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Sample records for antibody concentrations confers

  1. Blood stage malaria vaccine eliciting high antigen-specific antibody concentrations confers no protection to young children in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhards R Ogutu

    Full Text Available The antigen, falciparum malaria protein 1 (FMP1, represents the 42-kDa C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1 of the 3D7 clone of P. falciparum. Formulated with AS02 (a proprietary Adjuvant System, it constitutes the FMP1/AS02 candidate malaria vaccine. We evaluated this vaccine's safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy in African children.A randomised, double-blind, Phase IIb, comparator-controlled trial.The trial was conducted in 13 field stations of one mile radii within Kombewa Division, Nyanza Province, Western Kenya, an area of holoendemic transmission of P. falciparum. We enrolled 400 children aged 12-47 months in general good health.Children were randomised in a 1ratio1 fashion to receive either FMP1/AS02 (50 microg or Rabipur(R rabies vaccine. Vaccinations were administered on a 0, 1, and 2 month schedule. The primary study endpoint was time to first clinical episode of P. falciparum malaria (temperature >/=37.5 degrees C with asexual parasitaemia of >/=50,000 parasites/microL of blood occurring between 14 days and six months after a third dose. Case detection was both active and passive. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated for eight months after first immunisations; vaccine efficacy (VE was measured over a six-month period following third vaccinations.374 of 400 children received all three doses and completed six months of follow-up. FMP1/AS02 had a good safety profile and was well-tolerated but more reactogenic than the comparator. Geometric mean anti-MSP-1(42 antibody concentrations increased from1.3 microg/mL to 27.3 microg/mL in the FMP1/AS02 recipients, but were unchanged in controls. 97 children in the FMP1/AS02 group and 98 controls had a primary endpoint episode. Overall VE was 5.1% (95% CI: -26% to +28%; p-value = 0.7.FMP1/AS02 is not a promising candidate for further development as a monovalent malaria vaccine. Future MSP-1(42 vaccine development should focus on other formulations and antigen constructs

  2. Conference scene: progress with promising human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrick, James W

    2012-03-01

    Antibodies and antibody-based therapeutics have become big business, with annual sales over US$50 billion, accounting for >6% of worldwide pharmaceutical revenues. Ten molecules have blockbuster status (>US$1 billion), with six generating more than US$6 billion in sales. In excess of 300 products based on this rapidly maturing technology are in clinical trials. The generation and manufacture of human antibodies is now routine, although the cost of goods remains an issue. Optimizing combinations of antibodies with other therapeutics (e.g., chemotherapy) is a major short-term goal, while target validation and product differentiation remain significant hurdles if growth is to continue. Some of the notable highlights of the recent 16th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas meeting in Cannes, France are described below. The conference was sponsored by the international journal Human Antibodies, in association with the Integrative Medical Sciences Association (IMSA). The Program Chairman was Professor Mark Glassy, IMSA, San Diego, CA, USA.

  3. Serum Vaccine Antibody Concentrations in Adolescents Exposed to Perfluorinated Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Heilmann, Carsten; Weihe, Pal

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postnatal exposure to perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs) is associated with lower serum concentrations of specific antibodies against certain childhood vaccines at 7 y. OBJECTIVES: We prospectively followed a Faroese birth cohort to determine these associations at 13 y. METHODS......: In 516 subjects (79% of eligible cohort members) who were 13 years old, serum concentrations of PFASs and of antibodies against diphtheria and tetanus were measured and were compared with data from the previous examination at 7 y. Multiple regression analyses and structural equation models were applied...... to determine the association between postnatal PFAS exposures and antibody concentrations. RESULTS: Serum concentrations of PFASs and antibodies generally declined from 7 y to 13 y. However, 68 subjects had visited the emergency room and had likely received a vaccination booster, and a total of 202 children...

  4. Serum Vaccine Antibody Concentrations in Children Exposed to Perfluorinated Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P.; Andersen, E. W.; Budtz-Jorgensen, E.

    2012-01-01

    whether PFC exposure is associated with antibody response to childhood vaccinations. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective study of a birth cohort from the National Hospital in the Faroe Islands. A total of 656 consecutive singleton births were recruited during 1999-2001, and 587 participated...... in follow-up through 2008. Main Outcome Measures Serum antibody concentrations against tetanus and diphtheria toxoids at ages 5 and 7 years. Results Similar to results of prior studies in the United States, the PFCs with the highest serum concentrations were perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS......) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Among PFCs in maternal pregnancy serum, PFOS showed the strongest negative correlations with antibody concentrations at age 5 years, for which a 2-fold greater concentration of exposure was associated with a difference of -39% (95% CI, -55% to -17%) in the diphtheria antibody...

  5. Serum Vaccine Antibody Concentrations in Adolescents Exposed to Perfluorinated Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Heilmann, Carsten; Weihe, Pal

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postnatal exposure to perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs) is associated with lower serum concentrations of specific antibodies against certain childhood vaccines at 7 y. OBJECTIVES: We prospectively followed a Faroese birth cohort to determine these associations at 13 y. METHOD...

  6. Serum Vaccine Antibody Concentrations in Adolescents Exposed to Perfluorinated Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Carsten; Weihe, Pal; Nielsen, Flemming; Mogensen, Ulla B.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2017-01-01

    Background: Postnatal exposure to perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs) is associated with lower serum concentrations of specific antibodies against certain childhood vaccines at 7 y. Objectives: We prospectively followed a Faroese birth cohort to determine these associations at 13 y. Methods: In 516 subjects (79% of eligible cohort members) who were 13 years old, serum concentrations of PFASs and of antibodies against diphtheria and tetanus were measured and were compared with data from the previous examination at 7 y. Multiple regression analyses and structural equation models were applied to determine the association between postnatal PFAS exposures and antibody concentrations. Results: Serum concentrations of PFASs and antibodies generally declined from 7 y to 13 y. However, 68 subjects had visited the emergency room and had likely received a vaccination booster, and a total of 202 children showed higher vaccine antibody concentrations at 13 y than at 7 y. Therefore, separate analyses were conducted after exclusion of these two subgroups. Diphtheria antibody concentrations decreased at elevated PFAS concentrations at 13 y and 7 y; the associations were statistically significant for perfluorodecanoate (PFDA) at 7 y and for perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) at 13 y, both suggesting a decrease by ∼25% for each doubling of exposure. Structural equation models showed that a doubling in PFAS exposure at 7 y was associated with losses in diphtheria antibody concentrations at 13 y of 10–30% for the five PFASs. Few associations were observed for anti-tetanus concentrations. Conclusions: These results are in accord with previous findings of PFAS immunotoxicity at current exposure levels. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP275 PMID:28749778

  7. Effect of antibody charge and concentration on deposition of antibody to glomerular basement membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madaio, M.P.; Salant, D.J.; Adler, S.; Darby, C.; Couser, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    Fixed anionic sites within the glomerular capillary wall influence the permeation of serum proteins, the localization of various antigens, and the deposition of antibody in the subepithelial space. In anti-GBM nephritis antibody deposition occurs very rapidly to antigenic sites located relatively proximal in the glomerular capillary wall. The authors examined the influence of the glomerular charge barrier on anti-GBM antibody deposition by comparing the rate of deposition of antibodies with cationic and anionic isoelectric points. Purified sheep anti-rat GBM IgG was isolated from acid eluates of kidneys obtained 24 hr after rats were injected with sheep antiserum to rat GBM. Anti-GBM IgG was separated into cationic (pI 6.4-8.5) and anionic (pI 4.2-6.8) fractions, which were radiolabelled with 131 I and 125 I, respectively, shown to have equal antibody contents measured by in vitro binding to normal glomeruli, mixed in equal amounts, and injected in incremental doses to ten rats. At 1 hr the glomerular antibody binding of each fraction was directly related to the blood level (r . 0.95, r . 0.97) and delivery of antibody (r . 0.98, r . 0.98). Glomerular binding of cationic antibody was four times greater than anionic antibody over the entire range of deliveries studied (P less than 0.001). The authors conclude that glomerular deposition of anti-GBM antibody is directly related to blood concentration and delivery of antibody. Furthermore, the deposition of cationic antibodies to GBM antigens was significantly greater than the deposition of anionic antibodies

  8. IBC's 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 3-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H J; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3-6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3-5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4-5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society's special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5-6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy.

  9. 25-hydroxyvitamin D, autoantigenic and total antibody concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Steffen Ullitz; Pipper, Christian B; Johannesen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    conducted within this field. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate if higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were inversely associated with β-cell autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (isoform 65) (GADA) and insulinoma associated antigen-2A (IA-2A). Further, we also wanted to examine......BACKGROUND: B cells have recently entered the stage as an important accessory player in type 1 diabetes (T1D) etiopathogenesis. Experimental studies suggest regulatory functions of vitamin D on B cells. However, only a few human studies, with considerable methodological limitations, have been...... the relationship between 25(OH)D and total antibody concentrations. METHODS: We randomly selected 500 patients with newly diagnosed T1D and 500 siblings for 25(OH)D, antibody and genetic analysis from the population-based Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes. The relative change (RC) in the mean...

  10. An antibody that confers plant disease resistance targets a membrane-bound glyoxal oxidase in Fusarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiu-Shi; Xing, Shu; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Qu, Bo; Jiang, Jin-He; Fan, Chao; Yang, Peng; Liu, Jin-Long; Hu, Zu-Quan; Xue, Sheng; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-05-01

    Plant germplasm resources with natural resistance against globally important toxigenic Fusarium are inadequate. CWP2, a Fusarium genus-specific antibody, confers durable resistance to different Fusarium pathogens that infect cereals and other crops, producing mycotoxins. However, the nature of the CWP2 target is not known. Thus, investigation of the gene coding for the CWP2 antibody target will likely provide critical insights into the mechanism underlying the resistance mediated by this disease-resistance antibody. Immunoblots and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis gels containing cell wall proteins from Fusarium graminearum (Fg) revealed that a glyoxal oxidase (GLX) is the CWP2 antigen. Cellular localization studies showed that GLX is localized to the plasma membrane. This GLX efficiently catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production; this enzymatic activity was specifically inhibited by the CWP2 antibody. GLX-deletion strains of Fg, F. verticillioides (Fv) and F. oxysporum had significantly reduced virulence on plants. The GLX-deletion Fg and Fv strains had markedly reduced mycotoxin accumulation, and the expression of key genes in mycotoxin metabolism was downregulated. This study reveals a single gene-encoded and highly conserved cellular surface antigen that is specifically recognized by the disease-resistance antibody CWP2 and regulates both virulence and mycotoxin biosynthesis in Fusarium species. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Stability of monoclonal antibodies at high-concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Martin S; Nielsen, Anders D; Parshad, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have so far directly compared the impact of antibody subclass on protein stability. This case study investigates two mAbs (one IgG1 and one IgG4 ) with identical variable region. Investigations of mAbs that recognize similar epitopes are necessary to identify possible differences betw...

