RESULTS: The ECP antibody stained the activated eosinophils around the injured crypts in the colonic mucosa.Antibody treatment reduced the severity of colonic ulceration and acute clinical symptoms (diarrhea and/or blood-stained stool). Body weight gain was significantly greater and the colon length was significantly longer in anti-ECP-treated rats than in normal serum-treated rats. Expression of ECP in activated eosinophils was associated with the presence of erosions and inflammation. The number of Ki-67-positive cells in the regenerated surface epithelium increased in anti-ECP-treated rats compared with normal serum-treated rats. Western blot analysis revealed reduced expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in anti-ECP-treated rats.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that treatment with ECP antibody, improved DSS-induced colitis in rats, possibly by increasing the regenerative activity of the colonic epithelium and downregulation of the immune response,and suggest that anti-ECP may promote intestinal wound healing in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).

  7. Protein X of Streptococcus agalactiae induces opsonic antibodies in cows.

    OpenAIRE

    Rainard, P; Lautrou, Y; Sarradin, P.; Poutrel, B

    1991-01-01

    Protein X of Streptococcus agalactiae is a surface protein frequently associated with strains isolated from cases of mastitis of dairy cows. By immunizing cows with purified protein X, we obtained an antibody response which was restricted to X-bearing strains of S. agalactiae in a whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This response resulted in an increase in the opsonic activity of serum for strains bearing protein X, as assessed through the augmentation of the chemiluminescence respo...

  8. Carrier induced epitopic suppression of antibody responses induced by virus-like particles is a dynamic phenomenon caused by carrier-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegerlehner, Andrea; Wiesel, Melanie; Dietmeier, Klaus; Zabel, Franziska; Gatto, Dominique; Saudan, Philippe; Bachmann, Martin F

    2010-07-26

    Pre-existing immunity against vaccine carrier proteins has been reported to inhibit the immune response against antigens conjugated to the same carrier by a process termed carrier induced epitopic suppression (CIES). Hence understanding the phenomenon of CIES is of major importance for the development of conjugate vaccines. Virus-like particles (VLPs) are a novel class of potent immunological carriers which have been successfully used to enhance the antibody response to virtually any conjugated antigen. In the present study we investigated the impact of a pre-existing VLP-specific immune response on the development of antibody responses against a conjugated model peptide after primary, secondary and tertiary immunization. Although VLP-specific immune responses led to reduced peptide-specific antibody titers, we showed that CIES against peptide-VLP conjugates could be overcome by high coupling densities, repeated injections and/or higher doses of conjugate vaccine. Furthermore we dissected VLP-specific immunity by adoptively transferring VLP-specific antibodies, B-cells or T(helper) cells separately into naïve mice and found that the observed CIES against peptide-VLP conjugates was mainly mediated by carrier-specific antibodies.

  9. Intranasal vaccination with proinsulin DNA induces regulatory CD4+ T cells that prevent experimental autoimmune diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every, Alison L; Kramer, David R; Mannering, Stuart I; Lew, Andrew M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2006-04-15

    Insulin, an autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, when administered mucosally to diabetes-prone NOD mice induces regulatory T cells (T(reg)) that protect against diabetes. Compared with protein, Ag encoded as DNA has potential advantages as a therapeutic agent. We found that intranasal vaccination of NOD mice with plasmid DNA encoding mouse proinsulin II-induced CD4+ T(reg) that suppressed diabetes development, both after adoptive cotransfer with "diabetogenic" spleen cells and after transfer into NOD mice given cyclophosphamide to accelerate diabetes onset. In contrast to prototypic CD4+ CD25+ T(reg), CD4+ T(reg) induced by proinsulin DNA were both CD25+ and CD25- and not defined by markers such as glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR), CD103, or Foxp3. Intriguingly, despite induction of T(reg) and reduced islet inflammation, diabetes incidence in proinsulin DNA-treated mice was unchanged. However, diabetes was prevented when DNA vaccination was performed under the cover of CD40 ligand blockade, known to prevent priming of CTL by mucosal Ag. Thus, intranasal vaccination with proinsulin DNA has therapeutic potential to prevent diabetes, as demonstrated by induction of protective T(reg), but further modifications are required to improve its efficacy, which could be compromised by concomitant induction of pathogenic immunity. PMID:16585551

  10. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. ► We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. ► CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. ► CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  11. Anti-Interleukin-6 Receptor Antibody Therapy-Induced Retinopathy in a Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asumi Tada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tocilizumab, a humanized anti-human interleukin-6 (IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody, is beneficial for treating autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The most common adverse event is upper respiratory tract infection; ocular side effects are rare. We describe a case of skin ulceration and bilateral retinopathy with multifocal cotton-wool spots and retinal hemorrhages in a patient with RA treated with tocilizumab. Tocilizumab administration increased the serum level of IL-6 without affecting the IL-8 levels. We could not exclude the possibility of blood coagulation or retinal vascular changes caused by tocilizumab. The current case highlights the need to consider that ocular adverse effects can develop in patients treated with tocilizumab.

  12. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Alam, Jahangir; Afsar, Nure Alam; Huda, Nazmul; Kabir, Yearul; Qadri, Firdausi; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy. Infants received tetanus and pertussis vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. TT and PT anti-IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes was measured at 15 wk. Plasma antibodies were measured at 6 wk (pre-vaccination), 15 wk and 1 y of age. Prior to vaccination, TT and PT antibody were detected in 94.6% and 15.2% of infants. At 15 wk anti-TT-IgG and anti-PT-IgG in plasma was increased by 7-9 fold over pre-vaccination levels, while at 1 y plasma anti-TT-IgG was decreased by approximately 5-fold from the peak and had returned to near the pre-vaccination level. At 1 y plasma anti-PT-IgG was decreased by 2-fold 1 yfrom the 15 wk level. However, 89.5% and 82.3% of infants at 1 y had protective levels of anti-TT and anti-PT IgG, respectively. Pre-vaccination plasma IgG levels were associated with lower vaccine-specific IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes at 15 wk (p < 0.10). This apparent inhibition was seen for anti-TT-IgG at both 15 wk (p < 0.05) and t 1 y (p < 0.10) of age. In summary, we report an apparent inhibitory effect of passively derived maternal antibody on an infants' own antibody response to the same vaccine. However, since the cut-off values for protective titers are low, infants had protective antibody levels throughout infancy. PMID:27176823

  13. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells. - Highlights: • We report a therapeutic potential of DMSO in autoimmune diabetes. • DMSO exhibits an immune modulatory effect. • DMSO treatment increases regulatory T cell differentiation. • The increase in STAT5 signaling pathway explains the effect of DMSO in Tregs

  14. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Gu-Jiun [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sytwu, Huey-Kang [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yu, Jyh-Cherng [Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Yuan-Wu [School of Dentistry, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuo, Yu-Liang [Department of Medical Imaging, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); School of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yu, Chiao-Chi [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan [Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, Shing-Hwa, E-mail: h610129@gmail.com [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of General Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells. - Highlights: • We report a therapeutic potential of DMSO in autoimmune diabetes. • DMSO exhibits an immune modulatory effect. • DMSO treatment increases regulatory T cell differentiation. • The increase in STAT5 signaling pathway explains the effect of DMSO in Tregs.

  15. Redefining strategies to introduce tolerance inducing cellular therapy in humans to combat autoimmunity and transplantation reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eTen Brinke

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical translation of tolerance-inducing cell therapies requires a novel approach focused on innovative networks, patient involvement and, foremost, a fundamental paradigm shift in thinking from both Academia, Industry and Regulatory Agencies. Tolerance-inducing cell products differ essentially from conventional drugs. They are personalized and target interactive immunological networks to shift the balance towards tolerance. The human cell products are often absent or fundamentally different in animals. This creates important limitations of pre-clinical animal testing for safety and efficacy of these products and calls for novel translational approaches, which require the combined efforts of the different parties involved. Dedicated international and multidisciplinary consortia that focus on clinical translation are of utmost importance. They can help inform and educate regulatory policy makers on the unique requirements for these cell products, ranging from preclinical studies in animals to in vitro human studies. In addition, they can promote reliable immunomonitoring tools. The development of tolerance-inducing cell products requires not only bench-to-bedside but also reverse translation, from bedside back to the bench.

  16. Autoimmunity in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischner, M; Prokocimer, M; Zolberg, A; Shaklai, M

    1988-08-01

    Seventy-nine patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia were evaluated for the presence of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies. One patient has polymyositis and two additional patients presented with features suggestive of pernicious anaemia and chronic active hepatitis. The Coombs' direct test was positive in 7% and immune thrombocytopenia was present in 8.1% of patients. Five (7%) patients had M-protein in the serum. No increased frequency of other autoantibodies was noted in our study group. We conclude that the propensity to develop antibodies is restricted only to the haematopoietic system and that there is no increased frequency of non-haematological autoimmune diseases in chronic lymphatic leukaemia. PMID:3249703

  17. Sustained systemic delivery of monoclonal antibodies by genetically modified skin fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noël, D; Pelegrin, M; Brockly, F;

    2000-01-01

    In vivo production and systemic delivery of therapeutic antibodies by engineered cells might advantageously replace injection of purified antibodies for treating a variety of life-threatening diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and autoimmune diseases. We report here...... that skin fibroblasts retrovirally transduced to express immunoglobulin genes can be used for sustained long-term systemic delivery of cloned antibodies in immunocompetent mice. Importantly, no anti- idiotypic response against the ectopically expressed model antibody used in this study was observed....... This supports the notion that skin fibroblasts can potentially be used in antibody-based gene/cell therapy protocols without inducing any adverse immune response in treated individuals....

  18. Induction of Graves' disease in patients with non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism or nontoxic goiter after radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyrotropin receptors antibodies may occur and induce Graves' disease (GD) several months after radioiodine therapy in a small number of patients with non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism or nontoxic goiter. The prevalence of radiation-induced GD is between 0.05% and 5%. The hypothesis of this disease includes induction by autoimmune reaction and others. Detection of the thyroid autoantibodise or of 99mTc pertechnetate scan can forecast the appearance of GD. Antithyroid drugs, again radioiodine therapy and surgery are the treatments. (authors)

  19. Resistance to Streptozotocin-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes in Absence of Complement C3: Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Play a Role.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Gao

    Full Text Available The contribution of complement to the development of autoimmune diabetes has been proposed recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. We hypothesize that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC, which act as regulators in autoimmunity, play a role in resistance to diabetes in absence of complement C3. Indeed, MDSC number was increased significantly in STZ-treated C3-/- mice. These cells highly expressed arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. Importantly, depletion of MDSC led to the occurrence of overt diabetes in C3-/- mice after STZ. Furthermore, C3-/- MDSC actively suppressed diabetogenic T cell proliferation and prevented/delayed the development of diabetes in arginase and/or iNOS-dependent manner. Both Tregs and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β are crucial for MDSC induction in STZ-treated C3-/- mice as depletion of Tregs or blocking TGF-β bioactivity dramatically decreased MDSC number. These findings indicate that MDSC are implicated in resistance to STZ-induced diabetes in the absence of complement C3, which may be helpful for understanding of mechanisms underlying preventive effects of complement deficiency on autoimmune diseases.

  20. The role of parvovirus B19 in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    Human parvovirus B19 is a single-stranded DNA virus which preferentially targets the erythroblasts in the bone marrow. B19 infection commonly causes erythema infectiosum, arthralgia, fetal death, transient aplastic crisis in patients with shortened red cell survival, and persistent infection in people who are immunocompromised. Less common clinical manifestations include atypical skin rashes, neurological syndromes, cardiac syndromes, and various cytopenias. B19 infection has also been associated with development of a variety of different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatological, neurological, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, haematological, nephrological and metabolic. Production of a variety of autoantibodies has been demonstrated to occur during B19 infection and these have been shown to be key to the pathogenesis of the particular disease process in a significant number of cases, for example, production of rheumatoid factor in cases of B19-associated rheumatoid arthritis and production of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in patients with B19-associated type 1 diabetes mellitus. B19 infection has also been associated with the development of multiple autoimmune diseases in 12 individuals. Documented mechanisms in B19-associated autoimmunity include molecular mimicry (IgG antibody to B19 proteins has been shown to cross react with a variety of recognised human autoantigens, including collagen II, keratin, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, myelin basic protein, cardiolipin, and platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa), B19-induced apoptosis with presentation of self-antigens to T lymphocytes, and the phospholipase activity of the B19 unique VP1 protein. PMID:26644521

  1. Autoimmun pankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordside, Eva; Novovic, Srdan; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad;

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare inflammatory disease. AIP has characteristic histology, serology and imaging findings. Two types of AIP exist, type 1, which is a part of the systemic immunoglobulin G4-related disease, and type 2, which is only localized to the pancreas. Patients with type 1...... are predominantly older men, have involvement of other organs and more often experience relapse than patients with type 2. Both types respond well to steroid treatment. The most important differential diagnose is pancreatic cancer....

  2. Sauna as a valuable clinical tool for cardiovascular, autoimmune, toxicant- induced and other chronic health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinnion, Walter J

    2011-09-01

    Sauna therapy has been used for hundreds of years in the Scandinavian region as a standard health activity. Studies document the effectiveness of sauna therapy for persons with hypertension, congestive heart failure, and for post-myocardial infarction care. Some individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic fatigue, chronic pain, or addictions also find benefit. Existing evidence supports the use of saunas as a component of depuration (purification or cleansing) protocols for environmentally-induced illness. While far-infrared saunas have been used in many cardiovascular studies, all studies applying sauna for depuration have utilized saunas with radiant heating units. Overall, regular sauna therapy (either radiant heat or far-infrared units) appears to be safe and offers multiple health benefits to regular users. One potential area of concern is sauna use in early pregnancy because of evidence suggesting that hyperthermia might be teratogenic.

  3. Axonal damage in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in a C57BL/6 mouse model may be not secondary to inflammatory demyelination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boting Gao; Juan Chen; Qiong Wang; Wei Wang; Zhouping Tang

    2011-01-01

    The present study established a chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model in C57BL/6 mice induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptides and complete Freund's adjuvant. Onset latency was 12 days, with an incidence rate of 100%. Neuropathological characteristics included perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, demyelination, neuronal degeneration, and axonal damage within cerebral and myelic white matter. Electron microscopy revealed swollen mitochondria, complete organ disappearance, and fused or broken myelin sheath structure, which were accompanied by myelin sheath reconstruction. Moreover, axonal damage was not consistent with demyelination distribution, and severity of axonal damage did not correlate with demyelination. Results suggested that axonal damage in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model is not secondary to inflammatory demyelination.

  4. Fab-mediated binding of drug-dependent antibodies to platelets in quinidine- and quinine-induced thrombocytopenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Christie, D J; Mullen, P C; Aster, R H

    1985-01-01

    Platelets coated with quinine- or quinidine-induced antibodies form rosettes around protein A-Sepharose beads and normal platelets form rosettes about protein A-Sepharose beads coated with these antibodies. These reactions occurred only in the presence of sensitizing drug. Platelets also formed rosettes about protein A-Sepharose beads coated with an anti-PIA1 antibody, but drug was not required. Formation of rosettes between antibody-coated platelets and protein A-Sepharose was inhibited by F...

  5. The recognition and treatment of autoimmune epilepsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Jehan; Dale, Russell C

    2015-05-01

    There is emerging interest in autoimmune epilepsy, which represents a small but potentially treatable form of epilepsy. Most insights into autoimmune epilepsy derive from the recent descriptions of autoimmune encephalitis that takes two general forms: a focal encephalitis (such as limbic) or a diffuse encephalitis (such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor [NMDAR] encephalitis). The features of autoimmune epilepsy include acute or subacute onset of seizures, usually in the context of encephalopathy, and inflammation of the central nervous system on testing cerebrospinal fluid or magnetic resonance imaging. Neuronal antibodies associated with autoimmune encephalitis and seizures in children include NMDAR, voltage-gated potassium channel complex, glycine receptor, γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R), γ-Aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABA(B)R), and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. These antibodies support the diagnosis of autoimmune epilepsy, but are not essential for diagnosis. When autoimmune epilepsy is suspected, first-line immune therapy with corticosteroids in addition to intravenous immunoglobulin or plasma exchange should be considered. Second-line therapy with rituximab or cyclophosphamide can be considered if the syndrome is severe. A response to immune therapy supports the diagnosis of autoimmune epilepsy. Neuronal antibodies are increasingly found in patients with focal epilepsy of unknown cause who do not have 'encephalitis'. Recent epidemiological studies support the link between epilepsy and autoimmune diseases. Future studies need to define the spectrum of autoimmune epilepsy and focus on early identification and treatment. PMID:25483277

  6. Murine concanavalin A-induced hepatitis is prevented by interleukin 12 (IL-12) antibody and exacerbated by exogenous IL-12 through an interferon-gamma-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, F; Di Marco, R; Zaccone, P;

    2000-01-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis is a cell-mediated immunoinflammatory condition similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. We investigated the role of interleukin 12 (IL-12) in hepatitis induced in NMRI and C57/BL6 mice by a single injection of ConA. Recombinant murine IL-12 administered 24...... hours and 1 hour prior to ConA exacerbated both transaminase activities in plasma and histologic signs of hepatitis. These markers of liver injury were significantly reduced by prophylactic, but not therapeutic treatment with anti-IL-12 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The disease-modulatory effects of IL-12...... augmented in IL-12/ConA-treated mice and diminished in anti-IL-12 mAb/ConA-treated mice. Anti-IFN-gamma mAb also impeded the appearance of IL-12/ConA-induced hepatitis. Thus, IL-12-induced production of IFN-gamma might play a role in mediating the hepatitis-inducing effect of ConA. However, IL-12p40...

  7. Polyanhydride Nanovaccines Induce Germinal Center B Cell Formation and Sustained Serum Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela Ramirez, Julia E; Tygrett, Lorraine T; Hao, Jihua; Habte, Habtom H; Cho, Michael W; Greenspan, Neil S; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle-based subunit vaccines have shown promising characteristics by enhancing antigen presentation and inducing protective immune responses when compared with soluble protein. Specifically, polyanhydride nanoparticle-based vaccines (i.e., nanovaccines) have been shown to successfully encapsulate and release antigens, activate B and T cells, and induce both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity towards a variety of immunogens. One of the characteristics of strong thymus-dependent antibody responses is the formation of germinal centers (GC) and the generation of GC B cells, which is part of the T helper cell driven cellular response. In order to further understand the role of nanovaccines in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, their ability to induce germinal center B cell formation and isotype switching and the effects thereof on serum antibody responses were investigated in these studies. Polyanhydride nanovaccines based on 1,6-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)hexane and 1,8-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-3,6-dioxaoctane were used to subcutaneously administer a viral antigen. GC B cell formation and serum antibody responses induced by the nanovaccines were compared to that induced by alum-based vaccine formulations. It was demonstrated that a single dose of polyanhydride nanovaccines resulted in the formation of robust GCs and serum antibody in comparison to that induced by the alum-based formulation. This was attributed to the sustained release of antigen provided by the nanovaccines. When administered in a multiple dose regimen, the highest post-immunization titer and GC B cell number was enhanced, and the immune response induced by the nanovaccines was further sustained. These studies provide foundational information on the mechanism of action of polyanhydride nanovaccines. PMID:27319223

  8. Antibody-targeting of steady state dendritic cells induces tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eMahnke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are often defined as pivotal inducers of immunity, but these proinflammatory properties only develop after stimulation or ex vivo manipulation of DCs. Under non-inflammatory conditions in vivo, DCs are embedded into a tissue environment and encounter a plethora of self-antigens derived from apoptotic material. This material is transported to secondary lymphoid organs. As DCs maintain their non-activated phenotype in a sterile tissue environment, interaction with T cells will induce rather regulatory T cells (Treg than effector T cells. Thus, DCs are not only inducers of immunity but are also critical for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutical intervention for the induction of long lasting tolerance in several autoimmune conditions may therefore be possible by manipulating DC activation and/or targeting of DCs in their natural tissue environment.

  9. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R; Singer, Bernhard B; Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1(-/-) mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1(-/-) mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  10. Antigenic Complementarity in the Origins of Autoimmunity: A General Theory Illustrated With a Case Study of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Root-Bernstein

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel, testable theory of autoimmunity, outline novel predictions made by the theory, and illustrate its application to unravelling the possible causes of idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP. Pairs of stereochemically complementary antigens induce complementary immune responses (antibody or T-cell that create loss of regulation and civil war within the immune system itself. Antibodies attack antibodies creating circulating immune complexes; T-cells attack T-cells creating perivascular cuffing. This immunological civil war abrogates the self-nonself distinction. If at least one of the complementary antigens mimics a self antigen, then this unregulated immune response will target host tissues as well. Data demonstrating that complementary antigens are found in some animal models of autoimmunity and may be present in various human diseases, especially ITP, are reviewed. Specific mechanisms for preventing autoimmunity or suppressing existing autoimmunity are derived from the theory, and critical tests proposed. Finally, we argue that Koch's postulates are inadequate for establishing disease causation for multiple-antigen diseases and discuss the possibility that current research has failed to elucidate the causes of human autoimmune diseases because we are using the wrong criteria.

  11. Autoimmune Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, Amy M. L.; Britton, Jeffrey W.; McKeon, Andrew; So, Elson; Lennon, Vanda A.; Shin, Cheolsu; Klein, Christopher J.; Watson, Robert E.; Kotsenas, Amy L.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; Cascino, Gregory D.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Wirrell, Elaine C.; Nickels, Katherine C.; Aksamit, Allen J.; Noe, Katherine H.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical characteristics and immunotherapy responses in patients with autoimmune epilepsy. Design Observational, retrospective case series. Setting Mayo Clinic Health System. Patients Thirty-two patients with an exclusive (n=11) or predominant (n = 21) seizure presentation in whom an autoimmune etiology was suspected (on the basis of neural autoantibody [91%], inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid [31%], or magnetic resonance imaging suggesting inflammation [63%]) were studied. All had partial seizures: 81% had failed treatment with 2 or more anti-epileptic drugs and had daily seizures and 38% had seizure semiologies that were multifocal or changed with time. Head magnetic resonance imaging was normal in 15 (47%) at onset. Electroencephalogram abnormalities included interictal epileptiform discharges in 20; electrographic seizures in 15; and focal slowing in 13. Neural autoantibodies included voltage-gated potassium channel complex in 56% (leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 specific, 14; contactin-associated proteinlike 2 specific, 1); glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 in 22%; collapsin response-mediator protein 5 in 6%; and Ma2, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, and ganglionic acetylcholine receptor in 1 patient each. Intervention Immunotherapy with intravenous methylprednisolone; intravenous immune globulin; and combinations of intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immune globulin, plasmapheresis, or cyclo-phosphamide. Main Outcome Measure Seizure frequency. Results After a median interval of 17 months (range, 3–72 months), 22 of 27 (81%) reported improvement postimmunotherapy; 18 were seizure free. The median time from seizure onset to initiating immunotherapy was 4 months for responders and 22 months for nonresponders (P<.05). All voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patients reported initial or lasting benefit (P<.05). One voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody–positive patient was seizure free after

  12. Preparation of an antibody that recognizes and neutralizes Dictyostelium differentiation-inducing factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubohara, Yuzuru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Koji; Matsuo, Yusuke; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2010-05-28

    In the development of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, the differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1; 1-(3,5-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)hexan-1-one) plays an important role in the regulation of cell differentiation and chemotaxis; however, the cellular signaling systems involving DIF-1 remain to be elucidated. To obtain a probe for DIF-1, we synthesized a DIF derivative (DIF-1-NH(2); 6-amino-1-(3,5-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)hexan-1-one), and prepared an anti-DIF-1 antibody using a DIF-1-NH(2)-conjugated macromolecule as the immunogen. A 100-fold dilution of the antibody bound to DIF-1-NH(2)-conjugated resin, and this binding was inhibited by co-addition of 20 microM DIF-1 or DIF-1-NH(2). In a monolayer culture of HM44 cells, a DIF-deficient D. discoideum strain, 0.5 nM exogenous DIF-1 induced stalk cell formation in approximately 60% of the cells; this induction was dose-dependently inhibited by the antibody (diluted 12.5- or 25-fold). Furthermore, this inhibition by the antibody was recovered by co-addition of 2.5 or10 nM DIF-1. The results indicate that the anti-DIF-1 antibody recognizes DIF-1 and neutralizes its function. PMID:20416278

  13. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT

  14. Delivering HIV Gagp24 to DCIR Induces Strong Antibody Responses In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Flamar

    Full Text Available Targeting dendritic cell-specific endocytic receptors using monoclonal antibodies fused to desired antigens is an approach widely used in vaccine development to enhance the poor immunogenicity of protein-based vaccines and to induce immune responses. Here, we engineered an anti-human DCIR recombinant antibody, which cross-reacts with the homologous cynomolgous macaque receptor and was fused via the heavy chain C-terminus to HIV Gagp24 protein (αDCIR.Gagp24. In vitro, αDCIR.Gagp24 expanded multifunctional antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells recognizing multiple Gagp24 peptides from HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In non human primates, priming with αDCIR.Gagp24 without adjuvant elicited a strong anti-Gagp24 antibody response after the second immunization, while in the non-targeted HIV Gagp24 protein control groups the titers were weak. The presence of the double-stranded RNA poly(I:C adjuvant significantly enhanced the anti-Gagp24 antibody response in all the groups and reduced the discrimination between the different vaccine groups. The avidity of the anti-Gagp24 antibody responses was similar with either αDCIR.Gagp24 or Gagp24 immunization, but increased from medium to high avidity in both groups when poly(I:C was co-administered. This data provides a comparative analysis of DC-targeted and non-targeted proteins for their capacity to induce antigen-specific antibody responses in vivo. This study supports the further development of DCIR-based DC-targeting vaccines for protective durable antibody induction, especially in the absence of adjuvant.

  15. IL-17 Contributes to Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余海静; 黄加权; 刘阳; 艾国; 严伟明; 王晓晶; 宁琴

    2010-01-01

    The role of interleukin-17 (IL-17) in autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) was investigated. A mouse model of experimental autoimmune hepatitis was established, and the syngeneic S-100 antigen emulsified in complete Freud's adjuvant was injected intraperitoneally into adult male C57BL/6 mice. The IL-17 expression in serum and the livers of the mice models was detected by using ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. IL-17 neutralizing antibody was used to study the biological effect of IL-17 in the experimental...

  16. Papillomavirus pseudovirions packaged with the L2 gene induce cross-neutralizing antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte-Forero Diego F

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current vaccines against HPVs are constituted of L1 protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs and they have been shown to protect against natural HPV16 and HPV18 infections and associated lesions. In addition, limited cross-protection has been observed against closely related types. Immunization with L2 protein in animal models has been shown to provide cross-protection against distant papillomavirus types, suggesting that the L2 protein contains cross-neutralizing epitopes. However, vaccination with L2 protein or L2 peptides does not induce high titers of anti-L2 antibodies. In order to develop a vaccine with the potential to protect against other high-risk HPV types, we have produced HPV58 pseudovirions encoding the HPV31 L2 protein and compared their capacity to induce cross-neutralizing antibodies with that of HPV L1 and HPV L1/L2 VLPs. Methods The titers of neutralizing antibodies against HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and HPV58 induced in Balb/c mice were compared after immunization with L2-containing vaccines. Results Low titers of cross-neutralizing antibodies were detected in mice when immunized with L1/L2 VLPs, and the highest levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies were observed in mice immunized with HPV 58 L1/L2 pseudovirions encoding the HPV 31 L2 protein. Conclusions The results obtained indicate that high levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies are only observed after immunization with pseudovirions encoding the L2 protein. HPV pseudovirions thus represent a possible new strategy for the generation of a broad-spectrum vaccine to protect against high-risk HPVs and associated neoplasia.

  17. Proinsulin multi-peptide immunotherapy induces antigen-specific regulatory T cells and limits autoimmunity in a humanized model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, V B; Nikolic, T; Pearce, V Q; Demengeot, J; Roep, B O; Peakman, M

    2015-12-01

    Peptide immunotherapy (PIT) is a targeted therapeutic approach, involving administration of disease-associated peptides, with the aim of restoring antigen-specific immunological tolerance without generalized immunosuppression. In type 1 diabetes, proinsulin is a primary antigen targeted by the autoimmune response, and is therefore a strong candidate for exploitation via PIT in this setting. To elucidate the optimal conditions for proinsulin-based PIT and explore mechanisms of action, we developed a preclinical model of proinsulin autoimmunity in a humanized HLA-DRB1*0401 transgenic HLA-DR4 Tg mouse. Once proinsulin-specific tolerance is broken, HLA-DR4 Tg mice develop autoinflammatory responses, including proinsulin-specific T cell proliferation, interferon (IFN)-γ and autoantibody production. These are preventable and quenchable by pre- and post-induction treatment, respectively, using intradermal proinsulin-PIT injections. Intradermal proinsulin-PIT enhances proliferation of regulatory [forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+))CD25(high) ] CD4 T cells, including those capable of proinsulin-specific regulation, suggesting this as its main mode of action. In contrast, peptide delivered intradermally on the surface of vitamin D3-modulated (tolerogenic) dendritic cells, controls autoimmunity in association with proinsulin-specific IL-10 production, but no change in regulatory CD4 T cells. These studies define a humanized, translational model for in vivo optimization of PIT to control autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes and indicate that dominant mechanisms of action differ according to mode of peptide delivery. PMID:26206289

  18. In-vivo treatment with 5-azacytidine causes degeneration of central lymphatic organs and induces autoimmune disease in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauenstein, K.; Csordas, A.; Krömer, G.; Dietrich, H.; Wick, G.

    1991-01-01

    In-vitro evidence suggests that DNA methylation may be involved in the development of forbidden immune responses that can result in autoimmune disease. In the present study we examined in-vivo effects of 5-azacytidine (5-azaC), a substance that inhibits DNA methylation, on the immune system and the occurrence of a spontaneous autoimmune disease in the chicken model. We found that (1) treatment of young normal chickens with 1.0 mg/kg 5-azaC on 7 consecutive days caused a rapid degeneration of the central lymphoid organs thymus and bursa; (2) this regimen with 5-azaC apparently inhibited B cell maturation, as the frequency of cytoplasmic Ig+ plasma cells in the bone marrow was found to be significantly reduced, whereas the total number of bone marrow cells was unchanged; and (3) a chronic low-dose (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg) application of 5-azaC through 6 weeks was found to significantly enhance the spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis in newly hatched chickens of the Cornell C strain, as determined by anti-thyroglobulin autoantibody titres and histological analysis of thyroid gland infiltration. The possible implications of these data for the generation of pathogenic autoimmune responses are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1726865

  19. Update in Endocrine Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases.

  20. Modification of the FoxP3 transcription factor principally affects inducible T regulatory cells in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play a key role in protection against autoimmune disease. GFP-FoxP3 reporter mice have been used widely to study the induction, function and stability of both thymically- and peripherally-induced Treg cells. The N-terminal modification of FoxP3, however, affects its interaction with transcriptional co-factors; this can alter Treg cell development and function in certain self-antigen specific animal models. Interestingly, Treg cell function can be negatively or positively affected, depending on the nature of the model. In this study, we focused on the effect of the GFP-FoxP3 reporter on Treg cell development and function in the Tg4 mouse model. In this model, T cells express a transgenic T cell receptor (TCR specific for the Myelin Basic Protein (MBP peptide Ac1-9, making the animals susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a disease akin to multiple sclerosis in humans. Unlike diabetes-susceptible mice, Tg4 FoxP3(gfp mice did not develop spontaneous autoimmune disease and did not demonstrate augmented susceptibility to induced disease. Concurrently, thymic generation of natural Treg cells was not negatively affected. The induction of FoxP3 expression in naive peripheral T cells was, however, significantly impaired as a result of the transgene. This study shows that the requirements for the interaction of FoxP3 with co-factors, which governs its regulatory ability, differ not only between natural and inducible Treg cells but also between animal models of diseases such as diabetes and EAE.

  1. GSN antibody pretreatment aggravates radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced lung injury is one of the main dose limiting factors for thoracic radiation therapy. Gelsolin (GSN) is a widespread, multifunctional regulator of cellular structure and metabolism. In this work, the roles of GSN in radiation-induced lung injury in Balb/c mice were studied. The GSN levels in plasma reduced progressively in 72 hours after irradiation, and then increased gradually. GSN contents in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid increased after thoracic irradiation, whereas mRNA levels of GSN in the lung tissue decreased significantly within 24 hours after irradiation and then increased again. Mice were intravenously injected with 50 μg GSN antibody 0.5 hour before 20 Gy of thoracic irradiation. GSN antibody pretreatment increased lung inflammation, protein concentration in the BAL fluid and leukocytes infiltration in the irradiated mice. The activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD) in the plasma and the BAL fluid in irradiated mice injected with GSN antibody were less than that of control groups, whereas the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased. These results suggest that pretreatment of GSN antibody may aggravate radiation-induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  2. Association among ANA Patterns, Anti-ENA Antibody and Anti-dsDNA Antibody in Autoimmune Disease%评价自身抗体联合检测在诊断自身免疫性疾病中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙善会; 郑燕; 张茂修

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨检测抗核抗体(ANA)核型与抗可提取性核抗原(ENA)抗体及抗双链DNA(ds-DNA)抗体之间的相关性,提高对自身免疫性疾病(AID)的诊断及鉴别诊断参考价值。方法资料来源门诊及住院的AID病例血清标本进行检测,ANA检测采用间接免疫荧光法(IIF),抗ENA抗体检测采用欧蒙斑点法(抗nRNP/Sm、Sm、SSA/Ro、SSB/Lo、Scl-70和Jo-1)六项抗体及抗(ds-DNA)抗体采用ELISA法检测。结果在98例ANA阳性病例血清标本中核型分布为:细胞核均质型(36.74%),细胞核颗粒型(41.84%),细胞核仁型(11.22%),细胞核膜型(1.02%),细胞核着丝点型(1.02%);重叠核型中细胞核均质型/细胞核颗粒型(2.04%),细胞核均质型/细胞浆颗粒型(6.12%)等。98例ANA与ENA同时阳性血清标本中42例抗双链DNA抗体阳性(42.86%)。36例均质型阳性样本中抗SSA/Ro抗体(24.48%),抗SSB/Lo抗体(6.12%),抗nRNP/Sm抗体(6.12%)。41例细胞核颗粒型阳性样本抗nRNP/Sm抗体(19.39%),SSA/Ro抗体(15.31%),抗SSB/Lo抗体(6.12%)。ANA阳性可出现一种或多种自身抗体。结论 ANA常见核型有:细胞核颗粒型,细胞核均质型及细胞核仁型。ANA均质型核型检出的抗ds-DNA抗体为主,且抗ds-DNA抗体含量与荧光强度成正比。ANA核型与抗ENA抗体二者之间有一定的相对应性。ANA及核型、抗ENA抗体和抗ds-DNA抗体的联合检测可明确诊断AID,而且利于判断患者血清中各种自身抗体与临床表现的关系。%Objective To investigate the association among ANA patterns, anti-ENA antibody and anti-dsDNA antibodies in autoimmune diseases, and the reference signiifcance of detecting these antibodies on the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. Methods Serum samples from 98 pateints with autoimmune disorder were collected. ANA, anti-ENA and anti-dsDNA antibodies were detected using IIF, immuno-dot assay and ELISA. Results

  3. Significance of Anti-Ro-52 kDa and SSA Antibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases%抗Ro-52抗体与抗SSA抗体在自身免疫病中的检测意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金燕萍; 林贵高; 阎超; 鄢盛恺

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical correlation of anti-Ro-52 and SSA antibody and to determine the clinical diagnostic value of anti-Ro-52/SSA in Chinese patients presenting with SLE,SS and other autoimmune diseases. Methods Serum samples from 50 patients with SLE, 50 with SS and 30 other autoimmune diseases were tested for the presence of anti-Ro-52 and anti-SSA using a commercial WB kit, AN A were tested by IIF,50 health people serum as controls. Results The positive rate of anti-Ro-52 and SSA in patients with SLE were 60% and 64% respectively,patients with SS were 72% and 82% respectively,patients with other autoimmune diseases were 30% and 23. 33% respectively,higher than control group (6%),and with X2 inspection,the difference was statistically significant (P<0. 05). Conclusion High prevalence of anti-Ro-52 and SSA is of significance in diagnosis of SLE and SS,the relationship between the two needs to be further explored.%目的 探讨抗Ro-52 kDa自身抗体与抗SSA抗体的关系及其在中国人群中SLE和SS等自身免疫病的诊断价值.方法 收集自身免疫病患者血清,其中SLE 50例,SS 50例,其他自身免疫病30例,50例健康者血清作为对照,用免疫印迹法检测所有标本中抗Ro-52与抗SSA抗体,同时用间接免疫荧光法检测所有标本ANA核型.结果 抗Ro-52和抗SSA抗体阳性率在SLE患者中分别为60%和64%,在SS中分别为72%和82%,在其他自身免疫病患者中分别为30%和23.33%,均高于健康对照组(6%),经χ2检验,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 抗Ro-52和抗SSA抗体阳性对诊断SLE和SS有一定的临床价值,二者的确切关系还需进一步探讨.

