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Sample records for antibody homology models

  1. Quantifying homologous and heterologous antibody titre rises after influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, G; Perera, R A P M; Ngan, E; Fang, V J; Cauchemez, S; Ip, D K M; Peiris, J S M; Cowling, B J

    2016-08-01

    Most influenza virus infections are associated with mild disease. One approach to estimate the occurrence of influenza virus infections in individuals is via repeated measurement of humoral antibody titres. We used baseline and convalescent antibody titres measured by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and viral neutralization (VN) assays against influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and B viruses to investigate the characteristics of antibody rises following virologically confirmed influenza virus infections in participants in a community-based study. Multivariate models were fitted in a Bayesian framework to characterize the distribution of changes in antibody titres following influenza A virus infections. In 122 participants with PCR-confirmed influenza A virus infection, homologous antibody titres rose by geometric means of 1·2- to 10·2-fold after infection with A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09. Significant cross-reactions were observed between A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal A(H1N1). Antibody titre rises for some subtypes and assays varied by age, receipt of oseltamivir treatment, and recent receipt of influenza vaccination. In conclusion, we provided a quantitative description of the mean and variation in rises in influenza virus antibody titres following influenza virus infection. The multivariate patterns in boosting of antibody titres following influenza virus infection could be taken into account to improve estimates of cumulative incidence of infection in seroepidemiological studies. PMID:27018720

  2. Computing Small 1-Homological Models for Commutative Differential Graded Algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Victor; Armario, Jose Andres; Frau, Maria Dolores; Gonzalez-Diaz, Rocio; Jimenez, Maria Jose; Real, Pedro; Silva, Beatriz

    2001-01-01

    We use homological perturbation machinery specific for the algebra category [P. Real. Homological Perturbation Theory and Associativity. Homology, Homotopy and Applications vol. 2, n. 5 (2000) 51-88] to give an algorithm for computing the differential structure of a small 1--homological model for commutative differential graded algebras (briefly, CDGAs). The complexity of the procedure is studied and a computer package in Mathematica is described for determining such models.

  3. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    CERN Document Server

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  4. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Amari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  5. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Shinji; Kataoka, Ryoichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  6. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Isobe Masaharu; Yoshioka Megumi; Kurosawa Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Results We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR), in which PCR-am...

  7. Immunocytochemical identification of leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes in situ with homologous and heterologous polyclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.A. Barbosa

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available The unlabelled antibody peroxidase-antiperoxidase method was used to study the immunocytochemical properties of Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes in situ after tissues had been submitted to different fixation procedures. Antisera were obtained from rabbits chronically infected with different strains of T. cruzi or immunized with L. mexicana amazonensis and L. braziliensis guyanensis, and were applied on 5 µm thick sections. T. cruzi antigens were well stained by the three anti-T. cruzi sera and the two anti-heis.hmama.sera at optimum dilution between 1:1,000 and 1:2,000, regardless the parasite strain. Differently, the leishmanial antigens were revealed by Leishmania sera only at low dilutions (between 1:60 -1:160, whereas the anti-T. cruzi sera, at these low dilutions, gave rather weak stainings. Although there is no clear explanation for this immunocytochemical "reverse-monodirectional" cross-reactivity between Leishmania and T. cruzi, the present results show that polyclonal antibodies agains Leishmania species, when used for immunocytochemical detection of these parasites in situ, react more strongly with T. cruzi amastigotes than with the homologous amastigotes.

  8. Anti-HmuY antibodies specifically recognize Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY protein but not homologous proteins in other periodontopathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Śmiga

    Full Text Available Given the emerging evidence of an association between periodontal infections and systemic conditions, the search for specific methods to detect the presence of P. gingivalis, a principal etiologic agent in chronic periodontitis, is of high importance. The aim of this study was to characterize antibodies raised against purified P. gingivalis HmuY protein and selected epitopes of the HmuY molecule. Since other periodontopathogens produce homologs of HmuY, we also aimed to characterize responses of antibodies raised against the HmuY protein or its epitopes to the closest homologous proteins from Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia. Rabbits were immunized with purified HmuY protein or three synthetic, KLH-conjugated peptides, derived from the P. gingivalis HmuY protein. The reactivity of anti-HmuY antibodies with purified proteins or bacteria was determined using Western blotting and ELISA assay. First, we found homologs of P. gingivalis HmuY in P. intermedia (PinO and PinA proteins and T. forsythia (Tfo protein and identified corrected nucleotide and amino acid sequences of Tfo. All proteins were overexpressed in E. coli and purified using ion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic chromatography and gel filtration. We demonstrated that antibodies raised against P. gingivalis HmuY are highly specific to purified HmuY protein and HmuY attached to P. gingivalis cells. No reactivity between P. intermedia and T. forsythia or between purified HmuY homologs from these bacteria and anti-HmuY antibodies was detected. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that P. gingivalis HmuY protein may serve as an antigen for specific determination of serum antibodies raised against this bacterium.

  9. Anti-HmuY antibodies specifically recognize Porphyromonas gingivalis HmuY protein but not homologous proteins in other periodontopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmiga, Michał; Bielecki, Marcin; Olczak, Mariusz; Smalley, John W; Olczak, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Given the emerging evidence of an association between periodontal infections and systemic conditions, the search for specific methods to detect the presence of P. gingivalis, a principal etiologic agent in chronic periodontitis, is of high importance. The aim of this study was to characterize antibodies raised against purified P. gingivalis HmuY protein and selected epitopes of the HmuY molecule. Since other periodontopathogens produce homologs of HmuY, we also aimed to characterize responses of antibodies raised against the HmuY protein or its epitopes to the closest homologous proteins from Prevotella intermedia and Tannerella forsythia. Rabbits were immunized with purified HmuY protein or three synthetic, KLH-conjugated peptides, derived from the P. gingivalis HmuY protein. The reactivity of anti-HmuY antibodies with purified proteins or bacteria was determined using Western blotting and ELISA assay. First, we found homologs of P. gingivalis HmuY in P. intermedia (PinO and PinA proteins) and T. forsythia (Tfo protein) and identified corrected nucleotide and amino acid sequences of Tfo. All proteins were overexpressed in E. coli and purified using ion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic chromatography and gel filtration. We demonstrated that antibodies raised against P. gingivalis HmuY are highly specific to purified HmuY protein and HmuY attached to P. gingivalis cells. No reactivity between P. intermedia and T. forsythia or between purified HmuY homologs from these bacteria and anti-HmuY antibodies was detected. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that P. gingivalis HmuY protein may serve as an antigen for specific determination of serum antibodies raised against this bacterium. PMID:25658942

  10. Homology modeling a fast tool for drug discovery: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vyas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery.

  11. RNA Structural Homology Search with a Succinct Stochastic Grammar Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Lei Song; Ji-Zhen Zhao; Chun-Mei Liu; Kan Liu; Russell Malmberg; Li-Ming Cai

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of structural homology search tools, mostly based on profile stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) have been recently developed for the non-coding RNA gene identification. SCFGs can include statistical biases that often occur in RNA sequences, necessary to profile specific RNA structures for structural homology search. In this paper, a succinct stochastic grammar model is introduced for RNA that has competitive search effectiveness. More importantly, the profiling model can be easily extended to include pseudoknots, structures that are beyond the capability of profile SCFGs. In addition, the model allows heuristics to be exploited, resulting in a significant speed-up for the CYK algorithm-based search.

  12. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobe Masaharu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Results We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR, in which PCR-amplified immunoglobulin variable genes were selectively inserted into vectors, even in the presence of nonspecifically amplified DNA. TS-HR utilizes Red/ET-mediated homologous recombination with a target-selective vector (TS-vector with unique homology arms on its termini. Using TS-HR, immunoglobulin variable genes were cloned directly into expression vectors by co-transforming unpurified PCR products and the TS-vector into E. coli. Furthermore, the high cloning specificity of TS-HR allowed plasmids to be extracted from pools of transformed bacteria without screening single colonies for correct clones. We present a one-week protocol for the production of recombinant mouse monoclonal antibodies from large numbers of single plasma cells. Conclusion The time requirements and limitations of traditional cloning procedures for the production of recombinant immunoglobulins have been significantly reduced with the development of the TS-HR cloning technique.

  13. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Liebler, John; Neves, Bruno J.; Lewis, Warren G.; Coffee, Megan; Bienstock, Rachelle; Southan, Christopher; Andrade, Carolina H.

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening. PMID:27746901

  14. An antisperm monoclonal antibody inhibits sperm fusion with zona-free hamster eggs but not homologous eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primakoff, P; Hyatt, H

    1986-09-01

    The zona-free hamster egg penetration assay (HEPA) was evaluated as a test for identifying fertilization-blocking antibodies. A monoclonal antibody, AH-20, that binds to the surface of guinea pig sperm was used to test antibody inhibition of sperm-egg fusion. AH-20 strongly inhibited guinea pig sperm fusion with zona-free hamster eggs but had no effect on guinea pig sperm fusion with zona-free guinea pig eggs. No inhibition by AH-20 was found in the homologous fusion assay over a wide range of sperm concentration, fertilization rate, and fertilization index. The results suggest that although guinea pig sperm can fuse with both hamster and guinea pig eggs, some aspect of the fusion mechanism is different in the two cases. The findings also indicate that HEPA, which is frequently used to assess the fertility potential of human sperm, can identify as blockers of sperm-egg fusion antibodies that have no effect on homologous sperm-egg fusion. PMID:3527769

  15. Immunocytochemical identification of leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes in situ with homologous and heterologous polyclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.A. Barbosa

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available The unlabelled antibody peroxidase-antiperoxidase method was used to study the immunocytochemical properties of Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes in situ after tissues had been submitted to different fixation procedures. Antisera were obtained from rabbits chronically infected with different strains of T. cruzi or immunized with L. mexicana amazonensis and L. braziliensis guyanensis, and were applied on 5 µm thick sections. T. cruzi antigens were well stained by the three anti-T. cruzi sera and the two anti-heis.hmama.sera at optimum dilution between 1:1,000 and 1:2,000, regardless the parasite strain. Differently, the leishmanial antigens were revealed by Leishmania sera only at low dilutions (between 1:60 -1:160, whereas the anti-T. cruzi sera, at these low dilutions, gave rather weak stainings. Although there is no clear explanation for this immunocytochemical "reverse-monodirectional" cross-reactivity between Leishmania and T. cruzi, the present results show that polyclonal antibodies agains Leishmania species, when used for immunocytochemical detection of these parasites in situ, react more strongly with T. cruzi amastigotes than with the homologous amastigotes.O método daperoxidase-antiperoxidase foi utilizado para estudar as propriedades imunocitoquimicas de Leishmanias e de amastigotas do Trypanosoma cruzi, in situ, após os tecidos terem sido submetidos a diferentes tipos de fixação. Anti-soros foram obtidos de coelhos cronicamente infectados com três cepas de T. cruzi ou imunizados com L. mexicana ámazonensis e L. braziliensis guyanensis e aplicados nos cortes histológicos de 5 µm de espessura. Os antígenos de T. cruzi foram corados muito bem pelos três soros anti-T. cruzi e pelos dois soros anti-Leishmania com diluições entre 1:1.000 e 1:2.000. Diferentemente, os antígenos dç Leishmania foram revelados pelos soros anti- Leishmania somente em baixas diluições, ou seja, entre 1:60 e 1:160 enquanto que os soros

  16. Persistent Homology Transform for Modeling Shapes and Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Katharine; Mukherjee, Sayan; Doug M Boyer

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a statistic, the persistent homology transform (PHT), to model surfaces in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ and shapes in $\\mathbb{R}^2$. This statistic is a collection of persistence diagrams - multiscale topological summaries used extensively in topological data analysis. We use the PHT to represent shapes and execute operations such as computing distances between shapes or classifying shapes. We prove the map from the space of simplicial complexes in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ into the space ...

  17. Sequence analysis and homology modeling of laccase from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, Rohan J; Gavhane, Aj; Gaikar, Rb; Bansode, Ts; Maskar, Au; Gupta, Ak; Sohni, Sk; Patidar, Ma; Pandey, Tr; Jangle, Sn

    2010-09-20

    Industrial effluents of textile, paper, and leather industries contain various toxic dyes as one of the waste material. It imparts major impact on human health as well as environment. The white rot fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus Laccase is generally used to degrade these toxic dyes. In order to decipher the mechanism of process by which Laccase degrade dyes, it is essential to know its 3D structure. Homology modeling was performed in presented work, by satisfying Spatial restrains using Modeller Program, which is considered as standard in this field, to generate 3D structure of Laccase in unison, SWISSMODEL web server was also utilized to generate and verify the alternative models. We observed that models created using Modeller stands better on structure evaluation tests. This study can further be used in molecular docking techniques, to understand the interaction of enzyme with its mediators like 2, 2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) and Vanillin that are known to enhance the Laccase activity.

  18. Homology Models of Melatonin Receptors: Challenges and Recent Advances

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    Silvia Rivara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin exerts many of its actions through the activation of two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, named MT1 and MT2. So far, a number of different MT1 and MT2 receptor homology models, built either from the prototypic structure of rhodopsin or from recently solved X-ray structures of druggable GPCRs, have been proposed. These receptor models differ in the binding modes hypothesized for melatonin and melatonergic ligands, with distinct patterns of ligand-receptor interactions and putative bioactive conformations of ligands. The receptor models will be described, and they will be discussed in light of the available information from mutagenesis experiments and ligand-based pharmacophore models. The ability of these ligand-receptor complexes to rationalize structure-activity relationships of known series of melatonergic compounds will be commented upon.

  19. A quality metric for homology modeling: the H-factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    di Luccio Eric

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of protein structures provides fundamental insight into most biochemical functions and consequently into the cause and possible treatment of diseases. As the structures of most known proteins cannot be solved experimentally for technical or sometimes simply for time constraints, in silico protein structure prediction is expected to step in and generate a more complete picture of the protein structure universe. Molecular modeling of protein structures is a fast growing field and tremendous works have been done since the publication of the very first model. The growth of modeling techniques and more specifically of those that rely on the existing experimental knowledge of protein structures is intimately linked to the developments of high resolution, experimental techniques such as NMR, X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy. This strong connection between experimental and in silico methods is however not devoid of criticisms and concerns among modelers as well as among experimentalists. Results In this paper, we focus on homology-modeling and more specifically, we review how it is perceived by the structural biology community and what can be done to impress on the experimentalists that it can be a valuable resource to them. We review the common practices and provide a set of guidelines for building better models. For that purpose, we introduce the H-factor, a new indicator for assessing the quality of homology models, mimicking the R-factor in X-ray crystallography. The methods for computing the H-factor is fully described and validated on a series of test cases. Conclusions We have developed a web service for computing the H-factor for models of a protein structure. This service is freely accessible at http://koehllab.genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/toolkit/h-factor.

  20. Homologous recombination: from model organisms to human disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Modesti (Mauro); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractRecent experiments show that properly controlled recombination between homologous DNA molecules is essential for the maintenance of genome stability and for the prevention of tumorigenesis.

  1. Evaluation of selectivity in homologous multimodal chromatographic systems using in silico designed antibody fragment libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Woo, James; Krogh, Berit Olsen; Ahmadian, Haleh; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-12-24

    This study describes the in silico design, surface property analyses, production and chromatographic evaluations of a diverse set of antibody Fab fragment variants. Based on previous findings, we hypothesized that the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) constitute important binding sites for multimodal chromatographic ligands. Given that antibodies are highly diversified molecules and in particular the CDRs, we set out to examine the generality of this result. For this purpose, four different Fab fragments with different CDRs and/or framework regions of the variable domains were identified and related variants were designed in silico. The four Fab variant libraries were subsequently generated by site-directed mutagenesis and produced by recombinant expression and affinity purification to enable examination of their chromatographic retention behavior. The effects of geometric re-arrangement of the functional moieties on the multimodal resin ligands were also investigated with respect to Fab variant retention profiles by comparing two commercially available multimodal cation-exchange ligands, Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime, and two novel multimodal ligand prototypes. Interestingly, the chromatographic data demonstrated distinct selectivity trends between the four Fab variant libraries. For three of the Fab libraries, the CDR regions appeared as major binding sites for all multimodal ligands. In contrast, the fourth Fab library displayed a distinctly different chromatographic behavior, where Nuvia cPrime and related multimodal ligand prototypes provided markedly improved selectivity over Capto MMC. Clearly, the results illustrate that the discriminating power of multimodal ligands differs between different Fab fragments. The results are promising indications that multimodal chromatography using the appropriate multimodal ligands can be employed in downstream bioprocessing for challenging selective separation of product related variants.

  2. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi;

    2014-01-01

    for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  3. Prediction of VH-VL domain orientation for antibody variable domain modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujotzek, Alexander; Dunbar, James; Lipsmeier, Florian; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Antes, Iris; Deane, Charlotte M; Georges, Guy

    2015-04-01

    The antigen-binding site of antibodies forms at the interface of their two variable domains, VH and VL, making VH-VL domain orientation a factor that codetermines antibody specificity and affinity. Preserving VH-VL domain orientation in the process of antibody engineering is important in order to retain the original antibody properties, and predicting the correct VH-VL orientation has also been recognized as an important factor in antibody homology modeling. In this article, we present a fast sequence-based predictor that predicts VH-VL domain orientation with Q(2) values ranging from 0.54 to 0.73 on the evaluation set. We describe VH-VL orientation in terms of the six absolute ABangle parameters that have recently been proposed as a means to separate the different degrees of freedom of VH-VL domain orientation. In order to assess the impact of adjusting VH-VL orientation according to our predictions, we use the set of antibody structures of the recently published Antibody Modeling Assessment (AMA) II study. In comparison to the original AMAII homology models, we find an improvement in the accuracy of VH-VL orientation modeling, which also translates into an improvement in the average root-mean-square deviation with regard to the crystal structures.

  4. A homologous human prolactin (hPRL) radioimmunoassay with an antibody against 'little'-hPRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used the serum of a male patient with complete panhypopituitarism and a PRL-producing pituitary tumor and excessively high hPRL-levels (18-20 μg per ml) as source for the antigen. 10 ml serum were passed through 3 x 110 cm Sephadex G-75 columns. The 'big'-hPRL (20% of the total immunoreactivity) was discarded and the 'little'-hPRL (80%) of two chromatographies was lyophylized (approximately 50 μg hPRL) and injected into a rabbit together with 1 ml of Freund's adjuvant. Though the polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the preparation showed a marked protein heterogeneity, the labeling of this material with 125I and subsequent Sephadex G-50 and G-75 chromatography led to an elution pattern comparable to 125I-VLS-hPRL. Specific hPRL-antibodies (AB) could be demonstrated after 3 injections. After 9 injections the binding (Bsub(o)) of 125I-hPRL in a final AB-dilution of 1:100,000 was 22.5%. This AB-dilution was suitable for a highly specific prolactin-radioimmunoassay (hPRL-RIA) with a lower limit of detection (Bsub(o) minus 3 SD) below 0.1 ng VLS-hPRL and a maximal inhibition of tracer-binding when 10 ng of unlabeled hPRL were added. No crossreaction with hGH, hPL, hFSH, hLH and hTSH were found. Dilution curves of galactorrhea serum, pregnancy serum, 'big'- and 'little'-hPRL preparations from serum were shown to run parallel to the standard curve. For routine measurements pooled pregnancy serum was calibrated with the MRC-standard A-71/222 and used as standard in the RIA (1 ng VLS-hPRL equals 20 μU 71/222 hPRL). These findings show that serum of a patient with excessive hyperprolactinemia and panhypopituitarism can be an ideal source for the hPRL-immunogen, since in contrast to pituitary extracts no separation from other contaminating anterior pituitary hormones has to be performed. (orig.)

  5. Secondary structure and 3D homology modeling of swine leukocyte antigen class 2 (SLA-2) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Xu, Chong-bo; Long, Yi-hou; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    No information to date is available to elucidate the structure of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I) molecule which is comprised by a heavy chain of SLA-I non-covalently associated with a light chain, beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) proteins. Presently, one of SLA-I gene SLA-2 and beta(2)m gene were expressed as soluble maltose binding proteins (MBP-proteins) in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system and identified by western blotting with anti-MBP polyclonal antibodies. The expressed proteins MBP-SLA-2 and MBP-beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by DEAE-Sepharose. The purified products were cleaved by Factor Xa, respectively, and the interest of proteins SLA-2 and beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by separation from MBP on DEAE-Sepharose. The secondary structures of SLA-2 and beta(2)m were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectrophotometry. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of their peptide-binding domain (PBD) was modeled-based sequence homology. The content of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil in the SLA-2 protein were 76, 95, 36, and 67aa, respectively. In the 98aa of beta(2)m, the contents of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil were 0, 45, 8, and 45aa, respectively. The SLA-2 protein displayed a typical alpha-helix structure while beta(2)m protein displayed a typical beta-sheet structure. Homology modeling of the SLA-2 and beta(2)m proteins demonstrated similarities with the structure of human and mouse MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I proteins.

  6. An Improved Homologous Recombination Method for Rapid Cloning of the Antibody Heavy Chain Gene and Its Comparison with the Homologous Recombination and Traditional Cloning Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Hajirezaei; Mojtaba Darbouy; Manoochehr Rasouli; Bahram Kazemi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The homologous recombination (HR) is one of the conventional cloning methods for the production of recombinant DNA. It is a quick method for in vivo DNA cloning without using the high cost restriction enzymes. A few modifications in the cloning procedure can increase the efficiency of this method.Materials and Methods: In this study, effect of heating on the rate of the IgG1 heavy chain gene cloning was investigated in the HR method and then it was compared with HR method without ...

  7. CPHmodels-3.0--remote homology modeling using structure-guided sequence profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole;

    2010-01-01

    CPHmodels-3.0 is a web server predicting protein 3D structure by use of single template homology modeling. The server employs a hybrid of the scoring functions of CPHmodels-2.0 and a novel remote homology-modeling algorithm. A query sequence is first attempted modeled using the fast CPHmodels-2.......0 profile-profile scoring function suitable for close homology modeling. The new computational costly remote homology-modeling algorithm is only engaged provided that no suitable PDB template is identified in the initial search. CPHmodels-3.0 was benchmarked in the CASP8 competition and produced models.......3 A. These performance values place the CPHmodels-3.0 method in the group of high performing 3D prediction tools. Beside its accuracy, one of the important features of the method is its speed. For most queries, the response time of the server is...

  8. Modeling Human Serum Albumin Tertiary Structure to Teach Upper-Division Chemistry Students Bioinformatics and Homology Modeling Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Dus?an; Zlatovic´, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A homology modeling laboratory experiment has been developed for an introductory molecular modeling course for upper-division undergraduate chemistry students. With this experiment, students gain practical experience in homology model preparation and assessment as well as in protein visualization using the educational version of PyMOL…

  9. An Improved Homologous Recombination Method for Rapid Cloning of the Antibody Heavy Chain Gene and Its Comparison with the Homologous Recombination and Traditional Cloning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Hajirezaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The homologous recombination (HR is one of the conventional cloning methods for the production of recombinant DNA. It is a quick method for in vivo DNA cloning without using the high cost restriction enzymes. A few modifications in the cloning procedure can increase the efficiency of this method.Materials and Methods: In this study, effect of heating on the rate of the IgG1 heavy chain gene cloning was investigated in the HR method and then it was compared with HR method without heating and traditional cloning method. For doing this comparison, three cloning methods including HR, HR with the heat treatment, and traditional cloning were used to clone the human IgG1 heavy chain into the pcDNA3.1(+ plasmid.Results: The results showed that adding heat in the HR method converts insert and vector from the double strand DNA to the single strand DNA. This allows them to copulate with each other better and faster than the two other methods. The heat addition also helps the cell enzyme system for a faster and easier recombination and moreover it increases the cloning efficiency of the HR method in case of in vitro processing.Conclusion: The results showed that giving heat in the HR method increases cloning rate 7.5% and this increase reaches 10% in comparison with the traditional method. 

  10. Autologous antibody to src-homology 3-domain GRB2-like 1 specifically increases in the sera of patients with low-grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsutani Tomoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioma is the most common primary malignant central nervous system tumor in adult, and is usually not curable in spite of various therapeutic approaches. Clarification of the oncogenic process in its early stage is important for the diagnosis and effective therapy. Methods In the present study, we used the serological identification of antigens by recombinant cDNA expression cloning (SEREX to explore the subtle changes of the protein expression in low-grade glioma. The levels of serum autoantibodies to the SEREX-identified glioma-related antigens were analyzed by ELISA, and the epitope site was identified using deletion mutants and overlap peptide array. Changes in the serum autoantibody levels were examined in the rat glioma model using C6 and 9 L glioma cell lines. Results We identified 31 glioma-related antigens by SEREX. Among them, the serum level of autoantibody to src-homology 3-domain GRB2-like 1 (SH3GL1 was significantly higher in patients with low-grade glioma than healthy volunteers or high-grade gliomas. The 10 amino-acids at the C-terminal were identified as the epitope site by the overlap peptide array and the ELISA using deletion mutants. The tissue expression of SH3GL1 protein increased in proportion to glioma progression. The rat glioma models confirmed the increase of anti-SH3GL1 autoantibody level in the early stage and the suppression in the late stage. Conclusion SH3GL1 may be involved in the oncogenic process of gliomas and effectively elicit an autologous antibody response in low-grade gliomas. The immunological reaction to SH3GL1 would contribute to the establishment of a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for gliomas.

  11. Immunoglobulin with High-Titer In Vitro Cross-Neutralizing Hepatitis C Virus Antibodies Passively Protects Chimpanzees from Homologous, but Not Heterologous, Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens; Engle, Ronald E.; Faulk, Kristina;

    2015-01-01

    The importance of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) in protection against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains controversial. We infused a chimpanzee with H06 immunoglobulin from a genotype 1a HCV-infected patient and challenged with genotype strains efficiently neutralized by H06 in vitro. Genotype 1a...... NAbs afforded no protection against genotype 4a or 5a. Protection against homologous 1a lasted 18 weeks, but infection emerged when NAb titers waned. However, 6a infection was prevented. The differential in vivo neutralization patterns have implications for HCV vaccine development....

  12. Recognition of ZnT8, Proinsulin, and Homologous MAP Peptides in Sardinian Children at Risk of T1D Precedes Detection of Classical Islet Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Niegowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As numerous studies put in evidence the increasing incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D in children, an early diagnosis is of great importance to define correct treatment and diet. Currently, the identification of classical islet autoantibodies is the primary biomarker for diagnosis in subjects at risk, especially in pediatric patients. Recent studies suggest that detection of antibodies against ZnT8 protein in preclinical phase can predict the development of T1D. We previously demonstrated a significant association of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP with T1D in adult Sardinian patients. To enforce this finding, we investigated the presence of antibodies against ZnT8 and proinsulin (PI with respective homologous epitopes: MAP3865c133–141/ZnT8186–194, MAP3865c125–133/ZnT8178–186, MAP2404c70–85/PI46–61, and MAP1,4αgbp157–173/PI64–80, in 23 children at risk for T1D, formerly involved in the TRIGR study, and 22 healthy controls (HCs. Positivity to anti-MAP and homologous human peptides was detected in 48% of at-risk subjects compared to 5,85% HCs, preceding appearance of islet autoantibodies. Being MAP easily transmitted to humans with infected cow’s milk and detected in retail infant formulas, MAP epitopes could be present in extensively hydrolyzed formula and act as antigens stimulating β-cell autoimmunity.

  13. Modeling single cell antibody excretion on a biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Ivan; Baumgartner, Wolfgang; van der Velden, Thomas J G; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Schasfoort, Richard B M

    2016-07-01

    We simulated, using Comsol Multiphysics, the excretion of antibodies by single hybridoma cells and their subsequent binding on a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor. The purpose was to confirm that SPRi is suitable to accurately quantify antibody (anti-EpCAM) excretion. The model showed that antibody loss by diffusion away from the sensor was less than 1%. Unexpectedly, more than 99% of the excreted antibodies were captured on the sensor. These data prove the remarkable phenomenon that the SPRi output of cellular antibody excretion and its subsequent binding, performed under the conditions described here, is directly usable for quantification of single cell antibody production rates. PMID:27040182

  14. Homology modeling of the serotonin transporter: Insights into the primary escitalopram-binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Marie; Tagmose, L.; Jørgensen, A.M.M.;

    2007-01-01

    -ray structure of the closely related amino acid transporter, Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter (LeuT), provides an opportunity to develop a three-dimensional model of the structure of SERT. We present herein a homology model of SERT using LeuT as the template and containing escitalopram as a bound ligand...

  15. Impact of template choice on homology model efficiency in virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rataj, Krzysztof; Witek, Jagna; Mordalski, Stefan; Kosciolek, Tomasz; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2014-06-23

    Homology modeling is a reliable method of predicting the three-dimensional structures of proteins that lack NMR or X-ray crystallographic data. It employs the assumption that a structural resemblance exists between closely related proteins. Despite the availability of many crystal structures of possible templates, only the closest ones are chosen for homology modeling purposes. To validate the aforementioned approach, we performed homology modeling of four serotonin receptors (5-HT1AR, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT6R, 5-HT7R) for virtual screening purposes, using 10 available G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCR) templates with diverse evolutionary distances to the targets, with various approaches to alignment construction and model building. The resulting models were further validated in two steps by means of ligand docking and enrichment calculation, using Glide software. The final quality of the models was determined in virtual screening-like experiments by the AUROC score of the resulting ROC curves. The outcome of this research showed that no correlation between sequence identity and model quality was found, leading to the conclusion that the closest phylogenetic relative is not always the best template for homology modeling.

  16. CPHmodels-3.0--remote homology modeling using structure-guided sequence profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl

    2010-07-01

    CPHmodels-3.0 is a web server predicting protein 3D structure by use of single template homology modeling. The server employs a hybrid of the scoring functions of CPHmodels-2.0 and a novel remote homology-modeling algorithm. A query sequence is first attempted modeled using the fast CPHmodels-2.0 profile-profile scoring function suitable for close homology modeling. The new computational costly remote homology-modeling algorithm is only engaged provided that no suitable PDB template is identified in the initial search. CPHmodels-3.0 was benchmarked in the CASP8 competition and produced models for 94% of the targets (117 out of 128), 74% were predicted as high reliability models (87 out of 117). These achieved an average RMSD of 4.6 A when superimposed to the 3D structure. The remaining 26% low reliably models (30 out of 117) could superimpose to the true 3D structure with an average RMSD of 9.3 A. These performance values place the CPHmodels-3.0 method in the group of high performing 3D prediction tools. Beside its accuracy, one of the important features of the method is its speed. For most queries, the response time of the server is web server is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/CPHmodels/.

  17. A homologous recycling model for hot galactic coronae

    CERN Document Server

    Kritsuk, A G

    1996-01-01

    An equilibrium model is presented for a hydrostatic isothermal hot gas distribution in a gravitational well of a giant elliptical galaxy immersed in a massive dark halo. The self-consistently determined gravitational potential of the system provides the optical surface brightness distribution of the galaxy, matching the de Vaucouleurs R^1/4-law, if the sound speed in the gas, stellar velocity dispersion, and velocity dispersion of dark matter are related so that optical and X-ray brightness profiles match each other. The thermal equilibrium of the gas is described in the framework of a one-zone model, which incorporates radiative cooling, stellar mass loss, supernova heating, and mass sink due to local condensational instability. The sequence of saddle-node and saddle-connection bifurcations provides a first-order phase transition, which separates the stable hot phase in the cooling medium for a reasonably high efficiency of condensation and precludes catastrophic cooling of the gas. The bifurcations occur na...

  18. Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Zika virus (ZIKV is a flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae, which is similar to dengue virus, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Recent outbreaks in South America, Latin America, the Caribbean and in particular Brazil have led to concern for the spread of the disease and potential to cause Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly. Although ZIKV has been known of for over 60 years there is very little in the way of knowledge of the virus with few publications and no crystal structures. No antivirals have been tested against it either in vitro or in vivo. ZIKV therefore epitomizes a neglected disease. Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL. Eleven out of 15 models pass our model quality criteria for their further use. While a ZIKV glycoprotein E homology model was initially described in the immature conformation as a trimer, we now describe the mature dimer conformer which allowed the construction of an illustration of the complete virion. By comparing illustrations of ZIKV based on this new homology model and the dengue virus crystal structure we propose potential differences that could be exploited for antiviral and vaccine design. The prediction of sites for glycosylation on this protein may also be useful in this regard. While we await a cryo-EM structure of ZIKV and eventual crystal structures of the individual proteins, these homology models provide the community with a starting point for structure-based design of drugs and vaccines as well as a for computational virtual screening.

  19. A Holomorphic 0-Surgery Model for Open Books with Application to Cylindrical Contact Homology

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, Mei-Lin

    2004-01-01

    We give a simple model in the complex plane of the 0-surgery along a fibered knot of a closed 3-manifold M to yield a mapping torus M'. This model allows explicit relations between pseudoholomorphic curves in the symplectizations of M and M'. As an application we use it to compute the cylindrical contact homology of open books resulting from a positive Dehn twist on a torus with boundary.

  20. Modeling of high homologous temperature deformation behavior for stress and life-time analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krempl, E. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Stress and lifetime analyses need realistic and accurate constitutive models for the inelastic deformation behavior of engineering alloys at low and high temperatures. Conventional creep and plasticity models have fundamental difficulties in reproducing high homologous temperature behavior. To improve the modeling capabilities {open_quotes}unified{close_quotes} state variable theories were conceived. They consider all inelastic deformation rate-dependent and do not have separate repositories for creep and plasticity. The viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO), one of the unified theories, is introduced and its properties are delineated. At high homologous temperature where secondary and tertiary creep are observed modeling is primarily accomplished by a static recovery term and a softening isotropic stress. At low temperatures creep is merely a manifestation of rate dependence. The primary creep modeled at low homologous temperature is due to the rate dependence of the flow law. The model is unaltered in the transition from low to high temperature except that the softening of the isotropic stress and the influence of the static recovery term increase with an increase of the temperature.

  1. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Olivia B; Estevez, Carlos; Yu, Qingzhong; Suarez, David L

    2013-04-15

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere with vaccine antigen processing that reduces the subsequent immune response. Once MAb titers are depleted, the chick will respond to vaccination, but they are also susceptible to viral infection. This study examines the effect of MAb on seroconversion to different viral-vectored avian influenza virus (AIV) vaccines. Chicks were given passively transferred antibodies (PTA) using AIV hyperimmunized serum, and subsequently vaccinated with a fowlpox-AIV recombinant vaccine (FPr) or a Newcastle disease virus-AIV recombinant vaccine (NDVr). Our results indicate that passively transferred antibodies led to significant reduction of seroconversion and clinical protection from virulent challenge in recombinant virus vaccinated chicks thus demonstrating maternal antibody interference to vaccination. The passive antibody transfer model system provides an important tool to evaluate maternal antibody interference to vaccination. PMID:23398721

  2. Homology Modeling: Generating Structural Models to Understand Protein Function and Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    Geneticists and molecular and cell biologists routinely uncover new proteins important in specific biological processes/pathways. However, either the molecular functions or the functional mechanisms of many of these proteins are unclear due to a lack of knowledge of their atomic structures. Yet, determining experimental structures of many proteins presents technical challenges. The current methods for obtaining atomic-resolution structures of biomolecules (X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy) require pure preparations of proteins at concentrations much higher than those at which the proteins exist in a physiological environment. Additionally, NMR has size limitations, with current technology limited to the determination of structures of proteins with masses of up to 15 kDa. Due to these reasons, atomic structures of many medically and biologically important proteins do not exist. However, the structures of these proteins are essential for several purposes, including in silico drug design [1], understanding the effects of disease mutations [2], and designing experiments to probe the functional mechanisms of proteins. Comparative modeling has gained importance as a tool for bridging the gap between sequence and structure space, allowing researchers to build structural models of proteins that are difficult to crystallize or for which structure determination by NMR spectroscopy is not tractable. Comparative modeling, or homology modeling, exploits the fact that two proteins whose sequences are evolutionarily connected display similar structural features [3]. Thus, the known structure of a protein (template) can be used to generate a molecular model of the protein (query) whose experimental structure is notknown.

  3. Antibody structural modeling with prediction of immunoglobulin structure (PIGS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcatili, Paolo; Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Chailyan, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies (or immunoglobulins) are crucial for defending organisms from pathogens, but they are also key players in many medical, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. The ability to predict their structure and the specific residues involved in antigen recognition has several useful appl...... on average) to build a structural model of an antibody. It is based on the concept of canonical structures of antibody loops and on our understanding of the way light and heavy chains pack together....

  4. The use of homologous virus in the haemagglutination-inhibition assay after vaccination with Newcastle disease virus strain La Sota or clone30 leads to an over estimation of protective serum antibody titres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, R.A.; Oei, H.L.; Kemper, S.; Koch, G.; Visser, L.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of the use of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV)-strains Ulster and La Sota in the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay for the measurement of antibody titres after NDV vaccination. The use of the homologous La Sota antigen in the HI assay after Clone30 and La Sota vacci

  5. Involvement of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 in rodent model of neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shi-Ying; Sung, Chun-Sung; Chen, Wu-Fu; Chen, Chun-Hong; Feng, Chien-Wei; Yang, San-Nan; Hung, Han-Chun; Chen, Nan-Fu; Lin, Pey-Ru; Chen, San-Cher; Wang, Hui-Min David; Chu, Tian-Huei; Tai, Ming-Hong; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Many cancer research studies have extensively examined the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) pathway. There are only few reports that suggest that PTEN might affect pain; however, there is still a lack of evidence to show the role of PTEN for modulating pain. Here, we report a role for PTEN in a rodent model of neuropathic pain. Results We found that chronic constriction injury (CCI) surgery in rats could elicit downregulation of spinal PTEN as well a...

  6. Biophysical characterization of a model antibody drug conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Storms, Michael; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Okumura, C J; Maluf, Nasib Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADC) are important next-generation biopharmaceuticals and thus require stringent structure characterization as is the case for monoclonal antibodies. We have tested several biophysical techniques, i.e., circular dichroism, analytical ultracentrifugation, differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy, to characterize a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody as a model ADC. These techniques indicated possible small structure and stability changes by the conjugation, while largely retaining the tertiary structure of the antibody, consistent with unaltered biological activities. Thus, the above biophysical techniques are effective at detecting changes in the structural properties of ADC. PMID:27534450

  7. A Cayley Tree Immune Network Model with Antibody Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, R W; Perelson, A S; Anderson, Russell W.; Neumann, Avidan U.; Perelson, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: A Cayley tree model of idiotypic networks that includes both B cell and antibody dynamics is formulated and analyzed. As in models with B cells only, localized states exist in the network with limited numbers of activated clones surrounded by virgin or near-virgin clones. The existence and stability of these localized network states are explored as a function of model parameters. As in previous models that have included antibody, the stability of immune and tolerant localized states are shown to depend on the ratio of antibody to B cell lifetimes as well as the rate of antibody complex removal. As model parameters are varied, localized steady-states can break down via two routes: dynamically, into chaotic attractors, or structurally into percolation attractors. For a given set of parameters, percolation and chaotic attractors can coexist with localized attractors, and thus there do not exist clear cut boundaries in parameter space that separate regions of localized attractors from regions of percola...

  8. HOMOLOGY MODELLING AND SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF anxC3.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patchikolla Sateesh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, the number of sequence known proteins has increased rapidly. In contrast, the corresponding increment of structure known protein is much slower. The unbalanced situation has critically limited our ability to understand the molecular mechanism of protein and conduct structure based drug design timely by using updated information of newly found sequences. Therefore it is highly desired to model 3D structure of protein by using structural bioinformatics approach by homology modeling. In this study homology modelling approach was utilized to develop 3D structure of spergillus fumigatusAf293(anxc3.1. An annexin, (anxC3.1, was isolated and characterized from the industrially important filamentousfungus Aspergillus niger. anxC3.1 is a single copy gene encoding a 506 amino acid predicted protein which contains four annexin repeats. AnxC3.1 expression was found to be unaltered under a variety of conditions such as increased secretion, altered nitrogen source, heat shock, and decreased Ca2+ levels, indicating that anxC3.1 is constitutively expressed. This is the first reported functional characterization of a fungal annexin. So it highly desired to developmodel to this protein. Pair wise sequence alignment program like LAST was employed to study the influence of matrix on sequence alignment. Blosum 62 matrix by BLAST program revealed a clear evolutionary relationship, and this analysis displayed( 30% identity with the PDB protein 1M9IA. Homology derived, model is generated usinggeno3d and the model with lowest energy( -14401.90 kcal/mol, MSD(0.9843A was considered as the best optimized and superimposed model, and the structure was validated by using prochek analysis.

  9. Prediction of the three-dimensional structure of human interleukin-7 by homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroemer, R T; Doughty, S W; Robinson, A J; Richards, W G

    1996-06-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human interleukin (IL)-7 has been predicted based on homology to human IL-2, IL-4, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and growth hormone. The model has a topology common to other cytokines and displays a unique disulfide pattern. Knowledge of the tertiary structure of IL-7 has implications for analysis of key binding regions, suggestions for mutagenesis experiments and design of (ant)agonists. In this context, the model is discussed and compared with other cytokine structures. PMID:8862549

  10. Revisiting the homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors: β1-adrenoceptor as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mengyuan; Li, Minyong

    2012-06-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recognized to constitute the largest family of membrane proteins. Due to the disproportion in the quantity of crystal structures and their amino acid sequences, homology modeling contributes a reasonable and feasible approach to GPCR theoretical coordinates. With the brand new crystal structures resolved recently, herein we deliberated how to designate them as templates to carry out homology modeling in four aspects: (1) various sequence alignment methods; (2) protein weight matrix; (3) different sets of multiple templates; (4) active and inactive state of templates. The accuracy of models was evaluated by comparing the similarity of stereo conformation and molecular docking results between models and the experimental structure of Meleagris gallopavo β(1)-adrenergic receptor (Mg_Adrb1) that we desired to develop as an example. Our results proposed that: (1) Cobalt and MAFFT, two algorithms of sequence alignment, were suitable for single- and multiple-template modeling, respectively; (2) Blosum30 is applicable to align sequences in the case of low sequence identity; (3) multiple-template modeling is not always better than single-template one; (4) the state of template is an influential factor in simulating the GPCR structures as well. PMID:22454032

  11. DockoMatic 2.0: high throughput inverse virtual screening and homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Casey; Cornia, Nic; Jacob, Reed; Remm, Andrew; Peavey, Thomas; Weekes, Ken; Mallory, Chris; Oxford, Julia T; McDougal, Owen M; Andersen, Timothy L

    2013-08-26

    DockoMatic is a free and open source application that unifies a suite of software programs within a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) to facilitate molecular docking experiments. Here we describe the release of DockoMatic 2.0; significant software advances include the ability to (1) conduct high throughput inverse virtual screening (IVS); (2) construct 3D homology models; and (3) customize the user interface. Users can now efficiently setup, start, and manage IVS experiments through the DockoMatic GUI by specifying receptor(s), ligand(s), grid parameter file(s), and docking engine (either AutoDock or AutoDock Vina). DockoMatic automatically generates the needed experiment input files and output directories and allows the user to manage and monitor job progress. Upon job completion, a summary of results is generated by Dockomatic to facilitate interpretation by the user. DockoMatic functionality has also been expanded to facilitate the construction of 3D protein homology models using the Timely Integrated Modeler (TIM) wizard. The wizard TIM provides an interface that accesses the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) and MODELER programs and guides the user through the necessary steps to easily and efficiently create 3D homology models for biomacromolecular structures. The DockoMatic GUI can be customized by the user, and the software design makes it relatively easy to integrate additional docking engines, scoring functions, or third party programs. DockoMatic is a free comprehensive molecular docking software program for all levels of scientists in both research and education.

  12. Homology Modeling and Conformational Epitope Prediction of Envelope Protein of Alkhumra Haemorrhagic Fever Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Poorinmohammad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to generate in silico 3D-structure of the envelope protein of AHFV using homology modeling method to further predict its conformational epitopes and help other studies to investigate itsstructural features using the model.Methods: A 3D-structure prediction was developed for the envelope protein of Alkhumra haemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV, an emerging tick-borne flavivirus, based on a homology modeling method using M4T and Modwebservers, as the 3D-structure of the protein is not available yet. Modeled proteins were validated using Modfold 4 server and their accuracies were calculated based on their RSMDs. Having the 3D predicted model with high quality, conformational epitopes were predicted using DiscoTope 2.0.Results: Model generated by M4T was more acceptable than the Modweb-generated model. The global score and Pvalue calculated by Modfold 4 ensured that a certifiable model was generated by M4T, since its global score was almost near 1 which is the score for a high resolution X-ray crystallography structure. Furthermore, itsthe P-value was much lower than 0.001 which means that the model is completely acceptable. Having 0.46 Å rmsd, this model was shown to be highly accurate. Results from DiscoTope 2.0 showed 26 residues as epitopes, forming conformational epitopes of the modeled protein.Conclusion: The predicted model and epitopes for envelope protein of AHFV can be used in several therapeutic and diagnostic approaches including peptide vaccine development, structure based drug design or diagnostic kit development in order to facilitate the time consuming experimental epitope mapping process.

  13. Microwave accelerated synthesis of isoxazole hydrazide inhibitors of the system xc- transporter: Initial homology model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matti, Afnan A; Mirzaei, Joseph; Rudolph, John; Smith, Stephen A; Newell, Jayme L; Patel, Sarjubhai A; Braden, Michael R; Bridges, Richard J; Natale, Nicholas R

    2013-11-01

    Microwave accelerated reaction system (MARS) technology provided a good method to obtain selective and open isoxazole ligands that bind to and inhibit the Sxc- antiporter. The MARS provided numerous advantages, including: shorter time, better yield and higher purity of the product. Of the newly synthesized series of isoxazoles the salicyl hydrazide 6 exhibited the highest level of inhibitory activity in the transport assay. A homology model has been developed to summarize the SAR results to date, and provide a working hypothesis for future studies.

  14. A mechanistic compartmental model for total antibody uptake in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M; Dane Wittrup, K

    2012-12-01

    Antibodies are under development to treat a variety of cancers, such as lymphomas, colon, and breast cancer. A major limitation to greater efficacy for this class of drugs is poor distribution in vivo. Localization of antibodies occurs slowly, often in insufficient therapeutic amounts, and distributes heterogeneously throughout the tumor. While the microdistribution around individual vessels is important for many therapies, the total amount of antibody localized in the tumor is paramount for many applications such as imaging, determining the therapeutic index with antibody drug conjugates, and dosing in radioimmunotherapy. With imaging and pretargeted therapeutic strategies, the time course of uptake is critical in determining when to take an image or deliver a secondary reagent. We present here a simple mechanistic model of antibody uptake and retention that captures the major rates that determine the time course of antibody concentration within a tumor including dose, affinity, plasma clearance, target expression, internalization, permeability, and vascularization. Since many of the parameters are known or can be estimated in vitro, this model can approximate the time course of antibody concentration in tumors to aid in experimental design, data interpretation, and strategies to improve localization. PMID:22974563

  15. Homology modeling of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors: molecular dynamics refinement and docking evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bianca Maria Platania

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA receptors, a class of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, have been targeted for drug development for the treatment of neurological, psychiatric and ocular disorders. The lack of structural information about GPCRs and their ligand complexes has prompted the development of homology models of these proteins aimed at structure-based drug design. Crystal structure of human dopamine D(3 (hD(3 receptor has been recently solved. Based on the hD(3 receptor crystal structure we generated dopamine D(2 and D(3 receptor models and refined them with molecular dynamics (MD protocol. Refined structures, obtained from the MD simulations in membrane environment, were subsequently used in molecular docking studies in order to investigate potential sites of interaction. The structure of hD(3 and hD(2L receptors was differentiated by means of MD simulations and D(3 selective ligands were discriminated, in terms of binding energy, by docking calculation. Robust correlation of computed and experimental K(i was obtained for hD(3 and hD(2L receptor ligands. In conclusion, the present computational approach seems suitable to build and refine structure models of homologous dopamine receptors that may be of value for structure-based drug discovery of selective dopaminergic ligands.

  16. Improved homology model of cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus based on multiple templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Eduardo; Ventura, Oscar N; Eriksson, Leif A; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia

    2014-04-01

    A new homology model of cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus is derived based on multiple templates, and in particular the crystal structure of CHMO from Rhodococcus sp. The derived model was fully evaluated, showing that the quality of the new structure was improved over previous models. Critically, the nicotinamide cofactor is included in the model for the first time. Analysis of several molecular dynamics snapshots of intermediates in the enzymatic mechanism led to a description of key residues for cofactor binding and intermediate stabilization during the reaction, in particular Arg327 and the well known conserved motif (FxGxxxHxxxW) in Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases, in excellent agreement with known experimental and computational data.

  17. A restraint molecular dynamics and simulated annealing approach for protein homology modeling utilizing mean angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer Till

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed the program PERMOL for semi-automated homology modeling of proteins. It is based on restrained molecular dynamics using a simulated annealing protocol in torsion angle space. As main restraints defining the optimal local geometry of the structure weighted mean dihedral angles and their standard deviations are used which are calculated with an algorithm described earlier by Döker et al. (1999, BBRC, 257, 348–350. The overall long-range contacts are established via a small number of distance restraints between atoms involved in hydrogen bonds and backbone atoms of conserved residues. Employing the restraints generated by PERMOL three-dimensional structures are obtained using standard molecular dynamics programs such as DYANA or CNS. Results To test this modeling approach it has been used for predicting the structure of the histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein HPr from E. coli and the structure of the human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (Ppar γ. The divergence between the modeled HPr and the previously determined X-ray structure was comparable to the divergence between the X-ray structure and the published NMR structure. The modeled structure of Ppar γ was also very close to the previously solved X-ray structure with an RMSD of 0.262 nm for the backbone atoms. Conclusion In summary, we present a new method for homology modeling capable of producing high-quality structure models. An advantage of the method is that it can be used in combination with incomplete NMR data to obtain reasonable structure models in accordance with the experimental data.

  18. Mapping the epitopes of a neutralizing antibody fragment directed against the lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis and cross-reacting with the homologous edema factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Thullier

    Full Text Available The lethal toxin (LT of Bacillus anthracis, composed of the protective antigen (PA and the lethal factor (LF, plays an essential role in anthrax pathogenesis. PA also interacts with the edema factor (EF, 20% identity with LF to form the edema toxin (ET, which has a lesser role in anthrax pathogenesis. The first recombinant antibody fragment directed against LF was scFv 2LF; it neutralizes LT by blocking the interaction between PA and LF. Here, we report that scFv 2LF cross-reacts with EF and cross-neutralizes ET, and we present an in silico method taking advantage of this cross-reactivity to map the epitope of scFv 2LF on both LF and EF. This method identified five epitope candidates on LF, constituted of a total of 32 residues, which were tested experimentally by mutating the residues to alanine. This combined approach precisely identified the epitope of scFv 2LF on LF as five residues (H229, R230, Q234, L235 and Y236, of which three were missed by the consensus epitope candidate identified by pre-existing in silico methods. The homolog of this epitope on EF (H253, R254, E258, L259 and Y260 was experimentally confirmed to constitute the epitope of scFv 2LF on EF. Other inhibitors, including synthetic molecules, could be used to target these epitopes for therapeutic purposes. The in silico method presented here may be of more general interest.

  19. Antibody structural modeling with prediction of immunoglobulin structure (PIGS)

    KAUST Repository

    Marcatili, Paolo

    2014-11-06

    © 2014 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved. Antibodies (or immunoglobulins) are crucial for defending organisms from pathogens, but they are also key players in many medical, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. The ability to predict their structure and the specific residues involved in antigen recognition has several useful applications in all of these areas. Over the years, we have developed or collaborated in developing a strategy that enables researchers to predict the 3D structure of antibodies with a very satisfactory accuracy. The strategy is completely automated and extremely fast, requiring only a few minutes (~10 min on average) to build a structural model of an antibody. It is based on the concept of canonical structures of antibody loops and on our understanding of the way light and heavy chains pack together.

  20. Connectivity Homology Enables Inter-Species Network Models of Synthetic Lethality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Jacunski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic lethality is a genetic interaction wherein two otherwise nonessential genes cause cellular inviability when knocked out simultaneously. Drugs can mimic genetic knock-out effects; therefore, our understanding of promiscuous drugs, polypharmacology-related adverse drug reactions, and multi-drug therapies, especially cancer combination therapy, may be informed by a deeper understanding of synthetic lethality. However, the colossal experimental burden in humans necessitates in silico methods to guide the identification of synthetic lethal pairs. Here, we present SINaTRA (Species-INdependent TRAnslation, a network-based methodology that discovers genome-wide synthetic lethality in translation between species. SINaTRA uses connectivity homology, defined as biological connectivity patterns that persist across species, to identify synthetic lethal pairs. Importantly, our approach does not rely on genetic homology or structural and functional similarity, and it significantly outperforms models utilizing these data. We validate SINaTRA by predicting synthetic lethality in S. pombe using S. cerevisiae data, then identify over one million putative human synthetic lethal pairs to guide experimental approaches. We highlight the translational applications of our algorithm for drug discovery by identifying clusters of genes significantly enriched for single- and multi-drug cancer therapies.

  1. Homology Modelling of the GABA Transporter and Analysis of Tiagabine Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovstrup, S.; Taboureau, Olivier; Bräuner-Osborne, H.;

    2010-01-01

    A homology model of the human GABA transporter (GAT-1) based on the recently reported crystal structures of the bacterial leucine transporter from Aquifex aeolicus (LeuT) was developed. The stability of the resulting model embedded in a membrane environment was analyzed by extensive molecular...... by Phe 294) to the extracellular vestibule, where the side chain is stabilised by aliphatic residues. The tiagabine binding mode, reaching from the substrate binding site to the extracellular vestibule, forces the side chain of Phe 294 to adopt a distinct conformation from that found in the occluded...... conformation of the transporter. Hence, in presence of tiagabine, GAT-1 is constrained in an open-to-out conformation. Our results may be of particular interest for the design of new GAT-1 inhibitors....

  2. Discovery of Entamoeba histolytica hexokinase 1 inhibitors through homology modeling and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-Mendiola, María Leticia; Salas-Pacheco, José Manuel; Nájera, Hugo; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Yépez-Mulia, Lilián; Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2014-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the parasite which causes amebiasis is responsible for 110,000 deaths a year. Entamoeba histolytica depends on glycolysis to obtain ATP for cellular work. According to metabolic flux studies, hexokinase exerts the highest flux control of this metabolic pathway; therefore, it is an excellent target in the search of new antiamebic drugs. To this end, a tridimensional model of E. histolytica hexokinase 1 (EhHK1) was constructed and validated by homology modeling. After virtual screening of 14,400 small molecules, the 100 with the best docking scores were selected, purchased and assessed in their inhibitory capacity. The results showed that three molecules (compounds 2921, 11275 and 2755) inhibited EhHK1 with an I50 of 48, 91 and 96 µM, respectively. Thus, we found the first inhibitors of EhHK1 that can be used in the search of new chemotherapeutic agents against amebiasis.

  3. Successful virtual screening for a submicromolar antagonist of the neurokinin-1 receptor based on a ligand-supported homology model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2004-10-21

    The neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor belongs to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which represents one of the most relevant target families in small-molecule drug design. In this paper, we describe a homology modeling of the NK1 receptor based on the high-resolution X-ray structure of rhodopsin and the successful virtual screening based on this protein model. The NK1 receptor model has been generated using our new MOBILE (modeling binding sites including ligand information explicitly) approach. Starting with preliminary homology models, it generates improved models of the protein binding pocket together with bound ligands. Ligand information is used as an integral part in the homology modeling process. For the construction of the NK1 receptor, antagonist CP-96345 was used to restrain the modeling. The quality of the obtained model was validated by probing its ability to accommodate additional known NK1 antagonists from structurally diverse classes. On the basis of the generated model and on the analysis of known NK1 antagonists, a pharmacophore model was deduced, which subsequently guided the 2D and 3D database search with UNITY. As a following step, the remaining hits were docked into the modeled binding pocket of the NK1 receptor. Finally, seven compounds were selected for biochemical testing, from which one showed affinity in the submicromolar range. Our results suggest that ligand-supported homology models of GPCRs may be used as effective platforms for structure-based drug design.

  4. Animal models of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salama, Alan D

    2012-01-01

    To provide an update on the experimental models that have been developed recapitulating clinical antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis. The application of the models in the study of pathogenesis, and the therapeutic implications of this, are covered in the article by van Timmeren and Heeringa in this issue.

  5. Homology modeling, molecular docking and electrostatic potential analysis of MurF ligase from Klebsiella pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Venkatabalasubramanian; Thiyagarajan, Chinnaiyan; Kalaivanan, Sivakumaran; Selvakumar, Raj; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy; Jayachandran, Kesavan Swaminathan

    2012-01-01

    In spite of availability of moderately protective vaccine and antibiotics, new antibacterial agents are urgently needed to decrease the global incidence of Klebsiella pneumonia infections. MurF ligase, a key enzyme, which participates in the bacterial cell wall assembly, is indispensable to existence of K. pneumonia. MurF ligase lack mammalian vis-à-vis and have high specificity, uniqueness, and occurrence only in eubacteria, epitomizing them as promising therapeutic targets for intervention. In this study, we present a unified approach involving homology modeling and molecular docking studies on MurF ligase enzyme. As part of this study, a homology model of K. pneumonia (MurF ligase) enzyme was predicted for the first time in order to carry out structurebased drug design. The accuracy of the model was further validated using different computational approaches. The comparative molecular docking study on this enzyme was undertaken using different phyto-ligands from Desmodium sp. and a known antibiotic Ciprofloxacin. The docking analysis indicated the importance of hotspots (HIS 281 and ASN 282) within the MurF binding pocket. The Lipinski's rule of five was analyzed for all ligands considered for this study by calculating the ADME/Tox, drug likeliness using Qikprop simulation. Only ten ligands were found to comply with the Lipinski rule of five. Based on the molecular docking results and Lipinki values 6-Methyltetrapterol A was confirmed as a promising lead compound. The present study should therefore play a guiding role in the experimental design and development of 6-Methyltetrapterol A as a bactericidal agent. PMID:22715301

  6. Structure solution with ARCIMBOLDO using fragments derived from distant homology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammito, Massimo; Meindl, Kathrin; de Ilarduya, Iñaki M; Millán, Claudia; Artola-Recolons, Cecilia; Hermoso, Juan A; Usón, Isabel

    2014-09-01

    Molecular replacement, one of the general methods used to solve the crystallographic phase problem, relies on the availability of suitable models for placement in the unit cell of the unknown structure in order to provide initial phases. ARCIMBOLDO, originally conceived for ab initio phasing, operates at the limit of this approach, using small, very accurate fragments such as polyalanine α-helices. A distant homolog may contain accurate building blocks, but it may not be evident which sub-structure is the most suitable purely from the degree of conservation. Trying out all alternative possibilities in a systematic way is computationally expensive, even if effective. In the present study, the solution of the previously unknown structure of MltE, an outer membrane-anchored endolytic peptidoglycan lytic transglycosylase from Escherichia coli, is described. The asymmetric unit contains a dimer of this 194 amino acid protein. The closest available homolog was the catalytic domain of Slt70 (PDB code 1QTE). Originally, this template was used omitting contiguous spans of aminoacids and setting as many ARCIMBOLDO runs as models, each aiming to locate two copies sequentially with PHASER. Fragment trimming against the correlation coefficient prior to expansion through density modification and autotracing in SHELXE was essential. Analysis of the figures of merit led to the strategy to optimize the search model against the experimental data now implemented within ARCIMBOLDO-SHREDDER (http://chango.ibmb.csic.es/SHREDDER). In this strategy, the initial template is systematically shredded, and fragments are scored against each unique solution of the rotation function. Results are combined into a score per residue and the template is trimmed accordingly.