  12. Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and liver cytosol antibody type 1 concentrations in type 2 autoimmune hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Muratori, L; Cataleta, M; Muratori, P; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F

    1998-01-01

    Background—Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol antibody type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). 
Aims—Since LKM1 and LC1 react against two distinct liver specific autoantigens (cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6) and a 58 kDa cytosolic polypeptide respectively), the aim was to see whether LKM1 and LC1 concentrations correlate with liver disease activity. 
Patients—Twenty one patients with type 2 AIH were studied. 
Methods—A...

  13. Radioimmunoassay for quantification of anti-tuberculin antibody concentration in guinea pig sera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauch, H [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany, F.R.). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Kuemel, G [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany, F.R.). Virologische Abt.

    1978-04-01

    A well suited model system for the study of the role of antibodies in immunoregulation is the BCG-infected guinea pig. The assessment of a detailed analysis of the antibody kinetics after BCG infection in comparison to the kinetics of cell-mediated immunity by the delayed type hypersensitivity reaction requires that a specially sensitive, reproducible and precise assay for the determination of antibody concentration is at hand. The methods hitherto available do not meet these requirements. There was developed an indirect double antibody solid phase radioimmunoassay for that purpose.

  14. IgM but not IgG monoclonal anti-Nocardia brasiliensis antibodies confer protection against experimental actinomycetoma in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Suarez, Maria L; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2009-10-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a facultative intracellular microorganism that produces a human chronic infection known as actinomycetoma. Human and mouse anti-N. brasiliensis antibody response identify P24, P26 and P61 immunodominant antigens. In this work, we generated immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to immunodominant P61 antigen. The monoclonal IgM (NbM1) and IgG2a (NbG1) antibodies were assessed for their in vitro bactericidal activity, in vivo protective effect and ability to block catalase activity. These mAbs specifically recognized P61, but they did not inhibit its enzyme activity. The in vitro bactericidal effect of NbG1 was higher than the killing ability of the IgM mAb. In vivo experiments with a murine model of experimental infection with N. brasiliensis injected into rear footpads was used to test the effect of NbM1 and NbG1. The negative untreated group developed a chronic actinomycetoma within 4 weeks. IgM mAbs conferred protection to BALB/c mice infected with N. brasiliensis. IgG mAb lacked this protective effect. IgM mAb showed a dose-response correlation between antibody concentration and lesion size. These results demonstrate that humoral immune response mediated by antigen-specific IgM antibody protects against an intracellular bacterial infection.

  15. Serum concentrations of antibodies against vaccine toxoids in children exposed perinatally to immunotoxicants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, Carsten; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Nielsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    -2001, children were invited for examination with assessment of serum antibody concentrations at 5 years (before and after a booster vaccination) and at 7 years of age. Total PCB concentrations were determined in serum from ages 5 and 7 years, and data were also available on PCB concentrations in maternal...... pregnancy serum, maternal milk, and, for a subgroup, the child's serum at 18 months of age. RESULTS: A total of 587 children participated in the examinations at ages 5 and/or 7 years. At age 5 years, before the booster vaccination, the antidiphtheria antibody concentration was inversely associated with PCB......BACKGROUND: Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may cause immunotoxic effects, but the detailed dose-response relationship and possible vulnerable time windows of exposure are uncertain. In this study we applied serum concentrations of specific antibodies against childhood vaccines as sentinels...

  16. Serum vaccine antibody concentrations in children exposed to perfluorinated compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have emerged as important food contaminants. They cause immune suppression in a rodent model at serum concentrations similar to those occurring in the US population, but adverse health effects of PFC exposure are poorly understood....

  17. Estimated exposures to perfluorinated compounds in infancy predict attenuated vaccine antibody concentrations at age 5-years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Heilmann, Carsten; Weihe, Pal; Nielsen, Flemming; Mogensen, Ulla B; Timmermann, Amalie; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2017-12-01

    Perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs) are highly persistent and may cause immunotoxic effects. PFAS-associated attenuated antibody responses to childhood vaccines may be affected by PFAS exposures during infancy, where breastfeeding adds to PFAS exposures. Of 490 members of a Faroese birth cohort, 275 and 349 participated in clinical examinations and provided blood samples at ages 18 months and 5 years. PFAS concentrations were measured at birth and at the clinical examinations. Using information on duration of breastfeeding, serum-PFAS concentration profiles during infancy were estimated. As outcomes, serum concentrations of antibodies against tetanus and diphtheria vaccines were determined at age 5. Data from a previous cohort born eight years earlier were available for pooled analyses. Pre-natal exposure showed inverse associations with the antibody concentrations five years later, with decreases by up to about 20% for each two-fold higher exposure, while associations for serum concentrations at ages 18 months and 5 years were weaker. Modeling of serum-PFAS concentration showed levels for age 18 months that were similar to those measured. Concentrations estimated for ages 3 and 6 months showed the strongest inverse associations with antibody concentrations at age 5 years, particularly for tetanus. Joint analyses showed statistically significant decreases in tetanus antibody concentrations by 19-29% at age 5 for each doubling of the PFAS exposure in early infancy. These findings support the notion that the developing adaptive immune system is particularly vulnerable to immunotoxicity during infancy. This vulnerability appears to be the greatest during the first 6 months after birth, where PFAS exposures are affected by breast-feeding.

  18. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity special issue: II International Conference on Radioecological Concentration Processes. (50 years later).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Tenorio, Rafael; Holm, Elis

    2018-06-01

    An international conference on Radioecological Concentration Processes was held in Seville, Spain, 6-9 November 2016 at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores. It was attended by 160 participants from 35 different countries. This was the 2nd conference on this item since 1966, 50 years ago. The conference covered aspects of radiological important radionuclides on terrestrial, marine and freshwater environments and has allowed obtaining a clear picture of the status of the Radioecology as a consolidated discipline in the 21st century. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. International Conference on Solar Concentrators for the Generation of Electricity or Hydrogen: Book of Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, R.; Symko-Davies, M.; Hayden, H.

    2005-05-01

    The International Conference on Solar Concentrators for the Generation of Electricity or Hydrogen provides an opportunity to learn about current significant research on solar concentrators for generating electricity or hydrogen. The conference will emphasize in-depth technical discussions of recent achievements in technologies that convert concentrated solar radiation to electricity or hydrogen, with primary emphasis on photovoltaic (PV) technologies. Very high-efficiency solar cells--above 37%--were recently developed, and are now widely used for powering satellites. This development demands that we take a fresh look at the potential of solar concentrators for generating low-cost electricity or hydrogen. Solar electric concentrators could dramatically overtake other PV technologies in the electric utility marketplace because of the low capital cost of concentrator manufacturing facilities and the larger module size of concentrators. Concentrating solar energy also has advantages for th e solar generation of hydrogen. Around the world, researchers and engineers are developing solar concentrator technologies for entry into the electricity generation market and several have explored the use of concentrators for hydrogen production. The last conference on the subject of solar electric concentrators was held in November of 2003 and proved to be an important opportunity for researchers and developers to share new and crucial information that is helping to stimulate projects in their countries.

  20. Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 and liver cytosol antibody type 1 concentrations in type 2 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, L; Cataleta, M; Muratori, P; Lenzi, M; Bianchi, F B

    1998-05-01

    Liver/kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1) and liver cytosol antibody type 1 (LC1) are the serological markers of type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Since LKM1 and LC1 react against two distinct liver specific autoantigens (cytochrome P450IID6 (CYP2D6) and a 58 kDa cytosolic polypeptide respectively), the aim was to see whether LKM1 and LC1 concentrations correlate with liver disease activity. Twenty one patients with type 2 AIH were studied. All sera were tested by indirect immunofluorescence, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and immunoblotting visualised by enhanced chemiluminescence. To evaluate LKM1 and LC1 levels, the 50 kDa microsomal reactivity (corresponding to CYP2D6) and the 58 kDa cytosolic reactivity were quantified by densitometric analysis. Seven patients were positive for LKM1, nine for LC1, and five for both. Serial serum samples at onset and during immunosuppressive treatment were analysed in 13 patients (four positive for LKM1, six positive for LC1 and three positive for both). During remission, LKM1 concentration remained essentially unchanged in six of seven patients, and decreased in only one. Conversely, in two of nine patients, LC1 was completely lost, and, in the remaining seven, LC1 concentration was reduced by more than 50%. After immunosuppression tapering or withdrawal, flare ups of liver necrosis ensued with increasing LC1 concentration, but not LKM1. LC1 concentration, at variance with that of LKM1, parallels liver disease activity, and its participation in the pathogenic mechanisms of liver injury can be hypothesised.

  1. High-throughput immunoturbidimetric assays for in-process determination of polyclonal antibody concentration and functionality in crude samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Hanne; Kyhse-Andersen, J.; Thomas, O.R.T.

    2007-01-01

    We present fast, simple immunoturbidimetric assays suitable for direct determination of antibody 'concentration' and 'functionality' in crude samples, such as in-process samples taken at various stages during antibody purification. Both assays display excellent linearity and analytical recovery. ...... antibodies, require only basic laboratory equipment, are robust, fast, cheap, easy to perform, and readily adapted to automation....

  2. Immune response to pneumococcal polysaccharides 4 and 14 in elderly and young adults. I Antibody concentrations, avidity and functional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlone George M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae is a serious worldwide pathogen and the focus of numerous vaccine development projects. Currently the most widely accepted surrogate marker for evaluating the efficacy of a given vaccine is to utilize ELISA. Measurement of antibody concentration by ELISA without reduction in cross-reactive antibodies causes an overestimation of antibody concentration and therefore protection, this is most notable in the aged, an at risk group for this infection. We compared the immune response to the pneumococcal polysaccharides (PPS 4 and 14 of 20 young to 20 elderly adults. Pre-and post-vaccination IgG antibody concentrations and antibody avidity against PPS4 and PPS14 were measured using two different enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA absorption protocols. All sera were pre-absorbed with either cell-wall polysaccharide (CPS, or CPS and serotype 22F polysaccharide. Pre- and post-vaccination IgG antibody concentrations for serotype 4, but not 14, were significantly lowered with the additional absorption with serotype 22F polysaccharide in both age groups. Young and elderly demonstrated a significant increase from pre- to post-immunization antibody concentration, using either absorption method; and opsonophagocytic antibody titers in response to both PPS4 and PPS14. The correlation coefficients between ELISA and opsonophagocytic assays were improved by additional absorption with serotype 22F in response to serotype 4, but not serotype 14 in all age groups. Opsonophagocytic antibody titers in a sub-group of elderly (>77 years of age were significantly lower than the opsonophagocytic antibody concentrations in young adults. These results suggest the importance of eliminating cross-reactive antibodies from ELISA measurements by absorption of serum and an age-related impairment in the antibody response to pneumococcal polysaccharides.