  4. Antibody-Mediated Rejection of the Heart in the Setting of Autoimmune Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J. Lindley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is caused by the production of donor-specific antibodies (DSA which lead to allograft injury in part via complement activation. The inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies (IDP are inflammatory disorders of the nervous system, involving both cellular and humoral immune mechanisms directed against myelin. Case Report. A 58-year-old man five years after heart transplant presented with progressive dyspnea, imbalance, dysphagia, and weakness. Nerve conduction studies and electromyogram were consistent with IDP. Plasmapheresis and high-dose steroids resulted in improvement in neurologic symptoms. Within two weeks, he was readmitted with anasarca and acute renal failure, requiring intravenous furosemide and inotropic support. Echocardiogram and right heart catheterization revealed reduced cardiac function and elevated filling pressures. DSA was positive against HLA DR53, and endomyocardial biopsy revealed grade 1R chronic inflammation, with strong capillary endothelial immunostaining for C4d. Plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG were initiated. His anasarca and renal failure subsequently resolved, echocardiogram showed improved function off inotropes, and anti-DR53 MFI was reduced by 57%. Conclusions. This is an example of a single immune-mediated process causing concurrent IDP and AMR. The improvement in cardiac function and neurologic symptoms with plasmapheresis, IVIG, and high-dose steroids argues for a unifying antibody-mediated mechanism.

  5. Gastrointestinal Disorder Associated with Olmesartan Mimics Autoimmune Enteropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Scialom

    Full Text Available Anti-hypertensive treatment with the angiotensin II receptor antagonist olmesartan is a rare cause of severe Sprue-like enteropathy. To substantiate the hypothesis that olmesartan interferes with gut immune homeostasis, clinical, histopathological and immune features were compared in olmesartan-induced-enteropathy (OIE and in autoimmune enteropathy (AIE.Medical files of seven patients with OIE and 4 patients with AIE enrolled during the same period were retrospectively reviewed. Intestinal biopsies were collected for central histopathological review, T cell Receptor clonality and flow cytometric analysis of isolated intestinal lymphocytes.Among seven olmesartan-treated patients who developed villous atrophy refractory to a gluten free diet, three had extra-intestinal autoimmune diseases, two had antibodies reacting with the 75 kilodalton antigen characteristic of AIE and one had serum anti-goblet cell antibodies. Small intestinal lesions and signs of intestinal lymphocyte activation were thus reminiscent of the four cases of AIE diagnosed during the same period. Before olmesartan discontinuation, remission was induced in all patients (7/7 by immunosuppressive drugs. After interruption of both olmesartan and immunosuppressive drugs in six patients, remission was maintained in 4 but anti-TNF-α therapy was needed in two.This case-series shows that olmesartan can induce intestinal damage mimicking AIE. OIE usually resolved after olmesartan interruption but immunosuppressive drugs may be necessary to achieve remission. Our data sustain the hypothesis that olmesartan interferes with intestinal immuno regulation in predisposed individuals.

  6. 多重抗神经元抗体阳性的自身免疫性脑炎临床分析%Clinical analysis of autoimmune encephalitis with co-existence of multiple anti-neuronal antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任海涛; 杨洵哲; 关鸿志; 高鑫雅; 彭斌; 朱以诚; 崔丽英

    2016-01-01

    antibodies to neuronal cell-surface or synaptic receptors (including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR),contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2),α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR),leucine-rich glioma inactivated protein 1 (LGI1),and gamma-aminobutyric acid beta receptor (GABABR)).In those patients with positive antibodies,antibodies against intracellular neuronal antigens associated with paraneoplastic neurological symptoms were tested.Anti-aquaporin protein-4 (AQP4) antibody was tested depending on patients' clinical manifestations.Results Ten patients were detected combined with additional autoantibodies in 531 patients with positive antibodies related to autoimmune encephalitis.AntiHu antibody was positive in 5 patients with anti-GABABR encephalitis,in 1 of whom anti-NMDAR antibody was also identified;anti-AQP4 antibody was positive in 1 patient with relapsing anti-NMDAR encephalitis;anti-CASPR2 and anti-Yo antibodies were respectively positive in 2 patients with anti-LGI1 encephalitis;anti-CV2 and anti-Hu antibodies were respectively positive in 2 patients with anti-AMPAR encephalitis.Clinical presentation of all cases was consistent with typical encephalitis or limbic encephalitis.Brain stem was involved in 3 patients.Peripheral sensory neuropathy was present in 1 patient,while myalgia and fasciculation were present in 1 patient.Seven patients responded well to the immunotherapy.Tumors were pathologically or radiologically confirmed in 7 cases,including lung cancer in 5 cases,suspected thymoma in 1 case and highly suspected mediastinal tumor without pathological identification in 1 case.Conclusions Due to the pathological mechanism,co-existence of multiple autoantibodies affects clinical manifestations of patients and results in variation and overlap of them.The additional positivity of onconeuronal antibodies directs the search for occult tumor.

  7. ACE inhibitors can induce circulating antibodies directed to antigens of the superficial epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Rosa, Gian Marco; Drosera, Massimo; Intra, Chiara; Barsotti, Antonio; Parodi, Aurora

    2011-07-01

    Drug-induced pemphigus has been reported in patients receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The aim of this work was to study a group of hypertensive patients without skin diseases treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors (I), to verify the presence of serum circulating anti-antibodies. The indirect immunofluorescence showed that 33 sera (52.38%) presented autoantibodies directed to an antigen of the cytoplasm of the superficial epidermal keratinocytes. Two of the 33 positive sera had antibodies to Dsg1 and/or 3 in ELISA. Immunoblot analyses were negative. All the 48 control sera were found to have no circulating antibodies using the three assays. Our results would confirm that ACEI drugs may trigger the production of circulating autoantibodies also in patients without clinical manifestations of pemphigus. PMID:20563876

  8. Proatherogenic conditions promote autoimmune T helper 17 cell responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoyong; Kim, Young Uk; Sun, Hua; Lee, Joyce H; Reynolds, Joseph M; Hanabuchi, Shino; Wu, Huaizhu; Teng, Ba-Bie; Chung, Yeonseok

    2014-01-16

    Patients with systemic autoimmune diseases show increased incidence of atherosclerosis. However, the contribution of proatherogenic factors to autoimmunity remains unclear. We found that atherogenic mice (herein referred to as LDb mice) exhibited increased serum interleukin-17, which was associated with increased numbers of T helper 17 (Th17) cells in secondary lymphoid organs. The environment within LDb mice was substantially favorable for Th17 cell polarization of autoreactive T cells during homeostatic proliferation, which was considerably inhibited by antibodies directed against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). Moreover, the uptake of oxLDL induced dendritic-cell-mediated Th17 cell polarization by triggering IL-6 production in a process dependent on TLR4, CD36, and MyD88. Furthermore, self-reactive CD4(+) T cells that expanded in the presence of oxLDL induced more profound experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These findings demonstrate that proatherogenic factors promote the polarization and inflammatory function of autoimmune Th17 cells, which could be critical for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and other related autoimmune diseases.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...... AIP responds to steroid treatment, also a trial with steroids, can help to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer. OUTLOOK AND DISCUSSION: This review presents the pathological, radiologic and laboratory findings of AIP. Moreover, the treatment and pathogenesis are discussed.......BACKGROUND: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a relatively newly recognized type of pancreatitis that is characterized by diffuse or focal swelling of the pancreas due to lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A PubMed literature search was...

  10. Collagenase-3 (MMP-13) deficiency protects C57BL/6 mice from antibody-induced arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Anjana; Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Hartenstein, Bettina; Szabowski, Sibylle; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Angel, Peter; Bräuer, Rolf; Illges, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in tissue remodelling. Here we investigate the role of collagenase-3 (MMP-13) in antibody-induced arthritis. Methods For this study we employed the K/BxN serum-induced arthritis model. Arthritis was induced in C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MMP-13-deficient (MMP-13 –/– ) mice by intraperitoneal injection of 200 μl of K/BxN serum. Arthritis was assessed by measuring the ankle swelling. During the course of the experiments, mice were sacri...

  11. Prevention of herpes simplex virus induced stromal keratitis by a glycoprotein B-specific monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalbert Krawczyk

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of acyclovir (ACV and multidrug-resistant strains in patients with corneal HSV-1 infections leading to Herpetic Stromal Keratitis (HSK is a major health problem in industrialized countries and often results in blindness. To overcome this obstacle, we have previously developed an HSV-gB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2c that proved to be highly protective in immunodeficient NOD/SCID-mice towards genital infections. In the present study, we examined the effectivity of mAb 2c in preventing the immunopathological disease HSK in the HSK BALB/c mouse model. Therefore, mice were inoculated with HSV-1 strain KOS on the scarified cornea to induce HSK and subsequently either systemically or topically treated with mAb 2c. Systemic treatment was performed by intravenous administration of mAb 2c 24 h prior to infection (pre-exposure prophylaxis or 24, 40, and 56 hours after infection (post-exposure immunotherapy. Topical treatment was performed by periodical inoculations (5 times per day of antibody-containing eye drops as control, starting at 24 h post infection. Systemic antibody treatment markedly reduced viral loads at the site of infection and completely protected mice from developing HSK. The administration of the antiviral antibody prior or post infection was equally effective. Topical treatment had no improving effect on the severity of HSK. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mAb 2c proved to be an excellent drug for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections and for prevention of HSK and blindness. Moreover, the humanized counterpart (mAb hu2c was equally effective in protecting mice from HSV-induced HSK when compared to the parental mouse antibody. These results warrant the future development of this antibody as a novel approach for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections in humans.

  12. Autoimmune neurologic disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ming; Gorman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune neurologic diseases are of major clinical importance in children. Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are now increasingly recognized in childhood, where the antibodies bind to cell surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The antibodies are directed towards ion channels, receptors, and membrane proteins; and the diseases include limbic encephalitis and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antibody encephalitis, among many others. Additionally there are conditions where the wider immune system is implicated. Neurologic features like seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders, with neuroimaging and electrophysiologic features, may indicate a specific antibody-mediated or immune disorder. Often, phenotypic overlap is observed between these conditions, and phenotypic variation seen in children with the same condition. Nevertheless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement, although huge efforts are still required to optimize the outcome for many patients. In many patients no antibodies have yet been identified, even though they respond to immunotherapies. Here we describe the known antibodies and associated diseases, discuss conditions that are thought to be immune-mediated but have no known immunologic biomarker, and provide guidelines for the investigation and classification of these disorders. PMID:27112693

  13. Dicarbonyl Induced Structural Perturbations Make Histone H1 Highly Immunogenic and Generate an Auto-Immune Response in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions, through the interaction of AGEs with RAGE receptors and via activation of interleukin mediated transcription signalling, has been reported in cancer. Proteins modifications are being explored for their roles in the development and progression of cancer and autoantibody response against them is gaining interest as a probe for early detection of the disease. This study has analysed the changes in histone H1 upon modification by methylglyoxal (MG and its implications in auto-immunopathogenesis of cancer. Modified histone showed modifications in the aromatic residues, changed tyrosine microenvironment, intermolecular cross linking and generation of AGEs. It showed masking of hydrophobic patches and a hypsochromic shift in the in ANS specific fluorescence. MG aggressively oxidized histone H1 leading to the accumulation of reactive carbonyls. Far UV CD measurements showed di-carbonyl induced enhancement of the alpha structure and the induction of beta sheet conformation; and thermal denaturation (Tm studies confirmed the thermal stability of the modified histone. FTIR analysis showed amide I band shift, generation of a carboxyethyl group and N-Cα vibrations in the modified histone. LCMS analysis confirmed the formation of Nε-(carboxyethyllysine and electron microscopic studies revealed the amorphous aggregate formation. The modified histone showed altered cooperative binding with DNA. Modified H1 induced high titre antibodies in rabbits and the IgG isolated form sera of rabbits immunized with modified H1 exhibited specific binding with its immunogen in Western Blot analysis. IgG isolated from the sera of patients with lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer and cancer of head and neck region showed better recognition for neo-epitopes on the modified histone, reflecting the presence of circulating autoantibodies in cancer. Since reports suggest a link between AGE-RAGE axis and

  14. Encephalopathy Associated with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease: A Potentially Reversible Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Correia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid disease may occasionally associate with unspecific neurological symptoms, which are more commonly insidious, include cognitive or behavioural symptoms, and may associate with tremor, myoclonus, or ataxia. We report a 61-year-old female patient who presented with chronic headache, insidious mood, and cognitive disturbance which evolved in a few months to dementia associated with exuberant limb myoclonus. Diagnostic workup revealed high anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody titers and an inflammatory CSF profile, and it was negative for other possible etiologies. Treatment with steroids induced significant improvement. The diagnosis of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease is still controversial given the fact that the clinical presentation and diagnostic workup are unspecific, the pathophysiology is still undetermined, and the diagnosis is mostly of exclusion. No direct correlation is found between anti-thyroid antibody titers and clinical presentation, and it is currently speculated that other still unrecognized antibodies may be responsible for this clinical entity. It is extremely important to recognize this entity because it is potentially treatable with immunotherapies. It is also increasingly recognized that clinical improvement with first-line treatment with steroids may be absent or incomplete, and other immunotherapies as immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange must be attempted in the clinical suspicion of EEAT.

  15. Autoimmune Progesterone Anaphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Bemanian

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone induced dermatitis is a rare disorder. It typically occurs in females due to anautoimmune phenomenon to endogenous progesterone production, but can also be caused byexogenous intake of a synthetic progestin. Here in, we present a case of autoimmune progesterone anaphylaxis (AIPA observed in an adolescent female.The patient is an 18-year-old Caucasian female with no significant past medical history and noprior exogenous hormone use, who presented to her primary care physician complaining of cyclic skin eruptions with dyspnea, cough and respiratory distress. She noted that her symptoms occurred monthly, just prior to her menses. An intradermal skin test using 0.1 cml of progesterone was performed. The patient developed a 15mm wheal after 15 minutes, confirming the diagnosis of AIPA.The patient was started on a continuous regimen of an oral conjugated estrogen (0.625mg. The skin eruptions and respiratory symptoms have not returned since the initiation of this therapy.Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis manifests via the occurrence of cyclic skin eruptions.Women with the disorder commonly present with dermatologic lesions in the luteal phase of themenstrual cycle, if there are any other organ involvement in addition to skin (e.g. lung, GI thereaction should be called as autoimmune progesterone anaphylaxis. Diagnosis of AIPA is confirmed by performing a skin allergen test using progesterone.

  16. Antinuclear antibodies are not increased in the early phase of Borrelia infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiewak, R.W.; Stojek, NM; Chmielewska-Badora, J

    2004-01-01

    In the literature, there are case reports suggesting that Borrelia burgdorferi infection may induce autoimmune diseases dependent on antinuclear antibodies (ANA). The present study was undertaken in order to verify this possibility in a prospective manner. The study group comprised 78 consecutive pa

  17. Autoimmune thyroid disease and chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Cecilia; Demarco, Paul; Burman, Kenneth D; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2007-09-01

    We report six cases of autoimmune thyroid disease associated with chronic urticaria and briefly review the literature, including the histopathological nature of such lesions, and their aetiology and pathogenesis. In view of the prevalence of thyroid disease in patients with chronic urticaria, screening measurements of thyrotropin and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies are recommended, although negative antibodies do not exclude a relationship between urticaria and thyroid autoimmunity. After failure of conventional therapy for urticaria, patients who are apparently clinically euthyroid may be considered for a trial with levothyroxine. Improvement of urticaria was seen with levothyroxine treatment in three of four patients with only marginal abnormalities in thyroid function.

  18. Copaiba Oil Suppresses Inflammatory Cytokines in Splenocytes of C57Bl/6 Mice Induced with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora S. Dias

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is a murine autoimmune disease used to study multiple sclerosis. We have investigated the immunomodulatory effects of copaiba oil (100, 50 and 25 µg/mL on NO, H2O2, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17 production in cultured cells from EAE-mice. Copaiba oil (100 µg/mL inhibited H2O2, NO, IFN-γ TNF-α and IL-17 production spontaneously or after ConA and MOG35–55 stimulation. It is suggested that copaiba oil acts on the mechanism of development of EAE by IFN-γ, IL-17 and TNF-α inhibition, modulating the immune response on both Th1 and Th17 cells.

  19. Antibodies with higher bactericidal activity induced by a Neisseria gonorrhoeae Rmp deletion mutant strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guocai Li

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein reduction modifiable protein (Rmp has strong immunogenicity. However, anti-Rmp antibodies block rather than preserve the antibacterial effects of protective antibodies, which hampers the development of vaccines for gonococcal infections. We herein constructed an Rmp deletion mutant strain of N. gonorrhoeae by gene homologous recombination. The 261-460 nucleotide residues of Rmp gene amplified from N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain were replaced with a kanamycin-resistant Kan gene amplified from pET-28a. The resultant hybridized DNA was transformed into N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain. PCR was used to screen the colonies in which wild-type Rmp gene was replaced with a mutant gene fragment. Western blotting revealed that the Rmp deletion mutant strain did not express Rmp protein. Rmp deletion did not alter the morphological and Gram staining properties of the mutant strain that grew slightly more slowly than the wild-type one. Rmp gene mutated stably throughout 25 generations of passage. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay indicated that the antibodies induced by the mutant strain had evidently higher bactericidal activities than those induced by the wild-type strain. Further modification of the Rmp deletion mutant strain is still required in the development of novel live attenuated vaccines for gonorrhea by Opa genes deletion or screening of phenotypic variant strains that do not express Opa proteins.

  20. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P. W.; Seregin, Sergey S.; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Charles F Aylsworth; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ERAP1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Moreover, previous studies show ERAP1 to be ER-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating innate immune responses of human PBMCs using two ex...

  1. Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jithin Jose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity is characterized by the reaction of cells (auto reactive T-lymphocytes or products (autoantibodies of the immune system against the organism’s own antigens (autoantigen. It may be part of the physiological immune response (natural autoimmunity or pathologically induced, which may eventually lead to development of clinical abnormalities (autoimmune disease. Different mechanisms are involved in the induction and progression of autoimmunity. These include genetic or acquired defects in immune tolerance or immune regulatory pathways, molecular mimicry to viral or bacterial protein, an impaired clearance of apoptotic cell material. A A number of diseases have been identified in which there is autoimmunity, due to copious production of autoantibodies and autoreactive cells. The aim of the present article is to review on the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  2. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the baby is Rh-positive and the mother's antibody status is negative for anti-D, the mother is given additional RhIG. This test also may be used to help diagnose autoimmune-related hemolytic anemia ... when a person produces antibodies against his or her own RBC antigens. This ...

  3. Evaluation of the 2. generation radio-receptional assay for anti-TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Comparison with 1. generation and anti-thyroperoxidae antibodies (AbTPO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of autoantibodies to the TSH-receptor (TRAb) by radio-receptor assays (RRA) is widely requested in clinical practice for the diagnostic work-up of Graves' disease and its differentiation from diffuse thyroid autonomy. Additionally, TRAb measurement can be useful during antithyroid drug treatment of Graves' disease to evaluate the risk of relapse after therapy discontinuation. Nevertheless, some patients affected by Graves' disease are TRAb-negative when 1. generation assay is used. In this study the diagnostic performance of a newly developed 2. generation TRAb assay (TRAK human DYNOtest(R), BRAHMS Diagnostica GmbH, Berlin, Germany) was evaluated in 74 untreated patients affected by Graves' disease, in 53 untreated patients affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis and in 88 patients affected by euthyroid nodular goiter. It was also compared the new TRAb assay with the 1. generation test (TRAK(R) Assay, BRAHMS Diagnostica GmbH, Berlin, Germany) and anti-thyroperoxidase assay (AbTPO DYNOtest(R), BRAHMS GmbH, Berlin). The 2. generation TRAb assay showed the better diagnostic sensitivity in Graves' disease (97%) with respect to the 1. generation assay (85%) and AbTPO assay (64%). The AbTPO assay was positive in 50 of 53 (94%) patients affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. The 1. and 2. generation TRAb assays were positive in 4 (7%) and 7 (13%) of 53 patients affected by autoimmune thyroiditis, respectively. No patients affected by nodular goiter showed positive 1. and 2. generation TRAb assay while AbTPO levels were positive in 8 of 88 patients (specificity 91%). In conclusion, the 2. generation TRAb assay is clearly more sensitive than the 1. generation test and should be used in clinical practice to minimize the incidence of TRAb-negative Graves' disease. Long term prospective studies are needed to evaluate the prognostic role of 2. generation TRAb assay in Graves' disease. The assay of AbTPO is the best marker for autoimmune thyroiditis but is clearly less

  4. The autoimmune tautology

    OpenAIRE

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Although autoimmune diseases exhibit contrasting epidemiological features, pathology, and clinical manifestations, three lines of evidence demonstrate that these diseases share similar immunogenetic mechanisms (that is, autoimmune tautology). First, clinical evidence highlights the co-occurrence of distinct autoimmune diseases within an individual (that is, polyautoimmunity) and within members of a nuclear family (that is, familial autoimmunity). Second, physiopathologic evidence indicates th...

  5. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P W; Seregin, Sergey S; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Previous studies show ERAP1 to be endoplasmic reticulum-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating the innate immune responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus (Ad)-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad5 vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor, pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  6. T-cell exhaustion, co-stimulation and clinical outcome in autoimmunity and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Eoin F; Lee, James C; Jayne, David R W; Lyons, Paul A; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2015-07-30

    The clinical course of autoimmune and infectious disease varies greatly, even between individuals with the same condition. An understanding of the molecular basis for this heterogeneity could lead to significant improvements in both monitoring and treatment. During chronic infection the process of T-cell exhaustion inhibits the immune response, facilitating viral persistence. Here we show that a transcriptional signature reflecting CD8 T-cell exhaustion is associated with poor clearance of chronic viral infection, but conversely predicts better prognosis in multiple autoimmune diseases. The development of CD8 T-cell exhaustion during chronic infection is driven both by persistence of antigen and by a lack of accessory 'help' signals. In autoimmunity, we find that where evidence of CD4 T-cell co-stimulation is pronounced, that of CD8 T-cell exhaustion is reduced. We can reproduce the exhaustion signature by modifying the balance of persistent stimulation of T-cell antigen receptors and specific CD2-induced co-stimulation provided to human CD8 T cells in vitro, suggesting that each process plays a role in dictating outcome in autoimmune disease. The 'non-exhausted' T-cell state driven by CD2-induced co-stimulation is reduced by signals through the exhaustion-associated inhibitory receptor PD-1, suggesting that induction of exhaustion may be a therapeutic strategy in autoimmune and inflammatory disease. Using expression of optimal surrogate markers of co-stimulation/exhaustion signatures in independent data sets, we confirm an association with good clinical outcome or response to therapy in infection (hepatitis C virus) and vaccination (yellow fever, malaria, influenza), but poor outcome in autoimmune and inflammatory disease (type 1 diabetes, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and dengue haemorrhagic fever). Thus, T-cell exhaustion plays a central role in determining outcome in

  7. CD44 antibodies and immune thrombocytopenia in the amelioration of murine inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Mott

    Full Text Available Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7, also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics.

  8. Historical reflections on autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),initially known as chronic active or active chronic hepatitis (and by various other names),first came under clinical notice in the late 1940s.However,quite likely,chronic active hepatitis (CAH) had been observed prior to this and was attributed to a persistently destructive virus infection of the liver.An earlier (and controversial) designation in 1956 as lupoid hepatitis was derived from associated L.E.cell test positivity and emphasized accompanying multisystem features and immunological aberrations.Young women featured prominently in early descriptions of CAH.AIH was first applied in 1965 as a descriptive term.Disease-characteristic autoantibodies were defined from the early 1960s,notably antinuclear antibody (ANA),smooth muscle antibody (SMA) and liver-kidney microsomal (LKM) antibody.These are still widely used diagnostically but their relationship to pathogenesis is still not evident.A liver and disease specific autoantigen has long been searched for but unsuccessfully.Prolonged immunosuppressive therapy with predisolone and azathioprine in the 1960s proved beneficial and remains standard therapy today.AIH like many other autoimmune diseases is associated with particular HLA alleles especially with the "ancestral" B8,DR3 haplotype,and also with DR4.Looking forwards,AIH is one of the several enigmatic autoimmune diseases that,despite being (relatively) organ specific,are marked by autoimmune reactivities with non-organ-specific autoantigens.New paradigms are needed to explain the occurrence,expressions and pathogenesis of such diseases.

  9. Sex Differences in Autoimmune Disease from a Pathological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Frisancho-Kiss, Sylvia; Rose, Noel R.

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases affect ∼8% of the population, 78% of whom are women. The reason for the high prevalence in women is unclear. Women are known to respond to infection, vaccination, and trauma with increased antibody production and a more T helper (Th)2-predominant immune response, whereas a Th1 response and inflammation are usually more severe in men. This review discusses the distribution of autoimmune diseases based on sex and age, showing that autoimmune diseases progress from an acute p...

  10. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis, immunotherapy and thymectomy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Tyson L; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis is a rare condition in children. Identifying antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor is helpful in making the diagnosis. However, seronegative cases do exist and need to be distinguished from congenital forms of myasthenia. There is little published experience to inform the judicious management of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children. In this article, we report our experience in the management of 12 cases of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children in the modern era of medical immunotherapy and thymectomy. PMID:21911294

  11. Nivolumab, an Anti-Programmed Cell Death-1 Antibody, Induces Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Ogawa, Osamu; Oyama, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), an immunoreceptor, is located on T cells and pro-B cells and interacts with its ligands to inhibit T cell activation and proliferation, thereby promoting immunological self-tolerance. Nivolumab, an anti-PD1 antibody, blocks PD-1 and can restore anticancer immune responses by abrogating PD-1 pathway-mediated T-cell inhibition. Autoimmune adverse events are expected with PD-1 therapy. Fulminant type 1 diabetes is the subtype of type 1 diabetes. The clinical feature is the extremely rapid progression of hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis. Here we describe a 66-year-old woman with advanced melanoma who was treated with nivolumab. After 4 months and six doses of the medicine, the patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of nausea and vomiting. The laboratory data showed ketonuria, hyperglycemia (531 mg/dl), high anion gap metabolic acidosis, HbA1c (7.3%), and absence of insulin-secreting capacity. These data are compatible with the criteria of fulminant type 1 diabetes. The patient was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis because of fulminant type 1 diabetes. The findings of this case indicated that nivolumab can cause fulminant type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis due to fulminant type 1 diabetes is potentially fatal condition. Thus, diabetic ketoacidosis due to fulminant type 1 diabetes should be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients treated with nivolumab complain of gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27297738

  12. Antibody contributes to heterosubtypic protection against influenza A-induced tachypnea in cotton rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ottolini Martin G; Straight Timothy M; Prince Gregory A; Eichelberger Maryna C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Influenza virus infection or vaccination evokes an antibody response to viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) surface glycoproteins, which results in immunity against influenza A viruses of the same HA and NA subtype. A heterosubtypic immune response that offers some protection against different influenza A subtypes has been suggested from epidemiologic studies in human influenza outbreaks, and has been induced in experimental animal models. Original studies of s...

  13. Nebulized Anti-IL-13 Monoclonal Antibody Fab' Fragment Reduces Allergen-Induced Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Hacha, Jonathan; Tomlinson, K; Maertens, Ludovic; Paulissen, Geneviève; Rocks, Natacha; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnès; Palframan, R; Guéders, Maud; Cataldo, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a prototypic Th2 cytokine and a central mediator of the complex cascade of events leading to asthmatic phenotype. Indeed, IL-13 plays key roles in IgE synthesis, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, mucus hypersecretion, subepithelial fibrosis and eosinophil infiltration. Objectives: We assessed the potential efficacy of inhaled anti-IL-13 monoclonal antibody Fab' fragment on allergen-induced airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness and remodeling in an experime...

  14. An elderly ‘kawara’ craftsman with acute kidney injury and haemoptysis: a case of silica-induced autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Matsui, Satoshi; Tsuji, Hiroko; Ono, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    A 62-year-old Japanese ‘kawara’ (ceramic roof tile) craftsman presented with acute kidney injury and haemoptysis. This case met the systemic lupus erythematosus and microscopic polyangiitis criteria, with high titres of myeloperoxidase–antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (570 EU). Results showed the presence of antinuclear antibody at a high titre (1:2560), but detection of rheumatoid factor, anti-dsDNA, anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies was not apparent. This serology was similar to drug-indu...

  15. Origin and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Celli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are detected in the serum of patients with a variety of conditions, including autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus, infectious (syphilis, AIDS and lymphoproliferative disorders (paraproteinemia, myeloma, lymphocytic leukemias. Thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and other clinical complications are currently associated with a subgroup of aPL designating the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast, aPL from patients with infectious disorders are not associated with any clinical manifestation. These findings led to increased interest in the origin and pathogenesis of aPL. Here we present the clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome and review the origin of aPL, the characteristics of experimentally induced aPL and their historical background. Within this context, we discuss the most probable pathogenic mechanisms induced by these antibodies.

  16. Mimotopes selected with a neutralizing antibody against urease B from Helicobacter pylori induce enzyme inhibitory antibodies in mice upon vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Min

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urease B is an important virulence factor that is required for Helicobacter pylori to colonise the gastric mucosa. Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that inhibit urease B enzymatic activity will be useful as vaccines for the prevention and treatment of H. pylori infection. Here, we produced murine mAbs against urease B that neutralize the enzyme's activity. We mapped their epitopes by phage display libraries and investigated the immunogenicity of the selected mimotopes in vivo. Results The urease B gene was obtained (GenBank accession No. DQ141576 and the recombinant pGEX-4T-1/UreaseB protein was expressed in Escherichia coli as a 92-kDa recombinant fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase (GST. Five mAbs U001-U005 were produced by a hybridoma-based technique with urease B-GST as an immunogen. Only U001 could inhibit urease B enzymatic activity. Immunoscreening via phage display libraries revealed two different mimotopes of urease B protein; EXXXHDM from ph.D.12-library and EXXXHSM from ph.D.C7C that matched the urease B proteins at 347-353 aa. The antiserum induced by selected phage clones clearly recognised the urease B protein and inhibited its enzymatic activity, which indicated that the phagotope-induced immune responses were antigen specific. Conclusions The present work demonstrated that phage-displayed mimotopes were accessible to the mouse immune system and triggered a humoral response. The urease B mimotope could provide a novel and promising approach for the development of a vaccine for the diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori infection.

  17. Antibody-induced down-regulation of a mutated insulin receptor lacking an intact cytoplasmic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin receptor down-regulation was studied in various Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing transfected human insulin receptor cDNAs. In addition to a cell line expressing the normal receptor (CHO.T line), three lines expressing mutated receptors were studied: the CHO.T-t line, which expresses a receptor with a degraded cytoplasmic domain due to the removal of the C-terminal 112 amino acids, and the CHO.YF1 and CHO.YF3 lines, in which important autophosphorylation sites of the receptor kinase (tyrosines-1162 and -1163) have been replaced by phenylalanine. A monoclonal anti-receptor antibody, but not insulin itself, was found to down-regulate cell surface receptor levels in all four cell lines by 60-80% after 18-h treatment at 370C. Down-regulation of the CHO.T and CHO.T-t receptors occurred at similar antibody concentrations and with a similar time course, although the maximum level of CHO.T-t down-regulation (60%) was generally lower than the level of CHO.T down-regulation (80%). Pulse-chase labeling of these two cell types with [35S]methionine revealed that antibody treatment of both CHO.T and CHO.T-t cells resulted in a similar increase in the rate of degradation of mature receptor subunits. These results indicate that antibody-induced down-regulation of the insulin receptor in these cells can occur in the absence of various autophosphorylation sites of the receptor and that the mechanism of antibody-induced down-regulation is different from that for insulin

  18. Warm Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia and autoimmune hepatitis in an asymptomatic carrier of hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warm antibody autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, a rare disease (0.2-1 per 100,000 populations), is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing their premature destruction. Here, we present a case report of a 10 year old girl who came with features of haemolytic anaemia and history of blood transfusion since 3 years. On admission, laboratory test revealed that she had autoimmune hepatitis type 1 and was also an asymptomatic carrier of hepatitis B virus with positive HBs Ag. Steroid therapy resulted in clinical and laboratory remission. Direct antiglobulin test was negative after anaemia resolution, hepatitis B virus antigenemia persisted. To our knowledge, warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anaemia has not previously been described in association with autoimmune hepatitis and asymptomatic carrier state of hepatitis B virus. (author)

  19. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in autoimmune liver diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, C.; Kallenberg, Cees

    1999-01-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) are autoantibodies directed against cytoplasmic constituents of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes. ANCA have been detected in serum from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (mainly ulcerative colitis) and autoimmune mediated liver diseases (mainl

  20. Antibodies induced by multi-epitope vaccine showed inhibitory activity against heterologous influenza A virus (H3N2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jian; WU Fan; WEI Wei; CHEN Yinghua

    2006-01-01

    In this study, recognition of 4 recombinant viral proteins (GST-NHA1) by the antibodies induced by multi-epitope vaccine was testified. Inhibitory activities of these antibodies were also investigated in vitro against four heterologous influenza A viruses (H3N2). Three epitope-specific antibodies purified by affinity chromatography could reduce the plaque formation. Interestingly, the three neutralizing antibodies in combination showed obvious enhancement of inhibitory activity, suggesting that the development of recombinant multi-epitope vaccine might be an effective way against viral mutation.

  1. Antinuclear antibody-negative, drug-induced lupus caused by lisinopril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J D; Valeriano-Marcet, J; Kanik, K S; Vasey, F B

    2001-11-01

    The clinical symptoms of drug-induced lupus (DIL) are similar to those of idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus. The literature indicates that in patients with DIL, sera generally contain antinuclear antibodies (ANAs); however, ANA-negative DIL has been reported. The list of medications implicated as etiologic agents in DIL continues to grow. This list includes two different types of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors--captopril and enalapril. We report the first case of DIL caused by lisinopril. Our patient had negative results on ANA testing and had histone antibodies (IgG anti-[H2A-H2B]-DNA) mirroring the disease course. Antibodies to the (H2A-H2B)-DNA complex are seen in more than 90% of patients with active DIL, excluding those with DIL due to hydralazine. Thus, it is important to recognize the clinical significance of IgG anti-(H2A-H2B)-DNA antibodies and that negative ANA test results do not preclude the diagnosis of DIL.

  2. Hydralazine-induced constrictive pericarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, CFC; ElGamal, MIH; Gans, ROB; Hoorntje, SJ

    1996-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was diagnosed as having constrictive pericarditis 17 months after a typical hydralazine-induced autoimmune syndrome, This late complication of hydralazine has been reported only once. Ten years later the patient was found to have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies directed agai

  3. Characterisation of antibody responses in pigs induced by recombinant oncosphere antigens from Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Kyngdon, Craig T; Gauci, Charles G; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2012-12-14

    Recombinant antigens cloned from the oncosphere life cycle stage of the cestode parasite Taenia solium (T. solium) have been proven to be effective as vaccines for protecting pigs against infections with T. solium. Previous studies have defined three different host protective oncosphere antigens, TSOL18, TSOL16 and TSOL45. In this study, we evaluated the potential for combining the antigens TSOL16 and TSOL18 as a practical vaccine. Firstly, in a laboratory trial, we compared the immunogenicity of the combined antigens (TSOL16/18) versus the immunogenicity of the antigens separately. Secondly, in a field trial, we tested the ability of the TSOL16/18 vaccine to induce detectable antibody responses in animals living under environmental stress and traditionally reared in areas where T. solium cysticercosis is endemic; and finally, we characterised the immune response of the study population. Pigs of 8-16 weeks of age were vaccinated with 200 μg each of TSOL16 and TSOL18, plus 5mg of Quil-A. Specific total IgG, IgG(1) and IgG(2) antibody responses induced by TSOL16 and TSOL18 were determined with ELISA. The immunogenicity of both antigens was retained in the combined TSOL16/18 vaccine. The combined vaccine TSOL16/18 induced detectable specific anti-TSOL18 antibody responses in 100% (113/113) and specific anti-TSOL16 in 99% (112/113) of the vaccinated animals measured at 2 weeks following the booster vaccination. From the two IgG antibody subtypes analysed we found there was stronger response to IgG(2).

  4. Estrogen induces multiple regulatory B cell subtypes and promotes M2 microglia and neuroprotection during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Gil; Zhang, Jun; Bodhankar, Sheetal; Nguyen, Ha; Kent, Gail; Jordan, Kelley; Manning, Dustin; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2016-04-15

    Sex hormones promote immunoregulatory effects on multiple sclerosis. The current study evaluated estrogen effects on regulatory B cells and resident CNS microglia during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Herein, we demonstrate an estrogen-dependent induction of multiple regulatory B cell markers indicative of IL-10 dependent as well as IFN-γ dependent pathways. Moreover, although estrogen pretreatment of EAE mice inhibited the infiltration of pro-inflammatory cells into the CNS, it enhanced the frequency of regulatory B cells and M2 microglia. Our study suggests that estrogen has a broad effect on the development of regulatory B cells during EAE, which in turn could promote neuroprotection.

  5. Arg deficiency does not influence the course of Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG35-55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Freja Aksel; Hulst, Camilla; Bäckström, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inhibition of Abl kinases has an ameliorating effect on the rodent model for multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and arrests lymphocyte activation. The family of Abl kinases consists of the Abl1/Abl and Abl2/Arg tyrosine kinases. While the Abl kinase has bee...... encephalomyelitis is not dependent on Arg, but Arg plays a role for the number of B cells in immunized mice. This might suggest a novel role for the Arg kinase in B-cell trafficking or regulation. Furthermore, the results suggest that Arg is important for normal embryonic development....