  7. Theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of a disease resistance gene homolog encoding resistance protein in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Bahadur, Ranjit P

    2006-10-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes, the key players of innate immunity system in plants encode 'R' proteins. 'R' protein recognizes product of avirulance gene from the pathogen and activate downstream signaling responses leading to disease resistance. No three dimensional (3D) structural information of any 'R' proteins is available as yet. We have reported a 'R' gene homolog, the 'VMYR1', encoding 'R' protein in Vigna mungo. Here, we describe the homology modeling of the 'VMYR1' protein. The model was created by using the 3D structure of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Vibrio cholerae as a template. The strategy for homology modeling was based on the high structural conservation in the superfamily of P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in which target and template proteins belong. This is the first report of theoretical model structure of any 'R' proteins.

  8. 3D structure prediction of lignolytic enzymes lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase based on homology modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SWAPNIL K. KALE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Lignolytic enzymes have great biotechnological value in biopulping, biobleaching, and bioremediation. Manganese peroxidase (EC 1:11:1:13 and lignin peroxidase (EC 1:11:1:14 are extracellular and hem-containing peroxidases that catalyze H2O2-dependent oxidation of lignin. Because of their ability to catalyse oxidation of a wide range of organic compounds and even some inorganic compounds, they got tremendous industrial importance. In this study, 3D structure of lignin and manganese peroxidase has been predicted on the basis of homology modeling using Swiss PDB workspace. The physicochemical properties like molecular weight, isoelectric point, Grand average of hydropathy, instability and aliphatic index of the target enzymes were performed using Protparam. The predicted secondary structure of MnP has 18 helices and 6 strands, while LiP has 20 helices and 4 strands. Generated 3D structure was visualized in Pymol. The generated model for MnP and LiP has Z-score Qmean of 0.01 and -0.71, respectively. The predicted models were validated through Ramachandran Plot, which indicated that 96.1 and 95.5% of the residues are in most favored regions for MnP and LiP respectively. The quality of predicted models were assessed and confirmed by VERIFY 3D, PROCHECK and ERRAT. The modeled structure of MnP and LiP were submitted to the Protein Model Database.

  9. Homology modeling and function of trehalose synthase from Pseudomonas putida P06.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Wang, Tengfei; Ma, Chunling; Li, Zhongkui; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Ruiming

    2014-05-01

    Trehalose is a non-reducing disaccharide that has wide applications in the food industry and pharmaceutical manufacturing. Trehalose synthase (TreS) from Pseudomonas putida P06 catalyzes the reversible interconversion of maltose and trehalose and may have applications in the food industry. However, the catalytic mechanism of TreS is not well understood. Here, we investigated the structural characteristics of this enzyme by homology modeling. The highly conserved Asp294 residue was identified to be critical for catalytic activity. In addition, flexible docking studies of the enzyme-substrate system were performed to predict the interactions between TreS and its substrate, maltose. Amino acids that interact extensively with the substrate and stabilize the substrate in an orientation suitable for enzyme catalysis were identified. The importance of these residues for catalytic activity was confirmed by the biochemical characterization of the relevant mutants generated by site-directed mutagenesis. PMID:24563286

  10. DINAMO: a coupled sequence alignment editor/molecular graphics tool for interactive homology modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, M; Bentz, J; Baucom, A; Gregoret, L

    1998-01-01

    Gaining functional information about a novel protein is a universal problem in biomedical research. With the explosive growth of the protein sequence and structural databases, it is becoming increasingly common for researchers to attempt to build a three-dimensional model of their protein of interest in order to gain information about its structure and interactions with other molecules. The two most reliable methods for predicting the structure of a protein are homology modeling, in which the novel sequence is modeled on the known three-dimensional structure of a related protein, and fold recognition (threading), where the sequence is scored against a library of fold models, and the highest scoring model is selected. The sequence alignment to a known structure can be ambiguous, and human intervention is often required to optimize the model. We describe an interactive model building and assessment tool in which a sequence alignment editor is dynamically coupled to a molecular graphics display. By means of a set of assessment tools, the user may optimize his or her alignment to satisfy the known heuristics of protein structure. Adjustments to the sequence alignment made by the user are reflected in the displayed model by color and other visual cues. For instance, residues are colored by hydrophobicity in both the three-dimensional model and in the sequence alignment. This aids the user in identifying undesirable buried polar residues. Several different evaluation metrics may be selected including residue conservation, residue properties, and visualization of predicted secondary structure. These characteristics may be mapped to the model both singly and in combination. DINAMO is a Java-based tool that may be run either over the web or installed locally. Its modular architecture also allows Java-literate users to add plug-ins of their own design.

  11. The N-terminal domain of apolipoprotein B-100: structural characterization by homology modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khachfe Hassan M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein B-100 (apo B-100 stands as one of the largest proteins in humans. Its large size of 4536 amino acids hampers the production of X-ray diffraction quality crystals and hinders in-solution NMR analysis, and thus necessitates a domain-based approach for the structural characterization of the multi-domain full-length apo B. Results The structure of apo B-17 (the N-terminal 17% of apolipoprotein B-100 was predicted by homology modeling based on the structure of the N-terminal domain of lipovitellin (LV, a protein that shares not only sequence similarity with B17, but also a functional aspect of lipid binding and transport. The model structure was first induced to accommodate the six disulfide bonds found in that region, and then optimized using simulated annealing. Conclusion The content of secondary structural elements in this model structure correlates well with the reported data from other biophysical probes. The overall topology of the model conforms with the structural outline corresponding to the apo B-17 domain as seen in the EM representation of the complete LDL structure.

  12. Homology modeling and in silico site directed mutagenesis of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranyah, Kannuchamy; Kalva, Sukesh; Mukund, Nisha; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Saleena, Lilly M

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase is the crucial enzyme that involves in bioethanol synthesis pathway of Clostridium thermocellum. It is an ethanologenic organism but has been investigated less on its enzyme structure. The amino acid sequence of Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase was derived from UNIPROT and the screened crystal structure was taken as the template for homology modeling using MODELLER 9V11. The model was loop refined and was validated using RMSD, ProSA and PROCHECK. The docking and per residue interaction studies were carried out to elucidate the interaction energies of amino acid residues with pyruvate. To enhance the binding of pyruvate with the enzyme, mutation studies were carried out by replacing Thr31 as it had a less interaction energy. Out of 10 mutants, T31N, T31Q and T31G were selected using potential energy and the residual energy calculations. Five nanoseconds explicit MD simulations were run for apo, wild type and mutants T31N, T31Q and T31G using Desmond. RMSD, RMSF, distance plots and H-bonds analysis proved T31G to be a favorable mutant for binding of pyruvate. Thus, modeling PFOR would help in profound understanding of its structural clefts and mutation studies would aid in improving the enzyme efficiency. PMID:26369404

  13. Homology modeling studies of yeast Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKS): structural motifs as a basis for specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D L; Nilar, S H

    2010-06-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key components of cellular signal transduction. It is the objective of this communication to demonstrate that insight into protein-protein interactions in the Common Docking motif of yeast mitogen-activated protein kinases can be obtained based on homology models. Homology models for four yeast MAPKs, FUS3, KSS1, HOG1 and MPK1 were built based on the X-ray structures of active and inactive rat ERK2. The structural motifs required for the basis of specificity were rationalized based on these structures. PMID:19995338

  14. Loops In Proteins (LIP)--a comprehensive loop database for homology modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, E; Goede, A; Preissner, R

    2003-12-01

    One of the most important and challenging tasks in protein modelling is the prediction of loops, as can be seen in the large variety of existing approaches. Loops In Proteins (LIP) is a database that includes all protein segments of a length up to 15 residues contained in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). In this study, the applicability of LIP to loop prediction in the framework of homology modelling is investigated. Searching the database for loop candidates takes less than 1 s on a desktop PC, and ranking them takes a few minutes. This is an order of magnitude faster than most existing procedures. The measure of accuracy is the root mean square deviation (RMSD) with respect to the main-chain atoms after local superposition of target loop and predicted loop. Loops of up to nine residues length were modelled with a local RMSD <1 A and those of length up to 14 residues with an accuracy better than 2 A. The results were compared in detail with a thoroughly evaluated and tested ab initio method published recently and additionally with two further methods for a small loop test set. The LIP method produced very good predictions. In particular for longer loops it outperformed other methods.

  15. Construction and Analysis of Three-dimensional Graphic Model of Single-chain Fv Derived from an Anti-human Placental Acidic Isoferritin Monoclonal Antibody by Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Chun; SHEN Guanxin; ZHU Huifen; YANG Jing; ZHANG Yue; FENG Jiannan; SHEN Beifen

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) graphic model of a single-chain Fv (scFv) which was derived from an anti-human placental acidic isoferritin (PAF) monoclonal antibody (Mab) was constructed by a homologous protein-predicting computer algorithm on Silicon graphic computer station.The structure, surface static electricity and hydrophobicity of scFv were investigated. Computer graphic modelling indicated that all regions of scFv including the linker, variable regions of the heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains were suitable. The VH region and the VL region were involved in composing the "hydrophobic pocket". The linker was drifted away VH and VL regions. The complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of VH and VL regions surrounded the "hydrophobic pocket". This study provides a theory basis for improving antibody affinity, investigating antibody structure and analyzing the functions of VH and VL regions in antibody activity.

  16. A homology model of restriction endonuclease SfiI in complex with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skowronek Krzysztof J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction enzymes (REases are commercial reagents commonly used in recombinant DNA technologies. They are attractive models for studying protein-DNA interactions and valuable targets for protein engineering. They are, however, extremely divergent: the amino acid sequence of a typical REase usually shows no detectable similarities to any other proteins, with rare exceptions of other REases that recognize identical or very similar sequences. From structural analyses and bioinformatics studies it has been learned that some REases belong to at least four unrelated and structurally distinct superfamilies of nucleases, PD-DxK, PLD, HNH, and GIY-YIG. Hence, they are extremely hard targets for structure prediction and homology-based inference of sequence-function relationships and the great majority of REases remain structurally and evolutionarily unclassified. Results SfiI is a REase which recognizes the interrupted palindromic sequence 5'GGCCNNNN^NGGCC3' and generates 3 nt long 3' overhangs upon cleavage. SfiI is an archetypal Type IIF enzyme, which functions as a tetramer and cleaves two copies of the recognition site in a concerted manner. Its sequence shows no similarity to other proteins and nothing is known about the localization of its active site or residues important for oligomerization. Using the threading approach for protein fold-recognition, we identified a remote relationship between SfiI and BglI, a dimeric Type IIP restriction enzyme from the PD-DxK superfamily of nucleases, which recognizes the 5'GCCNNNN^NGGC3' sequence and whose structure in complex with the substrate DNA is available. We constructed a homology model of SfiI in complex with its target sequence and used it to predict residues important for dimerization, tetramerization, DNA binding and catalysis. Conclusions The bioinformatics analysis suggest that SfiI, a Type IIF enzyme, is more closely related to BglI, an "orthodox" Type IIP restriction enzyme

  17. Malaria vaccines: immunity, models and monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars; Barfod, Lea

    2008-01-01

    Although experts in the field have agreed on the malaria vaccine technology roadmap that should be followed (http://www.malariavaccineroadmap.net/), the path towards an effective malaria vaccine remains littered with intellectual and practical pot-holes. The animal models that are currently...

  18. A theoretical model of the tridimensional structure of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin Cry 11Bb toxin deduced by homology modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gutierrez

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Cry11Bb is an insecticidal crystal protein produced by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin during its stationary phase; this ¶-endotoxin is active against dipteran insects and has great potential for mosquito borne disease control. Here, we report the first theoretical model of the tridimensional structure of a Cry11 toxin. The tridimensional structure of the Cry11Bb toxin was obtained by homology modelling on the structures of the Cry1Aa and Cry3Aa toxins. In this work we give a brief description of our model and hypothesize the residues of the Cry11Bb toxin that could be important in receptor recognition and pore formation. This model will serve as a starting point for the design of mutagenesis experiments aimed to the improvement of toxicity, and to provide a new tool for the elucidation of the mechanism of action of these mosquitocidal proteins.

  19. Directed homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenberg, Uli

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata.......We introduce a new notion of directed homology for semicubical sets. We show that it respects directed homotopy and is functorial, and that it appears to enjoy some good algebraic properties. Our work has applications to higher-dimensional automata....

  20. Conserved functional motifs and homology modelling to predict hidden moonlighting functional sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R Irving

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Moonlighting functional centers within proteins can provide them with hitherto unrecognized functions. Here we review how hidden moonlighting functional centers which we define as binding sites that have catalytic activity or regulate protein function in a novel manner, can be identified using targeted bioinformatic searches. Functional motifs used in such searches include amino acid residues that are conserved across species and many of which have been assigned functional roles based on experimental evidence. Molecules that were identified in this manner seeking cyclic mononucleotide cyclases in plants are used as examples. The strength of this computational approach is enhanced when good homology models can be developed to test the functionality of the predicted centers in silico which in turn, increases confidence in the ability of the identified candidates to perform the predicted functions. Computational characterization of moonlighting functional centers is not diagnostic for catalysis but serves as a rapid screening method, and highlights testable targets from a potentially large pool of candidates for subsequent in vitro and in vivo experiments required to confirm the functionality of the predicted moonlighting centers.

  1. Conserved Functional Motifs and Homology Modeling to Predict Hidden Moonlighting Functional Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2015-06-09

    Moonlighting functional centers within proteins can provide them with hitherto unrecognized functions. Here, we review how hidden moonlighting functional centers, which we define as binding sites that have catalytic activity or regulate protein function in a novel manner, can be identified using targeted bioinformatic searches. Functional motifs used in such searches include amino acid residues that are conserved across species and many of which have been assigned functional roles based on experimental evidence. Molecules that were identified in this manner seeking cyclic mononucleotide cyclases in plants are used as examples. The strength of this computational approach is enhanced when good homology models can be developed to test the functionality of the predicted centers in silico, which, in turn, increases confidence in the ability of the identified candidates to perform the predicted functions. Computational characterization of moonlighting functional centers is not diagnostic for catalysis but serves as a rapid screening method, and highlights testable targets from a potentially large pool of candidates for subsequent in vitro and in vivo experiments required to confirm the functionality of the predicted moonlighting centers.

  2. Homology modeling and evolutionary trace analysis of superoxide dismutase from extremophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The gene sod in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans may play a crucial role in its tolerance to the extremely acidic, toxic and oxidative environment of bioleaching. For insight into the anti-toxic mechanism of the bacteria, a three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of the protein encoded by this gene was built by homology modeling techniques, refined by molecular dynamics simulations, assessed by PROFILE-3D and PROSTAT programs and its key residues were further detected by evolutionary trace analysis. Through these procedures, some trace residues were identified and spatially clustered. Among them, the residues of Asn38, Gly103 and Glu161 are randomly scattered throughout the mapped structure; interestingly, the other residues are all distinctly clustered in a subgroup near Fe atom. From these results, this gene can be confirmed at 3D level to encode the Fe-depending superoxide dismutase and subsequently play an anti-toxic role. Furthermore, the detected key residues around Fe binding site can be conjectured to be directly responsible for Fe binding and catalytic function.

  3. Inhibitor Discovery for the Human GLUT1 from Homology Modeling and Virtual Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Peter Man-Un; Song, Wenxin; Cheng, Lili; Zhao, Xinbin; Hu, Hailin; Chen, Ligong; Schlessinger, Avner

    2016-07-15

    The human Glucose Transporter 1 (hGLUT1 or SLC2A1) is a facilitative membrane transporter found in the liver, intestines, kidney, and brain, where it transports sugars such as d-glucose and d-galactose. Genetic variations in hGLUT1 are associated with a broad range of diseases and metabolic disorders. For example, hGLUT1 is upregulated in various cancer types (e.g., breast carcinoma) to support the increased anaerobic glycolysis and the Warburg effect. Thus, hGLUT1 is an emerging therapeutic target, which also transports commonly used cancer biomarkers (e.g., (18)F-DG). In this study, we use computational prediction followed by experimental testing, to characterize hGLUT1. We construct homology models of hGLUT1 in a partially occluded outward open ("occluded") conformation based on the X-ray structure of the E. coli xylose transporter, XylE. Comparison of the binding site of the occluded models to experimentally determined hGLUT structures revealed a hydrophobic pocket adjacent to the sugar-binding site, which was tested experimentally via site-directed mutagenesis. Virtual screening of various libraries of purchasable compounds against the occluded models, followed by experimental testing with cellular assays revealed seven previously unknown hGLUT1 ligands with IC50 values ranging from 0.45 μM to 59 μM. These ligands represent three unique chemotypes that are chemically different from any other known hGLUT1 ligands. The newly characterized hydrophobic pocket can potentially be utilized by the new ligands for increased affinity. Furthermore, the previously unknown hGLUT1 ligands can serve as chemical tools to further characterize hGLUT1 function or lead molecules for future drug development. PMID:27128978

  4. Modelling Virus and Antibody Dynamics during Dengue Virus Infection Suggests a Role for Antibody in Virus Clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E Clapham

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an infection of increasing global importance, yet uncertainty remains regarding critical aspects of its virology, immunology and epidemiology. One unanswered question is how infection is controlled and cleared during a dengue infection. Antibody is thought to play a role, but little past work has examined the kinetics of both virus and antibody during natural infections. We present data on multiple virus and antibody titres measurements recorded sequentially during infection from 53 Vietnamese dengue patients. We fit mechanistic mathematical models of the dynamics of viral replication and the host immune response to these data. These models fit the data well. The model with antibody removing virus fits the data best, but with a role suggested for ADCC or other infected cell clearance mechanisms. Our analysis therefore shows that the observed viral and antibody kinetics are consistent with antibody playing a key role in controlling viral replication. This work gives quantitative insight into the relationship between antibody levels and the efficiency of viral clearance. It will inform the future development of mechanistic models of how vaccines and antivirals might modify the course of natural dengue infection.

  5. Epitope grafting, re-creating a conformational Bet v 1 antibody epitope on the surface of the homologous apple allergen Mal d 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens; Ferreras, Mercedes; Ipsen, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    allergen Malus domestica group 1 (Mal d 1). Engineering of the epitope was accomplished by genetic engineering substituting amino acid residues in Mal d 1 differing between Bet v 1 and Mal d 1 within the epitope defined by the mAb BV16. The kinetic parameters characterizing the antibody binding interaction......Birch-allergic patients often experience oral allergy syndrome upon ingestion of vegetables and fruits, most prominently apple, that is caused by antibody cross-reactivity of the IgE antibodies in patients to proteins sharing molecular surface structures with the major birch pollen group 1 allergen...

  6. A homology model of the pore domain of a voltage-gated calcium channel is consistent with available SCAM data

    OpenAIRE

    Bruhova, Iva; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of x-ray structures of calcium channels, their homology models are used to rationalize experimental data and design new experiments. The modeling relies on sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels. Zhen et al. (2005. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.200509292) used the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to identify pore-lining residues in the Cav2.1 channel and concluded that their data are inconsistent with the symmetric architecture of the pore...

  7. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  8. Homology modeling, molecular dynamics and atomic level interaction study of snake venom 5' nucleotidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat, A Syed Yasir; Arun, A; Ilamathi, M; Asha, J; Sivashankari, P R; D'Souza, Cletus J M; Sivaramakrishnan, V; Dhananjaya, B L

    2014-03-01

    5' Nucleotidase (5' NUC) is a ubiquitously distributed enzyme known to be present in snake venoms (SV) that is responsible primarily for causing dysregulation of physiological homeostasis in humans by inducing anticoagulant effects and by inhibiting platelet aggregation. It is also known to act synergistically with other toxins to exert a more pronounced anti-coagulant effect during envenomation. Its structural and functional role is not yet ascertained clearly. The 3D structure of snake venom 5' nucleotidase (SV-5' NUC) is not yet known and was predicted by us for the first time using a comparative homology modeling approach using Demansia vestigiata protein sequence. The accuracy and stability of the predicted SV-5' NUC structure were validated using several computational approaches. Key interactions of SV-5' NUC were studied using experimental studies/molecular docking analysis of the inhibitors vanillin, vanillic acid and maltol. All these inhibitors were found to dock favorably following pharmacologically relevant absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) profiles. Further, atomic level docking interaction studies using inhibitors of the SV-5' NUC active site revealed amino acid residues Y65 and T72 as important for inhibitor-(SV-5' NUC) interactions. Our in silico analysis is in good agreement with experimental inhibition results of SV-5' NUC with vanillin, vanillic acid and maltol. The present study should therefore play a guiding role in the experimental design of new SV-5' NUC inhibitors for snake bite management. We also identified a few pharmacophoric features essential for SV-5' NUC inhibitory activity that can be utilized further for the discovery of putative anti-venom agents of therapeutic value for snake bite management.

  9. Homology modeling and docking studies of IscS from extremophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The gene iscS-3 from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans may play a central role in the delivery of sulfur to a variety of metabolic pathways in this organism. For insight into the sulfur metabolic mechanism of the bacteria, an integral three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of the protein encoded by this gene was built by homology modeling techniques, refined by molecular dynamics simulations, assessed by PROFILE-3D and PROSTAT programs and further used to search bind sites, carry out flexible docking with cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate(PLP) and substrate cysteine and hereby detect its key residues. Through these procedures, the detail conformations of PLP-IscS(P-I) and cysteine-PLP-IscS(C-P-I) complexes were obtained. In P-I complex, the residues of Lys208, His106, Thr78, Ser205, His207, Asp182 and Gln185 have large interaction energies and/or hydrogen bonds fixation with PLP. In C-P-I complex, the amino group in cysteine is very near His106, Lys208 and PLP, the interaction energies for cysteine with them are very high. The above results are well consistent with those experimental facts of the homologues from other sources. Interestingly, the four residues of Glu105, Glu79, Ser203 and His180 in P-I docking and the residue of Lys213 in C-P-I docking also have great interaction energies, which are fitly conservation in IscSs from all kinds of sources but have not been identified before. From these results, this gene can be confirmed at 3D level to encode the iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein lscS and subsequently play a sulfur traffic role. Furthermore, the substrate cysteine can be presumed to be effectively recruited into the active site. Finally, the above detected key residues can be conjectured to be directly responsible for the bind and/or catalysis of PLP and cysteine.

  10. Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking Analysis of Streptomyces peucetius CYP125A4 as C26 Monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Won; Lee, Na Rae; Oh, Tae Jin [SunMoon University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ji Hun [Physico-Chemical Assay Team, R and D, CELLTRION, Inc., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Among 23 cytochrome P450s, CYP125A4 was proposed as a putative monooxygenase based on the high level of amino acid sequence homology (54% identity and 75% similarity) with the well characterized C27-steroid Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP125A1. Utilizing MTBCYP125A1 as a template, homology modeling of SPCYP125A4 was conducted by Accelrys Discovery Studio 3.1 software. The modeled SPCYP125A4 structure with lowest energy value was subsequently assessed for its stereochemical quality and side-chain environment. The final model was generated by showing its active site through the molecular dynamics. The docking of steroids showed broad specificity of SPCYP125A4 with different orientation of ligand within active site facing the heme. One poses of C27-steroid with C26 facing the heme with distance of 3.734 A from the Fe were predominant

  11. Homological evolutionary vector fields in Korteweg-de Vries, Liouville, Maxwell, and several other models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiselev, Arthemy V.

    2012-01-01

    We review the construction of homological evolutionary vector fields on infinite jet spaces and partial differential equations. We describe the applications of this concept in three tightly inter-related domains: the variational Poisson formalism (e.g., for equations of Korteweg-de Vries type), geom

  12. Homology modeling and docking studies of BjGL, a novel (+) gamma-lactamase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dawei; Zhu, Shaozhou; Li, Xingzhou; Zheng, Guojun

    2014-02-01

    (+) Gamma-lactamases are enantioselective hydrolysis enzymes that can be used to produce optically pure (-) gamma-lactam, an important pharmaceutical intermediate for the anti-AIDS drug Abacavir. In this study, homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulation studies of a 3D homology model of BjGL, a novel (+) gamma-lactamase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were constructed and refined. The specific substrate (+) gamma-lactam and its enantiomer (-) gamma-lactam which can not be hydrolyzed was docked into the active site respectively, and the catalytic triad and other crucial residues that participate in the formation of the hydrophobic binding pocket, hydrogen bonds, and the oxyanion hole were identified. Furthermore, possible reasons for the high diastereoselectivity of BjGL binding with the substrate are proposed. PMID:24215997

  13. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and homology modeling of the first caudata amphibian antifreeze-like protein in axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songyan; Gao, Jiuxiang; Lu, Yiling; Cai, Shasha; Qiao, Xue; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2013-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) refer to a class of polypeptides that are produced by certain vertebrates, plants, fungi, and bacteria and which permit their survival in subzero environments. In this study, we report the molecular cloning, sequence analysis and three-dimensional structure of the axolotl antifreeze-like protein (AFLP) by homology modeling of the first caudate amphibian AFLP. We constructed a full-length spleen cDNA library of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). An EST having highest similarity (∼42%) with freeze-responsive liver protein Li16 from Rana sylvatica was identified, and the full-length cDNA was subsequently obtained by RACE-PCR. The axolotl antifreeze-like protein sequence represents an open reading frame for a putative signal peptide and the mature protein composed of 93 amino acids. The calculated molecular mass and the theoretical isoelectric point (pl) of this mature protein were 10128.6 Da and 8.97, respectively. The molecular characterization of this gene and its deduced protein were further performed by detailed bioinformatics analysis. The three-dimensional structure of current AFLP was predicted by homology modeling, and the conserved residues required for functionality were identified. The homology model constructed could be of use for effective drug design. This is the first report of an antifreeze-like protein identified from a caudate amphibian. PMID:23915159

  14. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and homology modeling of the first caudata amphibian antifreeze-like protein in axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songyan; Gao, Jiuxiang; Lu, Yiling; Cai, Shasha; Qiao, Xue; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2013-08-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) refer to a class of polypeptides that are produced by certain vertebrates, plants, fungi, and bacteria and which permit their survival in subzero environments. In this study, we report the molecular cloning, sequence analysis and three-dimensional structure of the axolotl antifreeze-like protein (AFLP) by homology modeling of the first caudate amphibian AFLP. We constructed a full-length spleen cDNA library of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum). An EST having highest similarity (∼42%) with freeze-responsive liver protein Li16 from Rana sylvatica was identified, and the full-length cDNA was subsequently obtained by RACE-PCR. The axolotl antifreeze-like protein sequence represents an open reading frame for a putative signal peptide and the mature protein composed of 93 amino acids. The calculated molecular mass and the theoretical isoelectric point (pl) of this mature protein were 10128.6 Da and 8.97, respectively. The molecular characterization of this gene and its deduced protein were further performed by detailed bioinformatics analysis. The three-dimensional structure of current AFLP was predicted by homology modeling, and the conserved residues required for functionality were identified. The homology model constructed could be of use for effective drug design. This is the first report of an antifreeze-like protein identified from a caudate amphibian.

  15. Immunoglobulin with High-Titer In Vitro Cross-Neutralizing Hepatitis C Virus Antibodies Passively Protects Chimpanzees from Homologous, but Not Heterologous, Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens; Engle, Ronald E.; Faulk, Kristina;

    2015-01-01

    The importance of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) in protection against hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains controversial. We infused a chimpanzee with H06 immunoglobulin from a genotype 1a HCV-infected patient and challenged with genotype strains efficiently neutralized by H06 in vitro. Genotype 1a...

  16. Sequence Analysis of the Protein Structure Homology Modeling of Growth Hormone Gene from Salmo trutta caspius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhasan Rezaei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of the growth hormone protein investigated and characterized from Salmo trutta caspius. Growth hormone gene in the Salmo trutta caspius have six exons in the full length that is translated into a Molecular Weight (kDa: ssDNA: 64.98 and dsDNA: 129.6. There are also 210 amino acid residue. The assembled full length of DNA contains open reading frame of growth hormone gene that contains 15 sequences in the full length. The average GC content is 47% and AT content is 53%. This protein multiple alignment has shown that this peptide is 100% identical to the corresponding homologous protein in the growth hormone protein which including Salmo salar (Accession number: AAA49558.1 and Rainbow trout (Salmo trutta (Accession number: AAA49555.1" sequences. The sequence of protein had deposited in Gene Bank, Accession number: AEK70940. Also we were analyzed second and third structure between sequences reported in Gene Bank Network system. The results are shown, there are homology between second structure in three sequences including: Salmo trutta caspius, Salmo salar and Rainbow trout. Regarding third structure, Salmo trutta caspius and Salmo salar are same type, but Rainbow trout has different homology with Salmo trutta caspius and Salmo salar. However, the sequences were observed three parallel " helix and in second structure there were almost same percent β sheet.

  17. A discriminative method for family-based protein remote homology detection that combines inductive logic programming and propositional models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbone Alessandra

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Remote homology detection is a hard computational problem. Most approaches have trained computational models by using either full protein sequences or multiple sequence alignments (MSA, including all positions. However, when we deal with proteins in the "twilight zone" we can observe that only some segments of sequences (motifs are conserved. We introduce a novel logical representation that allows us to represent physico-chemical properties of sequences, conserved amino acid positions and conserved physico-chemical positions in the MSA. From this, Inductive Logic Programming (ILP finds the most frequent patterns (motifs and uses them to train propositional models, such as decision trees and support vector machines (SVM. Results We use the SCOP database to perform our experiments by evaluating protein recognition within the same superfamily. Our results show that our methodology when using SVM performs significantly better than some of the state of the art methods, and comparable to other. However, our method provides a comprehensible set of logical rules that can help to understand what determines a protein function. Conclusions The strategy of selecting only the most frequent patterns is effective for the remote homology detection. This is possible through a suitable first-order logical representation of homologous properties, and through a set of frequent patterns, found by an ILP system, that summarizes essential features of protein functions.

  18. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    linker for yeast surface display of scFv and scFab fragments, we compared a series of different Gly-Ser-based linkers in display and antigen binding proficiency. We show that these formats of the model antibody can accommodate linkers of different lengths and that introduction of alanine or glutamate......-2. Based on the presented data we suggest that affinity maturation of the model antibody proceeds through multiple incremental steps of subtle improvements. We moreover conclude that the best affinity improved candidates are likely to be obtained through optimization of both the antigen...... fragments by in vivo homologous recombination large combinatorial antibody libraries can easily be generated. We have optimized ordered assembly of three CDR fragments into a gapped vector and observed increased transformation efficiency in a yeast strain carrying a deletion of the SGS1 helicase...

  19. Expression of venom gene homologs in diverse python tissues suggests a new model for the evolution of snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Card, Daren C; Andrew, Audra L; Shaney, Kyle J; Adams, Richard H; Schield, Drew R; Casewell, Nicholas R; Mackessy, Stephen P; Castoe, Todd A

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom gene evolution has been studied intensively over the past several decades, yet most previous studies have lacked the context of complete snake genomes and the full context of gene expression across diverse snake tissues. We took a novel approach to studying snake venom evolution by leveraging the complete genome of the Burmese python, including information from tissue-specific patterns of gene expression. We identified the orthologs of snake venom genes in the python genome, and conducted detailed analysis of gene expression of these venom homologs to identify patterns that differ between snake venom gene families and all other genes. We found that venom gene homologs in the python are expressed in many different tissues outside of oral glands, which illustrates the pitfalls of using transcriptomic data alone to define "venom toxins." We hypothesize that the python may represent an ancestral state prior to major venom development, which is supported by our finding that the expansion of venom gene families is largely restricted to highly venomous caenophidian snakes. Therefore, the python provides insight into biases in which genes were recruited for snake venom systems. Python venom homologs are generally expressed at lower levels, have higher variance among tissues, and are expressed in fewer organs compared with all other python genes. We propose a model for the evolution of snake venoms in which venom genes are recruited preferentially from genes with particular expression profile characteristics, which facilitate a nearly neutral transition toward specialized venom system expression.

  20. Repeat-swap homology modeling of secondary active transporters: updated protocol and prediction of elevator-type mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Kaufmann, Desirée; Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-01-01

    Secondary active transporters are critical for neurotransmitter clearance and recycling during synaptic transmission and uptake of nutrients. These proteins mediate the movement of solutes against their concentration gradients, by using the energy released in the movement of ions down pre-existing concentration gradients. To achieve this, transporters conform to the so-called alternating-access hypothesis, whereby the protein adopts at least two conformations in which the substrate binding sites are exposed to one or other side of the membrane, but not both simultaneously. Structures of a bacterial homolog of neuronal glutamate transporters, GltPh, in several different conformational states have revealed that the protein structure is asymmetric in the outward- and inward-open states, and that the conformational change connecting them involves a elevator-like movement of a substrate binding domain across the membrane. The structural asymmetry is created by inverted-topology repeats, i.e., structural repeats with similar overall folds whose transmembrane topologies are related to each other by two-fold pseudo-symmetry around an axis parallel to the membrane plane. Inverted repeats have been found in around three-quarters of secondary transporter folds. Moreover, the (a)symmetry of these systems has been successfully used as a bioinformatic tool, called "repeat-swap modeling" to predict structural models of a transporter in one conformation using the known structure of the transporter in the complementary conformation as a template. Here, we describe an updated repeat-swap homology modeling protocol, and calibrate the accuracy of the method using GltPh, for which both inward- and outward-facing conformations are known. We then apply this repeat-swap homology modeling procedure to a concentrative nucleoside transporter, VcCNT, which has a three-dimensional arrangement related to that of GltPh. The repeat-swapped model of VcCNT predicts that nucleoside transport also

  1. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Gupta

    Full Text Available We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo of Brugia malayi (B. malayi in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+ and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32 against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23 and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45. In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC to B. malayi infective larvae (L3. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of

  2. Homology modeling three-dimensional structure of AnxB1 and reducing its immunogenicity by sequence-deleted mutagenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hongli; SONG Yunlong; LIU Fan; HE Yan; SUN Shuhan

    2004-01-01

    AnxB1,a novel annexin previously isolated from Cysticercus cellulose,shows high thrombi affinity and anticoagulant activity in vivo.In order to investigate the relationship between structure and biological function,a predicted three-dimensional(3D)model of AnxB1 was generated by homology modeling.This model contains four homologous internal-domains and the Cα trace of domain Ⅰ,Ⅱ and IV shows high similarity.Based on the structure characterization,four sequence-deleted mutants were constructed and expressed as GST fusion proteins in E.coli.Two of the mutants,GST-M3 and GST-M4 reserved high anticoagulant activity(p<0.01 vs.GST).Furthermore,compared with the wild type GST-AnxB1,the immunogenicity of GST-M3 and GST-M4 was reduced significantly(p<0.01)and the molecular weight was lowered to 27 kD and 34 kD,respectively.These observations laid a solid foundation for further study on developing new thrombolytic agents with higher efficiency and lower side effect.

  3. In silico Sequence Analysis, Homology Modeling and Function Annotation of Ocimum basilicum Hypothetical Protein G1CT28_OCIBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobia Idrees

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ocimum basilicum is commonly known as sweet basil and belongs to the Lamiaceae Family. Ocimum basilicum has great therapeutic benefits and can be used for lowering blood pressure, as an antispasmodic as well as cleansing the blood. In the present study, subcellular localization prediction suggested that it is a cytoplasmic protein. We predicted the 3D structure of protein using homology modeling as 3D structure prediction approach. 3D structure of the protein was determined using Protein Structure Prediction Server (PS2 selecting MODELLER as 3D structure prediction method. Quality analysis of the model indicated that it is a reliable model. Furthermore, it was discovered that Ocimum basilicum hypothetical protein G1CT28_OCIBA is involved in two biological processes, oxidation reduction and metabolic process and the biochemical function of the protein is acting on the aldehyde or oxo group of donors, NAD or NADP as acceptor, catalytic activity and oxidoreductase.

  4. Using Homology Modeling, Molecular Dynamics and Molecular Docking Techniques to Identify Inhibitor Binding Regions of Somatostatin Receptor 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Hai-nan; WANG Yue-xi; ZHENG Ming-zhu; HAN Wei-wei; ZHENG Xin

    2013-01-01

    The G protein coupled receptor(GPCR),one of the members in the superfamily,which consists of thousands of integral membrane proteins,exerts a wide variety of physiological functions and responses to a large portion of the drug targets.The 3D structure of somatostatin receptor 1(SSTR1) was modeled and refined by means of homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation.This model was assessed by Verify-3D and Vadar,which confirmed the reliability of the refined model.The interaction between the inhibitor cysteamine,somatostatin(SST) and SSTRI was investigated by a molecular docking program,Affinity.The binding module not only showed the crucial residues involved in the interaction,but also provided important information about the interaction between SSTR1 on the one hand and ligands on the other,which might be the significant evidence for the structure-based design.

  5. NMR-based homology model for the solution structure of the C-terminal globular domain of EMILIN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdone, Giuliana [Istituto Biochimico Italiano ' G. Lorenzini' (Italy); Corazza, Alessandra [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy); Colebrooke, Simon A. [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Cicero, Daniel; Eliseo, Tommaso [Universita di Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Boyd, Jonathan [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Doliana, Roberto [Centro di Riferimento Oncologico di Aviano, Divisione di Oncologia Sperimentale 2 (Italy); Fogolari, Federico; Viglino, Paolo; Colombatti, Alfonso [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy); Campbell, Iain D. [University of Oxford, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Esposito, Gennaro [Universita di Udine, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche - MATI Centre of Excellence (Italy)], E-mail: gesposito@mail.dstb.uniud.it

    2009-02-15

    EMILIN1 is a glycoprotein of elastic tissues that has been recently linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The protein is formed by different independently folded structural domains whose role has been partially elucidated. In this paper the solution structure, inferred from NMR-based homology modelling of the C-terminal trimeric globular C1q domain (gC1q) of EMILIN1, is reported. The high molecular weight and the homotrimeric structure of the protein required the combined use of highly deuterated {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C-labelled samples and TROSY experiments. Starting from a homology model, the protein structure was refined using heteronuclear residual dipolar couplings, chemical shift patterns, NOEs and H-exchange data. Analysis of the gC1q domain structure of EMILIN1 shows that each protomer of the trimer adopts a nine-stranded {beta} sandwich folding topology which is related to the conformation observed for other proteins of the family. Distinguishing features, however, include a missing edge-strand and an unstructured 19-residue loop. Although the current data do not allow this loop to be precisely defined, the available evidence is consistent with a flexible segment that protrudes from each subunit of the globular trimeric assembly and plays a key role in inter-molecular interactions between the EMILIN1 gC1q homotrimer and its integrin receptor {alpha}4{beta}1.

  6. NMR-based homology model for the solution structure of the C-terminal globular domain of EMILIN1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EMILIN1 is a glycoprotein of elastic tissues that has been recently linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The protein is formed by different independently folded structural domains whose role has been partially elucidated. In this paper the solution structure, inferred from NMR-based homology modelling of the C-terminal trimeric globular C1q domain (gC1q) of EMILIN1, is reported. The high molecular weight and the homotrimeric structure of the protein required the combined use of highly deuterated 15N, 13C-labelled samples and TROSY experiments. Starting from a homology model, the protein structure was refined using heteronuclear residual dipolar couplings, chemical shift patterns, NOEs and H-exchange data. Analysis of the gC1q domain structure of EMILIN1 shows that each protomer of the trimer adopts a nine-stranded β sandwich folding topology which is related to the conformation observed for other proteins of the family. Distinguishing features, however, include a missing edge-strand and an unstructured 19-residue loop. Although the current data do not allow this loop to be precisely defined, the available evidence is consistent with a flexible segment that protrudes from each subunit of the globular trimeric assembly and plays a key role in inter-molecular interactions between the EMILIN1 gC1q homotrimer and its integrin receptor α4β1

  7. A Model System for Concurrent Detection of Antigen and Antibody Based on Immunological Fluorescent Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Cheng Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a combined antigen/antibody immunoassay implemented in a 96-well plate using fluorescent spectroscopic method. First, goat anti-human IgG was used to capture human IgG (model antigen; goat anti-human IgG (Cy3 or FITC was used to detect the model antigen; a saturating level of model antigen was then added followed by unlabelled goat anti-human IgG (model antibody; finally, Cy3 labelled rabbit anti-goat IgG was used to detect the model antibody. Two approaches were applied to the concomitant assay to analyze the feasibility. The first approach applied FITC and Cy3 when both targets were present at the same time, resulting in 50 ng/mL of the antibody detection limit and 10 ng/mL of antigen detection limit in the quantitative measurements of target concentration, taking the consideration of FRET efficiency of 68% between donor and acceptor. The sequential approach tended to lower the signal/noise (S/N ratio and the detection of the model antigen (lower than 1 ng/mL had better sensitivity than the model antibody (lower than 50 ng/mL. This combined antigen/antibody method might be useful for combined detection of antigens and antibodies. It will be helpful to screen for both antigen and antibody particularly in the situations of the multiserotype and high-frequency mutant virus infections.

  8. BAFF Blockade Prevents Anti-Drug Antibody Formation in a Mouse Model of Pompe Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Doerfler, Phillip A.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W; Morel, Laurence; Barry J Byrne

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies formed against the therapeutic protein are a life-threatening complication that arises during enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase deficiency; GAA). To provide an effective alternative to current practices, we investigated the capacity of anti-B-cell activating factor (BAFF) as a novel drug candidate to prevent antibody formation in a Pompe disease mouse model. A BAFF-neutralizing antibody was administered prophylactically and with maintenance doses in a...

  9. A Model System for Concurrent Detection of Antigen and Antibody Based on Immunological Fluorescent Method

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a combined antigen/antibody immunoassay implemented in a 96-well plate using fluorescent spectroscopic method. First, goat anti-human IgG was used to capture human IgG (model antigen); goat anti-human IgG (Cy3 or FITC) was used to detect the model antigen; a saturating level of model antigen was then added followed by unlabelled goat anti-human IgG (model antibody); finally, Cy3 labelled rabbit anti-goat IgG was used to detect the model antibody. Two approaches were appli...

  10. Stochastic simulation modeling to determine time to detect Bovine Viral Diarrhea antibodies in bulk tank milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foddai, Alessandro; Enøe, Claes; Krogh, Kaspar;

    2014-01-01

    A stochastic simulation model was developed to estimate the time from introduction ofBovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) in a herd to detection of antibodies in bulk tank milk(BTM) samples using three ELISAs. We assumed that antibodies could be detected, after afixed threshold prevalence...

  11. Homology Modelling and Insilico Analysis of Hemagglutinin Protein from H1n1 Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash M,

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available World wide spread of H1NI Influenza A Virus has raised concerns. Modelling of Hemagglutinin protein of Influenza A virus (A/Sakai/1/2009(H1N1 Hemagglutinin (HA protein was done using Modeller 9V2.Modelled structure was submitted to protein model database and can be downloaded using accession number PM0075832. Further modelled protein structure was subjected to Insilco analysis using various ioinformatics tools. Two anti-influenza drugs currently being used to treat infected patients are oseltamivir (Tamiflu and zanamivir (Relenza, both of which target the neuraminidase enzyme of the virus. Reports of the emergence of drug resistance make the development of new anti-influenza molecules a priority. Hence, modelled structure of H1NI Hemagglutinin will be very useful for insilico analysis of potential Hemagglutinin inhibitors. .

  12. Characterization of Mucosal Immune Responses to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Vaccine Antigens in a Human Challenge Model: Response Profiles after Primary Infection and Homologous Rechallenge with Strain H10407.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhra; Harro, Clayton; DeNearing, Barbara; Ram, Malathi; Feller, Andrea; Cage, Alicia; Bauers, Nicole; Bourgeois, A Louis; Walker, Richard; Sack, David A

    2015-11-18

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are the most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in children in resource-poor settings as well as in travelers. Although there are several approaches to develop an effective vaccine for ETEC, no licensed vaccines are currently available. A significant challenge to successful vaccine development is our poor understanding of the immune responses that correlate best with protection against ETEC illness. In this study, ETEC-specific mucosal immune responses were characterized and compared in subjects challenged with ETEC strain H10407 and in subjects rechallenged with the homologous organism. IgA responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB), and colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) in antibody in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS), feces, lavage fluid, and saliva samples were evaluated. In all assay comparisons, ALS was the most sensitive indicator of a local immune response, but serum IgA was also a useful indirect marker of immune response to oral antigens. Volunteers challenged and then rechallenged with strain H10407 were protected from illness following rechallenge. Comparing mucosal antibody responses after primary and homologous rechallenge, protection against disease was reflected in reduced antibody responses to key ETEC antigens and in reduced fecal shedding of the H10407 challenge strain. Subjects challenged with strain H10407 mounted stronger antibody responses to LPS and LTB than subjects in the rechallenge group, while responses to CFA/I in the rechallenge group were higher than in the challenge group. We anticipate that this study will help provide an immunological benchmark for the evaluation of ETEC vaccines and immunization regimens in the future.

  13. Low oxygen affinity in reptilian hemoglobin D: prediction of residue interactions in Geochelone carbonaria HbD by homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfullah, Ghosia; Khalil, Hilal Shahid; Amin, Farhat; Azhar, Noreen

    2008-04-01

    The homology model of hemoglobin D from Geochelone carbonaria, the red-footed tortoise was predicted using the 3D structure coordinates of Geochelone gigantea hemoglobin D as the template. The model was built using the program, MODELLER (8v1) and evaluated with PROCHECK and PROSA. The present study features an in-depth analysis of the 3D model and its conformational changes brought about with variations in its environment. These structural changes are correlated with its ability to adapt to different environmental constraints enabling the organism to better suit to its natural habitat. The model shows additional contacts between amino acid pairs of alpha-119 and beta-55, alpha-35 and beta-124, alpha-103 and beta-112, alpha-115 and beta-116, alpha-120 and beta-52, alpha-120 and beta-55, alpha-36 and beta-127 which are not found in human hemoglobin. It is predicted that these contacts may result in T-state stabilization thus lowering oxygen affinity. Furthermore, decrease in the interaction of phosphate heteroatoms with the amino acid residues of G. carbonaria Hb was also predicted in this study. PMID:18085430

  14. Discovery of Novel Inhibitors for Nek6 Protein through Homology Model Assisted Structure Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nek6 is a member of the NIMA (never in mitosis, gene A-related serine/threonine kinase family that plays an important role in the initiation of mitotic cell cycle progression. This work is an attempt to emphasize the structural and functional relationship of Nek6 protein based on homology modeling and binding pocket analysis. The three-dimensional structure of Nek6 was constructed by molecular modeling studies and the best model was further assessed by PROCHECK, ProSA, and ERRAT plot in order to analyze the quality and consistency of generated model. The overall quality of computed model showed 87.4% amino acid residues under the favored region. A 3 ns molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the structure was reliable and stable. Two lead compounds (Binding database ID: 15666, 18602 were retrieved through structure-based virtual screening and induced fit docking approaches as novel Nek6 inhibitors. Hence, we concluded that the potential compounds may act as new leads for Nek6 inhibitors designing.

  15. Laminated Windshield Breakage Modelling in the Context of Headform Impact Homologation Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiński, P.; Osiński, J.

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of modelling a laminated windshield using the FEM is to provide a critical look on the way the adult headform impact tests are conducted in the process of motor vehicle certification. The main aim of the study is to modify the design of a laminated windshield in the context of a vehicle collision with vulnerable road users. The initial phase of the work was to develop a model of the adult headform impactor. The validation consisted in conducting a series of FEM analyses of the impactor certification testing according to the Regulation (EC) 631/2009. Next, the impact of the headform model on a windshield was analysed. The FEM model of laminated glass is composed of two outer layers of glass and an inner layer of polyvinyl butyral. FEM analyses of the impaction were performed at five points of the windshield characterised by various dynamic responses of the impactor and various patterns of glass cracking. In modelling the layers of glass, the Abaqus environment "brittle cracking" model was used. The following material models of PVB resin were considered: elastic, elastic-plastic, hyperelastic, and low-density foam. Furthermore, the influence of the mesh type on the process of glass cracking in a laminated windshield was analysed.

  16. Mutational analysis of the high-affinity zinc binding site validates a refined human dopamine transporter homology model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stockner

    Full Text Available The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT. Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22% and (iii the extracellular loop 2 (EL2 of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter's movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle.

  17. In silico sequence analysis and homology modeling of predicted beta-amylase 7-like protein in Brachypodium distachyon L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERTUĞRUL FILIZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Beta-amylase (β-amylase, EC 3.2.1.2 is an enzyme that catalyses hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds in polysaccharides. In this study, we analyzed protein sequence of predicted beta-amylase 7-like protein in Brachypodium distachyon. pI (isoelectric point value was found as 5.23 in acidic character, while the instability index (II was found as 50.28 with accepted unstable protein. The prediction of subcellular localization was revealed that the protein may reside in chloroplast by using CELLO v.2.5. The 3D structure of protein was performed using comparative homology modeling with SWISS-MODEL. The accuracy of the predicted 3D structure was checked using Ramachandran plot analysis showed that 95.4% in favored region. The results of our study contribute to understanding of β-amylase protein structure in grass species and will be scientific base for 3D modeling of beta-amylase proteins in further studies.

  18. Heterologous protection elicited by candidate monomeric recombinant HIV-1 gp120 vaccine in the absence of cross neutralising antibodies in a macaque model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Mark

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current data suggest that an efficacious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 vaccine should elicit both adaptive humoral and cell mediated immune responses. Such a vaccine will also need to protect against infection from a range of heterologous viral variants. Here we have developed a simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV based model in cynomolgus macaques to investigate the breadth of protection conferred by HIV-1W61D recombinant gp120 vaccination against SHIVsbg and SHIVSF33 challenge, and to identify correlates of protection. Results High titres of anti-envelope antibodies were detected in all vaccinees. The antibodies reacted with both the homologous HIV-1W61D and heterologous HIV-1IIIB envelope rgp120 which has an identical sequence to the SHIVsbg challenge virus. Significant titres of virus neutralising antibodies were detected against SHIVW61D expressing an envelope homologous with the vaccine, but only limited cross neutralisation against SHIVsbg, SHIV-4 and SHIVSF33 was observed. Protection against SHIVsbg infection was observed in vaccinated animals but none was observed against SHIVSF33 challenge. Transfer of immune sera from vaccinated macaques to naive recipients did not confer protection against SHIVsbg challenge. In a follow-up study, T cell proliferative responses detected after immunisation with the same vaccine against a single peptide present in the second conserved region 2 of HIV-1 W61D and HIV-1 IIIB gp120, but not SF33 gp120. Conclusions Following extended vaccination with a HIV-1 rgp120 vaccine, protection was observed against heterologous virus challenge with SHIVsbg, but not SHIVSF33. Protection did not correlate with serological responses generated by vaccination, but might be associated with T cell proliferative responses against an epitope in the second constant region of HIV-1 gp120. Broader protection may be obtained with recombinant HIV-1 envelope based vaccines formulated with

  19. Homology modeling, substrate docking, and molecular simulation studies of mycobacteriophage Che12 lysin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadhali, Shainaba A; Hassan, Sameer; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Ranganathan, Uma Devi; Kumar, Vanaja

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacteriophages produce lysins that break down the host cell wall at the end of lytic cycle to release their progenies. The ability to lyse mycobacterial cells makes the lysins significant. Mycobacteriophage Che12 is the first reported temperate phage capable of infecting and lysogenising Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Gp11 of Che12 was found to have Chitinase domain that serves as endolysin (lysin A) for Che12. Structure of gp11 was modeled and evaluated using Ramachandran plot in which 98 % of the residues are in the favored and allowed regions. Che12 lysin A was predicted to act on NAG-NAM-NAG molecules in the peptidoglycan of cell wall. The tautomers of NAG-NAM-NAG molecule were generated and docked with lysin A. The stability and binding affinity of lysin A - NAG-NAM-NAG tautomers were studied using molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27411553

  20. Maximum-Entropy Models of Sequenced Immune Repertoires Predict Antigen-Antibody Affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asti, Lorenzo; Uguzzoni, Guido; Marcatili, Paolo;

    2016-01-01

    -frequency mutation rate in the genome region that codes for the antibody active site. Eventually, cells that produce antibodies with higher affinity for their cognate antigen are selected and clonally expanded. Here, we propose a new statistical approach based on maximum entropy modeling in which a scoring function...... related to the binding affinity of antibodies against a specific antigen is inferred from a sample of sequences of the immune repertoire of an individual. We use our inference strategy to infer a statistical model on a data set obtained by sequencing a fairly large portion of the immune repertoire...... of an HIV-1 infected patient. The Pearson correlation coefficient between our scoring function and the IC50 neutralization titer measured on 30 different antibodies of known sequence is as high as 0.77 (p-value 10-6), outperforming other sequence- and structure-based models....

  1. Distantly related lipocalins share two conserved clusters of hydrophobic residues: use in homology modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brasseur Robert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipocalins are widely distributed in nature and are found in bacteria, plants, arthropoda and vertebra. In hematophagous arthropods, they are implicated in the successful accomplishment of the blood meal, interfering with platelet aggregation, blood coagulation and inflammation and in the transmission of disease parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi and Borrelia burgdorferi. The pairwise sequence identity is low among this family, often below 30%, despite a well conserved tertiary structure. Under the 30% identity threshold, alignment methods do not correctly assign and align proteins. The only safe way to assign a sequence to that family is by experimental determination. However, these procedures are long and costly and cannot always be applied. A way to circumvent the experimental approach is sequence and structure analyze. To further help in that task, the residues implicated in the stabilisation of the lipocalin fold were determined. This was done by analyzing the conserved interactions for ten lipocalins having a maximum pairwise identity of 28% and various functions. Results It was determined that two hydrophobic clusters of residues are conserved by analysing the ten lipocalin structures and sequences. One cluster is internal to the barrel, involving all strands and the 310 helix. The other is external, involving four strands and the helix lying parallel to the barrel surface. These clusters are also present in RaHBP2, a unusual "outlier" lipocalin from tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. This information was used to assess assignment of LIR2 a protein from Ixodes ricinus and to build a 3D model that helps to predict function. FTIR data support the lipocalin fold for this protein. Conclusion By sequence and structural analyzes, two conserved clusters of hydrophobic residues in interactions have been identified in lipocalins. Since the residues implicated are not conserved for function, they should provide the minimal

  2. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  3. Sequencing and structural homology modeling of the ecdysone receptor in two chrysopids used in biological control of pest insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Moises João; Christiaens, Olivier; Rougé, Pierre; Grutzmacher, Anderson Dionei; Zimmer, Paulo Dejalma; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-04-01

    In insects, the process of molting and metamorphosis are mainly regulated by a steroidal hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and its analogs (ecdysteroids) that specifically bind to the ecdysone receptor ligand-binding domain (EcR-LBD). Currently, several synthetic non-steroidal ecdysone agonists, including tebufenozide, are commercially available as insecticides. Tebufenozide exerts its activity by binding to the 20E-binding site and thus activating EcR permanently. It appears that subtle differences in the architecture among LBDs may underpin the differential binding affinity of tebufenozide across taxonomic orders. In brief, first we demonstrated the harmlessness of tebufenozide towards Chrysoperla externa (Ce). Then, a molecular analysis of EcR-LBD of two neuropteran insects Chrysoperla carnea and Ce was presented. Finally, we constructed a chrysopid in silico homology model docked ponasterone A (PonA) and tebufenozide into the binding pocket and analyzed the amino acids indentified as critical for binding to PonA and tebufenozide. Due to a restrict extent in the cavity at the bottom of the ecdysone-binding pocket a steric clash occurred upon docking of tebufenozide. The absence of harm biological effect and the docking results suggest that tebufenozide is prevented of any deleterious effects on chrysopids.

  4. A homology model of the pore domain of a voltage-gated calcium channel is consistent with available SCAM data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhova, Iva; Zhorov, Boris S

    2010-03-01

    In the absence of x-ray structures of calcium channels, their homology models are used to rationalize experimental data and design new experiments. The modeling relies on sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels. Zhen et al. (2005. J. Gen. Physiol. doi:10.1085/jgp.200509292) used the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to identify pore-lining residues in the Ca(v)2.1 channel and concluded that their data are inconsistent with the symmetric architecture of the pore domain and published sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels. Here, we have built K(v)1.2-based models of the Ca(v)2.1 channel with 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSET)-modified engineered cysteines and used Monte Carlo energy minimizations to predict their energetically optimal orientations. We found that depending on the position of an engineered cysteine in S6 and S5 helices, the ammonium group in the long flexible MTSET-modified side chain can orient into the inner pore, an interface between domains (repeats), or an interface between S5 and S6 helices. Different local environments of equivalent positions in the four repeats can lead to different SCAM results. The reported current inhibition by MTSET generally decreases with the predicted distances between the ammonium nitrogen and the pore axis. A possible explanation for outliers of this correlation is suggested. Our calculations rationalize the SCAM data, validate one of several published sequence alignments between calcium and potassium channels, and suggest similar spatial dispositions of S5 and S6 helices in voltage-gated potassium and calcium channels. PMID:20176854

  5. Maximum-Entropy Models of Sequenced Immune Repertoires Predict Antigen-Antibody Affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Asti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The immune system has developed a number of distinct complex mechanisms to shape and control the antibody repertoire. One of these mechanisms, the affinity maturation process, works in an evolutionary-like fashion: after binding to a foreign molecule, the antibody-producing B-cells exhibit a high-frequency mutation rate in the genome region that codes for the antibody active site. Eventually, cells that produce antibodies with higher affinity for their cognate antigen are selected and clonally expanded. Here, we propose a new statistical approach based on maximum entropy modeling in which a scoring function related to the binding affinity of antibodies against a specific antigen is inferred from a sample of sequences of the immune repertoire of an individual. We use our inference strategy to infer a statistical model on a data set obtained by sequencing a fairly large portion of the immune repertoire of an HIV-1 infected patient. The Pearson correlation coefficient between our scoring function and the IC50 neutralization titer measured on 30 different antibodies of known sequence is as high as 0.77 (p-value 10-6, outperforming other sequence- and structure-based models.

  6. Homology models of dipeptidyl peptidases 8 and 9 with a focus on loop predictions near the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummey, Christian; Metz, Günther

    2007-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DP4) inhibitors are currently under intensive investigation in late-stage clinical trials as a treatment for type II diabetes. Lack of selectivity toward the related enzymes DP8 and DP9 has recently emerged as a possible source of drug-induced toxicity. Unlike DP4, X-ray structures of DP8 and DP9 are not yet available. As an aid to understanding the structural basis for selectivity, the authors have constructed homology models of DP8 and DP9 based on the X-ray coordinates of DP4. Accurate sequence alignment reveals common structural features indicative for a well-preserved overall fold comprising two domains, namely, a hydrolase domain and a so-called beta-propeller, which together form the active site deeply buried within the protein. The conformation of two loops inside this deep cavity is particularly relevant for the active sites. The authors used a published protocol for loop prediction based on conformational sampling and energy analysis to generate plausible solutions for these two loops. The predictive power of the approach was successfully evaluated for the template protein DP4 and two additional known structures from the same protein family, namely, FAP and DPX. The authors also show that inclusion of the covalent ligand NVP-728 greatly enhances the refinement. Based on the established evaluation protocol, the corresponding loops of DP8 and DP9 were predicted and the resulting active sites were compared with DP4. In particular, the authors conclude that differences in the P2-pocket are relevant for the design of selective DP4 inhibitors. The loss of key interactions in DP8 and DP9 as predicted from their models is consistent with the selectivity profile of the DP4 clinical candidate MK-431.

  7. Homology modeling of dissimilatory APS reductases (AprBA of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birte Meyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dissimilatory adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS reductase (cofactors flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD, and two [4Fe-4S] centers catalyzes the transformation of APS to sulfite and AMP in sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP; in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB it has been suggested to operate in the reverse direction. Recently, the three-dimensional structure of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus enzyme has been determined in different catalytically relevant states providing insights into its reaction cycle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Full-length AprBA sequences from 20 phylogenetically distinct SRP and SOB species were used for homology modeling. In general, the average accuracy of the calculated models was sufficiently good to allow a structural and functional comparison between the beta- and alpha-subunit structures (78.8-99.3% and 89.5-96.8% of the AprB and AprA main chain atoms, respectively, had root mean square deviations below 1 A with respect to the template structures. Besides their overall conformity, the SRP- and SOB-derived models revealed the existence of individual adaptations at the electron-transferring AprB protein surface presumably resulting from docking to different electron donor/acceptor proteins. These structural alterations correlated with the protein phylogeny (three major phylogenetic lineages: (1 SRP including LGT-affected Archaeoglobi and SOB of Apr lineage II, (2 crenarchaeal SRP Caldivirga and Pyrobaculum, and (3 SOB of the distinct Apr lineage I and the presence of potential APS reductase-interacting redox complexes. The almost identical protein matrices surrounding both [4Fe-4S] clusters, the FAD cofactor, the active site channel and center within the AprB/A models of SRP and SOB point to a highly similar catalytic process of APS reduction/sulfite oxidation independent of the metabolism type the APS reductase is involved in and the species it has been originated from. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the comparative

  8. Intersection homology Betti numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Durfee, A H

    1993-01-01

    A generalization of the formula of Fine and Rao for the ranks of the intersection homology groups of a complex algebraic variety is given. The proof uses geometric properties of intersection homology and mixed Hodge theory.