  3. Investigating high-concentration monoclonal antibody powder suspension in nonaqueous suspension vehicles for subcutaneous injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Mayumi; Armstrong, Nick; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2012-12-01

    Developing high-concentration monoclonal antibody (mAb) liquid formulations for subcutaneous (s.c.) administration is challenging because increased viscosity makes injection difficult. To overcome this obstacle, we investigated a nonaqueous powder suspension approach. Three IgG1 mAbs were spray dried and suspended at different concentrations in Miglyol® 840, benzyl benzoate, or ethyl lactate. Suspensions were characterized for viscosity, particle size, and syringeability; physical stability was visually inspected. Suspensions generally outperformed liquid solutions for injectability despite higher viscosity at the same mAb concentrations. Powder formulations and properties had little effect on viscosity or injectability. Ethyl lactate suspensions had lowest viscosity (Miglyol® 840 improved overall performance in high mAb concentration suspensions. This study demonstrated the viability of high mAb concentration (>300 mg/mL) in suspension formulations for s.c. administration. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Estimated exposures to perfluorinated compounds in infancy predict attenuated vaccine antibody concentrations at age 5-years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Heilmann, Carsten; Weihe, Pal

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs) are highly persistent and may cause immunotoxic effects. PFAS-associated attenuated antibody responses to childhood vaccines may be affected by PFAS exposures during infancy, where breastfeeding adds to PFAS exposures. Of 490 members of a Faroese birth...... cohort, 275 and 349 participated in clinical examinations and provided blood samples at ages 18 months and 5 years. PFAS concentrations were measured at birth and at the clinical examinations. Using information on duration of breastfeeding, serum-PFAS concentration profiles during infancy were estimated......, with decreases by up to about 20% for each two-fold higher exposure, while associations for serum concentrations at ages 18 months and 5 years were weaker. Modeling of serum-PFAS concentration showed levels for age 18 months that were similar to those measured. Concentrations estimated for ages 3 and 6 months...

  5. Quality control of radiolabeled antibodies through simultaneous determination of antibody concentration and specific activity using time-resolved interaction analysis and reverse kinetic fit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.; Mihaylova, D.; Wang, E.; Abrahamsen, L.; Buijs, J.; Bjoerkelund, H.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. With the advent of efficient methods for producing proteins that bind to a defined target, the number of radiolabeled proteins, and in particular antibodies, used for medical imaging and cancer therapy is increasing rapidly. In line with this increase, focus should be put on methods for the quality control (QC). Proper antibody quality is of fundamental importance to guarantee safety and consistent efficacy for the patient. Adequate QC procedures exist for small radiolabeled synthetic compounds like FDG, but antibody based radiopharmaceuticals are different. Proteins are much more complex and fragile than the synthetic compounds, and hence require new methods for adequate characterization and QC. Yet another complication is the labeling where there is a risk that a subpopulation of the protein is damaged to the level that it no longer binds the target. Therefore, a new toolbox is required to fulfill the quality characterization of radiolabeled antibodies. We have developed a QC assay for the simultaneous determination of antibody function, concentration and specific activity. The assay is based on time-resolved detection of the antibody interaction with antigen-coated magnetic beads in LigandTracer instruments. The resulting binding curve is evaluated using reverse kinetic fits, where the known interaction parameters of the antibody-antigen interaction are set constant while as the concentration and signal level are fitted. The assay takes approximately 2 hours and the majority of the time constitutes automated data collection in the instrument. The QC assay has been tested on multiple antibody-antigen interactions and consistently provides repeatable results for concentration and specific activity, both with coefficient of variation (CV) less than 15%. We believe that this QC assay can improve the quality of radiolabeled therapeutic antibodies. (authors)

  6. Selenium Supplementation does not Decrease Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody Concentration in Children and Adolescents with Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bonfig

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In adults, selenium supplementation decreases thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO Ab concentrations in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT. Our aim in this study was to investigate if selenium supplementation decreased TPO Ab and thyroglobulin antibody (Tg Ab concentrations in children with AIT. Forty-nine patients (33 females with newly diagnosed AIT and hypothyroidism were randomized to daily oral therapy with levothyroxine alone (group A, n = 18, levothyroxine plus 100 µg sodium-selenite (group B, n = 13, or levothyroxine plus 200 µg sodium-selenite (group C, n = 18. Mean age at diagnosis was 12.2 ± 2.2 years. All 49 patients needed a mean levothyroxine dose of 1.6 ± 0.5 µg/kg body weight to lower TSH to the treatment goal of 1–2 µU/ml, with no significant difference between groups. At study entry and after 12 months, TPO Ab concentrations were comparable in all three groups. Tg Ab concentrations decreased significantly after 12 months in group A and group C (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, but not in group B (p = 0.06. It is our conclusion that selenium supplementation with sodium-selenite does not decrease TPO Ab concentrations in children and adolescents, neither given in the reduced dose of 100 µg daily nor given in the “adult” supplementation dose of 200 µg daily.

  7. Higher Plasma Concentration of Food-Specific Antibodies in Persons with Autistic Disorder in Comparison to Their Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, Vladimir; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Trajkov, Dejan; Arsov, Todor; Strezova, Ana; Ajdinski, Ljubomir; Spiroski, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    Specific IgA, IgG, and IgE antibodies to food antigens in 35 participants with autistic disorder and 21 of their siblings in the Republic of Macedonia were examined. Statistically significant higher plasma concentration of IgA antibodies against alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, casein, and gliadin were found in the children with autistic…

  8. A threshold concentration of anti-merozoite antibodies is required for protection from clinical episodes of malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murungi, Linda M; Kamuyu, Gathoni; Lowe, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies to selected Plasmodium falciparum merozoite antigens are often reported to be associated with protection from malaria in one epidemiological cohort, but not in another. Here, we sought to understand this paradox by exploring the hypothesis that a threshold concentration of antibodies i...

  9. Gastric Cancer Screening by Combined Determination of Serum Helicobacter pylori Antibody and Pepsinogen Concentrations: ABC Method for Gastric Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Zhe Chen

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The early detection and diagnosis of gastric cancer benefit from the risk stratification, but the cutoff values for H. pylori antibody and serum PG concentration require further modification.

  10. A single administration of LFA-1 antibody confers prolonged allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento, A; Nguyen, M; Blake, T; Sirotina, A; Fioravanti, C; Burkholder, D; Gibson, R; Sigal, N H; Springer, M S; Koo, G C

    1993-02-01

    C57BL/6 (B6) thyroid gland transplanted to the left kidney capsule of an allogeneic (BALB/c) host was typically rejected in 14 days. A single administration of 500 micrograms of an antibody to the adhesion molecule, leucocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1, CD11a), prevented all thyroid allograft rejection for at least 70 days. Fifty percent of the treated recipients retained intact allografts for 470 days. However, the same treatment with anti-CD11a could not protect a sensitized BALB/c mouse from rejecting a second B6 thyroid allograft. Production of donor-specific alloantibodies elicited by allograft rejection was also inhibited in this system. In this transplant model, the Ab therapy is more efficacious than that of FK506, administered daily for 14 days at 15 mg/kg. These results demonstrate the remarkable effect of an anti-LFA-1 antibody in promotion of allograft survival.

  11. Soluble CD30 concentrations in ESRD patients with and without panel reactive HLA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Smita; Partlow, David; Barnes, Titus; Thomas, Phillip; Gugliuzza, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    In this retrospective study we compared accuracy of panel reactive antibodies (PRA) with serum soluble CD30 (sCD30) contents in predicting acute rejection crisis post-renal transplant. Pre-transplant sera from 115 patients were evaluated for their PRA and sCD30 concentrations. All patients received calcineurin inhibitor-based immunosuppressive therapy. Objective measurements for rejection were biopsy-proven acute rejection (AR) episodes within first six months of the transplant. Post-transplant sera of patients with AR were tested for the presence of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA). Overall AR rate was 16% (18/115). Patients positive for PRA and sCD30 tests were at significantly higher risk for AVR compared with those patients negative for both the tests (36% vs. 5%, p=0.01). Among negative PRA patients risk for AR was significantly elevated if they were also tested positive for sCD30 concentrations (21% vs. 5%, p=0.04). Of the 18 patients with AR, 14 were positive for sCD30, and 13 of them (93%) developed DSA post-transplant (p=0.001). These data showed that patients positive for sCD30 contents are at high risk for the development of DSA and AR post-transplant regardless of their pre-transplant PRA.

  12. Naturally selected hepatitis C virus polymorphisms confer broad neutralizing antibody resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Justin R; Wasilewski, Lisa N; Snider, Anna E; El-Diwany, Ramy; Osburn, William O; Keck, Zhenyong; Foung, Steven K H; Ray, Stuart C

    2015-01-01

    For hepatitis C virus (HCV) and other highly variable viruses, broadly neutralizing mAbs are an important guide for vaccine development. The development of resistance to anti-HCV mAbs is poorly understood, in part due to a lack of neutralization testing against diverse, representative panels of HCV variants. Here, we developed a neutralization panel expressing diverse, naturally occurring HCV envelopes (E1E2s) and used this panel to characterize neutralizing breadth and resistance mechanisms of 18 previously described broadly neutralizing anti-HCV human mAbs. The observed mAb resistance could not be attributed to polymorphisms in E1E2 at known mAb-binding residues. Additionally, hierarchical clustering analysis of neutralization resistance patterns revealed relationships between mAbs that were not predicted by prior epitope mapping, identifying 3 distinct neutralization clusters. Using this clustering analysis and envelope sequence data, we identified polymorphisms in E2 that confer resistance to multiple broadly neutralizing mAbs. These polymorphisms, which are not at mAb contact residues, also conferred resistance to neutralization by plasma from HCV-infected subjects. Together, our method of neutralization clustering with sequence analysis reveals that polymorphisms at noncontact residues may be a major immune evasion mechanism for HCV, facilitating viral persistence and presenting a challenge for HCV vaccine development.