  6. MicroRNA-674-5p/5-LO axis involved in autoimmune reaction of Concanavalin A-induced acute mouse liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kunkai; Wang, Qi; Qi, Luoyang; Hua, Dasong; Tao, Jingjing; Mangan, Connor J; Lou, Yijia; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is characterized, in part, by the pathways involving cysteinyl-leukotriene metabolites of arachidonic acid, the dynamics of which remain unclear. Here, we explored post-transcriptional regulation in the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway of arachidonic acid in a Concanavalin A (Con A) induced mouse model. We found that Con A administration lead to 5-LO overexpression and cysteinyl-leukotriene release in early hepatic injury, which was attenuated by cyclosporin A pretreatment. Subsequent microarray and qRT-PCR analysis further showed that microRNA-674-5p (miR-674-5p) displayed a significant decrease in expression in Con A-damaged liver. Noting that miR-674-5p harbors a potential binding region for 5-LO, we further transfected hepatic cell lines with overexpressing miR-674-5p mimic and discovered a negative regulating effect of miR-674-5p on 5-LO expression in the presence of IL-6 or TNF-α. These findings suggest that miR-674-5p might be a negative regulator in 5-LO mediated autoimmune liver injury, representing a compelling avenue towards future therapeutic interventions. PMID:27313091

  7. 抗Ro-52抗体在自身免疫性肝病中的检测%Antibody to Ro-52 in patients with autoimmune liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丹彤; 闫惠平; 檀玉芬; 刘妍; 赵艳; 冯霞; 向代军

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the significance of antibody to Ro-52 in patients with autoim-mune liver disease(AILD). Methods One hundred and fifteen patients with abnormal liver functions, who had anti-Ro-52 detection by immunological blotting, were reviewed retrospectively. According to types of AILD, the clinical features were compared between patients with and without anti-Ro-52, respectively, κ test of concordance was used to provide a chance-corrected valve for immune-serological results. Results The rates of anti-Ro-52 in autoimmune hepatitis( AIH), primary sclerosing cholangitis(PBC) and AIH/PBC o-verlap syndrome groups were 32.43%, 24.56% and 33.33%, respectively, there were no significant differ-enees among three groups ( x2 = 0. 949, P >0. 05). The rate of anti-soluble hver antigen/liver-pancreas ( an-ti-SLA/LP) in AIH patients with anti-Ro-52 (58.33%) was higher than AIH patients without anti-Ro-52 ( 16.00% ,P 0.40, P 0.05).抗可溶性肝抗原/肝胰抗原抗体(anti-soluble liver antigen/liver-pancreas,anti-SLA/LP)在抗Ro-52阳性AIH组频率(58.33%)高于阴性组(16.00%)(x2=6.955,P<0.05),抗SLA/LP抗体在抗R0-52阳性AIH/PBC重叠综合征组频率(85.71%)高于阴性组(28.57%)(x2=6.109,P<0.05).抗Ro-52抗体和抗SLA/LP抗体结果有一致性(κ=0.466,P<0.05).AIH/PBC重叠综合征组抗Ro-52阳性患者IgG水平高于阴性患者(t=2.508,P<0.05).结论 抗Ro-52抗体在AIH、PBC和MH/PBC重叠综合征中的分布没有差别;抗Ro-52抗体与抗SLA/LP抗体检测结果有一致性;抗Ro-52抗体阳性MH/PBC重叠综合征患者IgG水平高于抗体阴性者.

  8. Porphyria cutanea tarda associated with autoimmune hypothyroidism, vitiligo and alopecia universalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabán, J; Rodríguez-García, J L; Gil, J; País, J R; Medina, S

    1991-12-01

    The aetiology of porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) has not been elucidated, but the possibility of an autoimmune mechanism has been proposed. We report a case of an unknown clinical combination of PCT with autoimmune hypothyroidism, alopecia universalis and vitiligo with thyroid and parietal cell circulating antibodies. This is highly suggestive of underlying autoimmune damage in this patient. PMID:1803247

  9. Autoimmune Cytopenias in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL may be complicated at any time by autoimmune phenomena.The most common ones are hematologic disorders, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP. Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA and autoimmune agranulocytosis (AG are, indeed, more rarely seen. However, they are probably underestimated due to the possible misleading presence of cytopenias secondary to leukemic bone marrow involvement or to chemotherapy cytotoxicity. The source of autoantibodies is still uncertain, despite the most convincing data are in favor of the involvement of resting normal B-cells. In general, excluding the specific treatment of underlying CLL, the managementof these complications is not different from that of idiopathic autoimmune cytopenias or of those associated to other causes. Among different therapeutic approaches, monoclonal antibody rituximab, given alone or in combination, has shown to be very effective.

  10. B Cell Autonomous TLR Signaling and Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut; Rawlings, David J

    2009-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases and the recognition of importance of B cells in these disorders has grown dramatically in association with the remarkable success of B-cell depletion as a treatment for autoimmunity. The precise mechanisms that promote alterations in B cell tolerance remain incompletely defined. There is increasing evidence, however, that TLRs play a major role in these events. Stimulation of B cells via the TLR pathway not only leads to an increase in antibody production but also promotes additional changes including cytokine production and upregulation of activation markers increasing the effectiveness of B cells as APCs. Understanding the role of TLRs in systemic autoimmunity will not only provide insight into the disease pathogenesis but may also lead to the development of novel therapies. This article gives an overview of TLR signaling in B cells and the possible involvement of such signals in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18295736

  11. Adjuvants and immunization strategies to induce influenza virus hemagglutinin stalk antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Goff

    Full Text Available The global population remains vulnerable in the face of the next pandemic influenza virus outbreak, and reformulated vaccinations are administered annually to manage seasonal epidemics. Therefore, development of a new generation of vaccines is needed to generate broad and persistent immunity to influenza viruses. Here, we describe three adjuvants that enhance the induction of stalk-directed antibodies against heterologous and heterosubtypic influenza viruses when administered with chimeric HA proteins. Addavax, an MF59-like nanoemulsion, poly(I:C, and an RNA hairpin derived from Sendai virus (SeV Cantell were efficacious intramuscularly. The SeV RNA and poly(I:C also proved to be effective respiratory mucosal adjuvants. Although the quantity and quality of antibodies induced by the adjuvants varied, immunized mice demonstrated comparable levels of protection against challenge with influenza A viruses on the basis of HA stalk reactivity. Finally, we present that intranasally, but not intramuscularly, administered chimeric HA proteins induce mucosal IgA antibodies directed at the HA stalk.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against ROR1 induce apoptosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmanesh, A H; Hojjat-Farsangi, M; Khan, A S; Jeddi-Tehrani, M; Akhondi, M M; Bayat, A A; Ghods, R; Mahmoudi, A-R; Hadavi, R; Österborg, A; Shokri, F; Rabbani, H; Mellstedt, H

    2012-06-01

    ROR1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) recently identified to be overexpressed at the gene and protein levels in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against RTKs have been successfully applied for therapy of solid tumors. We generated five MAbs against the Ig (n = 1), cysteine-rich (CRD) (n = 2) and kringle (KNG) (n = 2) domains, respectively, of the extracellular part of ROR1. All CLL patients (n = 20) expressed ROR1 on the surface of the leukemic cells. A significantly higher frequency of ROR1 expression was found in patients with progressive versus non-progressive disease, and in those with unmutated versus mutated IgVH genes. All five MAbs alone induced apoptosis in the absence of complement or added effector cells (Annexin-V and MTT, as well as cleavage of poly-(ADP ribose)-polymerase, caspase-8 and caspase-9) of CLL cells but not of normal B cells. Most effective were MAbs against CRD and KNG, significantly superior to rituximab (P < 0.005). Cross-linking of anti-ROR1 MAbs using the F(ab')(2) fragments of anti-Fc antibodies significantly augmented apoptosis. Two of the MAbs induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) similar to that of rituximab and one anti-ROR1 MAb (KNG) (IgG1) showed killing activity by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The identified ROR1 epitopes may provide a basis for generating human ROR1 MAbs for therapy. PMID:22289919

  13. Preventing and curing citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis in a humanized mouse model using a Th2-polarizing iNKT cell agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kyle M; Rytelewski, Mateusz; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Meilleur, Shannon A; Mannik, Lisa A; Yue, David; Brintnell, William C; Welch, Ian; Cairns, Ewa; Haeryfar, S M Mansour

    2012-07-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate lymphocytes with unique reactivity to glycolipid antigens bound to non-polymorphic CD1d molecules. They are capable of rapidly releasing pro- and/or anti-inflammatory cytokines and constitute attractive targets for immunotherapy of a wide range of diseases including autoimmune disorders. In this study, we have explored the beneficial effects of OCH, a Th2-polarizing glycolipid agonist of iNKT cells, in a humanized mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in which citrullinated human proteins are targeted by autoaggressive immune responses in mice expressing an RA susceptibility human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR4 molecule. We found for the first time that treatment with OCH both prevents and cures citrulline-induced autoimmune arthritis as evidenced by resolved ankle swelling and reversed histopathological changes associated with arthritis. Also importantly, OCH treatment blocked the arthritogenic capacity of citrullinated antigen-experienced splenocytes without compromising their global responsiveness or altering the proportion of splenic naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Interestingly, administering the Th1-promoting iNKT cell glycolipid ligand α-C-galactosylceramide into HLA-DR4 transgenic mice increased the incidence of arthritis in these animals and exacerbated their clinical symptoms, strongly suggesting a role for Th1 responses in the pathogenesis of citrulline-induced arthritis. Therefore, our findings indicate a role for Th1-mediated immunopathology in citrulline-induced arthritis and provide the first evidence that iNKT cell manipulation by Th2-skewing glycolipids may be of therapeutic value in this clinically relevant model, a finding that is potentially translatable to human RA. PMID:21912419

  14. Prolonged acute hepatitis A mimicking autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rintaro Mikata; Osamu Yokosuka; Fumio Imazeki; Kenichi Fukai; Tatsuo Kanda; Hiromitsu Saisho

    2005-01-01

    AIM: We report a case with a prolonged course of hepatitisA, with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) higher than 500 IU/Lfor more than 2 mo.METHODS: A middle-aged woman had an elevated IgG level of more than 2 000 mg/dL, positive arti-nudear antibodies (ANA) and anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA), but no evidence of persistent hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. Liver biopsy findings were compatible with prolonged acute hepatitis, although acute onset of autoimmune hepatitis could not be ruled out.RESULTS: It was assumed that she developed a course of hepatitis similar to autoimmune hepatitis triggered by HAV infection. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment was initiated and a favorable outcome was obtained. CONCLUSION: We describe a case of a middle-aged woman who showed a prolonged course of acute hepatitis A mimicking autoimmune hepatitis. Treatment with UDCAproved to be effective.

  15. The autoimmune tautology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Although autoimmune diseases exhibit contrasting epidemiological features, pathology, and clinical manifestations, three lines of evidence demonstrate that these diseases share similar immunogenetic mechanisms (that is, autoimmune tautology). First, clinical evidence highlights the co-occurrence of distinct autoimmune diseases within an individual (that is, polyautoimmunity) and within members of a nuclear family (that is, familial autoimmunity). Second, physiopathologic evidence indicates that the pathologic mechanisms may be similar among autoimmune diseases. Lastly, genetic evidence shows that autoimmune phenotypes might represent pleiotropic outcomes of the interaction of non-specific disease genes.

  16. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dermatomyositis . What are some of the treatments for autoimmune diseases? Of first importance in treating any autoimmune disease ... being researched. What is the family connection in autoimmune diseases? The ability to develop an autoimmune disease is ...

  17. Discontinuation of Smoking Increases the Risk for Developing Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and/or Thyroglobulin Antibodies: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Effraimidis; J.G.P. Tijssen; W.M. Wiersinga

    2009-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune thyroid disease develops in genetic susceptible subjects, provoked by environmental factors. Little is known of the environment in the early stages of autoimmunity. Objective: We evaluated environmental factors contributing to de novo occurrence of thyroid antibodies. Design: We

  18. Antibody against the insulin receptor causes disappearance of insulin receptors in 3T3-L1 cells: a possible explanation of antibody-induced insulin resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Grunfeld, C.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a rabbit antibody induced against the rat insulin receptor (RAR) was tested using cultured 3T3-L1 fat cells. As previously seen with antibodies against the insulin receptor from patients with the type B syndrome of insulin resistance and acanthosis nigricans, RAR acutely mimicked the action of insulin by stimulating deoxyglucose uptake. After prolonged exposure of 3T3-L1 cells to RAR, insulinomimetic activity was lost and the cells became resistant to the action of insulin. This...

  19. 349 Detection of Anti-nucclear Antibodies (ana) Used for Diagnostic Approach of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. Correlation with Double Stranded DNA (DSDNA) and Extractable Nuclear Antigen (ENA) Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasiou, Ekarerini; Vakaloudi, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Mavridou, Styliani; Koteli, Asimoula

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the correlation between the titer of ANA and anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA antibodies and the contribution of ANA detection to the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases (CTD). Methods Our samples consisted of 516 specimens, from Rheumatology Department, collected during January 2010 – July 2010. The detection of ANA was performed using indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) and the detection of anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA using ELISA. Results Of the 364 (70.54%) samples with negati...

  20. 卵巢早衰抗卵巢抗体和抗透明带抗体及其分类%Study on anti-ovarian antibodies and anti-zona pellucida antibodies and their classfication in auto-immune premature ovarian failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宁; 欧汝强; 陈巧儿; 王一峰

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study the level and classfication of anti-ovarian antibodies (AoAb) and anti-zona pellucida antibodies (AZpAb) in the sera of premature ovarian failure (POF) patients and to study the pathogenesis of POF. Methods The level and classfication of AoAb and AZpAb in the sera from patient with POF, female infertility with the positive AsAb and the female patient with unexplained infertility were detected by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The level of AoAb and AZpAb in the sera from patient with POF, female infertility with the positive AsAb and female unexplaned infertile patients were significantly higher than those in normal control (P<0.01). Classfication of antibodies demonstrated that they were major IgG in the sera of POF, positive AsAb infertile and unexplaned infertile group. IgA and IgM were less. Conclusion There are significant relation between POF and auto-immunity, important for further study and prevention of auto-immune POF.%目的 探讨卵巢早衰(POF)患者血清中抗卵巢抗体(AoAb)、抗透明带抗体(AZpAb)水平及其分类情况,研究免疫性卵巢早衰的发病机理。方法 用酶联免疫法测定卵巢早衰、抗精子抗体(ASAb)阳性不孕妇女和不明原因不孕症妇女血清中AoAb,AZpAb并对其进行分类。结果 POF患者、ASAb阳性不孕妇女组及不育患者组血清中AoAb\\,AZpAb均比正常妇女组高(P<0.01)。在抗体的分类证明,各组抗体以IgG为主,IgA,IgM也有一定的比例。结论 POF与自身免疫异常密切相关,该结果对于深入研究和预防自身免疫性卵巢早衰有重要意义。

  1. Immune enhancement by novel vaccine adjuvants in autoimmune-prone NZB/W F1 mice: relative efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Swapan K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccines have profoundly impacted global health although concerns persist about their potential role in autoimmune or other adverse reactions. To address these concerns, vaccine components like immunogens and adjuvants require critical evaluation not only in healthy subjects but also in those genetically averse to vaccine constituents. Evaluation in autoimmune-prone animal models of adjuvants is therefore important in vaccine development. The objective here was to assess the effectiveness of experimental adjuvants: two phytol-derived immunostimulants PHIS-01 (phytanol and PHIS-03 (phytanyl mannose, and a new commercial adjuvant from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS-H, relative to a standard adjuvant alum. Phytol derivatives are hydrophobic, oil-in water diterpenoids, while alum is hydrophilic, and SIS is essentially a biodegradable and collagenous protein cocktail derived from extracellular matrices. Results We studied phthalate -specific and cross-reactive anti-DNA antibody responses, and parameters associated with the onset of autoimmune disorders. We determined antibody isotype and cytokine/chemokine milieu induced by the above experimental adjuvants relative to alum. Our results indicated that the phytol-derived adjuvant PHIS-01 exceeded alum in enhancing anti-phthalate antibody without much cross reactivity with ds-DNA. Relatively, SIS and PHIS-03 proved less robust, but they were also less inflammatory. Interestingly, these adjuvants facilitated isotype switching of anti-hapten, but not of anti-DNA response. The current study reaffirms our earlier reports on adjuvanticity of phytol compounds and SIS-H in non autoimmune-prone BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. These adjuvants are as effective as alum also in autoimmune-prone NZB/WF1 mice, and they have little deleterious effects. Conclusion Although all adjuvants tested impacted cytokine/chemokine milieu in favor of Th1/Th2 balance, the phytol compounds fared better in

  2. Results analysis of antinuclear antibodies spectrum tests in four kinds of autoimmune diseases%自身免疫性疾病的抗核抗体谱检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张园园; 潘宝龙; 马骏; 李俊娥

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨抗核抗体谱(ANAs)检测在系统性红斑狼疮(SLE)、干燥综合征(SS)、混合性结缔组织病(MCTD)、类风湿性关节炎(RA)患者中的诊断价值。方法回顾性分析1359例自身免疫性疾病患者血清抗核抗体谱16项检测,对单个抗体在4种疾病患者中的阳性率每种疾病中ANAs的构成比进行分析。结果 ANA在前3种疾病中阳性率均高于RA;抗ds-DNA、抗nRNP主要见于SLE和MCTD;抗Sm主要见于SLE;抗SSA、抗Ro-52、抗SSB阳性率表现为SS>MCTD>SLE>RA;抗SCL-70、抗PM-SCL、抗Jo-1均为较低阳性率;其余自身抗体阳性率表现为SLE>MCTD>SS≈RA。在数据基础上形成了4种自身免疫性疾病诊断的ANAs阳性率参考模型。结论可根据ANA谱中单个抗体在4种疾病中的阳性率特点,建立4种自身免疫性疾病诊断和鉴别诊断的ANAs阳性率参考模型。%ObjectiveTo explore the value of antinuclear antibodies(ANAs) spectrum tests in SLE、SS、MCTD and RA.Methods Retrospectively analyzed ANAs test results of 1359 cases patients with autoimmune diseases in our hospital since January 2011, made statistical analysis on positive rate of each autoantibody in four kinds of disease and ANAs constituent ratio in each disease.Results The positive rate of each autoantibody had certain characteristics :(1)The ANA positive rate in the previous three diseases reached more than 92.8%, while somewhat less in RA (48.5%);(2)Anti-dsDNA and anti-nRNP were mainly in SLE and MCTD;(3)Anti-Sm was mainly in SLE(26.5%);(4)The positive rates of anti-SSA,anti-Ro-52 and anti-SSB showed: SS>MCTD>SLE>RA; (5)The positive rates of anti-SCL70, anti-PM-SCL and anti-Jo1 were lower, no significant difference;(6)The other remaining autoantibodies were: SLE>MCTD>SS≈RA. The diagnostic reference model of ANAs constituent ratio of the four kinds of autoimmune disease: (1)SLE: ANA (93.1%), Ro-52 (50.4%), SSA (47.3%), Ans (42.5%), anti-dsDNA (41

  3. Detection of newly antibody-defined epitopes on HLA class I alleles reacting with antibodies induced during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, R J; Hönger, G; Hösli, I; Marrari, M; Schaub, S

    2016-08-01

    The determination of HLA mismatch acceptability at the epitope level can be best performed with epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. The website-based International Registry of HLA Epitopes (http://www.epregistry.com.br) has a list of 81 antibody-verified HLA-ABC epitopes but more epitopes need to be added. Pregnancy offers an attractive model to study antibody responses to mismatched HLA epitopes which can be readily determined from the HLA types of child and mother. This report describes a HLAMatchmaker-based analysis of 16 postpregnancy sera tested in single HLA-ABC allele binding assays. Most sera reacted with alleles carrying epitopes that have been antibody-verified, and this study focused on the reactivity of additional alleles that share other epitopes corresponding to eplets and other amino acid residue configurations. This analysis led in the identification of 16 newly antibody-defined epitopes, seven are equivalent to eplets and nine correspond to combinations of eplets in combination with other nearby residue configurations. These epitopes will be added to the repertoire of antibody-verified epitopes in the HLA Epitope Registry. PMID:27312793

  4. Screening tests for autoimmune-related immunotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Pieters, R; Albers, R

    1999-01-01

    A large number of chemicals induce or exacerbate autoimmune-like diseases in man. Because of the complexity of processes involved, these adverse effects are often if not always missed in standard toxicity testing. To date no validated and generally applicable predictive animal model exists and only a few chemicals have actually been shown to induce adverse autoimmune effects in certain animals. The popliteal lymph node assay (PLNA) is a very promising animal test to (pre)screen for systemic i...

  5. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway1

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Quarles, Ellen K.; Lai, Marvin A.; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K.; Smith, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1 and IL-18 receptors, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. Herein we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in antibody responses generated towards flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize innate immune components that regulate isotype specific antibody responses. Using purified flagellin from Salmonella, we dissected the contribution of innate flagellin recognition pathways to promote antibody responses towards flagellin and co-administered ovalbumin in C57BL/6 mice. We demonstrate IgG2c responses towards flagellin were TLR5- and inflammasome-dependent; IgG1 was the dominant isotype and partially TLR5- and inflammasome-dependent. Our data indicates a substantial flagellin-specific IgG1 response was induced through a TLR5-, inflammasome-, and MyD88-independent pathway. IgA anti-FliC responses were TLR5- & MyD88-dependent and caspase-1-independent. Unlike C57BL/6 mice, flagellin immunized A/J mice induced co-dominant IgG1 and IgG2a responses. Furthermore, MyD88-independent flagellin-induced antibody responses were even more pronounced in A/J MyD88−/− mice, and IgA anti-FliC responses were suppressed by MyD88. Flagellin also worked as an adjuvant toward co-administered ovalbumin, but it only promoted IgG1 anti-OVA responses. Our results demonstrate that a novel pathway for flagellin recognition contributes to antibody production. Characterization of this pathway will be useful for understanding immunity to flagellin and the rationale design of flagellin-based vaccines. PMID:24442437

  6. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia With Chronic Fatigue After HPV Vaccination as Part of the "Autoimmune/Auto-inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants": Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomljenovic, Lucija; Colafrancesco, Serena; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) with chronic fatigue 2 months following Gardasil vaccination. The patient suffered from persistent headaches, dizziness, recurrent syncope, poor motor coordination, weakness, fatigue, myalgias, numbness, tachycardia, dyspnea, visual disturbances, phonophobia, cognitive impairment, insomnia, gastrointestinal disturbances, and a weight loss of 20 pounds. The psychiatric evaluation ruled out the possibility that her symptoms were psychogenic or related to anxiety disorders. Furthermore, the patient tested positive for ANA (1:1280), lupus anticoagulant, and antiphospholipid. On clinical examination she presented livedo reticularis and was diagnosed with Raynaud's syndrome. This case fulfills the criteria for the autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). Because human papillomavirus vaccination is universally recommended to teenagers and because POTS frequently results in long-term disabilities (as was the case in our patient), a thorough follow-up of patients who present with relevant complaints after vaccination is strongly recommended.

  7. Short- and long-term effects of T-cell modulating agents in experimental autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the easy and reliable induction of a disease condition with many of the features present in human autoimmunity, mercury-induced autoimmunity (mHgAI) in rodents is a favourable autoimmune model. Genetically susceptible (H-2s) mice develop in response to mercury (Hg) a systemic autoimmune condition with antinucleolar antibodies (ANoA) targeting the protein fibrillarin, transient polyclonal B-cell activation, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and systemic immune-complex (IC) deposits. In order to study the short- and long-term effects of treatment with immunomodulating agents on the disease parameters in HgAI, groups of B10.S (H-2s) mice were given 6 mg HgCl2/l drinking water for 22 weeks. Three weeks initial treatment with cyclosporin A (CyA), a high dose of tacrolimus (HD tacrolimus), or anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (a-CD4) inhibited induction of ANoA and IC deposit by Hg. This effect persisted for the subsequent 19 weeks when the mice were only treated with Hg. Initial treatment with anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibody (a-IL-4) for 3 weeks inhibited induction of IgE and IC deposits by Hg, but not ANoA. However, subsequent treatment with Hg without a-IL-4 for 19 weeks induced IC deposits. The T-cell modulating agents aggravated some of the HgAI disease parameters: a-CD4 stimulated the polyclonal B-cell activation, a-IL-4 increased the IgG antichromatin antibody response, and a low dose of tacrolimus (LD tacrolimus) enhanced the ANoA, the polyclonal B-cell activation, and the IC deposits. We conclude that a short initial treatment with a-CD4 or CyA efficiently protects against induction of systemic autoimmunity for an extended period of time. However, some of the T-cell modulating agents, especially a low dose of tacrolimus, aggravate autoimmune manifestations not only during ongoing treatment, but also after treatment with these agents has ceased

  8. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed 9/2/2015. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy Summary. Dysautonomia International . http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID= ... page Basic Information In Depth Information Basic Information Dysautonomia International offers an information page on Autoimmune autonomic ...

  9. Protective role of antibodies induced by Brucella melitensis B115 against B. melitensis and Brucella abortus infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adone, Rosanna; Francia, Massimiliano; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Pesciaroli, Michele; Pasquali, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that antibodies specific for O-PS antigen of Brucella smooth strains are involved in the protective immunity of brucellosis. Since the rough strain Brucella melitensis B115 was able to protect mice against wild Brucella strains brucellosis despite the lack of anti-OPS antibodies, in this study we evaluated the biological significance of antibodies induced by this strain, directed to antigens other than O-PS, passively tranferred to untreated mice prior to infection with Brucella abortus 2308 and B. melitensis 16M virulent strains. The protective ability of specific antisera collected from mice vaccinated with B. melitensis B115, B. abortus RB51 and B. abortus S19 strains was compared. The results indicated that antibodies induced by B115 were able to confer a satisfactory protection, especially against B. abortus 2308, similar to that conferred by the antiserum S19, while the RB51 antiserum was ineffective. These findings suggest that antibodies induced by B115 could act as opsonins as well as antibodies anti-O-PS, thus triggering more efficient internalization and degradation of bacteria within phagocytes. This is the first study assessing the efficacy of antibodies directed to antigens other than O-PS in the course of brucellosis infection. PMID:22521283

  10. Monocyte procoagulant activity induced by in vivo administration of the OKT3 monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradier, O; Surquin, M; Stordeur, P; De Pauw, L; Kinnaert, P; Vereerstraeten, P; Capel, P; Goldman, M; Abramowicz, D

    1996-05-01

    The first injection of OKT3 in kidney transplant recipients activates the common pathway of coagulation. This may result in early thrombosis of graft vessels. To this day, the cells involved in this phenomenon have not been identified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether circulating monocytes participated in this OKT3-induced coagulopathy. The procoagulant activity (PCA) of circulating monocytes rose from (mean +/- SEM) 0.15 +/- 0.02 mU/mL to 0.40 +/- 0.05 mU/mL at 3 hours (P = .002) and 0.56 +/- 0.21 at 5 hours (P = .045) after the initial OKT3 injection. These monocytes displayed increased tissue factor expression at the same moments (mean flourescence intensity: 14 +/- 2 before OKT3 injection versus 54 +/- 14 at 3 hours, P = .008 and 34 +/- 7 at 5 hours, P = .01). Tissue factor mRNA was detected in blood by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction as early as 2 hours after OKT3 administration. The circulating monocytes also displayed a steady increase in membrane expression upregulation of ICAM-1, CD29, CD11b, and CD11c. In vitro experiments showed that OKT3 as well as 2 mitogenic, humanized anti-CD3 antibodies potently induced monocytic PCA whereas the 4 nonmitogenic anti-CD3 antibodies tested were over 1,000-fold less potent than OKT3. We conclude that (1) OKT3 induces in vivo tissue factor gene upregulation and membrane expression resulting in increased PCA of circulating monocytes; and (2) nonmitogenic anti-CD3 antibodies seem devoid of significant procoagulant properties. PMID:8611702

  11. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected. PMID:27446537

  12. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1 −/− mice limits...

  13. Autoimmune Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    2007159 Acute kidney injury of systemic sclerosis: scleroderma renal crisis and crescentic glomerulonephritis. LIU Dongyan(刘冬妍), et al. Dept Nephrol, PUMC Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijin 100730. Chin J Nephrol 2007;23(4):209-203. Objective To explore the clinicopathological characteristics of acute kidney injury (AKI) of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods A retrospective study was performed on 11 SSc patients with AKI. The clinical data were analyzed and the patients were divided into antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) negative group(n=9) and ANCA positive(n=2) group. Results In the ANCA negative group, 2 cases were without malignant hypertension, 1 was acute tubular necrosis(ATN) caused by herbs, 6 were scleroderma renal crisis(SRC), including 4 with renal biopsy, indicating hypertrophic arterial media, edema, thickened intima, onion-skin lesion in interlobular arteries and afferent arterioles, as well as ischemic lesion in glomeruli. In the MPO-ANCA positive group, 1 was crescentic glomerulonephritis. Malignant hypertension was not noticed. All patients were given steroid, 8 of them received CTX in addition. Nine patients received dialysis, and 8 cases progressed to permanent hemodialysis. Six cases with SRC were given high dose ACEI and / or ARB. Six patients resulted in early death. Conclusion Scleroderma renal crisis and ANCA associated vasculitis may cause AKI in SSc patients. Patients with positive ANCA differ from those with negative ANCA in terms of clinical manifestation, pathology and treatment. Survival and prognosis of SSc patient were bad. High dose corticosteroids increases the risk of scleroderma renal crisis, so it is thereby recommended that the dose above 15 rog/day should be avoided if possible.

  14. 349 Detection of Anti-nucclear Antibodies (ana) Used for Diagnostic Approach of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. Correlation with Double Stranded DNA (DSDNA) and Extractable Nuclear Antigen (ENA) Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Ekarerini; Vakaloudi, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Mavridou, Styliani; Koteli, Asimoula

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the correlation between the titer of ANA and anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA antibodies and the contribution of ANA detection to the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases (CTD). Methods Our samples consisted of 516 specimens, from Rheumatology Department, collected during January 2010 – July 2010. The detection of ANA was performed using indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) and the detection of anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA using ELISA. Results Of the 364 (70.54%) samples with negative ANA 4 (1%) had positive anti-ENA and 2 (0.5%) had positive anti-dsDNA while positive anti-ENA and anti-dsDNA were detected in the 44.73% (n = 68) and 21% (n = 32) of the specimens with positive ANA respectively. The probability of detecting positive anti-ENA and anti-dsDNA rises proportionately to the titer of ANA. Specifically, the correlation between the probability of detecting positive anti-ENA and the titer of ANA is 0.577 (P anti-ENA. The receiver operating (ROC) curves of the ANA titer for anti-ENA had a larger under the curve area compared to the ROC curve for anti-dsDNA, indicating that ANA titer is better for predicting anti-ENA than anti-dsDNA. The sensitivity of positive ANA in the prediction of the anti-ENA and anti-dsDNA was 94.40% and 94.10%, the specificity was 81% and 75.10%, the positive prognostic value was 44.70% and 21.10% and negative prognostic value was 98.90 and 99.50%. Conclusions The detection of ANA using indirect IFA has high sensitivity in predicting the presence of specialized antibodies and may be used as a screening method for the diagnosis of CTD. It is cost and time effective too. Our study also shows that the ANA titer is useful in predicting anti-ENA. Samples with low titer ANAs (1:160 or less) may not need a further test for anti-ENA unless an ANA-associated disease is highly suspected. However a test for anti-dsDNA should be considered in positive ANA samples at any titer including low titers.

  15. Cancer regression and autoimmunity induced by cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 blockade in patients with metastatic melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, Giao Q.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Hwu, Patrick; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Schwartzentruber, Douglas J.; Restifo, Nicholas P; Haworth, Leah R.; Seipp, Claudia A.; Freezer, Linda J.; Morton, Kathleen E.; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; Duray, Paul H.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Allison, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) is a critical immunoregulatory molecule (expressed on activated T cells and a subset of regulatory T cells) capable of down-regulating T cell activation. Blockade of CTLA-4 has been shown in animal models to improve the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We thus treated 14 patients with metastatic melanoma by using serial i.v. administration of a fully human anti-CTLA-4 antibody (MDX-010) in conjunction with s.c....

  16. Murine concanavalin A-induced hepatitis is prevented by interleukin 12 (IL-12) antibody and exacerbated by exogenous IL-12 through an interferon-gamma-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, F; Di Marco, R; Zaccone, P;

    2000-01-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis is a cell-mediated immunoinflammatory condition similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. We investigated the role of interleukin 12 (IL-12) in hepatitis induced in NMRI and C57/BL6 mice by a single injection of ConA. Recombinant murine IL-12 administered 24...

  17. SSB peptide and DNA co-immunization induces inhibition of anti-dsDNA antibody production in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus often have various autoantibodies.The relationship between these antibodies is still poorly understood.The aim of the present study was to observe the anti-SSB antibody and anti-dsDNA antibody production profiles following immunization with synthetic SSB peptide alone,DNA alone or co-immunization with these two antigens.Methods SSB 214-225 aa peptide was synthesized by organic chemistry solid-phase peptide synthesis.Rabbits were immunized with the foliowing antigens:synthetic SSB peptide linked with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH),DNA,SSB plus dsDNA,KLH and PBS.Antibodies were measured by ELISA.Histopathology and direct immufluorescence assays were also applied.Results Ainit-SSB and anti-dsDNA antibodies were produced following immunization with SSB peptide and DNA respectively.The level of SSB antibody in the co-immunization group was higher than that of the SSB peptide immunization group.The level of anti-dsDNA antibody in the co-immunization group was,however,lower than that in the DNA immunization group.Meanwhile,the level of anti-SSB antibody was higher than that of anti-DNA antibody in the co-immunization group.No morphological or immunological abnormalities were found in the heart,liver,kidney,spleen or skin tissues.Conclusion Inhibition of anti-dsDNA-antibody was induced by co-immunization with synthesized SSB peptide and DNA,which might explain,at least partly,the mild disease in some LE subsets associated with SSB antibody.

  18. Osthole prevents anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis in mice by affecting the caspase-3-mediated apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Toru; Hino, Okio

    2003-02-15

    Fas (Apo-1/CD95) ligand, which is a type II membrane protein, is a major inducer of apoptosis. Osthole is a coumarin derivative present in medicinal plants. The effect of osthole on hepatitis induced by anti-Fas antibody in mice was studied. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented the elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) caused by anti-Fas antibody (175 microg/kg, i.v.). Administration of osthole to mice even at a dose of 10 mg/kg significantly inhibited of anti-Fas antibody-induced elevation of plasma ALT. Capase-3 is a cysteine protease, and treatment of mice with anti-Fas antibody caused an elevation of caspase-3 activity at 3.5 and 6 hr. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (100 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited the elevation of caspase-3 activity caused by anti-Fas antibody. However, the addition of osthole (up to 10(-4)M) to a liver cytosol fraction isolated from mice treated with anti-Fas antibody did not inhibit caspase-3 activity in vitro. Thus, treatment of mice with osthole inhibited caspase-3 activity by an effect upstream of caspase-3 activation. The livers of mice treated with anti-Fas antibody contained apoptotic and dead cells; osthole attenuated the development of this apoptosis and cell death. The present results show that osthole prevented anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis by inhibiting the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway. PMID:12566097

  19. Neonatal molecular pathologies induced by maternal anti-Ro and anti-La antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera-Esparza R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maternal antinuclear antibodies with anti-Ro or anti-La specificity might be pathogenic to the fetus and could induce molecular neonatal pathologies, such as neonatal lupus (NL with or without congenital heart block (CHB. The cutaneous manifestations of neonatal lupus appear at birth or a few weeks later, and skin lesions may persist for weeks. While CHB is characterized by intrauterine bradycardia or low heart rates at birth and may persist for months, depending on the degree of blockage. Clinical and experimental data demonstrated that anti-Ro and anti-La autoantibodies functionally inhibit L-type calcium channels and induce abnormalities in electrical conduction of the cardiac myocytes. It has been 38 years since the first clinical description of CHB. Presently, the pathophysiology of CHB has been clarified through clinical and basic research studies.

  20. Attenuation of Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Fibrosis by Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Verissimo, Vivianne L; Cervelli, Jessica A; Vayas, Kinal N; Hall, LeRoy; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes acute injury to the lung that progresses to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a prominent infiltration of macrophages into the lung and upregulation of proinflammatory/profibrotic cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of anti-TNFα antibody to mitigate NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody (15 mg/kg, iv, every 9 days) beginning 30 min after intratracheal administration of NM (0.125 mg/kg) reduced progressive histopathologic alterations in the lung including perivascular and peribronchial edema, macrophage/monocyte infiltration, interstitial thickening, bronchiolization of alveolar walls, fibrin deposition, emphysema, and fibrosis. NM-induced damage to the alveolar-epithelial barrier, measured by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and cell content, was also reduced by anti-TNFα antibody, along with expression of the oxidative stress marker, heme oxygenase-1. Whereas the accumulation of proinflammatory/cytotoxic M1 macrophages in the lung in response to NM was suppressed by anti-TNFα antibody, anti-inflammatory/profibrotic M2 macrophages were increased or unchanged. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody also reduced NM-induced increases in expression of the profibrotic mediator, transforming growth factor-β. This was associated with a reduction in NM-induced collagen deposition in the lung. These data suggest that inhibiting TNFα may represent an efficacious approach to mitigating lung injury induced by mustards.