  9. Combinatorial Floer Homology

    CERN Document Server

    de Silva, Vin; Salamon, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    We define combinatorial Floer homology of a transverse pair of noncontractibe nonisotopic embedded loops in an oriented 2-manifold without boundary, prove that it is invariant under isotopy, and prove that it is isomorphic to the original Lagrangian Floer homology.

  10. Polyclonal antibody cocktails generated using DNA vaccine technology protect in murine models of orthopoxvirus disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballantyne John

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we demonstrated that DNA vaccination of nonhuman primates (NHP with a small subset of vaccinia virus (VACV immunogens (L1, A27, A33, B5 protects against lethal monkeypox virus challenge. The L1 and A27 components of this vaccine target the mature virion (MV whereas A33 and B5 target the enveloped virion (EV. Results Here, we demonstrated that the antibodies produced in vaccinated NHPs were sufficient to confer protection in a murine model of lethal Orthopoxvirus infection. We further explored the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce immunogen-specific polyclonal antibodies that could then be combined into cocktails as potential immunoprophylactic/therapeutics. Specifically, we used DNA vaccines delivered by muscle electroporation to produce polyclonal antibodies against the L1, A27, A33, and B5 in New Zealand white rabbits. The polyclonal antibodies neutralized both MV and EV in cell culture. The ability of antibody cocktails consisting of anti-MV, anti-EV, or a combination of anti-MV/EV to protect BALB/c mice was evaluated as was the efficacy of the anti-MV/EV mixture in a mouse model of progressive vaccinia. In addition to evaluating weight loss and lethality, bioimaging technology was used to characterize the spread of the VACV infections in mice. We found that the anti-EV cocktail, but not the anti-MV cocktail, limited virus spread and lethality. Conclusions A combination of anti-MV/EV antibodies was significantly more protective than anti-EV antibodies alone. These data suggest that DNA vaccine technology could be used to produce a polyclonal antibody cocktail as a possible product to replace vaccinia immune globulin.

  11. Object-oriented persistent homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Persistent homology provides a new approach for the topological simplification of big data via measuring the life time of intrinsic topological features in a filtration process and has found its success in scientific and engineering applications. However, such a success is essentially limited to qualitative data classification and analysis. Indeed, persistent homology has rarely been employed for quantitative modeling and prediction. Additionally, the present persistent homology is a passive tool, rather than a proactive technique, for classification and analysis. In this work, we outline a general protocol to construct object-oriented persistent homology methods. By means of differential geometry theory of surfaces, we construct an objective functional, namely, a surface free energy defined on the data of interest. The minimization of the objective functional leads to a Laplace-Beltrami operator which generates a multiscale representation of the initial data and offers an objective oriented filtration process. The resulting differential geometry based object-oriented persistent homology is able to preserve desirable geometric features in the evolutionary filtration and enhances the corresponding topological persistence. The cubical complex based homology algorithm is employed in the present work to be compatible with the Cartesian representation of the Laplace-Beltrami flow. The proposed Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology method is extensively validated. The consistence between Laplace-Beltrami flow based filtration and Euclidean distance based filtration is confirmed on the Vietoris-Rips complex for a large amount of numerical tests. The convergence and reliability of the present Laplace-Beltrami flow based cubical complex filtration approach are analyzed over various spatial and temporal mesh sizes. The Laplace-Beltrami flow based persistent homology approach is utilized to study the intrinsic topology of proteins and fullerene molecules. Based on a

  12. Studies on 16α-Hydroxylation of Steroid Molecules and Regioselective Binding Mode in Homology-Modeled Cytochrome P450-2C11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hamed I.; Yamada, Morio; Fujita, Yukihisa; Maeda, Mitsuko; Akaho, Eiichi

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the 16α-hydroxylation of steroid molecules and regioselective binding mode in homology-modeled cytochrome P450-2C11 to correlate the biological study with the computational molecular modeling. It revealed that there was a positive relationship between the observed inhibitory potencies and the binding free energies. Docking of steroid molecules into this homology-modeled CYP2C11 indicated that 16α-hydroxylation is favored with steroidal molecules possessing the following components, (1) a bent A-B ring configuration (5β-reduced), (2) C-3 α-hydroxyl group, (3) C-17β-acetyl group, and (4) methyl group at both the C-18 and C-19. These respective steroid components requirements were defined as the inhibitory contribution factor. Overall studies of the male rat CYP2C11 metabolism revealed that the above-mentioned steroid components requirements were essential to induce an effective inhibition of [3H]progesterone 16α-hydroxylation. As far as docking of homology-modeled CYP2C11 against investigated steroids is concerned, they are docked at the active site superimposed with flurbiprofen. It was also found that the distance between heme iron and C16α-H was between 4 to 6 Å and that the related angle was in the range of 180 ± 45°.

  13. Studies on 16α-Hydroxylation of Steroid Molecules and Regioselective Binding Mode in Homology-Modeled Cytochrome P450-2C11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed I. Ali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the 16α-hydroxylation of steroid molecules and regioselective binding mode in homology-modeled cytochrome P450-2C11 to correlate the biological study with the computational molecular modeling. It revealed that there was a positive relationship between the observed inhibitory potencies and the binding free energies. Docking of steroid molecules into this homology-modeled CYP2C11 indicated that 16α-hydroxylation is favored with steroidal molecules possessing the following components, (1 a bent A-B ring configuration (5β-reduced, (2 C-3 α-hydroxyl group, (3 C-17β-acetyl group, and (4 methyl group at both the C-18 and C-19. These respective steroid components requirements were defined as the inhibitory contribution factor. Overall studies of the male rat CYP2C11 metabolism revealed that the above-mentioned steroid components requirements were essential to induce an effective inhibition of [3H]progesterone 16α-hydroxylation. As far as docking of homology-modeled CYP2C11 against investigated steroids is concerned, they are docked at the active site superimposed with flurbiprofen. It was also found that the distance between heme iron and C16α-H was between 4 to 6 Å and that the related angle was in the range of 180±45∘.

  14. Modeling bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two cell membrane targets indicates the importance of surface diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengers, Bram G; McGinty, Sean; Nouri, Fatma Z; Argungu, Maryam; Hawkins, Emma; Hadji, Aymen; Weber, Andrew; Taylor, Adam; Sepp, Armin

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a mathematical framework for describing a bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two independent membrane-bound targets that are expressed on the same cell surface. The bispecific antibody in solution binds either of the two targets first, and then cross-links with the second one while on the cell surface, subject to rate-limiting lateral diffusion step within the lifetime of the monovalently engaged antibody-antigen complex. At experimental densities, only a small fraction of the free targets is expected to lie within the reach of the antibody binding sites at any time. Using ordinary differential equation and Monte Carlo simulation-based models, we validated this approach against an independently published anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab experimental data set. As a result of dimensional reduction, the cell surface reaction is expected to be so rapid that, in agreement with the experimental data, no monovalently bound bispecific antibody binary complexes accumulate until cross-linking is complete. The dissociation of the bispecific antibody from the ternary cross-linked complex is expected to be significantly slower than that from either of the monovalently bound variants. We estimate that the effective affinity of the bivalently bound bispecific antibody is enhanced for about 4 orders of magnitude over that of the monovalently bound species. This avidity enhancement allows for the highly specific binding of anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab to the cells that are positive for both target antigens over those that express only one or the other We suggest that the lateral diffusion of target antigens in the cell membrane also plays a key role in the avidity effect of natural antibodies and other bivalent ligands in their interactions with their respective cell surface receptors. PMID:27097222

  15. Microdistribution of fluorescently-labeled monoclonal antibody in a peritoneal dissemination model of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Mikako; Paik, David S.; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2010-02-01

    The microdistribution of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies within a tumor is important for determining clinical response. Nonuniform microdistribution predicts therapy failure. Herein, we developed a semiquantitative method for measuring microdistribution of an antibody within a tumor using in situ fluorescence microscopy and sought to modulate the microdistribution by altering the route and timing of antibody dosing. The microdistribution of a fluorescently-labeled antibody, trastuzumab (50-μg and 150-μg intraperitoneal injection (i.p.), and 100-μg intravenous injection (i.v.)) was evaluated in a peritoneal dissemination mouse model of ovarian cancer. In addition, we evaluated the microdistribution of concurrently-injected (30-μg i.p. and 100-μg i.v.) or serial (two doses of 30-μg i.p.) trastuzumab using in situ multicolor fluorescence microscopy. After the administration of 50-μg i.p. and 100-μg i.v. trastuzumab fluorescence imaging showed no significant difference in the central to peripheral signal ratio (C/P ratio) and demonstrated a peripheral-dominant accumulation, whereas administration of 150-μg i.p. trastuzumab showed relatively uniform, central dominant accumulation. With concurrent-i.p.-i.v. injections trastuzumab showed slightly higher C/P ratio than concurrently-injected i.p. trastuzumab. Moreover, in the serial injection study, the second injection of trastuzumab distributed more centrally than the first injection, while no difference was observed in the control group. Our results suggest that injection routes do not affect the microdistribution pattern of antibody in small peritoneal disseminations. However, increasing the dose results in a more uniform antibody distribution within peritoneal nodules. Furthermore, the serial i.p. injection of antibody can modify the microdistribution within tumor nodules. This work has implications for the optimal delivery of antibody based cancer therapies.

  16. Homology Modeling and Analysis of Structure Predictions of the Bovine Rhinitis B Virus RNA Dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra K. Rai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Rhinitis B Virus (BRBV is a picornavirus responsible for mild respiratory infection of cattle. It is probably the least characterized among the aphthoviruses. BRBV is the closest relative known to Foot and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV with a ~43% identical polyprotein sequence and as much as 67% identical sequence for the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, which is also known as 3D polymerase (3Dpol. In the present study we carried out phylogenetic analysis, structure based sequence alignment and prediction of three-dimensional structure of BRBV 3Dpol using a combination of different computational tools. Model structures of BRBV 3Dpol were verified for their stereochemical quality and accuracy. The BRBV 3Dpol structure predicted by SWISS-MODEL exhibited highest scores in terms of stereochemical quality and accuracy, which were in the range of 2Å resolution crystal structures. The active site, nucleic acid binding site and overall structure were observed to be in agreement with the crystal structure of unliganded as well as template/primer (T/P, nucleotide tri-phosphate (NTP and pyrophosphate (PPi bound FMDV 3Dpol (PDB, 1U09 and 2E9Z. The closest proximity of BRBV and FMDV 3Dpol as compared to human rhinovirus type 16 (HRV-16 and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV 3Dpols is also substantiated by phylogeny analysis and root-mean square deviation (RMSD between C-α traces of the polymerase structures. The absence of positively charged α-helix at C terminal, significant differences in non-covalent interactions especially salt bridges and CH-pi interactions around T/P channel of BRBV 3Dpol compared to FMDV 3Dpol, indicate that despite a very high homology to FMDV 3Dpol, BRBV 3Dpol may adopt a different mechanism for handling its substrates and adapting to physiological requirements. Our findings will be valuable in the

  17. Homology modeling of human γ-butyric acid transporters and the binding of pro-drugs 5-aminolevulinic acid and methyl aminolevulinic acid used in photodynamic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Baglo

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a safe and effective method currently used in the treatment of skin cancer. In ALA-based PDT, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, or ALA esters, are used as pro-drugs to induce the formation of the potent photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX. Activation of PpIX by light causes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and toxic responses. Studies have indicated that ALA and its methyl ester (MAL are taken up into the cells via γ-butyric acid (GABA transporters (GATs. Uptake via GATs into peripheral sensory nerve endings may also account for one of the few adverse side effects of ALA-based PDT, namely pain. In the present study, homology models of the four human GAT subtypes were constructed using three x-ray crystal structures of the homologous leucine transporter (LeuT as templates. Binding of the native substrate GABA and the possible substrates ALA and MAL was investigated by molecular docking of the ligands into the central putative substrate binding sites in the outward-occluded GAT models. Electrostatic potentials (ESPs of the putative substrate translocation pathway of each subtype were calculated using the outward-open and inward-open homology models. Our results suggested that ALA is a substrate of all four GATs and that MAL is a substrate of GAT-2, GAT-3 and BGT-1. The ESP calculations indicated that differences likely exist in the entry pathway of the transporters (i.e. in outward-open conformations. Such differences may be exploited for development of inhibitors that selectively target specific GAT subtypes and the homology models may hence provide tools for design of therapeutic inhibitors that can be used to reduce ALA-induced pain.

  18. Structure-Function Relationship of a Plant NCS1 Member – Homology Modeling and Mutagenesis Identified Residues Critical for Substrate Specificity of PLUTO, a Nucleobase Transporter from Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Witz; Pankaj Panwar; Markus Schober; Johannes Deppe; Farhan Ahmad Pasha; Joanne Lemieux, M; Torsten Möhlmann

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecula...

  19. A model of 3D-structure of H+,K+-ATPase catalytic subunit derived by homology modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong YAN; Yuan-dong HU; Song LI; Mao-sheng CHENG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To build a model of 3D-structure of H+, K+-ATPase catalytic subunit for theoretical study and anti-ulcer drug design. METHODS: The model was built on the basis of structural data from the Ca2+-ATPase. Structurally conserved regions were defined by amino acid sequence comparisons, optimum interconnecting loops were selected from the protein databank, and amino (N)- and carboxyl (C)-terminal ends were generated as random coil structures. Applying molecular mechanics method then minimized the model energy. Molecular dynamics technique was used to do further structural optimization. RESULTS: The model of 3D-structure of H+, K+-ATPase was derived. The model is reasonable according to several validation criteria. There were ten transmembrane helices (TM1-TM 10) in the model and inhibitor-binding site was identified on the TM5-8 riched negatively charged residues.CONCLUSION: The 3D-structure model from our study is informative to guide future molecular biology study about H+, K+-ATPase and drug design based on database searching.

  20. Specificity of anti-tau antibodies when analyzing mice models of Alzheimer's disease: problems and solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck R Petry

    Full Text Available Aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein are found in a group of diseases called tauopathies, which includes Alzheimer's disease. The causes and consequences of tau hyperphosphorylation are routinely investigated in laboratory animals. Mice are the models of choice as they are easily amenable to transgenic technology; consequently, their tau phosphorylation levels are frequently monitored by Western blotting using a panel of monoclonal/polyclonal anti-tau antibodies. Given that mouse secondary antibodies can recognize endogenous mouse immunoglobulins (Igs and the possible lack of specificity with some polyclonal antibodies, non-specific signals are commonly observed. Here, we characterized the profiles of commonly used anti-tau antibodies in four different mouse models: non-transgenic mice, tau knock-out (TKO mice, 3xTg-AD mice, and hypothermic mice, the latter a positive control for tau hyperphosphorylation. We identified 3 tau monoclonal antibody categories: type 1, characterized by high non-specificity (AT8, AT180, MC1, MC6, TG-3, type 2, demonstrating low non-specificity (AT270, CP13, CP27, Tau12, TG5, and type 3, with no non-specific signal (DA9, PHF-1, Tau1, Tau46. For polyclonal anti-tau antibodies, some displayed non-specificity (pS262, pS409 while others did not (pS199, pT205, pS396, pS404, pS422, A0024. With monoclonal antibodies, most of the interfering signal was due to endogenous Igs and could be eliminated by different techniques: i using secondary antibodies designed to bind only non-denatured Igs, ii preparation of a heat-stable fraction, iii clearing Igs from the homogenates, and iv using secondary antibodies that only bind the light chain of Igs. All of these techniques removed the non-specific signal; however, the first and the last methods were easier and more reliable. Overall, our study demonstrates a high risk of artefactual signal when performing Western blotting with routinely used anti-tau antibodies, and proposes

  1. OptMAVEn--a new framework for the de novo design of antibody variable region models targeting specific antigen epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn. OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced

  2. Identification of a new epitope in uPAR as a target for the cancer therapeutic monoclonal antibody ATN-658, a structural homolog of the uPAR binding integrin CD11b (αM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xu

    Full Text Available The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR plays a role in tumor progression and has been proposed as a target for the treatment of cancer. We recently described the development of a novel humanized monoclonal antibody that targets uPAR and has anti-tumor activity in multiple xenograft animal tumor models. This antibody, ATN-658, does not inhibit ligand binding (i.e. uPA and vitronectin to uPAR and its mechanism of action remains unclear. As a first step in understanding the anti-tumor activity of ATN-658, we set out to identify the epitope on uPAR to which ATN-658 binds. Guided by comparisons between primate and human uPAR, epitope mapping studies were performed using several orthogonal techniques. Systematic site directed and alanine scanning mutagenesis identified the region of aa 268-275 of uPAR as the epitope for ATN-658. No known function has previously been attributed to this epitope Structural insights into epitope recognition were obtained from structural studies of the Fab fragment of ATN-658 bound to uPAR. The structure shows that the ATN-658 binds to the DIII domain of uPAR, close to the C-terminus of the receptor, corroborating the epitope mapping results. Intriguingly, when bound to uPAR, the complementarity determining region (CDR regions of ATN-658 closely mimic the binding regions of the integrin CD11b (αM, a previously identified uPAR ligand thought to be involved in leukocyte rolling, migration and complement fixation with no known role in tumor progression of solid tumors. These studies reveal a new functional epitope on uPAR involved in tumor progression and demonstrate a previously unrecognized strategy for the therapeutic targeting of uPAR.

  3. High antibody titer against apical membrane antigen-1 is required to protect against malaria in the Aotus model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetij Dutta

    Full Text Available A Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA1 vaccine, formulated with AS02(A adjuvant, slowed parasite growth in a recent Phase 1/2a trial, however sterile protection was not observed. We tested this AS02(A, and a Montanide ISA720 (ISA formulation of 3D7 AMA1 in Aotus monkeys. The 3D7 parasite does not invade Aotus erythrocytes, hence two heterologous strains, FCH/4 and FVO, were used for challenge, FCH/4 AMA1 being more homologous to 3D7 than FVO AMA1. Following three vaccinations, the monkeys were challenged with 50,000 FCH/4 or 10,000 FVO parasites. Three of the six animals in the AMA+ISA group were protected against FCH/4 challenge. One monkey did not become parasitemic, another showed only a short period of low level parasitemia that self-cured, and a third animal showed a delay before exhibiting its parasitemic phase. This is the first protection shown in primates with a recombinant P. falciparum AMA1 without formulation in Freund's complete adjuvant. No animals in the AMA+AS02(A group were protected, but this group exhibited a trend towards reduced growth rate. A second group of monkeys vaccinated with AMA+ISA vaccine was not protected against FVO challenge, suggesting strain-specificity of AMA1-based protection. Protection against FCH/4 strain correlated with the quantity of induced antibodies, as the protected animals were the only ones to have in vitro parasite growth inhibitory activity of >70% at 1:10 serum dilution; immuno-fluorescence titers >8,000; ELISA titers against full-length AMA1 >300,000 and ELISA titer against AMA1 domains1+2 >100,000. A negative correlation between log ELISA titer and day 11 cumulative parasitemia (Spearman rank r = -0.780, p value = 0.0001, further confirmed the relationship between antibody titer and protection. High titers of cross-strain inhibitory antibodies against AMA1 are therefore critical to confer solid protection, and the Aotus model can be used to down-select future AMA1

  4. Homology in Electromagnetic Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Pellikka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss how homology computation can be exploited in computational electromagnetism. We represent various cellular mesh reduction techniques, which enable the computation of generators of homology spaces in an acceptable time. Furthermore, we show how the generators can be used for setting up and analysis of an electromagnetic boundary value problem. The aim is to provide a rationale for homology computation in electromagnetic modeling software.

  5. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  6. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies augment bacterial clearance in a murine pneumonia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K; Christophersen, L; Bjarnsholt, T;

    2016-01-01

    -P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies on bacterial eradication in a murine pneumonia model. METHODS: P. aeruginosa pneumonia was established in Balb/c mice and the effects of prophylactic IgY administration on lung bacteriology, clinical parameters and subsequent inflammation were compared to controls. RESULTS...

  7. Structural analysis and molecular modeling of two antitrichosanthin IgE clones from phage antibody library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZONGDONG; YURENYUAN; 等

    1997-01-01

    Recently we constructed a murine IgE phage surface display library and screened out two IgE (Fab) clones with specific binding activity to Trichosanthin (TCS).In this work,the Vε and Vκ genes of the two clones were sequenced and their putative germline gene usages were studied.On the basis of the known 3D structure of Trichosanthin and antibody,molecular modeling was carried out to study the antigen-antibody interaction.The possible antigenic determinant sites on the surface of TCS recognized by both the clones were analyzed,and the reaction forces between TCS and two Fab fragments were also analyzed respectively.

  8. Modelación por homología de la proteína Luxs de Porphyromonas gingivalis cepa W83 Modelling by homology of Luxs protein in Porphyromonas gingivalis strain W83

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Díaz Caballero

    2012-12-01

    the interaction between ligands and macromolecular receptors. Materials and Methods: In silico study from primary sequence analysis of six different proteins LuxS crystallized of several bacteria. 1J6X protein of Helicobacter pylori was selected for its similarity with the LuxS protein sequence in Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis strain W83 to produce a homology model of this protein, using the Sybyl and MOE software. A docking was performed to assess the reproducibility of the model in a biological environment. Results: The LuxS protein modelling of P. gingivalis strain W83 was developed, which allows the approach to a proposed structure for the interaction between the protein and its natural ligand. The model generated with computational resources achieved the correct position and biological behavior by means of developed calculations. The docking showed a cavity in which the ligand adopted several positions with good results. Conclusions: A LuxS protein model was obtained, validated by different methods. This generated a 3D model for LuxS protein in P. gingivalis strain W83 with biological reproducibility by means of molecular docking.

  9. Comparison of Gold Nanoparticle Conjugated Secondary Antibody with Non-Gold Secondary Antibody in an ELISA Kit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Tara; Madani, Rasool; Golchinfar, Fariba; Shoushtary, Abdolhamid; Amini, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    In this study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used as carriers of the signaling anti-chicken antibody peroxidase in comparison with anti-chicken antibody peroxidase without gold nanoparticle in a commercial avian influenza kit. AuNPs enhanced the absorbance and shortened the assay time. AuNPs act as a carrier of many enzymes and multiply the effect of enzyme when reacting with substrate. They amplify optical signal, while keeping low background signals.

  10. Homology modeling of wild-type, D516V, and H526L Mycobacterium tuberculosis RNA polymerase and their molecular docking study with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josa, Daniela; da Cunha, Elaine F F; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Souza, Thais C S; Caetano, Melissa S

    2008-02-01

    Rifamicyns (Rifs) are antibiotic widely used for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB); nevertheless, their efficacy has been limited by a high percentage of mutations, principally in the rpoB gene. In this work, the first three-dimensional molecular model of the hypothetical structures for the wild-type and D516V and H526L mutants of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtRNAP) were elucidated by a homology modeling method. In addition, the orientations and binding affinities of some Rifs with those new structures were investigated. Our findings could be helpful for the design of new more potent rifamycin analogs.

  11. Model system that predicts effective half-life for radiolabeled antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabeled antibodies to tumor associated proteins localize in both experimental and clinical cancers. In the therapeutic applications of radiolabeled antibody, tumor effective half-life along with the concentration of isotope deposited and energies of the isotope used, determine the tumor dose. Antibodies directed against the same antigenic specificity but derived from different species have varied tumor and whole body effective half-lives and as a result, achieve different tumor doses. In vitro testing does not evaluate the in vivo differences in effective half-life that affect tumor dose. The authors have developed an animal model to evaluate the effective half-live and biodistribution of radiolabeled immunoglobulin (IgG) from diverse species. In both the experimental model and in the clinical trials, radiolabeled immunospecific and normal IgG derived from monkey, rabbit, and porcine sources had the longest effective half-lives, goat and sheep had intermediate effective half-lives, and chicken and turkey had the shortest effective half-lives. These species have been immunized for clinical use. The value of this model system is that it appears to be an effective in vivo preclinical screen for tumor effective half-live of antibodies and IgG from diverse species, thus guiding potential clinical use

  12. Homology-modeled ligand-binding domains of medaka estrogen receptors and androgen receptors: A model system for the study of reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrogen and androgen and their receptors play critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development. Using the available structural models for the human estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptor as templates, we designed in silico agonist and antagonist models of medaka estrogen receptor (meER) alpha, beta-1, and beta-2, and androgen receptor (meAR) alpha and beta. Using these models, we studied (1) the structural relationship between the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of ERs and ARs of human and medaka, and (2) whether medaka ER and AR can be potential models for studying the ligand-binding activities of various agonists and antagonists of these receptors by docking analysis. A high level of conservation was observed between the sequences of the ligand-binding domains of meERα and huERα, meERβ1 and huERβ, meERβ2, and huERβ with 62.8%, 66.4%, and 65.1% identity, respectively. The sequence conservation between meARα and huAR, meARβ, and huAR was found with 70.1% and 61.0% of identity, respectively. Thirty-three selected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including both agonists and antagonists, were docked into the LBD of ER and AR, and the corresponding docking score for medaka models and human templates were calculated. In order to confirm the conservation of the overall geometry and the binding pocket, the backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) for Cα atoms was derived from the structure superposition of all 10 medaka homology models to the six human templates. Our results suggested conformational conservation between the ERs and ARs of medaka and human, Thus, medaka could be highly useful as a model system for studies involving estrogen and androgen interaction with their receptors.

  13. Pharmacophore-directed Homology Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of G Protein-coupled Receptor: Study of Possible Binding Modes of 5-HT2C Receptor Agonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhili ZUO; Gang CHEN; Xiaomin LUO; Chummok PUAH; Weiliang ZHU; Kaixian CHEN; Hualiang JIANG

    2007-01-01

    A new pharmacophore-based modeling procedure, including homology modeling, pharmacophore study, flexible molecular docking, and long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was employed to construct the structure of the human 5-HT2C receptor and determine the characteristics of binding modes of 5-HT2C receptor agonists. An agonist-receptor complex has been constructed based on homology modeling and a pharmacophore hypothesis model based on some high active compounds. Then MD simulations of the ligand-receptor complex in an explicit membrane environment were carried out. The conformation of the 5-HT2C receptor during MD simulation was explored, and the stable binding modes of the studied agonist were determined. Flexible molecular docking of several structurally diverse agonists of the human 5-HT2C receptor was carried out, and the general binding modes of these agonists were investigated. According to the models presented in this work and the results of Flexi-Dock, the involvement of the amino acid residues Asp134,Ser138, Asn210, Asn331, Tyr358, Ile131, Ser 132, Val135, Thr139, Ile189, Va1202, Va1208, Leu209, Phe214,Va1215, Gly218, Ser219, Phe223, Trp324, Phe327, and Phe328 in agonist recognition was studied. The obtained binding modes of the human 5-HT2C receptor agonists have good agreement with the site-directed mutagenesis data and other studies.

  14. Mechanistic studies of antibody mediated clearance of tau aggregates using an ex vivo brain slice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan eKrishnamurthy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that immunotherapy clears amyloid beta (A plaques and reduces A levels in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, as well as in AD patients. Tangle pathology is also relevant for the neurodegeneration in AD, and our studies have shown that active immunization with an AD related phospho-tau peptide reduces aggregated tau within the brain and slows the progression of tauopathy-induced behavioural impairments. Thus, clearance of neurofibrillary tangles and/or their precursors may reduce synaptic and neuronal loss associated with AD and other tauopathies. So far the mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated clearance of tau pathology are yet to be elucidated. In this study we have used a mouse brain slice model to examine the uptake and localization of FITC labeled anti-tau antibodies. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that the FITC labelled anti-tau antibody co-stained with phosphorylated tau, had a perinuclear appearance and co-localised with markers of the endosomal/lysosomal pathway. Additionally, tau and FITC IgG were found together in an enriched lysosome fraction. In summary, antibody-mediated clearance of intracellular tau aggregates appears to occur via the lysosomal pathway.

  15. Investigation of antigen-antibody interactions of sulfonamides with a monoclonal antibody in a fluorescence polarization immunoassay using 3D-QSAR models

    Science.gov (United States)

    A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) model of sulfonamide analogs binding a monoclonal antibody (MAbSMR) produced against sulfamerazine was carried out by Distance Comparison (DISCOtech), comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), and comparative molecular si...

  16. C-(4,5,6-trimethoxyindan-1-yl)methanamine: a mescaline analogue designed using a homology model of the 5-HT2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Thomas H; Chambers, James J; Parrish, Jason C; Braden, Michael R; Marona-Lewicka, Danuta; Kurrasch-Orbaugh, Deborah; Nichols, David E

    2006-07-13

    A conformationally restricted analogue of mescaline, C-(4,5,6-trimethoxyindan-1-yl)-methanamine, was designed using a 5-HT(2A) receptor homology model. The compound possessed 3-fold higher affinity and potency than and efficacy equal to that of mescaline at the 5-HT(2A) receptor. The new analogue substituted fully for LSD in drug discrimination studies and was 5-fold more potent than mescaline. Resolution of this analogue into its enantiomers corroborated the docking experiments, showing the R-(+) isomer to have higher affinity and potency and to have efficacy similar to that of mescaline at the 5-HT(2A) receptor.

  17. Lack of Widespread BBB Disruption in Alzheimer's Disease Models: Focus on Therapeutic Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien-Ly, Nga; Boswell, C Andrew; Jeet, Surinder; Beach, Thomas G; Hoyte, Kwame; Luk, Wilman; Shihadeh, Vera; Ulufatu, Sheila; Foreman, Oded; Lu, Yanmei; DeVoss, Jason; van der Brug, Marcel; Watts, Ryan J

    2015-10-21

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits brain uptake of therapeutic antibodies. It is believed that the BBB is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD), potentially increasing drug permeability de facto. Here we compared active versus passive brain uptake of systemically dosed antibodies (anti-transferrin receptor [TfR] bispecific versus control antibody) in mouse models of AD. We first confirmed BBB disruption in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis as a positive control. Importantly, we found that BBB permeability was vastly spared in mouse models of AD, including PS2-APP, Tau transgenics, and APOE4 knockin mice. Brain levels of TfR in mouse models or in human cases of AD resembled controls, suggesting target engagement of TfR bispecific is not limited. Furthermore, infarcts from human AD brain showed similar occurrences compared to age-matched controls. These results question the widely held view that the BBB is largely disrupted in AD, raising concern about assumptions of drug permeability in disease. PMID:26494278

  18. Improving Loop Modeling of the Antibody Complementarity-Determining Region 3 Using Knowledge-Based Restraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Jessica A; Koehler Leman, Julia; Willis, Jordan R; Cisneros, Alberto; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Structural restrictions are present even in the most sequence diverse portions of antibodies, the complementary determining region (CDR) loops. Previous studies identified robust rules that define canonical structures for five of the six CDR loops, however the heavy chain CDR 3 (HCDR3) defies standard classification attempts. The HCDR3 loop can be subdivided into two domains referred to as the "torso" and the "head" domains and two major families of canonical torso structures have been identified; the more prevalent "bulged" and less frequent "non-bulged" torsos. In the present study, we found that Rosetta loop modeling of 28 benchmark bulged HCDR3 loops is improved with knowledge-based structural restraints developed from available antibody crystal structures in the PDB. These restraints restrict the sampling space Rosetta searches in the torso domain, limiting the φ and ψ angles of these residues to conformations that have been experimentally observed. The application of these restraints in Rosetta result in more native-like structure sampling and improved score-based differentiation of native-like HCDR3 models, significantly improving our ability to model antibody HCDR3 loops. PMID:27182833

  19. Sutures and contact homology I

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Vincent; Ghiggini, Paolo; Honda, Ko; Hutchings, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We define a relative version of contact homology for contact manifolds with convex boundary, and prove basic properties of this relative contact homology. Similar considerations also hold for embedded contact homology.

  20. Protective efficacy of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in a nonhuman primate model of Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Marzi

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is the causative agent of severe hemorrhagic fever in primates, with human case fatality rates up to 90%. Today, there is neither a licensed vaccine nor a treatment available for Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF. Single monoclonal antibodies (MAbs specific for Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV have been successfully used in passive immunization experiments in rodent models, but have failed to protect nonhuman primates from lethal disease. In this study, we used two clones of human-mouse chimeric MAbs (ch133 and ch226 with strong neutralizing activity against ZEBOV and evaluated their protective potential in a rhesus macaque model of EHF. Reduced viral loads and partial protection were observed in animals given MAbs ch133 and ch226 combined intravenously at 24 hours before and 24 and 72 hours after challenge. MAbs circulated in the blood of a surviving animal until virus-induced IgG responses were detected. In contrast, serum MAb concentrations decreased to undetectable levels at terminal stages of disease in animals that succumbed to infection, indicating substantial consumption of these antibodies due to virus replication. Accordingly, the rapid decrease of serum MAbs was clearly associated with increased viremia in non-survivors. Our results indicate that EBOV neutralizing antibodies, particularly in combination with other therapeutic strategies, might be beneficial in reducing viral loads and prolonging disease progression during EHF.

  1. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xiao

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  2. Braid Floer homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, J. B.; Ghrist, R.; Vandervorst, R. C.; Wójcik, W.

    2015-09-01

    Area-preserving diffeomorphisms of a 2-disc can be regarded as time-1 maps of (non-autonomous) Hamiltonian flows on R / Z ×D2. The periodic flow-lines define braid (conjugacy) classes, up to full twists. We examine the dynamics relative to such braid classes and define a new invariant for such classes, the BRAID FLOER HOMOLOGY. This refinement of Floer homology, originally used for the Arnol'd Conjecture, yields a Morse-type forcing theory for periodic points of area-preserving diffeomorphisms of the 2-disc based on braiding. Contributions of this paper include (1) a monotonicity lemma for the behavior of the nonlinear Cauchy-Riemann equations with respect to algebraic lengths of braids; (2) establishment of the topological invariance of the resulting braid Floer homology; (3) a shift theorem describing the effect of twisting braids in terms of shifting the braid Floer homology; (4) computation of examples; and (5) a forcing theorem for the dynamics of Hamiltonian disc maps based on braid Floer homology.

  3. Realistic multi-cellular dosimetry for 177Lu-labelled antibodies: model and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcatili, S.; Pichard, A.; Courteau, A.; Ladjohounlou, R.; Navarro-Teulon, I.; Repetto-Llamazares, A.; Heyerdahl, H.; Dahle, J.; Pouget, J. P.; Bardiès, M.

    2016-10-01

    Current preclinical dosimetric models often fail to take account of the complex nature of absorbed dose distribution typical of in vitro clonogenic experiments in targeted radionuclide therapy. For this reason, clonogenic survival is often expressed as a function of added activity rather than the absorbed dose delivered to cells/cell nuclei. We designed a multi-cellular dosimetry model that takes into account the realistic distributions of cells in the Petri dish, for the establishment of survival curves as a function of the absorbed dose. General-purpose software tools were used for the generation of realistic, randomised 3D cell culture geometries based on experimentally determined parameters (cell size, cell density, cluster density, average cluster size, cell cumulated activity). A mixture of Monte Carlo and analytical approaches was implemented in order to achieve as accurate as possible results while reducing calculation time. The model was here applied to clonogenic survival experiments carried out to compare the efficacy of Betalutin®, a novel 177Lu-labelled antibody radionuclide conjugate for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, to that of 177Lu-labelled CD20-specific (rituximab) and non-specific antibodies (Erbitux) on lymphocyte B cells. The 3D cellular model developed allowed a better understanding of the radiative and non-radiative processes associated with cellular death. Our approach is generic and can also be applied to other radiopharmaceuticals and cell distributions.

  4. Towards Controlling the Glycoform: A Model Framework Linking Extracellular Metabolites to Antibody Glycosylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M. Jedrzejewski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycoproteins represent the largest group of the growing number of biologically-derived medicines. The associated glycan structures and their distribution are known to have a large impact on pharmacokinetics. A modelling framework was developed to provide a link from the extracellular environment and its effect on intracellular metabolites to the distribution of glycans on the constant region of an antibody product. The main focus of this work is the mechanistic in silico reconstruction of the nucleotide sugar donor (NSD metabolic network by means of 34 species mass balances and the saturation kinetics rates of the 60 metabolic reactions involved. NSDs are the co-substrates of the glycosylation process in the Golgi apparatus and their simulated dynamic intracellular concentration profiles were linked to an existing model describing the distribution of N-linked glycan structures of the antibody constant region. The modelling framework also describes the growth dynamics of the cell population by means of modified Monod kinetics. Simulation results match well to experimental data from a murine hybridoma cell line. The result is a modelling platform which is able to describe the product glycoform based on extracellular conditions. It represents a first step towards the in silico prediction of the glycoform of a biotherapeutic and provides a platform for the optimisation of bioprocess conditions with respect to product quality.

  5. Homology modeling of adenosine A2A receptor and molecular docking for exploration of appropriate potent antagonists for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijai; Somvanshi, Pallavi

    2009-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of central nervous system (CNS) that impaired the patient motor skills, speech and other functions. Adenosine A2A receptors have a unique cellular distribution in the neuron, which is used as a potential target for PD. Homology modeling was used to construct the 3-D structure of A2A using the known template (PDB: 2VT4), and the stereochemical quality was validated. Several effective antagonist drugs were selected and active amino acid residues in A2A were targeted on the basis of robust binding affinity between protein-drug interactions in molecular docking. Six antagonists, Bromocriptine, Cabergoline, Etilevodopa, Lysuride, Melevodopa and Pramipexole, were found more potent for binding and the active amino acids residues were identified (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/) in A2A receptor. It could be used as the basis for rationale designing of novel antagonist drugs against Parkinson's disease. PMID:20021407

  6. Validation of a homology model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DXS: rationalization of observed activities of thiamine derivatives as potent inhibitors of two orthologues of DXS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, T; Lacy, B; Monjas, L; Hawksley, D; de Voogd, A R; Illarionov, B; Iqbal, A; Leeper, F J; Fischer, M; Kontoyianni, M; Hirsch, A K H

    2015-12-14

    The enzyme DXS catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step of the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP, 1) pathway using thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) as cofactor; the DXS-catalyzed reaction constitutes also the first step in vitamin B1 and B6 metabolism in bacteria. DXS is the least studied among the enzymes of this pathway in terms of crystallographic information, with only one complete crystal structure deposited in the Protein Data Bank (Deinococcus radiodurans DXS, PDB: ). We synthesized a series of thiamine and ThDP derivatives and tested them for their biochemical activity against two DXS orthologues, namely D. radiodurans DXS and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DXS. These experimental results, combined with advanced docking studies, led to the development and validation of a homology model of M. tuberculosis DXS, which, in turn, will guide medicinal chemists in rationally designing potential inhibitors for M. tuberculosis DXS. PMID:26411373

  7. Anti-Lipid IgG Antibodies Are Produced via Germinal Centers in a Murine Model Resembling Human Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Reséndiz-Mora, Albany; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Zárate-Neira, Luz; Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Medina, Yolanda; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are produced in some mycobacterial infections and in certain autoimmune diseases [such as anti-phospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)]. However, few studies have addressed the B cell responses underlying the production of these immunoglobulins. Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are consistently found in a murine model resembling human lupus induced by chlorpromazine-stabilized non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA). NPA are transitory lipid associations found in the membranes of most cells; when NPA are stabilized they can become immunogenic and induce specific IgG antibodies, which appear to be involved in the development of the mouse model of lupus. Of note, anti-NPA antibodies are also detected in patients with SLE and leprosy. We used this model of lupus to investigate in vivo the cellular mechanisms that lead to the production of anti-lipid, class-switched IgG antibodies. In this murine lupus model, we found plasma cells (Gr1−, CD19−, CD138+) producing NPA-specific IgGs in the draining lymph nodes, the spleen, and the bone marrow. We also found a significant number of germinal center B cells (IgD−, CD19+, PNA+) specific for NPA in the draining lymph nodes and the spleen, and we identified in situ the presence of NPA in these germinal centers. By contrast, very few NPA-specific, extrafollicular reaction B cells (B220+, Blimp1+) were found. Moreover, when assessing the anti-NPA IgG antibodies produced during the experimental protocol, we found that the affinity of these antibodies progressively increased over time. Altogether, our data indicate that, in this murine model resembling human lupus, B cells produce anti-NPA IgG antibodies mainly via germinal centers. PMID:27746783

  8. Homology modeling of lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase of Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus and insights into the enzyme-substrate Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng C; Zhou Y; Zhu J; Lu J; Zhang W; Zhang M; Song Y; Ji H; Zhu J; Yao J; Yu J; Yang S

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of 14alpha-sterol demethylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT_14DM) provides a good template for modeling the three dimensional structure of lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase, which is the target of azole antifungal agents. Homologous 3D models of lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase from Candida albicans (CA_14DM) and Aspergillus fumigatus (AF_14DM) were built on the basis of the crystal coordinates of MT_14DM in complex with 4-phenylimidazole and fluconazole. The reliability of the two models was assessed by Ramachandran plots, Profile-3D analysis, and by analyzing the consistency of the two models with the experimental data on the P450(14DM). The overall structures of the resulting CA_14DM model and AF_14DM model are similar to those of the template structures. The two models remain the core structure characteristic for cytochrome P450s and most of the insertions and deletions expose the molecular surface. The structurally and functionally important residues such as the heme binding residues, the residues lining the substrate access channel, and residues in active site were identified from the model. To explore the binding mode of the substrate with the two models, 24(28)-methylene-24,25-dihydrolanosterol was docked into the active site of the two models and hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen-bonding were found to play an important role in substrate recognition and orientation. These results provided a basis for experiments to probe structure-function relationships in the P450(14DM). Although CA_14DM and AF_14DM shared similar core structural character, the active site of the two models were quite different, thus allowing the rational design of specific inhibitors to the target enzyme and the discovery of novel antifungal agents with broad spectrum.

  9. Pseudocycles and Integral Homology

    OpenAIRE

    Zinger, Aleksey

    2006-01-01

    We describe a natural isomorphism between the set of equivalence classes of pseudocycles and the integral homology groups of a smooth manifold. Our arguments generalize to settings well-suited for applications in enumerative algebraic geometry and for construction of the virtual fundamental class in the Gromov-Witten theory.

  10. Gorenstein homological dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik Granau

    2004-01-01

    In basic homological algebra, the projective, injective and 2at dimensions of modules play an important and fundamental role. In this paper, the closely related Gorenstein projective, Gorenstein injective and Gorenstein 2at dimensions are studied. There is a variety of nice results about Gorenste...

  11. Stimulation of natural killer cells with a CD137-specific antibody enhances trastuzumab efficacy in xenotransplant models of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Houot, Roch; Weiskopf, Kipp; Goldstein, Matthew J.; Scheeren, Ferenc; Czerwinski, Debra; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Weng, Wen-Kai; Clarke, Michael F.; Carlson, Robert W.; Stockdale, Frank E.; Mollick, Joseph A.; Chen, Lieping; Levy, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; also known as HER-2/neu), is indicated for the treatment of women with either early stage or metastatic HER2+ breast cancer. It kills tumor cells by several mechanisms, including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Strategies that enhance the activity of ADCC effectors, including NK cells, may improve the efficacy of trastuzumab. Here, we have shown that upon encountering trastuzumab-coated, HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, human NK cells become activated and express the costimulatory receptor CD137. CD137 activation, which was dependent on NK cell expression of the FcγRIII receptor, occurred both in vitro and in the peripheral blood of women with HER2-expressing breast cancer after trastuzumab treatment. Stimulation of trastuzumab-activated human NK cells with an agonistic mAb specific for CD137 killed breast cancer cells (including an intrinsically trastuzumab-resistant cell line) more efficiently both in vitro and in vivo in xenotransplant models of human breast cancer, including one using a human primary breast tumor. The enhanced cytotoxicity was restricted to antibody-coated tumor cells. This sequential antibody strategy, combining a tumor-targeting antibody with a second antibody that activates the host innate immune system, may improve the therapeutic effects of antibodies against breast cancer and other HER2-expressing tumors. PMID:22326955

  12. Structural Comparison of Different Antibodies Interacting with Parvovirus Capsids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafenstein, Susan; Bowman, Valorie D.; Sun, Tao; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Palermo, Laura M.; Chipman, Paul R.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Parrish, Colin R.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Cornell; Purdue

    2009-05-13

    The structures of canine parvovirus (CPV) and feline parvovirus (FPV) complexed with antibody fragments from eight different neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) reconstruction to resolutions varying from 8.5 to 18 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of one of the Fab molecules and the sequence of the variable domain for each of the Fab molecules have been determined. The structures of Fab fragments not determined crystallographically were predicted by homology modeling according to the amino acid sequence. Fitting of the Fab and virus structures into the cryoEM densities identified the footprints of each antibody on the viral surface. As anticipated from earlier analyses, the Fab binding sites are directed to two epitopes, A and B. The A site is on an exposed part of the surface near an icosahedral threefold axis, whereas the B site is about equidistant from the surrounding five-, three-, and twofold axes. One antibody directed to the A site binds CPV but not FPV. Two of the antibodies directed to the B site neutralize the virus as Fab fragments. The differences in antibody properties have been linked to the amino acids within the antibody footprints, the position of the binding site relative to the icosahedral symmetry elements, and the orientation of the Fab structure relative to the surface of the virus. Most of the exposed surface area was antigenic, although each of the antibodies had a common area of overlap that coincided with the positions of the previously mapped escape mutations.

  13. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; ...

  14. PK/PD analysis of a novel pH-dependent antigen-binding antibody using a dynamic antibody-antigen binding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraya, Kenta; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Iwayanagi, Yuki; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Ozeki, Kazuhisa; Nezu, Junichi; Ishigai, Masaki; Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we have reported novel engineered antibody with pH-dependent antigen-binding (recycling antibody), and with both pH-dependent antigen-binding and increased FcRn-binding at neutral pH (sweeping antibody). The purpose of this study is to perform PK/PD predictions to better understand the potential applications of the antibodies as therapeutics. To demonstrate the applicability of recycling and sweeping antibodies over conventional antibodies, PK/PD analyses were performed. PK/PD parameters for antibody and antigen dynamics were estimated from the results of a pharmacokinetic study in human FcRn transgenic mice. A simulation study was performed using the estimated PK/PD parameters with various target antigen profiles. In comparison to conventional antibody, recycling antibody enhanced antibody-antigen complex clearance by 3 folds, while sweeping antibody accelerated antigen clearance by 10 folds in a pharmacokinetic study. Simulation results showed that recycling and sweeping antibodies can improve dosage frequency and reduce the required dose for target antigens with various clearances, plasma concentrations or binding kinetics. Moreover, importance of the association rate constant to enhance the beneficial effect of antibodies was shown. These results support the conclusion that recycling and sweeping antibodies can be applied to various target antigens with different profiles, and expand the number of antigens that antibodies can target. PMID:26944099

  15. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Rajkannan; E J Padma Malar

    2007-09-01

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the crystal structure of monoclonal antibody specific for the pres1 region of the hepatitis B virus. At the optimized docked conformation, the interactions between the amino acids of antigen and antibody were examined. It is found that the docked complex is stabilized by 59.3 kcal/mol. The stability of the docked antigen-antibody complex is due to hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. The amino acids of the antigen and antibody responsible for the interaction were identified.

  16. Multi-epitope Models Explain How Pre-existing Antibodies Affect the Generation of Broadly Protective Responses to Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Lavine, Jennie; Ellebedy, Ali; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom

    2016-01-01

    The development of next-generation influenza vaccines that elicit strain-transcendent immunity against both seasonal and pandemic viruses is a key public health goal. Targeting the evolutionarily conserved epitopes on the stem of influenza’s major surface molecule, hemagglutinin, is an appealing prospect, and novel vaccine formulations show promising results in animal model systems. However, studies in humans indicate that natural infection and vaccination result in limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA, and the level of stem-specific antibody elicited is insufficient to provide broad strain-transcendent immunity. Here, we use mathematical models of the humoral immune response to explore how pre-existing immunity affects the ability of vaccines to boost antibodies to the head and stem of HA in humans, and, in particular, how it leads to the apparent lack of boosting of broadly cross-reactive antibodies to the stem epitopes. We consider hypotheses where binding of antibody to an epitope: (i) results in more rapid clearance of the antigen; (ii) leads to the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which inhibit B cell activation through Fcγ receptor-mediated mechanism; and (iii) masks the epitope and prevents the stimulation and proliferation of specific B cells. We find that only epitope masking but not the former two mechanisms to be key in recapitulating patterns in data. We discuss the ramifications of our findings for the development of vaccines against both seasonal and pandemic influenza. PMID:27336297

  17. The dopamine D2 receptor dimer and its interaction with homobivalent antagonists: homology modeling, docking and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Jörg, Manuela; Capuano, Ben

    2016-09-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to G protein-coupled receptor complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding. For this purpose, we have developed and tested a multi-component protocol to model the inactive conformation of the dopamine D2 receptor dimer, suitable for interaction with homobivalent antagonists. Our approach was based on protein-protein docking, applying the Rosetta software to obtain populations of dimers as present in membranes with all the main possible interfaces. Consensus scoring based on the values and frequencies of best interfaces regarding four scoring parameters, Rosetta interface score, interface area, free energy of binding and energy of hydrogen bond interactions indicated that the best scored dimer model possesses a TM4-TM5-TM7-TM1 interface, which is in agreement with experimental data. This model was used to study interactions of the previously published dopamine D2 receptor homobivalent antagonists based on clozapine,1,4-disubstituted aromatic piperidines/piperazines and arylamidoalkyl substituted phenylpiperazine pharmacophores. It was found that the homobivalent antagonists stabilize the receptor-inactive conformation by maintaining the ionic lock interaction, and change the dimer interface by disrupting a set of hydrogen bonds and maintaining water- and ligand-mediated hydrogen bonds in the extracellular and intracellular part of the interface. Graphical Abstract Structure of the final model of the dopamine D2 receptor homodimer, indicating the distancebetween Tyr37 and Tyr 5.42 in the apo form (left) and in the complex with the ligand (right). PMID:27491852

  18. The dopamine D2 receptor dimer and its interaction with homobivalent antagonists: homology modeling, docking and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Jörg, Manuela; Capuano, Ben

    2016-09-01

    In order to apply structure-based drug design techniques to G protein-coupled receptor complexes, it is essential to model their 3D structure and to identify regions that are suitable for selective drug binding. For this purpose, we have developed and tested a multi-component protocol to model the inactive conformation of the dopamine D2 receptor dimer, suitable for interaction with homobivalent antagonists. Our approach was based on protein-protein docking, applying the Rosetta software to obtain populations of dimers as present in membranes with all the main possible interfaces. Consensus scoring based on the values and frequencies of best interfaces regarding four scoring parameters, Rosetta interface score, interface area, free energy of binding and energy of hydrogen bond interactions indicated that the best scored dimer model possesses a TM4-TM5-TM7-TM1 interface, which is in agreement with experimental data. This model was used to study interactions of the previously published dopamine D2 receptor homobivalent antagonists based on clozapine,1,4-disubstituted aromatic piperidines/piperazines and arylamidoalkyl substituted phenylpiperazine pharmacophores. It was found that the homobivalent antagonists stabilize the receptor-inactive conformation by maintaining the ionic lock interaction, and change the dimer interface by disrupting a set of hydrogen bonds and maintaining water- and ligand-mediated hydrogen bonds in the extracellular and intracellular part of the interface. Graphical Abstract Structure of the final model of the dopamine D2 receptor homodimer, indicating the distancebetween Tyr37 and Tyr 5.42 in the apo form (left) and in the complex with the ligand (right).

  19. Algebra V homological algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Shafarevich, I

    1994-01-01

    This book, the first printing of which was published as volume 38 of the Encyclopaedia of Mathematical Sciences, presents a modern approach to homological algebra, based on the systematic use of the terminology and ideas of derived categories and derived functors. The book contains applications of homological algebra to the theory of sheaves on topological spaces, to Hodge theory, and to the theory of modules over rings of algebraic differential operators (algebraic D-modules). The authors Gelfand and Manin explain all the main ideas of the theory of derived categories. Both authors are well-known researchers and the second, Manin, is famous for his work in algebraic geometry and mathematical physics. The book is an excellent reference for graduate students and researchers in mathematics and also for physicists who use methods from algebraic geometry and algebraic topology.

  20. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy. PMID:26808665

  1. Homology modelling of the core domain of the endogenous lectin comitin: structural basis for its mannose-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1999-03-01

    The N-terminal core domain of comitin from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum has been modelled from the X-ray coordinates of the monocot mannose-binding lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis). Docking experiments performed on the three-dimensional model showed that two of the three mannose-binding sites of the comitin monomer are functional. They are located at both ends of the comitin dimer whereas the actin-interacting region occurs in the central hinge region where both monomers are non covalently associated. This distribution is fully consistent with the bifunctional character of comitin which is believed to link the Golgi vesicles exhibiting mannosylated membrane glycans to the actin cytoskeleton in the cell.

  2. [The contact model of crossing over: definition of conditions required for the co-orientation of homologs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadov, B F

    1999-05-01

    Three phenomena have been examined: (1) independence of the segregation of structurally normal homologues from the position of crossover exchange relative to the centromere; (2) independence of chromosomal rearrangement ability to disturb disjunction from its position on chromosome; and (3) dependent, predominantly distal position of crossover exchanges in nondisjunction chromosomes. All three phenomena are explained in terms of the contact model of crossing over. According to the model, disjunction of the homologues is provided by a series of local contacts between them. The maximal number of contacts per arm is constant and is determined by the size of the absolute interference zone. The co-orientating influence of the contact decreases with the movement of its site away from the centromeric region responsible for the co-orientation. The role of the contact consists of bringing the centromeric regions of the homologues together. Co-orientation success does not depend on the presence or absence of a crossover exchange at the site of the contact. The nondisjunction chromosomes are selected with regard to the absence of proximal (or close to proximal) contacts. Hence, the exchanges formed on the basis of these contacts, are co-orientation-associated. In the disjunction chromosomes, the entire set of contacts is present. Any of these can be the first to develop and generate a crossover exchange. Because of this, exchanges in the disjunction chromosomes do not demonstrate association with the co-orientation. According to the model, the distortion of the previous contact disturbs (retards or prevents) the formation of the next contact. Hence, distortion of the contact formation in the site of rearrangement, irrespective to its location, would negatively affect the formation of the contact in the proximal region, and would promote nondisjunction. PMID:10495946

  3. in-silico characterization of β-(1, 3)-endoglucanase (ENGL1) from Aspergillus fumigatus by homology modeling and docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Jain, Swatantra Kumar; Shukla, Praveen Kumar

    2013-01-01

    During the past few years a significant rise in aspergillosis caused by filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus has been recorded particularly in immunocompromised patients. At present, there are limited numbers of antifungal agents to combat these infections and the situation has become more complex due to emergence of antifungal resistance and side-effects of antifungal drugs. These situations have increased the demand for novel drug targets. Recent studies have revealed that the β-1,3-endoglucanase (ENGL1) plays an essential role in cell wall remodeling that is absolutely required during growth and morphogenesis of filamentous fungi and thus is a promising target for the development of antifungal agents. Unfortunately no structural information of fungal β- glucanases has yet been available in the Protein Databank (PDB). Therefore in the present study, 3D structure of β-(1,3)- endoglucanase (ENGL1) was modeled by using I-TASSER server and validated with PROCHECK and VERIFY 3D. The best model was selected, energy minimized and used to analyze structure function relationship with substrate β-(1,3)-glucan by C-DOCKER (Accelrys DS 2.0). The results indicated that amino acids (GLU 380, GLN 383, ASP 384, TYR 395, SER 712, and ARG 713) present in β-1,3-endoglucanase receptor are of core importance for binding activities and these residues are having strong hydrogen bond interactions with β-(1,3)-glucan. The predicted model and docking studies permits initial inferences about the unexplored 3D structure of the β-(1,3)-endoglucanase and may be promote in relational designing of molecules for structure-function studies. PMID:24143049

  4. Bioreactor process parameter screening utilizing a Plackett-Burman design for a model monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarabi, Cyrus D; Schiel, John E; Lute, Scott C; Chavez, Brittany K; Boyne, Michael T; Brorson, Kurt A; Khan, Mansoor A; Read, Erik K

    2015-06-01

    Consistent high-quality antibody yield is a key goal for cell culture bioprocessing. This endpoint is typically achieved in commercial settings through product and process engineering of bioreactor parameters during development. When the process is complex and not optimized, small changes in composition and control may yield a finished product of less desirable quality. Therefore, changes proposed to currently validated processes usually require justification and are reported to the US FDA for approval. Recently, design-of-experiments-based approaches have been explored to rapidly and efficiently achieve this goal of optimized yield with a better understanding of product and process variables that affect a product's critical quality attributes. Here, we present a laboratory-scale model culture where we apply a Plackett-Burman screening design to parallel cultures to study the main effects of 11 process variables. This exercise allowed us to determine the relative importance of these variables and identify the most important factors to be further optimized in order to control both desirable and undesirable glycan profiles. We found engineering changes relating to culture temperature and nonessential amino acid supplementation significantly impacted glycan profiles associated with fucosylation, β-galactosylation, and sialylation. All of these are important for monoclonal antibody product quality.

  5. Effective chemoimmunotherapy with anti-TGFβ antibody and cyclophosphamide in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    Full Text Available TGFβ is reportedly responsible for accumulation of CD4(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs in tumor. Thus, we treated mouse 4T1 mammary carcinoma with 1D11, a neutralizing anti-TGFβ (1,2,3 antibody. The treatment delayed tumor growth, but unexpectedly increased the proportion of Tregs in tumor. In vitro, 1D11 enhanced while TGFβ potently inhibited the proliferation of Tregs. To enhance the anti-tumor effects, 1D11 was administered with cyclophosphamide which was reported to eliminate intratumoral Tregs. This combination resulted in long term tumor-free survival of up to 80% of mice, and the tumor-free mice were more resistant to re-challenge with tumor. To examine the phenotype of tumor infiltrating immune cells, 4T1-tumor bearing mice were treated with 1D11 and a lower dose of cyclophosphamide. This treatment markedly inhibited tumor growth, and was accompanied by massive infiltration of IFNγ-producing T cells. Furthermore, this combination markedly decreased the number of splenic CD11b(+Gr1(+ cells, and increased their expression levels of MHC II and CD80. In a spontaneous 4T1 lung metastasis model with resection of primary tumor, this combination therapy markedly increased the survival of mice, indicating it was effective in reducing lethal metastasis burden. Taken together, our data show that anti-TGFβ antibody and cyclophosphamide represents an effective chemoimmunotherapeutic combination.