  13. Analysis of antibody aggregate content at extremely high concentrations using sedimentation velocity with a novel interference optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Kristian; Krause, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies represent the most important group of protein-based biopharmaceuticals. During formulation, manufacturing, or storage, antibodies may suffer post-translational modifications altering their physical and chemical properties. Such induced conformational changes may lead to the formation of aggregates, which can not only reduce their efficiency but also be immunogenic. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the amount of size variants to ensure consistency and quality of pharmaceutical antibodies. In many cases, antibodies are formulated at very high concentrations > 50 g/L, mostly along with high amounts of sugar-based excipients. As a consequence, all routine aggregation analysis methods, such as size-exclusion chromatography, cannot monitor the size distribution at those original conditions, but only after dilution and usually under completely different solvent conditions. In contrast, sedimentation velocity (SV) allows to analyze samples directly in the product formulation, both with limited sample-matrix interactions and minimal dilution. One prerequisite for the analysis of highly concentrated samples is the detection of steep concentration gradients with sufficient resolution: Commercially available ultracentrifuges are not able to resolve such steep interference profiles. With the development of our Advanced Interference Detection Array (AIDA), it has become possible to register interferograms of solutions as highly concentrated as 150 g/L. The other major difficulty encountered at high protein concentrations is the pronounced non-ideal sedimentation behavior resulting from repulsive intermolecular interactions, for which a comprehensive theoretical modelling has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the first SV analysis of highly concentrated antibodies up to 147 g/L employing the unique AIDA ultracentrifuge. By developing a consistent experimental design and data fit approach, we were able to provide a reliable estimation of the minimum

  14. Pharmacokinetics and concentration-effect relationships of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternant, David; Paintaud, Gilles

    2005-09-01

    Although monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) constitute a major advance in therapeutics, their pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties are not fully understood. Saturable mechanisms are thought to occur in distribution and elimination of mAbs, which are protected from degradation by the Brambell's receptor (FcRn). The binding of mAbs to their target antigen explains part of their nonlinear PK and PD properties. The interindividual variability in mAb PK can be explained by several factors, including immune response against the biodrug and differences in the number of antigenic sites. The concentration-effect relationships of mAbs are complex and dependent on their mechanism of action. Interindividual differences in mAb PD can be explained by factors such as genetics and clinical status. PK and concentration-effect studies are necessary to design optimal dosing regimens. Because of their above-mentioned characteristics, the interindividual variability in their dose-response relationships must be studied by PK-PD modelling.

  15. Opalescence in monoclonal antibody solutions and its correlation with intermolecular interactions in dilute and concentrated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2015-04-01

    Opalescence indicates physical instability of a formulation because of the presence of aggregates or liquid-liquid phase separation in solution and has been reported for monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. Increased solution opalescence can be attributed to attractive protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Techniques including light scattering, AUC, or membrane osmometry are routinely employed to measure PPIs in dilute solutions, whereas opalescence is seen at relatively higher concentrations, where both long- and short-range forces contribute to overall PPIs. The mAb molecule studied here shows a unique property of high opalescence because of liquid-liquid phase separation. In this study, opalescence measurements are correlated to PPIs measured in diluted and concentrated solutions using light scattering (kD ) and high-frequency rheology (G'), respectively. Charges on the molecules were calculated using zeta potential measurements. Results indicate that high opalescence and phase separation are a result of the attractive interactions in solution; however, the presence of attractive interactions do not always imply phase separation. Temperature dependence of opalescence suggests that thermodynamic contribution to opalescence is significant and Tcloud can be utilized as a potential tool to assess attractive interactions in solution. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring the concentration of, and detection of antibodies to, Aujeszky's disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardi, V; Szegletes, E; Perényi, T; Pergel, I; Smal, Z

    1990-01-01

    A double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for measuring Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) antigen concentration and an inhibition technique based on the former was developed for detection of antibodies to ADV. The results were checked by determining the cytopathic and serum neutralization titres. The correlation was satisfactory in both cases, with correlation coefficients above 0.8. When measuring ADV antigen concentration, the lower limit of detection was 10(3) TCID 50/0.2 ml. The sensitivity of ELISA in detecting antibodies to ADV was found to be superior to that of the serum neutralization test and, thus, enabled the testing of rabbit and guinea-pig sera.

  17. Modification of liposomal concentration in liposome/adenoviral complexes allows significant protection of adenoviral vectors from neutralising antibody, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jason C; Cavanagh, Heather M A; Burton, Mark A; Dingwall, Daniel J; Kalle, Wouter H J

    2005-06-01

    Adenoviral vectors have been commonly used in gene therapy protocols, however the success of their use is often limited by the induction of host immunity to the vector. Following exposure to the adenoviral vector, adenoviral-specific neutralising antibodies are produced which limits further administration. This study examines the efficacy of complexing liposomes to adenovirus for the protection of the adenovirus from neutralising antibodies in an in vitro setting. Dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB)-dioleoyl-l-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) liposomes were bound at varying concentrations to adenovirus to form AL complexes and tested these complexes' ability to prevent adenoviral neutralisation. It is shown that by increasing the concentration of liposomes in the adenoviral-liposome (AL) complexes we can increase the level of immuno-shielding afforded the adenovirus. It is also shown that the increase in liposomal concentration may lead to drawbacks such as increased cytotoxicity and reductions in expression levels.

  18. Gastric Cancer Screening by Combined Determination of Serum Helicobacter pylori Antibody and Pepsinogen Concentrations: ABC Method for Gastric Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian-Zhe; Huang, Cheng-Zhi; Hu, Wei-Xian; Liu, Ying; Yao, Xue-Qing

    2018-05-20

    Gastroscopy combined with gastric mucosa biopsies is currently regarded as a gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. However, its application is restricted in clinical practice due to its invasive property. A new noninvasive population screening process combining the assay of anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody and serum pepsinogen (PG) (ABC method) is adopted to recognize the high-risk patients for further endoscopy examination, avoiding the unnecessary gastroscopy for most population and saving the cost consumption for mass screening annually. Nevertheless, controversies exist for the grouping of ABC method and the intervals of gastroscopy surveillance for each group. In this review, we summarized these popular concerned topics for providing useful references to the healthcare practitioner in clinical practice. The PubMed databases were systematically searched from the inception dates to November 22, 2017, using the keywords "Helicobacter pylori," "Pepsinogens," and "Stomach Neoplasms." Original articles and reviews on the topics were selected. Anti-H. pylori antibody and serum PG concentration showed significant changes under the different status of H. pylori infection and the progression of atrophic gastritis, which can be used for risk stratification of gastric cancer in clinic. In addition, anti-H. pylori antibody titer can be used for further risk stratification of gastric cancer contributing to determine better endoscopy surveillance interval. The early detection and diagnosis of gastric cancer benefit from the risk stratification, but the cutoff values for H. pylori antibody and serum PG concentration require further modification.

  19. [Commentary on] Serum vaccine antibody concentrations in children exposed to perfluorinated compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P.; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford; Budtz-Jorgenser

    2012-01-01

    The article presents insights into a study which examined the role of perfluorinated compounds (PFC) in antibody response to childhood vaccinations. The prevalence of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) which were mentioned in the study was reported by the U...

  20. High Concentrations of Measles Neutralizing Antibodies and High-Avidity Measles IgG Accurately Identify Measles Reinfection Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Jennifer S.; Hickman, Carole J.; Mercader, Sara; Redd, Susan; McNall, Rebecca J.; Williams, Nobia; McGrew, Marcia; Walls, M. Laura; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 9% of the measles cases reported from 2012 to 2014 occurred in vaccinated individuals. Laboratory confirmation of measles in vaccinated individuals is challenging since IgM assays can give inconclusive results. Although a positive reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay result from an appropriately timed specimen can provide confirmation, negative results may not rule out a highly suspicious case. Detection of high-avidity measles IgG in serum samples provides laboratory evidence of a past immunologic response to measles from natural infection or immunization. High concentrations of measles neutralizing antibody have been observed by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assays among confirmed measles cases with high-avidity IgG, referred to here as reinfection cases (RICs). In this study, we evaluated the utility of measuring levels of measles neutralizing antibody to distinguish RICs from noncases by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Single and paired serum samples with high-avidity measles IgG from suspected measles cases submitted to the CDC for routine surveillance were used for the analysis. The RICs were confirmed by a 4-fold rise in PRN titer or by RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay, while the noncases were negative by both assays. Discrimination accuracy was high with serum samples collected ≥3 days after rash onset (area under the curve, 0.953; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.854 to 0.993). Measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml identified RICs with 90% sensitivity (95% CI, 74 to 98%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 82 to 100%). Therefore, when serological or RT-qPCR results are unavailable or inconclusive, suspected measles cases with high-avidity measles IgG can be confirmed as RICs by measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml. PMID:27335386

  1. A tetravalent virus-like particle vaccine designed to display domain III of dengue envelope proteins induces multi-serotype neutralizing antibodies in mice and macaques which confer protection against antibody dependent enhancement in AG129 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Ramasamy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is one of the fastest spreading vector-borne diseases, caused by four antigenically distinct dengue viruses (DENVs. Antibodies against DENVs are responsible for both protection as well as pathogenesis. A vaccine that is safe for and efficacious in all people irrespective of their age and domicile is still an unmet need. It is becoming increasingly apparent that vaccine design must eliminate epitopes implicated in the induction of infection-enhancing antibodies.We report a Pichia pastoris-expressed dengue immunogen, DSV4, based on DENV envelope protein domain III (EDIII, which contains well-characterized serotype-specific and cross-reactive epitopes. In natural infection, <10% of the total neutralizing antibody response is EDIII-directed. Yet, this is a functionally relevant domain which interacts with the host cell surface receptor. DSV4 was designed by in-frame fusion of EDIII of all four DENV serotypes and hepatitis B surface (S antigen and co-expressed with unfused S antigen to form mosaic virus-like particles (VLPs. These VLPs displayed EDIIIs of all four DENV serotypes based on probing with a battery of serotype-specific anti-EDIII monoclonal antibodies. The DSV4 VLPs were highly immunogenic, inducing potent and durable neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes encompassing multiple genotypes, in mice and macaques. DSV4-induced murine antibodies suppressed viremia in AG129 mice and conferred protection against lethal DENV-4 virus challenge. Further, neither murine nor macaque anti-DSV4 antibodies promoted mortality or inflammatory cytokine production when passively transferred and tested in an in vivo dengue disease enhancement model of AG129 mice.Directing the immune response to a non-immunodominant but functionally relevant serotype-specific dengue epitope of the four DENV serotypes, displayed on a VLP platform, can help minimize the risk of inducing disease-enhancing antibodies while eliciting effective tetravalent

  2. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  3. Estimated exposures to perfluorinated compounds in infancy predict attenuated vaccine antibody concentrations at age 5-years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Heilmann, Carsten; Weihe, Pal

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs) are highly persistent and may cause immunotoxic effects. PFAS-associated attenuated antibody responses to childhood vaccines may be affected by PFAS exposures during infancy, where breastfeeding adds to PFAS exposures. Of 490 members of a Faroese birth...... the notion that the developing adaptive immune system is particularly vulnerable to immunotoxicity during infancy. This vulnerability appears to be the greatest during the first 6 months after birth, where PFAS exposures are affected by breast-feeding....