  1. Diagnostic criteria of autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Longhi, Maria Serena; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. A set of inclusion and exclusion criteria for the diagnosis of AIH have been established by the International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group (IAIHG). There are two main types of AIH: type 1, positive for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle antibodies (SMAs) and type 2, defined by the presence of anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM-1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (LC-1) autoantibodies. The central role of autoantibodies in the diagnosis of AIH has led the IAIHG to produce a consensus statement detailing appropriate and effective methods for their detection. Autoantibodies should be tested by indirect immunofluorescence at an initial dilution of 1/40 in adults and 1/10 in children on a freshly prepared rodent substrate that includes kidney, liver and stomach sections to allow for the simultaneous detection of all reactivities relevant to AIH. Anti-LKM-1 is often confused with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) if rodent kidney is used as the sole immunofluorescence substrate. The identification of the molecular targets of anti-LKM-1 and AMA has led to the establishment of immuno-assays based on the use of the recombinant or purified autoantigens. Perinuclear anti-nuclear neutrophil antibody (p-ANNA) is an additional marker of AIH-1; anti soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies are specific for autoimmune liver disease, can be present in AIH-1 and AIH-2 and are associated with a more severe clinical course. Anti-SLA are detectable by ELISA or radio-immuno-assays, but not by immunofluorescence. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to

  2. Distribution of autoimmune antibodies and clinical features in 54 cases with recurrent optic neuritis%复发性视神经炎54例临床特点及自身免疫抗体的分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖云; 魏世辉; 范珂; 闫洪欣; 张译心; 戴艳丽

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察复发性视神经炎的临床特点以及自身免疫抗体(水通道蛋白4抗体和血清抗核抗体)的分布.方法 收集2010年10月至2012年4月间在解放军总医院神经眼科住院诊治的复发性视神经炎患者54例的临床资料,回顾分析其一般临床特点,统计其水通道蛋白4抗体(AQP4-Ab)(36例)和血清抗核抗体(ANAs)的阳性率,并与相关文献数据分析比较.结果 男女比例1∶2.6,发病年龄平均30.3岁;病程50d~20年,发病次数2~8次.病程中最差视力(矫正后)在0.1以下者44例,占81.5%.ANAs阳性率22.2% (12/54),AQP4-Ab阳性率27.8% (10/36);颅脑和/或脊髓核磁异常者占48.0% (24/50);脑脊液异常70.0% (16/23).结论 复发性视神经炎多发于青壮年,视力损害较重,自身免疫抗体(AQP4-Ab和ANAs)阳性率较视神经脊髓炎及复发性长节段横贯性脊髓炎略低,中枢神经系统影像检查对其诊治有重要价值.%ObJective To investigate the clinical features and seroprevalence of autoimmune antibodies (aquaporin-4 antibodies,AQP4-Ab and antinuclear antibodies,ANAs) in patients with recurrent optic neuritis (RON).Methods Fifty-four RON patients who were in-hospital in Ophthalmology Department of PLA from October 2010 to April 2012 were enrolled in the study.The general clinical features and statistic the positive rate of AQP4-Ab and ANAs were analyzed retrospectively,and the relative data in other studies were compared.Results The ratio of male to female was 1:2.6 and the average age of onset was 30.3 years old.The recurrent attacks of optic neuritis were 2 to 8 times during 50 days to 20 years.There were 44 patients (81.5%) who had ever appeared the lowest visual acuity (corrected) of <0.1 in the course of disease.The rate of seropositive ANAs was 22.2% (12/54) while 27.8% (10/36) for AQP4-Ab.The 48.0% (24/50) cases were abnormal in Brain and/or spinal cord MRI and 70.0% (16/23) in CSF.Conclusions RON is more appeared in

  3. 不孕不育妇女五项免疫性抗体检测结果分析%Analysis of the Results of Five Autoimmune Antibodies in Female Infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周艳; 韦启雕

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between five autoimmune antibodies and the female infertility. Methods The 49 blood serum samples of the female infertility were col ected from the section for outpatients in our hospital. The serum AsAb, EmAb , AoAb , ZpAb and ATAb of cases of female infertility were detected by Indirect immunofluorescence assay. Results The positive rate in 49 female infertility was 34.7%, 28.6%, 20.4%, 20.4%and 12.2%respectively. AsAb,EmAb and AoAb were detected from 37 blood serum samples of the healthy group,and the positive rates was 5.4%、2.7%、2.7%, and the dif erence significant between the two groups( <0.05).Among the testing of al immune antibodies,there were 26(53.1%) patients who were masculine in one items and 13(26.5%)patients who were masculine in two items. Conclusion AsAb,EmAb,AoAb,ZpAb and ATAb are the important immune factors in female infertility,and the patients should strengthen the test of immune antibodies in couples.%目的:探讨妇女不孕不育症与五项免疫性抗体的关系。方法收集我院就诊的49例不孕不育妇女的血清,37例健康体检者的血清作为对照组,采用间接免疫荧光法(IFA)检测抗精子抗体(AsAb)、抗子宫内膜抗体(EmAb)、抗卵巢抗体(AoAb)、抗透明带抗体(ZpAb)及抗滋养层抗体(ATAb)。结果49例不孕不育患者血清中检出AsAb阳性17例(34.7%),EmAb阳性14例(28.6%),AoAb阳性10例(20.4%),ZpAb阳性10例(20.4%),ATAb阳性6例(12.2%);对照组中检出AsAb、EmAb和AoAb的阳性例数和阳性率分别为2(5.4%)、1(2.7%)、1(2.7%),未检出ZpAb和ATAb;两组差异有统计学意义(<0.05)。其中2项或以上抗体同时阳性的,不孕不育组有13例(26.5%),健康组无同时阳性的。结论 AsAb、EmAb、AoAb、ZpAb和ATAb是引起女性不孕不育的重要免疫因素,不孕不育患者应进行免疫性抗体的检测。

  4. Infections and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    The high percentage of disease-discordant pairs of monozygotic twins demonstrates the central role of environmental factors in the etiology of autoimmune diseases. Efforts were first focussed on the search for triggering factors. The study of animal models has clearly shown that infections may trigger autoimmune diseases, as in the case of Coxsackie B4 virus in type I diabetes and the encephalomyocarditis virus in autoimmune myositis, two models in which viruses are thought to act by increasing immunogenicity of autoantigens secondary to local inflammation. The induction of a Guillain-Barré syndrome in rabbits after immunization with a peptide derived from Campylobacter jejuni is explained by mimicry between C. jejuni antigens and peripheral nerve axonal antigens. Other models involve chemical modification of autoantigens, as in the case of iodine-induced autoimmune thyroiditis. These mechanisms have so far only limited clinical counterparts (rheumatic fever, Guillain-Barré syndrome and drug-induced lupus or myasthenia gravis) but one may assume that unknown viruses may be at the origin of a number of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes and multiple sclerosis) as illustrated by the convergent data incriminating IFN-alpha in the pathophysiology of type I diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. Perhaps the difficulties met in identifying the etiologic viruses are due to the long lag time between the initial causal infection and onset of clinical disease. More surprisingly, infections may also protect from autoimmune diseases. Western countries are being confronted with a disturbing increase in the incidence of most immune disorders, including autoimmune and allergic diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and some lymphocyte malignancies. Converging epidemiological evidence indicates that this increase is linked to improvement of the socio-economic level of these countries, posing the question of the causal relationship and more precisely the

  5. Aetiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diego Vergani; Giorgina Mieli-Vergani

    2008-01-01

    The histological hallmark of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a dense portal mononuclear cell infiltrate that invades the surrounding parenchyma and comprises T and B lymphocytes,macrophages,and plasma cells.An unknown but powerful stimulus must be promoting the formation of this massive inflammatory cellular reaction that is likely to initiate and perpetuate liver damage.An autoimmune attack can follow different pathways to inflict damage on hepatocytes.Liver damage is likely to be orchestrated by CD4+T lymphocytes recognizing an autoantigenic liver peptide.To trigger an autoimmune response,the peptide must be embraced by an HLA class Ⅱ molecule and presented to naive CD4+T helper (Th0) cells by professional antigen presenting cells,with the co-stimulation of ligand-ligand fostering interaction between the two cells.Th0 cells become activated,differentiate into functional phenotypes according to the cytokines prevailing in the microenvironment and the nature of the antigen,and initiate a cascade of immune reactions determined by the cytokines produced by the activated T cells.Th1 cells,arising in the presence of the macrophage-derived interleukin (IL)-12,secrete mainly IL-2 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ),which activate macrophages,enhance expression of HLA class Ⅰ (increasing liver cell vulnerability to a CD8+T cell cytotoxic attack),and induce expression of HLA class Ⅱ molecules on hepatocytes.Th2 cells,which differentiate from Th0 if the microenvironment is rich in IL-4,produce mainly IL-4,IL-10,and IL-13 which favour autoantibody production by B lymphocytes.Physiologically,Th1 and Th2 antagonize each other.Th17 cells,a recently described population,arise in the presence of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and IL-6 and appear to have an important effector role in inflammation and autoimmunity.The process of autoantigen recognition is strictly controlled by regulatory mechanisms,such as those exerted by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells,which derive from Th0

  6. Heterosubtypic antiviral activity of hemagglutinin-specific antibodies induced by intranasal immunization with inactivated influenza viruses in mice.

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    Mieko Muramatsu

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus subtypes are classified on the basis of the antigenicity of their envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA; H1-H17 and neuraminidase. Since HA-specific neutralizing antibodies are predominantly specific for a single HA subtype, the contribution of antibodies to the heterosubtypic immunity is not fully understood. In this study, mice were immunized intranasally or subcutaneously with viruses having the H1, H3, H5, H7, H9, or H13 HA subtype, and cross-reactivities of induced IgG and IgA antibodies to recombinant HAs of the H1-H16 subtypes were analyzed. We found that both subcutaneous and intranasal immunizations induced antibody responses to multiple HAs of different subtypes, whereas IgA was not detected remarkably in mice immunized subcutaneously. Using serum, nasal wash, and trachea-lung wash samples of H9 virus-immunized mice, neutralizing activities of cross-reactive antibodies were then evaluated by plaque-reduction assays. As expected, no heterosubtypic neutralizing activity was detected by a standard neutralization test in which viruses were mixed with antibodies prior to inoculation into cultured cells. Interestingly, however, a remarkable reduction of plaque formation and extracellular release of the H12 virus, which was bound by the H9-induced cross-reactive antibodies, was observed when infected cells were subsequently cultured with the samples containing HA-specific cross-reactive IgA. This heterosubtypic plaque reduction was interfered when the samples were pretreated with anti-mouse IgA polyclonal serum. These results suggest that the majority of HA-specific cross-reactive IgG and IgA antibodies produced by immunization do not block cellular entry of viruses, but cross-reactive IgA may have the potential to inhibit viral egress from infected cells and thus to play a role in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A viruses.

  7. CD32a antibodies induce thrombocytopenia and type II hypersensitivity reactions in FCGR2A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Todd; Robles-Carrillo, Liza; Davila, Monica; Brodie, Meghan; Desai, Hina; Rivera-Amaya, Mildred; Francis, John L; Amirkhosravi, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The CD32a immunoglobulin G (IgG) receptor (Fcγ receptor IIa) is a potential therapeutic target for diseases in which IgG immune complexes (ICs) mediate inflammation, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a promising strategy for treating such diseases. However, IV.3, perhaps the best characterized CD32a-blocking mAb, was recently shown to induce anaphylaxis in immunocompromised "3KO" mice. This anaphylactic reaction required a human CD32a transgene because mice lack an equivalent of this gene. The finding that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in CD32a-transgenic mice was surprising because IV.3 had long been thought to lack the intrinsic capacity to trigger cellular activation via CD32a. Such an anaphylactic reaction would also limit potential therapeutic applications of IV.3. In the present study, we examine the molecular mechanisms by which IV.3 induces anaphylaxis. We now report that IV.3 induces anaphylaxis in immunocompetent CD32a-transgenic "FCGR2A" mice, along with the novel finding that IV.3 and 2 other well-characterized CD32a-blocking mAbs, AT-10 and MDE-8, also induce severe thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Using recombinant variants of these same mAbs, we show that IgG "Fc" effector function is necessary for the induction of anaphylaxis and thrombocytopenia in FCGR2A mice. Variants of these mAbs lacking the capacity to activate mouse IgG receptors not only failed to induce anaphylaxis or thrombocytopenia, but also very potently protected FCGR2A mice from near lethal doses of IgG ICs. Our findings show that effector-deficient IV.3, AT-10, and MDE-8 are promising candidates for developing therapeutic mAbs to treat CD32a-mediated diseases. PMID:26396093

  8. Pregnancy outcomes with thyroxine replacement for subclinical hypothyroidism: Role of thyroid autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study pregnancy outcomes in relation to thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb status with optimum thyroxine replacement for subclinical hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight women with subclinical hypothyroidism were followed up until the end of their pregnancy. TPO antibody status was performed for 59 women (positive 20, negative 39. Levothyroxine was supplemented to maintain TSH between 0.3-3 mIU/l in all patients, irrespective of TPOAb status. Pregnancy outcomes were noted as pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH, antepartum or postpartum hemorrhage, preterm delivery, and spontaneous abortion. Outcomes were compared between 3 groups as per TPO antibody status (positive, negative, and undetermined, which were matched for age and gestational period. Results: Thyroid autoimmunity was noted in 34% of women screened for TPO antibody. A total of 11 adverse pregnancy outcomes were recorded (4 spontaneous abortions, 4 preterm deliveries, 3 PIH with no significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Adverse pregnancy outcomes were not different in the 3 groups with adequate thyroxine replacement for pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism targeting TSH in euthyroid range, irrespective of thyroid autoimmunity status.

  9. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  10. Assessment of pulmonary antibodies with induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage induced by nasal vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a clinical phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freihorst Joachim

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a desirable albeit challenging strategy for prevention of airway infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We assessed the immunogenicity of a nasal vaccine based on the outer membrane proteins F and I from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lower airways in a phase I/II clinical trial. Methods N = 12 healthy volunteers received 2 nasal vaccinations with an OprF-OprI gel as a primary and a systemic (n = 6 or a nasal booster vaccination (n = 6. Antibodies were assessed in induced sputum (IS, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, and in serum. Results OprF-OprI-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were found in both BAL and IS at comparable rates, but differed in the predominant isotype. IgA antibodies in IS did not correlate to the respective serum levels. Pulmonary antibodies were detectable in all vaccinees even 1 year after the vaccination. The systemic booster group had higher IgG levels in serum. However, the nasal booster group had the better long-term response with bronchial antibodies of both isotypes. Conclusion The nasal OprF-OprI-vaccine induces a lasting antibody response at both, systemic and airway mucosal site. IS is a feasible method to non-invasively assess bronchial antibodies. A further optimization of the vaccination schedule is warranted.

  11. Etiopathogenesis of autoimmune responses against sperm

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    V. A. Bozhedomov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune reactions against sperm, which are accompanied by the elaboration of antisperm antibodies (AsAb, are one of the causes of male infertility.Objective: to specify the role of different factors (other than obstruction in the etiology of male immune infertility.Subjects and methods. Clinical and laboratory studies were made in 536 males from infertile couples (their age 18–45 years; a control group comprised fertile men whose wives were 8–16 weeks pregnant (n = 82. Their sperms were examined in accordance with the WHO recommendations. AsAbs in the sperm were determined by a MAR test. Oxidative stress was estimated using luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Chromosome damage was identified from DNA fragmentation by chromatin dispersion in an inert agarose gel, by making a microscopic examination of halo formation after acid DNA denaturation and nuclear protein lysis. The blood levels of interferons (IFN and their natural and in vitro induced production were determined by the Campbell method. Reproductive tract infections were diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.Results. There is a high significant correlation between the quantity of AsAb, on the one hand, and previous orchitis, as well as subclinical testicular injury, on the other hand. There was no correlation between varicocele and AsAb, but in the former, the risk of immune infertility and orchitis increases after injury; varicocelectomy promotes a reduction in AsAb with the higher degree of varicocele and a less marked autoimmune process. AsAbs are observed during Chlamydia infection with the increased production of IFN-γ. Cryptorchidism and orchiopexy, parotitis, epididymitis, herniotomy, chronic bacterial prostatitis, and other potential risk factors for decreased male fertility had no significant impacts on an odds ratio for developing immune infertility. In the majority (41 % of cases, immune infertility seems to be idiopathic, but it is accompanied by the

  12. Etiopathogenesis of autoimmune responses against sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bozhedomov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune reactions against sperm, which are accompanied by the elaboration of antisperm antibodies (AsAb, are one of the causes of male infertility.Objective: to specify the role of different factors (other than obstruction in the etiology of male immune infertility.Subjects and methods. Clinical and laboratory studies were made in 536 males from infertile couples (their age 18–45 years; a control group comprised fertile men whose wives were 8–16 weeks pregnant (n = 82. Their sperms were examined in accordance with the WHO recommendations. AsAbs in the sperm were determined by a MAR test. Oxidative stress was estimated using luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Chromosome damage was identified from DNA fragmentation by chromatin dispersion in an inert agarose gel, by making a microscopic examination of halo formation after acid DNA denaturation and nuclear protein lysis. The blood levels of interferons (IFN and their natural and in vitro induced production were determined by the Campbell method. Reproductive tract infections were diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.Results. There is a high significant correlation between the quantity of AsAb, on the one hand, and previous orchitis, as well as subclinical testicular injury, on the other hand. There was no correlation between varicocele and AsAb, but in the former, the risk of immune infertility and orchitis increases after injury; varicocelectomy promotes a reduction in AsAb with the higher degree of varicocele and a less marked autoimmune process. AsAbs are observed during Chlamydia infection with the increased production of IFN-γ. Cryptorchidism and orchiopexy, parotitis, epididymitis, herniotomy, chronic bacterial prostatitis, and other potential risk factors for decreased male fertility had no significant impacts on an odds ratio for developing immune infertility. In the majority (41 % of cases, immune infertility seems to be idiopathic, but it is accompanied by the

  13. Radiolabeled isatin binding to caspase-3 activation induced by anti-Fas antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Noninvasive imaging methods that can distinguish apoptosis from necrosis may be useful in furthering our understanding of diseases characterized by apoptotic dysregulation as well as aiding drug development targeting apoptotic pathways. We evaluated the ability of radiolabeled isatins to quantify caspase-3 activity induced by the activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway by the anti-Fas antibody in mice. Methods: The behavior of three different radiolabeled isatins ([18F]WC-II-89, [18F]WC-IV-3 and [11C]WC-98) was characterized in mice with and without anti-Fas antibody treatment by microPET imaging and biodistribution studies. The activity of [18F]WC-II-89 was also compared with [99mTc]mebrofenin. The effect of pan-caspase inhibition with quinolyl-valyl-O-methylaspartyl-[2,6-difluorophenoxy]-methyl ketone (Q-VD-OPh) on [18F]WC-II-89 uptake was studied. Caspase-3 activity was confirmed by a fluorometric enzyme assay. Results: All three tracers behaved similarly in microPET and biodistribution studies. Increased retention of all tracers was observed in the livers of treated animals and several other organs, all of which demonstrated increased caspase-3 enzyme activity; however, impaired hepatobiliary excretion made attribution of these findings to caspase-3 activity difficult. The isatin [18F]WC-II-89 was retained at statistically significantly higher levels in the organs after anti-Fas antibody treatment while [99mTc]mebrofenin activity cleared, suggesting specific binding to activated caspase-3, but the magnitude of increased binding was still relatively low. Caspase inhibition with Q-VD-OPh partially blocked [18F]WC-II-89 retention but completely blocked caspase-3 enzyme activity in the liver. Conclusions: The radiolabeled isatins appear to bind specifically to caspase-3 in vivo, but their sensitivity is limited. Further optimization is required for these tracers to be useful for clinical applications.

  14. Mapping of epitopes recognized by antibodies induced by immunization of mice with PspA and PspC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadesilho, Cintia F M; Ferreira, Daniela M; Gordon, Stephen B; Briles, David E; Moreno, Adriana T; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Ho, Paulo L; Miyaji, Eliane N

    2014-07-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) and pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) are important candidates for an alternative vaccine against pneumococcal infections. Since these antigens show variability, the use of variants that do not afford broad protection may lead to the selection of vaccine escape bacteria. Epitopes capable of inducing antibodies with broad cross-reactivities should thus be the preferred antigens. In this work, experiments using peptide arrays show that most linear epitopes recognized by antibodies induced in mice against different PspAs were located at the initial 44 amino acids of the mature protein and that antibodies against these linear epitopes did not confer protection against a lethal challenge. Conversely, linear epitopes recognized by antibodies to PspC included the consensus sequences involved in the interaction with human factor H and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). Since linear epitopes of PspA were not protective, larger overlapping fragments containing 100 amino acids of PspA of strain Rx1 were constructed (fragments 1 to 7, numbered from the N terminus) to permit the mapping of antibodies with conformational epitopes not represented in the peptide arrays. Antibodies from mice immunized with fragments 1, 2, 4, and 5 were capable of binding onto the surface of pneumococci and mediating protection against a lethal challenge. The fact that immunization of mice with 100-amino-acid fragments located at the more conserved N-terminal region of PspA (fragments 1 and 2) induced protection against a pneumococcal challenge indicates that the induction of antibodies against conformational epitopes present at this region may be important in strategies for inducing broad protection against pneumococci. PMID:24807052

  15. Antibody-induced secondary treatment failure in a patient treated with botulinum toxin type A for glabellar frown lines

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    Stengel G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gabriele Stengel, Eva Kristina Bee Hautarztpraxis Stengel and Bee, Münster, Germany Abstract: Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A preparations are widely used nonsurgical treatments for facial wrinkles. Higher doses of BTX-A are also used for therapeutic purposes in the treatment of conditions involving increased muscle tone, such as cervical dystonia. The phenomenon of antibody-induced treatment failure is well known in the therapeutic setting, but reports are also emerging following cosmetic use of BTX-A. We describe the case of a 41-year-old female nurse who developed secondary treatment failure during 6 years of BTX-A treatment for glabellar lines. After a good response to the first BTX-A injection, the intensity and duration of effect decreased after subsequent treatments. Antibody tests revealed a high titer of neutralizing anti-BTX-A antibodies. This case shows secondary treatment failure due to the production of neutralizing antibodies following administration of BTX-A formulations for cosmetic purposes and demonstrates that immunogenicity of BTX-A preparations is an important consideration, even in the cosmetic setting. Keywords: botulinum toxin type A, neutralizing antibodies, antibody-induced treatment failure

  16. Mucosal Antibodies Induced by Intranasal but Not Intramuscular Immunization Block Norovirus GII.4 Virus-Like Particle Receptor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, Kirsi; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) account for the majority of diagnosed cases of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines against NoV are currently under development. Serum antibodies that block the binding of NoV VLPs to histo-blood group antigens, the putative receptors for NoV, correlate with protection against NoV infection. The role of functional mucosal antibodies in protection is largely unknown, even though the intestinal mucosa is the entry port for NoV. Balb/c mice were immunized intramuscularly (IM) or intranasally (IN) with NoV GII.4 VLPs, and systemic and mucosal blocking antibody responses were studied. IN immunization elicited NoV-specific serum and mucosal IgG and IgA antibodies, whereas IM immunized animals completely lacked IgA. Both immunization routes induced similar blocking activity in serum but only IN route generated blocking antibodies in mucosa. The level of IgA in the mucosal (nasal) lavages strongly correlated (r = 0.841) with the blocking activity, suggesting that IgA, but not IgG, is the major NoV blocking antibody on mucosal surfaces. The results indicate that only mucosal immunization route induces the development of functional anti-NoV IgA on mucosal surface. PMID:27135874

  17. A sequence in subdomain 2 of DBL1α of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 induces strain transcending antibodies.

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    Karin Blomqvist

    Full Text Available Immunity to severe malaria is the first level of immunity acquired to Plasmodium falciparum. Antibodies to the variant antigen PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 present at the surface of the parasitized red blood cell (pRBC confer protection by blocking microvascular sequestration. Here we have generated antibodies to peptide sequences of subdomain 2 of PfEMP1-DBL1α previously identified to be associated with severe or mild malaria. A set of sera generated to the amino acid sequence KLQTLTLHQVREYWWALNRKEVWKA, containing the motif ALNRKE, stained the live pRBC. 50% of parasites tested (7/14 were positive both in flow cytometry and immunofluorescence assays with live pRBCs including both laboratory strains and in vitro adapted clinical isolates. Antibodies that reacted selectively with the sequence REYWWALNRKEVWKA in a 15-mer peptide array of DBL1α-domains were also found to react with the pRBC surface. By utilizing a peptide array to map the binding properties of the elicited anti-DBL1α antibodies, the amino acids WxxNRx were found essential for antibody binding. Complementary experiments using 135 degenerate RDSM peptide sequences obtained from 93 Ugandan patient-isolates showed that antibody binding occurred when the amino acids WxLNRKE/D were present in the peptide. The data suggests that the ALNRKE sequence motif, associated with severe malaria, induces strain-transcending antibodies that react with the pRBC surface.

  18. NK cell autoreactivity and autoimmune diseases

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    Alessandro ePoggi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of Natural Killer (NK cells in organ specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands upregulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILC, comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alterating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular matrix components and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity.

  19. DNA Vaccine of SARS-Cov S Gene Induces Antibody Response in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping ZHAO; Jin-Shan KE; Zhao-Lin QIN; Hao REN; Lan-Juan ZHAO; Jian-Guo YU; Jun GAO; Shi-Ying ZHU; Zhong-Tian QI

    2004-01-01

    The spike (S) protein, a main surface antigen of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), is one of the most important antigen candidates for vaccine design. In the present study, three fragments of the truncated S protein were expressed in E. Coli, and analyzed with pooled sera of convalescence phase of SARS patients.The full length S gene DNA vaccine was constructed and used to immunize BALB/c mice. The mouse serum IgG antibody against SARS-CoV was measured by ELISA with E. Coli expressed truncated S protein or SARS-CoV lysate as diagnostic antigen. The results showed that all the three fragments of S protein expressed by E. Coli was able to react with sera of SARS patients and the S gene DNA candidate vaccine could induce the production of specific IgG antibody against SARS-CoV efficiently in mice with seroconversion ratio of 75% after 3 times of immunization. These findings lay some foundations for further understanding the immunology of SARS-CoV and developing SARS vaccines.

  20. Cure of Chronic Viral Infection and Virus-Induced Type 1 Diabetes by Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Ejrnaes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of neutralizing antibodies is one of the most successful methods to interfere with receptor-ligand interactions in vivo. In particular blockade of soluble inflammatory mediators or their corresponding cellular receptors was proven an effective way to regulate inflammation and/or prevent its negative consequences. However, one problem that comes along with an effective neutralization of inflammatory mediators is the general systemic immunomodulatory effect. It is therefore important to design a treatment regimen in a way to strike at the right place and at the right time in order to achieve maximal effects with minimal duration of immunosuppression or hyperactivation. In this review we reflect on two examples of how short time administration of such neutralizing antibodies can block two distinct inflammatory consequences of viral infection. First, we review recent findings that blockade of IL-10/IL-10R interaction can resolve chronic viral infection and second, we reflect on how neutralization of the chemokine CXCL10 can abrogate virus-induced type 1 diabetes.

  1. Regulation of IL-2 induced proliferation and cytotoxicity in human natural killer cells by monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural killer (NK) activity is mediated by a subpopulation of cells termed large granular lymphocytes (LGL), which exhibit cytotoxic activity against a variety of tumor targets. LGL express OKT8, OKT9, OKT10, OKT11, 3G8 (FcγR), OKM1, NKH1. The addition of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2), increases cytotoxicity, induces IFN-γ production and leads to LGL proliferation. Since monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) represent highly specific probes to analyze possible surface molecules, they have studied the role of various MoAbs in the regulation of cytotoxicity, proliferation, and secretory function of purified LGL. LGL were isolated from nonadherent human peripheral blood leukocytes on discontinuous Percoll density gradients, followed by 290C E-rosette depletion of contaminating T cells. These preparations were ≥ 85% LGL and contained ≥ 5% OKT3+ cells. Using a limiting dilution assay, purified LGL were incubated with rIL-2 and the MoAbs (10 μg/ml) for 7 days. These cells were tested for cytotoxicity against K562 in a 51Cr- release assay, and for proliferation as determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Results indicate that the OKT9 antibody inhibited both the cytotoxicity and proliferation. MoAb against LGl markers (OKT11, OKT8, OKM1, 3G8, and NKH1) had no effect on cytotoxicity or proliferation. Unlike the T cell receptor complex (with OKT3), the surface molecules examined do not regulate LGL lysis or proliferation

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis has emerged over the last 40 years from a proposed concept to a well established and recognized entity. As an efficient mimicker of pancreatic carcinoma, its early and appropriate recognition are crucial. With mounting understanding of its pathogenesis and natural history, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. The characteristic laboratory features and imaging seen in autoimmune pancreatitis are reviewed along with some of the proposed diagnostic criteria and treatment algorithms.

  3. Experimental drugs for treatment of autoimmune myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Lina; Guo Shuli; Wang Yutang; Yang Liming; Liu Siyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the experimental drugs for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis.Data sources The literatures published in English about different kinds of experimental drugs based on different therapeutic mechanisms for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis were obtained from PubMed from 2002 to 2013.Study selection Original articles regarding the experimental drugs for treatment of autoimmune myocarditis were selected.Results This study summarized the effects of the experimental drugs for the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis,such as immunomodulators and immunosuppressants,antibiotics,Chinese medicinal herbs,cardiovascular diseases treatment drugs,etc.These drugs can significantly attenuate autoimmune myocarditis-induced inflammation and fibrosis,alleviate autoimmune myocarditis-triggered overt lymphocyte proliferation,and meanwhile reduce Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) and increase Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10).Conclusion This study summarized recent advances in autoimmune myocarditis treatment and further proposes that traditional Chinese medicine and immune regulators will play important roles in the future.

  4. Sialyl-Tn vaccine induces antibody-mediated tumour protection in a relevant murine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julien, S; Picco, G; Sewell, R;

    2009-01-01

    be carried on various glycoproteins. One such glycoprotein MUC1 is expressed by the vast majority of breast carcinomas. Both STn and MUC1 have been considered as targets for immunotherapy of breast cancer patients. Here we used different immunogens to target STn in an MUC1 transgenic mouse model of tumour......Changes in the composition of glycans added to glycoproteins and glycolipids are characteristic of the change to malignancy. Sialyl-Tn (STn) is expressed by 25-30% of breast carcinomas but its expression on normal tissue is highly restricted. Sialyl-Tn is an O-linked disaccharide that can...... challenge. We show that synthetic STn coupled to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (Theratope), induced antibodies to STn that recognised the glycan carried on a number of glycoproteins and in these mice a significant delay in tumour growth was observed. The protection was dependent on STn being expressed...

  5. Study of the immune response to thyroglobulin through a model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cellular and humoral immune response to thyroglobulin of different species was studied in guinea pigs. The experiments described suggested that the immune system can be activated against self-determinants. Human and pork thyroglobulin were able to induce the experimental thyroiditis as well as some immune responses, such as in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and antibodies. Although guinea pig thyroglobulin was unable to induce specific T-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro, delayed hypersensitivity response and antibodies, it was very efficient in inducing the autoimmune thyroiditis. On the contrary, bovine thyroglobulin did not induce experimental autoimmune thyroiditis despite producing good responses as determined by similar in vitro proliferative response, delayed hypersensitivity and on the humoral level. These results suggest that the assays utilised were not able to evaluate the relevant immune response to genesis of the thyroiditis. The determinant selection mechanisms operating in these immune responses are probably selecting determinants not responsible for self-recognition in vivo. It was suggested that the macrophage could be the cell responsible for the presentation of these determinants to the lymphocyte in an immunogenic form. (Author)

  6. Heparin-PF4 Antibodies in Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia: Its Relationship with FcgRIIa Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meganathan Kannan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We did the pilot study, in an attempt to determine the prevalence of HIT in Indians and determine its relationship, if any, to FcγRIIa polymorphism, the occurrence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT was investigated in 33 Indian patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery (CVS who received unfractionated heparin (UFH. Platelet counts were performed prior to the initiation of UFH therapy and 5-16 days, post-therapy. The fall in patients' platelet count >35% of the baseline value or 1 was considered to be suggestive of HIT syndrome. Heparin-induced platelet aggregation (HIPA, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant assay (ELISA and Serotonin Release Assay (SRA tests were performed in all the patients to detect the antibodies formed against the heparin and platelet factor 4 complex (H-PF4. DNA analysis for FcγRIIa polymorphism was done by allele specific PCR. Thrombocytopenia was found to be present in 10 (30% patients. Of these, 5 patients were found to be positive by HIPA, ELISA and SRA tests. These 5 patients were considered to have classic HIT syndrome. One of these patients had bleeding while the others were asymptomatic. One of the HIT positive patients was found to be homozygous for FcγRIIaHis/ His polymorphism and others were heterozygous, had one defective allele with single amino acid change (Arg 131 His at FcγRIIa platelet receptor. Frequency of occurrence of homozygous (FcγRIIaHis/ His and heterozygous (FcγRIIaArg/ His polymorphism was higher in patients with HIT (100% than in the normal population (68%. The prevalence of HIT in the pilot study (15% was higher than that in the west (5% but comparable to that from Japan (12% (14. However, the Occurance of FcγRIIa polymorphism in Indian (68% was higher than in the east (51% and comparable to that in the west (78%. Thus it appears that the FcγRIIa polymorphism may have some relation to occurrence of HIT. Higher prevalence of FcγRIIa polymorphism in Indian may predispose to higher

  7. The role of antibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, M; Stassen, M H W

    2002-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease associated with antibodies directed to the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. These antibodies reduce the number of receptors. Autoantibodies against AChR and other muscle antigens can be used for the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and related disorders. The origin and the role of these antibodies in the disease are discussed. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, an experimental model closely mimicking the disease, has provided answers to many questions about the role of antibodies, complement macrophages and AChR anchor proteins. Genetically modified anti-AChR antibodies may also be used in the future to treat myasthenia. PMID:12220686

  8. Epilepsy Associated with Systemic Autoimmune Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinsky, Orrin; Schein, Adam; Najjar, Souhel

    2013-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune disorders affect multiple organ systems. Brain involvement commonly causes seizures, which may be the presenting symptom. Systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjorgren's syndrome, Wegener's granulomatosis, sarcoidsosis, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, Behcet's, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy are reviewed. Mechanisms underlying CNS pathology in systemic autoimmune disorders—and specifically factors predisposing these patients—are discussed, including vascular disease (e.g., prothrombotic state, anticardiolipin antibody, emboli, vasculitis), antineuronal antibodies, immune complexes, cytokines, metabolic disorders, infection, and therapy. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies must be individualized for both the disorder and the patient. Systemic autoimmune disorders affect multiple organ systems and frequently involve the central and peripheral nervous systems. Seizures are among the most common neurological manifestation and occasionally can be the presenting symptom. There are many causes of seizures in systemic autoimmune disorders (Table 1), and the first clinical challenge is to determine not only the cause but also the significance of seizures. In some cases, they are clues to metabolic or infectious disorders or medication toxicity; in other cases, seizures herald a life-threatening progression of the underlying illness. PMID:23646005

  9. Epilepsy associated with systemic autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinsky, Orrin; Schein, Adam; Najjar, Souhel

    2013-03-01

    Systemic autoimmune disorders affect multiple organ systems. Brain involvement commonly causes seizures, which may be the presenting symptom. Systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjorgren's syndrome, Wegener's granulomatosis, sarcoidsosis, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, Behcet's, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy are reviewed. Mechanisms underlying CNS pathology in systemic autoimmune disorders-and specifically factors predisposing these patients-are discussed, including vascular disease (e.g., prothrombotic state, anticardiolipin antibody, emboli, vasculitis), antineuronal antibodies, immune complexes, cytokines, metabolic disorders, infection, and therapy. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies must be individualized for both the disorder and the patient. Systemic autoimmune disorders affect multiple organ systems and frequently involve the central and peripheral nervous systems. Seizures are among the most common neurological manifestation and occasionally can be the presenting symptom. There are many causes of seizures in systemic autoimmune disorders (Table 1), and the first clinical challenge is to determine not only the cause but also the significance of seizures. In some cases, they are clues to metabolic or infectious disorders or medication toxicity; in other cases, seizures herald a life-threatening progression of the underlying illness. PMID:23646005

  10. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Its 25th Anniversary With #25FOR25 Campaign During National Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA officially kicks of National Autoimmune ... will benefit AARDA. Click here to read more. Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two ...

  11. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia With Chronic Fatigue After HPV Vaccination as Part of the “Autoimmune/Auto-inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucija Tomljenovic PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS with chronic fatigue 2 months following Gardasil vaccination. The patient suffered from persistent headaches, dizziness, recurrent syncope, poor motor coordination, weakness, fatigue, myalgias, numbness, tachycardia, dyspnea, visual disturbances, phonophobia, cognitive impairment, insomnia, gastrointestinal disturbances, and a weight loss of 20 pounds. The psychiatric evaluation ruled out the possibility that her symptoms were psychogenic or related to anxiety disorders. Furthermore, the patient tested positive for ANA (1:1280, lupus anticoagulant, and antiphospholipid. On clinical examination she presented livedo reticularis and was diagnosed with Raynaud’s syndrome. This case fulfills the criteria for the autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA. Because human papillomavirus vaccination is universally recommended to teenagers and because POTS frequently results in long-term disabilities (as was the case in our patient, a thorough follow-up of patients who present with relevant complaints after vaccination is strongly recommended.

  12. Induction of Golli-MBP Expression in CNS Macrophages During Acute LPS-Induced CNS Inflammation and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey L. Papenfuss

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are the tissue macrophages of the CNS. Microglial activation coupled with macrophage infiltration is a common feature of many classic neurodegenerative disorders. The absence of cell-type specific markers has confounded and complicated the analysis of cell-type specific contributions toward the onset, progression, and remission of neurodegeneration. Molecular screens comparing gene expression in cultured microglia and macrophages identified Golli-myelin basic protein (MBP as a candidate molecule enriched in peripheral macrophages. In situ hybridization analysis of LPS/IFNg and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE–induced CNS inflammation revealed that only a subset of CNS macrophages express Golli-MBP. Interestingly, the location and morphology of Golli-MBP+ CNS macrophages differs between these two models of CNS inflammation. These data demonstrate the difficulties of extending in vitro observations to in vivo biology and concretely illustrate the complex heterogeneity of macrophage activation states present in region- and stage-specific phases of CNS inflammation. Taken altogether, these are consistent with the emerging picture that the phenotype of CNS macrophages is actively defined by their molecular interactions with the CNS microenvironment.