  6. Effective chemoimmunotherapy with anti-TGFβ antibody and cyclophosphamide in a mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Yang, Yuan; Zhou, Qiong; Weiss, Jonathan M; Howard, Olamae Zack; McPherson, John M; Wakefield, Lalage M; Oppenheim, Joost J

    2014-01-01

    TGFβ is reportedly responsible for accumulation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor. Thus, we treated mouse 4T1 mammary carcinoma with 1D11, a neutralizing anti-TGFβ (1,2,3) antibody. The treatment delayed tumor growth, but unexpectedly increased the proportion of Tregs in tumor. In vitro, 1D11 enhanced while TGFβ potently inhibited the proliferation of Tregs. To enhance the anti-tumor effects, 1D11 was administered with cyclophosphamide which was reported to eliminate intratumoral Tregs. This combination resulted in long term tumor-free survival of up to 80% of mice, and the tumor-free mice were more resistant to re-challenge with tumor. To examine the phenotype of tumor infiltrating immune cells, 4T1-tumor bearing mice were treated with 1D11 and a lower dose of cyclophosphamide. This treatment markedly inhibited tumor growth, and was accompanied by massive infiltration of IFNγ-producing T cells. Furthermore, this combination markedly decreased the number of splenic CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells, and increased their expression levels of MHC II and CD80. In a spontaneous 4T1 lung metastasis model with resection of primary tumor, this combination therapy markedly increased the survival of mice, indicating it was effective in reducing lethal metastasis burden. Taken together, our data show that anti-TGFβ antibody and cyclophosphamide represents an effective chemoimmunotherapeutic combination. PMID:24416401

  7. Gene prediction by pattern recognition and homology search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for combining pattern recognition-based exon prediction and database homology search in gene model construction. The goal is to use homologous genes or partial genes existing in the database as reference models while constructing (multiple) gene models from exon candidates predicted by pattern recognition methods. A unified framework for gene modeling is used for genes ranging from situations with strong homology to no homology in the database. To maximally use the homology information available, the algorithm applies homology on three levels: (1) exon candidate evaluation, (2) gene-segment construction with a reference model, and (3) (complete) gene modeling. Preliminary testing has been done on the algorithm. Test results show that (a) perfect gene modeling can be expected when the initial exon predictions are reasonably good and a strong homology exists in the database; (b) homology (not necessarily strong) in general helps improve the accuracy of gene modeling; (c) multiple gene modeling becomes feasible when homology exists in the database for the involved genes.

  8. Molecular characterization, homology modeling and docking studies of the R2787H missense variation in BRCA2 gene: Association with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Aouatef; Messaoudi, Abdelmonem; Mrad, Ridha; Fourati, Asma; Chabouni-Bouhamed, Habiba; Kharrat, Maher

    2016-08-21

    The significance of many BRCA unclassified variants (UVs) has not been evaluated. Classification of these variations as neutral or pathogenic presents a significant challenge and has important implications for breast and ovarian cancer genetic counseling. Here we report a combined molecular and computational approach to classify BRCA UVs missense variations. By using the LOH (Loss of heterozygosity) analysis at the BRCA1/BRCA2 loci, five bioinformatics approaches namely fathmm, PhD-SNP, SNAP, MutationTaster and Human Splicing Finder and the association with the clinico-pathological characteristics related to BRCA tumors, we were able to classify the R2787H (in BRCA2 gene) variant as pathogenic. Then, to investigate the functional role of the R2787H variation in altering BRCA2 structure, the homology model of this variant was constructed using the Rattus norvegicus BRCA2 (PDB ID: 1IYJ) as a template. The predicted model was then assessed for stereochemical quality and side chain environment. Furthermore, docking and binding free energy simulations were performed to investigate the ssDNA-BRCA2 complex interaction. Binding energy value calculation proves that this substitution affects the complex stability. Moreover, this alteration was not found in one hundred healthy controls. These findings suggest that R2787H variant could have potential functional impact. Our approach might be useful for evaluation of BRCA unclassified variants. However additional functional analyzes may provide appropriate assessment to classify such variants. PMID:27211102

  9. Homology modeling of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABA receptor channels and Surflex-docking of fipronil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Chen, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Gen-Yan

    2009-09-01

    To further explore the mechanism of selective binding of the representative gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABARs) noncompetitive antagonist (NCA) fipronil to insect over mammalian GABARs, three-dimensional models of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABAR were generated by homology modeling, using the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) of Torpedo marmorata as a template. Fipronil was docked into the putative binding site of the human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 receptors by Surflex-docking, and the calculated docking energies are in agreement with experimental results. The GABA receptor antagonist fipronil exhibited higher potency with house fly beta 3 GABAR than with human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 GABAR. Furthermore, analyses of Surflex-docking suggest that the H-bond interaction of fipronil with Ala2 and Thr6 in the second transmembrane segment (TM2) of these GABARs plays a relatively important role in ligand selective binding. The different subunit assemblies of human alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 and house fly beta 3 GABARs may result in differential selectivity for fipronil.

  10. n Silico Analysis of Envelope Dengue Virus-2 and Envelope Dengue Virus-3 Protein as the Backbone of Dengue Virus Tetravalent Vaccine by Using Homology Modeling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky I. Taufik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Dengue fever, which was caused by Dengue virus infection, had became a major public health problem in the tropic and subtropical countries. Dengue virus (DENV had four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4, based on their immunogenic in the human body. Preventive measure will be necessary to decrease the prevalence of dengue fever, by developing modern vaccine. Approach: This research was focused on in silico study of dengue virus vaccines, by using envelope (E protein of DENV-2 and DENV-3 as their backbones. T cell epitope prediction was determined by using MULTIPRED server and B cell epitope prediction was determined by using Conformational Epitope Prediction server (CEP. Homology modeling study of E DENV-3 protein as the vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (HMM Vaccine 1-6. Moreover, homology modeling study of E DENV-2 protein as vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (ANN vaccine 1-6. Results: The BLAST analysis of HMM and ANN vaccines had produced 93% and 91% identity, respectively. The Ramachandran Plot of both vaccines had shown less than 15% non glycine residue in the disallowed region, therefore it showed the solid stability of the proteins. The VAST analysis of E DENV-3 backbone vaccines had determined, that HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-3. HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest VAST score of 64.5. Moreover, the VAST analysis of E DENV-2 backbone vaccines had determined, that ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-2. ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 have the highest VAST score of 64.7. Conclusion/Recommendation: It could be inferred from this research that HMM4; HMM6; ANN1; ANN3; ANN4; ANN5; and ANN6 were the best in silico vaccine design, based on their similarity with native E DENV Proteins. This research could be applied for the wet

  11. Evaluation of potential models for imprinted and nonimprinted components of human chromosome 15q11-q13 syndromes by fine-structure homology mapping in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, R.D.; Gottlieb, W.; Davda, M. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States)); Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Horsthemke, B. (Universitatsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstrasse (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes are complex neurobehavioral contiguous gene syndromes whose expression depends on the unmasking of genomic imprinting for different genetic loci in human chromosome 15q11-q13. The homologous chromosomal region in the mouse genome has been fine-mapped by using interspecific (Mus spretus) crosses and overlapping, radiation-induced deletions to evaluate potential animal models for both imprinted and nonimprinted components of these syndromes. Four evolutionarily conserved sequences from human 15q11-q13, including two cDNAs from fetal brain (DN10, D15S12h; DN34, D15S9h-1), a microdissected clone (MN7; D15F37S1h) expressed in mouse brain, and the gene for the [beta]3 subunit of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (Gabrb3), were mapped in mouse chromosome 7 by analysis of deletions at the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus. Three of these loci are deleted in pre- and postnatally lethal p-locus mutations, which extend up to 5.5 [plus minus] 1.7 centimorgans (cM) proximal to p; D15S9h-1, which maps 1.1 [plus minus] 0.8 cM distal to p and is the mouse homolog of the human gene D15S9 (which shows a DNA methylation imprint), is not deleted in any of the p-locus deletion series. A transcript from the Gabrb3 gene, but not the transcript detected by MN7 at the D15F37S1h locus, is expressed in mice homozygous for the p[sup 6H] deletion, which have an abnormal neurological phenotype. Furthermore, the Gabrb3 transcript is expressed equally well from the maternal or paternal chromosome 7 and, therefore, its expression is not imprinted in mouse brain. Deletions, at the mouse p locus should serve as intermediate genetic reagents and models with which to analyze the genetics and etiology of individual components of human 15q11-q13 disorders. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Modeling neutralization of Shiga 2 toxin by A-and B-subunit-specific human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skakauskas, Vladas; Katauskis, Pranas

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model for Shiga 2 toxin neutralization by A-and B-subunit-specific human monoclonal antibodies initially delivered in the extracellular domain is presented, taking into account toxin and antibodies interaction in the extracellular domain, diffusion of toxin, antibodies, and their reaction products toward the cell, the receptor-mediated toxin and complex composed of toxin and antibody to A-subunit internalization from the extracellular into the intracellular medium and excretion of this complex back to the extracellular environment via recycling endosomal carriers. The retrograde transport of the intact toxin to the endoplasmic reticulum and its anterograde movement back to the vicinity of the plasma membrane with its subsequent exocytotic removal to the extracellular space via the secretory vesicle pathway is also taken into account. The model is composed of a set of coupled PDEs. A mathematical model based on a system of ODEs for Shiga 2 toxin neutralization by antibodies in the absence of cell is also studied. Both PDE and ODE systems are solved numerically. Numerical results are illustrated by figures and discussed. PMID:27155978

  13. Determining structure and function of steroid dehydrogenase enzymes by sequence analysis, homology modeling, and rational mutational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duax, William L; Thomas, James; Pletnev, Vladimir; Addlagatta, Anthony; Huether, Robert; Habegger, Lukas; Weeks, Charles M

    2005-12-01

    The short-chain oxidoreductase (SCOR) family of enzymes includes over 6,000 members identified in sequenced genomes. Of these enzymes, approximately 300 have been characterized functionally, and the three-dimensional crystal structures of approximately 40 have been reported. Since some SCOR enzymes are steroid dehydrogenases involved in hypertension, diabetes, breast cancer, and polycystic kidney disease, it is important to characterize the other members of the family for which the biological functions are currently unknown and to determine their three-dimensional structure and mechanism of action. Although the SCOR family appears to have only a single fully conserved residue, it was possible, using bioinformatics methods, to determine characteristic fingerprints composed of 30-40 residues that are conserved at the 70% or greater level in SCOR subgroups. These fingerprints permit reliable prediction of several important structure-function features including cofactor preference, catalytic residues, and substrate specificity. Human type 1 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isomerase (3beta-HSDI) has 30% sequence identity with a human UDP galactose 4-epimerase (UDPGE), a SCOR family enzyme for which an X-ray structure has been reported. Both UDPGE and 3-HSDI appear to trace their origins back to bacterial 3alpha,20beta-HSD. Combining three-dimensional structural information and sequence data on the 3alpha,20beta-HSD, UDPGE, and 3beta-HSDI subfamilies with mutational analysis, we were able to identify the residues critical to the dehydrogenase function of 3-HSDI. We also identified the residues most probably responsible for the isomerase activity of 3beta-HSDI. We test our predictions by specific mutations based on sequence analysis and our structure-based model.

  14. Homology modeling, molecular dynamics, and virtual screening of NorA efflux pump inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Baki Vijaya; Babu, Tirumalasetty Muni Chandra; Reddy, Netala Vasudeva; Rajendra, Wudayagiri

    2016-01-01

    Emerging drug resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus might be implicated to the overexpression of NorA efflux pump which is capable of extruding numerous structurally diverse compounds. However, NorA efflux pump is considered as a potential drug target for the development of efflux pump inhibitors. In the present study, NorA model was constructed based on the crystal structure of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (PDBID: 1PW4). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed using NAMD2.7 for NorA which is embedded in the hydrated lipid bilayer. Structural design of NorA unveils amino (N)- and carboxyl (C)-terminal domains which are connected by long cytoplasmic loop. N and C domains are composed of six transmembrane α-helices (TM) which exhibits pseudo-twofold symmetry and possess voluminous substrate binding cavity between TM helices. Molecular docking of reserpine, totarol, ferruginol, salvin, thioxanthene, phenothiazine, omeprazole, verapamil, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and acridine to NorA found that all the molecules were bound at the large hydrophobic cleft and indicated significant interactions with the key residues. In addition, structure-based virtual screening was employed which indicates that 14 potent novel lead molecules such as CID58685302, CID58685367, CID5799283, CID5578487, CID60028372, ZINC12196383, ZINC72140751, ZINC72137843, ZINC39227983, ZINC43742707, ZINC12196375, ZINC66166948, ZINC39228014, and ZINC14616160 have highest binding affinity for NorA. These lead molecules displayed considerable pharmacological properties as evidenced by Lipinski rule of five and prophecy of toxicity risk assessment. Thus, the present study will be helpful in designing and synthesis of a novel class of NorA efflux pump inhibitors that restore the susceptibilities of drug compounds. PMID:27757014

  15. Weak homology of elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, G; Principe, M D

    2002-01-01

    We start by studying a small set of objects characterized by photometric profiles that have been pointed out to deviate significantly from the standard R^{1/4} law. For these objects we confirm that a generic R^{1/n} law, with n a free parameter, can provide superior fits (the best-fit value of n can be lower than 2.5 or higher than 10), better than those that can be obtained by a pure R^{1/4} law, by an R^{1/4}+exponential model, and by other dynamically justified self--consistent models. Therefore, strictly speaking, elliptical galaxies should not be considered homologous dynamical systems. Still, a case for "weak homology", useful for the interpretation of the Fundamental Plane of elliptical galaxies, could be made if the best-fit parameter n, as often reported, correlates with galaxy luminosity L, provided the underlying dynamical structure also follows a systematic trend with luminosity. We demonstrate that this statement may be true even in the presence of significant scatter in the correlation n(L). Pr...

  16. The Homology Groups of a Partial Trace Monoid Action

    CERN Document Server

    Husainov, Ahmet A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the homology groups of mathematical models of concurrency. We study the Baues-Wirsching homology groups of a small category associated with a partial monoid action on a set. We prove that these groups can be reduced to the Leech homology groups of the monoid. For a trace monoid with an action on a set, we will build a cubical complex of free Abelian groups with homology groups isomorphic to the integral homology groups of the action category. It allows us to solve the problem posed by the author in 2004 of the constructing an algorithm for computing homology groups of the CE nets. We describe the algorithm and give examples of calculating the homology groups.

  17. Mammalian Cell Culture Process for Monoclonal Antibody Production: Nonlinear Modelling and Parameter Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Selişteanu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are at present one of the fastest growing products of pharmaceutical industry, with widespread applications in biochemistry, biology, and medicine. The operation of mAbs production processes is predominantly based on empirical knowledge, the improvements being achieved by using trial-and-error experiments and precedent practices. The nonlinearity of these processes and the absence of suitable instrumentation require an enhanced modelling effort and modern kinetic parameter estimation strategies. The present work is dedicated to nonlinear dynamic modelling and parameter estimation for a mammalian cell culture process used for mAb production. By using a dynamical model of such kind of processes, an optimization-based technique for estimation of kinetic parameters in the model of mammalian cell culture process is developed. The estimation is achieved as a result of minimizing an error function by a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. The proposed estimation approach is analyzed in this work by using a particular model of mammalian cell culture, as a case study, but is generic for this class of bioprocesses. The presented case study shows that the proposed parameter estimation technique provides a more accurate simulation of the experimentally observed process behaviour than reported in previous studies.

  18. Mammalian cell culture process for monoclonal antibody production: nonlinear modelling and parameter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selişteanu, Dan; Șendrescu, Dorin; Georgeanu, Vlad; Roman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are at present one of the fastest growing products of pharmaceutical industry, with widespread applications in biochemistry, biology, and medicine. The operation of mAbs production processes is predominantly based on empirical knowledge, the improvements being achieved by using trial-and-error experiments and precedent practices. The nonlinearity of these processes and the absence of suitable instrumentation require an enhanced modelling effort and modern kinetic parameter estimation strategies. The present work is dedicated to nonlinear dynamic modelling and parameter estimation for a mammalian cell culture process used for mAb production. By using a dynamical model of such kind of processes, an optimization-based technique for estimation of kinetic parameters in the model of mammalian cell culture process is developed. The estimation is achieved as a result of minimizing an error function by a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The proposed estimation approach is analyzed in this work by using a particular model of mammalian cell culture, as a case study, but is generic for this class of bioprocesses. The presented case study shows that the proposed parameter estimation technique provides a more accurate simulation of the experimentally observed process behaviour than reported in previous studies. PMID:25685797

  19. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDIES OF EC1 DOMAIN OF VE-CADHERIN TO ELUCIDATE DOCKING INTERACTION WITH CADHERIN-DERIVED PEPTIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivitri Dewi Prasasty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available VE-cadherin is a protein in the cadherin family that is found at the adherens junctions of the microvessel endothelial cells of the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB. It is recognized as the homotypic cell adhesion molecules and there is limited structural information on how VE-cadherins mediate cell-cell adhesion. It has been shown that the EC1 domain of cadherins is important for the homophilic interactions for cell-cell adhesion. Therefore, the aims of this study are to model the structure of the EC1 domain of VE-cadherin, study its molecular dynamics properties and evaluate its interactions with cadherin peptides. In this study, the sequence alignment between EC1 domain of VE-cadherin and the template protein were conducted by CLUSTALW2 platform. The SWISS-MODEL platform performed the homology modeling of the EC1 domain of VE-cadherin structure. Structural refinement was done by using KOBAMIN. Some validation analysis platforms also were conducted included PROCHECK, VERIFY3D, ERRAT and MOLPROBITY to check the allowed residues region in Ramachandran Plot (RP and the quality of the structure. The most favored region was found 95.5% in RP value and overall model structure quality is 71.34%. Molecular Dynamics (MD was run under CABS-FLEX to determine the flexibility of the residue index. The RMSD value of MD is 1.5Å per residue index. Eventually, molecular docking by AUTODOCK VINA was conducted to investigate protein-ligand interaction. From docking, it is found that the affinity energy is -4.8 kcal/mol which has the most favorable binding of EC1 domain with the peptide.

  20. Sialyl-Tn vaccine induces antibody-mediated tumour protection in a relevant murine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julien, S; Picco, G; Sewell, R;

    2009-01-01

    be carried on various glycoproteins. One such glycoprotein MUC1 is expressed by the vast majority of breast carcinomas. Both STn and MUC1 have been considered as targets for immunotherapy of breast cancer patients. Here we used different immunogens to target STn in an MUC1 transgenic mouse model of tumour......Changes in the composition of glycans added to glycoproteins and glycolipids are characteristic of the change to malignancy. Sialyl-Tn (STn) is expressed by 25-30% of breast carcinomas but its expression on normal tissue is highly restricted. Sialyl-Tn is an O-linked disaccharide that can...... challenge. We show that synthetic STn coupled to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (Theratope), induced antibodies to STn that recognised the glycan carried on a number of glycoproteins and in these mice a significant delay in tumour growth was observed. The protection was dependent on STn being expressed...

  1. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical.

  2. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical. PMID:25751125

  3. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member - Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Witz, Sandra

    2014-03-12

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. 2014 Witz et al.

  4. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M Joanne; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. PMID:24621654

  5. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Witz

    Full Text Available Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members.

  6. Sequence-structure-function relationships of a tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase studied by homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purta, Elzbieta; van Vliet, Françoise; Tricot, Catherine; De Bie, Lara G; Feder, Marcin; Skowronek, Krzysztof; Droogmans, Louis; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2005-05-15

    The Escherichia coli TrmB protein and its Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog Trm8p catalyze the S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent formation of 7-methylguanosine at position 46 (m7G46) in tRNA. To learn more about the sequence-structure-function relationships of these enzymes we carried out a thorough bioinformatics analysis of the tRNA:m7G methyltransferase (MTase) family to predict sequence regions and individual amino acid residues that may be important for the interactions between the MTase and the tRNA substrate, in particular the target guanosine 46. We used site-directed mutagenesis to construct a series of alanine substitutions and tested the activity of the mutants to elucidate the catalytic and tRNA-recognition mechanism of TrmB. The functional analysis of the mutants, together with the homology model of the TrmB structure and the results of the phylogenetic analysis, revealed the crucial residues for the formation of the substrate-binding site and the catalytic center in tRNA:m7G MTases.

  7. Improved prediction of antibody VL-VH orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marze, Nicholas A; Lyskov, Sergey; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2016-10-01

    Antibodies are important immune molecules with high commercial value and therapeutic interest because of their ability to bind diverse antigens. Computational prediction of antibody structure can quickly reveal valuable information about the nature of these antigen-binding interactions, but only if the models are of sufficient quality. To achieve high model quality during complementarity-determining region (CDR) structural prediction, one must account for the VL-VH orientation. We developed a novel four-metric VL-VH orientation coordinate frame. Additionally, we extended the CDR grafting protocol in RosettaAntibody with a new method that diversifies VL-VH orientation by using 10 VL-VH orientation templates rather than a single one. We tested the multiple-template grafting protocol on two datasets of known antibody crystal structures. During the template-grafting phase, the new protocol improved the fraction of accurate VL-VH orientation predictions from only 26% (12/46) to 72% (33/46) of targets. After the full RosettaAntibody protocol, including CDR H3 remodeling and VL-VH re-orientation, the new protocol produced more candidate structures with accurate VL-VH orientation than the standard protocol in 43/46 targets (93%). The improved ability to predict VL-VH orientation will bolster predictions of other parts of the paratope, including the conformation of CDR H3, a grand challenge of antibody homology modeling.

  8. 多巴胺D3R蛋白同源模建及其应用%Dopamine 3 Receptor Homology Model and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马丽英; 徐四川

    2012-01-01

    With the crystal structure of Rhodopsin (resolution: 2. 2 A) as a template, D3R protein was modeled by homology modeling. Erythrina molecules were docked into the modeled protein D3R. With the ligand molecule selected as a centroid, a spatial dimension with a radius of 6 A was selected in the docked D3R protein. Binding energy or repulsive energy was calculated between all amino acid residues and ligand molecules in the spatial dimension. Active sites for Erythrina molecules binding to the D3R protein have been found basing on the calculated binding energies.%以分辨率为2.2A的牛视紫红质蛋白的晶体结构为模板,采用同源模建方法,建立D3R模蛋白。对接D3R模蛋白与刺桐属配体分子,在对接的D3R蛋白的结合腔中选定一个以药物分子为质心,以半径为6A的空间范围,计算此空间范围内的所有氨基酸残基与配体分子的作用能量,即残基/配体的结合能或排斥能,据此得到配体分子与受体蛋白的活性结合位点。

  9. Modeling the Catalysis of Anti-Cocaine Catalytic Antibody: Competing Reaction Pathways and Free Energy Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Yongmei; Gao, Daquan; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2008-01-01

    The competing reaction pathways and the corresponding free energy barriers for cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by an anti-cocaine catalytic antibody, mAb 15A10, were studied by using a novel computational strategy based on the binding free energy calculations on the antibody binding with cocaine and transition states. The calculated binding free energies were used to evaluate the free energy barrier shift from the cocaine hydrolysis in water to the antibody-catalyzed cocaine hydrolysis for each ...

  10. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Patrick M; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2016-08-01

    Accurate prediction of the clinical pharmacokinetics of new therapeutic entities facilitates decision making during drug discovery, and increases the probability of success for early clinical trials. Standard strategies employed for predicting the pharmacokinetics of small-molecule drugs (e.g., allometric scaling) are often not useful for predicting the disposition monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), as mAbs frequently demonstrate species-specific non-linear pharmacokinetics that is related to mAb-target binding (i.e., target-mediated drug disposition, TMDD). The saturable kinetics of TMDD are known to be influenced by a variety of factors, including the sites of target expression (which determines the accessibility of target to mAb), the extent of target expression, the rate of target turnover, and the fate of mAb-target complexes. In most cases, quantitative information on the determinants of TMDD is not available during early phases of drug discovery, and this has complicated attempts to employ mechanistic mathematical models to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of mAbs. In this report, we introduce a simple strategy, employing physiologically-based modeling, to predict mAb disposition in humans. The approach employs estimates of inter-antibody variability in rate processes of extravasation in tissues and fluid-phase endocytosis, estimates for target concentrations in tissues derived through use of categorical immunohistochemical scores, and in vitro measures of the turnover of target and target-mAb complexes. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for four mAbs (cetuximab, figitumumab, dalotuzumab, trastuzumab) directed against three targets (epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor receptor 1, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2). The proposed modeling strategy was able to predict well the pharmacokinetics of cetuximab, dalotuzumab, and trastuzumab at a range of doses, but trended towards underprediction of figitumumab concentrations

  11. Mechanistic modeling of ion-exchange process chromatography of charge variants of monoclonal antibody products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijesh; Leweke, Samuel; von Lieres, Eric; Rathore, Anurag S

    2015-12-24

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEX) is universally accepted as the optimal method for achieving process scale separation of charge variants of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutic. These variants are closely related to the product and a baseline separation is rarely achieved. The general practice is to fractionate the eluate from the IEX column, analyze the fractions and then pool the desired fractions to obtain the targeted composition of variants. This is, however, a very cumbersome and time consuming exercise. A mechanistic model that is capable of simulating the peak profile will be a much more elegant and effective way to make a decision on the pooling strategy. This paper proposes a mechanistic model, based on the general rate model, to predict elution peak profile for separation of the main product from its variants. The proposed approach uses inverse fit of process scale chromatogram for estimation of model parameters using the initial values that are obtained from theoretical correlations. The packed bed column has been modeled along with the chromatographic system consisting of the mixer, tubing and detectors as a series of dispersed plug flow and continuous stirred tank reactors. The model uses loading ranges starting at 25% to a maximum of 70% of the loading capacity and hence is applicable to process scale separations. Langmuir model has been extended to include the effects of salt concentration and temperature on the model parameters. The extended Langmuir model that has been proposed uses one less parameter than the SMA model and this results in a significant ease of estimating the model parameters from inverse fitting. The proposed model has been validated with experimental data and has been shown to successfully predict peak profile for a range of load capacities (15-28mg/mL), gradient lengths (10-30CV), bed heights (6-20cm), and for three different resins with good accuracy (as measured by estimation of residuals). The model has been also

  12. Model based adaptive control of a continuous capture process for monoclonal antibodies production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinebach, Fabian; Angarita, Monica; Karst, Daniel J; Müller-Späth, Thomas; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-04-29

    A two-column capture process for continuous processing of cell-culture supernatant is presented. Similar to other multicolumn processes, this process uses sequential countercurrent loading of the target compound in order maximize resin utilization and productivity for a given product yield. The process was designed using a novel mechanistic model for affinity capture, which takes both specific adsorption as well as transport through the resin beads into account. Simulations as well as experimental results for the capture of an IgG antibody are discussed. The model was able to predict the process performance in terms of yield, productivity and capacity utilization. Compared to continuous capture with two columns operated batch wise in parallel, a 2.5-fold higher capacity utilization was obtained for the same productivity and yield. This results in an equal improvement in product concentration and reduction of buffer consumption. The developed model was used not only for the process design and optimization but also for its online control. In particular, the unit operating conditions are changed in order to maintain high product yield while optimizing the process performance in terms of capacity utilization and buffer consumption also in the presence of changing upstream conditions and resin aging.

  13. Para-(benzoyl)-phenylalanine as a potential inhibitor against LpxC of Leptospira spp.: homology modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Dibyabhaba; Priyadarshini, Vani; Munikumar, Manne; Swargam, Sandeep; Umamaheswari, Amineni; Bitla, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Leptospira interrogans, a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen is the main cause of human leptospirosis. Lipid A is a highly immunoreactive endotoxic center of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that anchors LPS into the outer membrane of Leptospira. Discovery of compounds inhibiting lipid-A biosynthetic pathway would be promising for dissolving the structural integrity of membrane leading to cell lysis and death of Leptospira. LpxC, a unique enzyme of lipid-A biosynthetic pathway was identified as common drug target of Leptospira. Herein, homology modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to discover potential inhibitors of LpxC. A reliable tertiary structure of LpxC in complex with inhibitor BB-78485 was constructed in Modeller 9v8. A data-set of BB-78485 structural analogs were docked with LpxC in Maestro v9.2 virtual screening workflow, which implements three stage Glide docking protocol. Twelve lead molecules with better XP Gscore compared to BB-78485 were proposed as potential inhibitors of LpxC. Para-(benzoyl)-phenylalanine - that showed lowest XP Gscore (-10.35 kcal/mol) - was predicted to have best binding affinity towards LpxC. MD simulations were performed for LpxC and para-(benzoyl)-phenylalanine docking complex in Desmond v3.0. Trajectory analysis showed the docking complex and inter-molecular interactions was stable throughout the entire production part of MD simulations. The results indicate para-(benzoyl)-phenylalanine as a potent drug molecule against leptospirosis. An animated Interactive 3D Complement (I3DC) is available in Proteopedia at http://proteopedia.org/w/Journal:JBSD:10.

  14. Rad51c- and Trp53-double-mutant mouse model reveals common features of homologous recombination-deficient breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiati, M; Munne, P M; Edgren, H; Eldfors, S; Hemmes, A; Kuznetsov, S G

    2016-09-01

    Almost half of all hereditary breast cancers (BCs) are associated with germ-line mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes. However, the tumor phenotypes associated with different HR genes vary, making it difficult to define the role of HR in BC predisposition. To distinguish between HR-dependent and -independent features of BCs, we generated a mouse model in which an essential HR gene, Rad51c, is knocked-out specifically in epidermal tissues. Rad51c is one of the key mediators of HR and a well-known BC predisposition gene. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Rad51c invariably requires inactivation of the Trp53 tumor suppressor (TP53 in humans) to produce mammary carcinomas in 63% of female mice. Nonetheless, loss of Rad51c shortens the latency of Trp53-deficient mouse tumors from 11 to 6 months. Remarkably, the histopathological features of Rad51c-deficient mammary carcinomas, such as expression of hormone receptors and luminal epithelial markers, faithfully recapitulate the histopathology of human RAD51C-mutated BCs. Similar to other BC models, Rad51c/p53 double-mutant mouse mammary tumors also reveal a propensity for genomic instability, but lack the focal amplification of the Met locus or distinct mutational signatures reported for other HR genes. Using the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, we show that deletion of TP53 can rescue RAD51C-deficient cells from radiation-induced cellular senescence, whereas it exacerbates their centrosome amplification and nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, our data indicate that a trend for genomic instability and inactivation of Trp53 are common features of HR-mediated BCs, whereas histopathology and somatic mutation patterns are specific for different HR genes. PMID:26820992

  15. Antibody response to recombinant human coagulation factor VIII in a new rat model of severe hemophilia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfgren, Karin Maria; Sondergaard, H.; Skov, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neutralizing antibodies towardFVIII replacement therapy (inhibitors) are the most seri-ous treatment-related complication in hemophilia A(HA). A rat model of severe HA (F8/) has recentlybeen developed, but an immunological characterization isneeded to determine the value of using...

  16. The Fab and Fc fragments of IgA1 exhibit a different arrangement from that in IgG: a study by X-ray and neutron solution scattering and homology modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, M K; Woof, J M; Kerr, M A; Perkins, S J

    1999-03-12

    Human immunoglobulin A (IgA) is an abundant antibody that mediates immune protection at mucosal surfaces as well as in plasma. The IgA1 isotype contains two four-domain Fab fragments and a four-domain Fc fragment analogous to that in immunoglobulin G (IgG), linked by a glycosylated hinge region made up of 23 amino acid residues from each of the heavy chains. IgA1 also has two 18 residue tailpieces at the C terminus of each heavy chain in the Fc fragment. X-ray scattering using H2O buffers and neutron scattering using 100 % 2H2O buffers were performed on monomeric IgA1 and a recombinant IgA1 that lacks the tailpiece (PTerm455). The radii of gyration RG from Guinier analyses were similar at 6.11-6.20 nm for IgA1 and 5.84-6.16 nm for PTerm455, and their cross-sectional radii of gyration RXS were also similar. The similarity of the RG and RXS values suggests that the tailpiece of IgA1 is not extended outwards in solution. The IgA1 RG values are higher than those for IgG, and the distance distribution function P(r) showed two distinct peaks, whereas a single peak was observed for IgG. Both results show that the hinge of IgA1 results in an extended Fab and Fc arrangement that is different from that in IgG. Automated curve-fit searches constrained by homology models for the Fab and Fc fragments were used to model the experimental IgA1 scattering curves. A translational search to optimise the relative arrangement of the Fab and Fc fragments held in a fixed orientation resembling that in IgG was not successful in fitting the scattering data. A new molecular dynamics curve-fit search method generated IgA1 hinge structures to which the Fab and Fc fragments could be connected in any orientation. A search based on these identified a limited family of IgA1 structures that gave good curve fits to the experimental data. These contained extended hinges of length about 7 nm that positioned the Fab-to-Fab centre-to-centre separation 17 nm apart while keeping the corresponding Fab

  17. Structural insight into tetrameric hTRPV1 from homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, virtual screening, and bioassay validations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhiwei; Pearce, Larry V; Xu, Xiaomeng; Yang, Xiaole; Yang, Peng; Blumberg, Peter M; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-03-23

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-activated cation channel protein, which contributes to inflammation, acute and persistent pain. Antagonists of human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of pain. Developing various antagonists of hTRPV1, however, has been hindered by the unavailability of a 3D structure of hTRPV1. Recently, the 3D structures of rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1) in the presence and absence of ligand have been reported as determined by cryo-EM. rTRPV1 shares 85.7% sequence identity with hTRPV1. In the present work, we constructed and reported the 3D homology tetramer model of hTRPV1 based on the cryo-EM structures of rTRPV1. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, energy minimizations, and prescreen were applied to select and validate the best model of hTRPV1. The predicted binding pocket of hTRPV1 consists of two adjacent monomers subunits, which were congruent with the experimental rTRPV1 data and the cyro-EM structures of rTRPV1. The detailed interactions between hTRPV1 and its antagonists or agonists were characterized by molecular docking, which helped us to identify the important residues. Conformational changes of hTRPV1 upon antagonist/agonist binding were also explored by MD simulation. The different movements of compounds led to the different conformational changes of monomers in hTRPV1, indicating that TRPV1 works in a concerted way, resembling some other channel proteins such as aquaporins. We observed that the selective filter was open when hTRPV1 bound with an agonist during MD simulation. For the lower gate of hTRPV1, we observed large similarities between hTRPV1 bound with antagonist and with agonist. A five-point pharmacophore model based on several antagonists was established, and the structural model was used to screen in silico for new antagonists for hTRPV1. By using the 3D TRPV1 structural model above, the pilot in silico screening has begun to yield promising hits with

  18. Erythropoietin enhances nerve repair in anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated models of immune neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is a monophasic immune neuropathic disorder in which a significant proportion of patients have incomplete recovery. The patients with incomplete recovery almost always have some degree of failure of axon regeneration and target reinnervation. Anti-ganglioside antibodies (Abs are the most commonly recognized autoimmune markers in all forms of GBS and specific Abs are associated with the slow/poor recovery. We recently demonstrated that specific anti-ganglioside Abs inhibit axonal regeneration and nerve repair in preclinical models by activation of small GTPase RhoA and its downstream effectors. The objective of this study was to determine whether erythropoietin (EPO, a pleiotropic cytokine with neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, enhances nerve regeneration in preclinical cell culture and animal models of autoimmune neuropathy/nerve repair generated with monoclonal and patient derived Abs. Primary neuronal cultures and a standardized sciatic crush nerve model were used to assess the efficacy of EPO in reversing inhibitory effects of anti-ganglioside Abs on nerve repair. We found that EPO completely reversed the inhibitory effects of anti-ganglioside Abs on axon regeneration in cell culture models and significantly improved nerve regeneration/repair in an animal model. Moreover, EPO-induced proregenerative effects in nerve cells are through EPO receptors and Janus kinase 2/Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 pathway and not via early direct modulation of small GTPase RhoA. These preclinical studies indicate that EPO is a viable candidate drug to develop further for neuroprotection and enhancing nerve repair in patients with GBS.

  19. 多巴胺D2受体的同源模建研究%Homology modeling of Dopamine D2 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    芮亚然; 刘维国; 李冬玲; 张严

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is the most abundant catecholaminergic neurotransmitter in the brain.It controls a variety of physiological functions of the central nervous system by Dopamine receptor, and Dopamine D2 receptor has been associated with a variety of neuropathological diseases, such as drug addiction, schizophrenia. Parkinson's disease. But so Tar. the structure of Dopamine D2 receptor is not available, which limited the design and development of relevenl drugs in this paper, the homology model of Dopamine D2 receptor was developed by using the Dopamine D3 receptor (JPBL) as template, which has (he highest sequence identity to D2 receptor. After Optimization and molecular dynamics simulation, the refined model structure was obtained. The final refined model was assessed by Profile-3D and Ramachamlran plot programs, then verified by docking with stepholidine(SPD). The results show that the Dopamine D2 model which we built is reasonable and reliable.%多巴胺是大脑中含量最丰富的儿茶酚胺类神经递质,主要通过多巴胺受体调控中枢神经系统的多种生理功能,其中多巴胺D2受体与药物成瘾、精神分裂症、帕金森病等多种疾病的发生相关.然而多巴胺D2受体的晶体结构至今尚未解析出来,给相关疾病的药物设计与开发带来困难.本文采用同源模建的方法,用目前与多巴胺D2受体同源性最高的多巴胺D3受体(3PBL)作为模板,构建多巴胺D2受体的三维结构.经过优化和分子动力学模拟,用Profile-3D和Ramachandran plot对模型进行评估,然后用多巴胺D2受体拮抗剂千金藤啶碱(stepholidine,SPD)进行对接验证,证明构建的多巴胺D2受体模型合理、可靠.

  20. 2-categories and cyclic homology

    OpenAIRE

    Slevin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the application of distributive laws between comonads to the theory of cyclic homology. Explicitly, our main aims are: 1) To study how the cyclic homology of associative algebras and of Hopf algebras in the original sense of Connes and Moscovici arises from a distributive law, and to clarify the role of different notions of bimonad in this generalisation. 2) To extend the procedure of twisting the cyclic homology of a unital associative algebra to any duplicial obj...

  1. The Geometry of Homological Triangles

    CERN Document Server

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2012-01-01

    This book is addressed to students, professors and researchers of geometry, who will find herein many interesting and original results. The originality of the book The Geometry of Homological Triangles consists in using the homology of triangles as a "filter" through which remarkable notions and theorems from the geometry of the triangle are unitarily passed. Our research is structured in seven chapters, the first four are dedicated to the homology of the triangles, while the last ones to their applications.

  2. Matrix Factorizations and Kauffman Homology

    CERN Document Server

    Gukov, S; Gukov, Sergei; Walcher, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    The topological string interpretation of homological knot invariants has led to several insights into the structure of the theory in the case of sl(N). We study possible extensions of the matrix factorization approach to knot homology for other Lie groups and representations. In particular, we introduce a new triply graded theory categorifying the Kauffman polynomial, test it, and predict the Kauffman homology for several simple knots.

  3. [Homology modeling and eukaryotic expression of a modified αβ TCR harboring the immunoglobulin-like domain of γδ TCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Changli; Shao, Hongwei; Shen, Han; Huang, Shulin

    2016-08-01

    Objective To design, construct and express a chimeric αβ TCR harboring the immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain of γδ TCR in Jurkat T cells. Methods The fusion sites of TCR δIg were determined by bioinformatics analysis. Then the protein structures of TCR α δIg and TCR β δIg were predicted by homology modeling. Furthermore, the structures of TCR α δIg and TCR β δIg were compared with the wild type (wt) TCR α and TCR β respectively by combinatorial extension (CE). After that, the TCR α δIg and TCR β δIg were fused to fluorescent protein ECFP and EYFP respectively via the overlap PCR, and then the fusion genes (TCR α δIg-ECFP and TCR β δIg-EYFP) were cloned into pIRES2-EGFP vector and respectively located at the upstream and downstream of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). The recombinant prokaryotic expression vector pIRES-TCR βδIg-EYFP/TCR αδIg-ECFP was transferred into Jurkat T cells. Finally, the expression of TCR δIg in Jurkat T cells was monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results The variable region structure of the TCR δIg did not change and the antigen recognition active regions remained stable compared to the wtTCR. The recombinant expression plasmid was successfully constructed as confirmed by PCR identification and sequencing analysis. CLSM showed that TCR δIg was expressed and located at the plasma membrane of Jurkat T cells. Conclusion The design of TCR δIg was reasonable and the TCR δIg could be expressed on Jurkat T cell surface. PMID:27412930

  4. Optical Imaging of Disseminated Leukemia Models in Mice with Near-Infrared Probe Conjugated to a Monoclonal Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Pesnel; Arnaud Pillon; Laurent Créancier; Stéphanie Lerondel; Alain Le Pape; Christian Recher; Cécile Demur; Nicolas Guilbaud; Anna Kruczynski

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The assessment of anticancer agents to treat leukemia needs to have animal models closer to the human pathology such as implantation in immunodeficient mice of leukemic cells from patient samples. A sensitive and early detection of tumor cells in these orthotopic models is a prerequisite for monitoring engraftment of leukemic cells and their dissemination in mice. Therefore, we developed a fluorescent antibody based strategy to detect leukemic foci in mice bearing patient-derived ...

  5. Homology of L_{\\infty}-Algebras and Cyclic Homology

    OpenAIRE

    Khalkhali, Masoud

    1998-01-01

    A classical result of Loday-Quillen and Tsygan states that the Lie algebra homology of the algebra of stable matrices over an associative algebra is isomorphic, as a Hopf algebra, to the exterior algebra of the cyclic homology of the algebra. In this paper we develop the necessary tools needed to extend extend this result to the category of L_{\\infty} algebras.

  6. Ultrafiltration of highly concentrated antibody solutions: Experiments and modeling for the effects of module and buffer conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binabaji, Elaheh; Ma, Junfen; Rao, Suma; Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-05-01

    Although ultrafiltration is currently used for the concentration and formulation of nearly all biotherapeutics, obtaining the very high target concentrations for monoclonal antibody products is challenging. The objective of this work was to examine the effects of the membrane module design and buffer conditions on both the filtrate flux and maximum achievable protein concentration during the ultrafiltration of highly concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions. Experimental data were obtained using both hollow fiber and screened cassettes and in the presence of specific excipients that are known to alter the solution viscosity. Data were compared with predictions of a recently developed model that accounts for the complex thermodynamic and hydrodynamic behavior in these systems, including the effects of back-filtration arising from the large pressure drop through the module due to the high viscosity of the concentrated antibody solutions. Model calculations were in good agreement with experimental data in hollow fiber modules with very different fiber length and in screened cassettes having different screen geometries. These results provide important insights into the key factors controlling the filtrate flux and maximum achievable protein concentration during ultrafiltration of highly concentrated antibody solutions as well as a framework for the development of enhanced ultrafiltration processes for this application. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:692-701, 2016.

  7. K-Kolmogorov homology groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we use the idea of the K-groups to define the K-Kolmogorov homology groups, and their induced homomorphisms and boundary operators for the case of a pair of discrete coefficient groups, where K denotes a locally-finite simplicial complex. Moreover, we prove that our homology construction is exact. (author)

  8. Discovery of Fully Human Anti-MET Monoclonal Antibodies with Antitumor Activity against Colon Cancer Tumor Models In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Htun van der Horst

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The receptor tyrosine kinase MET is a major component controlling the invasive growth program in embryonic development and in invasive malignancies. The discovery of therapeutic antibodies against MET has been difficult, and antibodies that compete with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF act as agonists. By applying phage technology and cell-based panning strategies, we discovered two fully human antibodies against MET (R13 and R28, which synergistically inhibit HGF binding to MET and elicit antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Cell-based phosphorylation assays demonstrate that R13 and R28 abrogate HGF-induced activation of MET, AKT1, ERK1/2, and HGF-induced migration and proliferation. FACS experiments suggest that the inhibitory effect is mediated by “locking” MET receptor in a state with R13, which then increases avidity of R28 for the extracellular domain of MET, thus blocking HGF binding without activating the receptor. In vivo studies demonstrate that the combination of R13/28 significantly inhibited tumor growth in various colon tumor xenograft models. Inhibition of tumor growth was associated with induction of hypoxia. Global gene expression analysis shows that inhibition of HGF/MET pathway significantly upregulated the tumor suppressors KLF6, CEACAM1, and BMP2, the negative regulator of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase PIK3IP1, and significantly suppressed SCF and SERPINE2, both enhancers of proliferation and invasiveness. Moreover, in an experimental metastasis model, R13/28 increased survival by preventing the recurrence of otherwise lethal lung metastases. Taken together, these results underscore the utility of a dual-antibody approach for targeting MET and possibly other receptor tyrosine kinases. Our approach could be expanded to drug discovery efforts against other cell surface proteins.

  9. A configuration space for equivariant connective K-homology

    CERN Document Server

    Velasquez, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Following ideas of Graeme Segal we construct a configuration space that represents equivariant connective K-homology for group actions of finite groups and furthermore we describe explicitly the complex homology of this configuration space as a Hopf algebra. As a consequence of this work we obtain models of representing spaces for equivariant K-theory.

  10. Intratypic heterologous vaccination of calves can induce an antibody response in presence of maternal antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, A.; Eble, P.L.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Chenard, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Maternal antibodies can interfere with foot-and-mouth disease vaccination. In this study we determined whether intratypic heterologous vaccination could help to improve herd immunity. Results - In unvaccinated calves, a half-life of maternal antibodies of 21 days was determined. At two weeks of age, calves without maternal antibodies showed a good antibody response against both vaccines used in the trial, while in calves with maternal antibodies no antibody response to homologous...

  11. Antibody to endotoxin core glycolipid reverses reticuloendothelial system depression in an animal model of severe sepsis and surgical injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of severe sepsis on the function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) we have measured the clearance kinetics and organ distribution of both low-dose technetium tin colloid (TTC) and 75selenomethionine-labelled E. coli in rabbits 24 hours after either sham laparotomy or appendix devascularization. Sepsis resulted in similar delayed blood clearance and reduced liver (Kupffer cell) uptake of both TTC and E. coli. To investigate the ability of polyclonal antibody to E. coli-J-5 (core glycolipid) to improve RES function in the same model of sepsis, further animals were pretreated with either core glycolipid antibody or control serum (10 ml IV) 2 hours before induction of sepsis. TTC clearance kinetics were determined 24 hours later. Antibody pretreated animals showed: a reduced incidence of bacteremia; normalization of the rate of blood clearance and liver uptake of TTC; and a 'rebound' increase in splenic uptake of TTC. We conclude that antibody to E. coli-J-5 enhances bacterial clearance by the RES

  12. Antibody to endotoxin core glycolipid reverses reticuloendothelial system depression in an animal model of severe sepsis and surgical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, M.C.; Chadwick, S.J.; Cheslyn-Curtis, S.; Rapson, N.; Dudley, H.A.

    1987-10-01

    To study the effect of severe sepsis on the function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) we have measured the clearance kinetics and organ distribution of both low-dose technetium tin colloid (TTC) and /sup 75/selenomethionine-labelled E. coli in rabbits 24 hours after either sham laparotomy or appendix devascularization. Sepsis resulted in similar delayed blood clearance and reduced liver (Kupffer cell) uptake of both TTC and E. coli. To investigate the ability of polyclonal antibody to E. coli-J-5 (core glycolipid) to improve RES function in the same model of sepsis, further animals were pretreated with either core glycolipid antibody or control serum (10 ml IV) 2 hours before induction of sepsis. TTC clearance kinetics were determined 24 hours later. Antibody pretreated animals showed: a reduced incidence of bacteremia; normalization of the rate of blood clearance and liver uptake of TTC; and a 'rebound' increase in splenic uptake of TTC. We conclude that antibody to E. coli-J-5 enhances bacterial clearance by the RES.

  13. Differential transgene expression patterns in Alzheimer mouse models revealed by novel human amyloid precursor protein-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfling, Corinna; Morawski, Markus; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Zanier, Elisa R; Moschke, Katrin; Serdaroglu, Alperen; Canneva, Fabio; von Hörsten, Stephan; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Forloni, Gianluigi; Jäger, Carsten; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Roßner, Steffen; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is histopathologically characterized by neurodegeneration, the formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular Aβ deposits that derive from proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). As rodents do not normally develop Aβ pathology, various transgenic animal models of AD were designed to overexpress human APP with mutations favouring its amyloidogenic processing. However, these mouse models display tremendous differences in the spatial and temporal appearance of Aβ deposits, synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and the manifestation of learning deficits which may be caused by age-related and brain region-specific differences in APP transgene levels. Consequentially, a comparative temporal and regional analysis of the pathological effects of Aβ in mouse brains is difficult complicating the validation of therapeutic AD treatment strategies in different mouse models. To date, no antibodies are available that properly discriminate endogenous rodent and transgenic human APP in brains of APP-transgenic animals. Here, we developed and characterized rat monoclonal antibodies by immunohistochemistry and Western blot that detect human but not murine APP in brains of three APP-transgenic mouse and one APP-transgenic rat model. We observed remarkable differences in expression levels and brain region-specific expression of human APP among the investigated transgenic mouse lines. This may explain the differences between APP-transgenic models mentioned above. Furthermore, we provide compelling evidence that our new antibodies specifically detect endogenous human APP in immunocytochemistry, FACS and immunoprecipitation. Hence, we propose these antibodies as standard tool for monitoring expression of endogenous or transfected APP in human cells and APP expression in transgenic animals. PMID:27470171

  14. Homology modeling of major intrinsic proteins in rice, maize and Arabidopsis: comparative analysis of transmembrane helix association and aromatic/arginine selectivity filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankararamakrishnan Ramasubbu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major intrinsic proteins (MIPs facilitate the transport of water and neutral solutes across the lipid bilayers. Plant MIPs are believed to be important in cell division and expansion and in water transport properties in response to environmental conditions. More than 30 MIP sequences have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, maize and rice. Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs, tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs, Nod26-like intrinsic protein (NIPs and small and basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs are subfamilies of plant MIPs. Despite sequence diversity, all the experimentally determined structures belonging to the MIP superfamily have the same "hour-glass" fold. Results We have structurally characterized 39 rice and 31 maize MIPs and compared them with that of Arabidopsis. Homology models of 105 MIPs from all three plant species were built. Structure-based sequence alignments were generated and the residues in the helix-helix interfaces were analyzed. Small residues (Gly/Ala/Ser/Thr are found to be highly conserved as a group in the helix-helix interface of MIP structures. Individual families sometimes prefer one or another of the residues from this group. The narrow aromatic/arginine (ar/R selectivity filter in MIPs has been shown to provide an important constriction for solute permeability. Ar/R regions were analyzed and compared between the three plant species. Seventeen TIP, NIP and SIP members from rice and maize have ar/R signatures that are not found in Arabidopsis. A subgroup of rice and maize NIPs has small residues in three of the four positions in the ar/R tetrad, resulting in a wider constriction. These MIP members could transport larger solute molecules. Conclusion Small residues are group-conserved in the helix-helix interface of MIP structures and they seem to be important for close helix-helix interactions. Such conservation might help to preserve the hour-glass fold in MIP structures. Analysis and

  15. A study on associations between antiprothrombin antibodies, antiplasminogen antibodies and thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmelink, MJA; De Groot, PG; Derksen, RHWM

    2003-01-01

    Anti-prothrombin antibodies area frequent cause of lupus anticoagulant (LAC), a thrombotic risk factor. Prothrombin shares structural homology with plasminogen, a kringle protein with an important role in fibrinolysis. Cross-reactivity between antiprothrombin antibodies and plasminogen has been desc

  16. Protective role of antimannan and anti-aspartyl proteinase antibodies in an experimental model of Candida albicans vaginitis in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    De Bernardis, F.; Boccanera, M; Adriani, D; Spreghini, E; G. Santoni; Cassone, A.

    1997-01-01

    The role of antibodies (Abs) in the resistance to vaginal infection by Candida albicans was investigated by using a rat vaginitis model. Animals receiving antimannoprotein (anti-MP) and anti-aspartyl proteinase (Sap) Ab-containing vaginal fluids from rats clearing a primary C. albicans infection showed a highly significant level of protection against vaginitis compared to animals given Ab-free vaginal fluid from noninfected rats. Preabsorption of the Ab-containing fluids with either one or bo...

  17. Accumulation and toxicity of antibody-targeted doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles in ovarian cancer cell spheroid model

    OpenAIRE

    Perche, Federico; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the evaluation of doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles targeting using an ovarian cancer cell spheroid model. Most ovarian cancer patients present at an advanced clinical stage and develop resistance to standard of care platinum/taxane therapy. Doxorubicin is also approved for ovarian cancer but had limited benefits in refractory patients. In this study, we used drug-resistant spheroid cultures of ovarian carcinoma to evaluate the uptake and cytotoxicity of an antibody-targeted doxo...

  18. CD28嵌合抗体及与抗原分子的3D空间结构模建%Construction of 3D model of CD28 chimeric antibody with its antigen docked

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程钢; 秦媛媛; 程迪; 陈曦; 张学光; 邱玉华

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To construct a 3D model of the chimeric antibodies (AntiCD28: ch-2F5) with corresponding antigen molecuie docked to theoretically verify the rationality of the binding of antibody with its antigen and to provide a method of 3D identification between antigen and antibody and spatial structure analysis. METHODS; We analyzed the sequence by submitting it to http://www. ncbi. nlm. nih. gov/ and made a comparison using integratly the 3 databases of Gen-Bank, Protein data bank and GENO-3D. The 3D model was constructed by Swiss-model homology modeling server and molecular docking online was performed by GRAMM-X Protein Docking Web Server. Chimeric heavy chain, light chain, heavy-light chain complex, heavy-light chain and antigen complex were displayed and photographed by the Chimera Software. Meanwhile, the spatial structures of heavy, light chains, variable region, constant region, CDR and frame area were marked by different colours respectively to exhibit the 3D structure on every side. RESULTS: The 3D structure of the heavy-light chain and antigen complex we constructed was consistent well with the theory of antigen binding to antibody molecules. CONCLUSON; The structure of the chimeric antibody we constructed with the bioinformatic method was in accordance with the general structure of antibody, and its antigen binding site was also consistent with the molecular theory. Thus, the model helps to analyze the 3D structure of antibody and antigen-antibody interaction.%目的:对1株嵌合抗体(antiCD28:ch-2F5)进行3D建模,并与其抗原分子进行对接,验证是否与抗原抗体结合理论相符,并提供一种抗原抗体及其识别的空间结构分析方法.方法:在http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov网站提交序列进行分析,综合运用GenBank、Protein data bank、GENO-3D等数据库比对分析,用Swiss-model同源建模服务器模建,运用GRAMM-X Protein Docking Web Server在线进行对接,结果采用Chimera软件对嵌合抗体的重、轻链、

  19. Interactions between HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies and Model Lipid Membranes imaged with AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauscher, Stefan; Hardy, Gregory; Alam, Munir; Shapter, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Lipid membrane interactions with rare, broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), 2F5 and 4E10, play a critical role in HIV-1 neutralization. Our research is motivated by recent immunization studies that have shown that induction of antibodies that avidly bind the gp41-MPER antigen is not sufficient for neutralization. Rather, it is required that antigen designs induce polyreactive antibodies that recognize MPER antigens as well as the viral lipid membrane. However, the mechanistic details of how membrane properties influence NAb-lipid and NAb-antigen interactions remain unknown. Furthermore, it is well established that the native viral membrane is heterogeneous, representing a mosaic of lipid rafts and protein clustering. However, the size, physical properties, and dynamics of these regions are poorly characterized and their potential roles in HIV-1 neutralization are also unknown. To understand how membrane properties contribute to 2F5/4E10 membrane interactions, we have engineered biomimetic supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and use atomic force microscopy to visualize membrane domains, antigen clustering, and antibody-membrane interactions at sub-nanometer z-resolution. Our results show that localized binding of HIV-1 antigens and NAbs occur preferentially with the most fluid membrane domain. This supports the theory that NAbs may interact with regions of low lateral lipid forces that allow antibody insertion into the bilayer.

  20. Mod two homology and cohomology

    CERN Document Server

    Hausmann, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Cohomology and homology modulo 2 helps the reader grasp more readily the basics of a major tool in algebraic topology. Compared to a more general approach to (co)homology this refreshing approach has many pedagogical advantages: It leads more quickly to the essentials of the subject, An absence of signs and orientation considerations simplifies the theory, Computations and advanced applications can be presented at an earlier stage, Simple geometrical interpretations of (co)chains. Mod 2 (co)homology was developed in the first quarter of the twentieth century as an alternative to integral homology, before both became particular cases of (co)homology with arbitrary coefficients. The first chapters of this book may serve as a basis for a graduate-level introductory course to (co)homology. Simplicial and singular mod 2 (co)homology are introduced, with their products and Steenrod squares, as well as equivariant cohomology. Classical applications include Brouwer's fixed point theorem, Poincaré duality, Borsuk-Ula...

  1. Human IgG1 Cγ1 Domain Is Crucial for the Bioactivity of the Engineered Anti-CD20 Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shusheng Geng; Jiannan Feng; Yan Li; Xianjiang Kang; Yingxun Sun; Xin Gu; Ying Huang; Hong Chang; Beifen Shen

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we discussed the necessity of human IgG1 Cγ1 domain for recombinant antibody using computeraided homology modeling method and experimental studies. The heavy (VH) and light (VL) chain variable regions of 1-28, a murine IgM-type anti-CD20 mAb, were ligated by linker peptide (Gly4Ser)3 to form the single-chain Fv fragment (scFv). Then, the engineered antibody (LH1-3) was generated by fusing scFv with the entire IgG1 heavy constant regions. The 3-D structure of LH1-3 was modeled using computer-aided homology modeling method and the binding activity of LH1-3 was evaluated theoretically. Compared to the 3-D structure of the Fv fragment of the parent antibody, the conformation of the active pocket of LH1-3 was remained because of the rigid support of Cγ1.Further experimental results of flow cytometry showed that the engineered anti-CD20 antibody possessed specifically binding activity to CD20-expressing target cells. The anti-CD20 antibody fragments could also mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of human B-lymphoid cell lines. Our study highlights some interests and advantages of a methodology based on the homology modeling and analysis of molecular structural properties.

  2. Compositional Homology and Creative Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Tedesco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of homology is the most solid theoretical basis elaborated by the morphological thinking during its history. The enucleation of some general criteria for the interpretation of homology is today a fundamental tool for life sciences, and for restoring their own opening to the question of qualitative innovation that arose so powerfully in the original Darwinian project. The aim of this paper is to verify the possible uses of the concept of compositional homology in order to provide of an adequate understanding of the dynamics of creative thinking.

  3. Fivebranes and 3-manifold homology

    CERN Document Server

    Gukov, Sergei; Vafa, Cumrun

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by physical constructions of homological knot invariants, we study their analogs for closed 3-manifolds. We show that fivebrane compactifications provide a universal description of various old and new homological invariants of 3-manifolds. In terms of 3d/3d correspondence, such invariants are given by the Q-cohomology of the Hilbert space of partially topologically twisted 3d N=2 theory T[M_3] on a Riemann surface with defects. We demonstrate this by concrete and explicit calculations in the case of monopole/Heegaard Floer homology and a 3-manifold analog of Khovanov-Rozansky link homology. The latter gives a categorification of Chern-Simons partition function. Some of the new key elements include the explicit form of the S-transform and a novel connection between categorification and a previously mysterious role of Eichler integrals in Chern-Simons theory.

  4. A neutralizing human monoclonal antibody protects against lethal disease in a new ferret model of acute nipah virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine N Bossart

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus is a broadly tropic and highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus whose natural reservoirs are several species of Pteropus fruit bats. Nipah virus has repeatedly caused outbreaks over the past decade associated with a severe and often fatal disease in humans and animals. Here, a new ferret model of Nipah virus pathogenesis is described where both respiratory and neurological disease are present in infected animals. Severe disease occurs with viral doses as low as 500 TCID(50 within 6 to 10 days following infection. The underlying pathology seen in the ferret closely resembles that seen in Nipah virus infected humans, characterized as a widespread multisystemic vasculitis, with virus replicating in highly vascular tissues including lung, spleen and brain, with recoverable virus from a variety of tissues. Using this ferret model a cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, m102.4, targeting the henipavirus G glycoprotein was evaluated in vivo as a potential therapeutic agent. All ferrets that received m102.4 ten hours following a high dose oral-nasal Nipah virus challenge were protected from disease while all controls died. This study is the first successful post-exposure passive antibody therapy for Nipah virus using a human monoclonal antibody.