  4. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  5. Capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry detects low concentration host cell impurities in monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guijie; Sun, Liangliang; Heidbrink-Thompson, Jennifer; Kuntumalla, Srilatha; Lin, Hung-yu; Larkin, Christopher J.; McGivney, James B.; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2016-01-01

    We have evaluated capillary zone electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-ESI-MS/MS) for detection of trace amounts of host cell protein impurities in recombinant therapeutics. Compared to previously published procedures, we have optimized the buffer pH used in the formation of a pH junction to increase injection volume. We also prepared a five-point calibration curve by spiking twelve standard proteins into a solution of a human monoclonal antibody. A custom CZE-MS/MS system was used to analyze the tryptic digest of this mixture without depletion of the antibody. CZE generated a ~70 min separation window (~90 min total analysis duration) and ~300 peak capacity. We also analyzed the sample using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-MS/MS. CZE-MS/MS generated ~five times higher base peak intensity and more peptide identifications for low-level spiked proteins. Both methods detected all proteins spiked at the ~100 ppm level with respect to the antibody. PMID:26530276

  6. Antibodies to parvovirus, distemper virus and adenovirus conferred to household dogs using commercial combination vaccines containing Leptospira bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, M; Namikawa, K; Maruo, T; Lynch, J; Sahara, H

    2010-12-11

    To examine how the inclusion (+) or exclusion (-) of inactivated Leptospira antigens in a vaccine for canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2) affects antibody titres to CPV-2, CDV and CAdV-1 antigens, household dogs were vaccinated with commercially available vaccines from one of three manufacturers. CPV-2, CDV and CAdV-1 antibody titres were measured 11 to 13 months later and compared within three different age groups and three different bodyweight groups. There were significant differences between CPV-2 antibody titres in dogs vaccinated with (+) vaccine and those vaccinated with (-) vaccine for two products in the two-year-old group and for one product in the greater than seven-year-old group; no significant differences were seen that could be attributed to bodyweight. No differences in CDV antibody titres were observed within age groups, but a significant difference was seen in the 11 to 20 kg weight group for one product. Significant differences in CAdV-1 antibody titres were seen for one product in both the two-year-old group and the ≤10 kg weight group.

  7. Use of anti-Aedes aegypti salivary extract antibody concentration to correlate risk of vector exposure and dengue transmission risk in Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berlin Londono-Renteria

    Full Text Available Norte de Santander is a region in Colombia with a high incidence of dengue virus (DENV. In this study, we examined the serum concentration of anti-Aedes salivary gland extract (SGE antibodies as a biomarker of DENV infection and transmission, and assessed the duration of anti-SGE antibody concentration after exposure to the vector ceased. We also determined whether SGE antibody concentration could differentiate between positive and negative DENV infected individuals and whether there are differences in exposure for each DENV serotype. We observed a significant decrease in the concentration of IgG antibodies at least 40 days after returning to an "Ae. aegypti-free" area. In addition, we found significantly higher anti-SGE IgG concentrations in DENV positive patients with some difference in exposure to mosquito bites among DENV serotypes. We conclude that the concentration of IgG antibodies against SGE is an accurate indicator of risk of dengue virus transmission and disease presence.

  8. Monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Hiyoshimaru

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects of monoclonal antibodies are described, centering on studies made by the author and those presented at the Second International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer held in March this year (1987). The history of immuno-nuclear medicine and procedures for producing monoclonal antibodies are briefly outlined. Monoclonal antibodies are immunoglobulins. Here, the structure of IgG, which is used most frequently, is described. An IgG is composed of two antigen binding fragments (Fab) and one crystallizable fragment (Fc). The end portion of a Fab reacts with an antigen. One of the major applications of immuno-nuclear medicine is the diagnosis of cancer. As label nucleides, 131 I and 111 I were selected in most cases in the past while 123 I and 99m Tc are currently used more often. Advantages and disadvantages of this diagnosis method is discussed citing studies presented at the First (1986) and Second (1987) International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer. The present status of the application of monoclonal antibodies to treatment of cancer is also described. (Nogami, K.)

  9. Stability of buffer-free freeze-dried formulations: A feasibility study of a monoclonal antibody at high protein concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garidel, Patrick; Pevestorf, Benjamin; Bahrenburg, Sven

    2015-11-01

    We studied the stability of freeze-dried therapeutic protein formulations over a range of initial concentrations (from 40 to 160 mg/mL) and employed a variety of formulation strategies (including buffer-free freeze dried formulations, or BF-FDF). Highly concentrated, buffer-free liquid formulations of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been shown to be a viable alternative to conventionally buffered preparations. We considered whether it is feasible to use the buffer-free strategy in freeze-dried formulations, as an answer to some of the known drawbacks of conventional buffers. We therefore conducted an accelerated stability study (24 weeks at 40 °C) to assess the feasibility of stabilizing freeze-dried formulations without "classical" buffer components. Factors monitored included pH stability, protein integrity, and protein aggregation. Because the protein solutions are inherently self-buffering, and the system's buffer capacity scales with protein concentration, we included highly concentrated buffer-free freeze-dried formulations in the study. The tested formulations ranged from "fully formulated" (containing both conventional buffer and disaccharide stabilizers) to "buffer-free" (including formulations with only disaccharide lyoprotectant stabilizers) to "excipient-free" (with neither added buffers nor stabilizers). We evaluated the impacts of varying concentrations, buffering schemes, pHs, and lyoprotectant additives. At the end of 24 weeks, no change in pH was observed in any of the buffer-free formulations. Unbuffered formulations were found to have shorter reconstitution times and lower opalescence than buffered formulations. Protein stability was assessed by visual inspection, sub-visible particle analysis, protein monomer content, charge variants analysis, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. All of these measures found the stability of buffer-free formulations that included a disaccharide stabilizer comparable to buffer

  10. A cross-sectional study of tetanus and diphtheria antibody concentrations post vaccination among lung transplant patients compared with healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, K A; Cunningham, K C; Henriquez, K M; Nielsen, A R; Worzella, S L; Hayney, M S

    2014-12-01

    Lung transplant (LuTx) patients are routinely immunized against tetanus and diphtheria. However, few studies have been done to measure serologic immunity in the transplant population. The primary objective of this study was to compare tetanus and diphtheria antibody concentrations in LuTx vs. healthy subjects. Serum was used from an available sample of 111 total individuals (n = 36 healthy; n = 75 LuTx). Tetanus and diphtheria antibody concentrations were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay method. A statistically significant difference in both tetanus and diphtheria antibody concentrations was found between the groups. The median concentration of tetanus antibody was higher for healthy individuals compared with the LuTx group (3.2 IU/mL [1.2-5.2 interquartile range {IQR}] vs. 1.3 IU/mL [0.4-2.6 IQR], respectively; P = 0.0001). No difference in time was found since the last tetanus-diphtheria vaccine or tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis vaccine dose between the groups (healthy 76.5 months [16-114 IQR] vs. LuTx 74.5 months [45-118 IQR]; P = 0.44). Tetanus and diphtheria immunizations are recommended for LuTx patients to reduce the risk of infection. Because the LuTx group has lower antibody concentrations, further studies should investigate the possible need for more frequent tetanus and diphtheria boosters. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Applying photoacoustics to quantification of melanin concentration in retinal pigment epithelium (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiao; Zhang, Hao F.; Liu, Wenzhong

    2016-03-01

    The melanin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) protects retina and other ocular tissues by photo-screening and acting as antioxidant and free radical scavenger. It helps maintain normal visual functions since human eye is subjected to lifelong high oxygen stress and photon exposure. Loss of the RPE melanin weakens the protection mechanism and jeopardizes ocular health. Local decrease in the RPE melanin concentration is believed to be both a cause and a sign of early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading blinding disease in developed world. Current technology cannot quantitatively measure the RPE melanin concentration which might be a promising marker in early AMD screening. Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM), as an emerging optical absorption-based imaging technology, can potentially be applied to measure the RPE melanin concentration if the dependence of the detectable photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitudes on the RPE melanin concentrations is verified. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using PA signal ratio from RPE melanin and the nearby retinal blood vessels as an indicator of the RPE melanin variation. A novel whole eye optical model was designed and Monte Carlo modeling of light (MCML) was employed. We examined the influences on quantification from PAOM axial resolution, the depth and diameter of the retinal blood vessel, and the RPE thickness. The results show that the scheme is robust to individual histological and illumination variations. This study suggests that PAOM is capable of quantitatively measuring the RPE melanin concentration in vivo.

  12. A post-marketing safety and efficacy assessment of a monoclonal antibody purified high-purity factor VIII concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, C R; Lee, C A; Savidge, G

    1996-01-01

    The identification of infrequent side-effects of clotting factor concentrates, undetected by clinical trials, is facilitated by post-marketing surveillance. We present a post-marketing surveillance study in which 97 patients with haemophilia A, attending three haemophilia centres, were treated over a median follow-up period of 284 days (range 1-1074), and a total follow-up period of 30,080 days, with a pasteurized immunoaffinity purified factor VIII concentrate (Monoclate-P, Armour, Collegeville, USA). 5216 infusions, using 10,527,000 units of Monoclate-P, were carried out, mostly for routine haemarthroses or prophylaxis. No new inhibitors were observed during the study. At the start of the study 60/97 were HIV seropositive, 67/97 HBs antibody positive, 12 HbsAb negative and the remainder HBsAb positive before the study period. 13/14 tested were HAV seropositive at the beginning of the study. One patient became HAV seropositive during the study period, an infection thought to be community acquired. No other seroconversions were observed. Only one mild transfusion reaction was observed. This study confirms the safety and efficacy of Monoclate-P. Post-marketing surveillance or nationally organized pharmaco-vigilance should be practiced more widely to enable identification of low-frequency side-effects of treatment.