  13. Ameliorative effects of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells on myelin basic protein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Lewis rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Myung-Soon Ko; Hyeong-geun Park; Young-Min Yun; Jeong Chan Ra; Taekyun Shin; Kyoung-Kap Lee

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been previously shown to exert an immunomodulatory function. The present study sought to investigate the effects of multipotential human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs) on disease progression and cytokine expression in Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by myelin basic protein. The duration of EAE paralysis in the group treated on day 7 postimmunization with 5 × 106 hAdMSCs was significantly reduced compared with the vehicle-treated controls and the 1 × 106 hAdMSC- treated group. The duration of EAE paralysis in the groups treated with 5 × 106 hAdMSCs on both day 1 and day 7 postimmunization was significantly reduced compared with the vehicle-treated controls and the groups treated with 5 × 106 hAdMSCs on both day 7 and day 10 postimmunization. The mRNA expression of interleukin-10 and indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase was significantly decreased in the hAdMSC-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group. These findings suggest that the ameliorative effects of hAdMSCs on EAE symptoms operate in a dose- and time-dependent manner and can be mediated in part by the ample production of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  14. Peste des petits ruminants virus-like particles induce both complete virus-specific antibodies and virus neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Zou, Yanli; Li, Lin; Wang, Zhiliang

    2015-03-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), an etiological agent of peste des petits ruminants (PPR), is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. In a previous study, a recombinant baculovirus has been constructed to co-express the PPRV matrix (M), haemagglutinin (H) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins in insect cells, causing budding of PPR virus-like particles (VLPs) from insect cell membranes by viewing of ultrathin section with a transmission electron microscope. In this follow-up study, these PPR VLPs were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation for immunizing mice twice. Three weeks post-primary immunization and 2 weeks post-secondary immunization, all serum samples were obtained and subsequently subjected to indirect ELISA detection on complete virus-specific antibodies. In addition, all serum samples, which were collected 2 weeks post-secondary immunization, were used for virus neutralization test on PPRV neutralizing antibodies. The results showed that the purified PPR VLPs induced both types of antibodies mentioned above in mice, indicating a given potential of VLP-based vaccine candidate against PPR. PMID:25486084

  15. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2011-01-01

    Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated...... for autoimmune thyroid diseases should have a careful follow-up. Furthermore, the presence of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) in patients with DTC may limit the use of serum thyroglobulin as a tumor marker due to methodological problems in the determination of serum thyroglobulin. However, in such cases serial...

  16. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2010-01-01

    Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated...... for autoimmune thyroid diseases should have a careful follow-up. Furthermore, the presence of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) in patients with DTC may limit the use of serum thyroglobulin as a tumor marker due to methodological problems in the determination of serum thyroglobulin. However, in such cases serial...

  17. [Unusual presentation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Prieto, M; Carbonero Celis, M J; Cuadrado Caballero, M C

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis is very rare. This is the case of an 18 month old female patient whose first sign of disease was torticollis due to an underlying atlanto-axial subluxation. Three months later, bilateral knee arthritis developed and she was diagnosed with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Throughout the disease a persistent elevation of liver enzymes was noted, combined with positive antinuclear antibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia, reaching the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune hepatitis.

  18. Autoimmune diseases in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pavithra M. Vengetesh; Shripad Hebbar; Lavanya Rai

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of autoimmune connective tissue disorders on the outcomes of pregnancy and the influence of treatment on pregnancy. Methods: Thirty-seven antenatal patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases, comprising of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), Mixed Connective Tissue Diseases (MCTD), ankylosing spondylitis and Takayasu arteritis were analysed. Results: Multigravidas con...

  19. Experimental autoimmune myositis model induced by pure myosin of rabbit%实验性自身免疫性肌炎动物模型的制作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段枫

    2012-01-01

    human s in idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. The model success rate was 80%. Conclusion Experimental autoimmune myositis model induced by pure myosin, which was with low mortality and high success rate,provided better tools for the study of the pathogenesis and treatment in inflammatory myopathy. Myosin might be a probable antigen.

  20. THE AUTOIMMUNE ECOLOGY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel eAnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology, which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation. As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology. In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status, gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  1. Bistability in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Mosekilde, Erik; Lund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases damage host tissue, which, in turn, may trigger a stronger immune response. Systems characterized by such positive feedback loops can display co-existing stable steady states. In a mathematical model of autoimmune disease, one steady state may correspond to the healthy state...

  2. The Autoimmune Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures - internal and external - across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied.

  3. Autoimmune thyroiditis in girls of pubertal age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two hundred twenty five girls with autoimmune thyroiditis aged 11-16 living in Belarus permanently have been examined in 8-10 years after Chernobyl accident. The disease at girls of pubertal age living on the contaminated territories is characterized by more frequent asthenoneurotic symptoms, more marked immunologic changes and higher levels of both antibodies to thyroglobulin and thyrocytes microsome antigens as compared to those from 'clean' regions

  4. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  5. Alpha1A-adrenergic receptor-directed autoimmunity induces left ventricular damage and diastolic dysfunction in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Wenzel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Agonistic autoantibodies to the alpha(1-adrenergic receptor occur in nearly half of patients with refractory hypertension; however, their relevance is uncertain. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We immunized Lewis rats with the second extracellular-loop peptides of the human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor and maintained them for one year. Alpha(1A-adrenergic antibodies (alpha(1A-AR-AB were monitored with a neonatal cardiomyocyte contraction assay by ELISA, and by ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human alpha(1A-adrenergic receptor transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rats were followed with radiotelemetric blood pressure measurements and echocardiography. At 12 months, the left ventricles of immunized rats had greater wall thickness than control rats. The fractional shortening and dp/dt(max demonstrated preserved systolic function. A decreased E/A ratio in immunized rats indicated a diastolic dysfunction. Invasive hemodynamics revealed increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressures and decreased dp/dt(min. Mean diameter of cardiomyocytes showed hypertrophy in immunized rats. Long-term blood pressure values and heart rates were not different. Genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, collagens, extracellular matrix proteins, calcium regulating proteins, and proteins of energy metabolism in immunized rat hearts were upregulated, compared to controls. Furthermore, fibrosis was present in immunized hearts, but not in control hearts. A subset of immunized and control rats was infused with angiotensin (Ang II. The stressor raised blood pressure to a greater degree and led to more cardiac fibrosis in immunized, than in control rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that alpha(1A-AR-AB cause diastolic dysfunction independent of hypertension, and can increase the sensitivity to Ang II. We suggest that alpha(1A-AR-AB could contribute to cardiovascular endorgan damage.

  6. Anti-GD(2) with an FC point mutation reduces complement fixation and decreases antibody-induced allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Linda S; Otto, Mario; Baldwin, William M; Vail, Emily; Gillies, Stephen D; Handgretinger, Rupert; Barfield, Raymond C; Ming Yu, Hui; Yu, Alice L

    2010-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against GD(2) ganglioside, such as ch14.18, the human-mouse chimeric antibody, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of neuroblastoma. However, treatment is associated with generalized, relatively opiate-resistant pain. We investigated if a point mutation in ch14.18 antibody (hu14.18K332A) to limit complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) would ameliorate the pain behavior, while preserving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro, CDC and ADCC were measured using europium-TDA assay. In vivo, allodynia was evaluated by measuring thresholds to von Frey filaments applied to the hindpaws after injection of either ch14.18 or hu14.18K332 into wild type rats or rats with deficient complement factor 6. Other rats were pretreated with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist and tested following ch14.18 injection. The mutation reduces the antibody's ability to activate complement, while maintaining its ADCC capabilities. Injection of hu14.18K322 (1 or 3mg/kg) produced faster resolving allodynia than that engendered by ch14.18 (1mg/kg). Injection of ch14.18 (1mg/kg) into rats with C6 complement deficiency further reduced antibody-induced allodynia, while pre-treatment with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist completely abolished ch14.18-induced allodynia. These findings showed that mutant hu14.18 K322 elicited less allodynia than ch14.18 and that ch14.18-elicited allodynia is due to activation of the complement cascade: in part, to formation of membrane attack complex, but more importantly to release of complement factor C5a. Development of immunotherapeutic agents with decreased complement-dependent lysis while maintaining cellular cytotoxicity may offer treatment options with reduced adverse side effects, thereby allowing dose escalation of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:20171010

  7. Intratypic heterologous vaccination of calves can induce an antibody response in presence of maternal antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, A.; Eble, P.L.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Chenard, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Maternal antibodies can interfere with foot-and-mouth disease vaccination. In this study we determined whether intratypic heterologous vaccination could help to improve herd immunity. Results - In unvaccinated calves, a half-life of maternal antibodies of 21 days was determined. At two weeks of age, calves without maternal antibodies showed a good antibody response against both vaccines used in the trial, while in calves with maternal antibodies no antibody response to homologous...

  8. Olmesartan, an AT1 Antagonist, Attenuates Oxidative Stress, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cardiac Inflammatory Mediators in Rats with Heart Failure Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Sukumaran, Kenichi Watanabe, Punniyakoti T. Veeraveedu, Narasimman Gurusamy, Meilei Ma, Rajarajan A. Thandavarayan, Arun Prasath Lakshmanan, Ken'ichi Yamaguchi, Kenji Suzuki, Makoto Kodama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II has been involved in immune and inflammatory responses which might contribute to the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. Recent evidence suggests that oxidative stress may play a role in myocarditis. Here, we investigated whether olmesartan, an AT1R antagonist protects against experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM by suppression of oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and inflammatory cytokines. EAM was induced in Lewis rats by immunization with porcine cardiac myosin, were divided into two groups and treated with either olmesartan (10 mg/kg/day or vehicle for a period of 21 days. Myocardial functional parameters measured by hemodynamic and echocardiographic analyses were significantly improved by the treatment with olmesartan compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. Treatment with olmesartan attenuated the myocardial mRNA expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, [Interleukin (IL-1β, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ] and the protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α compared with that of vehicle-treated rats. Myocardial protein expressions of AT1R, NADPH oxidase subunits (p47phox, p67phox, gp91phox and the expression of markers of oxidative stress (3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and the cardiac apoptosis were also significantly decreased by the treatment with olmesartan compared with those of vehicle-treated rats. Furthermore, olmesartan treatment down-regulated the myocardial expressions of glucose regulated protein-78, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene, caspase-12, phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and phospho-JNK. These findings suggest that olmesartan protects against EAM in rats, at least in part via suppression of oxidative stress, ER stress and inflammatory cytokines.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis in an 11-year-old boy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refaat, Rania [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ain Shams University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Cairo (Egypt); Harth, Marc; Proschek, Petra; Lindemayr, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    We report a case of histopathologically proven autoimmune pancreatitis in an 11-year-old boy. Abdominal US and MRI showed a focal swelling of the pancreatic head, the latter also showing delayed contrast enhancement. There was diffuse irregular pancreatic duct narrowing, compression of the intrapancreatic common bile duct, and mild proximal biliary dilatation on MR cholangiopancreatography. Laboratory results revealed normal serum IgG and subclass 4 with negative autoimmune antibodies, and slightly elevated carbohydrate antigen 19-9. This highlights the differentiation of autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic head cancer and, to a lesser extent, other forms of pancreatitis in children. (orig.)

  10. Evidence that pentoxifylline reduces anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody-induced cytokine release syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, M L; Gastaldello, K; Abramowicz, D; Kinnaert, P; Vereerstraeten, P; De Pauw, L; Vandenabeele, P; Moser, M; Leo, O; Goldman, M

    1991-10-01

    Pretreatment with pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine known for its beneficial effects on tissue lesions induced by the injection of endotoxin or recombinant cytokines, was shown to decrease the systemic release of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 2 occurring after the administration of the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody 145-2C11 in mice. In parallel, PTX attenuated the hypothermia and the rise in blood urea nitrogen observed in this model. The protective effect of PTX on the toxicity of 145-2C11 was confirmed by the reduction of the mortality among D-galactosamine-sensitized animals. The mitigation by PTX of the release of cytokines did not affect the immunosuppression entailed by 145-2C11 as assessed by the unmodified cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) unresponsiveness against alloantigens measured 48 hr after the injection of the mAb. In vitro experiments on human peripheral blood leukocytes indicated that PTX alone or in synergy with methylprednisolone (m-PDS) also inhibited the release of TNF and IL-2 induced by OKT3. Finally, in a preliminary pilot trial conducted in kidney transplant recipients, we observed that pretreatment with PTX (20 mg/kg i.v.) in addition to m-PDS (2 g i.v.) reduced by half the amount of TNF released in the blood stream after the first injection of OKT3, while no further reduction of the low levels of IL-2 was found. PMID:1833865

  11. DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits AID-induced antibody gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J L Cook

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Affinity maturation and class switching of antibodies requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-dependent hypermutation of Ig V(DJ rearrangements and Ig S regions, respectively, in activated B cells. AID deaminates deoxycytidine bases in Ig genes, converting them into deoxyuridines. In V(DJ regions, subsequent excision of the deaminated bases by uracil-DNA glycosylase, or by mismatch repair, leads to further point mutation or gene conversion, depending on the species. In Ig S regions, nicking at the abasic sites produced by AID and uracil-DNA glycosylases results in staggered double-strand breaks, whose repair by nonhomologous end joining mediates Ig class switching. We have tested whether nonhomologous end joining also plays a role in V(DJ hypermutation using chicken DT40 cells deficient for Ku70 or the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs. Inactivation of the Ku70 or DNA-PKcs genes in DT40 cells elevated the rate of AID-induced gene conversion as much as 5-fold. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs-deficiency appeared to reduce point mutation. The data provide strong evidence that double-strand DNA ends capable of recruiting the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex are important intermediates in Ig V gene conversion.

  12. Effects of Cytokine IL-18 Gene on Antibody Production Induced by Ag85A DNA Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENHai-wen; WANGZi-ming; FANXiong-lin; GANWei-min; SHITao; XUZhi-kai; LIYuan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of plasmid containing human IL-18 gene on the humoral immune response of mice immunized by Ag85A DNA vaccines of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 Rv strain. Methods: Human IL-18 cDNA was amplified from RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMCs)by RT-PCR and cloned into the pGEM-TEasy vector.After sequencing IL-18 gene was subcloned into the the sites of BamH I and EooR I digestion of pcDNA3.1. BALB/c mice were injected intramuscularly with eukaryotic expression plasmid pclL18, together with MTB pcAg85A DNA vaccines. The same immunization was repeated three times at intervals of two weeks. Mouse serawere collected at two weeks after the each injection. The titers of anti-Ag85A antibody were detected by ELISA. Results:IL-18 cDNA was amplified successfully from RNA of human PBMCs by RT-PCR and the result of sequencing was correct. The IL-18 gene was correctly inserted into the vector pcDNA3.1, which was confirmed with BamH I and EooR I digestion analysis. The positive plasmid was called pcIL18.After being immtmized with DNA vaccines,the titers of antibody obtained from mice being immtmized by pcAg85A combining with pclL18 were superior to mice inmunized by pcAg85A independently. Conc/us/on: Combination of IL-18 gene with MTB pcAg85A DNA vaccine could observably enhance the humoral immune responses to pcAg85A. It remains further investigated whether IL-18 gene plus MTB pcAg85A DNA vaccine could markedly induce the cellular mediated immune response to Ag85A or not.

  13. Blood stage merozoite surface protein conjugated to nanoparticles induce potent parasite inhibitory antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Kae; Xu, Hengyi; Stridiron, Andrew; Aguilar, Zoraida; Wang, Andrew; Hui, George

    2011-11-01

    In this proof-of-concept study we report the use of nanoparticles as a vaccine delivery system for a blood stage malaria vaccine. The recombinant malarial antigen, Merozoite Surface Protein 1 (rMSP1) of Plasmodium falciparum served as the model vaccine. The rMSP1 was covalently conjugated to polymer-coated quantum dot CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles (QDs) via surface carboxyl groups, forming rMSP1-QDs. Anti-MSP1 antibody responses induced by rMSP1-QDs were found to have 2-3 log higher titers than those obtained with rMSP1 administered with the conventional adjuvants, Montanide ISA51 and CFA. Moreover, the immune responsiveness and the induction of parasite inhibitory antibodies were significantly superior in mice injected with rMSP1-QDs. The rMSP1-QDs delivered via intra-peritoneal (i.p.), intra-muscular (i.m.), and subcutaneous (s.c.) routes were equally efficacious. The high level of immunogenicity exhibited by the rMSP1-QDs was achieved without further addition of other adjuvant components. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells were shown to efficiently take up the nanoparticles leading to their activation and the expression/secretion of key cytokines, suggesting that this may be a mode of action for the enhanced immunogenicity. This study provides promising results for the use of water soluble, inorganic nanoparticles (<15 nm) as potent vehicles/platforms to enhance the immunogenicity of polypeptide antigens in adjuvant-free immunizations.

  14. Leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 and voltage gated potassium channel autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Patryce McGinley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypothesizes linking these two disease processes are proposed.

  15. Vaccination with conserved regions of erythrocyte-binding antigens induces neutralizing antibodies against multiple strains of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Healer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A highly effective vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria should induce potent, strain transcending immunity that broadly protects against the diverse population of parasites circulating globally. We aimed to identify vaccine candidates that fulfill the criteria. METHODS: We have measured growth inhibitory activity of antibodies raised to a range of antigens to identify those that can efficiently block merozoite invasion for geographically diverse strains of P. falciparum. RESULTS: This has shown that the conserved Region III-V, of the P. falciparum erythrocyte-binding antigen (EBA-175 was able to induce antibodies that potently inhibit merozoite invasion across diverse parasite strains, including those reliant on invasion pathways independent of EBA-175 function. Additionally, the conserved RIII-V domain of EBA-140 also induced antibodies with strong in vitro parasite growth inhibitory activity. CONCLUSION: We identify an alternative, highly conserved region (RIV-V of EBA-175, present in all EBA proteins, that is the target of potent, strain transcending neutralizing antibodies, that represents a strong candidate for development as a component in a malaria vaccine.

  16. Anti-thromboxane B2 antibodies protect against acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ćavar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids are lipid compounds that mediate a variety of physiological and pathological functions in almost all body tissues and organs. Thromboxane (TX A2 is a powerful inducer of platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction and it has ulcerogenic activity in the gastrointestinal tract. Overdose or chronic use of a high dose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-paminophenol, APAP is a major cause of acute liver failure in the Western world. We investigated whether TXA2 plays a role in host response to toxic effect of APAP. CBA/H Zg mice of both sexes were intoxicated with a single lethal or high sublethal dose of APAP, which was administered to animals by oral gavage. The toxicity of APAP was determined by observing the survival of mice during 48 h, by measuring concentration of alanine-aminotransferase (ALT in plasma 20-22 h after APAP administration and by liver histology. The results have shown that anti-thromboxane (TX B2 antibodies (anti-TXB2 and a selective inhibitor of thromboxane (TX synthase, benzylimidazole (BZI, were significantly hepatoprotective, while a selective thromboxane receptor (TPR antagonist, daltroban, was slightly protective in this model of acute liver injury. A stabile metabolite of TXA2, TXB2, and a stabile agonist of TPR, U-46619, had no influence on APAP-induced liver damage. Our findings suggest that TXA2 has a pathogenic role in acute liver toxicity induced with APAP, which was highly abrogated by administration of anti-TXB2. According to our results, this protection is mediated, at least in part, through decreased production of TXB2 by liver fragments ex vivo.

  17. Precisely Molded Nanoparticle Displaying DENV-E Proteins Induces Robust Serotype-Specific Neutralizing Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Gabriel; Yi, Xianwen; Stone, Michelle; Horvath, Katie; Miley, Michael J.; DeSimone, Joseph; Luft, Chris J.; de Silva, Aravinda M.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the causative agent of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. The virus is endemic in over 120 countries, causing over 350 million infections per year. Dengue vaccine development is challenging because of the need to induce simultaneous protection against four antigenically distinct DENV serotypes and evidence that, under some conditions, vaccination can enhance disease due to specific immunity to the virus. While several live-attenuated tetravalent dengue virus vaccines display partial efficacy, it has been challenging to induce balanced protective immunity to all 4 serotypes. Instead of using whole-virus formulations, we are exploring the potentials for a particulate subunit vaccine, based on DENV E-protein displayed on nanoparticles that have been precisely molded using Particle Replication in Non-wetting Template (PRINT) technology. Here we describe immunization studies with a DENV2-nanoparticle vaccine candidate. The ectodomain of DENV2-E protein was expressed as a secreted recombinant protein (sRecE), purified and adsorbed to poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles of different sizes and shape. We show that PRINT nanoparticle adsorbed sRecE without any adjuvant induces higher IgG titers and a more potent DENV2-specific neutralizing antibody response compared to the soluble sRecE protein alone. Antigen trafficking indicate that PRINT nanoparticle display of sRecE prolongs the bio-availability of the antigen in the draining lymph nodes by creating an antigen depot. Our results demonstrate that PRINT nanoparticles are a promising platform for delivering subunit vaccines against flaviviruses such as dengue and Zika. PMID:27764114

  18. "The NET Outcome": Are Neutrophil Extracellular Traps of Any Relevance to the Pathophysiology of Autoimmune Disorders in Childhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaglis, Stavros; Hahn, Sinuhe; Hasler, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation represents a form of cell death distinct from apoptosis or necrosis, by which invading pathogens are simultaneously entangled and potentially eliminated. Increased NET formation is observed in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated small vessel vasculitis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS), and psoriasis. NETs contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity by exposing cryptic autoepitopes, which may facilitate the generation of autoantibodies, induce the production of interferons, and activate the complement cascade. In SLE, augmented disease activity and renal disease are associated with increased NET formation, so that NETs could serve as a marker for the monitoring of disease activity. NETs can additionally cause endothelial cell damage and death and stimulate inflammation in atheromatous plaques, adding to the accelerated atherosclerosis witnessed in autoimmune disease. Since NETs induce production of interferons, assessing the extent of NET formation might facilitate the prediction of IFN-alpha levels and identification of SLE patients with presumably better responses to anti-IFN-alpha therapies or other novel therapeutic concepts, such as N-acetyl-cysteine and inhibitors of DNase 1 and peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), which also target NETs. In summary, the study of NETs provides a novel approach to the understanding of autoimmune disease pathogenesis in childhood and opens new vistas in the development of sensitive disease markers and targeted therapies. PMID:27679792

  19. Analysis by Flow Cytometry of B-Cell Activation and Antibody Responses Induced by Toll-Like Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pone, Egest J

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed in B lymphocytes and contribute to B-cell activation, antibody responses, and their maturation. TLR stimulation of mouse B cells induces class switch DNA recombination (CSR) to isotypes specified by cytokines, and also induces formation of IgM(+) as well as class-switched plasma cells. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling, while on its own inducing limited B-cell proliferation and no CSR, can enhance CSR driven by TLRs. Particular synergistic or antagonistic interactions among TLR pathways, BCR, and cytokine signaling can have important consequences for B-cell activation, CSR, and plasma cell formation. This chapter outlines protocols for the induction and analysis of B-cell activation and antibody production by TLRs with or without other stimuli. PMID:26803633

  20. The NTS-DBL2X region of VAR2CSA Induces cross-reactive antibodies that inhibit adhesion of several Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chondroitin sulfate A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigey, Pascal; Gnidehou, Sédami; Doritchamou, Justin;

    2011-01-01

    -adapted parasite lines and field isolates expressing VAR2CSA. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to analyze functional resemblance between antibodies induced in animals and those naturally acquired by immune multigravidae. Results. Antibodies targeting the N-terminal sequence (NTS......) up to DBL2X (NTS-DBL2X) efficiently blocked parasite adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A in a manner similar to that of antibodies raised against the entire VAR2CSA extracellular domain. Interestingly, naturally acquired antibodies and those induced by vaccination against NTS-DBL2X target overlapping...

  1. Characterization of a Novel Anti-DR5 Monoclonal Antibody WD1 with the Potential to Induce Tumor Cell Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Beifen Shen; Yuanfang Ma; Yan Li; Zhou Lin; Chunxia Qiao; Ming Lv; Ming Yu; He Xiao; Qingyang Wang; Liyan Wang; Jiannan Feng

    2008-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis. inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a TNF family member capable of inducing apoptosis. Death receptor 5(DR 51 is a key receptor of TRAIL and plays an important role in TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To prepare monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against DR5, cDNA encoding soluble DR5(sDR5)was firstly amplified by revere transcriptase. polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specific primers, and then inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector pET-30a. The recombinant plasmid Was expressed in Escherichia coil strain BL21(DE3), and sDR5 was purified by nickel affinity chromatography. As an antigen. sDR5 Was used to immunize mice. Hybridomas secreting antibodies against sDR5 were identified. One positive clone Was selected to produce antibody, WD1. ELISA and immunofluorescence demonstrated that WD1 could bind recombinant sDR5 and membrane bound DR5 (mDR5)on Jurkat and Molt-4 cells. ATPLite assays showed that Jurkat and Molt-4 cells were sensitive to the antibody in a dose dependent manner. The Annexin V/PI assays and Giemsa's staining both showed that WD1 could induce Jurkat cell apoptosis efficiently. Transient transfection of 293T cells and indirect immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that mAb(WD1)couldn't cross. react with DR4.Our findings indicated that the novel antibody, WD1 could act as a direct agonist, bind DR5 characteristically, and initiate efficient apoptotic signaling and tumor regression. Thus, WD1 would be a leading candidate for potential cancer therapeutics. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(1):55-60.

  2. Production of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies in activated lymphocyte derived DNA induced lupus model was dependent on CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z; Xu, L; Xu, W; Xiong, S

    2012-04-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that activated lymphocyte derived DNA (ALD-DNA) could function as an autoantigen to induce production of anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Here we carefully evaluated the potential role of T cells in the induction of anti-dsDNA antibody. We demonstrated that ALD-DNA could effectively induce production of anti-dsDNA antibodies in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, ALD-DNA could not induce the generation of anti-dsDNA antibodies in nude mice. We further showed that in vivo depletion of CD3(+) T cells blocked the induction of anti-dsDNA antibodies in BALB/c mice. Notably, we demonstrated that CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T cells conferred ALD-DNA to induce anti-dsDNA antibodies. Finally, we demonstrated that adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells could rescue ALD-DNA induced anti-dsDNA antibodies in nude mice. Our results suggested that T helper cells were required for ALD-DNA to induce anti-dsDNA antibodies. These findings could further our understanding about the immunogenic properties of DNA and throw new light on SLE pathogenesis.

  3. [Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więsik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Jahnz-Różyk, Karina

    2015-12-31

    The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently sensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  4. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  5. Antinuclear antibodies are not increased in the early phase of Borrelia infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Spiewak, R.W.; Stojek, NM; Chmielewska-Badora, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the literature, there are case reports suggesting that Borrelia burgdorferi infection may induce autoimmune diseases dependent on antinuclear antibodies (ANA). The present study was undertaken in order to verify this possibility in a prospective manner. The study group comprised 78 consecutive patients (51 women and 27 men, median age 41.5 years) referred to our Department for the serologic diagnosis of Borrelia infection. The patients' sera were tested for Borrelia-specific IgM and IgG (R...

  6. Autoimmunity in Immunodeficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoric, Krista; Koontz, Jessica B.; Mattox, Daniel; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) comprise a diverse group of clinical disorders with varied genetic defects. Paradoxically, a substantial proportion of PID patients develop autoimmune phenomena in addition to having increased susceptibility to infections from their impaired immunity. Although much of our understanding comes from data gathered through experimental models, there are several well-characterized PID that have improved our knowledge of the pathways that drive autoimmunity. The goals of this review will be to discuss these immunodeficiencies and to review the literature with respect to the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity within each put forth to date. PMID:23591608

  7. Autoimmunity and the Gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases have increased dramatically worldwide since World War II. This is coincidental with the increased production and use of chemicals both in industrial countries and agriculture, as well as the ease of travel from region to region and continent to continent, making the transfer of a pathogen or pathogens from one part of the world to another much easier than ever before. In this review, triggers of autoimmunity are examined, principally environmental. The number of possible environmental triggers is vast and includes chemicals, bacteria, viruses, and molds. Examples of these triggers are given and include the mechanism of action and method by which they bring about autoimmunity.

  8. Polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies mimicking the small cell lung carcinoma antigen cluster-5A interact with a panel of antibodies and induce specific immune response in animals.

    OpenAIRE

    Zwicky, C.; Stahel, R A; Jaksche, H.; Waibel, R.; Lehmann, H. P.; Loibner, H

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies (ab2) were generated by immunising goats with the murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody SWA20 which recognises the SCLC antigen cluster-5A, a tumour-associated sialoglycoprotein. Ab2 was shown to bind specifically to antibody SWA20, but not to isotype matched control antibodies. Pre-incubation with ab2 completely inhibited target cell binding of antibody SWA20 and of four other antibodies to cluster-5A antigen, while no effect was seen with antibodies to cluste...

  9. Dendritic Cell-Specific Deletion of β-Catenin Results in Fewer Regulatory T-Cells without Exacerbating Autoimmune Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, C. Henrique; Ober-Blöbaum, Julia L.; Brouwers-Haspels, Inge; Asmawidjaja, Patrick S.; Mus, Adriana M. C.; Razawy, Wida; Molendijk, Marlieke; Clausen, Björn E.; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells that have the dual ability to stimulate immunity and maintain tolerance. However, the signalling pathways mediating tolerogenic DC function in vivo remain largely unknown. The β-catenin pathway has been suggested to promote a regulatory DC phenotype. The aim of this study was to unravel the role of β-catenin signalling to control DC function in the autoimmune collagen-induced arthritis model (CIA). Deletion of β-catenin specifically in DCs was achieved by crossing conditional knockout mice with a CD11c-Cre transgenic mouse line. Bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were generated and used to study the maturation profile of these cells in response to a TLR2 or TLR4 ligand stimulation. CIA was induced by intra-dermal immunization with 100 μg chicken type II collagen in complete Freund’s adjuvant on days 0 and 21. CIA incidence and severity was monitored macroscopically and by histology. The T cell profile as well as their cytokine production were analysed by flow cytometry. Lack of β-catenin specifically in DCs did not affect the spontaneous, TLR2- or TLR4-induced maturation and activation of BMDCs or their cytokine production. Moreover, no effect on the incidence and severity of CIA was observed in mice lacking β-catenin in CD11c+ cells. A decreased frequency of splenic CD3+CD8+ T cells and of regulatory T cells (Tregs) (CD4+CD25highFoxP3+), but no changes in the frequency of splenic Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3-CCR4+), Th2 (CCR6-CXCR3-CCR4+) and Th1 (CCR6-CXCR3+CCR4-) cells were observed in these mice under CIA condition. Furthermore, the expression of IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-4 or IFNγ was also not affected. Our data indicate that ablation of β-catenin expression in DCs did not alter the course and severity of CIA. We conclude that although deletion of β-catenin resulted in a lower frequency of Tregs, this decrease was not sufficient to aggravate the onset and severity of CIA. PMID:26587585

  10. Dendritic Cell-Specific Deletion of β-Catenin Results in Fewer Regulatory T-Cells without Exacerbating Autoimmune Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Henrique Alves

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen presenting cells that have the dual ability to stimulate immunity and maintain tolerance. However, the signalling pathways mediating tolerogenic DC function in vivo remain largely unknown. The β-catenin pathway has been suggested to promote a regulatory DC phenotype. The aim of this study was to unravel the role of β-catenin signalling to control DC function in the autoimmune collagen-induced arthritis model (CIA. Deletion of β-catenin specifically in DCs was achieved by crossing conditional knockout mice with a CD11c-Cre transgenic mouse line. Bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs were generated and used to study the maturation profile of these cells in response to a TLR2 or TLR4 ligand stimulation. CIA was induced by intra-dermal immunization with 100 μg chicken type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant on days 0 and 21. CIA incidence and severity was monitored macroscopically and by histology. The T cell profile as well as their cytokine production were analysed by flow cytometry. Lack of β-catenin specifically in DCs did not affect the spontaneous, TLR2- or TLR4-induced maturation and activation of BMDCs or their cytokine production. Moreover, no effect on the incidence and severity of CIA was observed in mice lacking β-catenin in CD11c+ cells. A decreased frequency of splenic CD3+CD8+ T cells and of regulatory T cells (Tregs (CD4+CD25highFoxP3+, but no changes in the frequency of splenic Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3-CCR4+, Th2 (CCR6-CXCR3-CCR4+ and Th1 (CCR6-CXCR3+CCR4- cells were observed in these mice under CIA condition. Furthermore, the expression of IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-4 or IFNγ was also not affected. Our data indicate that ablation of β-catenin expression in DCs did not alter the course and severity of CIA. We conclude that although deletion of β-catenin resulted in a lower frequency of Tregs, this decrease was not sufficient to aggravate the onset and severity of CIA.

  11. Intestinal barrier dysfunction develops at the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and can be induced by adoptive transfer of auto-reactive T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Nouri

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers. These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies.

  12. Cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J; Arita, Y; Bystryn, J C

    1993-06-01

    Patients with vitiligo have been found to have circulating antibodies to pigment cells. To evaluate the functional activity of these antibodies, a highly sensitive europium release assay was used to compare complement-mediated cytolysis of human melanocytes by sera of 56 patients with vitiligo (20 with active disease, 25 with inactive disease, 11 with unidentified disease activity) and 47 control individuals. Significant melanocyte lysis was mediated by 32 (57%) of the patients with vitiligo but by only three (6%) of the control sera (p < 0.001), and by 17 (85%) of 20 patients with active vitiligo versus 11 (44%) of 25 patients with inactive disease (p < 0.025). Mean melanocyte lysis by vitiligo sera was 24% versus 6% by control sera (p < 0.0001). A subset of 12 vitiligo sera with high titers of cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes (34% mean cytolysis) reacted minimally (< 2% mean cytolysis) to a panel of control cells that included human and murine melanomas, human fibroblasts, lung carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. These findings indicate that antibodies present in patients with vitiligo have the functional ability to selectively kill melanocytes and are more common in active disease. These observations support, but do not prove, the hypothesis that vitiligo is an autoimmune disease and that anti-pigment cell antibodies have a role in inducing the disease. PMID:8496621

  13. Autoimmune Pancreatitis: A Succinct Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Putra; Xiaoying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis with characteristic clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis is often challenging due to its low incidence and nonspecific clinical and radiologic findings. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer share similar clinical presentations, including obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain and weight loss. Due to these overlapping features, autoimmune pancreatitis patients...