  5. Antibody response in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) immunized with a model antigen associated with different adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, T R; Di Domenico, J; Kirsten, K S; Nied, C O; Frandoloso, R; Kreutz, L C

    2016-07-25

    Adjuvants are essential to boost the immune response to inoculated antigen and play a central role in vaccine development. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of several adjuvants in the production of anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) antibodies in silver catfish. Two hundred and seventy juvenile silver catfish (60-80 g) of both sexes were intraperitoneally vaccinated with BSA (200 µg/fish) alone or mixed to the following adjuvants: Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA), Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), aluminum hydroxide (AlOH), Montanide, four types of cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) and three concentrations of β-glucan, and the immune enhancing property was evaluated by measuring anti-BSA antibodies in blood samples at biweekly intervals. Our results demonstrated that CpGs ODNs and β-glucan were as effective as classical adjuvants (FCA, FIA, AlOH and Montanide) in promoting anti-BSA antibodies and that the kinetics of antibody production induced by all adjuvants used in our study had a similar trend to that observed in other fish species, with a peak at 28 days post-vaccination. These results may be useful for the selection of adjuvants for vaccine formulation intended for silver catfish and for the development of vaccine and vaccination strategies to other fish species. PMID:27464022

  6. Bispecific antibodies for treatment of cancer in experimental animal models and man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Helfrich, Wijnand; Molema, Ingrid; de Leij, Lou

    1998-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a powerful anti-cancer treatment modality. However, despite numerous encouraging results obtained in pre-clinical studies, a definite breakthrough towards an established clinical treatment modality has as yet not occurred. Antibodies against tumor antigens have been shown to localis

  7. Parametric representation of centrifugal pump homologous curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veloso, Marcelo A.; Mattos, Joao R.L. de, E-mail: velosom@cdtn.br, E-mail: jrmattos@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Essential for any mathematical model designed to simulate flow transient events caused by pump operations is the pump performance data. The performance of a centrifugal pump is characterized by four basic quantities: the rotational speed, the volumetric flow rate, the dynamic head, and the hydraulic torque. The curves showing the relationships between these four variables are called the pump characteristic curves. The characteristic curves are empirically developed by the pump manufacturer and uniquely describe head and torque as functions of volumetric flow rate and rotation speed. Because of comprising a large amount of points, this configuration is not suitable for computational purposes. However, it can be converted to a simpler form by the development of the homologous curves, in which dynamic head and hydraulic torque ratios are expressed as functions of volumetric flow and rotation speed ratios. The numerical use of the complete set of homologous curves requires specification of sixteen partial curves, being eight for the dynamic head and eight for the hydraulic torque. As a consequence, the handling of homologous curves is still somewhat complicated. In solving flow transient problems that require the pump characteristic data for all the operation zones, the parametric form appears as the simplest way to deal with the homologous curves. In this approach, the complete characteristics of a pump can be described by only two closed curves, one for the dynamic head and other for the hydraulic torque, both in function of a single angular coordinate defined adequately in terms of the quotient between volumetric flow ratio and rotation speed ratio. The usefulness and advantages of this alternative method are demonstrated through a practical example in which the homologous curves for a pump of the type used in the main coolant loops of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) are transformed to the parametric form. (author)

  8. Recombineering Homologous Recombination Constructs in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Scoggin, Shane; Shalaby, Nevine A.; Williams, Nathan David; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Buszczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The continued development of techniques for fast, large-scale manipulation of endogenous gene loci will broaden the use of Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism for human-disease related research. Recent years have seen technical advancements like homologous recombination and recombineering. However, generating unequivocal null mutations or tagging endogenous proteins remains a substantial effort for most genes. Here, we describe and demonstrate techniques for using recombineeri...

  9. Integrin-blocking antibodies delay keratinocyte re-epithelialization in a human three-dimensional wound healing model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Egles

    Full Text Available The alpha6beta4 integrin plays a significant role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis through modulation of growth factor signaling, and is a potentially important therapeutic target. However, alpha6beta4-mediated cell-matrix adhesion is critical in normal keratinocyte attachment, signaling and anchorage to the basement membrane through its interaction with laminin-5, raising potential risks for targeted therapy. Bioengineered Human Skin Equivalent (HSE, which have been shown to mimic their normal and wounded counterparts, have been used here to investigate the consequences of targeting beta4 to establish toxic effects on normal tissue homeostasis and epithelial wound repair. We tested two antibodies directed to different beta4 epitopes, one adhesion-blocking (ASC-8 and one non-adhesion blocking (ASC-3, and determined that these antibodies were appropriately localized to the basal surface of keratinocytes at the basement membrane interface where beta4 is expressed. While normal tissue architecture was not altered, ASC-8 induced a sub-basal split at the basement membrane in non-wounded tissue. In addition, wound closure was significantly inhibited by ASC-8, but not by ASC-3, as the epithelial tongue only covered 40 percent of the wound area at 120 hours post-wounding. These results demonstrate beta4 adhesion-blocking antibodies may have adverse effects on normal tissue, whereas antibodies directed to other epitopes may provide safer alternatives for therapy. Taken together, we conclude that these three-dimensional tissue models provide a biologically relevant platform to identify toxic effects induced by candidate therapeutics, which will allow generation of findings that are more predictive of in vivo responses early in the drug development process.

  10. Passive immunization with phospho-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology and functional deficits in two distinct mouse tauopathy models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethu Sankaranarayanan

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, an extensive accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles, along with neuronal loss, is evident in distinct brain regions. Staging of tau pathology by postmortem analysis of AD subjects suggests a sequence of initiation and subsequent spread of neurofibrillary tau tangles along defined brain anatomical pathways. Further, the severity of cognitive deficits correlates with the degree and extent of tau pathology. In this study, we demonstrate that phospho-tau (p-tau antibodies, PHF6 and PHF13, can prevent the induction of tau pathology in primary neuron cultures. The impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation and spread of tau pathology, as well as functional deficits, was subsequently evaluated with these antibodies in two distinct transgenic mouse tauopathy models. The rTg4510 transgenic mouse is characterized by inducible over-expression of P301L mutant tau, and exhibits robust age-dependent brain tau pathology. Systemic treatment with PHF6 and PHF13 from 3 to 6 months of age led to a significant decline in brain and CSF p-tau levels. In a second model, injection of preformed tau fibrils (PFFs comprised of recombinant tau protein encompassing the microtubule-repeat domains into the cortex and hippocampus of young P301S mutant tau over-expressing mice (PS19 led to robust tau pathology on the ipsilateral side with evidence of spread to distant sites, including the contralateral hippocampus and bilateral entorhinal cortex 4 weeks post-injection. Systemic treatment with PHF13 led to a significant decline in the spread of tau pathology in this model. The reduction in tau species after p-tau antibody treatment was associated with an improvement in novel-object recognition memory test in both models. These studies provide evidence supporting the use of tau immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for AD and other tauopathies.

  11. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV. RESULTS: Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  12. Localization theorems in topological Hochschild homology and topological cyclic homology

    CERN Document Server

    Blumberg, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    We construct localization cofiber sequences for the topological Hochschild homology (THH) and topological cyclic homology (TC) of spectral categories. Using a ``global'' construction of the THH and TC of a scheme in terms of the perfect complexes in a spectrally enriched version of the category of unbounded complexes, the sequences specialize to localization cofiber sequences associated to the inclusion of an open subscheme. These are the targets of the cyclotomic trace from the localization sequence of Thomason-Trobaugh in K-theory. We also deduce a version of Thomason's blow-up formula for THH and TC.

  13. Length-independent structural similarities enrich the antibody CDR canonical class model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jaroslaw; Baker, Terry; Georges, Guy; Kelm, Sebastian; Klostermann, Stefan; Shi, Jiye; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) are antibody loops that make up the antigen binding site. Here, we show that all CDR types have structurally similar loops of different lengths. Based on these findings, we created length-independent canonical classes for the non-H3 CDRs. Our length variable structural clusters show strong sequence patterns suggesting either that they evolved from the same original structure or result from some form of convergence. We find that our length-independent method not only clusters a larger number of CDRs, but also predicts canonical class from sequence better than the standard length-dependent approach. To demonstrate the usefulness of our findings, we predicted cluster membership of CDR-L3 sequences from 3 next-generation sequencing datasets of the antibody repertoire (over 1,000,000 sequences). Using the length-independent clusters, we can structurally classify an additional 135,000 sequences, which represents a ∼20% improvement over the standard approach. This suggests that our length-independent canonical classes might be a highly prevalent feature of antibody space, and could substantially improve our ability to accurately predict the structure of novel CDRs identified by next-generation sequencing. PMID:26963563

  14. An in vitro model of antibody-enhanced killing of the intracellular parasite Leishmania amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine N Gibson-Corley

    Full Text Available Footpad infection of C3HeB/FeJ mice with Leishmania amazonensis leads to chronic lesions accompanied by large parasite loads. Co-infecting these animals with L. major leads to induction of an effective Th1 immune response that can resolve these lesions. This cross-protection can be recapitulated in vitro by using immune cells from L. major-infected animals to effectively activate L. amazonensis-infected macrophages to kill the parasite. We have shown previously that the B cell population and their IgG2a antibodies are required for effective cross-protection. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to L. major, killing L. amazonensis parasites is dependent upon FcRγ common-chain and NADPH oxidase-generated superoxide from infected macrophages. Superoxide production coincided with killing of L. amazonensis at five days post-activation, suggesting that opsonization of the parasites was not a likely mechanism of the antibody response. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that non-specific immune complexes could provide a mechanism of FcRγ common-chain/NADPH oxidase dependent parasite killing. Macrophage activation in response to soluble IgG2a immune complexes, IFN-γ and parasite antigen was effective in significantly reducing the percentage of macrophages infected with L. amazonensis. These results define a host protection mechanism effective during Leishmania infection and demonstrate for the first time a novel means by which IgG antibodies can enhance killing of an intracellular pathogen.

  15. Metagenomic gene annotation by a homology-independent approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, Jeff; Zhang, Tao; Salmeen, Annette; Hess, Matthias; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Wang, Zhong; Du, Changbin

    2011-06-02

    Fully understanding the genetic potential of a microbial community requires functional annotation of all the genes it encodes. The recently developed deep metagenome sequencing approach has enabled rapid identification of millions of genes from a complex microbial community without cultivation. Current homology-based gene annotation fails to detect distantly-related or structural homologs. Furthermore, homology searches with millions of genes are very computational intensive. To overcome these limitations, we developed rhModeller, a homology-independent software pipeline to efficiently annotate genes from metagenomic sequencing projects. Using cellulases and carbonic anhydrases as two independent test cases, we demonstrated that rhModeller is much faster than HMMER but with comparable accuracy, at 94.5percent and 99.9percent accuracy, respectively. More importantly, rhModeller has the ability to detect novel proteins that do not share significant homology to any known protein families. As {approx}50percent of the 2 million genes derived from the cow rumen metagenome failed to be annotated based on sequence homology, we tested whether rhModeller could be used to annotate these genes. Preliminary results suggest that rhModeller is robust in the presence of missense and frameshift mutations, two common errors in metagenomic genes. Applying the pipeline to the cow rumen genes identified 4,990 novel cellulases candidates and 8,196 novel carbonic anhydrase candidates.In summary, we expect rhModeller to dramatically increase the speed and quality of metagnomic gene annotation.

  16. A PHF8 homolog in C. elegans promotes DNA repair via homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Lee

    Full Text Available PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, defects in which are associated with X-linked mental retardation. In this study, we examined the roles of two PHF8 homologs, JMJD-1.1 and JMJD-1.2, in the model organism C. elegans in response to DNA damage. A deletion mutation in either of the genes led to hypersensitivity to interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs, while only mutation of jmjd-1.1 resulted in hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs. In response to ICLs, JMJD-1.1 did not affect the focus formation of FCD-2, a homolog of FANCD2, a key protein in the Fanconi anemia pathway. However, the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 was affected by the mutation: the accumulations of both proteins at ICLs appeared normal, but their subsequent disappearance was retarded, suggesting that later steps of homologous recombination were defective. Similar changes in the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 were seen in response to DSBs, supporting a role of JMJD-1.1 in homologous recombination. Such a role was also supported by our finding that the hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was rescued by knockdown of lig-4, a homolog of Ligase 4 active in nonhomologous end-joining. The hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was increased by rad-54 knockdown, suggesting that JMJD-1.1 acts in parallel with RAD-54 in modulating chromatin structure. Indeed, the level of histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation, a marker of heterochromatin, was higher in jmjd-1.1 cells than in wild-type cells. We conclude that the histone demethylase JMJD-1.1 influences homologous recombination either by relaxing heterochromatin structure or by indirectly regulating the expression of multiple genes affecting DNA repair.

  17. Pre- and postexposure efficacy of fully human antibodies against Spike protein in a novel humanized mouse model of MERS-CoV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Kristen E; Coleman, Christopher M; Mujica, Alejandro O; Kamat, Vishal; Badithe, Ashok; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Hunt, Charleen; Strein, John; Berrebi, Alexander; Sisk, Jeanne M; Matthews, Krystal L; Babb, Robert; Chen, Gang; Lai, Ka-Man V; Huang, Tammy T; Olson, William; Yancopoulos, George D; Stahl, Neil; Frieman, Matthew B; Kyratsous, Christos A

    2015-07-14

    Traditional approaches to antimicrobial drug development are poorly suited to combatting the emergence of novel pathogens. Additionally, the lack of small animal models for these infections hinders the in vivo testing of potential therapeutics. Here we demonstrate the use of the VelocImmune technology (a mouse that expresses human antibody-variable heavy chains and κ light chains) alongside the VelociGene technology (which allows for rapid engineering of the mouse genome) to quickly develop and evaluate antibodies against an emerging viral disease. Specifically, we show the rapid generation of fully human neutralizing antibodies against the recently emerged Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and development of a humanized mouse model for MERS-CoV infection, which was used to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of the isolated antibodies. The VelocImmune and VelociGene technologies are powerful platforms that can be used to rapidly respond to emerging epidemics. PMID:26124093

  18. Simulation of homology models for the extracellular domains (ECD) of ErbB3, ErbB4 and the ErbB2-ErbB3 complex in their active conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Gonzalez, Juan Felipe; Ramos, Javier; Cruz, Victor L; Martínez-Salazar, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are associated with a number of biological processes and are becoming increasingly recognized as important therapeutic targets against cancer. In this work, we provide models based on homology for the extracellular domains (ECD) of ErbB3 and ErbB4 in their active conformations, including a Heregulin ligand, followed by further refinement of the models by molecular dynamics simulations at atomistic scale. We compare the results with a model built for ErbB2 based on crystallographic information and analyze the common features observed among members of the family, namely, the periscope movement of the dimerization arm and the hinge displacement of domain IV. Finally, we refine a model for the interaction of the ECDs corresponding to a ErbB2-ErbB3 heterodimer, which is widely recognized to have a high impact in cancer development.

  19. Generation of a panel of antibodies against proteins encoded on human chromosome 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiseman Frances K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS is caused by trisomy of all or part of chromosome 21. To further understanding of DS we are working with a mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries most of human chromosome 21 in addition to the normal mouse chromosome complement. This mouse is a model for human DS and recapitulates many of the features of the human syndrome such as specific heart defects, and cerebellar neuronal loss. The Tc1 mouse is mosaic for the human chromosome such that not all cells in the model carry it. Thus to help our investigations we aimed to develop a method to identify cells that carry human chromosome 21 in the Tc1 mouse. To this end, we have generated a panel of antibodies raised against proteins encoded by genes on human chromosome 21 that are known to be expressed in the adult brain of Tc1 mice Results We attempted to generate human specific antibodies against proteins encoded by human chromosome 21. We selected proteins that are expressed in the adult brain of Tc1 mice and contain regions of moderate/low homology with the mouse ortholog. We produced antibodies to seven human chromosome 21 encoded proteins. Of these, we successfully generated three antibodies that preferentially recognise human compared with mouse SOD1 and RRP1 proteins on western blots. However, these antibodies did not specifically label cells which carry a freely segregating copy of Hsa21 in the brains of our Tc1 mouse model of DS. Conclusions Although we have successfully isolated new antibodies to SOD1 and RRP1 for use on western blots, in our hands these antibodies have not been successfully used for immunohistochemistry studies. These antibodies are freely available to other researchers. Our data high-light the technical difficulty of producing species-specific antibodies for both western blotting and immunohistochemistry.

  20. Enhanced Innate Inflammation Induced by Anti-BTLA Antibody in Dual Insult Model of Hemorrhagic Shock/Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tingting; Bai, Jianwen; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Chen, Yaping; Biron, Bethany M; Ayala, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis following hemorrhagic shock is a common clinical condition, in which innate immune system suffers from severe suppression. B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) is an immune-regulatory coinhibitory receptor expressed not only on adaptive, but also on innate immune cells. Our previous data showed that BTLA gene deficient mice were protected from septic mortality when compared with wild-type control C57BL/6 mice. Here, we extended our study by treating C57BL/6 mice with an anti-BTLA monoclonal antibody (clone 6A6; reported to have the ability to neutralize or agonize/potentiate BTLA signaling) in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock (Hem) followed by sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP); positing initially that if BTLA engagement was neutralized, like gene deficiency, an anti-BTLA mAb would have the similar effects on the inflammatory response/morbidity in these mice after such insults. Here, we report that BTLA expression is elevated on innate immune cells after Hem/CLP. However, anti-BTLA antibody treatment increased cytokine (TNF-α, IL-12, IL-10)/chemokine (KC, MIP-2, MCP-1) levels and inflammatory cells (neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells) recruitment in the peritoneal cavity, which in turn aggravated organ injury and elevated these animals' mortality in Hem/CLP. When compared with the protective effects of our previous study using BTLA gene deficient mice in a model of lethal septic challenge, we further confirmed BTLA's contribution to enhanced innate cell recruitment, elevated IL-10 levels, and reduced survival, and that engagement of antibody with BTLA potentiates/exacerbates the pathophysiology in Hem/sepsis.

  1. Antibodies targeted to the brain with image-guided focused ultrasound reduces amyloid-beta plaque load in the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica F Jordão

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD relies on antibodies directed against toxic amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta, which circulate in the bloodstream and remove Abeta from the brain. In mouse models of AD, the administration of anti-Abeta antibodies directly into the brain, in comparison to the bloodstream, was shown to be more efficient at reducing Abeta plaque pathology. Therefore, delivering anti-Abeta antibodies to the brain of AD patients may also improve treatment efficiency. Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS is known to transiently-enhance the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, allowing intravenously administered therapeutics to enter the brain. Our goal was to establish that anti-Abeta antibodies delivered to the brain using magnetic resonance imaging-guided FUS (MRIgFUS can reduce plaque pathology. To test this, TgCRND8 mice received intravenous injections of MRI and FUS contrast agents, as well as anti-Abeta antibody, BAM-10. MRIgFUS was then applied transcranially. Within minutes, the MRI contrast agent entered the brain, and BAM-10 was later found bound to Abeta plaques in targeted cortical areas. Four days post-treatment, Abeta pathology was significantly reduced in TgCRND8 mice. In conclusion, this is the first report to demonstrate that MRIgFUS delivery of anti-Abeta antibodies provides the combined advantages of using a low dose of antibody and rapidly reducing plaque pathology.

  2. Homology group on manifolds and their foldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abu-Saleem

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce the definition of the induced unfolding on the homology group. Some types of conditional foldings restricted on the elements of the homology groups are deduced. The effect of retraction on the homology group of a manifold is dicussed. The unfolding of variation curvature of manifolds on their homology group are represented. The relations between homology group of the manifold and its folding are deduced.

  3. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  4. Grid diagrams and Khovanov homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droz, Jean-Marie; Wagner, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    We explain how to compute the Jones polynomial of a link from one of its grid diagrams and we observe a connection between Bigelow’s homological definition of the Jones polynomial and Kauffman’s definition of the Jones polynomial. Consequently, we prove that the Maslov grading on the Seidel–Smith...

  5. Cocoa Diet Prevents Antibody Synthesis and Modifies Lymph Node Composition and Functionality in a Rat Oral Sensitization Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Bossacoma, Mariona; Abril-Gil, Mar; Saldaña-Ruiz, Sandra; Franch, Àngels; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castell, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Cocoa powder, a rich source of polyphenols, has shown immunomodulatory properties in both the intestinal and systemic immune compartments of rats. The aim of the current study was to establish the effect of a cocoa diet in a rat oral sensitization model and also to gain insight into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) activities induced by this diet. To achieve this, three-week-old Lewis rats were fed either a standard diet or a diet with 10% cocoa and were orally sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) and with cholera toxin as a mucosal adjuvant. Specific antibodies were quantified, and lymphocyte composition, gene expression, and cytokine release were established in MLN. The development of anti-OVA antibodies was almost totally prevented in cocoa-fed rats. In addition, this diet increased the proportion of TCRγδ+ and CD103+CD8+ cells and decreased the proportion of CD62L+CD4+ and CD62L+CD8+ cells in MLN, whereas it upregulated the gene expression of OX40L, CD11c, and IL-1β and downregulated the gene expression of IL-17α. In conclusion, the cocoa diet induced tolerance in an oral sensitization model accompanied by changes in MLN that could contribute to this effect, suggesting its potential implication in the prevention of food allergies. PMID:27120615

  6. Early diagnosis of systemic lupus erythmatosus using ANN models of dsDNA binding antibody sequence data

    OpenAIRE

    Bahari, Mohamad Hasan; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Azemi, Asad; Mirsalehi, Mir Mojtaba; Khademi, Morteza

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a new method based on artificial neural networks (ANN), is introduced for identifying pathogenic antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythmatosus (SLE). dsDNA binding antibodies have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. In order to identify these dsDNA binding antibodies, the protein sequences of 42 dsDNA binding and 608 non-dsDNA binding antibodies were extracted from Kabat database and encoded using a physicochemical property of their amino acids namely Hyd...

  7. A Bivariate Mixture Model for Natural Antibody Levels to Human Papillomavirus Types 16 and 18: Baseline Estimates for Monitoring the Herd Effects of Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Margaretha A; Berkhof, Johannes; van de Kassteele, Jan; van Boven, Michiel; Bogaards, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Post-vaccine monitoring programs for human papillomavirus (HPV) have been introduced in many countries, but HPV serology is still an underutilized tool, partly owing to the weak antibody response to HPV infection. Changes in antibody levels among non-vaccinated individuals could be employed to monitor herd effects of immunization against HPV vaccine types 16 and 18, but inference requires an appropriate statistical model. The authors developed a four-component bivariate mixture model for jointly estimating vaccine-type seroprevalence from correlated antibody responses against HPV16 and -18 infections. This model takes account of the correlation between HPV16 and -18 antibody concentrations within subjects, caused e.g. by heterogeneity in exposure level and immune response. The model was fitted to HPV16 and -18 antibody concentrations as measured by a multiplex immunoassay in a large serological survey (3,875 females) carried out in the Netherlands in 2006/2007, before the introduction of mass immunization. Parameters were estimated by Bayesian analysis. We used the deviance information criterion for model selection; performance of the preferred model was assessed through simulation. Our analysis uncovered elevated antibody concentrations in doubly as compared to singly seropositive individuals, and a strong clustering of HPV16 and -18 seropositivity, particularly around the age of sexual debut. The bivariate model resulted in a more reliable classification of singly and doubly seropositive individuals than achieved by a combination of two univariate models, and suggested a higher pre-vaccine HPV16 seroprevalence than previously estimated. The bivariate mixture model provides valuable baseline estimates of vaccine-type seroprevalence and may prove useful in seroepidemiologic assessment of the herd effects of HPV vaccination. PMID:27537200

  8. A Bivariate Mixture Model for Natural Antibody Levels to Human Papillomavirus Types 16 and 18: Baseline Estimates for Monitoring the Herd Effects of Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Margaretha A.; Berkhof, Johannes; van de Kassteele, Jan; van Boven, Michiel; Bogaards, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    Post-vaccine monitoring programs for human papillomavirus (HPV) have been introduced in many countries, but HPV serology is still an underutilized tool, partly owing to the weak antibody response to HPV infection. Changes in antibody levels among non-vaccinated individuals could be employed to monitor herd effects of immunization against HPV vaccine types 16 and 18, but inference requires an appropriate statistical model. The authors developed a four-component bivariate mixture model for jointly estimating vaccine-type seroprevalence from correlated antibody responses against HPV16 and -18 infections. This model takes account of the correlation between HPV16 and -18 antibody concentrations within subjects, caused e.g. by heterogeneity in exposure level and immune response. The model was fitted to HPV16 and -18 antibody concentrations as measured by a multiplex immunoassay in a large serological survey (3,875 females) carried out in the Netherlands in 2006/2007, before the introduction of mass immunization. Parameters were estimated by Bayesian analysis. We used the deviance information criterion for model selection; performance of the preferred model was assessed through simulation. Our analysis uncovered elevated antibody concentrations in doubly as compared to singly seropositive individuals, and a strong clustering of HPV16 and -18 seropositivity, particularly around the age of sexual debut. The bivariate model resulted in a more reliable classification of singly and doubly seropositive individuals than achieved by a combination of two univariate models, and suggested a higher pre-vaccine HPV16 seroprevalence than previously estimated. The bivariate mixture model provides valuable baseline estimates of vaccine-type seroprevalence and may prove useful in seroepidemiologic assessment of the herd effects of HPV vaccination. PMID:27537200

  9. Comparison of mHTT Antibodies in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models Reveal Specific Binding Profiles and Steady-State Ubiquitin Levels with Disease Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Jones, Lesley; Dunnett, Stephen B; Brooks, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) cellular pathology is characterised by the aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein into inclusion bodies. The present paper compared the sensitivity of five widely used mHTT antibodies (S830; MW8; EM48; 1C2; ubiquitin) against mice from five commonly used HD mouse models (R6/1; YAC128; HdhQ92; B6 HdhQ150; B6 x129/Ola HdhQ150) at two ages to determine: the most sensitive antibodies for each model; whether mHTT antibody binding differed depending on aggregation stage (diffuse versus frank inclusion); the role of ubiquitin during aggregation as the ubiquitin proteosome system has been implicated in disease development. The models demonstrated unique profiles of antibody binding even when the models varied only by background strain (HdhQ150). MW8 was highly sensitive for detecting frank inclusions in all lines whereas EM48, ubiquitin and 1C2 demonstrated consistent staining in all models irrespective of age or form of mHTT. MW8 and S830 were the most sensitive antibodies with 1C2 the least. Ubiquitin levels were stable for each model regardless of age. Ubiquitin was particularly sensitive in young YAC128 mice that demonstrate an absence of inclusions until ~12 months of age suggesting high affinity to mHTT in its diffuse form. The data indicate that generalisations across models regarding the quantification of aggregations may not be valid and that mHTT antibody binding is unique to the mouse model and sensitive to changes in inclusion development. PMID:27196694

  10. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  11. Modeling the dynamics and migratory pathways of virus-specific antibody-secreting cell populations in primary influenza infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Miao

    Full Text Available The B cell response to influenza infection of the respiratory tract contributes to viral clearance and establishes profound resistance to reinfection by related viruses. Numerous studies have measured virus-specific antibody-secreting cell (ASC frequencies in different anatomical compartments after influenza infection and provided a general picture of the kinetics of ASC formation and dispersion. However, the dynamics of ASC populations are difficult to determine experimentally and have received little attention. Here, we applied mathematical modeling to investigate the dynamics of ASC growth, death, and migration over the 2-week period following primary influenza infection in mice. Experimental data for model fitting came from high frequency measurements of virus-specific IgM, IgG, and IgA ASCs in the mediastinal lymph node (MLN, spleen, and lung. Model construction was based on a set of assumptions about ASC gain and loss from the sampled sites, and also on the directionality of ASC trafficking pathways. Most notably, modeling results suggest that differences in ASC fate and trafficking patterns reflect the site of formation and the expressed antibody class. Essentially all early IgA ASCs in the MLN migrated to spleen or lung, whereas cell death was likely the major reason for IgM and IgG ASC loss from the MLN. In contrast, the spleen contributed most of the IgM and IgG ASCs that migrated to the lung, but essentially none of the IgA ASCs. This finding points to a critical role for regional lymph nodes such as the MLN in the rapid generation of IgA ASCs that seed the lung. Results for the MLN also suggest that ASC death is a significant early feature of the B cell response. Overall, our analysis is consistent with accepted concepts in many regards, but it also indicates novel features of the B cell response to influenza that warrant further investigation.

  12. Modeling of cell culture damage and recovery leads to increased antibody and biomass productivity in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Saeideh; Nikdel, Ali; Meshram, Mukesh; McConkey, Brendan; Ingalls, Brian; Budman, Hector; Scharer, Jeno

    2014-09-01

    The development of an efficient and productive cell-culture process requires a deep understanding of intracellular mechanisms and extracellular conditions for optimal product synthesis. Mathematical modeling provides an effective strategy to predict, control, and optimize cell performance under a range of culture conditions. In this study, a mathematical model is proposed for the investigation of cell damage of a Chinese hamster ovary cell culture secreting recombinant anti-RhD monoclonal antibody (mAb). Irreversible cell damage was found to be correlated with a reduction in pH. This irreversible damage to cellular function is described mathematically by a Tessier-based model, in which the actively growing fraction of cells is dependent on an intracellular metabolic product acting as a growth inhibitor. To further verify the model, an offline model-based optimization of mAb production in the cell culture was carried out, with the goal of minimizing cell damage and thereby enhancing productivity through intermittent refreshment of the culture medium. An experimental implementation of this model-based strategy resulted in a doubling of the yield as compared to the batch operation and the resulting biomass and productivity profiles agreed with the model predictions.

  13. Accumulation and toxicity of antibody-targeted doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles in ovarian cancer cell spheroid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche, Federico; Patel, Niravkumar R; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-11-28

    We describe the evaluation of doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles targeting using an ovarian cancer cell spheroid model. Most ovarian cancer patients present at an advanced clinical stage and develop resistance to standard of care platinum/taxane therapy. Doxorubicin is also approved for ovarian cancer but had limited benefits in refractory patients. In this study, we used drug-resistant spheroid cultures of ovarian carcinoma to evaluate the uptake and cytotoxicity of an antibody-targeted doxorubicin formulation. Doxorubicin was encapsulated in polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugated micelles. The doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles (MDOX) were further decorated with a cancer cell-specific monoclonal 2C5 antibody to obtain doxorubicin-loaded immunomicelles (2C5-MDOX). Targeting and resulting toxicity of doxorubicin-loaded PEG-PE micelles were evaluated in three dimensional cancer cell spheroids. Superior accumulation of 2C5-MDOX compared to free doxorubicin or untargeted MDOX in spheroids was evidenced both by flow cytometry, fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Interestingly, even higher toxicity was measured by lactate dehydrogenase release and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling of targeted doxorubicin micelles in Bcl-2 overexpressing adriamycin-resistant spheroids. Overall, these results support use of spheroids to evaluate tumor targeted drug delivery. PMID:22974689

  14. Sutured Floer homology and hypergraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Juhász, András; Rasmussen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    By applying Seifert's algorithm to a special alternating diagram of a link L, one obtains a Seifert surface F of L. We show that the support of the sutured Floer homology of the sutured manifold complementary to F is affine isomorphic to the set of lattice points given as hypertrees in a certain hypergraph that is naturally associated to the diagram. This implies that the Floer groups in question are supported in a set of Spin^c structures that are the integer lattice points of a convex polytope. This property has an immediate extension to Seifert surfaces arising from homogeneous link diagrams (including all alternating and positive diagrams). In another direction, together with work in progress of the second author and others, our correspondence suggests a method for computing the "top" coefficients of the HOMFLY polynomial of a special alternating link from the sutured Floer homology of a Seifert surface complement for a certain dual link.

  15. Representation theory and homological stability

    CERN Document Server

    Church, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the idea of *representation stability* (and several variations) for a sequence of representations V_n of groups G_n. One main goal is to expand the important and well-studied concept of homological stability so that it applies to a much broader variety of examples. Representation stability also provides a framework in which to find and to predict patterns, from classical representation theory (Littlewood--Richardson and Murnaghan rules, stability of Schur functors), to cohomology of groups (pure braid, Torelli and congruence groups), to Lie algebras and their homology, to the (equivariant) cohomology of flag and Schubert varieties, to combinatorics (the (n+1)^(n-1) conjecture). The majority of this paper is devoted to exposing this phenomenon through examples. In doing this we obtain applications, theorems, and conjectures. Beyond the discovery of new phenomena, the viewpoint of representation stability can be useful in solving problems outside the theory. In addition to the applications given in...

  16. Persistent Homology of Collaboration Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Carstens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, network science has introduced several statistical measures to determine the topological structure of large networks. Initially, the focus was on binary networks, where edges are either present or not. Thus, many of the earlier measures can only be applied to binary networks and not to weighted networks. More recently, it has been shown that weighted networks have a rich structure, and several generalized measures have been introduced. We use persistent homology, a recent technique from computational topology, to analyse four weighted collaboration networks. We include the first and second Betti numbers for the first time for this type of analysis. We show that persistent homology corresponds to tangible features of the networks. Furthermore, we use it to distinguish the collaboration networks from similar random networks.

  17. Optical imaging of disseminated leukemia models in mice with near-infrared probe conjugated to a monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Pesnel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The assessment of anticancer agents to treat leukemia needs to have animal models closer to the human pathology such as implantation in immunodeficient mice of leukemic cells from patient samples. A sensitive and early detection of tumor cells in these orthotopic models is a prerequisite for monitoring engraftment of leukemic cells and their dissemination in mice. Therefore, we developed a fluorescent antibody based strategy to detect leukemic foci in mice bearing patient-derived leukemic cells using fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI to determine when to start treatments with novel antitumor agents. METHODS: Two mAbs against the CD44 human myeloid marker or the CD45 human leukocyte marker were labeled with Alexa Fluor 750 and administered to leukemia-bearing mice after having verified the immunoreactivity in vitro. Bioluminescent leukemic cells (HL60-Luc were used to compare the colocalization of the fluorescent mAb with these cells. The impact of the labeled antibodies on disease progression was further determined. Finally, the fluorescent hCD45 mAb was tested in mice engrafted with human leukemic cells. RESULTS: The probe labeling did not modify the immunoreactivity of the mAbs. There was a satisfactory correlation between bioluminescence imaging (BLI and FRI and low doses of mAb were sufficient to detect leukemic foci. However, anti-hCD44 mAb had a strong impact on the tumor proliferation contrary to anti-hCD45 mAb. The use of anti-hCD45 mAb allowed the detection of leukemic patient cells engrafted onto NOD/SCID mice. CONCLUSIONS: A mAb labeled with a near infrared fluorochrome is useful to detect leukemic foci in disseminated models provided that its potential impact on tumor proliferation has been thoroughly documented.

  18. Optical Imaging of Disseminated Leukemia Models in Mice with Near-Infrared Probe Conjugated to a Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnel, Sabrina; Pillon, Arnaud; Créancier, Laurent; Lerondel, Stéphanie; Le Pape, Alain; Recher, Christian; Demur, Cécile; Guilbaud, Nicolas; Kruczynski, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Background The assessment of anticancer agents to treat leukemia needs to have animal models closer to the human pathology such as implantation in immunodeficient mice of leukemic cells from patient samples. A sensitive and early detection of tumor cells in these orthotopic models is a prerequisite for monitoring engraftment of leukemic cells and their dissemination in mice. Therefore, we developed a fluorescent antibody based strategy to detect leukemic foci in mice bearing patient-derived leukemic cells using fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) to determine when to start treatments with novel antitumor agents. Methods Two mAbs against the CD44 human myeloid marker or the CD45 human leukocyte marker were labeled with Alexa Fluor 750 and administered to leukemia-bearing mice after having verified the immunoreactivity in vitro. Bioluminescent leukemic cells (HL60-Luc) were used to compare the colocalization of the fluorescent mAb with these cells. The impact of the labeled antibodies on disease progression was further determined. Finally, the fluorescent hCD45 mAb was tested in mice engrafted with human leukemic cells. Results The probe labeling did not modify the immunoreactivity of the mAbs. There was a satisfactory correlation between bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and FRI and low doses of mAb were sufficient to detect leukemic foci. However, anti-hCD44 mAb had a strong impact on the tumor proliferation contrary to anti-hCD45 mAb. The use of anti-hCD45 mAb allowed the detection of leukemic patient cells engrafted onto NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions A mAb labeled with a near infrared fluorochrome is useful to detect leukemic foci in disseminated models provided that its potential impact on tumor proliferation has been thoroughly documented. PMID:22303450

  19. Targeting the insulin growth factor-1 receptor with fluorescent antibodies enables high resolution imaging of human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Youp; Lee, Jin Young; Zhang, Yong; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine whether insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) antibodies, conjugated with bright fluorophores, could enable visualization of pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models. IGF-1R antibody (clone 24-31) was conjugated with 550 nm or 650 nm fluorophores. Western blotting confirmed the expression of IGF-1R in Panc-1, BxPC3, and MIAPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Labeling with fluorophore-conjugated IGF-1R antibody demonstrated fluorescent foci on the membrane of the pancreatic cancer cells. Subcutaneous Panc-1, BxPC-3, and MIA PaCa-2 tumors became fluorescent after intravenous administration of fluorescent IGF-1R antibodies. Orthotopically-transplanted BxPC-3 tumors became fluorescent with the conjugated IGF-1R antibodies, and were easily visible with intravital imaging. Gross and microscopic ex vivo imaging of resected pancreatic tumor and normal pancreas confirmed that fluorescence indeed came from the membrane of cancer cells, and it was stronger from the tumor than the normal tissue. The present study demonstrates that fluorophore-conjugated IGF-1R antibodies can visualize pancreatic cancer and it can be used with various imaging devices such as endoscopy and laparoscopy for diagnosis and fluorescence-guided surgery. PMID:26919100

  20. Novel receptor-derived cyclopeptides to treat heart failure caused by anti-β1-adrenoceptor antibodies in a human-analogous rat model.

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    Valérie Boivin

    Full Text Available Despite recent therapeutic advances the prognosis of heart failure remains poor. Recent research suggests that heart failure is a heterogeneous syndrome and that many patients have stimulating auto-antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop of the β1 adrenergic receptor (β1EC2. In a human-analogous rat model such antibodies cause myocyte damage and heart failure. Here we used this model to test a novel antibody-directed strategy aiming to prevent and/or treat antibody-induced cardiomyopathy. To generate heart failure, we immunised n = 76/114 rats with a fusion protein containing the human β1EC2 (amino-acids 195-225 every 4 weeks; n = 38/114 rats were control-injected with 0.9% NaCl. Intravenous application of a novel cyclic peptide mimicking β1EC2 (β1EC2-CP, 1.0 mg/kg every 4 weeks or administration of the β1-blocker bisoprolol (15 mg/kg/day orally was initiated either 6 weeks (cardiac function still normal, prevention-study, n = 24 (16 treated vs. 8 untreated or 8.5 months after the 1st immunisation (onset of cardiomyopathy, therapy-study, n = 52 (40 treated vs. 12 untreated; n = 8/52 rats from the therapy-study received β1EC2-CP/bisoprolol co-treatment. We found that β1EC2-CP prevented and (alone or as add-on drug treated antibody-induced cardiac damage in the rat, and that its efficacy was superior to mono-treatment with bisoprolol, a standard drug in heart failure. While bisoprolol mono-therapy was able to stop disease-progression, β1EC2-CP mono-therapy -or as an add-on to bisoprolol- almost fully reversed antibody-induced cardiac damage. The cyclo¬peptide acted both by scavenging free anti-β1EC2-antibodies and by targeting β1EC2-specific memory B-cells involved in antibody-production. Our model provides the basis for the clinical translation of a novel double-acting therapeutic strategy that scavenges harmful anti-β1EC2-antibodies and also selectively depletes memory B-cells involved in the production of such

  1. Purification of Monoclonal Antibodies Using a Fiber Based Cation-Exchange Stationary Phase: Parameter Determination and Modeling

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    Jan Schwellenbach

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (mAb currently dominate the market for protein therapeutics. Because chromatography unit operations are critical for the purification of therapeutic proteins, the process integration of novel chromatographic stationary phases, driven by the demand for more economic process schemes, is a field of ongoing research. Within this study it was demonstrated that the description and prediction of mAb purification on a novel fiber based cation-exchange stationary phase can be achieved using a physico-chemical model. All relevant mass-transport phenomena during a bind and elute chromatographic cycle, namely convection, axial dispersion, boundary layer mass-transfer, and the salt dependent binding behavior in the fiber bed were described. This work highlights the combination of model adaption, simulation, and experimental parameter determination through separate measurements, correlations, or geometric considerations, independent from the chromatographic cycle. The salt dependent binding behavior of a purified mAb was determined by the measurement of adsorption isotherms using batch adsorption experiments. Utilizing a combination of size exclusion and protein A chromatography as analytic techniques, this approach can be extended to a cell culture broth, describing the salt dependent binding behavior of multiple components. Model testing and validation was performed with experimental bind and elute cycles using purified mAb as well as a clarified cell culture broth. A comparison between model calculations and experimental data showed a good agreement. The influence of the model parameters is discussed in detail.

  2. Localization of 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody ERIC1 in a subcutaneous xenograft model of neuroblastoma in SCID mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to evaluate a novel strategy of immunolocalization of human neuroblastoma by targeting the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), which is over-expressed on neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma is the most frequent solid extracranial childhood tumour and also the most common neoplasm in the first year of life. The most frequent metastatic sites are bone, bone marrow and liver. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is constitutively expressed on nearly 100% of all neuroblastomas. NCAM has been successfully used as a target for immunotoxines and bi-specific antibodies in multiple myeloma, small cell lung cancer, glioma or neuroblastoma, in vitro and in vivo. NCAM expression was quantified on established neuroblastoma cells by real time PCR and NCAM expression on the cell surface shown by flow cytometry. A SCID mouse model using IMR5-75 neuroblastoma cells to induce subcutaneous tumour growth was established. 131I was used to label monoclonal NCAM specific ERIC1 antibodies generating the 131I-ERIC1 antibody, which shows a high affinity to NCAM also after labelling (KD= 9 x 10-8). Groups of five to six mice received intravenous injections of 3-9 MBq of 131I-ERIC1 on day 0 into the tail vein. At time points 2.5 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h post injection mice were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Blood, liver, spleen, kidneys, muscle, femur, thyroid, intestines, lung, tumour and urine were removed and weighed. Organ-specific radioactivity was measured in a well-counter as well as that of the tail and remnant cadavers. Data were calculated as dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) and tumour to non-tumour ratios (T/NT ratio). For blocking experiments mice were pre-injected with 140μg of unlabelled ERIC1 into the tail vein 24 h prior 131I-ERIC1 application. Mice from these blocking experiments were measured after 72 h. Measurement of organ-specific radioactivity showed low organ-specific uptake (5.33 %ID/g after 72 h), which continuously decreased over the 96 hour

  3. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody T1h and variant anti-CD6 murine 10D12 in healthy animals and in experimental arthritis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic of two radio labeled monoclonal antibodies was performed with the help of imaging techniques. Isotopic labeling was carried out by means of standardized methods. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was performed using the population approach and sparse data design. Introduction: Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is an efficient option for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Th1 is a MAb anti human CD6 developed for the treatment of autoimmune disease and 10D12 is its counterpart anti murine CD6 developed as a pharmacological tool to get deep into the response mechanisms in animals models of rheumatoid arthritis.To investigate the behavior of both antibodies in the assay system, molecules were labeled with 125I to evaluate pharmacokinetic in healthy animals and with 99mTc to evaluate the antibody uptake in inflamed area of induced arthritis. Materials and methods: Antibodies were supplied by the Center of Molecular immunology. Iodination was performed by the iodogen method and technetium labeling was carried out directly by Schwarz method. Female C57BL6 from CENPALAB were used for experiments. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic was performed by a sparse data design using the population approach. Uptake in region of inflammation was quantified by gammagraphy at the same time points of blood sampling. A compartmental model was build to quantify uptake kinetic. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed using MONOLIX software version 4.2. Results: Minor pharmacokinetic differences were found between monoclonal antibodies labeled with 125I and 99mTc. As a humanized antibody, T1h shows a faster clearance than 10D12 and a biodistribution pattern reflecting preference for excretion mechanisms. The arthritis accumulation was not consistent with a targeted mediated uptake. On the other hand, radio labeled 10D12 shows an accumulation profile in arthritis with two peaks of maximum concentration representing an initial transit to

  4. VH-VL orientation prediction for antibody humanization candidate selection: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujotzek, Alexander; Lipsmeier, Florian; Harris, Seth F; Benz, Jörg; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Georges, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Antibody humanization describes the procedure of grafting a non-human antibody's complementarity-determining regions, i.e., the variable loop regions that mediate specific interactions with the antigen, onto a β-sheet framework that is representative of the human variable region germline repertoire, thus reducing the number of potentially antigenic epitopes that might trigger an anti-antibody response. The selection criterion for the so-called acceptor frameworks (one for the heavy and one for the light chain variable region) is traditionally based on sequence similarity. Here, we propose a novel approach that selects acceptor frameworks such that the relative orientation of the 2 variable domains in 3D space, and thereby the geometry of the antigen-binding site, is conserved throughout the process of humanization. The methodology relies on a machine learning-based predictor of antibody variable domain orientation that has recently been shown to improve the quality of antibody homology models. Using data from 3 humanization campaigns, we demonstrate that preselecting humanization variants based on the predicted difference in variable domain orientation with regard to the original antibody leads to subsets of variants with a significant improvement in binding affinity.

  5. A new, integrated, continuous purification process template for monoclonal antibodies: Process modeling and cost of goods studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenopoulos, Alex

    2015-11-10

    An evolving biopharmaceutical industry requires advancements in biomanufacturing that offer increased productivity and improved economics without sacrificing process robustness. Accordingly, we have developed a new monoclonal antibody purification template comprised of flocculation-based clarification, capture by continuous multi-column protein A chromatography and flow-through polishing. The new process offers a robust, single-use manufacturing solution while significantly reducing overall cost of goods. Modeling studies verify that the individual clarification, capture and polishing solutions offer significant advantages as stand-alone unit operations. These technologies were also designed to be integrated into a continuous purification template. Process modeling studies have been used to highlight both cost and operational advantages of the new process template. Depending on scale, savings of more than 20% and 60% were seen for commercial and clinical operation, respectively. Integrating the technologies into a continuous process consistently offered additional cost advantages. During template development, process modeling was instrumental in highlighting the importance of identifying technologies that provided high product yield and purification factors. Additionally, high product concentration and eliminating the need for intermediate product dilution emerged as important considerations for newly developed unit operations. Combining experimental work with insights from modeling can significantly improve the outcome of product and process development.

  6. Efficacy of Polyvalent Human Immunoglobulins in an Animal Model of Neuromyelitis Optica Evoked by Intrathecal Anti-Aquaporin 4 Antibodies

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    Benedikt Grünewald

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders (NMOSD are associated with autoantibodies (ABs targeting the astrocytic aquaporin-4 water channels (AQP4-ABs. These ABs have a direct pathogenic role by initiating a variety of immunological and inflammatory processes in the course of disease. In a recently-established animal model, chronic intrathecal passive-transfer of immunoglobulin G from NMOSD patients (NMO-IgG, or of recombinant human AQP4-ABs (rAB-AQP4, provided evidence for complementary and immune-cell independent effects of AQP4-ABs. Utilizing this animal model, we here tested the effects of systemically and intrathecally applied pooled human immunoglobulins (IVIg using a preventive and a therapeutic paradigm. In NMO-IgG animals, prophylactic application of systemic IVIg led to a reduced median disease score of 2.4 on a 0–10 scale, in comparison to 4.1 with sham treatment. Therapeutic IVIg, applied systemically after the 10th intrathecal NMO-IgG injection, significantly reduced the disease score by 0.8. Intrathecal IVIg application induced a beneficial effect in animals with NMO-IgG (median score IVIg 1.6 vs. sham 3.7 or with rAB-AQP4 (median score IVIg 2.0 vs. sham 3.7. We here provide evidence that treatment with IVIg ameliorates disease symptoms in this passive-transfer model, in analogy to former studies investigating passive-transfer animal models of other antibody-mediated disorders.

  7. Efficacy of Polyvalent Human Immunoglobulins in an Animal Model of Neuromyelitis Optica Evoked by Intrathecal Anti-Aquaporin 4 Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Benedikt; Bennett, Jeffrey L.; Toyka, Klaus V.; Sommer, Claudia; Geis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders (NMOSD) are associated with autoantibodies (ABs) targeting the astrocytic aquaporin-4 water channels (AQP4-ABs). These ABs have a direct pathogenic role by initiating a variety of immunological and inflammatory processes in the course of disease. In a recently-established animal model, chronic intrathecal passive-transfer of immunoglobulin G from NMOSD patients (NMO-IgG), or of recombinant human AQP4-ABs (rAB-AQP4), provided evidence for complementary and immune-cell independent effects of AQP4-ABs. Utilizing this animal model, we here tested the effects of systemically and intrathecally applied pooled human immunoglobulins (IVIg) using a preventive and a therapeutic paradigm. In NMO-IgG animals, prophylactic application of systemic IVIg led to a reduced median disease score of 2.4 on a 0–10 scale, in comparison to 4.1 with sham treatment. Therapeutic IVIg, applied systemically after the 10th intrathecal NMO-IgG injection, significantly reduced the disease score by 0.8. Intrathecal IVIg application induced a beneficial effect in animals with NMO-IgG (median score IVIg 1.6 vs. sham 3.7) or with rAB-AQP4 (median score IVIg 2.0 vs. sham 3.7). We here provide evidence that treatment with IVIg ameliorates disease symptoms in this passive-transfer model, in analogy to former studies investigating passive-transfer animal models of other antibody-mediated disorders. PMID:27571069

  8. Primate Models in Organ Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Douglas J.; Kirk, Allan D.

    2013-01-01

    Large animal models have long served as the proving grounds for advances in transplantation, bridging the gap between inbred mouse experimentation and human clinical trials. Although a variety of species have been and continue to be used, the emergence of highly targeted biologic- and antibody-based therapies has required models to have a high degree of homology with humans. Thus, the nonhuman primate has become the model of choice in many settings. This article will provide an overview of no...

  9. Immuno-therapy with anti-CTLA4 antibodies in tolerized and non-tolerized mouse tumor models.

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    Jonas Persson

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies specific for cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (anti-CTLA4 are a novel form of cancer immunotherapy. While preclinical studies in mouse tumor models have shown anti-tumor efficacy of anti-CTLA4 injection or expression, anti-CTLA4 treatment in patients with advanced cancers had disappointing therapeutic benefit. These discrepancies have to be addressed in more adequate pre-clinical models. We employed two tumor models. The first model is based on C57Bl/6 mice and syngeneic TC-1 tumors expressing HPV16 E6/E7. In this model, the HPV antigens are neo-antigens, against which no central tolerance exists. The second model involves mice transgenic for the proto-oncogen neu and syngeneic mouse mammary carcinoma (MMC cells. In this model tolerance to Neu involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. Anti-CTLA4 delivery as a protein or expression from gene-modified tumor cells were therapeutically efficacious in the non-tolerized TC-1 tumor model, but had no effect in the MMC-model. We also used the two tumor models to test an immuno-gene therapy approach for anti-CTLA4. Recently, we used an approach based on hematopoietic stem cells (HSC to deliver the relaxin gene to tumors and showed that this approach facilitates pre-existing anti-tumor T-cells to control tumor growth in the MMC tumor model. However, unexpectedly, when used for anti-CTLA4 gene delivery in this study, the HSC-based approach was therapeutically detrimental in both the TC-1 and MMC models. Anti-CTLA4 expression in these models resulted in an increase in the number of intratumoral CD1d+ NKT cells and in the expression of TGF-β1. At the same time, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which potentially can support anti-tumor T-cell responses, were lower in tumors of mice that received anti-CTLA4-HSC therapy. The differences in outcomes between the tolerized and non-tolerized models also provide a potential explanation for the low efficacy

  10. A region of the insulin receptor important for ligand binding (residues 450-601) is recognized by patients' autoimmune antibodies and inhibitory monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, B; Roth, R A

    1991-01-01

    Chimeric receptors containing different portions of the homologous human insulin receptor, insulin-like growth factor I receptor, and insulin receptor-related receptor were utilized to identify the epitopes recognized by various anti-insulin receptor antibodies. The antibodies studied included 12 monoclonal antibodies to the extracellular domain of the human insulin receptor as well as 15 patients' sera with autoimmune anti-insulin receptor antibodies. All of the patients' sera and all 8 mono...

  11. The intrinsic cysteine and histidine residues of the anti-Salmonella antibody Se155-4: a model for the introduction of new functions into antibody-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, N Martin; Watson, David C; Cunningham, Anna M; MacKenzie, C Roger

    2014-10-01

    New functions can be incorporated into anti-hapten or anti-protein antibodies by mutating selected residues in the binding-site region either to Cys, to allow alkylation with reagents bearing the desired functional groups, or to His, to create metal-binding sites or to make antigen binding pH-sensitive. However, choosing suitable sites for these mutations has been hampered by the lack of antibodies with these features, to serve as models. Remarkably, the anti-carbohydrate antibody Se155-4, specific for the Salmonella group B lipopolysaccharide, already has a Cys and two pairs of His residues close to the antigen-binding pocket in its structure, and shows pH-dependent antigen binding. We therefore investigated modification of its Cys94L in an scFv version of the antibody with the aims of creating a 'reagentless' fluorescent sensor and attaching a metal-binding group that might confer lyase activity. These groups were successfully introduced, as judged by mass spectrometry, and had only slightly reduced antigen binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The fluorescent product was sensitive to addition of antigen in a solution format, unlike a modification of a more distant Cys introduced into the VH CDR4 loop. Two other routes to modulate antigen binding were also explored, metal binding by the His pair alongside the antigen-binding pocket and insertions into CDR4 to extend the antigen-contact area. His residues adjacent to the antigen-binding pocket bound copper, causing a 5-fold decrease in antigen binding. In CDR4 of the VH domain, the preferred insert length was four residues, which gave stable antigen-binding products but did not improve overall antigen affinity.

  12. Study of the influence of homologous serum globulin preparations on the intestinal automicroflora in irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinegin, B.V.; Klemparskaya, N.N.; Mal' tsev, V.N.; Korshunov, G.A.; Shal' nova, G.A.; Kuz' mina, T.D.

    1984-09-01

    In spite of considerable experience of practical use of serum globulin preparations, their effect on automicroflora wasn't studied. The favorable effect of therapeutic injection of homologous serum globulin preparations on automicroflora of small and large intestine of mices was established for the model of acute radiation sickness caused by /sup 60/Co irradiation with 700 R dose. The effect of injecting two types of globulin preparations was studied: ones prepared of blood of intact and hemostimulated mices (to increase the content of normal antitissue antibodies in the serum). Besides the general globulin fraction isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation a study was made on the effect of purified IgG and IgM preparations. Threefold subcutaneous or intraperitoneal globulin in ection of 1 ..mu..g dose in a mice prevented after 2, 24, 48 h after irradiation the development of bacteriosis, typical for radiation injury - decreased accumulation of putrefactive bacteria and reduced the suppression of lactobacilli content. Globulin preparations and fractions of hemostimulated mice serum, enriched by normal antitissue antibodies are the most effective ones.

  13. Broad-specificity immunoassay for O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides: Application of molecular modeling to improve assay sensitivity and study antibody recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against 4-(diethoxyphosphorothioyloxy)benzoic acid (hapten 1) was raised and used to develop a broad-specificity competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) for 14 O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). Computer-assisted molecular modeling was...

  14. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA are predominantly IgG autoantibodies directed against constituents of primary granules of neutrophils and monocytes’ lysosomes. Although several antigenic targets have been identified, those ANCA directed to proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, whereas the importance of other ANCA remains unknown. Both are strongly associated with small vessel vasculitides, the ANCA-associated vasculitides, which include Wegener’s granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome, and the localised forms of these diseases (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis. ANCA is a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides. 85-95% of patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. There is increasing evidence that myeloperoxidase- ANCA are directly involved in the pathogenesis of necrotizing vasculitis. This is less clear for proteinase 3-ANCA, markers for Wegener’s granulomatosis. With respect to proteinase 3-ANCA, complementary proteinase 3, a peptide translated from the antisense DNA strand of proteinase 3 and homologous to several microbial peptides, may be involved in induction of proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

  15. Therapeutic Efficacy Assessment of CK6, a Monoclonal KIT Antibody, in a Panel of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Xenograft Models

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    Thomas Van Looy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the efficacy of CK6, a KIT monoclonal antibody, in a panel of human gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST xenograft models. Nude mice were bilaterally transplanted with human GIST xenografts (four patient derived and two cell line derived, treated for 3 weeks, and grouped as follows: control (untreated; CK6 (40 mg/kg, 3× weekly; imatinib (50 mg/kg, twice daily; sunitinib (40 mg/kg, once daily; imatinib + CK6; sunitinib + CK6 (same doses and schedules as in the single-agent treatments. Tumor volume assessment, Western blot analysis, and histopathology were used for evaluation of efficacy. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U (MWU and Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests. CK6 as a single agent only reduced tumor growth rate in the UZLX-GIST3 model (P = .053, MWU compared to control, while in none of the other GIST models an effect on tumor growth rate was observed. CK6 did not result in significant anti-proliferative or pro-apoptotic effects in any of the GIST models, and moreover, CK6 did not induce a remarkable inhibition of KIT activation. Furthermore, no synergistic effect of combining CK6 with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs was observed. Conversely, in certain GIST xenografts, anti-tumor effects seemed to be inferior under combination treatment compared to single-agent TKI treatment. In the GIST xenografts tested, the anti-tumor efficacy of CK6 was limited. No synergy was observed on combination of CK6 with TKIs in these GIST models. Our findings highlight the importance of using relevant in vivo human tumor xenograft models in the preclinical assessment of drug combination strategies.

  16. Occurrence of antibodies against insect virus proteins in mammals: simple model to differentiate between passive exposure and active virus growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, N F; McKnight, L; Tinsley, T W

    1981-02-01

    Antibodies against an "enterovirus-like" virus of insects, cricket paralysis virus, occur in the sera of domestic animals. When these antibodies were used in combination with the immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled virus proteins from infected Drosophila cells in culture, it could be demonstrated that the animals were exposed to preformed virus. PMID:6260677

  17. Occurrence of antibodies against insect virus proteins in mammals: simple model to differentiate between passive exposure and active virus growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, N F; McKnight, L.; Tinsley, T. W.

    1981-01-01

    Antibodies against an "enterovirus-like" virus of insects, cricket paralysis virus, occur in the sera of domestic animals. When these antibodies were used in combination with the immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled virus proteins from infected Drosophila cells in culture, it could be demonstrated that the animals were exposed to preformed virus.

  18. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for a domain antibody in mice using the two-pore theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepp, Armin; Berges, Alienor; Sanderson, Andrew; Meno-Tetang, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Domain antibodies (dAbs) are the smallest antigen-binding fragments of immunoglobulins. To date, there is limited insight into the pharmacokinetics of dAbs, especially their distribution into tissues and elimination. The objective of this work was to develop a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model to investigate the biodisposition of a non-specific dAb construct in mice. Following a single IV administration of 10 mg/kg dummy dAb protein to twenty four female mice, frequent blood samples were collected and whole body lateral sections were analyzed by quantitative whole-body autoradiography. The model is based on the two-pore hypothesis of extravasation where organ-specific isogravimetric flow rates (Jorg,ISO) and permeability-surface area products (PSorg) are expressed as linear functions of the lymph flow rate (Jorg) and the kidney compartment is modified to account for glomerular filtration of dAb. As a result, only Jorg, glomerular filtration coefficient and the combined volume of Bowman's capsule, proximal and distal renal tubules and loop of Henle were optimized by fitting simultaneously all blood and organ data to the model. Our model captures the pharmacokinetic profiles of dAb in blood and all organs and shows that extravasation into interstitial space is a predominantly diffusion-driven process. The parameter values were estimated with good precision (%RMSE ≈ 30) and low cross-correlation (R(2) < 0.2). We developed a flexible model with a limited parameter number that may be applied to other biotherapeutics after adapting for size-related effects on extravasation and renal elimination processes. PMID:25577033

  19. A model-based meta-analysis of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics to guide optimal first-in-human study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davda, Jasmine P; Dodds, Michael G; Gibbs, Megan A; Wisdom, Wendy; Gibbs, John

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective analysis were (1) to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (popPK) of four different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in a combined analysis of individual data collected during first-in-human (FIH) studies and (2) to provide a scientific rationale for prospective design of FIH studies with mAbs. The data set was composed of 171 subjects contributing a total of 2716 mAb serum concentrations, following intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) doses. mAb PK was described by an open 2-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment and a depot compartment with first-order absorption. Parameter values obtained from the popPK model were further used to generate optimal sampling times for a single dose study. A robust fit to the combined data from four mAbs was obtained using the 2-compartment model. Population parameter estimates for systemic clearance and central volume of distribution were 0.20 L/day and 3.6 L with intersubject variability of 31% and 34%, respectively. The random residual error was 14%. Differences (> 2-fold) in PK parameters were not apparent across mAbs. Rich designs (22 samples/subject), minimal designs for popPK (5 samples/subject), and optimal designs for non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and popPK (10 samples/subject) were examined by stochastic simulation and estimation. Single-dose PK studies for linear mAbs executed using the optimal designs are expected to yield high-quality model estimates, and accurate capture of NCA estimations. This model-based meta-analysis has determined typical popPK values for four mAbs with linear elimination and enabled prospective optimization of FIH study designs, potentially improving the efficiency of FIH studies for this class of therapeutics.