  13. Extra-epitopic hepatitis C virus polymorphisms confer resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies by modulating binding to scavenger receptor B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Diwany, Ramy; Cohen, Valerie J; Mankowski, Madeleine C; Wasilewski, Lisa N; Brady, Jillian K; Snider, Anna E; Osburn, William O; Murrell, Ben; Ray, Stuart C; Bailey, Justin R

    2017-02-01

    Broadly-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) may guide vaccine development for highly variable viruses including hepatitis C virus (HCV), since they target conserved viral epitopes that could serve as vaccine antigens. However, HCV resistance to bNAbs could reduce the efficacy of a vaccine. HC33.4 and AR4A are two of the most potent anti-HCV human bNAbs characterized to date, binding to highly conserved epitopes near the amino- and carboxy-terminus of HCV envelope (E2) protein, respectively. Given their distinct epitopes, it was surprising that these bNAbs showed similar neutralization profiles across a panel of natural HCV isolates, suggesting that some viral polymorphisms may confer resistance to both bNAbs. To investigate this resistance, we developed a large, diverse panel of natural HCV envelope variants and a novel computational method to identify bNAb resistance polymorphisms in envelope proteins (E1 and E2). By measuring neutralization of a panel of HCV pseudoparticles by 10 μg/mL of each bNAb, we identified E1E2 variants with resistance to one or both bNAbs, despite 100% conservation of the AR4A binding epitope across the panel. We discovered polymorphisms outside of either binding epitope that modulate resistance to both bNAbs by altering E2 binding to the HCV co-receptor, scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1). This study is focused on a mode of neutralization escape not addressed by conventional analysis of epitope conservation, highlighting the contribution of extra-epitopic polymorphisms to bNAb resistance and presenting a novel mechanism by which HCV might persist even in the face of an antibody response targeting multiple conserved epitopes.

  14. Nasal Immunization Confers High Avidity Neutralizing Antibody Response and Immunity to Primary and Recurrent Genital Herpes in Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Josefine; Zhang, Yuan; Olafsdottir, Thorunn A.; Thörn, Karolina; Cairns, Tina M.; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Harandi, Ali M.

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in both the developing and developed world. Following infection, individuals experience life-long latency associated with sporadic ulcerative outbreaks. Despite many efforts, no vaccine has yet been licensed for human use. Herein, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 gD envelope protein mounts significant protection to primary infection as well as the establishment of latency and recurrent genital herpes in guinea pigs. Nasal immunization was shown to elicit specific T cell proliferative and IFN-γ responses as well as systemic and vaginal gD-specific IgG antibody (Ab) responses. Furthermore, systemic IgG Abs displayed potent HSV-2 neutralizing properties and high avidity. By employing a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis combined with a battery of known gD-specific neutralizing monoclonal Abs (MAbs), we showed that nasal immunization generated IgG Abs directed to two major discontinuous neutralizing epitopes of gD. These results highlight the potential of nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 envelope protein for induction of protective immunity to primary and recurrent genital herpes. PMID:28082979

  15. Nasal Immunization Confers High Avidity Neutralizing Antibody Response and Immunity to Primary and Recurrent Genital Herpes in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Josefine; Zhang, Yuan; Olafsdottir, Thorunn A; Thörn, Karolina; Cairns, Tina M; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin J; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Harandi, Ali M

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in both the developing and developed world. Following infection, individuals experience life-long latency associated with sporadic ulcerative outbreaks. Despite many efforts, no vaccine has yet been licensed for human use. Herein, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 gD envelope protein mounts significant protection to primary infection as well as the establishment of latency and recurrent genital herpes in guinea pigs. Nasal immunization was shown to elicit specific T cell proliferative and IFN-γ responses as well as systemic and vaginal gD-specific IgG antibody (Ab) responses. Furthermore, systemic IgG Abs displayed potent HSV-2 neutralizing properties and high avidity. By employing a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis combined with a battery of known gD-specific neutralizing monoclonal Abs (MAbs), we showed that nasal immunization generated IgG Abs directed to two major discontinuous neutralizing epitopes of gD. These results highlight the potential of nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 envelope protein for induction of protective immunity to primary and recurrent genital herpes.

  16. American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists National Biotechnology Conference Short Course: Translational Challenges in Developing Antibody-Drug Conjugates: May 24, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thudium, Karen; Bilic, Sanela; Leipold, Douglas; Mallet, William; Kaur, Surinder; Meibohm, Bernd; Erickson, Hans; Tibbitts, Jay; Zhao, Hong; Gupta, Manish

    2013-01-01

    The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) National Biotechnology Conference Short Course "Translational Challenges in Developing Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs)," held May 24, 2012 in San Diego, CA, was organized by members of the Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Metabolism section of AAPS. Representatives from the pharmaceutical industry, regulatory authorities, and academia in the US and Europe attended this short course to discuss the translational challenges in ADC development and the importance of characterizing these molecules early in development to achieve therapeutic utility in patients. Other areas of discussion included selection of target antigens; characterization of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion; assay development and hot topics like regulatory perspectives and the role of pharmacometrics in ADC development. MUC16-targeted ADCs were discussed to illustrate challenges in preclinical development; experiences with trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1; Genentech) and the recently approved brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris; Seattle Genetics) were presented in depth to demonstrate considerations in clinical development. The views expressed in this report are those of the participants and do not necessarily represent those of their affiliations.

  17. Clinical response to adalimumab: relationship to anti-adalimumab antibodies and serum adalimumab concentrations in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelds, Geertje M.; Wijbrandts, Carla A.; Nurmohamed, Michael T.; Stapel, Steven; Lems, Willem F.; Aarden, Lucien; Dijkmans, Ben A. C.; Tak, Paul Peter; Wolbink, Gerrit Jan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not respond, or lose initial response, to adalimumab treatment. One explanation for non-response is that patients develop anti-adalimumab antibodies. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the incidence of formation of antibody

  18. Glycans Flanking the Hypervariable Connecting Peptide between the A and B Strands of the V1/V2 Domain of HIV-1 gp120 Confer Resistance to Antibodies That Neutralize CRF01_AE Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Rourke, Sara M.; Sutthent, Ruengpung; Phung, Pham; Mesa, Kathryn A.; Frigon, Normand L.; To, Briana; Horthongkham, Navin; Limoli, Kay; Wrin, Terri; Berman, Phillip W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance to neutralizing antibodies is critical for the development of vaccines designed to prevent HIV infection. In this study, we used a genetic approach to characterize naturally occurring polymorphisms in the HIV envelope protein that conferred neutralization sensitivity or resistance. Libraries of closely related envelope genes, derived from virus quasi-species, were constructed from individuals infected with CRF01_AE viruses. The libraries were screened with plasma containing broadly neutralizing antibodies, and neutralization sensitive and resistant variants were selected for sequence analysis. In vitro mutagenesis allowed us to identify single amino acid changes in three individuals that conferred resistance to neutralization by these antibodies. All three mutations created N-linked glycosylation sites (two at N136 and one at N149) proximal to the hypervariable connecting peptide between the C-terminus of the A strand and the N-terminus of the B strand in the four-stranded V1/V2 domain β-sheet structure. Although N136 has previously been implicated in the binding of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, this glycosylation site appears to inhibit the binding of neutralizing antibodies in plasma from HIV-1 infected subjects. Previous studies have reported that the length of the V1/V2 domain in transmitted founder viruses is shorter and possesses fewer glycosylation sites compared to viruses isolated from chronic infections. Our results suggest that vaccine immunogens based on recombinant envelope proteins from clade CRF01_AE viruses might be improved by inclusion of envelope proteins that lack these glycosylation sites. This strategy might improve the efficacy of the vaccines used in the partially successful RV144 HIV vaccine trial, where the two CRF01_AE immunogens (derived from the A244 and TH023 isolates) both possessed glycosylation sites at N136 and N149. PMID:25793890

  19. EHD1 confers resistance to cisplatin in non-small cell lung cancer by regulating intracellular cisplatin concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Jing; Meng, Qingwei; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Xuesong; Cai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer. However, resistance to cisplatin (CDDP) remains a major challenge in NSCLC treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of EHD1 [Eps15 homology (EH) domain - containing protein 1] to confer CDDP resistance in NSCLC cells and to investigate mechanisms of this resistance. The associations between EHD1 expression in NSCLC specimens and clinicopathological features, including prognosis, were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Using DNA microarrays, we performed a genome-wide analysis of cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells to identify the involvement of the EHD1 gene in this resistance. We overexpressed and knocked down EHD1 in cell lines to investigate the effect of this gene on proliferation and apoptosis. A quantitative analytical method for assessing CDDP in cells was developed. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure the concentration of cisplatin in cells. The immunohistochemistry assay showed that adjuvant chemotherapy-treated NSCLC patients expressing EHD1 exhibited reduced OS compared with patients who did not express EHD1 (P = 0.01). Moreover, DNA microarrays indicated that the EHD1 gene was upregulated in CDDP- resistant NSCLC cells. The IC50 value of CDDP in cells that overexpressed EHD1 was 3.3-fold greater than that in the A549-control line, and the IC50 value of EHD1 knockdown cells was at least 5.2-fold lower than that of the control cells, as evidenced by a CCK-8 assay. We found that the percentage of early apoptotic cells was significantly decreased in A549-EHD1 cells, but the rates of early apoptosis were higher in the EHD1 knockdown cell line than in the A549/DDP control line, as indicated by a flow cytometry analysis. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that the total platinum level was lower in A549-EHD1 cells than in control cells, and the concentration of CDDP was higher in the EHD1 knockdown cells than in

  20. Effective single chain antibody (scFv) concentrations in vivo via adenoviral vector mediated expression of secretory scFv

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, WO; Gomez-Navarro, J; Buchsbaum, DJ; Xiang, J; Casado, E; Barker, SD; Mahasreshti, PJ; Haisma, HJ; Barnes, MN; Siegal, GP; Alvarez, RD; Hemminki, A; Nettelbeck, DM; Curiel, DT

    Single chain antibodies (scFv) represent powerful interventional agents for the achievement of targeted therapeutics. The practical utility of these agents have been limited, however, by difficulties related to production of recombinant scFv and the achievement of effective and sustained levels of

  1. Comparison of serum and salivary antibodies in children vaccinated with oral live or parenteral inactivated poliovirus vaccines of different antigen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, S; Carlsson, B; Jalil, F; Mellander, L; Van Wezel, A L; Böttiger, M; Hanson, L A

    1991-12-01

    A new antigen-rich inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) in ordinary (IPV1), double (IPV2) and quadruple (IPV4) antigen concentrations was given in 2 doses to 6 and 18 week old Pakistani infants. The immune responses to poliovirus types 1 and 3 were compared to those in infants given three doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) at 6, 12 and 18 weeks of age. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA, was used to estimate IgG and IgA in serum and secretory IgA (SIgA) in saliva. Two to three years later, a follow-up of the serum antibody response was carried out in the same infants using a microneutralization test. Serum IgG antibody responses to poliovirus type 1 antigen after two doses of IPV1, IPV2 and IPV4 were not significantly higher than the response after three doses of OPV at 21 weeks of age (p greater than 0.05). The serum IgG responses to poliovirus type 3 were similar to those against type 1 in all the groups. Mean neutralizing antibody titres to poliovirus type 1 was significantly higher in the IPV2 group than the rest of the groups (p less than 0.01). For type 3, these titres were highest but not significantly, in the IPV4 group (p greater than 0.05). This study shows that two doses of a new antigen-rich IPV can give similar immediate serum antibody responses as OPV but higher late responses. SIgA antibodies in saliva were more efficiently induced by OPV after three doses than after 2 doses of IPV (p less than 0.05).