  14. [Platelet factor 4, target of anti-heparin antibodies: application to biological diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiral, J

    1997-01-01

    Heparin-platelet factor 4 (H-PF4) complexes are the target for heparin-dependent antibodies present in most of heparin-induced thrombocytopenias (HIT). The highest reactivity is obtained with 27 IU of heparin per mg of PF4. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and pentosane polysulphate can also form these complexes. Antibodies to H-PF4, may be of the IgG, IgA or IgM isotypes. In some HIT, IgGs are absent and only IgMs and/or IgAs are observed. These antibodies may also develop in heparin (15%) or LMWH (8%) treated patients in the absence of thrombocytopenia. IgGs rarely develop in these cases. Presence of antibodies to H-PF4 is therefore a risk factor for developing HIT. Development of pathology requires additional factors such as: PF4 and heparin at an optimised ratio allowing formation of macromolecular complexes; presence of activated platelets exposing increased Fc gamma RII-A and heparin receptors; His. 131 phenotype of Fc gamma RII-A; pre-thrombotic and/or inflammatory clinical manifestations. Assay of antibodies to H-PF4 improves HIT diagnosis and could be predictive for monitoring heparin-therapies. PMID:9238439

  15. Rapid assessment of antibody-induced ricin neutralization by employing a novel functional cell-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Yoav; Alcalay, Ron; Sabo, Tamar; Noy-Porat, Tal; Epstein, Eyal; Kronman, Chanoch; Mazor, Ohad

    2015-09-01

    Ricin is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known against which there is no available antidote. Currently, the most promising countermeasures against the toxin are based on neutralizing antibodies elicited by active vaccination or administered passively. A cell-based assay is widely applied for the primary screening and evaluation of anti-ricin antibodies, yet such assays are usually time-consuming (18-72 h). Here, we report of a novel assay to monitor ricin activity, based on HeLa cells that stably express the rapidly-degraded ubiquitin-luciferase (Ub-FL, half-life of 2 min). Ricin-induced arrest of protein synthesis could be quantified within 3 to 6h post intoxication (IC90 of 300 and 100 ng/ml, respectively). Furthermore, by stabilizing the intracellular levels of Ub-FL in the last hour of the assay, a 3-fold increase in the assay sensitivity was attained. We applied this assay to monitor the efficacy of a ricin holotoxin-based vaccine by measuring the formation of neutralizing antibodies throughout the immunization course. The potency of anti-ricin monoclonal antibodies (directed to either subunit of the toxin) could also be easily and accurately measured in this assay format. Owing to its simplicity, this assay may be implemented for high-throughput screening of ricin-neutralizing antibodies and for identification of small-molecule inhibitors of the toxin, as well as other ribosome-inactivating toxins. PMID:26003675

  16. Generation and characterization of function-blocking anti-ectodysplasin A (EDA) monoclonal antibodies that induce ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Willen, Laure; Dang, Anh Thu; Sarrasin, Heidi; Tardivel, Aubry; Hermes, Katharina; Schneider, Holm; Gaide, Olivier; Donzé, Olivier; Kirby, Neil; Headon, Denis J; Schneider, Pascal

    2014-02-14

    Development of ectodermal appendages, such as hair, teeth, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, and mammary glands, requires the action of the TNF family ligand ectodysplasin A (EDA). Mutations of the X-linked EDA gene cause reduction or absence of many ectodermal appendages and have been identified as a cause of ectodermal dysplasia in humans, mice, dogs, and cattle. We have generated blocking antibodies, raised in Eda-deficient mice, against the conserved, receptor-binding domain of EDA. These antibodies recognize epitopes overlapping the receptor-binding site and prevent EDA from binding and activating EDAR at close to stoichiometric ratios in in vitro binding and activity assays. The antibodies block EDA1 and EDA2 of both mammalian and avian origin and, in vivo, suppress the ability of recombinant Fc-EDA1 to rescue ectodermal dysplasia in Eda-deficient Tabby mice. Moreover, administration of EDA blocking antibodies to pregnant wild type mice induced in developing wild type fetuses a marked and permanent ectodermal dysplasia. These function-blocking anti-EDA antibodies with wide cross-species reactivity will enable study of the developmental and postdevelopmental roles of EDA in a variety of organisms and open the route to therapeutic intervention in conditions in which EDA may be implicated. PMID:24391090

  17. Generation and Characterization of Function-blocking Anti-ectodysplasin A (EDA) Monoclonal Antibodies That Induce Ectodermal Dysplasia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk-Quintas, Christine; Willen, Laure; Dang, Anh Thu; Sarrasin, Heidi; Tardivel, Aubry; Hermes, Katharina; Schneider, Holm; Gaide, Olivier; Donzé, Olivier; Kirby, Neil; Headon, Denis J.; Schneider, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Development of ectodermal appendages, such as hair, teeth, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, and mammary glands, requires the action of the TNF family ligand ectodysplasin A (EDA). Mutations of the X-linked EDA gene cause reduction or absence of many ectodermal appendages and have been identified as a cause of ectodermal dysplasia in humans, mice, dogs, and cattle. We have generated blocking antibodies, raised in Eda-deficient mice, against the conserved, receptor-binding domain of EDA. These antibodies recognize epitopes overlapping the receptor-binding site and prevent EDA from binding and activating EDAR at close to stoichiometric ratios in in vitro binding and activity assays. The antibodies block EDA1 and EDA2 of both mammalian and avian origin and, in vivo, suppress the ability of recombinant Fc-EDA1 to rescue ectodermal dysplasia in Eda-deficient Tabby mice. Moreover, administration of EDA blocking antibodies to pregnant wild type mice induced in developing wild type fetuses a marked and permanent ectodermal dysplasia. These function-blocking anti-EDA antibodies with wide cross-species reactivity will enable study of the developmental and postdevelopmental roles of EDA in a variety of organisms and open the route to therapeutic intervention in conditions in which EDA may be implicated. PMID:24391090

  18. Coeliac disease and autoimmune disease-genetic overlap and screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundin, Knut E. A.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2015-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a treatable, gluten-induced disease that often occurs concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. In genetic studies since 2007, a partial genetic overlap between these diseases has been revealed and further insights into the pathophysiology of coeliac disease and autoimmunity ha

  19. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  20. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. PMID:27036091

  1. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection

  2. Antibody-targeted horseradish peroxidase associated with indole-3-acetic acid induces apoptosis in vitro in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmazzo, Leandro F F; Santana-Lemos, Bárbara A; Jácomo, Rafael H; Garcia, Aglair B; Rego, Eduardo M; da Fonseca, Luiz M; Falcão, Roberto P

    2011-05-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), when oxidized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP), is transformed into cytotoxic molecules capable of inducing cell injury. The aim of this study was to test if, by targeting hematopoietic tumors with HRP-conjugated antibodies in association with IAA treatment, there is induction of apoptosis. We used two lineages of hematologic tumors: NB4, derived from acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and Granta-519 from mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). We also tested cells from 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and from 10 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). HRP targeting was performed with anti-CD33 or anti-CD19 antibodies (depending on the origin of the cell), followed by incubation with goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with HRP. Eight experimental groups were analyzed: control, HRP targeted, HRP targeted and incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA, and cells not HRP targeted but incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA. Apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide labeling. Results showed that apoptosis was dependent on the dose of IAA utilized, the duration of exposure to the prodrug and the origin of the neoplasia. Targeting HRP with antibodies was efficient in activating IAA and inducing apoptosis. PMID:21168913

  3. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  4. Autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay

    2008-01-01

    The liver was one of the earliest recognized sites among autoimmune diseases yet autoimmune hepatitis,primary biliary cirrhosis,primary sclerosing cholangitis,and their overlap forms,are still problematic in diagnosis and causation.The contributions herein comprise 'pairs of articles' on clinical characteristics,and concepts of etiopathogenesis,for each of the above diseases,together with childhood autoimmune liver disease,overlaps,interpretations of diagnostic serology,and liver transplantation.This issue is timely,since we are witnessing an ever increasing applicability of immunology to a wide variety of chronic diseases,hepatic and non-hepatic,in both developed and developing countries.The 11 invited expert review articles capture the changing features over recent years of the autoimmune liver diseases,the underlying immunomolecular mechanisms of development,the potent albeit still unexplained genetic influences,the expanding repertoire of immunoserological diagnostic markers,and the increasingly effective therapeutic possibilities.

  5. Psychoneuroimmunology of autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, M P; Fozdar, M

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between the immune system and psychological states are both intricate and intriguing. Research at a molecular level has thrown considerable light on the previously ill-defined area of psychoneuroimmunology. In this report, we explore the psychoneuroimmunology of autoimmune disorders, particularly rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosus. Animal models of these diseases have provided a particularly useful window on complex psychoneuroimmunological interactions. Observations about the effect of stress on the onset and course of autoimmune disorders has added to our understanding of psychoneuroimmunological interactions. These interactions are bi-directional, as reflected in the autoimmune-mediated neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus. Exploring the role of various neurotransmitters and neuromodulators in the stress response may have important therapeutic implications for autoimmune disorders.

  6. Target Proteins in Human Autoimmunity: Cytochromes P450 and Udp-Glycoronosyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Obermayer-Straub

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytochromes P450 (CYPs and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs are targets of autoantibodies in several hepatic and extrahepatic autoimmune diseases. Autoantibodies directed against hepatic CYPs and UGTs were first detected by indirect immunofluorescence as antiliver and/or kidney microsomal antibodies. In autoimmune hepatitis (AIH type 2, liver and/or kidney microsomal (LKM type 1 autoantibodies are detected and are directed against CYP2D6. About 10% of AIH-2 sera further contain LKM-3 autoantibodies directed against family 1 UGTs. Chronic infections by hepatitis C virus and hepatitis delta virus may induce several autoimmune phenomena, and multiple autoantibodies are detected. Anti-CYP2D6 autoantibodies are detected in up to 4% of patients with chronic hepatitis C, and anti-CYP2A6 autoantibodies are detected in about 2% of these patients. In contrast, 14% of patients with chronic hepatitis delta virus infections generate anti-UGT autoantibodies. In a small minority of patients, certain drugs are known to induce immune-mediated, idiosyncratic drug reactions, also known as ’drug-induced hepatitis’. Drug-induced hepatitis is often associated with autoantibodies directed against hepatic CYPs or other hepatic proteins. Typical examples are tienilic acid-induced hepatitis with anti-CYP2C9, dihydralazine hepatitis with anti-CYP1A2, halothane hepatitis with anti-CYP2E1 and anticonvulsant hepatitis with anti-CYP3A. Recent data suggest that alcoholic liver disease may be induced by mechanisms similar to those that are active in drug-induced hepatitis. Autoantibodies directed against several CYPs are further detected in sera from patients with the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1. Patients with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 with hepatitis often develop anti-CYP1A2; patients with adrenal failure develop anti-CYP21, anti- CYP11A1 or CYP17; and patients with gonadal failure develop anti-CYP11A1 or CYP17. In idiopathic Addison disease

  7. Etiopathogenesis of insulin autoimmunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Åke Lenmark; Moustakas, Antonis K; Papadopoulos, George K; Norio Kanatsuna

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmunity against pancreatic islet beta cells is strongly associated with proinsulin, insulin, or both. The insulin autoreactivity is particularly pronounced in children with young age at onset of type 1 diabetes. Possible mechanisms for (pro)insulin autoimmunity may involve beta-cell destruction resulting in proinsulin peptide presentation on HLA-DR-DQ Class II molecules in pancreatic draining lymphnodes. Recent data on proinsulin peptide binding to type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQ2 and ...

  8. Detection of Vaccine-Induced Antibodies to Ebola Virus in Oral Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Teresa; Rampling, Tommy; Samuel, Dhan; Bowyer, Georgina; Ewer, Katie J.; Venkatraman, Navin; Edmans, Matthew; Dicks, Steve; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Tedder, Richard S.; Gilbert, Sarah C.

    2016-01-01

    Blood sampling to assess production of antigen-specific antibodies after immunization is commonly performed, but it presents logistical difficulties for trials carried out during an infectious disease outbreak. In this study, we show that antibodies may be reliably detected in oral fluid collected in a minimally invasive manner without use of sharps. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT02240875. PMID:27004234

  9. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Johnstone, Duncan B.; Martin, Kayla A.; Tempera, Italo; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger–Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR), consistent with their Pelger–Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW) was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbric/+), and the (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Faslpr mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3), was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  10. Malaria-induced acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ofori, Michael F; Dodoo, Daniel; Staalsoe, Trine;

    2002-01-01

    In areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, protective immunity is acquired during childhood in parallel with acquisition of agglutinating antibodies to parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed on parasitized red blood cells. In a semi-immune child in such an area......, clinical disease is caused mainly by parasites expressing VSA not recognized by preexisting VSA-specific antibodies in that child. Such malaria episodes are known to cause an increase in agglutinating antibodies specifically recognizing VSA expressed by the parasite isolate causing the illness, whereas...... donors (the malaria patient). The data from this first detailed longitudinal study of acquisition of VSA antibodies support the hypothesis that naturally acquired protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria is mediated, at least in part, by VSA-specific antibodies....

  11. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  12. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  13. Murine pattern recognition receptor dectin-1 is essential in the development of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Reid, Delyth M; Yeoh, Joyce; Taylor, Julie; McKenzie, Emma J; Brown, Gordon D; Gordon, Siamon; Forrester, John V; Wong, Simon Y C

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) are an essential component of immunization protocols in a number of autoimmune disease animal models including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and uveoretinitis (EAE and EAU, respectively). We determined the role in EAU of two C-type lectin receptors on myeloid cells that recognize and respond to mycobacteria. Using receptor-specific antibodies and knockout mice, we demonstrated for the first time that the macrophage mannose receptor delays disease development but does not affect severity. In contrast, dectin-1 is critically involved in the development of CFA-mediated EAU. Disease severity is reduced in dectin-1 knockout mice and antibody blockade of dectin-1 during the induction, but not the effector phase, prevents EAU development. Significantly, similar blockade of dectin-1 in vivo has no effect in non-CFA-mediated, spontaneously induced or adoptive transfer models of EAU. Thus dectin-1 plays a critical role in the ability of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce EAU in mice.

  14. Granulocyte antigen systems and antibodies and their clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCullough, J.

    1983-03-01

    Granulocyte alloantibodies and autoantibodies have a key role in the pathophysiology of several clinical problems. These include febrile transfusion reactions, severe pulmonary reactions to transfusion, isoimmune neonatal neutropenia, failure of effective granulocyte transfusion, autoimmune neutropenia, drug-induced neutropenia, and neutropenias secondary to many other diseases. Although many techniques are available for detecting granulocyte antibodies, the optimal in-vitro tests for predicting the antibodies' clinical effects are not established. Use of indium-111-labeled granulocytes may provide valuable information regarding the in-vivo effects of different granulocyte antibodies. Granulocyte transfusions continue to be used for a limited number of severely infected neutropenic patients who do not respond to antibiotic therapy.

  15. Salubrinal Acts as a Dusp2 Inhibitor and Suppresses Inflammation in Anti-Collagen Antibody-Induced Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hamamura, Kazunori; Nishimura, Akinobu; Chen,Andy; Takigawa, Shinya; Sudo, Akihiro; Yokota, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Dual-specificity phosphatase 2 (Dusp2; also called phosphatase of activated cells 1, PAC1) is highly expressed in activated immune cells. We examined whether a potential inhibitor of Dusp2, salubrinal, prevents inflammatory cytokine expression in immune cells and arthritic responses in a mouse model of anti-collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). Salubrinal is a synthetic chemical that inhibits de-phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α). In this study, ...

  16. Follicular Helper T Cells in Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherm, Martin G; Ott, Verena B; Daniel, Carolin

    2016-08-01

    The development of multiple disease-relevant autoantibodies is a hallmark of autoimmune diseases. In autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D), a variable time frame of autoimmunity precedes the clinically overt disease. The relevance of T follicular helper (TFH) cells for the immune system is increasingly recognized. Their pivotal contribution to antibody production by providing help to germinal center (GC) B cells facilitates the development of a long-lived humoral immunity. Their complex differentiation process, involving various stages and factors like B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6), is strictly controlled, as anomalous regulation of TFH cells is connected with immunopathologies. While the adverse effects of a TFH cell-related insufficient humoral immunity are obvious, the role of increased TFH frequencies in autoimmune diseases like T1D is currently highlighted. High levels of autoantigen trigger an excessive induction of TFH cells, consequently resulting in the production of autoantibodies. Therefore, TFH cells might provide promising approaches for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27324759

  17. 抗β2糖蛋白Ⅰ抗体对自身免疫性溶血性贫血临床结局的影响%Effect of Anti-beta2 Glycoprotein I Antibodies on Outcome of the Patients with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾晓虹; 薛原; 林臖芳; 郑玲; 康日辉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship of anti-beta2 glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-β2GPI)and the outcome of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA).Methods During December 2008 to April 2013,consecutive case series of patients with AIHA were studied in the First affiliated hospital of Fujian Medical university.Patients were classified as Primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia (Primary AIHA Group)and autoimmune hemolytic anemia secondary to SLE (SLE-AIHA Group).Levels of IgG subtype anti-β2GPI were assessed in all cases.Data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5.Results A total of 42 patients with AIHA were enrolled in the study,22 cases were primary AIHA,while 20 cases were SLE-AIHA.In the SLE-AIHA Group,patients with positive IgG subtype anti-β2GPI,revealed longer time in achieving partial remission than patients without the antibody [(18 ±7)d vs.(13 ±4)d,P 0.05].Conclusion IgG subtype anti-β2GPI antibody may be one of the factors related to the prognosis of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.%目的:评估抗β2糖蛋白 I 抗体(anti β2 glycoprotein Ⅰ,aβ2GPI)与自身免疫性溶血性贫血(autoimmune hemolytic anemia,AIHA)临床结局的相关性。方法连续收集2008年12月至2013年4月在福建医科大学附属第一医院血液风湿科门诊和病房诊治的 AIHA 患者,包括继发于 SLE 的 AIHA 患者(SLE-AIHA 组)和原发性 AIHA 患者(原发性 AIHA 组)。检测所有患者 IgG 类抗β2GPI。采用 SPSS11.5软件统计分析。结果共纳入 AIHA 患者42例,SLE-AIHA 组22例,原发性AIHA 组20例。SLE-AIHA 组 IgG 类抗β2GPI 阳性患者溶血达部分缓解所需时间显著长于该抗体阴性患者,差异有统计学意义[(18±7)d vs.(13±4)d,P <0.05]。原发性 AIHA 组 IgG 类抗β2GPI 阳性组和阴性组患者溶血达部分缓解所需时间无统计学差异[(15±5)d vs.(11±3)d,P >0.05]。结论IgG 类抗β2

  18. CX3CL1 (fractalkine and CX3CR1 expression in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: kinetics and cellular origin

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    Olsson Tomas

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS. It is associated with local activation of microglia and astroglia, infiltration of activated macrophages and T cells, active degradation of myelin and damage to axons and neurons. The proposed role for CX3CL1 (fractalkine in the control of microglia activation and leukocyte infiltration places this chemokine and its receptor CX3CR1 in a potentially strategic position to control key aspects in the pathological events that are associated with development of brain lesions in MS. In this study, we examine this hypothesis by analyzing the distribution, kinetics, regulation and cellular origin of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 mRNA expression in the CNS of rats with an experimentally induced MS-like disease, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Methods The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied with in situ hybridization histochemical detection of their mRNA with radio labeled cRNA probes in combination with immunohistochemical staining of phenotypic cell markers. Both healthy rat brains and brains from rats with MOG EAE were analyzed. In defined lesional stages of MOG EAE, the number of CX3CR1 mRNA-expressing cells and the intensity of the in situ hybridization signal were determined by image analysis. Data were statistically evaluated by ANOVA, followed by Tukeyprimes multiple comparison test. Results Expression of CX3CL1 mRNA was present within neuronal-like cells located throughout the neuraxis of the healthy rat. Expression of CX3CL1 remained unaltered in the CNS of rats with MOG-induced EAE, with the exception of an induced expression in astrocytes within inflammatory lesions. Notably, the brain vasculature of healthy and encephalitic animals did not exhibit signs of CX3CL1 mRNA expression. The receptor, CX3CR1, was expressed by microglial cells in all regions of the healthy brain

  19. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

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    Bainan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

  20. Oral Application of T4 Phage Induces Weak Antibody Production in the Gut and in the Blood

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    Joanna Majewska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A specific humoral response to bacteriophages may follow phage application for medical purposes, and it may further determine the success or failure of the approach itself. We present a long-term study of antibody induction in mice by T4 phage applied per os: 100 days of phage treatment followed by 112 days without the phage, and subsequent second application of phage up to day 240. Serum and gut antibodies (IgM, IgG, secretory IgA were analyzed in relation to microbiological status of the animals. T4 phage applied orally induced anti-phage antibodies when the exposure was long enough (IgG day 36, IgA day 79; the effect was related to high dosage. Termination of phage treatment resulted in a decrease of IgA again to insignificant levels. Second administration of phage induces secretory IgA sooner than that induced by the first administrations. Increased IgA level antagonized gut transit of active phage. Phage resistant E. coli dominated gut flora very late, on day 92. Thus, the immunological response emerges as a major factor determining phage survival in the gut. Phage proteins Hoc and gp12 were identified as highly immunogenic. A low response to exemplary foreign antigens (from Ebola virus presented on Hoc was observed, which suggests that phage platforms can be used in oral vaccine design.

  1. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Garcia Beatriz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2 were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell.

  2. The protective antibodies induced by a novel epitope of human TNF-alpha could suppress the development of collagen-induced arthritis.

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    Jie Dong

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha is a major inflammatory mediator that exhibits actions leading to tissue destruction and hampering recovery from damage. At present, two antibodies against human TNF-alpha (hTNF-alpha are available, which are widely used for the clinic treatment of certain inflammatory diseases. This work was undertaken to identify a novel functional epitope of hTNF-alpha. We performed screening peptide library against anti-hTNF-alpha antibodies, ELISA and competitive ELISA to obtain the epitope of hTNF-alpha. The key residues of the epitope were identified by means of combinatorial alanine scanning and site-specific mutagenesis. The N terminus (80-91 aa of hTNF-alpha proved to be a novel epitope (YG1. The two amino acids of YG1, proline and valine, were identified as the key residues, which were important for hTNF-alpha biological function. Furthermore, the function of the epitope was addressed on an animal model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA. CIA could be suppressed in an animal model by prevaccination with the derivative peptides of YG1. The antibodies of YG1 could also inhibit the cytotoxicity of hTNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that YG1 is a novel epitope associated with the biological function of hTNF-alpha and the antibodies against YG1 can inhibit the development of CIA in animal model, so it would be a potential target of new therapeutic antibodies.

  3. Budesonide in previously untreated autoimmune hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegand, J; Schuler, A; Kanzler, S; Lohse, A; Beuers, U; Kreisel, W; Spengler, U; Koletzko, S; Jansen, PLM; Hochhaus, G; Mollmann, HW; Prols, M; Manns, MP

    2005-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic liver disease that is effectively treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Predniso(lo)ne, often in combination with azathioprine, is the basic therapeutic option to induce remission. However, this regimen can cause numerous side effects. The aim of

  4. Detection of antibodies to single-stranded DNA in naturally acquired and experimentally induced viral hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive ''Farr'' assay, utilizing 125I-labelled DNA was developed for detecting antibody to single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA). The test was shown to be specific and as sensitive as assays using 14C-labelled DNA, for the detection of antibody in patients with connective tissue diseases. Groups of sera from patients with naturally acquired viral hepatitis and experimentally infected chimpanzees were tested for anti-ssDNA by the 125I assay and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). No consistent pattern was observed with either technique, indicating the elevated levels of this antibody are not as reliable markers of parenchymal liver damage as had been previously suggested

  5. Variability in detection and quantification of interferon β-1b–induced neutralizing antibodies

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    Hartung Hans-Peter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon-beta (IFNB therapy for multiple sclerosis can lead to the induction of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs against IFNB. Various methods are used for detection and quantification of NAbs. Methods Blood samples from 125 IFNB-1b–treated patients, which were tested NAb negative or NAb positive after conclusion of a clinical study, were retested three years after first being assessed in four different laboratories that offer routine NAb testing to practicing neurologists. The myxovirus protein A (MxA induction assay, the cytopathic effect (CPE assay (two laboratories, or the luciferase assay were used. Intra- and inter-laboratory agreement between assays with respect to NAb detection and NAb titer quantification were evaluated. Results High agreement for NAb detection (kappa coefficient, 0.86 and for titer levels was observed for the intra-laboratory comparison in the laboratory using the MxA induction assay performed three years ago and now. A similarly high agreement for NAb detection (kappa coefficient, 0.87 and for titer quantification was noted for the MxA assay of this laboratory with one of two laboratories using the CPE assay. All other inter-laboratory comparisons showed kappa values between 0.57 and 0.68 and remarkable differences in individual titer levels. Conclusions There are considerable differences in the detection and quantification of IFNB-induced NAbs among laboratories offering NAb testing for clinical practice using different assay methods. It is important that these differences are considered when interpreting NAb results for clinical decision-making and when developing general recommendations for potentially clinically meaningful NAb titer levels.

  6. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

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    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other organ non-specific non-endocrine autoimmune diseases. Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Conclusions. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Other­wise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  7. The role of stress in the clinical expression of thyroid autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsoulis, Agathocles

    2006-11-01

    During stress, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathoadrenal system leads to increased secretion of glucocorticoids and catecholamines, respectively, in order to maintain homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that stress hormones, acting on antigen-presenting immune cells, may influence the differentiation of bipotential T helper (Th) cells away from Th1 and toward a Th2 phenotype. This results in suppression of cellular immunity and potentiation of humoral immunity. Thyroid autoimmunity is clinically expressed as Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and its variants (sporadic or postpartum thyroiditis) or as Grave's disease (GD). The different phenotypic expression of thyroid autoimmunity is largely dependent on the balance of Th1 versus Th2 immune response. A predominantly Th1-mediated immune activity may promote apoptotic pathways on thyroid follicular cells leading to thyroid cell destruction and HT. Conversely, predominance of Th2-mediated immune response may induce antigen-specific B lymphocytes to produce anti-TSH receptor (TSHr) antibodies causing GD. The weight of evidence from epidemiological and case-control studies supports an association between stress and GD. On the other hand, there is little information available on the effect of stress on HT, but there is evidence for an increase in postpartum thyroiditis, following the cellular immune suppressive effect of pregnancy. Whether stress has a causative effect on GD remains elusive. Circumstantial evidence supports the hypothesis that stress may influence the clinical expression of thyroid autoimmunity in susceptible individuals favoring the development of GD by shifting the Th1-Th2 balance away for Th1 and toward Th2. Conversely, recovery from stress or the immune suppressive effect of pregnancy may induce a Th2 to Th1 "return shift" leading to autoimmune (sporadic) or postpartum thyroiditis, respectively. PMID:17192582

  8. Estrogens and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Capellino, Silvia; Sulli, Alberto; Serioli, Bruno; Secchi, Maria Elena; Villaggio, Barbara; Straub, Rainer H

    2006-11-01

    Sex hormones are implicated in the immune response, with estrogens as enhancers at least of the humoral immunity and androgens and progesterone (and glucocorticoids) as natural immune-suppressors . Several physiological, pathological, and therapeutic conditions may change the serum estrogen milieu and/or peripheral conversion rate, including the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, menopause, being elderly, chronic stress, altered circadian rhythms, inflammatory cytokines, and use of corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, and steroid hormonal replacements, inducing altered androgen/estrogen ratios and related effects. In particular, cortisol and melatonin circadian rhythms are altered, at least in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and partially involve sex hormone circadian synthesis and levels as well. Abnormal regulation of aromatase activity (i.e., increased activity) by inflammatory cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6) may partially explain the abnormalities of peripheral estrogen synthesis in RA (i.e., increased availability of 17-beta estradiol and possible metabolites in synovial fluids) and in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as the altered serum sex-hormone levels and ratio (i.e., decreased androgens and DHEAS). In the synovial fluids of RA patients, the increased estrogen concentration is observed in both sexes and is more specifically characterized by the hydroxylated forms, in particular 16alpha-hydroxyestrone, which is a mitogenic and cell proliferative endogenous hormone. Local effects of sex hormones in autoimmune rheumatic diseases seems to consist mainly in modulation of cell proliferation and cytokine production (i.e., TNF-alpha, Il-1, IL-12). In this respect, it is interesting that male patients with RA seem to profit more from anti-TNFalpha strategies than do female patients. PMID:17261796

  9. Guillain-Barré syndrome- and Miller Fisher syndrome-associated Campylobacter jejuni lipopolysaccharides induce anti-GM1 and anti-GQ1b Antibodies in rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. de Klerk; H.P. Endtz (Hubert); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); J.D. Laman (Jon); F.G.A. van der Meché; P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); C.W. Ang (Wim)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractCampylobacter jejuni infections are thought to induce antiganglioside antibodies in patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) by molecular mimicry between C. jejuni lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and gangliosides. We used purifi

  10. Pain-induced skin autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Odoardi, Francesca; Neuhuber, Winfried; Flügel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A recent paper published in Nature reports sensory nerve fibers in the skin that give local immune cells important instructions for the organization of an immune response; in this particular case the cooperation between the nervous and immune systems had disastrous consequences, namely an auto-destruction of the skin.

  11. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes.

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    Monica Poggianella

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well.

  12. Evaluation of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody seroconversion induced by minocycline, sulfasalazine, or penicillamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, HK; Slot, MC; Pan, GL; Weissbach, CA; Niles, JL; Merkel, PA

    2000-01-01

    Objective, Case reports have suggested that minocycline, sulfasalazine, and penicillamine are associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis, This study evaluated ANCA seroconversion due to these agents in serum samples prospectively collected in randomized, double-bl

  13. A novel bispecific antibody, S-Fab, induces potent cancer cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; He, Ping; Zhou, Changhua; Jing, Li; Dong, Bin; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yawei; Miao, Ji; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that engage immune cells to kill cancer cells have been actively studied in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we present a novel bispecific format, S-Fab, fabricated by linking a single-domain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen VHH to a conventional anti-CD3 Fab. In contrast to most bispecific antibodies, the S-Fab bispecific antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from bacteria. The purified S-Fab is stable in serum and is able to recruit T cells to drive potent cancer cell killing. In xenograft models, the S-Fab antibody suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our study suggested that the bispecific S-Fab format can be applied to a wide range of immunotherapies.

  14. Neutralization of Japanese Encephalitis Virus by heme-induced broadly reactive human monoclonal antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Nimesh Gupta; Mélissanne de Wispelaere; Maxime Lecerf; Manjula Kalia; Tobias Scheel; Sudhanshu Vrati; Claudia Berek; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Philippe Desprès; Sébastien Lacroix-Desmazes; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    International audience Geographical expansion and re-emerging new genotypes of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) require the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we studied a non-conventional approach for antibody therapy and show that, upon exposure to heme, a fraction of natural human immunoglobulins acquires high-affinity reactivity with the antigenic domain-III of JEV E glycoprotein. These JEV-reactive antibodies exhibited neutralizing activity against recently domina...

  15. Complement and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; Greco, Elisabetta; Ballanti, Marta; Di Muzio, Gioia; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is a component of the innate immune system. Its main function was initially believed to be limited to the recognition and elimination of pathogens through direct killing or stimulation of phagocytosis. However, in recent years, the immunoregulatory functions of the complement system were demonstrated and it was determined that the complement proteins play an important role in modulating adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. When the delicate mechanisms that regulate this sophisticated enzymatic system are unbalanced, the complement system may cause damage, mediating tissue inflammation. Dysregulation of the complement system has been involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Complement deficiencies have been associated with an increased risk to develop autoimmune disorders. Because of its functions, the complement system is an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Up to date, several compounds interfering with the complement cascade have been studied in experimental models for autoimmune diseases. The main therapeutic strategies are inhibition of complement activation components, inhibition of complement receptors, and inhibition of membrane attack complex. At present, none of the available agents was proven to be both safe and effective for treatment of autoimmune diseases in humans. Nonetheless, data from preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the modulation of the complement system could constitute a viable strategy for the treatment of autoimmune conditions in the decades to come.

  16. Autoimmune hepatitis from the paediatric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eve A

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an important entity within the broad spectrum of autoimmune hepatobiliary disease comprised of AIH, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Since the 1960s, AIH has been investigated with extensive clinical research aimed at effective therapeutic intervention. It was one of the first liver diseases where treatment was demonstrated to prolong survival. AIH occurs in children, as well as in adults. Its clinical manifestations in children may differ from classic adult AIH. These differences have elucidated certain aspects of AIH and hepatobiliary disease in general. There are two major patterns of AIH: type 1, with anti-smooth muscle antibodies and type 2, with anti-liver/kidney microsomal antibodies. The second type of AIH was first identified in children and is more common in younger patients. AIH often presents as acute disease in children and also in adults: the nomenclature has dropped the allusion to chronicity. Some children who have sclerosing cholangitis present with clinical disease closely resembling AIH; this AIH-like PSC, termed autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC), is also found in adults. Children with AIH may have identifiable monogenic disorders of immune regulation such as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). Like adults with AIH, children with AIH usually respond very favourably to immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids ± azathioprine. True cures seem to be rare, although many children achieve a stable remission. Nonetheless children with AIH may develop cirrhosis and some require liver transplantation. Early diagnosis and improved treatment strategies may further improve the outlook for children with AIH.

  17. Sclerosing cholecystitis associated with autoimmune pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Terumi Kamisawa; Yuyang Tu; Hitoshi Nakajima; Naoto Egawa; Kouji Tsuruta; Atsutake Okamoto; Shinichirou Horiguchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histopathological and radiological findings of the gallbladder in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP).METHODS: The radiological findings of the gallbladder of 19 AIP patients were retrospectively reviewed.Resected gallbladders of 8 AIP patients were examined histologically and were immunostained with antiIgG4 antibody. Controls consisted of gallbladders resected for symptomatic gallstones (n=10) and those removed during pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma (n=10), as well as extrahepatic bile ducts and pancreases removed by pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma (n=10).RESULTS: Thickening of the gallbladder wall was detected by ultrasound and/or computed tomography in 10 patients with AIP (3 severe and 7 moderate);in these patients severe stenosis of the extrahepatic bile duct was also noted. Histologically, thickening of the gallbladder was detected in 6 of 8 (75%) patients with AIP; 4 cases had transmural lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with fibrosis, and 2 cases had mucosal-based lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. Considerable transmural thickening of the extrahepatic bile duct wall with dense fibrosis and diffuse ly rnphoplasmacytic infiltration was detected in 7 patients. Immunohistochemically, severe or moderate infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells was detected in the gallbladder, bile duct, and pancreas of all 8 patients, but was not detected in controls.CONCLUSION: Gallbladder wall thickening with fibrosis and abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells is frequently detected in patients with AIR We propose the use of a new term, sclerosing cholecystitis, for these cases that are induced by the same mechanism as sclerosing pancreatitis or sclerosing cholangitis in AIP.

  18. Hepatitis C Virus E1 and E2 Proteins Used as Separate Immunogens Induce Neutralizing Antibodies with Additive Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Beaumont

    Full Text Available Various strategies involving the use of hepatitis C virus (HCV E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins as immunogens have been developed for prophylactic vaccination against HCV. However, the ideal mode of processing and presenting these immunogens for effective vaccination has yet to be determined. We used our recently described vaccine candidate based on full-length HCV E1 or E2 glycoproteins fused to the heterologous hepatitis B virus S envelope protein to compare the use of the E1 and E2 proteins as separate immunogens with their use as the E1E2 heterodimer, in terms of immunogenetic potential and the capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. The specific anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibody responses induced in animals immunized with vaccine particles harboring the heterodimer were profoundly impaired with respect to those in animals immunized with particles harboring E1 and E2 separately. Moreover, the anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies had additive neutralizing properties that increase the cross-neutralization of heterologous strains of various HCV genotypes, highlighting the importance of including both E1 and E2 in the vaccine for an effective vaccination strategy. Our study has important implications for the optimization of HCV vaccination strategies based on HCV envelope proteins, regardless of the platform used to present these proteins to the immune system.

  19. Hepatitis C Virus E1 and E2 Proteins Used as Separate Immunogens Induce Neutralizing Antibodies with Additive Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Elodie; Roch, Emmanuelle; Chopin, Lucie; Roingeard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Various strategies involving the use of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins as immunogens have been developed for prophylactic vaccination against HCV. However, the ideal mode of processing and presenting these immunogens for effective vaccination has yet to be determined. We used our recently described vaccine candidate based on full-length HCV E1 or E2 glycoproteins fused to the heterologous hepatitis B virus S envelope protein to compare the use of the E1 and E2 proteins as separate immunogens with their use as the E1E2 heterodimer, in terms of immunogenetic potential and the capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. The specific anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibody responses induced in animals immunized with vaccine particles harboring the heterodimer were profoundly impaired with respect to those in animals immunized with particles harboring E1 and E2 separately. Moreover, the anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies had additive neutralizing properties that increase the cross-neutralization of heterologous strains of various HCV genotypes, highlighting the importance of including both E1 and E2 in the vaccine for an effective vaccination strategy. Our study has important implications for the optimization of HCV vaccination strategies based on HCV envelope proteins, regardless of the platform used to present these proteins to the immune system.

  20. Hepatitis C Virus E1 and E2 Proteins Used as Separate Immunogens Induce Neutralizing Antibodies with Additive Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Elodie; Roch, Emmanuelle; Chopin, Lucie; Roingeard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Various strategies involving the use of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins as immunogens have been developed for prophylactic vaccination against HCV. However, the ideal mode of processing and presenting these immunogens for effective vaccination has yet to be determined. We used our recently described vaccine candidate based on full-length HCV E1 or E2 glycoproteins fused to the heterologous hepatitis B virus S envelope protein to compare the use of the E1 and E2 proteins as separate immunogens with their use as the E1E2 heterodimer, in terms of immunogenetic potential and the capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. The specific anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibody responses induced in animals immunized with vaccine particles harboring the heterodimer were profoundly impaired with respect to those in animals immunized with particles harboring E1 and E2 separately. Moreover, the anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies had additive neutralizing properties that increase the cross-neutralization of heterologous strains of various HCV genotypes, highlighting the importance of including both E1 and E2 in the vaccine for an effective vaccination strategy. Our study has important implications for the optimization of HCV vaccination strategies based on HCV envelope proteins, regardless of the platform used to present these proteins to the immune system. PMID:26966906

  1. Autoimmunity in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    Compared to the clear trend observed in previous years, the number of peer-reviewed articles published during 2015 and retrieved using the "autoimmunity" key word declined by 4 %, while remaining 5 % of immunology articles. On the other hand, a more detailed analysis of the published articles in leading immunology and autoimmunity journals revealed exciting scenarios, with fascinating lines of evidence being supported by convincing data and likely followed by rapid translational or clinical developments. As examples, the study of the microbiome, the development of new serum or other tissue biomarkers, and a more solid understanding of disease pathogenesis and tolerance breakdown mechanisms have been central issues in the past year. Furthermore and similar to the oncology field, progress in the understanding of single autoimmune condition is becoming most specific with psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis being ideal paradigms with treatment options diverging after decades of common therapies, as illustrated by IL17-targeting approaches. The ultimate result of these advances is towards personalized medicine with an ideal approach being tailored on a single patient, based on a finely tuned definition of the immunogenetics, epigenetics, microbiome, and biomarkers. Finally, experimental reports suggest that cancer-associated immune mechanisms or the role of T and B cell subpopulations should be better understood in autoimmune diseases. While we hailed the 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world as part of an annus mirabilis, we should not be mistaken in the strong stimulus of research in autoimmunity represented by the 2015 articles that will be summarized in this article. PMID:27422713

  2. Myelin protein zero and its antibody in serum as biomarkers of n-hexane-induced peripheral neuropathy and neurotoxicity effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Xiaowei; Liu Qingjun; Zhang Yanshu; Dai Yufei; Duan Huawei; Bin Ping; Niu Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to n-hexane can lead to peripheral neuropathy that no effective treatment regimen could be applied presently.This study investigated whether myelin protein zero (P0) protein and its antibody could be used to distinguish n-hexane intoxication and protect workers from peripheral neuropathy.Methods We compared P0 protein and its antibody among three levels of n-hexane-exposed groups,which included 18 patients with n-hexane-induced peripheral neuropathy as case group,120 n-hexane-exposed workers as n-hexaneexposed control group,and 147 non-hexane-exposed participants used as control group.ELISA method was applied to detect P0 protein and its antibody.Results P0 protein in serum was significantly higher in the case group and n-hexane-exposed control group in comparison with the control group (P<0.01).Compared with the n-hexane-exposed control group,the case group also had significant increase of P0 protein (P<0.01).After 6 months therapy,P0 protein was observed to decrease significantly in the case group (P<0.01).The P0 antibody in serum was significantly higher in the n-hexane-exposed control group than in the control group (P<0.01),but not significantly different between cases and controls.Conclusions P0 antibodies in serum may be a short-term effect biomarker for n-hexane exposure.P0 protein in serum may be an early effective biomarker for peripheral nerve neuropathy and its biological limit value needs investigation in the future study.