  20. Rapid Screening for Potential Epitopes Reactive with a Polycolonal Antibody by Solution-Phase H/D Exchange Monitored by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Noble, Kyle A.; Mao, Yuan; Young, Nicolas L.; Sathe, Shridhar K.; Roux, Kenneth H.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-07-01

    The potential epitopes of a recombinant food allergen protein, cashew Ana o 2, reactive to polyclonal antibodies, were mapped by solution-phase amide backbone H/D exchange (HDX) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Ana o 2 polyclonal antibodies were purified in the serum from a goat immunized with cashew nut extract. Antibodies were incubated with recombinant Ana o 2 (rAna o 2) to form antigen:polyclonal antibody (Ag:pAb) complexes. Complexed and uncomplexed (free) rAna o 2 were then subjected to HDX-MS analysis. Four regions protected from H/D exchange upon pAb binding are identified as potential epitopes and mapped onto a homologous model.

  1. Anti-diphtheria antibody seroprotection rates are similar 10 years after vaccination with dTpa or DTPa using a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvart, Brigitte; Burgess, Margaret; Zepp, Fred; Mertsola, Jussi; Wolter, Joanne; Schuerman, Lode

    2004-12-01

    The reduced antigen content diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (dTpa) vaccine (Boostrixtrade mark) has been shown to induce a strong booster response to all the vaccine components in 4-6 year olds. However, anti-diphtheria antibody levels were observed to be lower when compared to the "full strength" paediatric DTPa vaccine. To assess the impact of this difference on long-term protection, a mathematical model was developed to predict diphtheria antibody decay over time. The model was based on a linear decrease in log-transformed antibody concentrations after the first year post-vaccination. When applied to data collected 3.5 years after vaccination of 4-6 year olds with either DTPa or dTpa, the model predicted that 10 years post-vaccination, 98.6% of subjects vaccinated with dTpa were likely to remain seroprotected against diphtheria, compared to 99.6% vaccinated with DTPa. Therefore, the difference observed in diphtheria antibody geometric mean concentrations 1 month after booster vaccination at 4-6 years with dTpa or DTPa is unlikely to be of clinical relevance 10 years later at the time of the adolescent booster.

  2. Monoclonal antibody BrE-3 participation in a multivariate prognostic model for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C M; Baratta, F S; Ozzello, L; Ceriani, R L

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MoAb) BrE-3, an anti-human milk fat globule (HMFG) MoAb, is used here as a novel prognostic indicator for survival and relapse time in patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. A scoring system (4-Score method) was developed to this effect that measured, in a statistically reliable fashion, the level of expression of the epitope for MoAb BrE-3 in the cytoplasm and membranes of breast carcinoma cells in paraffin-embedded sections. In univariate analysis, data obtained by the 4-Score Method as well as data from traditional prognostic indicators (tumor size, axillary node status, and grade of differentiation) were found to be associated with patient survival and relapse. In multivariate analysis, using a Cox proportional hazards regression model, levels of expression of BrE-3 epitope plus tumor size and axillary node status were weighted and combined in an Individual Linear Composite Prognostic Score (ILCPS) that had a high level of association with survival and relapse time in this sample model of patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. This level of association was found to be higher than the level of association for any other combination of traditional or 4-Score method variables. The level of expression of BrE-3 significantly adds to the prognostic capacity of traditional prognostic markers for infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast. PMID:7981443

  3. The 3D structure of the defense-related rice protein Pir7b predicted by homology modeling and ligand binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Quan; Han, Wei-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Han; Yao, Yuan; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2008-07-01

    To better understand the ligand-binding mechanism of protein Pir7b, important part in detoxification of a pathogen-derived compound against Pyricularia oryzae, a 3D structure model of protein Pir7b was constructed based on the structure of the template SABP2. Three substrates were docking to this protein, two of them were proved to be active, and some critical residues are identified, which had not been confirmed by the experiments. His87 and Leu17 considered as 'oxyanion hole' contribute to initiating the Ser86 nucleophilic attack. Gln187 and Asp139 can form hydrogen bonds with the anilid group to maintain the active binding orientation with the substrates. The docking model can well interpret the specificity of protein Pir7b towards the anilid moiety of the substrates and provide valuable structure information about the ligand binding to protein Pir7b. PMID:18449577

  4. Development of a Rotavirus-Shedding Model in Rhesus Macaques, Using a Homologous Wild-Type Rotavirus of a New P Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Monica M.; Sestak, Karol; Choi, Anthony H.-C.; Basu, Mitali; Cole, Michael J.; Aye, Pyone P.; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Ward, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Although there are several reports on rotavirus inoculation of nonhuman primates, no reliable model exists. Therefore, this study was designed to develop a rhesus macaque model for rotavirus studies. The goals were to obtain a wild-type macaque rotavirus and evaluate it as a challenge virus for model studies. Once rotavirus was shown to be endemic within the macaque colony at the Tulane National Primate Research Center, stool specimens were collected from juvenile animals (2.6 to 5.9 months of age) without evidence of previous rotavirus infection and examined for rotavirus antigen. Six of 10 animals shed rotavirus during the 10-week collection period, and the electropherotypes of all isolates were identical to each other but distinct from those of prototype simian rotaviruses. These viruses were characterized as serotype G3 and subgroup 1, properties typical of many animal rotaviruses, including simian strains. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP4 gene was performed with a culture-grown isolate from the stool of one animal, designated the TUCH strain. Based on both genotypic and phylogenetic comparisons between TUCH VP4 and cognate proteins of representatives of the reported 22 P genotypes, the TUCH virus belongs to a new genotype, P[23]. A pool of wild-type TUCH was prepared and intragastrically administered to eight cesarean section-derived, specific-pathogen-free macaques 14 to 42 days of age. All animals were kept in a biocontainment level 2 facility. Although no diarrhea was observed and the animals remained clinically normal, all animals shed large quantities of rotavirus antigen in their feces after inoculation, which resolved by the end of the 14-day observation period. Therefore, TUCH infection of macaques provides a useful nonhuman primate model for studies on rotavirus protection. PMID:15613323

  5. In silico study and validation of phosphotransacetylase (PTA) as a putative drug target for Staphylococcus aureus by homology-based modelling and virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morya, V K; Dewaker, Varun; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterium, can cause a range of illnesses from minor skin infections to life-threatening diseases, such as bacteraemia, endocarditis, meningitis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome and sepsis. Due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance strains, there is a need to develop of new class of antibiotics or drug for this pathogen. The phosphotransacetylase enzyme plays an important role in the acetate metabolism and found to be essential for the survival of the S. aureus. This enzyme was evaluated as a putative drug target for S. aureus by in silico analysis. The 3D structure of the phosphotransacetylase from S. aureus was modelled, using the 1TD9 chain 'A' from Bacillus subtilis as a template at the resolution of 2.75 Å. The generated model has been validated by PROCHECK, WHAT IF and SuperPose. The docking was performed by the Molegro virtual docker using the ZINC database generated ligand library. The ligand library was generated within the limitation of the Lipinski rule of five. Based on the dock-score, five molecules have been subjected to ADME/TOX analysis and subjected for pharmacophore model generation. The zinc IDs of the potential inhibitors are ZINC08442078, ZINC8442200, ZINC 8442087 and ZINC 8442184 and found to be pharmacologically active antagonist of phosphotransacetylase. The molecules were evaluated as no-carcinogenic and persistent molecule by START programme. PMID:23054816

  6. PET-based compartmental modeling of {sup 124}I-A33 antibody: quantitative characterization of patient-specific tumor targeting in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Ruan, Shutian; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Stony Brook School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Radiology, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Divgi, Chaitanya [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Scott, Andrew M. [La Trobe University, Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Melbourne (Australia); Kemeny, Nancy E.; Wong, Douglas; Scheinberg, David [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Fong, Yuman [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); City of Hope, Department of Surgery, Duarte, CA (United States); Ritter, Gerd; Jungbluth, Achem; Old, Lloyd J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against tumor antigens has proven effective for targeted therapy of human cancers, as shown by a growing list of successful antibody-based drug products. We describe a novel, nonlinear compartmental model using PET-derived data to determine the ''best-fit'' parameters and model-derived quantities for optimizing biodistribution of intravenously injected {sup 124}I-labeled antitumor antibodies. As an example of this paradigm, quantitative image and kinetic analyses of anti-A33 humanized mAb (also known as ''A33'') were performed in 11 colorectal cancer patients. Serial whole-body PET scans of {sup 124}I-labeled A33 and blood samples were acquired and the resulting tissue time-activity data for each patient were fit to a nonlinear compartmental model using the SAAM II computer code. Excellent agreement was observed between fitted and measured parameters of tumor uptake, ''off-target'' uptake in bowel mucosa, blood clearance, tumor antigen levels, and percent antigen occupancy. This approach should be generally applicable to antibody-antigen systems in human tumors for which the masses of antigen-expressing tumor and of normal tissues can be estimated and for which antibody kinetics can be measured with PET. Ultimately, based on each patient's resulting ''best-fit'' nonlinear model, a patient-specific optimum mAb dose (in micromoles, for example) may be derived. (orig.)

  7. Early diagnosis of systemic lupus erythmatosus using ANN models of dsDNA binding antibody sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Mohamad Hasan; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Azemi, Asad; Mirsalehi, Mir Mojtaba; Khademi, Morteza

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a new method based on artificial neural networks (ANN), is introduced for identifying pathogenic antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythmatosus (SLE). dsDNA binding antibodies have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. In order to identify these dsDNA binding antibodies, the protein sequences of 42 dsDNA binding and 608 non-dsDNA binding antibodies were extracted from Kabat database and encoded using a physicochemical property of their amino acids namely Hydrophilicity. Encoded antibodies were used as the training patterns of a general regression neural network (GRNN). Simulation results show that the accuracy of proposed method in recognizing dsDNA binding antibodies is 83.2%. We have also investigated the roles of the light and heavy chains of anti-dsDNA antibodies in binding to DNA. Simulation results concur with the published experimental findings that in binding to DNA, the heavy chain of anti-dsDNA is more important than their light chain. PMID:21346864

  8. Disassembly and reassembly of human papillomavirus virus-like particles produces more virion-like antibody reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Qinjian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV vaccines based on major capsid protein L1 are licensed in over 100 countries to prevent HPV infections. The yeast-derived recombinant quadrivalent HPV L1 vaccine, GARDASIL(R, has played an important role in reducing cancer and genital warts since its introduction in 2006. The L1 proteins self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs. Results VLPs were subjected to post-purification disassembly and reassembly (D/R treatment during bioprocessing to improve VLP immunoreactivity and stability. The post-D/R HPV16 VLPs and their complex with H16.V5 neutralizing antibody Fab fragments were visualized by cryo electron microscopy, showing VLPs densely decorated with antibody. Along with structural improvements, post-D/R VLPs showed markedly higher antigenicity to conformational and neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs H16.V5, H16.E70 and H263.A2, whereas binding to mAbs recognizing linear epitopes (H16.J4, H16.O7, and H16.H5 was greatly reduced. Strikingly, post-D/R VLPs showed no detectable binding to H16.H5, indicating that the H16.H5 epitope is not accessible in fully assembled VLPs. An atomic homology model of the entire HPV16 VLP was generated based on previously determined high-resolution structures of bovine papillomavirus and HPV16 L1 pentameric capsomeres. Conclusions D/R treatment of HPV16 L1 VLPs produces more homogeneous VLPs with more virion-like antibody reactivity. These effects can be attributed to a combination of more complete and regular assembly of the VLPs, better folding of L1, reduced non-specific disulfide-mediated aggregation and increased stability of the VLPs. Markedly different antigenicity of HPV16 VLPs was observed upon D/R treatment with a panel of monoclonal antibodies targeting neutralization sensitive epitopes. Multiple epitope-specific assays with a panel of mAbs with different properties and epitopes are required to gain a better understanding of the immunochemical

  9. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus-Like Particle Binding to Target Cells by Antiviral Antibodies in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Daniel; Barth, Heidi; Gissler, Bettina; Schürmann, Peter; Adah, Mohammed I.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Pape, Gerd R.; Depla, Erik; Jacobs, Dirk; Maertens, Geert; Patel, Arvind H.; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Liang, T. Jake; Blum, Hubert E.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic viral hepatitis worldwide. The study of antibody-mediated virus neutralization has been hampered by the lack of an efficient and high-throughput cell culture system for the study of virus neutralization. The HCV structural proteins have been shown to assemble into noninfectious HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs). Similar to serum-derived virions, HCV-LPs bind and enter human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we developed an HCV-LP-based model system for a systematic functional analysis of antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. We demonstrate that cellular HCV-LP binding was specifically inhibited by antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C in a dose-dependent manner. Using a library of homologous overlapping envelope peptides covering the entire HCV envelope, we identified an epitope in the N-terminal E2 region (SQKIQLVNTNGSWHI; amino acid positions 408 to 422) as one target of human antiviral antibodies inhibiting cellular particle binding. Using a large panel of serum samples from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C, we demonstrated that the presence of antibodies with inhibition of binding activity was not associated with viral clearance. In conclusion, antibody-mediated inhibition of cellular HCV-LP binding represents a convenient system for the functional characterization of human anti-HCV antibodies, allowing the mapping of envelope neutralization epitopes targeted by naturally occurring antiviral antibodies. PMID:15308699

  10. Antibody-Mediated Inhibition of TNFR1 Attenuates Disease in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Sarah K.; Olaf Maier; Roman Fischer; Richard Fairless; Sonja Hochmeister; Aleksandar Stojic; Lara Pick; Doreen Haar; Sylvia Musiol; Maria K Storch; Klaus Pfizenmaier; Ricarda Diem

    2014-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is known to regulate inflammation in a number of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Although targeting of TNF in models of MS has been successful, the pathological role of TNF in MS remains unclear due to clinical trials where the non-selective inhibition of TNF resulted in exacerbated disease. Subsequent experiments have indicated that this may have resulted from the divergent effects of the two TNF receptor...

  11. Amino- and Carboxyl-Terminal CCR5 Mutations in Brazilian HIV-1-Infected Women and Homology Model of p.L55Q CCR5 Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Giselle Calasans de Souza; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T; Jesus, Jaqueline Goes; Novaes, Thiago; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Sousa Júnior, Edivaldo Costa; Santos, Edson de Souza; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Zanette, Dalila Luciola; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior

    2015-07-01

    Genetic factors from an HIV-1 host can affect the rate of progression to AIDS and HIV infection. To investigate the frequency of mutations in the CCR5 gene, HIV-1 samples from infected women and uninfected individuals were selected for sequencing of the CCR5 gene regions encoding the N- and C-terminal protein domains. Physicochemical CCR5 modeling and potential protein domain analysis were performed in order to evaluate the impact of the mutations found in the properties and structure of CCR5. The p.L55Q mutation in the N-terminal protein domain was observed only in uninfected individuals, with an allelic frequency of 1.8%. Physicochemical analysis revealed that the p.L55Q mutation magnified the flexibility and accessibility profiles and the modeling of CCR5 structures showed resulting in a small deviation to the right, as well as a hydrophobic to hydrophilic property alteration. The p.L55Q mutation also resulted in a slight modification of the electrostatic load of this region. Additionally, three novel silent mutations were found at the C-terminal coding region among HIV-1-infected women. The results suggest that the p.L55Q mutation might alter CCR5 conformation. Further studies should be conducted to verify the role of this mutation in HIV-1 susceptibility.

  12. 3Rs-respecting animal models in radiopharmaceutical research with a special emphasis to monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In better developed human medical centres hybrid (or fusion) diagnostic imaging (PET/CT, SPECT/CT, PET/MRI …) is available for clinicians to detect, localize, stage and follow-up theire patients suffering a wide variety (oncological, cardiovascular, neurological, orthopaedic …) of diseases. Easy to understand that not only human and veterinary clinical but numerous research applications could be implemented using these novel digital imaging methods. The use of hybrid equipments is not simply an expensive toy in researcher’s hands but and effective tool that serves 2 out of the 3 Rs (Refinement and Reduction) requirements as well. Hybrid (fusion) imaging method allows high-resolution pictures including correct anatomical structures and quantized functional data as altogether after radiolabelled ligand applications. Serial images could be taken using only one single anesthetized animal that must not be exterminated at the end of process. The re-use of laboratory animals allowing us to compare the characteristics of different labelled molecules in the very same biological model. Spontaneously diseased canine, feline and exotic animals is a constant source of animal models for the biomedical research and represents a great choice to replace laboratory animals. Osteosarcoma, mammary gland carcinoma, thyroid carcinoma, brain tumours and a few others in dogs or cats might be the best known animal models of the appropriate human diseases. Diagnosing and then treating them with the most promising human methods (including cold MoAbs, immunotherapy, radiolabelled ligands ...) is a chance for the suffering animals, a new hope for owners and referral vets - and parallel applicable data for human oncologists and translational researchers. Authors wish to share with audience their 20 years expert in the field and hope to find friends and co-operators among them. (author)

  13. Link homology and equivariant gauge theory

    OpenAIRE

    Poudel, Prayat; Saveliev, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    The singular instanton Floer homology was defined by Kronheimer and Mrowka in connection with their proof that the Khovanov homology is an unknot detector. We study this theory for knots and two-component links using equivariant gauge theory on their double branched covers. We show that the special generator in the singular instanton Floer homology of a knot is graded by the knot signature mod 4, thereby providing a purely topological way of fixing the absolute grading in the theory. Our appr...

  14. Including Biological Literature Improves Homology Search

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jeffrey T.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Altman, Russ B

    2001-01-01

    Annotating the tremendous amount of sequence information being generated requires accurate automated methods for recognizing homology. Although sequence similarity is only one of many indicators of evolutionary homology, it is often the only one used. Here we find that supplementing sequence similarity with information from biomedical literature is successful in increasing the accuracy of homology search results. We modified the PSI-BLAST algorithm to use literature similarity in each iterati...

  15. Effects of Anti-CD45RB Monoclonal Antibody for T Lymphocyte Subsets in Mice Heart Transplantation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, C-Y; Wang, X-F; Qi, H; Li, F-R

    2016-08-01

    Anti-CD45RB monoclonal antibody (anti-CD45RBmAb), as a new immune tolerance inducer, may inhibit T cell proliferation and induce immune tolerance through competitive combination with CD45RB on the T cell surface, which blocks the conduction of activation signals. However, how anti-CD45RBmAb plays its role on T lymphocyte subsets during immunosuppression remains unclear. In this work, we investigate the effects of anti-CD45RBmAb on CD3(+) T lymphocyte both in vitro and in allogeneic heart transplant model in vivo. Interestingly, anti-CD45RBmAb could inhibit the proliferation of T cells, promote the transformation of T lymphocyte to Treg and Th2 cells, suppress the transformation to Th17 and Th1 cells, increase the number of Ts cells, decrease the number of Tm cells and thus play a role in immune inhibition and induction of immune tolerance. PMID:27146476

  16. A cocktail of humanized anti-pertussis toxin antibodies limits disease in murine and baboon models of whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Annalee W; Wagner, Ellen K; Laber, Joshua R; Goodfield, Laura L; Smallridge, William E; Harvill, Eric T; Papin, James F; Wolf, Roman F; Padlan, Eduardo A; Bristol, Andy; Kaleko, Michael; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread vaccination, pertussis rates are rising in industrialized countries and remain high worldwide. With no specific therapeutics to treat disease, pertussis continues to cause considerable infant morbidity and mortality. The pertussis toxin is a major contributor to disease, responsible for local and systemic effects including leukocytosis and immunosuppression. We humanized two murine monoclonal antibodies that neutralize pertussis toxin and expressed them as human immunoglobulin G1 molecules with no loss of affinity or in vitro neutralization activity. When administered prophylactically to mice as a binary cocktail, antibody treatment completely mitigated the Bordetella pertussis-induced rise in white blood cell counts and decreased bacterial colonization. When administered therapeutically to baboons, antibody-treated, but not untreated control animals, experienced a blunted rise in white blood cell counts and accelerated bacterial clearance rates. These preliminary findings support further investigation into the use of these antibodies to treat human neonatal pertussis in conjunction with antibiotics and supportive care.

  17. Homology modelling and bivalent single-chain Fv construction of anti-HepG2 single-chain immunoglobulin Fv fragments from a phage display library

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ming Ni; Bing Yu; Y U Huang; Zhenjie Tang; Ping Lei; Xin Shen; Wei Xin; Huifen Zhu; Guanxin Shen

    2008-12-01

    We prepared single-chain immunoglobulin Fv fragments (scFv) SLH10 specific for the HepG2 cell line after biopanning from a large human-naïve phage display library (Griffin. 1 Library). The three-dimensional (3D) structure of SLH10 was modelled by the Insight II molecule simulation software. The structure was refined using the molecular dynamics method. The structures with the least steric clashes and lowest energy were determined finally. The optimized structures of heavy (VH) and light (VL) variable chains of SLH10 scFv were obtained. Then SLH10 bivalent single-chain Fv (BsFv) was constructed that would be suitable for high-affinity targeting. SLH10 BsFv was generated by linking scFvs together and identified by sequencing. Its expression products were confirmed by western blot analysis. The relative molecular masses of scFv and BsFv were approximately 30 kDa and 60 kDa, respectively. Flow cytometry revealed that SLH10 BsFv bound the selected cell lines with greater signal intensity than the parental scFv. The improved antigen binding of SLH10 BsFv may be useful for immunodiagnostics or targeted gene therapy for liver cancer.

  18. Discovery of Azurin-Like Anticancer Bacteriocins from Human Gut Microbiome through Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking against the Tumor Suppressor p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuong Nguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Azurin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is known anticancer bacteriocin, which can specifically penetrate human cancer cells and induce apoptosis. We hypothesized that pathogenic and commensal bacteria with long term residence in human body can produce azurin-like bacteriocins as a weapon against the invasion of cancers. In our previous work, putative bacteriocins have been screened from complete genomes of 66 dominant bacteria species in human gut microbiota and subsequently characterized by subjecting them as functional annotation algorithms with azurin as control. We have qualitatively predicted 14 putative bacteriocins that possessed functional properties very similar to those of azurin. In this work, we perform a number of quantitative and structure-based analyses including hydrophobic percentage calculation, structural modeling, and molecular docking study of bacteriocins of interest against protein p53, a cancer target. Finally, we have identified 8 putative bacteriocins that bind p53 in a same manner as p28-azurin and azurin, in which 3 peptides (p1seq16, p2seq20, and p3seq24 shared with our previous study and 5 novel ones (p1seq09, p2seq05, p2seq08, p3seq02, and p3seq17 discovered in the first time. These bacteriocins are suggested for further in vitro tests in different neoplastic line cells.

  19. Discovery of novel inhibitors of Streptococcus pneumoniae based on the virtual screening with the homology-modeled structure of histidine kinase (VicK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Weiliang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the widespread abusage of antibiotics, antibiotic-resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae has been increasing quickly in recent years, and it is obviously urgent to develop new types of antibiotics. Two-component systems (TCSs are the major signal transduction pathways in bacteria and have emerged as potential targets for antibacterial drugs. Among the 13 pairs of TCSs proteins presenting in S. pneumoniae, VicR/K is the unique one essential for bacterium growth, and block agents to which, if can be found, may be developed as effective antibiotics against S. pneumoniae infection. Results Using a structure-based virtual screening (SBVS method, 105 compounds were computationally identified as potential inhibitors of the histidine kinase (HK VicK protein from the compound library SPECS. Six of them were then validated in vitro to be active in inhibiting the growth of S. pneumoniae without obvious cytotoxicity to Vero cell. In mouse sepsis models, these compounds are still able to decrease the mortality of the mice infected by S. pneumoniae and one compound even has significant therapeutic effect. Conclusion To our knowledge, these compounds are the first reported inhibitors of HK with antibacterial activity in vitro and in vivo, and are novel lead structures for developing new drugs to combat pneumococcal infection.

  20. Monoclonal antibody evidence for structural similarities between the central rod regions of actinin and dystrophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T M; Ellis, J M; Ginjaar, I B; van Paassen, M M; van Ommen, G J; Moorman, A F; Cartwright, A J; Morris, G E

    1990-10-15

    A monoclonal antibody, MANDYS141, binds to both dystrophin and actinin on Western blots (SDS-denatured), but only to actinin in frozen sections of human muscle (native conformation). It differs from a polyclonal cross-reacting antiserum in that it binds to several muscle isoforms of actinin (smooth, fast and slow) from man, mouse and chicken and recognises a quite different part of the proposed triple-helical region of dystrophin (amino acids 1750-2248). The results suggest that structural homologies between actinin and dystrophin occur more than once in their central helical regions and provide experimental support for an actinin-like central rod model for dystrophin. PMID:1699800

  1. Time-Evolution Contrast of Target MRI Using High-Stability Antibody Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles: An Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, high-quality antibody functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles are synthesized. Such physical characterizations as particle morphology, particle size, stability, and relaxivity of magnetic particles are investigated. The immunoreactivity of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles is examined by utilizing immunomagnetic reduction. The results show that the mean diameter of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles is around 50 nm, and the relaxivity of the magnetic particles is 145 (mM·s−1. In addition to characterizing the magnetic nanoparticles, the feasibility of using the antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the contrast medium of target magnetic resonance imaging is investigated. These antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles are injected into mice bearing with tumor. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes darker after the injection and then recovers 50 hours after the injection. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes the darkest at around 20 hours after the injection. Thus, the observing time window for the specific labeling of tumors with antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was found to be 20 hours after injecting biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles into mice. The biopsy of tumor is stained after the injection to prove that the long-term darkness of tumor magnetic-resonance image is due to the specific anchoring of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles at tumor.

  2. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    -glutamate receptor antibodies is discussed separately in this very comprehensive review, with regards to: the human diseases in which these anti-glutamate receptor antibodies were found thus far, their presence and production in the nervous system, their association with various psychiatric/behavioral/cognitive/motor impairments, their possible association with certain infectious organisms, their detrimental effects in vitro as well as in vivo in animal models in mice, rats or rabbits, and their diverse and unique mechanisms of action. The review also covers the very encouraging positive responses to immunotherapy of some patients that have either of the above-mentioned anti-glutamate receptor antibodies, and that suffer from various neurological diseases/problems. All the above are also summarized in the review's five schematic and useful figures, for each type of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies separately. The review ends with a summary of all the main findings, and with recommended guidelines for diagnosis, therapy, drug design and future investigations. In the nut shell, the human studies, the in vitro studies, as well as the in vivo studies in animal models in mice, rats and rabbit revealed the following findings regarding the five different types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies: (1) Anti-AMPA-GluR3B antibodies are present in ~25-30% of patients with different types of Epilepsy. When these anti-glutamate receptor antibodies (or other types of autoimmune antibodies) are found in Epilepsy patients, and when these autoimmune antibodies are suspected to induce or aggravate the seizures and/or the cognitive/psychiatric/behavioral impairments that sometimes accompany the seizures, the Epilepsy is called 'Autoimmune Epilepsy'. In some patients with 'Autoimmune Epilepsy' the anti-AMPA-GluR3B antibodies associate significantly with psychiatric/cognitive/behavior abnormalities. In vitro and/or in animal models, the anti-AMPA-GluR3B antibodies by themselves induce many

  3. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    -glutamate receptor antibodies is discussed separately in this very comprehensive review, with regards to: the human diseases in which these anti-glutamate receptor antibodies were found thus far, their presence and production in the nervous system, their association with various psychiatric/behavioral/cognitive/motor impairments, their possible association with certain infectious organisms, their detrimental effects in vitro as well as in vivo in animal models in mice, rats or rabbits, and their diverse and unique mechanisms of action. The review also covers the very encouraging positive responses to immunotherapy of some patients that have either of the above-mentioned anti-glutamate receptor antibodies, and that suffer from various neurological diseases/problems. All the above are also summarized in the review's five schematic and useful figures, for each type of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies separately. The review ends with a summary of all the main findings, and with recommended guidelines for diagnosis, therapy, drug design and future investigations. In the nut shell, the human studies, the in vitro studies, as well as the in vivo studies in animal models in mice, rats and rabbit revealed the following findings regarding the five different types of anti-glutamate receptor antibodies: (1) Anti-AMPA-GluR3B antibodies are present in ~25-30% of patients with different types of Epilepsy. When these anti-glutamate receptor antibodies (or other types of autoimmune antibodies) are found in Epilepsy patients, and when these autoimmune antibodies are suspected to induce or aggravate the seizures and/or the cognitive/psychiatric/behavioral impairments that sometimes accompany the seizures, the Epilepsy is called 'Autoimmune Epilepsy'. In some patients with 'Autoimmune Epilepsy' the anti-AMPA-GluR3B antibodies associate significantly with psychiatric/cognitive/behavior abnormalities. In vitro and/or in animal models, the anti-AMPA-GluR3B antibodies by themselves induce many

  4. Model-directed engineering of "difficult-to-express" monoclonal antibody production by Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pybus, Leon P; Dean, Greg; West, Nathan R; Smith, Andrew; Daramola, Olalekan; Field, Ray; Wilkinson, Stephen J; James, David C

    2014-02-01

    Despite improvements in volumetric titer for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production processes using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, some "difficult-to-express" (DTE) MAbs inexplicably reach much lower process titers. These DTE MAbs require intensive cell line and process development activity, rendering them more costly or even unsuitable to manufacture. To rapidly and rationally identify an optimal strategy to improve production of DTE MAbs, we have developed an engineering design platform combining high-yielding transient production, empirical modeling of MAb synthesis incorporating an unfolded protein response (UPR) regulatory loop with directed expression and cell engineering approaches. Utilizing a panel of eight IgG1 λ MAbs varying >4-fold in volumetric titer, we showed that MAb-specific limitations on folding and assembly rate functioned to induce a proportionate UPR in host CHO cells with a corresponding reduction in cell growth rate. Derived from comparative empirical modeling of cellular constraints on the production of each MAb we employed two strategies to increase production of DTE MAbs designed to avoid UPR induction through an improvement in the rate/cellular capacity for MAb folding and assembly reactions. Firstly, we altered the transfected LC:HC gene ratio and secondly, we co-expressed a variety of molecular chaperones, foldases or UPR transactivators (BiP, CypB, PDI, and active forms of ATF6 and XBP1) with recombinant MAbs. DTE MAb production was significantly improved by both strategies, although the mode of action was dependent upon the approach employed. Increased LC:HC ratio or CypB co-expression improved cell growth with no effect on qP. In contrast, BiP, ATF6c and XBP1s co-expression increased qP and reduced cell growth. This study demonstrates that expression-engineering strategies to improve production of DTE proteins in mammalian cells should be product specific, and based on rapid predictive tools to assess the relative impact of

  5. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantin Mischaikow; Michael Schatz; William Kalies; Thomas Wanner

    2010-05-24

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure

  6. Multiscale analysis of nonlinear systems using computational homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantin Mischaikow, Rutgers University/Georgia Institute of Technology, Michael Schatz, Georgia Institute of Technology, William Kalies, Florida Atlantic University, Thomas Wanner,George Mason University

    2010-05-19

    This is a collaborative project between the principal investigators. However, as is to be expected, different PIs have greater focus on different aspects of the project. This report lists these major directions of research which were pursued during the funding period: (1) Computational Homology in Fluids - For the computational homology effort in thermal convection, the focus of the work during the first two years of the funding period included: (1) A clear demonstration that homology can sensitively detect the presence or absence of an important flow symmetry, (2) An investigation of homology as a probe for flow dynamics, and (3) The construction of a new convection apparatus for probing the effects of large-aspect-ratio. (2) Computational Homology in Cardiac Dynamics - We have initiated an effort to test the use of homology in characterizing data from both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of arrhythmia in the heart. Recently, the use of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging in conjunction with voltage sensitive fluorescent dyes has enabled researchers to visualize electrical activity on the surface of cardiac tissue, both in vitro and in vivo. (3) Magnetohydrodynamics - A new research direction is to use computational homology to analyze results of large scale simulations of 2D turbulence in the presence of magnetic fields. Such simulations are relevant to the dynamics of black hole accretion disks. The complex flow patterns from simulations exhibit strong qualitative changes as a function of magnetic field strength. Efforts to characterize the pattern changes using Fourier methods and wavelet analysis have been unsuccessful. (4) Granular Flow - two experts in the area of granular media are studying 2D model experiments of earthquake dynamics where the stress fields can be measured; these stress fields from complex patterns of 'force chains' that may be amenable to analysis using computational homology. (5) Microstructure

  7. An experimental test of stroke recovery by implanting a hyaluronic acid hydrogel carrying a Nogo receptor antibody in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Jun [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tian Weiming [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hou Shaoping [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Xu Qunyuan [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Spector, Myron [Tissue Engineering, VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cui Fuzhai [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-12-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a hyaluronic-acid-based (HA-based) hydrogel implant, carrying a polyclonal antibody to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR), on adult rats that underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Behavioral tests of a forelimb-reaching task suggested that the disabled function of the impaired forelimb in this stroke model was ameliorated by the implant to a certain extent. These behavioral findings were correlated with immunohistochemical results of investigating the distribution of NgR antibody, neurofilaments (NF) and neuron-specific class III {beta}-tubulin (TuJ1) in the brain sections. The porous hydrogel functioned as a scaffold to deliver the NgR antibody, support cell migration and development. In addition, it was found NF-positive and TuJ1-positive expressions were distributed in the implanted hydrogel. Collectively, the results demonstrate the promise of the HA hydrogel as a scaffold material and the delivery vehicle of the NgR antibody for the repair of defects and the support of neural regeneration in the brain.

  8. Pilin Vaccination Stimulates Weak Antibody Responses and Provides No Protection in a C57Bl/6 Murine Model of Acute Clostridium difficile Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldarelli, Grace A; Matz, Hanover; Gao, Si; Chen, Kevin; Hamza, Therwa; Yfantis, Harris G; Feng, Hanping; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of nosocomial infections in the United States, adding billions of dollars per year to health care costs. A vaccine targeted against the bacterium would be extremely beneficial in decreasing the morbidity and mortality caused by C. difficile-associated disease; a vaccine directed against a colonization factor would hinder the spread of the bacterium as well as prevent disease. Type IV pili (T4Ps) are extracellular appendages composed of protein monomers called pilins. They are involved in adhesion and colonization in a wide variety of bacteria and archaea, and are putative colonization factors in C. difficile. We hypothesized that vaccinating mice with pilins would lead to generation of anti-pilin antibodies, and would protect against C. difficile challenge. We found that immunizing C57Bl/6 mice with various pilins, whether combined or as individual proteins, led to low anti-pilin antibody titers and no protection upon C. difficile challenge. Passive transfer of anti-pilin antibodies led to high serum anti-pilin IgG titers, but to undetectable fecal anti-pilin IgG titers and did not protect against challenge. The low antibody titers observed in these experiments may be due to the particular strain of mice used. Further experiments, possibly with a different animal model of C. difficile infection, are needed to determine if an anti-T4P vaccine would be protective against C. difficile infection. PMID:27375958

  9. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  10. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Hot spot turbulence is a potential contributor to yield degradation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules, although its origin, if present, remains unclear. In this work, a perturbation analysis is performed of an analytical homologous solution that mimics the hot spot and surrounding cold fuel during the late stages of an ICF implosion. It is shown that the flow is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability, and that during stagnation, short wavelength entropy and vorticity fluctuations amplify by a factor exp (π |N0 | ts) , where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. This amplification factor is exponentially sensitive to mean flow gradients and varies from 103-107 for realistic gradients. Comparisons are made with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and it is found that a numerical resolution of ~ 30 zones per wavelength is required to capture the evolution of vorticity accurately. This translates to an angular resolution of ~(12 / l) ∘ , or ~ 0 .1° to resolve the fastest growing modes (Legendre mode l > 100).

  11. Stability of p53 homologs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Brandt

    Full Text Available Most proteins have not evolved for maximal thermal stability. Some are only marginally stable, as for example, the DNA-binding domains of p53 and its homologs, whose kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities are strongly correlated. Here, we applied high-throughput methods using a real-time PCR thermocycler to study the stability of several full-length orthologs and paralogs of the p53 family of transcription factors, which have diverse functions, ranging from tumour suppression to control of developmental processes. From isothermal denaturation fluorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry, we found that full-length proteins showed the same correlation between kinetic and thermodynamic stability as their isolated DNA-binding domains. The stabilities of the full-length p53 orthologs were marginal and correlated with the temperature of their organism, paralleling the stability of the isolated DNA-binding domains. Additionally, the paralogs p63 and p73 were significantly more stable and long-lived than p53. The short half-life of p53 orthologs and the greater persistence of the paralogs may be biologically relevant.

  12. Homotopic Chain Maps Have Equal s-Homology and d-Homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Kazemi-Baneh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The homotopy of chain maps on preabelian categories is investigated and the equality of standard homologies and d-homologies of homotopic chain maps is established. As a special case, if X and Y are the same homotopy type, then their nth d-homology R-modules are isomorphic, and if X is a contractible space, then its nth d-homology R-modules for n≠0 are trivial.

  13. A Novel Anti-Histone H1 Monoclonal Antibody, SSV Monoclonal Antibody, Improves Lung Injury and Survival in a Mouse Model of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Sepsis-Like Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Kusano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Histones play important roles in both host defenses and inflammation related to microbial infection. A peptide mimotope (SSV was identified from a novel histone H1 monoclonal antibody (16G9 mAb that was shown to inhibit the mixed lymphocyte reaction. In the present study, an anti-SSV producing hybridoma was established. We investigated the effects of SSV mAb in a mouse acute inflammation model induced by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Methods. SSV mAb was generated and characterized. Mice were treated with SSV mAb or a control IgG antibody prior to LPS injection. Evaluation of survival rate and lung tissue on histological score was performed. The levels of inflammatory cytokines and histones H1, H3, and H4 in plasma and lung tissue were measured by ELISA. Results. Competitive ELISA revealed that SSV mAb binds to histone H1. SSV mAb improved lung injury and prolonged the survival of LPS-injected mice. Increased levels of histones H1, H3, and H4 and inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in plasma and lung tissue after LPS injection were ameliorated by SSV mAb. Conclusion. SSV mAb is shown to have anti-inflammatory activity and organ-protective effects, highlighting the importance of controlling histone H1 as well as H3 and H4 levels during inflammation.

  14. Why do bacteria engage in homologous recombination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiologists have long recognized that the uptake and incorporation of homologous DNA from outside the cell is a common feature of bacteria, with important implications for their evolution. However, the exact reasons why bacteria engage in homologous recombination remain elusive. This Opinion art

  15. Detecting atmospheric rivers using persistent homology

    OpenAIRE

    Alfsvåg, Kristian Stusdal

    2015-01-01

    This master's thesis is a first investigation on the problem of seeing whether it is possible to detect atmospheric rivers using persistent homology. Two different computations are done and a basic analysis is made. In addition an implementation of persistent homology made during the thesis is described.

  16. Relative K-homology and normal operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manuilov, Vladimir; Thomsen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    -term exact sequence which generalizes the excision six-term exact sequence in the first variable of KK-theory. Subsequently we investigate the relative K-homology which arises from the group of relative extensions by specializing to abelian $C^*$-algebras. It turns out that this relative K-homology carries...

  17. Generation of Anti-Murine ADAMTS13 Antibodies and Their Application in a Mouse Model for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deforche, Louis; Tersteeg, Claudia; Roose, Elien; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Pareyn, Inge; De Cock, Elien; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy linked to a deficiency in the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. In the current study, a novel mouse model for acquired TTP was generated to facilitate development and validation of new therapies for this disease. Therefore, a large panel (n = 19) of novel anti-mouse ADAMTS13 (mADAMTS13) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of mouse origin was generated. Inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs were identified using the FRETS-VWF73 assay. Four mAbs strongly inhibited mADAMTS13 activity in vitro (∼68-90% inhibition). Injecting a combination of 2 inhibitory mAbs (13B4 and 14H7, 1.25 mg/kg each) in Adamts13+/+ mice resulted in full inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (96 ± 4% inhibition, day 1 post injection), leading to the appearance of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers. Interestingly, the inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs 13B4 and 14H7 were ideally suited to induce long-term ADAMTS13 deficiency in Adamts13+/+ mice. A single bolus injection resulted in full ex vivo inhibition for more than 7 days. As expected, the mice with the acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency did not spontaneously develop TTP, despite the accumulation of UL-VWF multimers. In line with the Adamts13-/- mice, TTP-like symptoms could only be induced when an additional trigger (rVWF) was administered. On the other hand, the availability of our panel of anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs allowed us to further develop a sensitive ELISA to detect ADAMTS13 in mouse plasma. In conclusion, a novel acquired TTP mouse model was generated through the development of inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs. Consequently, this model provides new opportunities for the development and validation of novel treatments for patients with TTP. In addition, these newly developed inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs are of great value to specifically study the role of ADAMTS13 in mouse models of thrombo-inflammatory disease. PMID:27479501

  18. Antibodies against bovine herpesvirus (BHV) 5 may be differentiated from antibodies against BHV1 in a BHV1 glycoprotein E blocking ELISA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellenberg, G.J.; Mars, M.H.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    2001-01-01

    We examined whether antibodies against bovine herpesvirus (BHV) 5 cross-react with BHV1 antigens and whether they could interfere with BHV1 eradication programmes. Six calves were experimentally infected with different doses of BHV5 strain N569; homologous antibodies were ?rst detectable on day 11 p

  19. Summary receiver operating characteristics (SROC) and hierarchical SROC models for analysis of diagnostic test evaluations of antibody ELISAs for paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Nils; Nielsen, Søren S

    2009-11-15

    Critical, systematic reviews of available diagnostic test evaluations are a meticulous approach to synthesize evidence about a diagnostic test. However, often the review finds that data quality is poor due to deficiencies in design and reporting of the test evaluations and formal statistical comparisons are discouraged. Even when only simple summary measures are appropriate, the strong correlation between sensitivity and specificity and their dependence on differences in diagnostic threshold across studies, creates the need for tools to summarise properties of the diagnostic test under investigation. This study presents summary receiver operating characteristics (SROC) analysis as a means to synthesize information from diagnostic test evaluation studies. Using data from a review of diagnostic tests for ante mortem diagnosis of paratuberculosis as an illustration, SROC and hierarchical SROC (HSROC) analysis were used to estimate overall diagnostic accuracies of antibody ELISAs for bovine paratuberculosis while accounting for covariates: the target condition (infectious or infected) used in the test evaluation (one for the evaluation of Se and one for Sp); and the type of test (serum vs. milk). The methods gave comparable results (regarding the estimated diagnostic log odds ratio), considering the small sample size and the quality of data. The SROC analysis found a difference in the performance of tests when the target condition for evaluation of Se was infected rather than infectious, suggesting that ELISAs are not suitable for detecting infected cattle. However, the SROC model does not take differences in sample size between study units into account, whereas the HSROC allows for both between and within study variation. Considering the small sample size, more credibility should be given to the results of the HSROC. For both methods the area under the (H)SROC curve was calculated and results were comparable. The conclusion is that while the SROC is simpler and easier

  20. CCR3 monoclonal antibody inhibits airway eosinophilic inflammation and mucus overproduction in a mouse model of asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-hao SHEN; Feng XU; Gen-sheng ZHANG; Shao-bin WANG; Wei-hua XU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effect of a rat anti-mouse CC-chemokine receptor-3 (CCR3) monoclonal antibody (CCR3 mAb) on airway eosinophilia and mucus overproduction in asthmatic mice. Methods: An asthma model was sensitized and challenged by ovalbumin (OVA) in male C57BL/6 mice. Asthmatic mice were given dual administration (intraperitoneal injection and aerosol inhalation) of CCR3 mAb or nonspecific rat IgG (ns-IgG). The number of total and differential inflammatory cells in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was counted. Eosinophils number, the goblet cell percentage (GCP) and airway mucus index (AMI) were measured in the lung tissues. Interleukin (IL)-5 levels in the BALF were examined. The expression of MUC5AC and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA in the lung tissues was detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The results were compared among the groups. Results: CCR3 mAb significantly suppressed the increased eosinophils in the BALF and lung tissues in OVA-challenged mice compared with ns-IgG-treated mice. IL-5 levels in the BALF in CCR3 mAb and ns-IgG administration mice exhibited no obvious changes relative to OVA-challenged asthmatic mice. CCR3 mAb reduced the increased GCP and AMI after OVA challenge and decreased the enhanced expression of MUC5AC and EGFR mRNA in lung tissues in asthmatic animals. Conclusion: CCR3 mAb can significantly inhibit airway eosinophilia and mucus overproduction in asthmatic mice. Blockage of CCR3 may represent a new strategy to asthma therapy.

  1. Efficacy and safety of AVP-21D9, an anthrax monoclonal antibody, in animal models and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkevich, Nina V; Hopkins, Robert J; Bernton, Edward; Meister, Gabriel T; Vela, Eric M; Atiee, George; Johnson, Virginia; Nabors, Gary S; Aimes, Ronald T; Ionin, Boris; Skiadopoulos, Mario H

    2014-07-01

    Anthrax is an acute infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Timely administration of antibiotics approved for the treatment of anthrax disease may prevent associated morbidity and mortality. However, any delay in initiating antimicrobial therapy may result in increased mortality, as inhalational anthrax progresses rapidly to the toxemic phase of disease. An anthrax antitoxin, AVP-21D9, also known as Thravixa (fully human anthrax monoclonal antibody), is being developed as a therapeutic agent against anthrax toxemia. The efficacy of AVP-21D9 in B. anthracis-infected New Zealand White rabbits and in cynomolgus macaques was evaluated, and its safety and pharmacokinetics were assessed in healthy human volunteers. The estimated mean elimination half-life values of AVP-21D9 in surviving anthrax-challenged rabbits and nonhuman primates (NHPs) ranged from approximately 2 to 4 days and 6 to 11 days, respectively. In healthy humans, the mean elimination half-life was in the range of 20 to 27 days. Dose proportionality was observed for the maximum serum concentration (Cmax) of AVP-21D9 and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC). In therapeutic efficacy animal models, treatment with AVP-21D9 resulted in survival of up to 92% of the rabbits and up to 67% of the macaques. Single infusions of AVP-21D9 were well tolerated in healthy adult volunteers across all doses evaluated, and no serious adverse events were reported. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01202695.).

  2. Antibody directs properdin-dependent activation of the complement alternative pathway in a mouse model of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui-Fang; Yan, Huimin; Stover, Cordula M; Fernandez, Tamara Montes; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Song, Wen-Chao; Wu, Xiaobo; Thompson, Robert W; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Atkinson, John P; Hourcade, Dennis E; Pham, Christine T N

    2012-02-14

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex inflammatory vascular disease. There are currently limited treatment options for AAA when surgery is inapplicable. Therefore, insights into molecular mechanisms underlying AAA pathogenesis may reveal therapeutic targets that could be manipulated pharmacologically or biologically to halt disease progression. Using an elastase-induced AAA mouse model, we previously established that the complement alternative pathway (AP) plays a critical role in the development of AAA. However, the mechanism by which complement AP is initiated remains undefined. The complement protein properdin, traditionally viewed as a positive regulator of the AP, may also initiate complement activation by binding directly to target surfaces. In this study, we sought to determine whether properdin serves as a focal point for the initiation of the AP complement activation in AAA. Using a properdin loss of function mutation in mice and a mutant form of the complement factor B protein that produces a stable, properdin-free AP C3 convertase, we show that properdin is required for the development of elastase-induced AAA in its primary role as a convertase stabilizer. Unexpectedly, we find that, in AAA, natural IgG antibodies direct AP-mediated complement activation. The absence of IgG abrogates C3 deposition in elastase-perfused aortic wall and protects animals from AAA development. We also determine that blockade of properdin activity prevents aneurysm formation. These results indicate that an innate immune response to self-antigens activates the complement system and initiates the inflammatory cascade in AAA. Moreover, the study suggests that properdin-targeting strategies may halt aneurysmal growth.

  3. Peridinialean dinoflagellate plate patterns, labels and homologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Tabulation patterns for peridinialean dinoflagellate thecae and cysts have been traditionally expressed using a plate labelling system described by C.A. Kofoid in the early 1900's. This system can obscure dinoflagellate plate homologies and has not always been strictly applied. The plate-labelling system presented here introduces new series labels but incorporates key features and ideas from the more recently proposed systems of G.L. Eaton and F.J.R. Taylor, as modified by W.R. Evitt. Plate-series recognition begins with the cingulum (C-series) and proceeds from the cingulum toward the apex for the three series of the epitheca/epicyst and proceeds from the cingulum toward the antapex for the two series of the hypotheca/hypocyst. The epithecal/epicystal model consists of eight plates that touch the anterior margin of the cingulum (E-series: plates E1-E7, ES), seven plates toward the apex that touch the E-series plates (M-series: R, M1-M6), and up to seven plates near the apex that do not touch E-series plates (D-series: Dp-Dv). The hypothecal/hypocystal model consists of eight plates that touch the posterior margin of the cingulum (H-series: H1-H6,HR,HS) and three plates toward the antapex (T1-T3). Epithecal/epicystal tabulation patterns come in both 8- and 7- models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the E-series. Hypothecal/hypocystal tabulation patterns also come in both 8- and 7-models, corresponding to eight and seven plates, respectively, in the H-series. By convention, the 7-model epitheca/epicyst has no plates E1 and M1; the 7-model hypotheca/hypocyst has no plate H6. Within an 8-model or 7-model, the system emphasizes plates that are presumed to be homologous by giving them identical labels. I introduce the adjectives "monothigmate", "dithigmate," and "trithigmate" to designate plates touching one, two, and three plates, respectively, of the adjacent series. The term "thigmation" applies to the analysis of plate contacts between

  4. Homology Modeling and Docking Studies of Cannabinoid Receptor CB1%大麻素受体CB1三维结构的同源模建及其对接研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂国刚; 李少华

    2011-01-01

    大麻素CB1受体属于G蛋白偶联受体.以牛视紫红质的晶体结构为模板,利用同源模建法对CB1受体的三维结构进行了模拟,并采用分子动力学方法对模型进行了修正和优化.在此基础上,分析了活性位点的组成和结构,研究了拮抗剂利莫那班与CBi受体的对接,明确了CB1受体与利莫那班结合时起重要作用的氨基酸残基.发现利莫那班与CB1受体残基Lys192形成氢键相互作用是CB1受体拮抗剂的重要分子作用基础.%CB1 receptor belongs to G protein-coupled receptor.Using bovine rhodopsin as structural template, the 3D structure of CB1 receptor was built by homology modeling, and refined using molecular dynamics method.On the basis of the modeling, the components and strncture of active site in CB1 receptor were analyzed, and the docking of rimonabant with CB1 receptor was investigated.The binding pattern revealed important residues that interacted with the rimonabant.The hydrogen bonding interaction between Lys192 and rimonabant is crucial for CB1 receptor antagonist.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are antibodies having single specificity for a given antigen site (epitope). The development of hybridoma technology and the relative ease by which MAbs can be prepared has revolutionized many aspects of serological applications in diagnosis and differentiation of disease producing agents. The property of monospecificity offers advantages in diagnostic applications over polyclonal sera in that tests can be defined exactly with regard to the antigen detected and the affinity of reaction between the given antigenic site and the monoclonal reagent. In addition, MAbs offer better possibilities for test standardization, because the same reagent can be used in different laboratories. Such an MAb can be supplied by a central laboratory or 'grown' from hybridoma cells, ensuring that the resultant product is identical from laboratory to laboratory and that the part of the test involving the MAb reaction is the same. The methodologies for inoculation regimes, mice, cloning methods, selection of fusion partners, etc., have been validated extensively in developed country laboratories. The decision to establish a MAb production facility must be examined on a strict cost-benefit basis, since it is still expensive to produce a product. There are many MAbs available that should be sought to allow exploitation in developing tests. If a production facility is envisaged, it should produce reagents for national needs, i.e. there should be a clear problem oriented approach whereby exact needs are defined. In the field of veterinary applications, MAbs are the central reagent in many immunoassays based on the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The development of specific tests for diagnosing diseases is dominated by MAbs and has been fuelled by a strong research base, mainly in developed countries allied to developing countries through the study of related diseases. Thus, there are very many assays dependent on MAbs, some of which form the basis of

  6. Epitope mapping of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis: microwave-assisted synthesis of the peptide antigens and ELISA screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Giulia; Ieronymaki, Matthaia; Nuti, Francesca; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Larregola, Maud; Aharoni, Rina; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The role of pathologic auto-antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in multiple sclerosis is a highly controversial matter. As the use of animal models may enable to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the human disorder, numerous studies on multiple sclerosis are carried out using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In particular, the most extensively used EAE model is obtained by immunizing C57BL/6 mice with the immunodominant peptide MOG(35-55). In this scenario, we analyzed the anti-MOG antibody response in this model using the recombinant refolded extracellular domain of the protein, MOG(1-117). To assess the presence of a B-cell intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism, we tested also five synthetic peptides mapping the 1-117 sequence of MOG, including MOG(35-55). For this purpose, we cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and on-column refolded MOG(1-117), and we applied an optimized microwave-assisted solid-phase synthetic strategy to obtain the designed peptide sequences. Subsequently, we set up a solid-phase immunoenzymatic assay testing both naïve and EAE mice sera and using MOG protein and peptides as antigenic probes. The results obtained disclose an intense IgG antibody response against both the recombinant protein and the immunizing peptide, while no response was observed against the other synthetic fragments, thus excluding the presence of an intramolecular epitope spreading mechanism. Furthermore, as the properly refolded recombinant probe is able to bind antibodies with greater efficiency compared with MOG(35-55), we hypothesize the presence of both linear and conformational epitopes on MOG(35-55) sequence. PMID:26663200

  7. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Swanstrom

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73% failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9% levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV.

  8. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, J. A.; Plante, J. A.; Plante, K. S.; Young, E. F.; McGowan, E.; Gallichotte, E. N.; Widman, D. G.; Heise, M. T.; de Silva, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV) infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73%) failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9%) levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV. PMID:27435464

  9. Detection of homologous horizontal gene transfer in SNP data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-23

    We study the detection of mutations, sequencing errors, and homologous horizontal gene transfers (HGT) in a set of closely related microbial genomes. We base the model on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) and break the genomes into blocks to handle the rearrangement problem. Then we apply a synamic programming algorithm to model whether changes within each block are likely a result of mutations, sequencing errors, or HGT.

  10. Systemically administered IgG anti-toxin antibodies protect the colonic mucosa during infection with Clostridium difficile in the piglet model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocean R Cohen

    Full Text Available The use of anti-toxin human monoclonal antibodies (HMab as treatment for C. difficile infection has been investigated in animal models and human clinical trials as an alternative to or in combination with traditional antibiotic therapy. While HMab therapy appears to be a promising option, how systemically administered IgG antibodies protect the colonic mucosa during Clostridium difficile infection is unknown. Using the gnotobiotic piglet model of Clostridium difficile infection, we administered a mixture of anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB HMabs systemically to piglets infected with either pathogenic or non-pathogenic C. difficile strains. The HMabs were present throughout the small and large intestinal tissue of both groups, but significant HMabs were present in the lumen of the large intestines only in the pathogenic strain-infected group. Similarly, HMabs measured in the large intestine over a period of 2-4 days following antibody administration were not significantly different over time in the gut mucosa among the groups, but concentrations in the lumen of the large intestine were again consistently higher in the pathogenic strain-infected group. These results indicate that systemically administered HMab IgG reaches the gut mucosa during the course of CDI, protecting the host against systemic intoxication, and that leakage through the damaged colon likely protects the mucosa from further damage, allowing initiation of repair and recovery.

  11. Threading homology through algebra selected patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Boffi, Giandomenico

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at graduate students and researchers in mathematics, this book takes homological themes, such as Koszul complexes and their generalizations, and shows how these can be used to clarify certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them. - ;Threading Homology through Algebra takes homological themes (Koszul complexes and their variations, resolutions in general) and shows how these affect the perception of certain problems in selected parts of algebra, as well as their success in solving a number of them. The text deals with regular local ri

  12. Homologous modeling and function analysis on thioredoxin glutathione reductase from Schistosoma j aponicum%日本血吸虫硫氧还蛋白谷胱甘肽还原酶同源建模及功能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄经纬; 郑予桐; 李家璜; 华子春

    2014-01-01

    目的:对日本血吸虫硫氧还蛋白谷胱甘肽还原酶(TGR)进行结构及功能分析。方法基于结构序列比较利用Swiss-Pdbviewer构建了日本血吸虫的TGR同源结构模型,并对模型进行结构评估;分析日本血吸虫TGR与底物结合时可能的位点,比较这些位点在不同来源TGR中的异同。结果日本血吸虫 TGR结构在 PROCHECK评估中被证实可靠;位点比较分析表明NADPH、GDS结合区是保守的位点;GSH结合区存在特异性。结论作用于GDS、NADPH结合区的其它来源的TGR抑制剂可能对日本血吸虫TGR也有作用;GSH结合区是设计寄生虫TGR特异性抑制剂的潜在靶点之一;TGR的C末端对电子传递起着重要作用并可能参与底物的结合,因而阻断日本血吸虫TGR的C末端摆动的抑制剂将可能有效地抑制日本血吸虫TGR活性。%To explore the structure and function of thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) from Schistosoma j aponi-cum ,the homologous model of TGR in Schistosoma j aponicum was constructed by Swiss-Pdbviewer based on sequence and structure alignment .The potential substrates binding sites of TGR were analyzed and these sites of various TGRs were also as-sessed .Our results showed that the homologous model of Schistosoma japonicum TGR based on Schistosoma mansoni TGR structure was proved to be reasonable by PROCHECK program .Analysis of binding sites showed that NADPH and GDS bind-ing sites were conservative sites and GSH binding site was a specific site for parasite .Our data suggested that inhibitors which work in NADPH and GDS binding sites of other various TGRs may also interact with TGR form Schistosoma j aponicum .GSH binding region might be one of the potential targets for design of specific inhibitors of parasite TGRs .In addition ,C-terminal of TGR plays an important role in electron transfer and may participate in the binding of the substrate .Thus compound inhibiting swing of C-terminal could

  13. Combining BRAF inhibitor and anti PD-L1 antibody dramatically improves tumor regression and anti tumor immunity in an immunocompetent murine model of anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauner, Eran; Gunda, Viswanath; Vanden Borre, Pierre; Zurakowski, David; Kim, Yon Seon; Dennett, Kate Virginia; Amin, Salma; Freeman, Gordon James; Parangi, Sareh

    2016-03-29

    The interaction of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand is widely studied in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies blocking these molecules have had great success but little is known about them in thyroid cancer. We investigated the role of PD-L1 in thyroid cancer with respect to BRAF mutation and MAP kinase pathway activity and the effect of anti PD-L1 antibody therapy on tumor regression and intra-tumoral immune response alone or in combination with BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi). BRAFV600E cells showed significantly higher baseline expression of PD-L1 at mRNA and protein levels compared to BRAFWT cells. MEK inhibitor treatment resulted in a decrease of PD-L1 expression across all cell lines. BRAFi treatment decreased PD-L1 expression in BRAFV600E cells, but paradoxically increased its expression in BRAFWT cells. BRAFV600E mutated patients samples had a higher level of PD-L1 mRNA compared to BRAFWT (p=0.015). Immunocompetent mice (B6129SF1/J) implanted with syngeneic 3747 BRAFV600E/WT P53-/- murine tumor cells were randomized to control, PLX4720, anti PD-L1 antibody and their combination. In this model of aggressive thyroid cancer, control tumor volume reached 782.3±174.6mm3 at two weeks. The combination dramatically reduced tumor volume to 147.3±60.8, compared to PLX4720 (439.3±188.4 mm3, P=0.023) or PD-L1 antibody (716.7±62.1, Panti PD-L1 treatment potentiates the effect of BRAFi on tumor regression and intensifies anti tumor immune response in an immunocompetent model of ATC. Clinical trials of this therapeutic combination may be of benefit in patients with ATC.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  15. Real bundle gerbes, orientifolds and twisted KR-homology

    CERN Document Server

    Hekmati, Pedram; Szabo, Richard J; Vozzo, Raymond F

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a notion of Real bundle gerbes on manifolds equipped with an involution. We elucidate their relation to Jandl gerbes and prove that they are classified by their Real Dixmier-Douady class in Grothendieck's equivariant sheaf cohomology. We show that the Grothendieck group of Real bundle gerbe modules is isomorphic to twisted KR-theory for a torsion Real Dixmier-Douady class. Building on the Baum-Douglas model for K-homology and the orientifold construction in string theory, we introduce geometric cycles for twisted KR-homology groups using Real bundle gerbe modules. We prove that this defines a real-oriented generalised homology theory dual to twisted KR-theory for Real closed manifolds, and more generally for Real finite CW-complexes, for any Real Dixmier-Douady class. This is achieved by defining an explicit natural transformation to analytic twisted KR-homology and proving that it is an isomorphism. Our constructions give a new framework for the classification of orientifolds in string theory, p...