  2. Variability of in vivo recovery of factor IX after infusion of monoclonal antibody purified factor IX concentrates in patients with hemophilia B. The Mononine Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, G C; Shapiro, A D; Kurczynski, E M; Kim, H C; Bergman, G E

    1995-05-01

    Monoclonal antibody purified factor IX concentrate, Mononine (Armour Pharmaceutical Company, Kankakee, Illinois, USA), is a recently developed replacement factor concentrate for the treatment of patients with hemophilia B. The pharmacokinetic properties of monoclonal antibody purified factor IX concentrate (MAb Factor IX concentrate) have been evaluated in only small samples of patients, and little is known about those factors that might influenced in vivo recovery of factor IX after infusion is a larger patient population. In vivo recovery of factor IX was therefore evaluated for 80 different indications in 72 patients who received MAb Factor IX concentrate for the management of spontaneous or trauma-induced bleeding, or as prophylaxis with surgery. The average recovery after infusions for presurgical pharmacokinetic analysis (mean +/- standard deviation) was 1.28 +/- 0.56 U/dl rise per U/kg infused (range 0.41-2.80), and the average recovery after all infusions for treatment was 1.23 +/- 0.49 U/dl rise per U/kg infused (range - 0.35-2.92). Recovery values for multiple MAb Factor IX doses in a given patient were also variable; the average recovery was 1.22 +/- 0.53 U/dl rise per U/kg given, and standard deviations ranged from 0.03 to 1.26. Patient age, weight, and MAb Factor IX concentrate dose minimally but significantly influenced factor IX recovery. There was no significant effect of either race, history of previous thrombotic complications during treatment with other replacement factor concentrates, or bleeding state on recovery. All of the patients treated with this preparation experienced excellent hemostasis, and no thrombotic complications were observed.

  3. Randomized Cross-Sectional Study to Compare HIV-1 Specific Antibody and Cytokine Concentrations in Female Genital Secretions Obtained by Menstrual Cup and Cervicovaginal Lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archary, Derseree; Liebenberg, Lenine J; Werner, Lise; Tulsi, Sahil; Majola, Nelisile; Naicker, Nivashnee; Dlamini, Sarah; Hope, Thomas J; Samsunder, Natasha; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Morris, Lynn; Passmore, Jo-Ann S; Garrett, Nigel J

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing methods for genital specimen collection to accurately characterize mucosal immune responses is a priority for the HIV prevention field. The menstrual cup (MC) has been proposed as an alternative to other methods including cervicovaginal lavage (CVL), but no study has yet formally compared these two methods. Forty HIV-infected, antiretroviral therapy-naïve women from the CAPRISA 002 acute HIV infection cohort study were randomized to have genital fluid collected using the MC with subsequent CVL, or by CVL alone. Qualitative data, which assessed levels of comfort and acceptability of MC using a 5-point Likert scale, was collected. Luminex multiplex assays were used to measure HIV-specific IgG against multiple gene products and 48 cytokines. The majority (94%) of participants indicated that insertion, wearing and removal of the MC was comfortable. Nineteen MCs with 18 matching, subsequent CVLs and 20 randomized CVLs were available for analysis. Mucosal IgG responses against four HIV-antigens were detected in 99% of MCs compared to only 80% of randomized CVLs (p = 0.029). Higher specific antibody activity and total antibodies were observed in MCs compared to CVL (all p<0.001). In MCs, 42/48 (88%) cytokines were in the detectable range in all participants compared to 27/48 (54%) in CVL (p<0.001). Concentrations of 22/41 cytokines (53.7%) were significantly higher in fluid collected by MC. Both total IgG (r = 0.63; p = 0.005) and cytokine concentrations (r = 0.90; p<0.001) correlated strongly between MC and corresponding post-MC CVL. MC sampling improves the detection of mucosal cytokines and antibodies, particularly those present at low concentrations. MC may therefore represent an ideal tool to assess immunological parameters in genital secretions, without interfering with concurrent collection of conventional CVL samples.

  4. Randomized Cross-Sectional Study to Compare HIV-1 Specific Antibody and Cytokine Concentrations in Female Genital Secretions Obtained by Menstrual Cup and Cervicovaginal Lavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derseree Archary

    Full Text Available Optimizing methods for genital specimen collection to accurately characterize mucosal immune responses is a priority for the HIV prevention field. The menstrual cup (MC has been proposed as an alternative to other methods including cervicovaginal lavage (CVL, but no study has yet formally compared these two methods.Forty HIV-infected, antiretroviral therapy-naïve women from the CAPRISA 002 acute HIV infection cohort study were randomized to have genital fluid collected using the MC with subsequent CVL, or by CVL alone. Qualitative data, which assessed levels of comfort and acceptability of MC using a 5-point Likert scale, was collected. Luminex multiplex assays were used to measure HIV-specific IgG against multiple gene products and 48 cytokines.The majority (94% of participants indicated that insertion, wearing and removal of the MC was comfortable. Nineteen MCs with 18 matching, subsequent CVLs and 20 randomized CVLs were available for analysis. Mucosal IgG responses against four HIV-antigens were detected in 99% of MCs compared to only 80% of randomized CVLs (p = 0.029. Higher specific antibody activity and total antibodies were observed in MCs compared to CVL (all p<0.001. In MCs, 42/48 (88% cytokines were in the detectable range in all participants compared to 27/48 (54% in CVL (p<0.001. Concentrations of 22/41 cytokines (53.7% were significantly higher in fluid collected by MC. Both total IgG (r = 0.63; p = 0.005 and cytokine concentrations (r = 0.90; p<0.001 correlated strongly between MC and corresponding post-MC CVL.MC sampling improves the detection of mucosal cytokines and antibodies, particularly those present at low concentrations. MC may therefore represent an ideal tool to assess immunological parameters in genital secretions, without interfering with concurrent collection of conventional CVL samples.

  5. Measurement of cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood: HPLC and radioimmunoassay with a specific monoclonal antibody and 3H- or 125I-labeled ligand compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, B.A.; Daft, M.C.; Koenig, J.W.; Flye, M.W.; Turk, J.W.; Scott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We compared cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood as measured by HPLC and by RIA with a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine with 3 H- or 125 I-labeled cyclosporine ligand. The 3 H-RIA kit slightly underestimated cyclosporine concentrations (greater than 600 micrograms/L) in comparison with HPLC. Over a wide range of concentrations, cyclosporine measured with the 125 I-RIA kit correlated well with HPLC (slope = 0.99, n = 301, r = 0.98), observed for samples from recipients of kidney, heart, or liver allografts (respective slopes: 1.01, 0.93, and 1.00). The 125 I-RIA standard curve was linear to 1000 micrograms of cyclosporine per liter. Inter- and intra-assay CVs for 125 I-RIA measurements of cyclosporine were less than or equal to 7%. Evidently, the 125 I-RIA kit involving a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine is equivalent to the HPLC assay and can replace it for therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine therapy

  6. Validation of analytical method to calculate the concentration of conjugated monoclonal antibody; Validacao de metodo analitico para calculo de concentracao de anticorpo monoclonal conjugado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcarde, Lais F.; Massicano, Adriana V.F.; Oliveira, Ricardo S.; Araujo, Elaine B. de, E-mail: lais_alcarde@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative analytical method using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the antibody concentration in conjunction with bifunctional chelator. Assays were performed using a high performance liquid chromatograph, and the following conditions were used: flow rate of 1 mL / min, 15 min run time, 0.2 M sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.0 as the mobile phase and column of molecular exclusion BioSep SEC S-3000 (300 x 7.8 mm, 5 μM - Phenomenex). The calibration curve was obtained with AcM diluted in 0.2 M sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.0 by serial dilution, yielding the concentrations: 400 μg/mL, 200 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL, 50 μg/mL, 25 μg/mL and 12.5 μg/mL. From the calibration curve calculated the equation of the line and with it the concentration of the immunoconjugate. To ensure the validity of the method accuracy and precision studies were conducted. The accuracy test consisted in the evaluation of 3 samples of known concentration, being this test performed with low concentrations (50 μg/mL), medium (100 μg/mL) and high (200 μg/mL). The precision test consisted of 3 consecutive measurements of one sample of known concentration, subject to the conditions set forth above for the other tests. The correlation coefficient of the standard curve was greater than 97%, the accuracy was satisfactory at low concentrations as well as accuracy. The method was validated by showing it for the accurate and precise determination of the concentration of the immunoconjugate. Furthermore, this assay was found to be extremely important, because using the correct mass of the protein, the radiochemical purity of the radioimmunoconjugate was above 95% in all studies.

  7. Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy for Temperature and Species Concentration in the Plume of a Supersonic Nozzle (Conference Paper with Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-12

    Paper with Briefing Charts 22 May 2017 - 30 July 2017 Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy for Temperature and Species Concentration in the Plume of a...environments. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) is a laser absorption spectroscopy technique that allows for quantitative, time-resolved...American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy for Temperature and Species Concentration in the

  8. Detection of adult T-cell leukemia virus (ATLV) bearing lymphocytes in concentrated red blood cells derived from ATL associated antibody (ATLA-Ab) positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Y; Ohya, K; Ueda, R; Fukuda, T

    1986-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia associated antibody (ATLA-Ab) positive persons were screened by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) testing. Their lymphocytes were collected from concentrated red blood cells (CRC), and cultured in vitro with and without phytohemagglutinin (PHA) for 10 days. The expression of ATL virus (ATLV) positive lymphocytes during the in vitro culture was then analyzed by IF assay using mouse monoclonal antibody ATL-19 reactive to p19 core protein of ATLV. 97% of ATLA-Ab positive CRC (36 cases) demonstrated ATLV positive lymphocytes after being cultured for more than 10 days with PHA, whereas, none of ATLA-Ab negative CRC (22 cases) demonstrated ATLV positive lymphocytes. All of the 10 ATLA-Ab positive CRC that were stored for 2, 4, and 7 days contained lymphocytes which expressed ATLV after in vitro culture, while 7 of 10 CRC stored for 14 days and only 1 of 10 CRCs stored for 20 days, expressed ATLV positive lymphocytes. This data indicates that almost all of the ATLA-Ab positive blood contained ATLV positive lymphocytes, and that the in vitro appearance of these ATLV positive lymphocytes was reduced by storing the CRC for more than 14 days.