  3. Common mechanisms of autoimmune diseases (the autoimmune tautology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The fact that autoimmune diseases share subphenotypes, physiopathological mechanisms and genetic factors has been called autoimmune tautology, and indicates that they have a common origin. The autoimmune phenotypes vary depending on the target cell and the affected organ, gender, ancestry, trigger factors and age at onset. Ten shared characteristics supporting this logical theory are herein reviewed.

  4. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT. PMID:26807990

  5. Epigenomics of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhawna; Hawkins, R David

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of largely unknown etiology. Genetic studies have identified a limited number of causal genes from a marginal number of individuals, and demonstrated a high degree of discordance in monozygotic twins. Studies have begun to reveal epigenetic contributions to these diseases, primarily through the study of DNA methylation, but chromatin and non-coding RNA changes are also emerging. Moving forward an integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, with the latter two coming from specific cell types, will provide an understanding that has been missed from genetics alone. We provide an overview of the current state of the field and vision for deriving the epigenomics of autoimmunity.

  6. Intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate the serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Kihara-Fujioka, Miran; Hachimura, Satoshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2010-08-16

    Colonization of the gut by commensal bacteria modulates the induction of oral tolerance and allergy. However, how these intestinal bacteria modulate antigen-specific T cell responses induced by oral antigens remains unclear. In order to investigate this, we used germ-free (GF) ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA23-3) mice. Conventional (CV) or GF mice were administered an OVA-containing diet. Cytokine production by CD4(+) cells from spleen (SP), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) was evaluated by ELISA, as was the peripheral antibody titer. T cell phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry. CD4(+) cells from the SP and MLN of CV and GF mice fed an OVA diet for 3 weeks produced significantly less IL-2 than the corresponding cells from mice receiving a control diet, suggesting that oral tolerance could be induced at the T cell level in the systemic and intestinal immune systems of both bacterial condition of mice. However, we also observed that the T cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dietary antigen was delayed in the systemic immune tissues and was weaker in the intestinal immune tissues of the GF mice. Intestinal MLN and PP CD4(+) T cells from these animals also produced lower levels of IL-10, had less activated/memory type CD45RB(low) cells, and expressed lower levels of CTLA-4 but not Foxp3 compared to their CV counterparts. Furthermore, GF mice produced higher serum levels of OVA-specific antibodies than CV animals. CD40L expression by SP CD4(+) cells from GF mice fed OVA was higher than that of CV mice. These results suggest that intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigens through modulation of the intestinal and systemic T cell phenotype. PMID:20621647

  7. Human agonistic TRAIL receptor antibodies Mapatumumab and Lexatumumab induce apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma and act synergistically with cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felley-Bosco Emanuela

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is associated with exposure to asbestos, and projections suggest that the yearly number of deaths in Western Europe due to MPM will increase until 2020. Despite progress in chemo- and in multimodality therapy, MPM remains a disease with a poor prognosis. Inducing apoptosis by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL or agonistic monoclonal antibodies which target TRAIL-receptor 1 (TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 has been thought to be a promising cancer therapy. Results We have compared the sensitivity of 13 MPM cell lines or primary cultures to TRAIL and two fully human agonistic monoclonal antibodies directed to TRAIL-R1 (Mapatumumab and TRAIL-R2 (Lexatumumab and examined sensitization of the MPM cell lines to cisplatin-induced by the TRAIL-receptor antibodies. We found that sensitivity of MPM cells to TRAIL, Mapatumumab and Lexatumumab varies largely and is independent of TRAIL-receptor expression. TRAIL-R2 contributes more than TRAIL-R1 to death-receptor mediated apoptosis in MPM cells that express both receptors. The combination of cisplatin with Mapatumumab or Lexatumumab synergistically inhibited the cell growth and enhanced apoptotic death. Furthermore, pre-treatment with cisplatin followed by Mapatumumab or Lexatumumab resulted in significant higher cytotoxic effects as compared to the reverse sequence. Combination-induced cell growth inhibition was significantly abrogated by pre-treatment of the cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Conclusion Our results suggest that the sequential administration of cisplatin followed by Mapatumumab or Lexatumumab deserves investigation in the treatment of patients with MPM.

  8. Thermally induced degradation pathways of three different antibody-based drug development candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincke, Anja; Winter, Jonas; Bunte, Thomas; Olbrich, Carsten

    2014-10-01

    Protein-based medicinal products are prone to undergo a variety of chemical and physical degradation pathways. One of the most important exogenous stress condition to consider during manufacturing, transport and storage processes is temperature, because antibody-based therapeutics are only stable in a limited temperature range. In this study, three different formats of antibody-based molecules (IgG1, a bispecific scFv and a fab fragment) were exposed to thermal stress conditions occurring during transport and storage. For evaluation, an analytical platform was developed for the detection and characterization of relevant degradation pathways of different antibody-based therapeutics. The effect of thermal stress conditions on the stability of the three antibody-based formats was therefore investigated using visual inspection, different spectroscopic measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), electrophoresis, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and surface plasmon resonance technology (SPR). In summary, thermal stress led to heterogeneous chemical and physical degradation pathways of all three antibody-based formats used. In addition, identical exogenous stress conditions resulted in different kinds and levels of aggregates and fragmentation products. This knowledge is fundamental for a systematic and successful stabilization of protein-based therapeutics by the use of formulation additives.

  9. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  10. The complement system in systemic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Daha, Mohamed R; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2010-05-01

    Complement is part of the innate immune system. Its major function is recognition and elimination of pathogens via direct killing and/or stimulation of phagocytosis. Activation of the complement system is, however, also involved in the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune diseases. Activation via the classical pathway has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated diseases such as cryoglobulinemic vasculitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In SLE, the role of complement is somewhat paradoxical. It is involved in autoantibody-initiated tissue damage on the one hand, but, on the other hand, it appears to have protective features as hereditary deficiencies of classical pathway components are associated with an increased risk for SLE. There is increasing evidence that the alternative pathway of complement, even more than the classical pathway, is involved in many systemic autoimmune diseases. This is true for IgA-dominant Henoch Schönlein Purpura, in which additional activation of the lectin pathway contributes to more severe disease. In anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis the complement system was considered not to be involved since immunoglobulin deposition is generally absent in the lesions. However, recent studies, both in human and animal models, demonstrated complement activation via the alternative pathway as a major pathogenic mechanism. Insight into the role of the various pathways of complement in the systemic autoimmune diseases including the vasculitides opens up new ways of treatment by blocking effector pathways of complement. This has been demonstrated for monoclonal antibodies to C5 or C5a in experimental anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome and ANCA-associated vasculitis.

  11. T Cell Vaccination as an Immunotherapy for Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JingwuZhang

    2004-01-01

    Immunization with inactivated autoreactive T cells (T cell vaccination) selected from individual's own T cellrepertoire provides a unique in vivo setting for testing immune regulation that is known to involve interactionsof a variety of related surface molecules (1). It induces regulatory immune responses that closely resemble thein vivo situation where the immune system is challenged by clonal activation and expansion of given T cellpopulations in various autoimmune diseases. T cell vaccination provides a powerful means of eliciting naturalreactions of the immune system in response to clonal expansion of T cells, which can used as a therapeuticapproach to suppress or eliminate specific pathogenic autoreactive T cells in autoimmune conditions. Clinicaltrials using T cell vaccination to deplete autoreactive T cells in human autoimmune conditions have begun toreveal the pathologic relevance of various autoimmune T cell populations in the disease processes, providing aunique opportunity to test the autoimmune theories in a clinical setting. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2004; 1(5):321-327.

  12. Expression and biological characterization of an anti-CD20 biosimilar candidate antibody: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorvignit, Denise; Palacios, Julio L; Merino, Maylin; Hernández, Tays; Sosa, Katya; Casaco, Angel; López-Requena, Alejandro; Mateo de Acosta, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The CD20 molecule is a non-glycosylated protein expressed mainly on the surface of B lymphocytes. In some pathogenic B cells, it shows an increased expression, thus becoming an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric antibody that specifically recognizes the human CD20 molecule. This antibody is indicated for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this work, we describe the stable expression and biological evaluation of an anti-CD20 biosimilar antibody. While rituximab is produced in fed-batch culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, our biosimilar antibody expression process consists of continuous culture of recombinant murine NS0 myeloma cells. The ability of the purified biosimilar antibody to recognize the CD20 molecule on human tumor cell lines, as well as on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from humans and primates, was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The biosimilar antibody induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis on human cell lines with high expression of CD20. In addition, this antibody depleted CD20-positive B lymphocytes from peripheral blood in monkeys. These results indicate that the biological properties of the biosimilar antibody compare favorably with those of the innovator product, and that it should be evaluated in future clinical trials. PMID:22647435

  13. Expression and biological characterization of an anti-CD20 biosimilar candidate antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorvignit, Denise; Palacios, Julio L.; Merino, Maylin; Hernández, Tays; Sosa, Katya; Casacó, Angel; López-Requena, Alejandro; Mateo de Acosta, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The CD20 molecule is a non-glycosylated protein expressed mainly on the surface of B lymphocytes. In some pathogenic B cells, it shows an increased expression, thus becoming an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric antibody that specifically recognizes the human CD20 molecule. This antibody is indicated for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this work, we describe the stable expression and biological evaluation of an anti-CD20 biosimilar antibody. While rituximab is produced in fed-batch culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, our biosimilar antibody expression process consists of continuous culture of recombinant murine NS0 myeloma cells. The ability of the purified biosimilar antibody to recognize the CD20 molecule on human tumor cell lines, as well as on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from humans and primates, was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The biosimilar antibody induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis on human cell lines with high expression of CD20. In addition, this antibody depleted CD20-positive B lymphocytes from peripheral blood in monkeys. These results indicate that the biological properties of the biosimilar antibody compare favorably with those of the innovator product, and that it should be evaluated in future clinical trials. PMID:22647435

  14. Markers of autoimmune liver diseases in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Secil Demirdal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Osteoporosis is a common complication of chronic liver diseases. However, there is limited information about autoimmune liver diseases as a factor of secondary osteoporosis. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the autoantibodies of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis. METHODS: One hundred fifty female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis were included. Bone mineral density was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. We analysized autoantibodies including antinuclear antibodies, liver membrane antibodies, anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, liver-specific protein, antismooth muscle antibodies, and anti-mitochondrial antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. Serum was assayed for the levels of aminotransferases. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 63,13±8,6 years. The mean values of L1-L4 T-scores and femur total T-scores were -3,08±0,58 and -1,53±0,81, respectively. Among the 150 patients with osteoporosis, 14 (9.3% were antinuclear antibodies, four (2.7% were liver membrane antibodies, three (2.0% were anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1, and two (1.3% were liver-specific protein positive. None of the patients had anti-mitochondrial antibodies or smooth muscle antibodies positivity. The mean values of levels of aminotransferases were within normal range. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of liver membrane antibodies, liver-specific protein, and anti-liver/kidney microsomal autoantibodies1 has permitted us to see that there may be some suspicious clues of autoimmune liver diseases in patients with osteoporosis as a secondary risk factor. On the other hand, there is a need for comprehensive studies with a larger sample size and studies designed to compare the results with a normal population to understand the clinical importance of our findings.

  15. Autoimmun hepatitis. Fremtroedelsesformer, diagnostik og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Tage-Jensen, U; Vyberg, M

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study concerning ten patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AiH), diagnosed during a 2 1/2-year period is presented. The age of the patients ranged from 25 to 82 years and nine of the patients were women. Their symptoms included jaundice, pruritus, fever, anorexia and fatigue during a...... detected in nine patients, while none had increased levels of anti-nuclear antibody titer. Histological features of moderate or severe chronic active hepatitis were demonstrated in nine patients. One patient presented with clinical and histological features of acute hepatitis. Prednisolone therapy was...

  16. Hepatitis C virus hypervariable region 1 variants presented on hepatitis B virus capsid-like particles induce cross-neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Lange

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is still a serious global health burden. Despite improved therapeutic options, a preventative vaccine would be desirable especially in undeveloped countries. Traditionally, highly conserved epitopes are targets for antibody-based prophylactic vaccines. In HCV-infected patients, however, neutralizing antibodies are primarily directed against hypervariable region I (HVRI in the envelope protein E2. HVRI is the most variable region of HCV, and this heterogeneity contributes to viral persistence and has thus far prevented the development of an effective HVRI-based vaccine. The primary goal of an antibody-based HCV vaccine should therefore be the induction of cross-reactive HVRI antibodies. In this study we approached this problem by presenting selected cross-reactive HVRI variants in a highly symmetric repeated array on capsid-like particles (CLPs. SplitCore CLPs, a novel particulate antigen presentation system derived from the HBV core protein, were used to deliberately manipulate the orientation of HVRI and therefore enable the presentation of conserved parts of HVRI. These HVRI-CLPs induced high titers of cross-reactive antibodies, including neutralizing antibodies. The combination of only four HVRI CLPs was sufficient to induce antibodies cross-reactive with 81 of 326 (24.8% naturally occurring HVRI peptides. Most importantly, HVRI CLPs with AS03 as an adjuvant induced antibodies with a 10-fold increase in neutralizing capability. These antibodies were able to neutralize infectious HCVcc isolates and 4 of 19 (21% patient-derived HCVpp isolates. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the induction of at least partially cross-neutralizing antibodies is possible. This approach might be useful for the development of a prophylactic HCV vaccine and should also be adaptable to other highly variable viruses.

  17. Leucine-Rich Glioma Inactivated-1 and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Autoimmune Encephalitis Associated with Ischemic Stroke: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Marisa; Morales-Vidal, Sarkis; Ruland, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypotheses linking these two disease processes are proposed.

  18. Autoimmune muscular pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, M C

    2005-05-01

    The T cell-mediated mechanism responsible for Polymyositis and inclusion Body Myositis and the complement-mediated microangiopathy associated with Dermatomyositis are reviewed. The management of autoimmune myopathies with the presently available immunotherapeutic agents as well as new therapies and ongoing trials are discussed.

  19. Autoimmunity and Turner's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleo, Ana; Moroni, Luca; Caliari, Lisa; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2012-05-01

    Turner Syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder, affecting female individuals, resulting from the partial or complete absence of one sex chromosome, and occurring in approximately 50 per 100,000 liveborn girls. TS is associated with reduced adult height and with gonadal dysgenesis, leading to insufficient circulating levels of female sex steroids and to infertility. Morbidity and mortality are increased in TS but average intellectual performance is within the normal range. TS is closely associated to the presence of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases (AID), especially autoimmune thyroiditis and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the fact that the strong association between TS and AID is well known and has been widely studied, the underlying immunopathogenic mechanism remains partially unexplained. Recent studies have displayed how TS patients do not show an excess of immunogenic risk markers. This is evocative for a higher responsibility of X-chromosome abnormalities in the development of AID, and particularly of X-genes involved in immune response. For instance, the long arm of the X chromosome hosts a MHC-locus, so the loss of that region may lead to a deficiency in immune regulation. Currently no firm guidelines for diagnosis exist. In conclusion, TS is a condition associated with a number of autoimmune manifestations. Individuals with TS need life-long medical attention. As a consequence of these findings, early diagnosis and regular screening for potential associated autoimmune conditions are essential in the medical follow-up of TS patients. PMID:22154619

  20. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses. PMID:25124037

  1. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  2. A pilot study comparing the development of EIAV Env-specific antibodies induced by DNA/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccines and an attenuated Chinese EIAV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglai; Lin, Yuezhi; Ma, Jian; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Liping; Li, Shenwei; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jianhua; Shen, Rongxian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    Data from successful attenuated lentiviral vaccine studies indicate that fully mature Env-specific antibodies characterized by high titer, high avidity, and the predominant recognition of conformational epitopes are associated with protective efficacy. Although vaccination with a DNA prime/recombinant vaccinia-vectored vaccine boost strategy has been found to be effective in some trials with non-human primate/simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) models, it remains unclear whether this vaccination strategy could elicit mature equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) Env-specific antibodies, thus protecting vaccinated horses against EIAV infection. Therefore, in this pilot study we vaccinated horses using a strategy based on DNA prime/recombinant Tiantan vaccinia (rTTV)-vectored vaccines encoding EIAV env and gag genes, and observed the development of Env-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and p26-specific antibodies. Vaccination with DNA induced low titer, low avidity, and the predominant recognition of linear epitopes by Env-specific antibodies, which was enhanced by boosting vaccinations with rTTV vaccines. However, the maturation levels of Env-specific antibodies induced by the DNA/rTTV vaccines were significantly lower than those induced by the attenuated vaccine EIAV(FDDV). Additionally, DNA/rTTV vaccines did not elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent EIAV strain, all of the vaccinees and control horses died from EIAV disease. These data indicate that the regimen of DNA prime/rTTV vaccine boost did not induce mature Env-specific antibodies, which might have contributed to immune protection failure. PMID:23171359

  3. Low fasting serum triglyceride level as a precocious marker of autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannello, Silvia; Cavaleri, Antonina; Milazzo, Paolina; Cantarella, Santi; Belfiore, Francesco

    2003-08-01

    The authors recently reported the occurrence of low fasting serum triglyceride (TG) and high free fatty acid (FFA) levels in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. TG estimation in diverse groups of patients with autoimmune disease or hyperactive immune response confirmed the occurrence of a similar decrease of TG. In some patients, serum FFA level was also evaluated. TG value in lean and obese patients was compared with that in lean (n = 108) and obese (n = 208) control subjects without autoimmune disease. In patients affected by autoimmune chronic thyroiditis with enhanced concentration of antithyroglobulin antibodies and without thyroidal failure (n = 24), lean and obese patients had reduced TG (-69/%, P autoimmune diseases (scleroderma, APECED [autoimmune polyendocrinopathy, candidiasis, and ectodermal dystrophy], urticaria or urticarial vasculitis, Reiter or Sjogren syndromes, ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis or Guillain-Barré syndrome) (n = 14), decreased TG was also observed both in the lean and obese subjects (-59%, P autoimmunity or immune system hyperreactivity. PMID:14600656

  4. Broader HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses induced by envelope glycoprotein mutants based on the EIAV attenuated vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lianxing

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to induce a potent and cross-reactive neutralizing antibody (nAb, an effective envelope immunogen is crucial for many viral vaccines, including the vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV attenuated vaccine has controlled the epidemic of this virus after its vaccination in over 70 million equine animals during the last 3 decades in China. Data from our past studies demonstrate that the Env protein of this vaccine plays a pivotal role in protecting horses from both homologous and heterogeneous EIAV challenges. Therefore, the amino acid sequence information from the Chinese EIAV attenuated vaccine, in comparison with the parental wild-type EIAV strains, was applied to modify the corresponding region of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 CN54. The direction of the mutations was made towards the amino acids conserved in the two EIAV vaccine strains, distinguishing them from the two wild-type strains. The purpose of the modification was to enhance the immunogenicity of the HIV Env. Results The induced nAb by the modified HIV Env neutralized HIV-1 B and B'/C viruses at the highest titer of 1:270. Further studies showed that a single amino acid change in the C1 region accounts for the substantial enhancement in induction of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions This study shows that an HIV envelope modified by the information of another lentivirus vaccine induces effective broadly neutralizing antibodies. A single amino acid mutation was found to increase the immunogenicity of the HIV Env.

  5. Immunization of fucose-containing polysaccharides from Reishi mushroom induces antibodies to tumor-associated Globo H-series epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shih-Fen; Liang, Chi-Hui; Ho, Ming-Yi; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Tsai, Tsung-I; Hsieh, Yves S-Y; Tsai, Chih-Ming; Li, Shiou-Ting; Cheng, Yang-Yu; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Lin, Tung-Yi; Lin, Zong-Yan; Yang, Wen-Bin; Ren, Chien-Tai; Lin, Kuo-I; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Hung; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2013-08-20

    Carbohydrate-based vaccines have shown therapeutic efficacy for infectious disease and cancer. The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) containing complex polysaccharides has been used as antitumor supplement, but the mechanism of immune response has rarely been studied. Here, we show that the mice immunized with a l-fucose (Fuc)-enriched Reishi polysaccharide fraction (designated as FMS) induce antibodies against murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells, with increased antibody-mediated cytotoxicity and reduced production of tumor-associated inflammatory mediators (in particular, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1). The mice showed a significant increase in the peritoneal B1 B-cell population, suggesting FMS-mediated anti-glycan IgM production. Furthermore, the glycan microarray analysis of FMS-induced antisera displayed a high specificity toward tumor-associated glycans, with the antigenic structure located in the nonreducing termini (i.e., Fucα1-2Galβ1-3GalNAc-R, where Gal, GalNAc, and R represent, respectively, D-galactose, D-N-acetyl galactosamine, and reducing end), typically found in Globo H and related tumor antigens. The composition of FMS contains mainly the backbone of 1,4-mannan and 1,6-α-galactan and through the Fucα1-2Gal, Fucα1-3/4Man, Fucα1-4Xyl, and Fucα1-2Fuc linkages (where Man and Xyl represent d-mannose and d-xylose, respectively), underlying the molecular basis of the FMS-induced IgM antibodies against tumor-specific glycans.

  6. Vaccine-Induced Antibodies that Neutralize Group 1 and Group 2 Influenza A Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, M Gordon; Wheatley, Adam K; Thomas, Paul V; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Soto, Cinque; Bailer, Robert T; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Gillespie, Rebecca A; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Kong, Wing-Pui; Leung, Kwanyee; Narpala, Sandeep N; Prabhakaran, Madhu S; Yang, Eun Sung; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhang, Yi; Asokan, Mangaiarkarasi; Boyington, Jeffrey C; Bylund, Tatsiana; Darko, Sam; Lees, Christopher R; Ransier, Amy; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Wang, Lingshu; Whittle, James R; Wu, Xueling; Yassine, Hadi M; Santos, Celia; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Baxa, Ulrich; Mullikin, James C; Subbarao, Kanta; Douek, Daniel C; Graham, Barney S; Koup, Richard A; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Roederer, Mario; Shapiro, Lawrence; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; McDermott, Adrian B

    2016-07-28

    Antibodies capable of neutralizing divergent influenza A viruses could form the basis of a universal vaccine. Here, from subjects enrolled in an H5N1 DNA/MIV-prime-boost influenza vaccine trial, we sorted hemagglutinin cross-reactive memory B cells and identified three antibody classes, each capable of neutralizing diverse subtypes of group 1 and group 2 influenza A viruses. Co-crystal structures with hemagglutinin revealed that each class utilized characteristic germline genes and convergent sequence motifs to recognize overlapping epitopes in the hemagglutinin stem. All six analyzed subjects had sequences from at least one multidonor class, and-in half the subjects-multidonor-class sequences were recovered from >40% of cross-reactive B cells. By contrast, these multidonor-class sequences were rare in published antibody datasets. Vaccination with a divergent hemagglutinin can thus increase the frequency of B cells encoding broad influenza A-neutralizing antibodies. We propose the sequence signature-quantified prevalence of these B cells as a metric to guide universal influenza A immunization strategies. PMID:27453470

  7. Propylthiouracil induced anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with bone marrow plasmacytosis andgranulocytopenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdullah Ozkok

    2009-01-01

    @@ Antithyroid drugs are molecules known as thionamides that inhibit thyroid hormone synthesis by interfering with thyroid peroxidase mediated iodination of tyrosine residues in thyroglobulin. These extensively used drugs are associated with a variety of well-known side effects such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasctilitis, granulocytopenia and aplastic anemia.

  8. Recombinant Outer Capsid Glycoprotein (VP7 of Rotavirus Expressed in Insect Cells Induces Neutralizing Antibodies in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Keyvani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Rotaviruses cause diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. Rotavirus outer capsid protein, VP7 is major neutralizing antigen that is important component of subunit vaccine to prevent rotavirus infection.Many efforts have been done to produce recombinant VP7 that maintain native characteristics.We used baculovirus expression system to produce rotavirus VP7 protein and to study its immunogenicity. Methods: Simian rotavirus SA11 full-length VP7 ORF was cloned into a cloning plasmid and then the cloned gene was inserted into the linear DNA of baculovirus Autographa californica Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus (AcNPV downstream of the polyhedrin promoter by in vitro recombination reactions. The expressed VP7 in the insect cells was recognized by rabbit hyperimmune serum raised against SA11 rotavirus by Immunofluorescence and western blotting assays. Rabbits were immunized subcutaneously by cell extracts expressing VP7 protein. Results: Reactivity with anti-rotavirus antibody suggested that expressed VP7 protein had native antigenic determinants.Injection of recombinant VP7 in rabbits elicited the production of serum antibodies,which were able to recognize VP7 protein from SA11 rotavirus by Western blotting test and neutralized SA11 rotavirus in cell culture.Conclusion: Recombinant outer capsid glycoprotein (VP7 of rotavirus expressed in insect cells induces neutralizing antibodies in rabbits and may be a candidate of rotavirus vaccine.

  9. Single chain variable fragment antibodies block aggregation and toxicity induced by familial ALS-linked mutant forms of SOD1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadge, Ghanashyam D.; Pavlovic, John; Koduvayur, Sujatha P.; Kay, Brian K.; Roos, Raymond P.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases are familial (known as FALS) with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, and ~25% of FALS cases are caused by mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). There is convincing evidence that mutant SOD1 (mtSOD1) kills motor neurons (MNs) because of a gain-of-function toxicity, most likely related to aggregation of mtSOD1. A number of recent reports have suggested that antibodies can be used to treat mtSOD1-induced FALS. To follow up on the use of antibodies as potential therapeutics, we generated single chain fragments of variable region antibodies (scFvs) against SOD1, and then expressed them as ‘intrabodies’ within a motor neuron cell line. In the present study, we describe isolation of human scFvs that interfere with mtSOD1 in vitro aggregation and toxicity. These scFvs may have therapeutic potential in sporadic ALS, as well as FALS, given that sporadic ALS may also involve abnormalities in the SOD1 protein or activity. PMID:23607939

  10. Haploinsufficiency of activation-induced deaminase for antibody diversification and chromosome translocations both in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isora V Sernández

    Full Text Available The humoral immune response critically relies on the secondary diversification of antibodies. This diversification takes places through somatic remodelling of the antibody genes by two molecular mechanisms, Class Switch Recombination (CSR and Somatic Hypermutation (SHM. The enzyme Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID initiates both SHM and CSR by deaminating cytosine residues on the DNA of immunoglobulin genes. While crucial for immunity, AID-catalysed deamination is also the triggering event for the generation of lymphomagenic chromosome translocations. To address whether restricting the levels of AID expression in vivo contributes to the regulation of its function, we analysed mice harbouring a single copy of the AID gene (AID(+/-. AID(+/- mice express roughly 50% of normal AID levels, and display a mild hyperplasia, reminiscent of AID deficient mice and humans. Moreover, we found that AID(+/- cells have an impaired competence for CSR and SHM, which indicates that AID gene dose is limiting for its physiologic function. We next evaluated the impact of AID reduction in AID(+/- mice on the generation of chromosome translocations. Our results show that the frequency of AID-promoted c-myc/IgH translocations is reduced in AID(+/- mice, both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, AID is haploinsufficient for antibody diversification and chromosome translocations. These findings suggest that limiting the physiologic levels of AID expression can be a regulatory mechanism that ensures an optimal balance between immune proficiency and genome integrity.

  11. Drug-induced lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  12. Cytokines and Cytokine Profiles in Human Autoimmune Diseases and Animal Models of Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Kunz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise pathomechanisms of human autoimmune diseases are still poorly understood. However, a deepened understanding of these is urgently needed to improve disease prevention and early detection and guide more specific treatment approaches. In recent years, many new genes and signalling pathways involved in autoimmunity with often overlapping patterns between different disease entities have been detected. Major contributions were made by experiments using DNA microarray technology, which has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, among which were rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes. In systemic lupus erythematosus, a so-called interferon signature has been identified. In psoriasis, researchers found a particular immune signalling cluster. Moreover the identification of a new subset of inflammatory T cells, so-called Th17 T cells, secreting interleukin (IL-17 as one of their major cytokines and the identification of the IL-23/IL-17 axis of inflammation regulation, have significantly improved our understanding of autoimmune diseases. Since a plethora of new treatment approaches using antibodies or small molecule inhibitors specifically targeting cytokines, cellular receptors, or signalling mechanisms has emerged in recent years, more individualized treatment for affected patients may be within reach in the future.

  13. Intratypic heterologous vaccination of calves can induce an antibody response in presence of maternal antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.; Eble, P.L.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Chenard, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Maternal antibodies can interfere with foot-and-mouth disease vaccination. In this study we determined whether intratypic heterologous vaccination could help to improve herd immunity. Results - In unvaccinated calves, a half-life of maternal antibodies of 21 days was determined. At two

  14. High-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay for analysis of natural and vaccine-induced antibodies against human papillomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sehr

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, automated, purely add-on, high-throughput pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (HT-PBNA with excellent repeatability and run-to-run reproducibility was developed for human papillomavirus types (HPV 16, 18, 31, 45, 52, 58 and bovine papillomavirus type 1. Preparation of 384 well assay plates with serially diluted sera and the actual cell-based assay are separated in time, therefore batches of up to one hundred assay plates can be processed sequentially. A mean coefficient of variation (CV of 13% was obtained for anti-HPV 16 and HPV 18 titers for a standard serum tested in a total of 58 repeats on individual plates in seven independent runs. Natural antibody response was analyzed in 35 sera from patients with HPV 16 DNA positive cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2+ lesions. The new HT-PBNA is based on Gaussia luciferase with increased sensitivity compared to the previously described manual PBNA (manPBNA based on secreted alkaline phosphatase as reporter. Titers obtained with HT-PBNA were generally higher than titers obtained with the manPBNA. A good linear correlation (R(2 = 0.7 was found between HT-PBNA titers and anti-HPV 16 L1 antibody-levels determined by a Luminex bead-based GST-capture assay for these 35 sera and a Kappa-value of 0.72, with only 3 discordant sera in the low titer range. In addition to natural low titer antibody responses the high sensitivity of the HT-PBNA also allows detection of cross-neutralizing antibodies induced by commercial HPV L1-vaccines and experimental L2-vaccines. When analyzing the WHO international standards for HPV 16 and 18 we determined an analytical sensitivity of 0.864 and 1.105 mIU, respectively.

  15. Interrelation specific autoimmune pathologies of a thyroid gland with inorganic autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O V Paramonova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of a pathology of a thyroid gland at rheumatic diseases, in particular at rheumatoid arthritis, remains actual and to this day. The work purpose was studying antitelogenesis to thyroid hormones at patients with mixt autoimmune pathology. In whey of blood of patients with RA and autothyroid pathology are found out antibodies (AB to Т3 and Т4, their concentration correlates with activity of pathological process. It is shown, that level AB to Т3 and Т4 authentically differs from the maintenance of the given antibodies in whey of blood of healthy faces. Level of antibodies to thyroid hormones can be considered as the criterion predicting development of pathology of a thyroid gland at patients with RA.

  16. B cell autophagy mediates TLR7-dependent autoimmunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weindel, Chi G; Richey, Lauren J; Bolland, Silvia; Mehta, Abhiruchi J; Kearney, John F; Huber, Brigitte T

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, defined by loss of B cell self-tolerance that results in production of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and chronic inflammation. While the initiating events in lupus development are not well defined, overexpression of the RNA-recognizing toll-like receptor (TLR)7 has been linked to SLE in humans and mice. We postulated that autophagy plays an essential role in TLR7 activation of B cells for the induction of SLE by delivering RNA ligands to the endosomes, where this innate immune receptor resides. To test this hypothesis, we compared SLE development in Tlr7 transgenic (Tg) mice with or without B cell-specific ablation of autophagy (Cd19-Cre Atg5(f/f)). We observed that in the absence of B cell autophagy the 2 hallmarks of SLE, ANA and inflammation, were eliminated, thus curing these mice of lupus. This was also evident in the significantly extended survival of the autophagy-deficient mice compared to Tlr7.1 Tg mice. Furthermore, glomerulonephritis was ameliorated, and the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the knockout (KO) mice were indistinguishable from those of control mice. These data provide direct evidence that B cells require TLR7-dependent priming through an autophagy-dependent mechanism before autoimmunity is induced, thereafter involving many cell types. Surprisingly, hyper-IgM production persisted in Tlr7.1 Tg mice in the absence of autophagy, likely involving a different activation pathway than the production of autoantibodies. Furthermore, these mice still presented with anemia, but responded with a striking increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), possibly due to the absence of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  17. Age impact on autoimmune thyroid disease in females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Dana; Craciunescu, Mihalea; Timar, Romulus; Schiller, Adalbert; Pater, Liana; Craina, Marius

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid autoimmune disease, a widespread phenomenon in female population, impairs thyroid function during pregnancy. Identifying cases, which will develop hypothyroidism during pregnancy, is crucial in the follow-up process. The study group comprised 108 females, with ages between 20-40 years; with known inactive autoimmune thyroid disease, before pregnancy that became pregnant in the study follow-up period. They were monitored by means of clinical, hormonal and immunological assays. Supplemental therapy with thyroid hormones was used, where needed. Maternal age and level of anti-thyroid antibodies were used to predict thyroid functional impairment.

  18. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  19. Protective antibody and CD8+ T-cell responses to the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induced by a nanoparticle vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Kaba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The worldwide burden of malaria remains a major public health problem due, in part, to the lack of an effective vaccine against the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. An effective vaccine will most likely require the induction of antigen specific CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells as well as long-lasting antibody responses all working in concert to eliminate the infection. We report here the effective modification of a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN vaccine previously proven effective in control of a P. berghei infection in a rodent model to now present B- and T-cell epitopes of the human malaria parasite P. falciparum in a platform capable of being used in human subjects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To establish the basis for a SAPN-based vaccine, B- and CD8(+ T-cell epitopes from the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and the universal CD4 T-helper epitope PADRE were engineered into a versatile small protein (∼125 amino acids that self-assembles into a spherical nanoparticle repetitively displaying the selected epitopes. P. falciparum epitope specific immune responses were evaluated in mice using a transgenic P. berghei malaria parasite of mice expressing the human malaria full-length P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (Tg-Pb/PfCSP. We show that SAPN constructs, delivered in saline, can induce high-titer, long-lasting (1 year protective antibody and poly-functional (IFNγ(+, IL-2(+ long-lived central memory CD8(+ T-cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these Ab or CD8(+ T-cells can independently provide sterile protection against a lethal challenge of the transgenic parasites. CONCLUSION: The SAPN construct induces long-lasting antibody and cellular immune responses to epitope specific sequences of the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP and prevents infection in mice by a transgenic P. berghei parasite displaying the full length PfCSP.

  20. Long-term follow-up of seven patients with ophthalmopathy not associated with thyroid autoimmunity: heterogeneity of autoimmune ophthalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCorquodale T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Tom McCorquodale,1 Hooshang Lahooti,1 Bamini Gopinath,2 Jack R Wall11Department of Medicine, Nepean Clinical School, the University of Sydney, Penrith, NSW, Australia; 2Centre for Vision Research, the University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Ophthalmopathy is the most common extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease. However, in approximately 5% of cases this autoimmune eye disorder occurs in the apparent absence of Graves' hyperthyroidism: the so-called euthyroid Graves' disease (EGD.Methods: Seven patients with EGD were followed for evidence of thyroid and orbital autoimmunity, for up to 10 years. Calsequestrin and collagen XIII antibodies were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and TSH-receptor (TSH-r antibodies were measured as TSH-r-binding antibody (TRAb and thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI. Eye signs were characterized and quantified as clinical activity score (CAS, NOSPECS classes, Nunery types 1 and 2, and margin-reflex distance (MRD.Results: Calsequestrin antibodies were detected on at least one occasion in three of the seven patients and collagen XIII antibodies were detected one or more times in five patients. In one patient with isolated congestive ophthalmopathy who was studied intensely, collagen XIII antibodies were initially positive and then became negative as the eye disease stabilized, while antibodies targeting calsequestrin were always negative. TRAb was not detected in any patient, but TSI was detected in three patients on one occasion each. Ultrasound abnormalities were found in four of the six patients for whom this was carried out, but there was no clear evidence for thyroiditis in any of these patients. For comparison, 13 patients were studied with typical Graves' ophthalmopathy. There were no significant differences compared to EGD in respect to the prevalence of positive calsequestrin or collagen XIII antibodies, but these patients included more

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Inhibition of Rat Ependymal Cilia Is Attenuated by Antipneumolysin Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Hirst, Robert A; Mohammed, Bashir J.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Andrew, Peter W.; O'Callaghan, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Ciliated ependymal cells line the ventricular surfaces and aqueducts of the brain. In ex vivo experiments, pneumolysin caused rapid inhibition of the ependymal ciliary beat frequency and caused ependymal cell disruption. Wild-type pneumococci and pneumococci deficient in pneumolysin caused ciliary slowing, but penicillin lysis of wild-type, not pneumolysin-deficient, pneumococci increased the extent of ciliary inhibition. This effect was abolished by antipneumolysin antibody. Ependymal ciliar...

  2. Intranasal Delivery of Group B Meningococcal Native Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccine Induces Local Mucosal and Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Shoemaker, David R.; Saunders, Nancy B.; Brandt, Brenda L.; Moran, E. Ellen; LaClair, Andrew D.; Zollinger, Wendell D.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown that intranasal immunization of mice with meningococcal native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) induces both a good local mucosal antibody response and a good systemic bactericidal antibody response. However, in the intranasal mouse model, some of the NOMV entered the lung and caused an acute granulocytic response. We therefore developed an alternate animal model using the rabbit. This model reduces the probability of lung involvement and more closely mimics intranasal ...