  16. Optimizing the design of oligonucleotides for homology directed gene targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Miné-Hattab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene targeting depends on the ability of cells to use homologous recombination to integrate exogenous DNA into their own genome. A robust mechanistic model of homologous recombination is necessary to fully exploit gene targeting for therapeutic benefit. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, our recently developed numerical simulation model for homology search is employed to develop rules for the design of oligonucleotides used in gene targeting. A Metropolis Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to predict the pairing dynamics of an oligonucleotide with the target double-stranded DNA. The model calculates the base-alignment between a long, target double-stranded DNA and a probe nucleoprotein filament comprised of homologous recombination proteins (Rad51 or RecA polymerized on a single strand DNA. In this study, we considered different sizes of oligonucleotides containing 1 or 3 base heterologies with the target; different positions on the probe were tested to investigate the effect of the mismatch position on the pairing dynamics and stability. We show that the optimal design is a compromise between the mean time to reach a perfect alignment between the two molecules and the stability of the complex. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: A single heterology can be placed anywhere without significantly affecting the stability of the triplex. In the case of three consecutive heterologies, our modeling recommends using long oligonucleotides (at least 35 bases in which the heterologous sequences are positioned at an intermediate position. Oligonucleotides should not contain more than 10% consecutive heterologies to guarantee a stable pairing with the target dsDNA. Theoretical modeling cannot replace experiments, but we believe that our model can considerably accelerate optimization of oligonucleotides for gene therapy by predicting their pairing dynamics with the target dsDNA.

  17. Exceptional cosmetic surgeries on homology spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Ravelomanana, Huygens C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cosmetic surgery conjecture for hyperbolic knots in integer homology spheres, focusing on exceptional surgeries. We give some restrictions on the slopes of exceptional truly cosmetic surgeries according to the type of surgery.

  18. Superconformal field theories and cyclic homology

    CERN Document Server

    Eager, Richard

    2015-01-01

    One of the predictions of the AdS/CFT correspondence is the matching of protected operators between a superconformal field theory and its holographic dual. We review the spectrum of protected operators in quiver gauge theories that flow to superconformal field theories at low energies. The spectrum is determined by the cyclic homology of an algebra associated to the quiver gauge theory. Identifying the spectrum of operators with cyclic homology allows us to apply the Hochschild-Kostant-Rosenberg theorem to relate the cyclic homology groups to deRham cohomology groups. The map from cyclic homology to deRham cohomology can be viewed as a mathematical avatar of the passage from open to closed strings under the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  19. The role of antibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, M; Stassen, M H W

    2002-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease associated with antibodies directed to the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. These antibodies reduce the number of receptors. Autoantibodies against AChR and other muscle antigens can be used for the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and related disorders. The origin and the role of these antibodies in the disease are discussed. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, an experimental model closely mimicking the disease, has provided answers to many questions about the role of antibodies, complement macrophages and AChR anchor proteins. Genetically modified anti-AChR antibodies may also be used in the future to treat myasthenia. PMID:12220686

  20. Cylindrical contact homology and topological entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Marcelo R. R.

    2014-01-01

    We establish a relation between the growth of the cylindrical contact homology of a contact manifold and the topological entropy of Reeb flows on this manifold. We show that if a contact manifold $(M,\\xi)$ admits a hypertight contact form $\\lambda_0$ for which the cylindrical contact homology has exponential homotopical growth rate, then the Reeb flow of every contact form on $(M,\\xi)$ has positive topological entropy. Using this result, we provide numerous new examples of contact 3-manifolds...

  1. Dualities in Persistent (Co)Homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Silva, Vin; Morozov, Dmitriy; Vejdemo-Johansson, Mikael

    2011-09-16

    We consider sequences of absolute and relative homology and cohomology groups that arise naturally for a filtered cell complex. We establishalgebraic relationships between their persistence modules, and show that they contain equivalent information. We explain how one can use the existingalgorithm for persistent homology to process any of the four modules, and relate it to a recently introduced persistent cohomology algorithm. Wepresent experimental evidence for the practical efficiency of the latter algorithm.

  2. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage for orbital reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linberg, J.V.; Anderson, R.L.; Edwards, J.J.; Panje, W.R.; Bardach, J.

    1980-07-01

    Human costal cartilage is an excellent implant material for orbital and periorbital reconstruction because of its light weight, strength, homogeneous consistency and the ease with which it can be carved. Its use has been limited by the necessity of a separate surgical procedure to obtain the material. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage has been shown to have almost all the autogenous cartilage and is convenient to use. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage transplants do not elicit rejection reactions, resist infection and rarely undergo absorption.

  3. On the hodological criterion for homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunes, Macarena; Francisco Botelho, João; Ahumada Galleguillos, Patricio; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Owen's pre-evolutionary definition of a homolog as “the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function” and its redefinition after Darwin as “the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry” entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish “sameness.”Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium. PMID:26157357

  4. SGN-CD33A: a novel CD33-targeting antibody-drug conjugate using a pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer is active in models of drug-resistant AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung Sutherland, May S; Walter, Roland B; Jeffrey, Scott C; Burke, Patrick J; Yu, Changpu; Kostner, Heather; Stone, Ivan; Ryan, Maureen C; Sussman, Django; Lyon, Robert P; Zeng, Weiping; Harrington, Kimberly H; Klussman, Kerry; Westendorf, Lori; Meyer, David; Bernstein, Irwin D; Senter, Peter D; Benjamin, Dennis R; Drachman, Jonathan G; McEarchern, Julie A

    2013-08-22

    Outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unsatisfactory, and novel treatments are urgently needed. One strategy explores antibodies and their drug conjugates, particularly those targeting CD33. Emerging data with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) demonstrate target validity and activity in some patients with AML, but efficacy is limited by heterogeneous drug conjugation, linker instability, and a high incidence of multidrug resistance. We describe here the development of SGN-CD33A, a humanized anti-CD33 antibody with engineered cysteines conjugated to a highly potent, synthetic DNA cross-linking pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer via a protease-cleavable linker. The use of engineered cysteine residues at the sites of drug linker attachment results in a drug loading of approximately 2 pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimers per antibody. In preclinical testing, SGN-CD33A is more potent than GO against a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML cells in vitro and in xenotransplantation studies in mice. Unlike GO, antileukemic activity is observed with SGN-CD33A in AML models with the multidrug-resistant phenotype. Mechanistic studies indicate that the cytotoxic effects of SGN-CD33A involve DNA damage with ensuing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Together, these data suggest that SGN-CD33A has CD33-directed antitumor activity and support clinical testing of this novel therapeutic in patients with AML.

  5. Elimination of Tumor Cells Using Folate Receptor Targeting by Antibody-Conjugated, Gold-Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles in a Murine Breast Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan S. Krystofiak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The chemotherapeutic treatment of cancer suffers from poor specificity for targeting the tumor cells and often results in adverse effects such as systemic toxicity, damage to nontarget tissues, and development of drug-resistant tumors in patients. Increasingly, drug nanocarriers have been explored as a way of lessening or overcoming these problems. In this study, antibody-conjugated Au-coated magnetite nanoparticles, in conjunction with inductive heating produced by exposure to an oscillating magnetic field (OMF, were evaluated for their effects on the viability of tumor cells in a murine model of breast cancer. Treatment effects were evaluated by light microscopy and SEM. Results. 4T1 mammary epithelial carcinoma cells overexpressing the folate receptor were targeted with an anti-folate receptor primary antibody, followed by labeling with secondary antibody-conjugated Au-coated magnetite nanoparticles. In the absence of OMF exposure, nanoparticle labeling had no effect on 4T1 cell viability. However, following OMF treatment, many of the labeled 4T1 cells showed extensive membrane damage by SEM analysis, and dramatically reduced viability as assessed using a live/dead staining assay. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that Au-coated magnetite targeted to tumor cells through binding to an overexpressed surface receptor, in the presence of an OMF, can lead to tumor cell death.

  6. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells secreting anti-PD-L1 antibodies more effectively regress renal cell carcinoma in a humanized mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Chang, De-Kuan; Sun, Jiusong; Sui, Jianhua; Freeman, Gordon J.; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have led to improved progression-free survival of many patients; however the therapies are toxic, rarely achieve durable long-term complete responses and are not curative. Herein we used a single bicistronic lentiviral vector to develop a new combination immunotherapy that consists of human anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX)-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells engineered to secrete human anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibodies at the tumor site. The local antibody delivery led to marked immune checkpoint blockade. Tumor growth diminished 5 times and tumor weight reduced 50–80% when compared with the anti-CAIX CAR T cells alone in a humanized mice model of ccRCC. The expression of PD-L1 and Ki67 in the tumors decreased and an increase in granzyme B levels was found in CAR T cells. The anti-PD-L1 IgG1 isotype, which is capable of mediating ADCC, was also able to recruit human NK cells to the tumor site in vivo. These armed second-generation CAR T cells empowered to secrete human anti-PD-L1 antibodies in the ccRCC milieu to combat T cell exhaustion is an innovation in this field that should provide renewed potential for CAR T cell immunotherapy of solid tumors where limited efficacy is currently seen. PMID:27145284

  7. A Khovanov Type Link Homology with Geometric Interpretation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Li ZHANG; Feng Chun LEI

    2016-01-01

    We study a Khovanov type homology close to the original Khovanov homology theory from Frobenius system. The homology is an invariant for oriented links up to isotopy by applying a tautological functor on the geometric complex. The homology has also geometric descriptions by introducing the genus generating operations. We prove that Jones Polynomial is equal to a suitable Euler characteristic of the homology groups. As an application, we compute the homology groups of (2, k)-torus knots for every k∈N.

  8. Anti-schistosomal drugs: observations on the mechanism of drug resistance to hycanthone, and on the involvement of host antibodies in the mode of action of praziquantel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Brindley

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports recent observations from our laboratory dealing with the anti-schistosome drugs hycanthone (HC and praziquantel (PZQ. In particular, we discuss a laboratory model of drug resistance to HC in Schistosoma mansoni and show that drug sensitive and resistant lines of the parasite can be differentiated on the basis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms using homologous ribosomal gene probes. In addition, we summarize data demonstrating that effective chemotherapy of S. mansoni infection with PZQ in mice requires the presence of host anti-parasite antibodies. These antibodies bind to PZQ treated worms and may be involved in an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity reactions which result in the clearance of worms from the vasculature.

  9. Brugia malayi: vaccination of jirds with /sup 60/cobalt-attenuated infective stage larvae protects against homologous challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, J.A.; Higashi, G.I.

    1985-11-01

    Vaccination of inbred jirds (Meriones unguiculatus) with /sup 60/cobalt radiation-attenuated Brugia malayi infective stage larvae (L3) protected against homologous challenge given either subcutaneously (sc) or by the intraperitoneal (ip) route. Groups of jirds vaccinated once sc with 75, 15 Krad L3 showed from 69% to 91% reduction in recovered worms after ip challenge infection compared to infection in non-vaccinated control jirds, while 75% reduction in mean worm burden was seen in jirds receiving sc challenge infection. A single sc vaccination with 75, 10 or 20 Krad L3 produced no protection (10 Krad) and 64% reduction in recovered worms (20 Krad). Therefore the 15 Krad dose appeared to be best. A marked increase in anti-B. malayi antibody in vaccinated jirds was seen (by ELISA) immediately after challenge infection and an immunofluorescence assay showed that L3 incubated in serum from vaccinated jirds were completely and uniformly covered with specific antibody. Eosinophil-rich granulomas containing dead and moribund L3 were recovered from vaccinated jirds. This model of protective immunity in a Brugia-susceptible small rodent may provide a useful system for identification of molecularly defined filarial-protective immunogens.

  10. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  11. Dissecting the Role of Anti-ganglioside Antibodies in Guillain-Barré Syndrome: an Animal Model Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, Pallavi; Vong, Joaquim Si Long; Kumar, Gajendra; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Zhang, Gang; Sheikh, Kazim A; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-09-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an autoimmune polyneuropathy disease affecting the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Most of the GBS patients experienced neurological symptoms such as paresthesia, weakness, pain, and areflexia. There are also combinations of non-neurological symptoms which include upper respiratory tract infection and diarrhea. One of the major causes of GBS is due largely to the autoantibodies against gangliosides located on the peripheral nerves. Gangliosides are sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids consisting of a ceramide lipid anchor with one or more sialic acids attached to a neutral sugar backbone. Molecular mimicry between the outer components of oligosaccharide of gangliosides on nerve membrane and lipo-oligosaccharide of microbes is thought to trigger the autoimmunity. Intra-peritoneal implantation of monoclonal ganglioside antibodies secreting hybridoma into animals induced peripheral neuropathy. Recent studies demonstrated that injection of synthesized anti-ganglioside antibodies raised by hybridoma cells into mice initiates immune response against peripheral nerves, and eventually failure in peripheral nerve regeneration. Accumulating evidences indicate that the conjugation of anti-ganglioside monoclonal antibodies to activating FcγRIII present on the circulating macrophages inhibits axonal regeneration. The activation of RhoA signaling pathways is also involved in neurite outgrowth inhibition. However, the link between these two molecular events remains unresolved and requires further investigation. Development of anti-ganglioside antagonists can serve as targeted therapy for the treatment of GBS and will open a new approach of drug development with maximum efficacy and specificity. PMID:26374552

  12. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  13. Investigating homology between proteins using energetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O Wrabl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated experimental observations demonstrate that protein stability is often preserved upon conservative point mutation. In contrast, less is known about the effects of large sequence or structure changes on the stability of a particular fold. Almost completely unknown is the degree to which stability of different regions of a protein is generally preserved throughout evolution. In this work, these questions are addressed through thermodynamic analysis of a large representative sample of protein fold space based on remote, yet accepted, homology. More than 3,000 proteins were computationally analyzed using the structural-thermodynamic algorithm COREX/BEST. Estimated position-specific stability (i.e., local Gibbs free energy of folding and its component enthalpy and entropy were quantitatively compared between all proteins in the sample according to all-vs.-all pairwise structural alignment. It was discovered that the local stabilities of homologous pairs were significantly more correlated than those of non-homologous pairs, indicating that local stability was indeed generally conserved throughout evolution. However, the position-specific enthalpy and entropy underlying stability were less correlated, suggesting that the overall regional stability of a protein was more important than the thermodynamic mechanism utilized to achieve that stability. Finally, two different types of statistically exceptional evolutionary structure-thermodynamic relationships were noted. First, many homologous proteins contained regions of similar thermodynamics despite localized structure change, suggesting a thermodynamic mechanism enabling evolutionary fold change. Second, some homologous proteins with extremely similar structures nonetheless exhibited different local stabilities, a phenomenon previously observed experimentally in this laboratory. These two observations, in conjunction with the principal conclusion that homologous proteins generally conserved

  14. Potency of a human monoclonal antibody to diphtheria toxin relative to equine diphtheria anti-toxin in a guinea pig intoxication model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heidi L; Cheslock, Peter; Leney, Mark; Barton, Bruce; Molrine, Deborah C

    2016-08-17

    Prompt administration of anti-toxin reduces mortality following Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection. Current treatment relies upon equine diphtheria anti-toxin (DAT), with a 10% risk of serum sickness and rarely anaphylaxis. The global DAT supply is extremely limited; most manufacturers have ceased production. S315 is a neutralizing human IgG1 monoclonal antibody to diphtheria toxin that may provide a safe and effective alternative to equine DAT and address critical supply issues. To guide dose selection for IND-enabling pharmacology and toxicology studies, we dose-ranged S315 and DAT in a guinea pig model of diphtheria intoxication based on the NIH Minimum Requirements potency assay. Animals received a single injection of antibody premixed with toxin, were monitored for 30 days, and assigned a numeric score for clinical signs of disease. Animals receiving ≥ 27.5 µg of S315 or ≥ 1.75 IU of DAT survived whereas animals receiving ≤ 22.5 µg of S315 or ≤ 1.25 IU of DAT died, yielding a potency estimate of 17 µg S315/IU DAT (95% CI 16-21) for an endpoint of survival. Because some surviving animals exhibited transient limb weakness, likely a systemic sign of toxicity, DAT and S315 doses required to prevent hind limb paralysis were also determined, yielding a relative potency of 48 µg/IU (95% CI 38-59) for this alternate endpoint. To support advancement of S315 into clinical trials, potency estimates will be used to evaluate the efficacy of S315 versus DAT in an animal model with antibody administration after toxin exposure, more closely modeling anti-toxin therapy in humans. PMID:27070129

  15. Potency of a human monoclonal antibody to diphtheria toxin relative to equine diphtheria anti-toxin in a guinea pig intoxication model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heidi L.; Cheslock, Peter; Leney, Mark; Barton, Bruce; Molrine, Deborah C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prompt administration of anti-toxin reduces mortality following Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection. Current treatment relies upon equine diphtheria anti-toxin (DAT), with a 10% risk of serum sickness and rarely anaphylaxis. The global DAT supply is extremely limited; most manufacturers have ceased production. S315 is a neutralizing human IgG1 monoclonal antibody to diphtheria toxin that may provide a safe and effective alternative to equine DAT and address critical supply issues. To guide dose selection for IND-enabling pharmacology and toxicology studies, we dose-ranged S315 and DAT in a guinea pig model of diphtheria intoxication based on the NIH Minimum Requirements potency assay. Animals received a single injection of antibody premixed with toxin, were monitored for 30 days, and assigned a numeric score for clinical signs of disease. Animals receiving ≥ 27.5 µg of S315 or ≥ 1.75 IU of DAT survived whereas animals receiving ≤ 22.5 µg of S315 or ≤ 1.25 IU of DAT died, yielding a potency estimate of 17 µg S315/IU DAT (95% CI 16–21) for an endpoint of survival. Because some surviving animals exhibited transient limb weakness, likely a systemic sign of toxicity, DAT and S315 doses required to prevent hind limb paralysis were also determined, yielding a relative potency of 48 µg/IU (95% CI 38–59) for this alternate endpoint. To support advancement of S315 into clinical trials, potency estimates will be used to evaluate the efficacy of S315 versus DAT in an animal model with antibody administration after toxin exposure, more closely modeling anti-toxin therapy in humans. PMID:27070129

  16. Human antibody response to herpes simplex virus-specific polypeptides after primary and recurrent infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Kahlon, J; Lakeman, F. D.; Ackermann, M; Whitley, R J

    1986-01-01

    Human antibody responses to specific polypeptides of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively) were assessed in serial serum specimens from 18 infected patients by immunoblot technology. Nine patients had HSV-1 infections (six genital and three oral) and nine had HSV-2 genital infections. Antibodies to homologous and heterologous HSV antigens were studied and correlated with total microneutralization and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibodies as well as correlat...

  17. Topical gel formulation of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody VRC01 confers protection against HIV-1 vaginal challenge in a humanized mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Veselinovic, Milena; C Preston Neff; Mulder, Leila R.; Akkina, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    The new generation broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 shows great potential as a topically administered microbicide to prevent sexual transmission. We evaluated its efficacy in a RAG-hu humanized mouse model of vaginal HIV-1 transmission. Mice were challenged vaginally with R5 tropic HIV-1 BaL an hour after intravaginal application of the VRC01 (1mg/ml concentration.) gel. A combination of four first generation bNAbs, namely b12, 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12, was used as a positive effic...

  18. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-Colchicine Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, Bajarang Vasant; Borogaon, Anubhaw; Panda, Dulal; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin isotypes are found to play an important role in regulating microtubule dynamics. The isotype composition is also thought to contribute in the development of drug resistance as tubulin isotypes show differential binding affinities for various anti-cancer agents. Tubulin isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV show differential binding affinity for colchicine. However, the origin of differential binding affinity is not well understood at the molecular level. Here, we investigate the origin of differential binding affinity of a colchicine analogue N-deacetyl-N-(2-mercaptoacetyl)-colchicine (DAMA-colchicine) for human αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, employing sequence analysis, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and MM-GBSA binding free energy calculations. The sequence analysis study shows that the residue compositions are different in the colchicine binding pocket of αβII and αβIII, whereas no such difference is present in αβIV tubulin isotypes. Further, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations results show that residue differences present at the colchicine binding pocket weaken the bonding interactions and the correct binding of DAMA-colchicine at the interface of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes. Post molecular dynamics simulation analysis suggests that these residue variations affect the structure and dynamics of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes, which in turn affect the binding of DAMA-colchicine. Further, the binding free-energy calculation shows that αβIV tubulin isotype has the highest binding free-energy and αβIII has the lowest binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine. The order of binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine is αβIV ≃ αβII > αβIII. Thus, our computational approaches provide an insight into the effect of residue variations on differential binding of αβII, αβIII and αβIV tubulin isotypes with DAMA-colchicine and may help to design new analogues with higher

  20. Exploring the Origin of Differential Binding Affinities of Human Tubulin Isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV for DAMA-Colchicine Using Homology Modelling, Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, Bajarang Vasant; Borogaon, Anubhaw; Panda, Dulal; Kunwar, Ambarish

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin isotypes are found to play an important role in regulating microtubule dynamics. The isotype composition is also thought to contribute in the development of drug resistance as tubulin isotypes show differential binding affinities for various anti-cancer agents. Tubulin isotypes αβII, αβIII and αβIV show differential binding affinity for colchicine. However, the origin of differential binding affinity is not well understood at the molecular level. Here, we investigate the origin of differential binding affinity of a colchicine analogue N-deacetyl-N-(2-mercaptoacetyl)-colchicine (DAMA-colchicine) for human αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, employing sequence analysis, homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and MM-GBSA binding free energy calculations. The sequence analysis study shows that the residue compositions are different in the colchicine binding pocket of αβII and αβIII, whereas no such difference is present in αβIV tubulin isotypes. Further, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations results show that residue differences present at the colchicine binding pocket weaken the bonding interactions and the correct binding of DAMA-colchicine at the interface of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes. Post molecular dynamics simulation analysis suggests that these residue variations affect the structure and dynamics of αβII and αβIII tubulin isotypes, which in turn affect the binding of DAMA-colchicine. Further, the binding free-energy calculation shows that αβIV tubulin isotype has the highest binding free-energy and αβIII has the lowest binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine. The order of binding free-energy for DAMA-colchicine is αβIV ≃ αβII > αβIII. Thus, our computational approaches provide an insight into the effect of residue variations on differential binding of αβII, αβIII and αβIV tubulin isotypes with DAMA-colchicine and may help to design new analogues with higher

  1. On the hodological criterion for homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena eFaunes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Owen’s pre-evolutionary definition of a homologue as the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function and its redefinition after Darwin as the same trait in different lineages due to common ancestry entail the same heuristic problem: how to establish sameness. Although different criteria for homology often conflict, there is currently a generalized acceptance of gene expression as the best criterion. This gene-centered view of homology results from a reductionist and preformationist concept of living beings. Here, we adopt an alternative organismic-epigenetic viewpoint, and conceive living beings as systems whose identity is given by the dynamic interactions between their components at their multiple levels of composition. We posit that there cannot be an absolute homology criterion, and instead, homology should be inferred from comparisons at the levels and developmental stages where the delimitation of the compared trait lies. In this line, we argue that neural connectivity, i.e., the hodological criterion, should prevail in the determination of homologies between brain supra-cellular structures, such as the vertebrate pallium.

  2. Pro- and anti-tumour effects of B cells and antibodies in cancer: a comparison of clinical studies and preclinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Thomas V; Terry, Alexandra M; Bolton, Holly A; Hancock, David G; Shklovskaya, Elena; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    The primary immune role of B cells is to produce antibodies, but they can also influence T cell function via antigen presentation and, in some contexts, immune regulation. Whether their roles in tumour immunity are similar to those in other chronic immune responses such as autoimmunity and chronic infection, where both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles have been described, remains controversial. Many studies have aimed to define the role of B cells in antitumor immune responses, but despite this considerable body of work, it is not yet possible to predict how they will affect immunity to any given tumour. In many human cancers, the presence of tumour-infiltrating B cells and tumour-reactive antibodies correlates with extended patient survival, and this clinical observation is supported by data from some animal models. On the other hand, T cell responses can be adversely affected by B cell production of immunoregulatory cytokines, a phenomenon that has been demonstrated in humans and in animal models. The isotype and concentration of tumour-reactive antibodies may also influence tumour progression. Recruitment of B cells into tumours may directly reflect the subtype and strength of the anti-tumour T cell response. As the response becomes chronic, B cells may attenuate T cell responses in an attempt to decrease host damage, similar to their described role in chronic infection and autoimmunity. Understanding how B cell responses in cancer are related to the effectiveness of the overall anti-tumour response is likely to aid in the development of new therapeutic interventions against cancer.

  3. The endless tale of non-homologous end-joining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric Weterings; David J Chen

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in cells by ionizing radiation and reactive oxygen species. In addi-tion, they are commonly generated during V(D)J recombination, an essential aspect of the developing immune system. Failure to effectively repair these DSBs can result in chromosome breakage, cell death, onset of cancer, and defects in the immune system of higher vertebrates. Fortunately, all mammalian cells possess two enzymatic pathways that mediate the repair of DSBs: homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). The NHEJ process utilizes enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA molecule, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and finally repair the DNA break. In this review, all the known enzymes that play a role in the NHEJ process are discussed and a working model for the co-operation of these enzymes during DSB repair is presented.

  4. Molecular evolution of a Drosophila homolog of human BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sarah M; Noor, Mohamed A F

    2009-11-01

    The human cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, functions in double-strand break repair by homologous recombination, and it appears to function via interaction of a repetitive region ("BRC repeats") with RAD-51. A putatively simpler homolog, dmbrca2, was identified in Drosophila melanogaster recently and also affects mitotic and meiotic double-strand break repair. In this study, we examined patterns of repeat variation both within Drosophila pseudoobscura and among available Drosophila genome sequences. We identified extensive variation within and among closely related Drosophila species in BRC repeat number, to the extent that variation within this genus recapitulates the extent of variation found across the entire animal kingdom. We describe patterns of evolution across species by documenting recent repeat expansions (sometimes in tandem arrays) and homogenizations within available genome sequences. Overall, we have documented patterns and modes of evolution in a new model system of a gene which is important to human health.

  5. A Molecular Model for Cocaine Binding by the Immunotherapeutic Human/Mouse Chimeric Monoclonal Antibody 2E2

    OpenAIRE

    Lape, Michael; Paula, Stefan; Ball, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Immunotherapy by cocaine-binding monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of cocaine addiction. The human (γ1 heavy chain)/murine (λ light chain) chimeric mAb 2E2 has excellent affinity and specificity for cocaine and recent animal studies have demonstrated 2E2’s ability in vivo to reduce cocaine levels in the brain as well as alter cocaine self-administration behavior in rats. In this study, we used mAb 2E2 amino acid sequence information to create a...

  6. Homological stability for oriented configuration spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We prove homological stability for sequences of "oriented configuration spaces" as the number of points in the configuration goes to infinity. These are spaces of configurations of n points in a connected manifold M of dimension at least 2 which 'admits a boundary', with labels in a path-connected space X, and with an orientation: an ordering of the points up to even permutations. They are double covers of the corresponding unordered configuration spaces, where the points do not have this orientation. To prove our result we adapt methods from a paper of Randal-Williams, which proves homological stability in the unordered case. Interestingly the oriented configuration spaces stabilise more slowly than the unordered ones: the stability slope we obtain is one-third, compared to one-half in the unordered case (these are the best possible slopes in their respective cases). This result can also be interpreted as homological stability for unordered configuration spaces with certain twisted coefficients.

  7. Crystal structure of an archaeal actin homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeben, Annette; Kofler, Christine; Nagy, István; Nickell, Stephan; Hartl, F Ulrich; Bracher, Andreas

    2006-04-21

    Prokaryotic homologs of the eukaryotic structural protein actin, such as MreB and ParM, have been implicated in determination of bacterial cell shape, and in the segregation of genomic and plasmid DNA. In contrast to these bacterial actin homologs, little is known about the archaeal counterparts. As a first step, we expressed a predicted actin homolog of the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum, Ta0583, and determined its crystal structure at 2.1A resolution. Ta0583 is expressed as a soluble protein in T.acidophilum and is an active ATPase at physiological temperature. In vitro, Ta0583 forms sheets with spacings resembling the crystal lattice, indicating an inherent propensity to form filamentous structures. The fold of Ta0583 contains the core structure of actin and clearly belongs to the actin/Hsp70 superfamily of ATPases. Ta0583 is approximately equidistant from actin and MreB on the structural level, and combines features from both eubacterial actin homologs, MreB and ParM. The structure of Ta0583 co-crystallized with ADP indicates that the nucleotide binds at the interface between the subdomains of Ta0583 in a manner similar to that of actin. However, the conformation of the nucleotide observed in complex with Ta0583 clearly differs from that in complex with actin, but closely resembles the conformation of ParM-bound nucleotide. On the basis of sequence and structural homology, we suggest that Ta0583 derives from a ParM-like actin homolog that was once encoded by a plasmid and was transferred into a common ancestor of Thermoplasma and Ferroplasma. Intriguingly, both genera are characterized by the lack of a cell wall, and therefore Ta0583 could have a function in cellular organization.

  8. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  9. Homological and homotopical Dehn functions are different

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, Aaron; Dani, Pallavi; Young, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The homological and homotopical Dehn functions are different ways of measuring the difficulty of filling a closed curve inside a group or a space. The homological Dehn function measures fillings of cycles by chains, while the homotopical Dehn function measures fillings of curves by disks. Since the two definitions involve different sorts of boundaries and fillings, there is no a priori relationship between the two functions, but prior to this work there were no known examples of finitely-presented groups for which the two functions differ. This paper gives the first such examples, constructed by amalgamating a free-by-cyclic group with several Bestvina-Brady groups.

  10. Sheaves on Graphs and Their Homological Invariants

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Joel

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a notion of a sheaf of vector spaces on a graph, and develop the foundations of homology theories for such sheaves. One sheaf invariant, its "maximum excess," has a number of remarkable properties. It has a simple definition, with no reference to homology theory, that resembles graph expansion. Yet it is a "limit" of Betti numbers, and hence has a short/long exact sequence theory and resembles the $L^2$ Betti numbers of Atiyah. Also, the maximum excess is defined via a supermodul...

  11. New mesogenic homologous series of -methylcinnamates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R A Vora; A K Prajapati

    2001-04-01

    Compounds of a new smectogenic homologous series of -methylcinnamates were prepared by condensing different 4--alkoxybenzoyl chloride with methoxyethyl trans-4-hydroxy- -methylcinnamate. In this series, the first six members are non-mesogenic. -Heptyloxy derivative exhibits monotropic smectic A phase whereas rest of the members exhibit enantiotropic smectic A mesophase. The compounds are characterized by combination of elemental analysis and spectroscopic techniques. Enthalpies of few homologues are measured by DSC techniques. Fluorescent properties are also observed. The thermal stabilities of the present series are compared with those of other structurally related mesogenic homologous series.

  12. Relative Derived Equivalences and Relative Homological Dimensions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Yong PAN

    2016-01-01

    Let A be a small abelian category. For a closed subbifunctor F of Ext1A (−,−), Buan has generalized the construction of Verdier’s quotient category to get a relative derived category, where he localized with respect to F-acyclic complexes. In this paper, the homological properties of relative derived categories are discussed, and the relation with derived categories is given. For Artin algebras, using relative derived categories, we give a relative version on derived equivalences induced by F-tilting complexes. We discuss the relationships between relative homological dimensions and relative derived equivalences.

  13. Sutured Floer homology distinguishes between Seifert surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, Irida

    2010-01-01

    In this note we exhibit the first example of a knot in the three-sphere with a pair of minimal genus Seifert surfaces that can be distinguished using the sutured Floer homology of their complementary manifolds together with the Spin^c-grading. This answers a question of Juh\\'asz. More precisely, we show that the Euler characteristic of the sutured Floer homology of the complementary manifolds distinguishes between the two surfaces, and we exhibit an infinite family of knots with pairs of Seifert surfaces that can be distinguished in such a way.

  14. Chemical changes demonstrated in cartilage by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy in an antibody-induced murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxford, Allyson M.; Selva Nandakumar, Kutty; Holmdahl, Rikard; Tobin, Mark J.; McNaughton, Don; Rowley, Merrill J.

    2011-06-01

    Collagen antibody-induced arthritis develops in mice following passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to type II collagen (CII) and is attributed to effects of proinflammatory immune complexes, but transferred mAbs may react directly and damagingly with CII. To determine whether such mAbs cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation, mice lacking complement factor 5 that do not develop joint inflammation were injected intravenously with two arthritogenic mAbs to CII, M2139 and CIIC1. Paws were collected at day 3, decalcified, paraffin embedded, and 5-μm sections were examined using standard histology and synchrotron Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). None of the mice injected with mAb showed visual or histological evidence of inflammation but there were histological changes in the articular cartilage including loss of proteoglycan and altered chondrocyte morphology. Findings using FTIRM at high lateral resolution revealed loss of collagen and the appearance of a new peak at 1635 cm-1 at the surface of the cartilage interpreted as cellular activation. Thus, we demonstrate the utility of synchrotron FTIRM for examining chemical changes in diseased cartilage at the microscopic level and establish that arthritogenic mAbs to CII do cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation.

  15. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  16. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  17. Combining BRAF inhibitor and anti PD-L1 antibody dramatically improves tumor regression and anti tumor immunity in an immunocompetent murine model of anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Zurakowski, David; Kim, Yon Seon; Dennett, Kate Virginia; Amin, Salma; Freeman, Gordon James; Parangi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand is widely studied in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies blocking these molecules have had great success but little is known about them in thyroid cancer. We investigated the role of PD-L1 in thyroid cancer with respect to BRAF mutation and MAP kinase pathway activity and the effect of anti PD-L1 antibody therapy on tumor regression and intra-tumoral immune response alone or in combination with BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi). BRAFV600E cells showed significantly higher baseline expression of PD-L1 at mRNA and protein levels compared to BRAFWT cells. MEK inhibitor treatment resulted in a decrease of PD-L1 expression across all cell lines. BRAFi treatment decreased PD-L1 expression in BRAFV600E cells, but paradoxically increased its expression in BRAFWT cells. BRAFV600E mutated patients samples had a higher level of PD-L1 mRNA compared to BRAFWT (p=0.015). Immunocompetent mice (B6129SF1/J) implanted with syngeneic 3747 BRAFV600E/WT P53−/− murine tumor cells were randomized to control, PLX4720, anti PD-L1 antibody and their combination. In this model of aggressive thyroid cancer, control tumor volume reached 782.3±174.6mm3 at two weeks. The combination dramatically reduced tumor volume to 147.3±60.8, compared to PLX4720 (439.3±188.4 mm3, P=0.023) or PD-L1 antibody (716.7±62.1, P<0.001) alone. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed intense CD8+ CTL infiltration and cytotoxicity and favorable CD8+:Treg ratio compared to each individual treatment. Our results show anti PD-L1 treatment potentiates the effect of BRAFi on tumor regression and intensifies anti tumor immune response in an immunocompetent model of ATC. Clinical trials of this therapeutic combination may be of benefit in patients with ATC. PMID:26943572

  18. OptMAVEn – A New Framework for the de novo Design of Antibody Variable Region Models Targeting Specific Antigen Epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tong; Pantazes, Robert J; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design method...

  19. Betti numbers and stability for configuration spaces via factorization homology

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Using factorization homology, we realize the rational homology of the unordered configuration spaces of an arbitrary manifold $M$, possibly with boundary, as the homology of a Lie algebra constructed from the compactly supported cohomology of $M$. By locating the homology of each configuration space within the Chevalley-Eilenberg complex of this Lie algebra, we extend theorems of B\\"{o}digheimer-Cohen-Taylor and F\\'{e}lix-Thomas and give a new, combinatorial proof of the homological stability...

  20. H5N1 whole-virus vaccine induces neutralizing antibodies in humans which are protective in a mouse passive transfer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Howard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vero cell culture-derived whole-virus H5N1 vaccines have been extensively tested in clinical trials and consistently demonstrated to be safe and immunogenic; however, clinical efficacy is difficult to evaluate in the absence of wide-spread human disease. A lethal mouse model has been utilized which allows investigation of the protective efficacy of active vaccination or passive transfer of vaccine induced sera following lethal H5N1 challenge. METHODS: We used passive transfer of immune sera to investigate antibody-mediated protection elicited by a Vero cell-derived, non-adjuvanted inactivated whole-virus H5N1 vaccine. Mice were injected intravenously with H5N1 vaccine-induced rodent or human immune sera and subsequently challenged with a lethal dose of wild-type H5N1 virus. RESULTS: Passive transfer of H5N1 vaccine-induced mouse, guinea pig and human immune sera provided dose-dependent protection of recipient mice against lethal challenge with wild-type H5N1 virus. Protective dose fifty values for serum H5N1 neutralizing antibody titers were calculated to be ≤1∶11 for all immune sera, independently of source species. CONCLUSIONS: These data underpin the confidence that the Vero cell culture-derived, whole-virus H5N1 vaccine will be effective in a pandemic situation and support the use of neutralizing serum antibody titers as a correlate of protection for H5N1 vaccines.

  1. Protein conformation and disease : pathological consequences of analogous mutations in homologous proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, F. J.; Pokkuluri, P. R.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division

    2000-12-19

    The antibody light chain variable domain (V{sub L}){sup 1} and myelin protein zero (MPZ) are representatives of the functionally diverse immunoglobulin superfamily. The V{sub L} is a subunit of the antigen-binding component of antibodies, while MPZ is the major membrane-linked constituent of the myelin sheaths that coat peripheral nerves. Despite limited amino acid sequence homology, the conformations of the core structures of the two proteins are largely superimposable. Amino acid variations in V{sub L} account for various conformational disease outcomes, including amyloidosis. However, the specific amino acid changes in V{sub L} that are responsible for disease have been obscured by multiple concurrent primary structure alterations. Recently, certain demyelination disorders have been linked to point mutations and single amino acid polymorphisms in MPZ. We demonstrate here that some pathogenic variations in MPZ correspond to changes suspected of determining amyloidosis in V{sub L}. This unanticipated observation suggests that studies of the biophysical origin of conformational disease in one member of a superfamily of homologous proteins may have implications throughout the superfamily. In some cases, findings may account for overt disease; in other cases, due to the natural repertoire of inherited polymorphisms, variations in a representative protein may predict subclinical impairment of homologous proteins.

  2. Einstein Metrics on Rational Homology Spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, Charles P.; Galicki, Krzysztof

    2003-01-01

    We prove the existence of Sasakian-Einstein metrics on infinitely many rational homology spheres in all odd dimensions greater than 3. In dimension 5 we obain somewhat sharper results. There are examples where the number of effective parameters in the Einstein metric grows exponentially with dimension.

  3. Homological Perturbation Theory and Mirror Symmetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian ZHOU

    2003-01-01

    We explain how deformation theories of geometric objects such as complex structures,Poisson structures and holomorphic bundle structures lead to differential Gerstenhaber or Poisson al-gebras. We use homological perturbation theory to construct A∞ algebra structures on the cohomology,and their canonically defined deformations. Such constructions are used to formulate a version of A∞algebraic mirror symmetry.

  4. Gorenstein Homological Dimensions and Change of Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan YANG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we shall be concerned with what happens of Gorenstein homological dimensions when certain modifications are made to a ring. The five structural operations addressed later are the formation of excellent extensions,localizations,Morita equivalences,polynomial extensions and power series extensions.

  5. Homological stability for unordered configuration spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts. In the first part we give a self-contained proof of homological stability for the spaces C_n(M;X) of configurations of n unordered points in a connected open manifold M with labels in a path-connected space X, with the best possible integral stability range of 2* \\leq n. Along the way we give a new proof of the high connectivity of the complex of injective words. If the manifold has dimension at least three, we show that in rational homology the stability range may be improved to * \\leq n. In the second part we study to what extent the homology of the spaces C_n(M) can be considered stable when M is a closed manifold. In this case there are no stabilisation maps, but one may still ask if the dimensions of the homology groups over some field stabilise with n. We prove that this is true when M is odd-dimensional, or when the field is F_2 or Q. It is known to be false in the remaining cases.

  6. Homological stability for configuration spaces of manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Church, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Let C_n(M) be the configuration space of n distinct ordered points in M. We prove that if M is any connected orientable manifold (closed or open), the homology groups H_i(C_n(M); Q) are representation stable in the sense of [Church-Farb]. Applying this to the trivial representation, we obtain as a corollary that the unordered configuration space B_n(M) satisfies classical homological stability: for each i, H_i(B_n(M); Q) is isomorphic to H_i(B_{n+1}(M); Q) for n > i. This improves on results of McDuff, Segal, and others for open manifolds. Applied to closed manifolds, this provides natural examples where rational homological stability holds even though integral homological stability fails. To prove the main theorem, we introduce the notion of monotonicity for a sequence of S_n--representations, which is of independent interest. Sequences that are both monotone and uniformly representation stable form an abelian category. Monotonicity provides a new mechanism for proving representation stability using spectral...

  7. Planar open books and Floer homology

    OpenAIRE

    Ozsvath, Peter; Stipsicz, Andras I.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2005-01-01

    Giroux has described a correspondence between open book decompositions on a 3--manifold and contact structures. In this paper we use Heegaard Floer homology to give restrictions on contact structures which correspond to open book decompositions with planar pages, generalizing a recent result of Etnyre.

  8. Khovanov-Rozansky homology and Directed Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    We determine the cycle packing number of a directed graph using elementary projective algebraic geometry. Our idea is rooted in the Khovanov-Rozansky theory. In fact, using the Khovanov-Rozansky homology of a graph, we also obtain algebraic methods of detecting directed and undirected cycles containing a particular vertex or edge.

  9. Homological aperiodic tilings of 3-dimensional geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Piotr W

    2012-01-01

    We construct the first aperiodic tiles for two amenable 3-dimensional Lie groups: Sol and the Heisenberg group. Our construction relies on the use of higher-dimensional uniformly finite homology. In particular, we settle completely the existence of aperiodic tiles for all of the non-compact geometries of 3-manifolds appearing in the geometrization conjecture.

  10. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevi...

  11. Quality control using a multilevel logistic model for the Danish pig Salmonella surveillance antibody-ELISA programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Hanne; Ekeroth, Lars; Houe, Hans

    2007-01-01

    In Denmark, the level of Salmonella infection in pig herds is monitored with a surveillance programme using an indirect antibody ELISA. Our purpose with the present study was to determine whether sample results from the programme were useful in the quality control of this ELISA. Test results from...... solved. A logistic analysis was carried out with outcome 0 for a negative test result and I for a positive test result. Row and column on the microtitre plates, multiprobe robot, and their interactions were included as fixed effects, and date, plate, and slaughterhouse were included as random effects...... throughout. Analysis of the test results from the wells with test samples gave good information on systematic errors across the microtitre plates, and severe errors appeared significant even when data from short time periods were used....

  12. Gene Disruption by Homologous Recombination in the Xylella fastidiosa Citrus Variegated Chlorosis Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaurivaud, Patrice; Souza, Leonardo C. A.; Virgílio, Andrea C. D.; Mariano, Anelise G.; Palma, Renê R.; Monteiro, Patrícia B.

    2002-01-01

    Mutagenesis by homologous recombination was evaluated in Xylella fastidiosa by using the bga gene, coding for β-galactosidase, as a model. Integration of replicative plasmids by homologous recombination between the cloned truncated copy of bga and the endogenous gene was produced by one or two crossover events leading to β-galactosidase mutants. A promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was used to monitor the expression of the target gene and to select a cvaB mutant. PMID:12200328

  13. Effect of chromosome homology an plasmid transformation and plasmid conjugal transfer in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balganesh, M.; Setlow, J.K.

    1984-05-14

    The pairing between plasmid and the homologous part of the chromosome associated with plasmid establishment may differ from the pairing which results from integration of a homologous region of the plasmid into the chromosome. Thus the rate of novobiocin transformation decreases with duplication of the chromosomal portion in pMB2, but the rate of establishment of the plasmid increases with this duplication. A model to explain these data is given. 17 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  14. A Homolog Pentameric Complex Dictates Viral Epithelial Tropism, Pathogenicity and Congenital Infection Rate in Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Stewart; Choi, K Yeon; Root, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair

    2016-07-01

    In human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), tropism to epithelial and endothelial cells is dependent upon a pentameric complex (PC). Given the structure of the placenta, the PC is potentially an important neutralizing antibody target antigen against congenital infection. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV. Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) potentially encodes a UL128-131 HCMV PC homolog locus (GP128-GP133). In transient expression studies, GPCMV gH and gL glycoproteins interacted with UL128, UL130 and UL131 homolog proteins (designated GP129 and GP131 and GP133 respectively) to form PC or subcomplexes which were determined by immunoprecipitation reactions directed to gH or gL. A natural GP129 C-terminal deletion mutant (aa 107-179) and a chimeric HCMV UL128 C-terminal domain swap GP129 mutant failed to form PC with other components. GPCMV infection of a newly established guinea pig epithelial cell line required a complete PC and a GP129 mutant virus lacked epithelial tropism and was attenuated in the guinea pig for pathogenicity and had a low congenital transmission rate. Individual knockout of GP131 or 133 genes resulted in loss of viral epithelial tropism. A GP128 mutant virus retained epithelial tropism and GP128 was determined not to be a PC component. A series of GPCMV mutants demonstrated that gO was not strictly essential for epithelial infection whereas gB and the PC were essential. Ectopic expression of a GP129 cDNA in a GP129 mutant virus restored epithelial tropism, pathogenicity and congenital infection. Overall, GPCMV forms a PC similar to HCMV which enables evaluation of PC based vaccine strategies in the guinea pig model. PMID:27387220

  15. A Homolog Pentameric Complex Dictates Viral Epithelial Tropism, Pathogenicity and Congenital Infection Rate in Guinea Pig Cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Stewart; Choi, K Yeon; Root, Matthew; McGregor, Alistair

    2016-07-01

    In human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), tropism to epithelial and endothelial cells is dependent upon a pentameric complex (PC). Given the structure of the placenta, the PC is potentially an important neutralizing antibody target antigen against congenital infection. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital CMV. Guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) potentially encodes a UL128-131 HCMV PC homolog locus (GP128-GP133). In transient expression studies, GPCMV gH and gL glycoproteins interacted with UL128, UL130 and UL131 homolog proteins (designated GP129 and GP131 and GP133 respectively) to form PC or subcomplexes which were determined by immunoprecipitation reactions directed to gH or gL. A natural GP129 C-terminal deletion mutant (aa 107-179) and a chimeric HCMV UL128 C-terminal domain swap GP129 mutant failed to form PC with other components. GPCMV infection of a newly established guinea pig epithelial cell line required a complete PC and a GP129 mutant virus lacked epithelial tropism and was attenuated in the guinea pig for pathogenicity and had a low congenital transmission rate. Individual knockout of GP131 or 133 genes resulted in loss of viral epithelial tropism. A GP128 mutant virus retained epithelial tropism and GP128 was determined not to be a PC component. A series of GPCMV mutants demonstrated that gO was not strictly essential for epithelial infection whereas gB and the PC were essential. Ectopic expression of a GP129 cDNA in a GP129 mutant virus restored epithelial tropism, pathogenicity and congenital infection. Overall, GPCMV forms a PC similar to HCMV which enables evaluation of PC based vaccine strategies in the guinea pig model.

  16. Evaluation of a measles vaccine campaign by oral-fluid surveys in a rural Kenyan district: interpretation of antibody prevalence data using mixture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuma, E O; Okiro, E A; Bett, A; Abwao, J; Were, S; Samuel, D; Vyse, A; Gay, N; Brown, D W G; Nokes, D J

    2009-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a measles vaccine campaign in rural Kenya, based on oral-fluid surveys and mixture-modelling analysis. Specimens were collected from 886 children aged 9 months to 14 years pre-campaign and from a comparison sample of 598 children aged 6 months post-campaign. Quantitative measles-specific antibody data were obtained by commercial kit. The estimated proportions of measles-specific antibody negative in children aged 0-4, 5-9 and 10-14 years were 51%, 42% and 27%, respectively, pre- campaign and 18%, 14% and 6%, respectively, post-campaign. We estimate a reduction in the proportion susceptible of 65-78%, with approximately 85% of the population recorded to have received vaccine. The proportion of 'weak' positive individuals rose from 35% pre-campaign to 54% post-campaign. Our results confirm the effectiveness of the campaign in reducing susceptibility to measles and demonstrate the potential of oral-fluid studies to monitor the impact of measles vaccination campaigns.

  17. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines coinfected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seung I; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Sung-Hyen; Lee, Kyung Woo; Lillehoj, Erik P; Hong, Yeong Ho; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, D Hye-Young; Chun, Ji-Eun

    2013-09-01

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with coinfection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis. Day-old male Cobb, Ross, and Hubbard broilers were orally infected with viable C. perfringens and E. maxima and fed a high-protein diet to promote the development of experimental disease. Body weight loss, intestinal lesions, and serum antibody levels against alpha-toxin and necrotic enteritis B-like (NetB) toxin were measured as parameters of disease susceptibility and host immune response. Cobb chickens exhibited increased body weight loss compared with Ross and Hubbard breeds and greater gut lesion severity compared with Ross chickens. NetB antibody levels were greater in Cobb chickens compared with the Ross or Hubbard groups. These results suggest that Cobb chickens may be more susceptible to necrotic enteritis in the field compared with the Ross and Hubbard lines.

  18. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  19. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally. PMID:18179828

  20. Building multiclass classifiers for remote homology detection and fold recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karypis George

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein remote homology detection and fold recognition are central problems in computational biology. Supervised learning algorithms based on support vector machines are currently one of the most effective methods for solving these problems. These methods are primarily used to solve binary classification problems and they have not been extensively used to solve the more general multiclass remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems. Results We present a comprehensive evaluation of a number of methods for building SVM-based multiclass classification schemes in the context of the SCOP protein classification. These methods include schemes that directly build an SVM-based multiclass model, schemes that employ a second-level learning approach to combine the predictions generated by a set of binary SVM-based classifiers, and schemes that build and combine binary classifiers for various levels of the SCOP hierarchy beyond those defining the target classes. Conclusion Analyzing the performance achieved by the different approaches on four different datasets we show that most of the proposed multiclass SVM-based classification approaches are quite effective in solving the remote homology prediction and fold recognition problems and that the schemes that use predictions from binary models constructed for ancestral categories within the SCOP hierarchy tend to not only lead to lower error rates but also reduce the number of errors in which a superfamily is assigned to an entirely different fold and a fold is predicted as being from a different SCOP class. Our results also show that the limited size of the training data makes it hard to learn complex second-level models, and that models of moderate complexity lead to consistently better results.

  1. Anti-PrPC monoclonal antibody infusion as a novel treatment for cognitive deficits in an alzheimer's disease model mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strittmatter Stephen M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most common of the conformational neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the conversion of a normal biological protein into a β-sheet-rich pathological isoform. In AD the normal soluble Aβ (sAβ forms oligomers and fibrils which assemble into neuritic plaques. The most toxic form of Aβ is thought to be oligomeric. A recent study reveals the cellular prion protein, PrPC, to be a receptor for Aβ oligomers. Aβ oligomers suppress LTP signal in murine hippocampal slices but activity remains when pretreated with the PrP monoclonal anti-PrP antibody, 6D11. We hypothesized that targeting of PrPC to prevent Aβ oligomer-related cognitive deficits is a potentially novel therapeutic approach. APP/PS1 transgenic mice aged 8 months were intraperitoneally (i.p. injected with 1 mg 6D11 for 5 days/week for 2 weeks. Two wild-type control groups were given either the same 6D11 injections or vehicle solution. Additional groups of APP/PS1 transgenic mice were given either i.p. injections of vehicle solution or the same dose of mouse IgG over the same period. The mice were then subjected to cognitive behavioral testing using a radial arm maze, over a period of 10 days. At the conclusion of behavioral testing, animals were sacrificed and brain tissue was analyzed biochemically or immunohistochemically for the levels of amyloid plaques, PrPC, synaptophysin, Aβ40/42 and Aβ oligomers. Results Behavioral testing showed a marked decrease in errors in 6D11 treated APP/PS1 Tg mice compared with the non-6D11 treated Tg groups (p C or Aβ oligomer levels. 6D11 treated APP/PS1 Tg mice had significantly greater synaptophysin immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus molecular layer of the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated APP/PS1 Tg mice (p Conclusions Even short term treatment with monoclonal antibodies such as 6D11 or other compounds which block the binding of Aβ oligomers to PrPC can be used to treat

  2. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  3. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Xuan Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers.

  4. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers. PMID:27341339

  5. Antibodies against beta-lactamase can improve ceftazidime treatment of lung infection with beta-lactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a rat model of chronic lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Bagge, Niels; Høiby, Niels

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that antibodies against the chromosomal beta-lactamase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a beta ab) might act as beta-lactamase inhibitors in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung infection with P. aeruginosa, we compared in a rat model of chronic lung infection the...... efficacy of treatment with ceftazidime in beta-lactamase-immunized (group I) and non-immunized (group II) rats. Chronic lung infection was established with alginate-embedded P. aeruginosa producing high amounts of beta-lactamase in 133 Lewis rats. Prior to infection, group I (66 rats) was immunized three...... times at 2-week intervals with purified beta-lactamase in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) and group II (67 rats) received IFA. Ceftazidime treatment was initiated after challenge and continued for 10 days, after which the rats were sacrificed and the lung bacteriology and pathology were analysed. Rat...

  6. Homological stability for unordered configuration spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts. In the first part we give a self-contained proof of homological stability for the spaces C_n(M;X) of configurations of n unordered points in a connected open manifold M with labels in a path-connected space X, with the best possible integral stability range...... of the spaces C_n(M) can be considered stable when M is a closed manifold. In this case there are no stabilisation maps, but one may still ask if the dimensions of the homology groups over some field stabilise with n. We prove that this is true when M is odd-dimensional, or when the field is F_2 or Q...

  7. Homological mirror symmetry and tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Catanese, Fabrizio; Kontsevich, Maxim; Pantev, Tony; Soibelman, Yan; Zharkov, Ilia

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between Tropical Geometry and Mirror Symmetry goes back to the work of Kontsevich and Y. Soibelman (2000), who applied methods of non-archimedean geometry (in particular, tropical curves) to Homological Mirror Symmetry. In combination with the subsequent work of Mikhalkin on the “tropical” approach to Gromov-Witten theory, and the work of Gross and Siebert, Tropical Geometry has now become a powerful tool. Homological Mirror Symmetry is the area of mathematics concentrated around several categorical equivalences connecting symplectic and holomorphic (or algebraic) geometry. The central ideas first appeared in the work of Maxim Kontsevich (1993). Roughly speaking, the subject can be approached in two ways: either one uses Lagrangian torus fibrations of Calabi-Yau manifolds (the so-called Strominger-Yau-Zaslow picture, further developed by Kontsevich and Soibelman) or one uses Lefschetz fibrations of symplectic manifolds (suggested by Kontsevich and further developed by Seidel). Tropical Ge...

  8. Homological Pisot Substitutions and Exact Regularity

    CERN Document Server

    Barge, Marcy; Jones, Leslie; Sadun, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional substitution tiling spaces where the dilatation (stretching factor) is a degree d Pisot number, and where the first rational Cech cohomology is d-dimensional. We construct examples of such "homological Pisot" substitutions that do not have pure discrete spectra. These examples are not unimodular, and we conjecture that the coincidence rank must always divide a power of the norm of the dilatation. To support this conjecture, we show that homological Pisot substitutions exhibit an Exact Regularity Property (ERP), in which the number of occurrences of a patch for a return length is governed strictly by the length. The ERP puts strong constraints on the measure of any cylinder set in the corresponding tiling space.

  9. The colocalization transition of homologous chromosomes at meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemi, Mario; Panning, Barbara; Prisco, Antonella

    2008-06-01

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division required in sexual reproduction. During its early stages, in the mother cell nucleus, homologous chromosomes recognize each other and colocalize in a crucial step that remains one of the most mysterious of meiosis. Starting from recent discoveries on the system molecular components and interactions, we discuss a statistical mechanics model of chromosome early pairing. Binding molecules mediate long-distance interaction of special DNA recognition sequences and, if their concentration exceeds a critical threshold, they induce a spontaneous colocalization transition of chromosomes, otherwise independently diffusing.

  10. Studying RNA Homology and Conservation with Infernal: From Single Sequences to RNA Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquist, Lars; Burge, Sarah W; Gardner, Paul P

    2016-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput technologies have led to a deluge of putative non-coding RNA (ncRNA) sequences identified in a wide variety of organisms. Systematic characterization of these transcripts will be a tremendous challenge. Homology detection is critical to making maximal use of functional information gathered about ncRNAs: identifying homologous sequence allows us to transfer information gathered in one organism to another quickly and with a high degree of confidence. ncRNA presents a challenge for homology detection, as the primary sequence is often poorly conserved and de novo secondary structure prediction and search remain difficult. This unit introduces methods developed by the Rfam database for identifying "families" of homologous ncRNAs starting from single "seed" sequences, using manually curated sequence alignments to build powerful statistical models of sequence and structure conservation known as covariance models (CMs), implemented in the Infernal software package. We provide a step-by-step iterative protocol for identifying ncRNA homologs and then constructing an alignment and corresponding CM. We also work through an example for the bacterial small RNA MicA, discovering a previously unreported family of divergent MicA homologs in genus Xenorhabdus in the process. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27322404

  11. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone.

  12. Hochschild homology, lax codescent, and duplicial structure

    OpenAIRE

    Garner, Richard; Lack, Stephen; Slevin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We study the duplicial objects of Dwyer and Kan, which generalize the cyclic objects of Connes. We describe duplicial objects in terms of the decalage comonads, and we give a conceptual account of the construction of duplicial objects due to Bohm and Stefan. This is done in terms of a 2-categorical generalization of Hochschild homology. We also study duplicial structure on nerves of categories, bicategories, and monoidal categories.

  13. On the definition of homological critical value

    OpenAIRE

    Govc, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    We point out that there is a problem with the definition of homological critical value (as defined in the widely cited paper \\cite{stability} by Cohen-Steiner, Edelsbrunner and Harer). Under that definition, the critical value lemma of \\cite{stability} in fact fails. We provide several counterexamples and a definition (due to Bubenik and Scott \\cite{categorification}) we feel should be preferred and under which the critical value lemma does indeed hold. One of the counterexamples we have foun...