  3. Immunisation with recombinant PfEMP1 domains elicits functional rosette-inhibiting and phagocytosis-inducing antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Ghumra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rosetting is a Plasmodium falciparum virulence factor implicated in the pathogenesis of life-threatening malaria. Rosetting occurs when parasite-derived P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein One (PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes binds to human receptors on uninfected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 is a possible target for a vaccine to induce antibodies to inhibit rosetting and prevent severe malaria. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We examined the vaccine potential of the six extracellular domains of a rosette-mediating PfEMP1 variant (ITvar9/R29var1 from the R29 parasite strain by immunizing rabbits with recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. Antibodies raised to each domain were tested for surface fluorescence with live infected erythrocytes, rosette inhibition and phagocytosis-induction. Antibodies to all PfEMP1 domains recognized the surface of live infected erythrocytes down to low concentrations (0.02-1.56 µg/ml of total IgG. Antibodies to all PfEMP1 domains except for the second Duffy-Binding-Like region inhibited rosetting (50% inhibitory concentration 0.04-4 µg/ml and were able to opsonize and induce phagocytosis of infected erythrocytes at low concentrations (1.56-6.25 µg/ml. Antibodies to the N-terminal region (NTS-DBL1α were the most effective in all assays. All antibodies were specific for the R29 parasite strain, and showed no functional activity against five other rosetting strains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are encouraging for vaccine development as they show that potent antibodies can be generated to recombinant PfEMP1 domains that will inhibit rosetting and induce phagocytosis of infected erythrocytes. However, further work is needed on rosetting mechanisms and cross-reactivity in field isolates to define a set of PfEMP1 variants that could induce functional antibodies against a broad range of P. falciparum rosetting parasites.

  4. Immunization of rabbits with nematode Ascaris lumbricoides antigens induces antibodies cross-reactive to house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Takuya; Khan, Al Fazal; Yasueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Akemi; Fukutomi, Yuma; Takai, Toshiro; Zaman, Khalequz; Yunus, Md; Takeuchi, Haruko; Iwata, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    There are controversial reports on the relationship between helminthic infection and allergic diseases. Although IgE cross-reactivity between nematode Ascaris antigens and house dust-mite allergens in allergic patients have been reported, whether Ascaris or the mite is the primary sensitizer remains unknown. Here we found that immunization of naïve animals with Ascaris lumbricoides (Al) antigens induced production of antibodies cross-reactive to mite antigens from Dermatophagoides farinae (Df). Sera from Bangladeshi children showed IgE reactivity to Ascaris and mite extracts. IgG from rabbits immunized with Al extract exhibited reactivity to Df antigens. Treatment of the anti-Al antibody with Df antigen-coupled beads eliminated the reactivity to Df antigens. In immunoblot analysis, an approximately 100-kDa Df band was the most reactive to anti-Al IgG. The present study is the first step towards the establishment of animal models to study the relationship between Ascaris infection and mite-induced allergic diseases.

  5. Y-Hydroxyphosphonate inducing single-chain antibodies capable of catalyzing soman hydrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王字玲; 荣康泰; 杨日芳; 恽榴红

    2000-01-01

    A γ-hydroxyphosphonate P6 (O1-methyl-O2-(1, 2, 2-trimethylpropyl)-2-hydroxy-5-nitro-phenyl methylphosphonic acid) which is proposed to be an analog of the transition state in hydrolysis of soman was synthesized. Artificial antigens were obtained by conjugating P6 to the carrier proteins BSA (bovine serum albumin) and LPH (Limulus polyphenus hemocyanin). Mice were immunized with P6-LPH and recombinant single-chain antibody phage display library was constructed. After 4 rounds of panning against P6-BSA and competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay, more than 70 strains of phage antibodies capable of binding soman were obtained and 11 of them can accelerate the hydrolysis reaction of soman. One of them (EP6) was studied further. Soluble single-chain antibody was prepared and purification was performed by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The kinetic experiment was carried out showing that the turnover number kcatt= 198 min-1 and the rate enhancement kcatkuncat = 122 419. When 0.16 mg · mL-1

  6. Is autoimmune hepatitis a frequent finding among HCV patients with intense interface hepatitis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rosilene; G; Badiani; Vitória; Becker; Renata; M; Perez; Carla; AL; Matos; Lara; B; Lemos; Valéria; P; Lanzoni; Luis; Eduardo; C; Andrade; Alessandra; Dellavance; Antonio; Eduardo; B; Silva; Maria; Lucia; G; Ferraz

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the overlap of autoimmune hepatitis in hepatitis C virus(HCV)-infected patients with intense interface hepatitis.METHODS:Among 1759 patients with hepatitis C submitted to liver biopsy,92(5.2%) presented intense interface hepatitis.These patients were evaluated regarding the presence of antinuclear antibody(ANA),anti-smooth muscle antibody(SMA) and anti-liver/kidney microsomal antibody(LKM-1),levels of γ-globulin and histological findings related to autoimmune hepatitis(plasma cell infiltrate...

  7. Update on autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas Teufel; Peter R Galle; Stephan Kanzler

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a necroinflammatory liver disease of unknown etiology that occurs in children and adults of all ages. Characteristics are its autoimmune features, hyperglobulinemia (IgG), and the presence of circulating autoantibodies, as well as a response to immunosuppressant drugs. Current treatment consists of prednisone and azathioprine and in most patients this disease has become very treatable. Over the past 2 years, a couple of new insights into the genetic aspects, clinical course and treatment of AIH have been reported, which will be the focus of this review. In particular, we concentrate on genome-wide microsatellite analysis, a novel mouse model of AIH, the evaluation of a large AIH cohort for overlap syndromes,suggested novel criteria for the diagnosis of AIH, and the latest studies on treatment of AIH with budenoside and mycophenolate mofetil.

  8. Assessment of metallothionein and antibodies to metallothionein in normal and autistic children having exposure to vaccine-derived thimerosal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijendra K; Hanson, Jeff

    2006-06-01

    Allergic autoimmune reaction after exposure to heavy metals such as mercury may play a causal role in autism, a developmental disorder of the central nervous system. As metallothionein (MT) is the primary metal-detoxifying protein in the body, we conducted a study of the MT protein and antibodies to metallothionein (anti-MT) in normal and autistic children whose exposure to mercury was only from thimerosal-containing vaccines. Laboratory analysis by immunoassays revealed that the serum level of MT did not significantly differ between normal and autistic children. Furthermore, autistic children harboured normal levels of anti-MT, including antibodies to isoform MT-I (anti-MT-I) and MT-II (anti-MT-II), without any significant difference between normal and autistic children. Our findings indicate that because autistic children have a normal profile of MT and anti-MT, the mercury-induced autoimmunity to MT may not be implicated in the pathogenesis of autism.

  9. IL-35 and Autoimmunity: a Comprehensive Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinjung; Leung, Patrick S C; Bowlus, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin 35 (IL-35) is the most recently identified member of the IL-12 family of cytokines and offers the potential to be a target for new therapies for autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Similar to other members of the IL-12 family including IL-12, IL-23, and IL-27, IL-35 is composed of a heterodimer of α and β chains, which in the case of IL-35 are the p35 and Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) proteins. However, unlike its proinflammatory relatives, IL-35 has immunosuppressive effects that are mediated through regulatory T and B cells. Although there are limited data available regarding the role of IL-35 in human autoimmunity, several murine models of autoimmunity suggest that IL-35 may have potent effects in regulating immunoreactivity via IL-10-dependent mechanisms. We suggest that similar effects are operational in human disease and IL-35-directed therapies hold significant promise. In particular, we emphasize that IL-35 has immunosuppressive ability that are mediated via regulatory T and B cells that are IL-10 dependent. Further, although deletion of IL-35 does not result in spontaneous breach of tolerance, recombinant IL-35 can improve autoimmune responses in several experimental models.

  10. Peptide immunotherapy in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Anderton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We now have potent drugs available to treat the inflammatory component of multiple sclerosis (MS. However, not all patients respond, the drugs are not curative, and the associated risks to beneficial immune surveillance are considerable. A more desirable approach is to specifically target those comparatively rare T lymphocytes that are orchestrating the autoimmune attack. Using the autoantigen itself to instill immune tolerance in those cells remains a holy grail of immunotherapy. Peptide immunotherapy (PIT is highly effective at silencing autoimmune responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, and clinical trials of PIT are underway in MS. This review discusses the current paradigms for PIT-induced tolerance in naïve T cells. It highlights the need for better understanding of the mode of action of PIT upon memory and effector T cells that are responsible for driving/sustaining ongoing autoimmune pathology. Recent studies in EAEsuggest genetic and epigenetic changes in these pathogenic T-cell populations in response to PIT. Finally, future challenges to effective translation of PIT to the clinic are considered.

  11. Etiopathogenesis of Insulin Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Kanatsuna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmunity against pancreatic islet beta cells is strongly associated with proinsulin, insulin, or both. The insulin autoreactivity is particularly pronounced in children with young age at onset of type 1 diabetes. Possible mechanisms for (proinsulin autoimmunity may involve beta-cell destruction resulting in proinsulin peptide presentation on HLA-DR-DQ Class II molecules in pancreatic draining lymphnodes. Recent data on proinsulin peptide binding to type 1 diabetes-associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 is reviewed and illustrated by molecular modeling. The importance of the cellular immune reaction involving cytotoxic CD8-positive T cells to kill beta cells through Class I MHC is discussed along with speculations of the possible role of B lymphocytes in presenting the proinsulin autoantigen over and over again through insulin-carrying insulin autoantibodies. In contrast to autoantibodies against other islet autoantigens such as GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8 transporters, it has not been possible yet to standardize the insulin autoantibody test. As islet autoantibodies predict type 1 diabetes, it is imperative to clarify the mechanisms of insulin autoimmunity.

  12. Easily obtainable clinical features increase the diagnostic accuracy for later autoimmune diabetes in adults. An evidence based report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, M.W.M.D.; Meijer, M.; Peeters, B.; Poulsen, M.N.F.; Rutten, M.J.; Bots, M.L.; Heijden, van der G.J.M.G.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) represents a subgroup of diabetes mellitus. LADA is characterised by adult-onset diabetes and circulating autoimmune antibodies. LADA patients may need a different therapeutic approach than the usual type 2 diabetes mellitus. When LADA is inadeq

  13. Fluorescence Adherence Inhibition Assay: A Novel Functional Assessment of Blocking Virus Attachment by Vaccine-Induced Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Asati

    Full Text Available Neutralizing antibodies induced by vaccination or natural infection play a critically important role in protection against the viral diseases. In general, neutralization of the viral infection occurs via two major pathways: pre- and post-attachment modes, the first being the most important for such infections as influenza and polio, the latter being significant for filoviruses. Neutralizing capacity of antibodies is typically evaluated by virus neutralization assays that assess reduction of viral infectivity to the target cells in the presence of functional antibodies. Plaque reduction neutralization test, microneutralization and immunofluorescent assays are often used as gold standard virus neutralization assays. However, these methods are associated with several important prerequisites such as use of live virus requiring safety precautions, tedious evaluation procedure and long assessment time. Hence, there is a need for a robust, inexpensive high throughput functional assay that can be performed rapidly using inactivated virus, without extensive safety precautions. Herein, we report a novel high throughput Fluorescence Adherence Inhibition assay (fADI using inactivated virus labeled with fluorescent secondary antibodies virus and Vero cells or erythrocytes as targets. It requires only few hours to assess pre-attachment neutralizing capacity of donor sera. fADI assay was tested successfully on donors immunized with polio, yellow fever and influenza vaccines. To further simplify and improve the throughput of the assay, we have developed a mathematical approach for calculating the 50% titers from a single sample dilution, without the need to analyze multi-point titration curves. Assessment of pre- and post-vaccination human sera from subjects immunized with IPOL®, YF-VAX® and 2013-2014 Fluzone® vaccines demonstrated high efficiency of the assay. The results correlated very well with microneutralization assay performed independently by the FDA

  14. Fluorescence Adherence Inhibition Assay: A Novel Functional Assessment of Blocking Virus Attachment by Vaccine-Induced Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Atul; Kachurina, Olga; Karol, Alex; Dhir, Vipra; Nguyen, Michael; Parkhill, Robert; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Chumakov, Konstantin; Warren, William; Kachurin, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies induced by vaccination or natural infection play a critically important role in protection against the viral diseases. In general, neutralization of the viral infection occurs via two major pathways: pre- and post-attachment modes, the first being the most important for such infections as influenza and polio, the latter being significant for filoviruses. Neutralizing capacity of antibodies is typically evaluated by virus neutralization assays that assess reduction of viral infectivity to the target cells in the presence of functional antibodies. Plaque reduction neutralization test, microneutralization and immunofluorescent assays are often used as gold standard virus neutralization assays. However, these methods are associated with several important prerequisites such as use of live virus requiring safety precautions, tedious evaluation procedure and long assessment time. Hence, there is a need for a robust, inexpensive high throughput functional assay that can be performed rapidly using inactivated virus, without extensive safety precautions. Herein, we report a novel high throughput Fluorescence Adherence Inhibition assay (fADI) using inactivated virus labeled with fluorescent secondary antibodies virus and Vero cells or erythrocytes as targets. It requires only few hours to assess pre-attachment neutralizing capacity of donor sera. fADI assay was tested successfully on donors immunized with polio, yellow fever and influenza vaccines. To further simplify and improve the throughput of the assay, we have developed a mathematical approach for calculating the 50% titers from a single sample dilution, without the need to analyze multi-point titration curves. Assessment of pre- and post-vaccination human sera from subjects immunized with IPOL®, YF-VAX® and 2013-2014 Fluzone® vaccines demonstrated high efficiency of the assay. The results correlated very well with microneutralization assay performed independently by the FDA Center of

  15. Fluorescence Adherence Inhibition Assay: A Novel Functional Assessment of Blocking Virus Attachment by Vaccine-Induced Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Atul; Kachurina, Olga; Karol, Alex; Dhir, Vipra; Nguyen, Michael; Parkhill, Robert; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Chumakov, Konstantin; Warren, William; Kachurin, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies induced by vaccination or natural infection play a critically important role in protection against the viral diseases. In general, neutralization of the viral infection occurs via two major pathways: pre- and post-attachment modes, the first being the most important for such infections as influenza and polio, the latter being significant for filoviruses. Neutralizing capacity of antibodies is typically evaluated by virus neutralization assays that assess reduction of viral infectivity to the target cells in the presence of functional antibodies. Plaque reduction neutralization test, microneutralization and immunofluorescent assays are often used as gold standard virus neutralization assays. However, these methods are associated with several important prerequisites such as use of live virus requiring safety precautions, tedious evaluation procedure and long assessment time. Hence, there is a need for a robust, inexpensive high throughput functional assay that can be performed rapidly using inactivated virus, without extensive safety precautions. Herein, we report a novel high throughput Fluorescence Adherence Inhibition assay (fADI) using inactivated virus labeled with fluorescent secondary antibodies virus and Vero cells or erythrocytes as targets. It requires only few hours to assess pre-attachment neutralizing capacity of donor sera. fADI assay was tested successfully on donors immunized with polio, yellow fever and influenza vaccines. To further simplify and improve the throughput of the assay, we have developed a mathematical approach for calculating the 50% titers from a single sample dilution, without the need to analyze multi-point titration curves. Assessment of pre- and post-vaccination human sera from subjects immunized with IPOL®, YF-VAX® and 2013-2014 Fluzone® vaccines demonstrated high efficiency of the assay. The results correlated very well with microneutralization assay performed independently by the FDA Center of

  16. Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Todorović-Đilas Ljiljana; Ičin Tijana; Novaković-Paro Jovanka; Bajkin Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction, Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a...

  17. CD8+ T-Cell Deficiency, Epstein-Barr Virus Infection, Vitamin D Deficiency, and Steps to Autoimmunity: A Unifying Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Pender

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T-cell deficiency is a feature of many chronic autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis, vitiligo, bullous pemphigoid, alopecia areata, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, myasthenia gravis, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, and pernicious anaemia. It also occurs in healthy blood relatives of patients with autoimmune diseases, suggesting it is genetically determined. Here it is proposed that this CD8+ T-cell deficiency underlies the development of chronic autoimmune diseases by impairing CD8+ T-cell control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection, with the result that EBV-infected autoreactive B cells accumulate in the target organ where they produce pathogenic autoantibodies and provide costimulatory survival signals to autoreactive T cells which would otherwise die in the target organ by activation-induced apoptosis. Autoimmunity is postulated to evolve in the following steps: (1 CD8+ T-cell deficiency, (2 primary EBV infection, (3 decreased CD8+ T-cell control of EBV, (4 increased EBV load and increased anti-EBV antibodies, (5 EBV infection in the target organ, (6 clonal expansion of EBV-infected autoreactive B cells in the target organ, (7 infiltration of autoreactive T cells into the target organ, and (8 development of ectopic lymphoid follicles in the target organ. It is also proposed that deprivation of sunlight and vitamin D at higher latitudes facilitates the development of autoimmune diseases by aggravating the CD8+ T-cell deficiency and thereby further impairing control of EBV. The hypothesis makes predictions which can be tested, including the prevention and successful treatment of chronic autoimmune diseases by controlling EBV infection.

  18. Nitrosative Stress and Nitrated Proteins in Trichloroethene-Mediated Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Gangduo Wang; Jianling Wang; Xuemei Luo; Shakeel Ansari, G. A.; M Firoze Khan

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been linked to a variety of autoimmune diseases (ADs) including SLE, scleroderma and hepatitis. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ADs are largely unknown. Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggested the contribution of oxidative/nitrosative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) supplementation provided protection by attenuating oxidative stress. This study was unde...

  19. Mast Cells Contribute to Peripheral Tolerance and Attenuate Autoimmune Vasculitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Poh-Yi; Summers, Shaun A.; Ooi, Joshua D.; O’Sullivan, Kim M.; Tan, Diana S.Y.; Muljadi, Ruth C.M.; Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A. Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells contribute to the modulation of the immune response, but their role in autoimmune renal disease is not well understood. Here, we induced autoimmunity resulting in focal necrotizing GN by immunizing wild-type or mast cell-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice with myeloperoxidase. Mast cell-deficient mice exhibited more antimyeloperoxidase CD4+ T cells, enhanced dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to myeloperoxidase, and more severe focal necrotizing GN. Furthermore, the lymph no...

  20. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    OpenAIRE

    Steinman Lawrence; Ho Peggy; Luo Jian; Wyss-Coray Tony

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc). Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal co...

  1. AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE DURING PREGNANCY AND THE MICROCHIMERISM LEGACY OF PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina M Adams Waldorf; Nelson, J. Lee

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy has both short-term effects and long-term consequences. For women who have an autoimmune disease and subsequently become pregnant, pregnancy can induce amelioration of the mother’s disease, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, while exacerbating or having no effect on other autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus. That pregnancy also leaves a long-term legacy has recently become apparent by the discovery that bi-directional cell trafficking results in persistence of fetal ...

  2. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood may be due to: Chronic liver disease Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Myositis (inflammatory muscle disease) ... Saunders; 2011:chap 51. Read More Antibody Arthritis Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Liver disease Scleroderma Systemic ...

  3. Clinical features and management of autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward L Krawitt

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology which can progress to cirrhosis.Its clinical manifestations are highly variable and sometimes follow a fluctuating course.Diagnosis is based on characteristic histologic,clinical,biochemical and serological findings. Anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive treatment frequently induces remission but long-term maintenance therapy is often required. Liver transplantation is generally successful in patients with decompensated cirrhosis unresponsive to or intolerant of medical therapy.

  4. Chronic calorie restriction attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Piccio, Laura; Stark, Jennifer L.; Cross, Anne H.

    2008-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) prevents many age-associated diseases and prolongs the lifespan. CR induces multiple metabolic and physiologic modifications, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects that may be beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS). The present studies sought to determine whether CR or increased calorie intake alters the course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the leading animal model for MS. SJL and C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 40% ...

  5. High Dose Cyclophosphamide Treatment for Autoimmune Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Brodsky, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg) was initially developed as a conditioning regimen for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Recently, high-dose cyclophosphamide without bone marrow transplantation has been employed as a method to induce durable treatment-free remissions in severe aplastic anemia and a variety of other severe autoimmune disorders. The premise underlying this approach is that high-dose cyclophosphamide is maximally immunosuppressive, but not myeloablative. Early hemato...

  6. Prevalence of serological markers for celiac disease (IgA and IgG class antigliadin antibodies and IgA class antiendomysium antibodies in patients with autoimmune rheumatologic diseases in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil Pesquisa de anticorpos antigliadina (classes IgA e IgG e anticorpos antiendomísio classe IgA, em pacientes com doenças reumatológicas autoimunes em Belo Horizonte, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor de Barros Koehne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Patients with autoimmune rheumatologic conditions and celiac disease tend to have a variety of autoantibodies, many of which have no clear pathogenic role. The literature contains frequent reports of celiac disease being more prevalent in patients with rheumatologic diseases, although this remains controversial. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of positive serum tests for celiac disease, particularly IgA and IgG antigliadin (AGA antibodies and IgA antiendomysium antibodies (EmA in patients with autoimmune rheumatologic diseases. A second aim was to correlate positive serum tests with prednisone and immunosuppressant medication. METHODS: A total of 190 adults and pediatric patients with a variety of autoimmune rheumatologic diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthrophathies were evaluated and tested for IgA and IgG antigliadin-antibodies and IgA antiendomysium antibodies. Patients with positive serum tests underwent endoscopic duodenal biopsies for pathology studies. RESULTS: There were four positive sera (2.1% for AGA IgA, all of which tested negative for AGA IgG and EmA. Three sera (1.6% tested positive for AGA IgG; all were negative for AGA IgA and EmA. The EmA test at a 1:2.5 serum dilution tested positive in 94 patients (49.5%; at a 1:5 serum dilution it was positive in 41 patients (21.6%. Eleven subjects tested positive for EmA at 1:40 dilution; and all of these tested negative for IgA tissue antitransglutaminase (tTG antibodies. Nine of the 11 EmA-positive patients and all 7 patients with positive antigliadin antibodies tests underwent duodenal endoscopic biopsies, and no significant changes were demonstrated in their duodenal mucosa. A positive EmA was associated with elevated optical density AGA IgA readings; however, there was no relationship between positive EmA and AGA IgG optical density readings. Prednisone and immunosuppressant use were unrelated

  7. Antigen and substrate withdrawal in the management of autoimmune thrombotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cines, Douglas B; McCrae, Keith R; Zheng, X Long; Sachais, Bruce S; Luning Prak, Eline T; Siegel, Don L

    2012-11-15

    Prevailing approaches to manage autoimmune thrombotic disorders, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, include immunosuppression and systemic anticoagulation, though neither provides optimal outcome for many patients. A different approach is suggested by the concurrence of autoantibodies and their antigenic targets in the absence of clinical disease, such as platelet factor 4 in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and β(2)-glycoprotein-I (β(2)GPI) in antiphospholipid syndrome. The presence of autoantibodies in the absence of disease suggests that conformational changes or other alterations in endogenous protein autoantigens are required for recognition by pathogenic autoantibodies. In thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, the clinical impact of ADAMTS13 deficiency caused by autoantibodies likely depends on the balance between residual antigen, that is, enzyme activity, and demand imposed by local genesis of ultralarge multimers of von Willebrand factor. A corollary of these concepts is that disrupting platelet factor 4 and β(2)GPI conformation (or ultralarge multimer of von Willebrand factor oligomerization or function) might provide a disease-targeted approach to prevent thrombosis without systemic anticoagulation or immunosuppression. Validation of this approach requires a deeper understanding of how seemingly normal host proteins become antigenic or undergo changes that increase antibody avidity, and how they can be altered to retain adaptive functions while shedding epitopes prone to elicit harmful autoimmunity. PMID:22966172

  8. γ-Hydroxyphosphonate inducing single-chain antibodies capable of catalyzing soman hydrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A γ-hydroxyphosphonate P6 (O1-methyl-O2-(1, 2, 2-trimethylpropyl)-2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenyl methylphosphonic acid) which is proposed to be an analog of the transition state in hydrolysis of soman was synthesized. Artificial antigens were obtained by conjugating P6 to the carrier proteins BSA (bovine serum albumin) and LPH (Limulus polyphenus hemocyanin). Mice were immunized with P6-LPH and recombinant single-chain antibody phage display library was constructed. After 4 rounds of panning against P6-BSA and competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay, more than 70 strains of phage antibodies capable of binding soman were obtained and 11 of them can accelerate the hydrolysis reaction of soman. One of them (EP6) was studied further. Soluble single-chain antibody was prepared and purification was performed by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The kinetic experiment was carried out showing that the turnover number kcat = 198 minγ1 and the rate enhancement kcat/kuncat = 122 419. When 0.16 mg·mLγ1 EP6 was preincubated in vitro with 0.132 mmol·Lγ1 (220 g·kgγ1 = 1.1×LD95) of soman prior to the administration to mice by subcutaneous route, all animals (19 mice) survived whereas all the control mice (14) treated with PBS and soman died within 30 min. Furthermore, EP6 could prolong the latent time of spasm and death when mice were passively immunized with EP6 intravenously 15 min before 1×LD95 of soman challenge. These results demonstrate that EP6 is able to increase the rate of soman degradation and protect against soman's toxicity, especially in vitro.

  9. Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis: Spectrum of the disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe; Maggiore; Silvia; Nastasio; Marco; Sciveres

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile autoimmune hepatitis(JAIH) is a progressive inflammatory liver disease, affecting mainly young girls, from infancy to late adolescence, characterized by active liver damage, as shown by high serum activity of aminotransferases, by elevated immunoglobulin G levels, high titers of serum non organ-specific andorgan-specific autoantibodies, and by interface hepatitis on liver biopsy. It is a multifactorial disease of unknown etiology in which environmental factors act as a trigger in genetically predisposed individuals. Two types of JAIH are identified according to the autoan-tibody panel detected at diagnosis: AIH-1, characterized by the presence of anti-smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody and AIH-2, by anti-liver-kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and/or by the presence of anti-liver cytosol type 1 antibody. Epidemiological distribution, genetic markers, clinical presentation and pattern of serum cytokines differentiate the two types of AIH suggesting possible pathogenetic mechanisms. The most effective therapy for AIH is pharmacological suppression of the immune response. Treatment should be started as soon as the diagnosis is made to avoid severe liver damage and progression of fibrosis. The aim of this review is to outline the most significant and peculiar features of JAIH, based largely on our own personal database and on a review of current literature.

  10. Epilepsy in systemic autoimmune disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmunity and inflammation have been implicated as causative factors of seizures and epilepsy. Autoimmune disorders can affect the central nervous system as an isolated syndrome or be part of a systemic disease. Examples of systemic autoimmune disorders include systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, rheumatic arthritis, and Sjögren syndrome. Overall, there is a 5-fold increased risk of seizures and epilepsy in children with systemic autoimmune disorders. Various etiologic factors have been implicated in causing the seizures in these patients, including direct inflammation, effect on blood vessels (vasculitis), and production of autoantibodies. Potential treatments for this autoimmune injury include steroids, immunoglobulins, and other immune-modulatory therapies. A better understanding of the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases could lead to targeted treatments and better outcomes. PMID:25510945

  11. Interleukin 1-induced down-regulation of antibody binding to CD4 molecules on human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, N; Christensen, L D; Ødum, Niels;

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is involved in the early activation of T lymphocytes. The CD4 antigen, described as a phenotypic marker of helper T cells, is also important in early T-cell activation by its ability to bind to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells, and to transmit positive (and......+ cells. Under optimal growth conditions, the initial reduction in antibody binding to CD4 was followed by an apparent re-expression of the CD4 antigen even in the presence of high concentrations of IL-1. This re-expression did not occur if the cells were cultured at 4 degrees C, or after treatment...

  12. Flagellin induces antibody responses through a TLR5- and inflammasome-independent pathway1

    OpenAIRE

    López-Yglesias, Américo Harry; Zhao, Xiaodan; Ellen K Quarles; Lai, Marvin A.; VandenBos, Tim; Strong, Roland K.; Smith, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellin is a potent immunogen that activates the innate immune system via TLR5 and Naip5/6, and generates strong T and B cell responses. The adaptor protein MyD88 is critical for signaling by TLR5, as well as IL-1 and IL-18 receptors, major downstream mediators of the Naip5/6 Nlrc4-inflammasome. Herein we define roles of known flagellin receptors and MyD88 in antibody responses generated towards flagellin. We used mice genetically deficient in flagellin recognition pathways to characterize ...

  13. Autoimmune liver serology: Current diagnostic and clinical challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios P Bogdanos; Pietro Invernizzi; Ian R Mackay; Diego Vergani

    2008-01-01

    Liver-related autoantibodies are crucial for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AiLD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC),and the sclerosing cholangitis variants in adults and children.AIH-1 is specified by anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and smooth muscle antibody (SMA). AIH-2 is specified by antibody to liver kidney microsomal antigen type-1 (anti-LKM1) and anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1).SMA,ANA and anti-LKM antibodies can be present in de-novo AIH following liver transplantation.PBC is specified by antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) reacting with enzymes of the 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complexes (chiefly pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit) and disease-specific ANA mainly reacting with nuclear pore gp210 and nuclear body sp100. Sclerosing cholangitis presents as at least two variants,first the classical primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) mostly affecting adult men wherein the only (and nonspecific) reactivity is an atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA),also termed perinuclear anti-neutrophil nuclear antibodies (p-ANNA) and second the childhood disease called autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) with serological features resembling those of type 1 AIH.Liver diagnostic serology is a fast-expanding area of investigation as new purified and recombinant autoantigens,and automated technologies such as ELISAs and bead assays,become available to complement (or even compete with) traditional immunofluorescence procedures.We survey for the first time global trends in quality assurance impacting as it does on (1) manufacturers/purveyors of kits and reagents,(2) diagnostic service laboratories that fulfill clinicians'requirements, and (3) the end-user,the physician providing patient care,who must properly interpret test results in the overall clinical context.

  14. AUTOIMMUNE CYTOPENIAS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, FACTS AND MYTHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavankumar Tandra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available CLL has been defined as presence of more than 5000 small mature appearing monoclonal B lymphocytes with a specific immunophenotype in peripheral blood. It is a well-known fact that CLL is associated with autoimmune cytopenias. CLL cells are CD5+ B lymphocytes, and usually are not the “guilty” cells which produce autoantibodies. T cell defect is another characteristic of CLL and the total number of T cells is increased, and there is inversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is the most common autoimmune complication of CLL and has been reported in 10-25% of CLL patients. However, the stage-adjusted estimated rate of AIHA in CLL is about 5%. Conversely, CLL is three times more common in patients who present with AIHA. Direct agglutinin test (DAT is positive in 7-14% of CLL patients but AIHA may also occur in DAT negative patients. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT is the second most common complication of CLL and has been reported in 2-3% of patients. DAT is positive in AIT but presence of antiplatelet antibodies is neither diagnostic nor reliable. Autoimmune neutropenia (AIN and pure red cell aplasia (PRCA are very rare complications of CLL and like other autoimmune complications of CLL may occur at any clinical stage. It is believed that most case reports of AIN and PRCA in CLL actually belong to large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGL. Non-hematologic autoimmune complications of CLL including cold agglutinin disease (CAD, paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP, acquired angioedema, and anti-myelin associated globulin are rare. Before starting any treatment, clinicians should distinguish between autoimmune cytopenias and massive bone marrow infiltration since autoimmune complications of CLL are not necessarily equal to advanced disease with poor prognosis. According to IWCLL guideline, steroids are the mainstay of treatment of simple autoimmunity. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, cyclosporine, and rituximab are used in

  15. Evaluation of the effects of dexamethasone-induced stress on levels of natural antibodies in immunized laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Stefano; Rossetti, Michele; Tomaso, Francesco Di; Caputo, Anna Rocchina

    2016-09-01

    Natural antibodies (NAb) are an important humoral component of innate immunity, playing a pivotal role as first line of defence against pathogens even without prior antigen-specific activation or antigen-driven selection. The levels of NAb in plasma of young laying hens were explored in more detail and identified 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl bovine serum albumin (TNP-BSA), as the non-self antigen showing the highest levels of IgΥ- and IgM-NAb. Subsequently, the relation between specific antibody (SpAb) levels and NAb levels, and the effect of dexamethasone (DEX)-induced stress on the acquired Ab response and on NAb levels were examined. According to obtained results, the affinity of NAb and SpAb, measured using the thiocyanate elution method, resulted higher in SpAb than in NAb. After stress induction, IgM-NAb and SpAb levels showed a transient decrease, whereas the levels of IgΥ-NAb were not changed. Moreover, statistical analysis showed positive correlations between IgΥ- and IgM-NAb levels and between IgM-NAb and SpAb levels that are lost as stress has been induced, whereas no correlation was observed between IgΥ-NAb and SpAb levels, neither before nor after the DEX-administration. This indicates that IgM-NAb assessment could be a valid tool to estimate the potential of the acquired Ab response and that the dexamethasone-induced stress condition causes depression of IgM-NAb levels and the acquired Ab response, but it has no evaluable effects on IgΥ-NAb levels. PMID:27436442

  16. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawant, Sandeep; Parr, Jeremy; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis in children can be generalized or ocular, and associated with antibodies to acetylcholine receptors or muscle-specific kinase, but it can be negative for those antibodies (seronegative). It needs to be distinguished from congenital myasthenic syndromes and other neuromuscular diseases. In the perinatal period, transient neonatal myasthenia and arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, due to maternal antibodies, need to be considered. Juvenile myasthenia is similar in presentation and treatment to that in adults. Here we present guidelines for recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:23622368

  17. Induction of autoimmune disease by radiation exposure. Analysis of molecular structure of myeloperoxidase in neutrophil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) that is one of autoimmune antibodies has been paid attention since the antibody was found in patients with articular rheumatism. Molecular structure of myeloperoxidase (MPO), which has been regarded as the antigen of ANCA was investigated in this study. Peripheral neutrophil was exposed to γ-ray at 10 and 30 Gy followed by addition of cytochalasin B. The extracellular and intracellular activities of MPO were determined to estimate the effects of the radiation. Moreover, MPO released to the culture medium was purified from the crude extract of the medium and investigated by Western blot analysis to confirm the occurrence of molecular cleavage in MPO. The releasing activity of MPO was decreased by γ-ray exposure at a dose ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 Gy and it tended to increase with 10 or 30 Gy. On the other hand, the activity of the released enzyme was increased by exposure at 0.1-3.0 Gy and became the normal level with 10 or 30 Gy. There were no changes in the SDS-PAGE pattern for the proteins from neutrophils. Western blotting revealed that 30 kDa fragment was included in the proteins released from neutrophils exposed to 0.1-0.3 Gy. The evidence that a low dose exposure induced such fragmentation of MPO molecule would be utilized to evaluate the effects of low-dose radiation. These results suggested that the MPO molecule fragmented by radiation exposure is highly reactive with the autoantibody in neutrophils, but correlation between MPO and its ANCA- related autoimmune disease has not yet demonstrated. (M.N.)

  18. Pediatric Autoimmune Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections and Tourette's Syndrome in Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinello, Chiara; Laviola, Giovanni; Macrì, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Tourette's Syndrome (TS) - a multifactorial pediatric disorder characterized by the recurrent exhibition of motor tics and/or vocal utterances - can partly depend on immune dysregulation provoked by early repeated streptococcal infections. The natural and adaptive antibody-mediated reaction to streptococcus has been proposed to potentially turn into a pathological autoimmune response in vulnerable individuals. Specifically, in conditions of increased permeability of the blood brain barrier (BBB), streptococcus-induced antibodies have been proposed to: (i) reach neuronal targets located in brain areas responsible for motion control; and (ii) contribute to the exhibition of symptoms. This theoretical framework is supported by indirect evidence indicating that a subset of TS patients exhibit elevated streptococcal antibody titers upon tic relapses. A systematic evaluation of this hypothesis entails preclinical studies providing a proof of concept of the aforementioned pathological sequelae. These studies shall rest upon individuals characterized by a vulnerable immune system, repeatedly exposed to streptococcus, and carefully screened for phenotypes isomorphic to the pathological signs of TS observed in patients. Preclinical animal models may thus constitute an informative, useful tool upon which conducting targeted, hypothesis-driven experiments. In the present review we discuss the available evidence in preclinical models in support of the link between TS and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infections (PANDAS), and the existing gaps that future research shall bridge. Specifically, we report recent preclinical evidence indicating that the immune responses to repeated streptococcal immunizations relate to the occurrence of behavioral and neurological phenotypes reminiscent of TS. By the same token, we discuss the limitations of these studies: limited evidence of behavioral phenotypes

  19. Autoimmune diagnostics: the technology, the strategy and the clinical governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Tozzoli, Renato; Villalta, Danilo

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, there has been a profound change in autoimmune diagnostics. From long, tiring and inaccurate manual methods, the art of diagnostics has turned to modern, rapid and automated technology. New antibody tests have been developed, and almost all autoimmune diseases now have some specific diagnostic markers. The current need to make the most of available economic and human resources has led to the production of diagnostic algorithms and guidelines designated for optimal strategic use of the tests and to increase the diagnostic appropriateness. An important role in this scenario was assumed by the laboratory autoimmunologist, whose task is not only to govern the analytical phase, but also to help clinicians in correctly choosing the most suitable test for each clinical situation and provide consultancy support. In this review, we summarize recent advances in technology, describe the diagnostic strategies and highlight the current role of the laboratory autoimmunologist in the clinical governance of autoimmune diagnostics. PMID:25398640

  20. Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Crea; Carla Bizzarri; Marco Cappa

    2011-01-01

    The two major autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) include Graves' disease (GD) and autoimmune thyroiditis (AT); both of which are characterized by infiltration of the thyroid by T and B cells reactive to thyroid antigens, by the production of thyroid autoantibodies and by abnormal thyroid function (hyperthyroidism in GD and hypothyroidism in AT). While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, it is believed to develop when a combination of genetic susceptibility and environment...