  14. Nash equilibria via duality and homological selection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Basu; Samik Basu; Mahan MJ

    2014-11-01

    Given a multifunction from to the -fold symmetric product Sym$_{k}(X)$, we use the Dold–Thom theorem to establish a homological selection theorem. This is used to establish existence of Nash equilibria. Cost functions in problems concerning the existence of Nash equilibria are traditionally multilinear in the mixed strategies. The main aim of this paper is to relax the hypothesis of multilinearity. We use basic intersection theory, Poincaré duality in addition to the Dold–Thom theorem.

  15. Persistent Homology and Partial Similarity of Shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Di Fabio, Barbara; Landi, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform shape retrieval based not only on full similarity, but also partial similarity is a key property for any content-based search engine. We prove that persistence diagrams can reveal a partial similarity between two shapes by showing a common subset of points. This can be explained using the Mayer-Vietoris formulas that we develop for ordinary, relative and extended persistent homology. An experiment outlines the potential of persistence diagrams as shape descriptors in re...

  16. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive......Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...

  17. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, 67Ga and 131I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  18. Dental homologies in lamniform sharks (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenshu

    2002-01-01

    The dentitions of lamniform sharks are said to exhibit a unique heterodonty called the "lamnoid tooth pattern." The presence of an inflated hollow "dental bulla" on each jaw cartilage allows the recognition of homologous teeth across most modern macrophagous lamniforms based on topographic correspondence through the "similarity test." In most macrophagous lamniforms, three tooth rows are supported by the upper dental bulla: two rows of large anterior teeth followed by a row of small intermediate teeth. The lower tooth row occluding between the two rows of upper anterior teeth is the first lower anterior tooth row. Like the first and second lower anterior tooth rows, the third lower tooth row is supported by the dental bulla and may be called the first lower intermediate tooth row. The lower intermediate tooth row occludes between the first and second upper lateral tooth rows situated distal to the upper dental bulla, and the rest of the upper and lower tooth rows, all called lateral tooth rows, occlude alternately. Tooth symmetry cannot be used to identify their dental homology. The presence of dental bullae can be regarded as a synapomorphy of Lamniformes and this character is more definable than the "lamnoid tooth pattern." The formation of the tooth pattern appears to be related to the evolution of dental bullae. This study constitutes the first demonstration of supraspecific tooth-to-tooth dental homologies in nonmammalian vertebrates.

  19. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkovits, G. (Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  20. Design of high productivity antibody capture by protein A chromatography using an integrated experimental and modeling approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, C. K.; Osuna-Sanchez, H.; Valéry, E.; Sørensen, E; Bracewell, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    An integrated experimental and modeling approach for the design of high productivity protein A chromatography is presented to maximize productivity in bioproduct manufacture. The approach consists of four steps: (1) small-scale experimentation, (2) model parameter estimation, (3) productivity optimization and (4) model validation with process verification. The integrated use of process experimentation and modeling enables fewer experiments to be performed, and thus minimizes the time and mate...

  1. Rapid Generation of Human-Like Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Urgent Preparedness for Influenza Pandemics and Virulent Infectious Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixu Meng

    Full Text Available The outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases caused by pathogens such as SARS coronavirus, H5N1, H1N1, and recently H7N9 influenza viruses, have been associated with significant mortality and morbidity in humans. Neutralizing antibodies from individuals who have recovered from an infection confer therapeutic protection to others infected with the same pathogen. However, survivors may not always be available for providing plasma or for the cloning of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs.The genome and the immunoglobulin genes in rhesus macaques and humans are highly homologous; therefore, we investigated whether neutralizing mAbs that are highly homologous to those of humans (human-like could be generated. Using the H5N1 influenza virus as a model, we first immunized rhesus macaques with recombinant adenoviruses carrying a synthetic gene encoding hemagglutinin (HA. Following screening an antibody phage display library derived from the B cells of immunized monkeys, we cloned selected macaque immunoglobulin heavy chain and light chain variable regions into the human IgG constant region, which generated human-macaque chimeric mAbs exhibiting over 97% homology to human antibodies. Selected mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against three clades (0, 1, 2 of the H5N1 influenza viruses. The in vivo protection experiments demonstrated that the mAbs effectively protected the mice even when administered up to 3 days after infection with H5N1 influenza virus. In particular, mAb 4E6 demonstrated sub-picomolar binding affinity to HA and superior in vivo protection efficacy without the loss of body weight and obvious lung damage. The analysis of the 4E6 escape mutants demonstrated that the 4E6 antibody bound to a conserved epitope region containing two amino acids on the globular head of HA.Our study demonstrated the generation of neutralizing mAbs for potential application in humans in urgent preparedness against outbreaks of new influenza infections or

  2. Anti-CEA monoclonal antibody: technetium-99m labeling and the validation process of a scintigraphic animal model with a non-cellular antigenic implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Marques, Fabio Luiz Navarro; Okamoto, Miriam Roseli Yoshie; Hironaka, Fausto Haruki; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2002-07-01

    Animal models are currently used to verify the biodistribution of different radiopharmaceuticals before its clinical application in Nuclear Medicine; however, there may be some limitations. The utilization of labelled anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) in experimental models often requires implant of human antigens (usually a cellular implant), which cannot be achieved in immunocompetent animals. Our purpose was to label an anti-CEA MoAb with technetium-99m (99Tc) and to validate a simplified animal model using a noncellular antigenic implant. MoAb was directly labelled with 99mTc, after reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol. Labeling efficiency was checked by ascending chromatography and immunoreactive fraction was measured in plastic wells sensitized with the antigen. Radiopharmaceutical biodistribution was evaluated by dissection and scintigraphy in 5 mice groups; following the subcutaneous administration of Al(OH)3, CEA adsorbed Al(OH)2 and a control group evaluation. Labeling efficiency was 94+/-3%, which showed to be stable for 24 hr, with immunoreactive fraction above 50%. Invasive biodistribution evaluation showed prolonged blood retention, hepatic and renal uptake. A significant increase in uptake was observed in scintigraphic studies of animals with CEA-adsorbed Al(OH)3 implants compared with the other groups (p<0.05). The non-cellular antigenic implant model simplifies the pre-clinical evaluation of labelled MoAb. PMID:12146705

  3. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  4. A single dose of neuron-binding human monoclonal antibody improves spontaneous activity in a murine model of demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Denic

    Full Text Available Our laboratory demonstrated that a natural human serum antibody, sHIgM12, binds to neurons in vitro and promotes neurite outgrowth. We generated a recombinant form, rHIgM12, with identical properties. Intracerebral infection with Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV of susceptible mouse strains results in chronic demyelinating disease with progressive axonal loss and neurologic dysfunction similar to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. To study the effects of rHIgM12 on the motor function of TMEV-infected mice, we monitored spontaneous nocturnal activity over many weeks. Nocturnal behavior is a sensitive measure of rodent neurologic function because maximal activity changes are expected to occur during the normally active night time monitoring period. Mice were placed in activity boxes eight days prior to treatment to collect baseline spontaneous activity. After treatment, activity in each group was continuously recorded over 8 weeks. We chose a long 8-week monitoring period for two reasons: (1 we previously demonstrated that IgM induced remyelination is present by 5 weeks post treatment, and (2 TMEV-induced demyelinating disease in this strain progresses very slowly. Due to the long observation periods and large data sets, differences among treatment groups may be difficult to appreciate studying the original unfiltered recordings. To clearly delineate changes in the highly fluctuating original data we applied three different methods: (1 binning, (2 application of Gaussian low-pass filters (GF and (3 polynomial fitting. Using each of the three methods we showed that compared to control IgM and saline, early treatment with rHIgM12 induced improvement in both horizontal and vertical motor function, whereas later treatment improved only horizontal activity. rHIgM12 did not alter activity of normal, uninfected mice. This study supports the hypothesis that treatment with a neuron-binding IgM not only protects neurons in vitro, but

  5. Homological mirror symmetry on noncommutative two-tori

    CERN Document Server

    Kajiura, H

    2004-01-01

    Homological mirror symmetry is a conjecture that a category constructed in the A-model and a category constructed in the B-model are equivalent in some sense. We construct a cyclic differential graded (DG) category of holomorphic vector bundles on noncommutative two-tori as a category in the B-model side. We define the corresponding Fukaya's category in the A-model side, and prove the equivalence of the two categories at the level of cyclic categories. We further write down explicitly Feynman rules for higher Massey products derived from the cyclic DG category. As a background of these arguments, a physical explanation of the mirror symmetry for noncommutative two-tori is also given.

  6. Molecular cloning, DNA sequence analysis, and characterization of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae dtxR homolog from Brevibacterium lactofermentum.

    OpenAIRE

    Oguiza, J A; Tao, X; Marcos, A T; Martín, J F; Murphy, J R

    1995-01-01

    A homolog of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae dtxR gene was isolated from Brevibacterium lactofermentum. The product of the B. lactofermentum dtxR gene was immunoreactive with polyclonal anti-DtxR antibodies and functioned as an iron-activated repressor capable of regulating the expression of beta-galactosidase from a diphtheria tox promoter/operator transcriptional fusion in recombinant Escherichia coli. The extents of induction by increasing concentrations of the chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl were...

  7. Injection of an antibody against a p21 c-Ha-ras protein inhibits cleavage in axolotl eggs.

    OpenAIRE

    Baltus, E; Hanocq-Quertier, J; Hanocq, F.; Brachet, J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a ras protein was demonstrated in cleaving axolotl eggs by selective immunoprecipitation with a polyclonal antibody against a peptide encoded by the c-Ha-ras oncogene, cellular homolog of the v-Ha-ras oncogene of Harvey rat sarcoma virus. Injection of this antibody into axolotl oocytes subjected to progesterone treatment does not prevent meiotic maturation. Injection of the same antibody into a blastomere of axolotl eggs at the 2- or 4-cell stage causes cleavage arrest in the ...

  8. Tocopherol and tocotrienol homologs in parenteral lipid emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas M; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral lipid emulsions, which are made of oils from plant and fish sources, contain different types of tocopherols and tocotrienols (vitamin E homologs). The amount and types of vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions vary considerably and are not completely known. The objective of this analysis was to develop a quantitative method to determine levels of all vitamin E homologs in various lipid emulsions. An HPLC system was used to measure vitamin E homologs using a Pinnacle DB Silic...

  9. Equivariant geometric K-homology for compact Lie group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, Paul; Schick, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Let G be a compact Lie-group, X a compact G-CW-complex. We define equivariant geometric K-homology groups K^G_*(X), using an obvious equivariant version of the (M,E,f)-picture of Baum-Douglas for K-homology. We define explicit natural transformations to and from equivariant K-homology defined via KK-theory (the "official" equivariant K-homology groups) and show that these are isomorphism.

  10. Duality and products in algebraic (co)homology theories

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalzig, N.; Kraehmer, U.

    2008-01-01

    The origin and interplay of products and dualities in algebraic (co)homology theories is ascribed to a ×A-Hopf algebra structure on the relevant universal enveloping algebra. This provides a unified treatment for example of results by Van den Bergh about Hochschild (co)homology and by Huebschmann about Lie–Rinehart (co)homology.

  11. Characterization of homologous and heterologous adaptive immune responses in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz Ivan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study characterized the homologous and heterologous immune response in type-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection. Two experiments were conducted: in experiment 1, eight pigs were inoculated with PRRSV strain 3262 and 84 days post-inoculation (dpi they were challenged with either strain 3262 or strain 3267 and followed for the next 14 days (98 dpi. In experiment 2, eight pigs were inoculated with strain 3267 and challenged at 84 dpi as above. Clinical course, viremia, humoral response (neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, NA and virus-specific IFN-γ responses (ELISPOT were evaluated all throughout the study. Serum levels of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and TGF-β were determined (ELISA after the second challenge. In experiment 1 primo-inoculation with strain 3262 induced viremia of ≤ 28 days, low titres of homologous NA but strong IFN-γ responses. In contrast, strain 3267 induced longer viremias (up to 56 days, higher NA titres (≤ 6 log2 and lower IFN-γ responses. Inoculation with 3267 produced higher serum IL-8 levels. After the re-challenge at 84 dpi, pigs in experiment 1 developed mostly a one week viremia regardless of the strain used. In experiment 2, neither the homologous nor the heterologous challenge resulted in detectable viremia although PRRSV was present in tonsils of some animals. Homologous re-inoculation with 3267 produced elevated TGF-β levels in serum for 7–14 days but this did not occur with the heterologous re-inoculation. In conclusion, inoculation with different PRRSV strains result in different virological and immunological outcomes and in different degrees of homologous and heterologous protection.

  12. Evidence of protein-free homology recognition in magnetic bead force–extension experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    (O’) Lee, D. J.; Danilowicz, C.; Rochester, C.; Prentiss, M.

    2016-01-01

    Earlier theoretical studies have proposed that the homology-dependent pairing of large tracts of dsDNA may be due to physical interactions between homologous regions. Such interactions could contribute to the sequence-dependent pairing of chromosome regions that may occur in the presence or the absence of double-strand breaks. Several experiments have indicated the recognition of homologous sequences in pure electrolytic solutions without proteins. Here, we report single-molecule force experiments with a designed 60 kb long dsDNA construct; one end attached to a solid surface and the other end to a magnetic bead. The 60 kb constructs contain two 10 kb long homologous tracts oriented head to head, so that their sequences match if the two tracts fold on each other. The distance between the bead and the surface is measured as a function of the force applied to the bead. At low forces, the construct molecules extend substantially less than normal, control dsDNA, indicating the existence of preferential interaction between the homologous regions. The force increase causes no abrupt but continuous unfolding of the paired homologous regions. Simple semi-phenomenological models of the unfolding mechanics are proposed, and their predictions are compared with the data. PMID:27493568

  13. Sorafenib Decreases Tumor Exposure to an Anti-carcinoembryonic Antigen Monoclonal Antibody in a Mouse Model of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Veena A; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2016-07-01

    In this investigation, we test the hypothesis that treatment with sorafenib, an anti-angiogenic agent, decreases tumor vascularization and, consequently, hinders the delivery of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to xenograft tumors. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice bearing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expressing tumor xenografts were divided into control and sorafenib-treated groups. Sorafenib was administered to the latter group at 50 mg/kg IP every 48 h, starting 4 days post-tumor implantation. When tumors attained a size of 200-300 mm(3), mice were evaluated for (a) tumor microvessel density (using immunohistochemical analysis), (b) tumor macromolecular extravasation (using Evans Blue Dye (EBD)), (c) pharmacokinetics of an anti-CEA mAb, T84.66, following an intravenous dose of 10 mg/kg, and (d) intra-tumoral spatial distribution of T84.66 (using autoradiography). Sorafenib treatment resulted in a substantial reduction in tumor growth rate, a visible reduction in tumor microvessel density, and in a 46.4% decrease in EBD extravasation in tumor tissue (p area under the mAb plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-7d): 1.67 × 10(3) ± 1.28 × 10(2) vs. 1.76 × 10(3) ± 1.75 × 10(2) nM × day, p = 0.51). However, tumor AUC(0-7d) was reduced by 40.8% in sorafenib-treated mice relative to that observed in control mice (5.61 × 10(2) ± 4.27 × 10(1) vs. 9.48 × 10(2) ± 5.61 × 10(1) nM × day, p < 0.001). Sorafenib therapy was also found to markedly alter mAb tumor spatial distribution. The results collectively suggest that sorafenib treatment causes a significant reduction in mAb delivery to, and distribution within, solid tumors. PMID:27029796

  14. Anti-alpha-toxin monoclonal antibody and antibiotic combination therapy improves disease outcome and accelerates healing in a Staphylococcus aureus dermonecrosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Jamese J; Datta, Vivekananda; Tkaczyk, Christine; Hamilton, Melissa; Sadowska, Agnieszka; Jones-Nelson, Omari; O'Day, Terrence; Weiss, William J; Szarka, Szabolcs; Nguyen, Vien; Prokai, Laszlo; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-toxin (AT) is a major virulence determinant in Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infection models. We previously demonstrated that prophylactic administration of 2A3, an AT-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb), prevents S. aureus disease in a mouse dermonecrosis model by neutralizing AT-mediated tissue necrosis and immune evasion. In the present study, MEDI4893*, an affinity-optimized version of 2A3, was characterized for therapeutic activity in the dermonecrosis model as a single agent and in combination with two frontline antibiotics, vancomycin and linezolid. MEDI4893* postinfection therapy was found to exhibit a therapeutic treatment window similar to that for linezolid but longer than that for vancomycin. Additionally, when combined with either vancomycin or linezolid, MEDI4893* resulted in reduced tissue damage, increased neutrophil and macrophage infiltration and abscess formation, and accelerated healing relative to those with the antibiotic monotherapies. These data suggest that AT neutralization with a potent MAb holds promise for both prophylaxis and adjunctive therapy with antibiotics and may be a valuable addition to currently available options for the treatment of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections.

  15. Eps homology domain endosomal transport proteins differentially localize to the neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mate Suzanne E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recycling of endosomes is important for trafficking and maintenance of proteins at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We have previously shown high expression of the endocytic recycling regulator Eps15 homology domain-containing (EHD1 proteinin the Torpedo californica electric organ, a model tissue for investigating a cholinergic synapse. In this study, we investigated the localization of EHD1 and its paralogs EHD2, EHD3, and EHD4 in mouse skeletal muscle, and assessed the morphological changes in EHD1−/− NMJs. Methods Localization of the candidate NMJ protein EHD1 was assessed by confocal microscopy analysis of whole-mount mouse skeletal muscle fibers after direct gene transfer and immunolabeling. The potential function of EHD1 was assessed by specific force measurement and α-bungarotoxin-based endplate morphology mapping in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle. Results Endogenous EHD1 localized to primary synaptic clefts of murine NMJ, and this localization was confirmed by expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein labeled-EHD1 in murine skeletal muscle in vivo. EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle had normal histology and NMJ morphology, and normal specific force generation during muscle contraction. The EHD 1–4 proteins showed differential localization in skeletal muscle: EHD2 to muscle vasculature, EHD3 to perisynaptic regions, and EHD4 to perinuclear regions and to primary synaptic clefts, but at lower levels than EHD1. Additionally, specific antibodies raised against mammalian EHD1-4 recognized proteins of the expected mass in the T. californica electric organ. Finally, we found that EHD4 expression was more abundant in EHD1−/− mouse skeletal muscle than in wild-type skeletal muscle. Conclusion EHD1 and EHD4 localize to the primary synaptic clefts of the NMJ. Lack of obvious defects in NMJ structure and muscle function in EHD1−/− muscle may be due to functional compensation by other EHD paralogs.

  16. A dynamic mathematical model for monoclonal antibody N-linked glycosylation and nucleotide sugar donor transport within a maturing Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez del Val, Ioscani; Nagy, Judit M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are one of the most important products of the biopharmaceutical industry. Their therapeutic efficacy depends on the post-translational process of glycosylation, which is influenced by manufacturing process conditions. Herein, we present a dynamic mathematical model for mAb glycosylation that considers cisternal maturation by approximating the Golgi apparatus to a plug flow reactor and by including recycling of Golgi-resident proteins (glycosylation enzymes and transport proteins [TPs]). The glycosylation reaction rate expressions were derived based on the reported kinetic mechanisms for each enzyme, and transport of nucleotide sugar donors [NSDs] from the cytosol to the Golgi lumen was modeled to serve as a link between glycosylation and cellular metabolism. Optimization-based methodologies were developed for estimating unknown enzyme and TP concentration profile parameters. The resulting model is capable of reproducing glycosylation profiles of commercial mAbs. It can further reproduce the effect gene silencing of the FucT glycosylation enzyme and cytosolic NSD depletion have on the mAb oligosaccharide profile. All novel elements of our model are based on biological evidence and generate more accurate results than previous reports. We therefore believe that the improvements contribute to a more detailed representation of the N-linked glycosylation process. The overall results show the potential of our model toward evaluating cell engineering strategies that yield desired glycosylation profiles. Additionally, when coupled to cellular metabolism, this model could be used to assess the effect of process conditions on glycosylation and aid in the design, control, and optimization of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes.

  17. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  18. Sequential radioimmunotherapy with 177Lu- and 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody BR96 in a syngeneic rat colon carcinoma model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Sophie E; Elgström, Erika; Bäck, Tom;

    2014-01-01

    for small, established tumors. A combination of such radionuclides may be successful in regimens of radioimmunotherapy. In this study, rats were treated by sequential administration of first a 177Lu-labeled antibody, followed by a 211At-labeled antibody 25 days later. METHODS: Rats bearing solid colon...

  19. Production of anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies in activated lymphocyte derived DNA induced lupus model was dependent on CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Z; Xu, L; Xu, W; Xiong, S

    2012-04-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that activated lymphocyte derived DNA (ALD-DNA) could function as an autoantigen to induce production of anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies in syngeneic BALB/c mice. Here we carefully evaluated the potential role of T cells in the induction of anti-dsDNA antibody. We demonstrated that ALD-DNA could effectively induce production of anti-dsDNA antibodies in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, ALD-DNA could not induce the generation of anti-dsDNA antibodies in nude mice. We further showed that in vivo depletion of CD3(+) T cells blocked the induction of anti-dsDNA antibodies in BALB/c mice. Notably, we demonstrated that CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T cells conferred ALD-DNA to induce anti-dsDNA antibodies. Finally, we demonstrated that adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells could rescue ALD-DNA induced anti-dsDNA antibodies in nude mice. Our results suggested that T helper cells were required for ALD-DNA to induce anti-dsDNA antibodies. These findings could further our understanding about the immunogenic properties of DNA and throw new light on SLE pathogenesis.

  20. L^2-homology for compact quantum groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kyed, David

    2006-01-01

    A notion of L^2-homology for compact quantum groups is introduced, generalizing the classical notion for countable, discrete groups. If the compact quantum group in question has tracial Haar state, it is possible to define its L^2-Betti numbers and Novikov-Shubin invariants/capacities. It is proved that these L^2-Betti numbers vanish for the Gelfand dual of a compact Lie group and that the zeroth Novikov-Shubin invariant equals the dimension of the underlying Lie group. Finally, we relate our...

  1. Homology of lipoprotein lipase to pancreatic lipase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Avram, C M; Ben-Zeev, O; Lee, T.D. (Taunia D.); Haaga, K; Shively, J. E.; Goers, J; Pedersen, M.E; Reeve, J R; Schotz, M C

    1986-01-01

    Bovine milk lipoprotein lipase was subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. The first 19 amino-terminal residues were Asp-Arg-Ile-Thr-Gly-Gly-Lys-Asp-Phe-Arg-Asp-Ile-Glu-Ser-Lys-Phe-Ala-Leu- Arg. In addition, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of a tryptic digest of reduced and alkylated lipase resolved a number of peptides, five of which contained cysteine. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides revealed in most instances a close homology to porcine pancreatic lipase....

  2. Fukaya categories as categorical Morse homology

    CERN Document Server

    Nadler, David

    2011-01-01

    The Fukaya category of a Weinstein manifold is an intricate symplectic invariant of high interest in mirror symmetry and geometric representation theory. We show in analogy with Morse homology that the Fukaya category can be obtained by gluing together Fukaya categories of Weinstein cells. Our main technical result is a d\\'evissage pattern for Lagrangian branes parallel to that for constructible sheaves. As an application, we exhibit the Fukaya category as the global sections of a sheaf on the conic topology of the Weinstein manifold. This can be viewed as a symplectic analogue of the well-known algebraic and topological theories of (micro)localization.

  3. Railway vehicle performance optimisation using virtual homologation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, H.; Madeira, J. F. A.; Ambrósio, J.; Pombo, J.

    2016-09-01

    Unlike regular automotive vehicles, which are designed to travel in different types of roads, railway vehicles travel mostly in the same route during their life cycle. To accept the operation of a railway vehicle in a particular network, a homologation process is required according to local standard regulations. In Europe, the standards EN 14363 and UIC 518, which are used for railway vehicle acceptance, require on-track tests and/or numerical simulations. An important advantage of using virtual homologation is the reduction of the high costs associated with on-track tests by studying the railway vehicle performance in different operation conditions. This work proposes a methodology for the improvement of railway vehicle design with the objective of its operation in selected railway tracks by using optimisation. The analyses required for the vehicle improvement are performed under control of the optimisation method global and local optimisation using direct search. To quantify the performance of the vehicle, a new objective function is proposed, which includes: a Dynamic Performance Index, defined as a weighted sum of the indices obtained from the virtual homologation process; the non-compensated acceleration, which is related to the operational velocity; and a penalty associated with cases where the vehicle presents an unacceptable dynamic behaviour according to the standards. Thus, the optimisation process intends not only to improve the quality of the vehicle in terms of running safety and ride quality, but also to increase the vehicle availability via the reduction of the time for a journey while ensuring its operational acceptance under the standards. The design variables include the suspension characteristics and the operational velocity of the vehicle, which are allowed to vary in an acceptable range of variation. The results of the optimisation lead to a global minimum of the objective function in which the suspensions characteristics of the vehicle are

  4. Periodic cyclic homology of affine Hecke algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Solleveld, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    This is the author's PhD-thesis, which was written in 2006. The version posted here is identical to the printed one. Instead of an abstract, the short list of contents: Preface 5 1 Introduction 9 2 K-theory and cyclic type homology theories 13 3 Affine Hecke algebras 61 4 Reductive p-adic groups 103 5 Parameter deformations in affine Hecke algebras 129 6 Examples and calculations 169 A Crossed products 223 Bibliography 227 Index 237 Samenvatting 245 Curriculum vitae 253

  5. Exponential growth of colored HOMFLY-PT homology

    CERN Document Server

    Wedrich, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We define reduced colored sl(N) link homologies and use deformation spectral sequences to characterize their dependence on color and rank. We then define reduced colored HOMFLY-PT homologies and prove that they arise as large N limits of sl(N) homologies. Together, these results allow proofs of many aspects of the physically conjectured structure of the family of type A link homologies. In particular, we verify a conjecture of Gorsky, Gukov and Sto\\v{s}i\\'c about the growth of colored HOMFLY-PT homologies.

  6. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen-...... for combating HER2+ breast cancer. © 2013 by Tabriz University of Medical Sciences.......Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen......-binding fragments in cancer targeting and therapy. VHHs express low immunogenicity, are highly robust and easy to manufacture and have the ability to recognize hidden or uncommon epitopes. We highlight the utility of VHH in design of new molecular, multifunctional particulate and immune cell-based systems...

  7. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  8. Homology Modeling of Different CYP51 Subtypes from Magnaporthe Grisea and Comparison of Their Binding Models with Diniconazole%稻瘟菌CYP51不同亚型的同源模建及与烯唑醇对接模型的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡诗雨; 刘婷婷; 张阳; 万坚; 杨劭; 赵进; 杨娇艳

    2012-01-01

    为开发稻瘟菌(Magnaporthe grisea)的高效、特异14α-去甲基化酶抑制剂(DMIs),实现水稻稻瘟病的有效防治,对稻瘟菌甾醇14α-去甲基化酶CYP51的三维结构进行了同源模拟,并通过分子对接比较分析了稻瘟菌CYP51两个亚型(MG-CYP51F1和MG-CYP51F2)与烯唑醇的相互作用机理.结果表明,稻瘟菌中MG-CYP51F1和MGCYP51F2与烯唑醇的结合模式基本相同,疏水作用是其结合最重要的影响因素,活性空腔内相互对应的相同或相似疏水性氨基酸共同形成了与配体结合的疏水口袋.MG-CYP51F1和MG-CYP51F2都可以作为药物设计的靶标,对基于靶酶的药物设计过程不构成影响,这为稻瘟菌高效特异DMIs药物研发提供了重要参考信息.%In this paper,the comparison analysis was executed on two homologous 3D models of CYP51 subtypes MG-CYP51F1 and MG-CYP51F2 from Magnaporthe grisea and the characteristics of their interaction with diniconazole based on homology modeling and molecular docking.The results showed that both of subtypes shared the similar binding pattern with diniconazole,in which hydrophobic interaction was the most important.Diniconazole was binded to the large hydrophobic cavity which was formed by the corresponding same or similar hydrophobic amino acids in active cavities.Thus either of the two CYP51 subtypes could be used as the antifun-gal target for designation of DMIs.The study provided references for the development of the specific and effective DMIs for M.grisea.

  9. Supplemented vaccination with tandem repeat M2e virus-like particles enhances protection against homologous and heterologous HPAI H5 viruses in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Byung-Min; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Jung, Suk Chan; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Yu-Na; Kang, Sang-Moo; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2016-01-27

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 viruses derived from A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96 have been continuously circulating globally, severely affecting the public health and poultry industries. The matrix 2 protein ectodomain (M2e) is considered a promising candidate for a universal cross-protective influenza vaccine that provides more effective control over HPAI H5 viruses harboring variant hemagglutinin (HA)-antigens. Here, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a tandem repeat construct of heterologous M2e presented on virus-like particles (M2e5x VLPs) either alone or as a supplement against HPAI H5 viruses in a chicken model. Chickens immunized with M2e5x VLPs alone induced M2e-specific antibodies but were not protected against HPAI H5. The homo- and cross-protective efficacy of M2e5x VLP-supplemented vaccination of chickens was also examined. Importantly, supplementation with M2e5x VLPs induced significantly higher levels of antibodies specific for M2e and different viruses as well as provided improved protection against homologous and heterologous HPAI H5 viruses. Considering the limited efficacy of inactivated vaccines, supplement vaccination with M2e5x VLPs may be an effective measure for preventing outbreaks of HPAI viruses that have the ability to constantly change their antigenic properties in poultry.

  10. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immune response in mouse models: the role of regulatory Tcells, anti-tumor antibodies, and immune attacks on brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Fatma; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Chung, Hoon; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-02-01

    We have previously shown that photodynamic therapy mediated by a vascular regimen of benzoporphyrin derivative and 690nm light is capable of inducing a robust immune response in the mouse CT26.CL25 tumor model that contains a tumor-rejection antigen, beta-galactosidase (β-gal). For the first time we show that PDT can stimulate the production of serum IgG antibodies against the β-gal antigen. It is known that a common cause of death from cancer, particularly lung cancer, is brain metastases; especially the inoperable ones that do not respond to traditional cytotoxic therapies either. We asked whether PDT of a primary tumor could stimulate immune response that could attack the distant brain metastases. We have developed a mouse model of generating brain metastases by injecting CT26.CL25 tumor cells into the brain as well as injecting the same cancer cells under the skin at the same time. When the subcutaneous tumor was treated with PDT, we observed a survival advantage compared to mice that had untreated brain metastases alone.

  11. Relationship between haemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titres and clinical protection against influenza: development and application of a bayesian random-effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megas Françoise

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibodies directed against haemagglutinin, measured by the haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay are essential to protective immunity against influenza infection. An HI titre of 1:40 is generally accepted to correspond to a 50% reduction in the risk of contracting influenza in a susceptible population, but limited attempts have been made to further quantify the association between HI titre and protective efficacy. Methods We present a model, using a meta-analytical approach, that estimates the level of clinical protection against influenza at any HI titre level. Source data were derived from a systematic literature review that identified 15 studies, representing a total of 5899 adult subjects and 1304 influenza cases with interval-censored information on HI titre. The parameters of the relationship between HI titre and clinical protection were estimated using Bayesian inference with a consideration of random effects and censorship in the available information. Results A significant and positive relationship between HI titre and clinical protection against influenza was observed in all tested models. This relationship was found to be similar irrespective of the type of viral strain (A or B and the vaccination status of the individuals. Conclusion Although limitations in the data used should not be overlooked, the relationship derived in this analysis provides a means to predict the efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccines when only immunogenicity data are available. This relationship can also be useful for comparing the efficacy of different influenza vaccines based on their immunological profile.

  12. Detailed assessment of homology detection using different substitution matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; WANG Wei

    2006-01-01

    Homology detection plays a key role in bioinformatics, whereas substitution matrix is one of the most important components in homology detection. Thus, besides the improvement of alignment algorithms, another effective way to enhance the accuracy of homology detection is to use proper substitution matrices or even construct new matrices.A study on the features of various matrices and on the comparison of the performances between different matrices in homology detection enable us to choose the most proper or optimal matrix for some specific applications. In this paper, by taking BLOSUM matrices as an example, some detailed features of matrices in homology detection are studied by calculating the distributions of numbers of recognized proteins over different sequence identities and sequence lengths. Our results clearly showed that different matrices have different preferences and abilities to the recognition of remote homologous proteins. Furthermore, detailed features of the various matrices can be used to improve the accuracy of homology detection.

  13. The effects of variations in the specificities of the antibody components on a two-site immunoradiometric assay for ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variations in the sub-unit antigenic structure of ferritins derived from various human tissues are reflected in the differing specificities of antisera raised against these ferritin preparations. In this study it was shown that antibody specificity played an important role in determining the sensitivity and overall binding of labelled antibody in a two-site immunoradiometric assay for ferritin. Homologous assay systems, in which solid phase and radio-labelled antibodies were of similar specificities, were generally less sensitive and showed lower binding than heterologous assay systems, in which solid phase and labelled antibodies were of different specificities. The source of the ferritin which was used as assay standard also played an important part in determining the sensitivity and overall binding in homologous antibody systems, spleen ferritin standards yielding assays superior to those obtained with placenta or liver ferritin standards. However, these differences between standards were not seen in a heterologous system employing solid-phase antibodies directed against liver ferritin and labelled antibodies directed against placenta ferritin. The nature of the ferritin used to prepare immunoadsorbant for the purification of antibodies before radioiodination also affected the assay characteristics; antibodies prepared on spleen ferritin immunoadsorbant being more reactive than antibodies prepared on placenta ferritin immunoadsorbant, which in turn were more reactive than antibodies prepared on liver ferritin immunoadsorbant. (author)

  14. Sheaves on Graphs and Their Homological Invariants

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Joel

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a notion of a sheaf of vector spaces on a graph, and develop the foundations of homology theories for such sheaves. One sheaf invariant, its "maximum excess," has a number of remarkable properties. It has a simple definition, with no reference to homology theory, that resembles graph expansion. Yet it is a "limit" of Betti numbers, and hence has a short/long exact sequence theory and resembles the $L^2$ Betti numbers of Atiyah. Also, the maximum excess is defined via a supermodular function, which gives the maximum excess much stronger properties than one has of a typical Betti number. The maximum excess gives a simple interpretation of an important graph invariant, which will be used to study the Hanna Neumann Conjecture in a future paper. Our sheaf theory can be viewed as a vast generalization of algebraic graph theory: each sheaf has invariants associated to it---such as Betti numbers and Laplacian matrices---that generalize those in classical graph theory.

  15. Partial Protection against Porcine Influenza A Virus by a Hemagglutinin-Expressing Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine in the Absence of Neutralizing Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Meret E.; Vielle, Nathalie J.; Python, Sylvie; Brechbühl, Daniel; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Zimmer, Gert; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This work was initiated by previous reports demonstrating that mismatched influenza A virus (IAV) vaccines can induce enhanced disease, probably mediated by antibodies. Our aim was, therefore, to investigate if a vaccine inducing opsonizing but not neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (HA) of a selected heterologous challenge virus would enhance disease or induce protective immune responses in the pig model. To this end, we immunized pigs with either whole inactivated virus (WIV)-vaccine or HA-expressing virus replicon particles (VRP) vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Both types of vaccines induced virus neutralizing and opsonizing antibodies against homologous virus as shown by a highly sensitive plasmacytoid dendritic cell-based opsonization assay. Opsonizing antibodies showed a broader reactivity against heterologous IAV compared with neutralizing antibodies. Pigs immunized with HA-recombinant VRP vaccine were partially protected from infection with a mismatched IAV, which was not neutralized but opsonized by the immune sera. The VRP vaccine reduced lung lesions, lung inflammatory cytokine responses, serum IFN-α responses, and viral loads in the airways. Only the VRP vaccine was able to prime IAV-specific IFNγ/TNFα dual secreting CD4+ T cells detectable in the peripheral blood. In summary, this work demonstrates that with the virus pair selected, a WIV vaccine inducing opsonizing antibodies against HA which lack neutralizing activity, is neither protective nor does it induce enhanced disease in pigs. In contrast, VRP-expressing HA is efficacious vaccines in swine as they induced both potent antibodies and T-cell immunity resulting in a broader protective value.

  16. Mechanisms of immunotherapeutic intervention by anti-CD40L (CD154) antibody in an animal model of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, L.M.; Miga, A.J.; Vanderlugt, C.L.; Dal Canto, M.C.; Laman, J.D.; Noelle, R.J.; Miller, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    Relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (R-EAE) in the SJL mouse is a Th1-mediated autoimmune demyelinating disease model for human multiple sclerosis and is characterized by infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS) by Th1 cells and macrophages. Disease relapses are mediated by T

  17. Using simple models to describe the kinetics of growth, glucose consumption, and monoclonal antibody formation in naive and infliximab producer CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Meza, Julián; Araíz-Hernández, Diana; Carrillo-Cocom, Leydi Maribel; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Rocha-Pizaña, María Del Refugio; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2016-08-01

    Despite their practical and commercial relevance, there are few reports on the kinetics of growth and production of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells-the most frequently used host for the industrial production of therapeutic proteins. We characterize the kinetics of cell growth, substrate consumption, and product formation in naive and monoclonal antibody (mAb) producing recombinant CHO cells. Culture experiments were performed in 125 mL shake flasks on commercial culture medium (CD Opti CHO™ Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) diluted to different glucose concentrations (1.2-4.8 g/L). The time evolution of cell, glucose, lactic acid concentration and monoclonal antibody concentrations was monitored on a daily basis for mAb-producing cultures and their naive counterparts. The time series were differentiated to calculate the corresponding kinetic rates (rx = d[X]/dt; rs = d[S]/dt; rp = d[mAb]/dt). Results showed that these cell lines could be modeled by Monod-like kinetics if a threshold substrate concentration value of [S]t = 0.58 g/L (for recombinant cells) and [S]t = 0.96 g/L (for naïve cells), below which growth is not observed, was considered. A set of values for μmax, and Ks was determined for naive and recombinant cell cultures cultured at 33 and 37 °C. The yield coefficient (Yx/s) was observed to be a function of substrate concentration, with values in the range of 0.27-1.08 × 10(7) cell/mL and 0.72-2.79 × 10(6) cells/mL for naive and recombinant cultures, respectively. The kinetics of mAb production can be described by a Luedeking-Piret model (d[mAb]/dt = αd[X]/dt + β[X]) with values of α = 7.65 × 10(-7) µg/cell and β = 7.68 × 10(-8) µg/cell/h for cultures conducted in batch-agitated flasks and batch and instrumented bioreactors operated in batch and fed-batch mode. PMID:26091615

  18. Physiological homology between Drosophila melanogaster and vertebrate cardiovascular systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Choma

    2011-05-01

    The physiology of the Drosophila melanogaster cardiovascular system remains poorly characterized compared with its vertebrate counterparts. Basic measures of physiological performance remain unknown. It also is unclear whether subtle physiological defects observed in the human cardiovascular system can be reproduced in D. melanogaster. Here we characterize the cardiovascular physiology of D. melanogaster in its pre-pupal stage by using high-speed dye angiography and optical coherence tomography. The heart has vigorous pulsatile contractions that drive intracardiac, aortic and extracellular-extravascular hemolymph flow. Several physiological measures, including weight-adjusted cardiac output, body-length-adjusted aortic velocities and intracardiac shear forces, are similar to those in the closed vertebrate cardiovascular systems, including that of humans. Extracellular-extravascular flow in the pre-pupal D. melanogaster circulation drives convection-limited fluid transport. To demonstrate homology in heart dysfunction, we showed that, at the pre-pupal stage, a troponin I mutant, held-up2 (hdp2, has impaired systolic and diastolic heart wall velocities. Impaired heart wall velocities occur in the context of a non-dilated phenotype with a mildly depressed fractional shortening. We additionally derive receiver operating characteristic curves showing that heart wall velocity is a potentially powerful discriminator of systolic heart dysfunction. Our results demonstrate physiological homology and support the use of D. melanogaster as an animal model of complex cardiovascular disease.

  19. Open-closed field theories, string topology, and Hochschild homology

    CERN Document Server

    Blumberg, Andrew J; Teleman, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    In this expository paper we discuss a project regarding the string topology of a manifold, that was inspired by recent work of Moore-Segal, Costello, and Hopkins and Lurie, on "open-closed topological conformal field theories". Given a closed, oriented manifold M, we describe the "string topology category" S_M, which is enriched over chain complexes over a fixed field k. The objects of S_M are connected, closed, oriented submanifolds N of M, and the complex of morphisms between N_1 and N_2 is a chain complex homotopy equivalent to the singular chains C_*(P_{N_1, N_2}), where C_*(P_{N_1, N_2}) is the space of paths in M that start in N_1 and end in N_2. The composition pairing in this category is a chain model for the open string topology operations of Sullivan and expanded upon by Harrelson, and Ramirez. We will describe a calculation yielding that the Hochschild homology of the category S_M is the homology of the free loop space, LM. Another part of the project is to calculate the Hochschild cohomology of th...

  20. C-kit-targeted imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumor using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody in a mouse tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogawa, Chizuru [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tsuji, Atsushi B. [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: a_tsuji@nirs.go.jp; Sudo, Hitomi [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Sugyo, Aya [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Chisato [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Molecular Imaging and Radiotherapy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Odaka, Kenichi [Molecular Probe Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Uehara, Tomoya; Arano, Yasushi [Department of Molecular Imaging and Radiotherapy, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor arising from the gastrointestinal tract and highly expresses mutated c-kit. We aimed to develop a specific and sensitive method for detecting GISTs using radiolabeled anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody. Methods: A mutated c-kit-expressing cell clone was established by transfecting an expressing vector of mutated c-kit gene into HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells. The tumors were developed by inoculating c-kit-expressing cells into nude mice. {sup 125}I- and {sup 111}In-labeled anti-c-kit antibodies (12A8 and 41A11) were evaluated in vitro by cell binding, competitive inhibition and cellular internalization assays, and in vivo by biodistribution and imaging studies in tumor-bearing mice. Results: Both {sup 125}I- and {sup 111}In-labeled antibodies showed specific binding with c-kit-expressing cells with high affinity (dissociation constants = 2.2-7.1x10{sup 9} M{sup -1}). Internalization assay showed that {sup 125}I-labeled antibodies were rapidly internalized and dehalogenated, with the release of {sup 125}I from the cells, resulting in reduction of cell-associated radioactivity with time. In contrast, {sup 111}In-labeled antibody was internalized but did not result in the reduced radioactivity associated with tumor cells. Reflecting this phenomenon, the in vivo tumor uptake of {sup 125}I-labeled antibody was low on Day 1, further decreasing with time, while tumor uptake of {sup 111}In-labeled antibody was high on Day 1, further increasing with time. The xenografted tumor was clearly visualized by scintigraphy after injection of {sup 111}In-labeled antibody. Conclusion: The anti-c-kit monoclonal antibody labeled with a metal radionuclide would be promising for c-kit-targeted imaging of GISTs.

  1. Beneficial effect of an antibody against interleukin-2 receptor(daclizumab) in an experimental model of hepatocyte xenotransplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimitrios Papagoras; Apostolos Papalois; Alexandra Tsaroucha; Dimitrios Lytras; John Kyriazanos; Nikoletta Giannakou; Prodromos Laftsidis; Constantine Simopoulos

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the use of Daclizumab (Dmab) as an immunosuppressive agent in an experimental model of hepatocyte xenotransplantation (XenoTx) in rats with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF).METHODS: Two white male New Zealand rabbits were used as donors and 68 Wistar rats as recipients.FHF was induced by intravenous application of dimethylnitrosamine (DMNA). The isolated hepatocytes of the rabbits were xenotransplanted into the spleen of the rats 24 h after FHF induction. Group A (n = 13): no treatment; Group B (n = 14): FHF and XenoTx; Group C (n = 14): FHF and XenoTx and cyclosporin (CsA); Group D (n = 14): FHF and XenoTx and Dmab; Group E (n =13): FHF and XenoTx and CsA and Dmab. The rats were followed for 15 d.RESULTS: Statistical analysis showed better survival among groups D (92.86%) and E (76.92%) compared to group A (all rats died after 72 h), group B (28.57%)or group C (71.43%), although the differences were not statistically significant. Biochemical evaluation of the liver enzymes and histology confirmed satisfactory function and engraftment, respectively.CONCLUSION: This experimental model has shown the safe, effective and beneficial use of Dmab in a xenotransplantation model of rabbit hepatocytes in rats.

  2. Evidence for homologous peptidergic neurons in the buccal ganglia of diverse nudibranch mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, W H; Willows, A O

    1992-03-01

    The buccal ganglia of seven nudibranches (Aeolidia papillosa, Armina californica, Dirona albolineata, D. picta, Hermissenda crassicornis, Melibe leonina, and Tritonia diomedea) were examined to explore possible homologies between large cells that reacted with antibodies directed against small cardioactive peptide B (SCPB). The buccal ganglion of each species possessed a pair of large, dorsal-lateral, whitish neurons that contained an SCPB-like peptide. We refer to these neurons as the SLB (SCPB-immunoreactive Large Buccal) cells. In all species examined, the SLB cells project out the gastroesophageal nerves and appear to innervate the esophagus. In each species, an apparent rhythmic feeding motor program (FMP) was observed by intracellular recording from both SLB neurons and other neurons in isolated preparations of the buccal ganglia. SLB cells often fire at a high frequency, and usually burst in a specific phase relation to the FMP activity. Stimulation of SLB cells enhances expression of the feeding motor program, either by potentiating existing activity or eliciting the FMP in quiescent preparations. Finally, perfusion of isolated buccal ganglia with SCPB excites the SLB cells and activates FMPs. Thus, both the immunohistochemical and electrophysiological data suggest that the SLB cells within three suborders of the opisthobranchia (Dendronotacea, Arminacea, and Aeolidacea) are homologous. A comparison of our data with previously published studies indicates that SLB cell homologs may exist in other gastropods as well. PMID:1527526

  3. Real-time immuno-PCR for ultrasensitive detection of pyrene and other homologous PAHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X Y; Li, Y S; Zhou, Y; Zhang, Y Y; Qiao, B; Sun, Y; Yang, L; Hu, P; Lu, S Y; Ren, H L; Zhang, J H; Wang, X R; Liu, Z S

    2015-08-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are significant environmental pollutant that can lead to cancer and endocrine system disrupting. Here we developed a real-time immuno-PCR (RT-IPCR) assay based on a biotinylated reporter DNA system for ultrasensitive detection of pyrene (PYR) and homologous PAHs in water. The PAHs in sample compete with PYR-OVA coated on PCR plate to bind with monoclonal antibody (McAb). The biotinylated goat anti-mouse IgG (Bio-IgG) can be captured by the McAb bound with PYR-OVA. Then streptavidin is bound with biotin on Bio-IgG. Finally biotinylated reporter DNA is captured by the streptavidin and quantified by real-time PCR using FastStart universal SYBR Green Master (ROX) kit. The linear range of the assay was from 500 fmol L(-1) to 5 nmol L(-)) with a detection limit of 450 fmol L(-1). The average recoveries of PYR and homologous PAHs from lake water, tap water and commercial mineral water were 96.8%, 101.4% and 99.6% respectively, indicating that water samples had little interfere with the assay. The results demonstrated that the developed RT-IPCR might be a potential method for ultrasensitive detection of PYR and homologous PAHs in drinking and environment water sample. PMID:25791466

  4. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the

  5. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the baby is Rh-positive and the mother's antibody status is negative for anti-D, the mother is given additional RhIG. This test also may be used to help diagnose autoimmune-related hemolytic anemia ... when a person produces antibodies against his or her own RBC antigens. This ...

  6. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB) Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hongyu; Cassan, Robyn; Johnstone, Darrell; Han, Xiaobing; Joyee, Antony George; McQuoid, Monica; Masi, Andrea; Merluza, John; Hrehorak, Bryce; Reid, Ross; Kennedy, Kieron; Tighe, Bonnie; Rak, Carla; Leonhardt, Melanie; Dupas, Brian; Saward, Laura; Berry, Jody D.; Nykiforuk, Cory L.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA), and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB), which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4) and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1) antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail) provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively) in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI) model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI. PMID:27336843

  7. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Qiu

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infection (CDI is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA, and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB, which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4 and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1 antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI.

  8. Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Chronic Amyloid-beta Oligomer Infusion Is Counteracted by Antibody Treatment Infused with Osmotic Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Ahmadali; Provost, Chloé; Pham, Brendon; Brouillette, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Decline in hippocampal-dependent explicit memory (memory for facts and events) is one of the earliest clinical symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is well established that synapse loss and ensuing neurodegeneration are the best predictors for memory impairments in AD. Latest studies have emphasized the neurotoxic role of soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (Aβo) that begin to accumulate in the human brain approximately 10 to 15 yr before the clinical symptoms become apparent. Many reports indicate that soluble Aβo correlate with memory deficits in AD models and humans. The Aβo-induced neurodegeneration observed in neuronal and brain slice cultures has been more challenging to reproduce in many animal models. The model of repeated Aβo infusions shown here overcome this issue and allow addressing two key domains for developing new disease modifying therapies: identify biological markers to diagnose early AD, and determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning Aβo-induced memory deficits at the onset of AD. Since soluble Aβo aggregate relatively fast into insoluble Aβ fibrils that correlate poorly with the clinical state of patients, soluble Aβo are prepared freshly and injected once per day during six days to produce marked cell death in the hippocampus. We used cannula specially design for simultaneous infusions of Aβo and continuous infusion of Aβo antibody (6E10) in the hippocampus using osmotic pumps. This innovative in vivo method can now be used in preclinical studies to validate the efficiency of new AD therapies that might prevent the deposition and neurotoxicity of Aβo in pre-dementia patients. PMID:27585306

  9. Assessment of fetal exposure risk following seminal excretion of a therapeutic IgG4 (T-IgG4) monoclonal antibody using a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, William J; Hilbish, Kim G; Page, Todd J; Coutant, David E

    2014-09-01

    Studies were conducted in New Zealand White rabbits to assess the seminal transfer, vaginal absorption, and placental transfer of a therapeutic monoclonal antibody (T-IgG4). T-IgG4 was administered by intravenous injection (IV) in males and by IV and intravaginal routes in females. Low levels of T-IgG4 were excreted into seminal plasma (100- to 370-fold lower than serum concentrations) and absorbed following vaginal dosing (three orders of magnitude lower than IV administration). On gestation day 29 (GD29), fetal serum T-IgG4 levels were 1.5-fold greater than maternal levels following IV dosing. The fetal T-IgG4 exposure ratio for seminal transfer vs. direct maternal IV dosing was estimated to be 1.3×10(-8). Applying human serum T-IgG4 exposure data to the model, the estimated human T-IgG4 serum concentration from seminal transfer was 3.07×10(-7)μg/mL, an exposure level at least 1000-fold lower than the T-IgG4-ligand dissociation constant (Kd) and at least seven orders of magnitude lower than the in vivo concentration producing 20% inhibition of the target (EC20). These data indicate that excretion of a T-IgG4 into semen would not result in a biologically meaningful exposure risk to the conceptus of an untreated partner. PMID:24863471

  10. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based broad-specificity ELISA for fluroquinolone antibiotics in foods and molecular modeling studies of cross-reactive compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of a competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) with monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) having broad specificity for fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics is described. Four FQs, ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NOR), enrofloxacin (ENR) and ofloxacin (OFL) were conjugated to...

  11. Role of discs large homolog 5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frauke Friedrichs; Monika Stoll

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, an association of genetic variation in the discs large homolog 5 (DLG5) gene with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was described in two large European study samples[1]. The initial report of DLG5 as a novel IBD susceptibility gene sparked a multitude of studies investigating its effect on CD and IBD, respectively,leading to controversial findings and ongoing discussions concerning the validity of the initial association finding and its role in the aetiology of Crohn disease. This review aims to summarize the current state of knowledge and to place the reported findings in the context of current concepts of complex diseases. This includes aspects of statistical power, phenotype differences and genetic heterogeneity between different populations as well as gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

  12. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations....... In this study I present new insights for the role of SUMOylation in regulating HR by dissecting the role of SUMO in the interaction between the central HR-mediator protein Rad52 and its paralogue Rad59 and the outcome of recombination. This data provides evidence for the importance of SUMO in promoting protein......-protein interactions at the sites of repair, enabling effective Rad51-mediated recombination through the concerted action of the Rad52-Rad59 complex and the helicase Srs2. In addition, I also peer into the role of Rad52 SUMOylation in the context of persistent DSBs and telomere homeostasis. Furthermore, I characterize...

  13. Cell Wall Growth and Modulation Dynamics in a Model Unicellular Green Alga—Penium margaritaceum: Live Cell Labeling with Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Domozych, David S; Hannah Brechka; Alicia Britton; Marc Toso

    2011-01-01

    Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga that possesses cell wall polymers similar to those of land plants. Several wall macromolecules of this alga are recognized by monoclonal antibodies specific for wall polymer epitopes of land plants. Immunofluorescence protocols using these antibodies may be employed to label specific cell wall constituents of live cells. Fluorescent labeling persists for several days, and this attribute allows for tracing of wall epitopes in both l...

  14. Pre- and postexposure efficacy of fully human antibodies against Spike protein in a novel humanized mouse model of MERS-CoV infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal, Kristen E.; Coleman, Christopher M; Mujica, Alejandro O; Kamat, Vishal; Badithe, Ashok; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Hunt, Charleen; Strein, John; Berrebi, Alexander; Sisk, Jeanne M.; Matthews, Krystal L.; babb, Robert; Chen, Gang; Lai, Ka-Man V.; Huang, Tammy T.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional approaches for development of antibodies are poorly suited to combating the emergence of novel pathogens, as they require multiple steps of laborious optimization and process adaptation for clinical development. Here, we describe the simultaneous use of two state-of-the-art technologies to rapidly generate and validate antibodies against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), following a highly optimized process that links immunization to production of clinical m...

  15. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies. PMID:27236551

  16. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  17. A roadmap for the computation of persistent homology

    CERN Document Server

    Otter, Nina; Tillmann, Ulrike; Grindrod, Peter; Harrington, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Persistent homology is a method used in topological data analysis to study qualitative features of data, which is robust to perturbations, dimension independent and provides statistical summaries of the outputs. Despite recent progress, the computation of persistent homology for large data sets remains an open problem. We investigate the challenges of computing persistent homology and navigate through the different algorithms and data structures. Specifically, we evaluate the (currently available) open source implementations of persistent homology computations on a wide range of synthetic and real-world data sets, and indicate which algorithms and implementations are best suited to these data. We provide guidelines for the computation of persistent homology, make our own implementations used in this study available, and put forward measures to quantify the challenges of the computation of persistent homology.

  18. Engineered Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG expressing IgG-binding domains of protein G: Capture of hyperimmune bovine colostrum antibodies and protection against diarrhea in a mouse pup rotavirus infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Zhang, Ran; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2014-01-16

    Rotavirus-induced diarrhea causes more than 500,000 deaths annually in the world, and although vaccines are being made available, new effective treatment strategies should still be considered. Purified antibodies derived from hyperimmune bovine colostrum (HBC), from cows immunized with rotavirus, were previously used for treatment of rotavirus diarrhea in children. A combination of HBC antibodies and a probiotic strain of Lactobacillus (L. rhamnosus GG) was also found to be more effective than HBC alone in reducing diarrhea in a mouse model of rotavirus infection. In order to further improve this form of treatment, L. rhamnosus GG was engineered to display surface expressed IgG-binding domains of protein G (GB1, GB2, and GB3) which capture HBC-derived IgG antibodies (HBC-IgG) and thus target rotavirus. The expression of IgG-binding domains on the surface of the bacteria as well as their binding to HBC-IgG and to rotavirus (simian strain RRV) was demonstrated by Western blot, flow cytometry, and electron microscopy. The prophylactic effect of engineered L. rhamnosus GG and anti-rotaviral activity of HBC antibodies was evaluated in a mouse pup model of RRV infection. The combination therapy with engineered L. rhamnosus GG (PG3) and HBC was significantly more effective in reducing the prevalence, severity, and duration of diarrhea in comparison to HBC alone or a combination of wild-type L. rhamnosus GG and HBC. The new therapy reduces the effective dose of HBC between 10 to 100-fold and may thus decrease treatment costs. This antibody capturing platform, tested here for the first time in vivo, could potentially be used to target additional gastrointestinal pathogens. PMID:24291196

  19. Beneficial Effects of Anti-Interleukin-6 Antibodies on Impaired Gastrointestinal Motility, Inflammation and Increased Colonic Permeability in a Murine Model of Sepsis Are Most Pronounced When Administered in a Preventive Setup.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nullens

    Full Text Available During sepsis, gastrointestinal ileus, mucosal barrier dysfunction and bacterial translocation are accepted to be important triggers that can maintain or exacerbate the septic state. In the caecal ligation and puncture animal model of sepsis, we demonstrated that systemic and colonic interleukin-6 levels are significantly increased coinciding with an impaired colonic barrier function. We therefore aimed to study the effect of therapeutic or curative administration of anti-IL6 antibodies on overall GI motility, colonic permeability and translocation of intestinal bacteria in blood and mesenteric lymph nodes in the mouse caecal ligation and puncture model.OF-1 mice were randomized to either the preventive or curative protocol, in which they received 1 mg/kg of antibodies to interleukin-6, or its IgG isotype control solution. They subsequently underwent either the caecal ligation and puncture procedure, or sham-surgery. GI motility was assessed 48 h following the procedure, as well as colonic permeability, serum and colon cytokines, colonic tight junction proteins at the mRNA level; cultures of blood and mesenteric lymph nodes were performed.Preventive administration of anti-interleukin-6 antibodies successfully counteracted the gastrointestinal motility disturbances and impaired colonic barrier function that could be observed in vehicle-treated septic animals. Serum and colonic levels of proinflammatory cytokines were significantly lower when animals were preventively treated with anti-interleukin-6 antibodies. A repetitive injection 24 h later resulted in the most pronounced effects. Curative treatment significantly lowered systemic and colonic inflammation markers while the effects on transit and permeability were unfortunately no longer significant.Caecal ligation and puncture resulted in septic ileus with an increased colonic permeability. Antibodies to interleukin-6 were able to ameliorate gastro-intestinal motility, suppress inflammation and

  20. Understanding the conformational impact of chemical modifications on monoclonal antibodies with diverse sequence variation using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and structural modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aming; Hu, Ping; MacGregor, Paul; Xue, Yu; Fan, Haihong; Suchecki, Peter; Olszewski, Leonard; Liu, Aston

    2014-04-01

    Chemical modifications can potentially induce conformational changes near the modification site and thereby impact the safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has emerged as a powerful analytical technique with high spatial resolution and sensitivity in detecting such local conformational changes. In this study, we utilized HDX-MS combined with structural modeling to examine the conformational impact on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) caused by common chemical modifications including methionine (Met) oxidation, aspartic acid (Asp) isomerization, and asparagine (Asn) deamidation. Four mAbs with diverse sequences and glycosylation states were selected. The data suggested that the impact of Met oxidation was highly dependent on its location and glycosylation state. For mAbs with normal glycosylation in the Fc region, oxidation of the two conserved Met252 and Met428 (Kabat numbering) disrupted the interface interactions between the CH2 and CH3 domains, thus leading to a significant decrease in CH2 domain thermal stability as well as a slight increase in aggregation propensity. In contrast, Met oxidation in the variable region and CH3 domain had no detectable impact on mAb conformation. For aglycosylated mAb, Met oxidation could cause a more global conformational change to the whole CH2 domain, coincident with the larger decrease in thermal stability and significant increase in aggregation rate. Unlike Met oxidation, Asn deamidation and Asp isomerization mostly had very limited effects on mAb conformation, with the exception of succiminide intermediate formation which induced a measurable local conformational change to be more solvent protected. Structural modeling suggested that the succinimide intermediate was stabilized by adjacent aromatic amino acids through ring-ring stacking interactions. PMID:24597564