  9. Influence of large-scale deployment of concentrated solar power on North African countries: Socio-economic aspects (Conference Paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Komendantova, N.; Patt, A.

    2010-01-01

    To prevent catastrophic results of climate change, the stabilization of atmospheric concentrations of CO2 below 450 or even 350 parts per million is necessary. The large-scale electricity generation from renewable energy sources is one of possible options to satisfy the world's growing energy demand and to reduce green house gas emissions from electricity generation. Several studies show technical viability of large-scale deployment of concentrated solar power in North African countries and i...

  10. Dissolution of pre-existing platelet thrombus by synergistic administration of low concentrations of bifunctional antibodies against β3 integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suying Dang

    Full Text Available Most antithrombotic approaches target prevention rather than the more clinically relevant issue of resolution of an existing thrombus. In this study, we describe a novel and effective therapeutic strategy for ex vivo clearance of pre-existing platelet thrombus by the combination of two bifunctional platelet GPIIIa49-66 ligands that target different parts of the arterial thrombus. We produced an additional GPIIIa49-66 agent (named APAC, which homes to activated platelets. Like our previously described SLK (which targets newly deposited fibrin strands surrounding the platelet thrombus, APAC destroys platelet aggregates ex vivo in an identical fashion with 85% destruction of platelet aggregates at 2 hours. The combined application of APAC and SLK demonstrated a ~2 fold greater platelet thrombus dissolution than either agent alone at a low concentration (0.025 µM. Platelet-rich clot lysis experiments demonstrated the time required for 50% platelet-rich fibrin clot lysis (T(50% by APAC (95 ± 6.1 min or SLK (145 ± 7.1 min was much longer than that by combined APAC + SLK (65 ± 7.6 min at the final concentration of 0.025 µM (APAC + SLK vs APAC, p<0.05; APAC + SLK vs SLK, p<0.01. Thus these low concentrations of a combination of both agents are likely to be more effective and less toxic when used therapeutically in vivo.

  11. Identification of regulated genes conferring resistance to high concentrations of glyphosate in a new strain of Enterobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Yun-Yan; Gai, Jun-Yi; Zhao, Tuan-Jie

    2013-12-01

    Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide that inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) activity. Most plants and microbes are sensitive to glyphosate. However, transgenic-resistant crops that contain a modified epsps obtained from the resistant microbes have been commercially successful and therefore, new resistance genes and their adaptive regulatory mechanisms are of great interest. In this study, a soil-borne, glyphosate-resistant bacterium was selected and identified as Enterobacter. The EPSPS in this strain was found to have been altered to a resistant one. A total of 42 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the glyphosate were screened using microarray techniques. Under treatment, argF, sdhA, ivbL, rrfA-H were downregulated, whereas the transcripts of speA, osmY, pflB, ahpC, fusA, deoA, uxaC, rpoD and a few ribosomal protein genes were upregulated. Data were verified by quantitative real-time PCR on selected genes. All transcriptional changes appeared to protect the bacteria from glyphosate and associated osmotic, acidic and oxidative stresses. Many DEGs may have the potential to confer resistance to glyphosate alone, and some may be closely related to the shikimate pathway, reflecting the complex gene interaction network for glyphosate resistance. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Osmolyte Effects on Monoclonal Antibody Stability and Concentration-Dependent Protein Interactions with Water and Common Osmolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Gregory V; Razinkov, Vladimir I; Kerwin, Bruce A; Blake, Steven; Qi, Wei; Curtis, Robin A; Roberts, Christopher J

    2016-04-07

    Preferential interactions of proteins with water and osmolytes play a major role in controlling the thermodynamics of protein solutions. While changes in protein stability and shifts in phase behavior are often reported with the addition of osmolytes, the underlying protein interactions with water and/or osmolytes are typically inferred rather than measured directly. In this work, Kirkwood-Buff integrals for protein-water interactions (G12) and protein-osmolyte interactions (G23) were determined as a function of osmolyte concentration from density measurements of antistreptavidin immunoglobulin gamma-1 (AS-IgG1) in ternary aqueous solutions for a set of common neutral osmolytes: sucrose, trehalose, sorbitol, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). For sucrose and PEG solutions, both protein-water and protein-osmolyte interactions depend strongly on osmolyte concentrations (c3). Strikingly, both osmolytes change from being preferentially excluded to preferentially accumulated with increasing c3. In contrast, sorbitol and trehalose solutions do not show large enough preferential interactions to be detected by densimetry. G12 and G23 values are used to estimate the transfer free energy for native AS-IgG1 (Δμ2N) and compared with existing models. AS-IgG1 unfolding via calorimetry shows a linear increase in midpoint temperatures as a function of trehalose, sucrose, and sorbitol concentrations, but the opposite behavior for PEG. Together, the results highlight limitations of existing models and common assumptions regarding the mechanisms of protein stabilization by osmolytes. Finally, PEG preferential interactions destabilize the Fab regions of AS-IgG1 more so than the CH2 or CH3 domains, illustrating preferential interactions can be specific to different protein domains.

  13. Magnitude of Increased Infliximab Clearance Imposed by Anti-infliximab Antibodies in Crohn's Disease Is Determined by Their Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edlund, Helena; Steenholdt, Casper; Ainsworth, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    in IFX clearance imposed by anti-IFX Abs has generally been evaluated using a binary classification, i.e., positive or negative. This analysis aimed to investigate if anti-IFX Ab concentrations provide a more adequate prediction of alterations in clearance. Data originated from a clinical trial on Crohn......'s disease patients with IFX treatment failure. The trial was not originally designed for pharmacokinetic analysis. Therefore, published pharmacokinetic models were utilized as priors to enable covariate investigation. The impact of anti-IFX Abs on clearance was assessed using different mathematical...

  14. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  15. Transgenic Restoration of Urea Transporter A1 Confers Maximal Urinary Concentration in the Absence of Urea Transporter A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Janet D; Wang, Yanhua; Mistry, Abinash; LaRocque, Lauren M; Molina, Patrick A; Rogers, Richard T; Blount, Mitsi A; Sands, Jeff M

    2016-05-01

    Urea has a critical role in urinary concentration. Mice lacking the inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) urea transporter A1 (UT-A1) and urea transporter A3 (UT-A3) have very low levels of urea permeability and are unable to concentrate urine. To investigate the role of UT-A1 in the concentration of urine, we transgenically expressed UT-A1 in knockout mice lacking UT-A1 and UT-A3 using a construct with a UT-A1 gene that cannot be spliced to produce UT-A3. This construct was inserted behind the original UT-A promoter to yield a mouse expressing only UT-A1 (UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-)). Western blot analysis demonstrated UT-A1 in the inner medulla of UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) and wild-type mice, but not in UT-A1/UT-A3 knockout mice, and an absence of UT-A3 in UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) and UT-A1/UT-A3 knockout mice. Immunohistochemistry in UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) mice also showed negative UT-A3 staining in kidney and other tissues and positive UT-A1 staining only in the IMCD. Urea permeability in isolated perfused IMCDs showed basal permeability in the UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) mice was similar to levels in wild-type mice, but vasopressin stimulation of urea permeability in wild-type mice was significantly greater (100% increase) than in UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) mice (8% increase). Notably, basal urine osmolalities in both wild-type and UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) mice increased upon overnight water restriction. We conclude that transgenic expression of UT-A1 restores basal urea permeability to the level in wild-type mice but does not restore vasopressin-stimulated levels of urea permeability. This information suggests that transgenic expression of UT-A1 alone in mice lacking UT-A1 and UT-A3 is sufficient to restore urine-concentrating ability. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Antimitochondrial antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of routine measuring of serum drug concentrations and anti-drug antibodies in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients with TNF-α blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laine J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Juha Laine,1 T Sakari Jokiranta,2,3 Kari K Eklund,4,5 Merja Väkeväinen,1 Kari Puolakka6 1Pfizer Oy, Helsinki, 2United Medix Laboratories Ltd, Espoo, 3Research Programs Unit, Immunobiology, 4Department of Rheumatology, University of Helsinki, 5Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, 6Department of Medicine, South Karelia, Finland Abstract: Monitoring of anti-drug antibodies (ADAbs or serum concentrations of biologicals in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis could provide an explanation for a loss of efficacy and help in the choice of subsequent medication. Current clinical practices do not generally include such monitoring of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α blockers on a routine basis. The main aims of this study were to estimate the probabilities of optimal and nonoptimal treatment decisions if infliximab or adalimumab drug trough level (DL and ADAbs are tested or not in rheumatoid arthritis, and to model cost-effectiveness of performing such monitoring on a routine basis. Data on DLs and ADAbs concentrations were obtained in Finland from clinically requested monitoring analyses of 486 and 1,137 samples from patients on adalimumab and infliximab, respectively. DL was within the target range in 42% of samples from adalimumab- and 50.4% of infliximab-treated patients. ADAbs were detected in approximately 20% and 13.5% of samples from adalimumab- and infliximab-treated patients, respectively. ADAbs were found in 52.3% and 41.3% of those with low adalimumab or infliximab DLs, respectively. The monitoring data were incorporated into probabilities for making the optimal treatment decision. Economic impact of clinical decision-making was modeled in a short-term (3–6 months scenario with 100 hypothetical patients. In the model, the combined measurement of DLs and ADAbs was cost-saving compared to the nontesting scenario when the monitoring results affected the treatment decision in at least 2–5 of 100 patients, a proportion which is easily

  18. Decrease by 50% of plasma IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody concentrations within 2 months after start of gluten-free diet in children with celiac disease used as a confirming diagnostic test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Flemming; Hermansen, Mette N; Pedersen, Merete F

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histological examination of small bowel biopsies is normally the gold standard for the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD). The objective of this study was to investigate whether the rate of decreases in elevated plasma IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA-tTG) and/or IgG deamidated...... gliadin peptides antibody (IgG - DGP) concentrations could be used as a confirming test for CD in children on a gluten-free diet (GFD) when biopsy was omitted in the diagnostic process. METHODS: In this retrospective study we compared children (≤18 years old) with a CD-confirming biopsy (n = 16......) to children without a biopsy (n = 18). After initiation of GFD the antibody half-life (the time (T½) when the antibody concentration is 50% decreased) was determined in all children. RESULTS: Children with a biopsy (IgA-tTG, T½ = 1.9 months; IgG - DGP, T½ = 2.2 months) and children without a biopsy (Ig...

  19. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... Another milestone in the history of antibodies was the work of Porter and Edelman ... transgenic animals (Lonberg et al., 1994; Green et al.,. 1994) or .... create and to screen human recombinant antibodies libraries, that is ...

  20. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  1. Elevated Concentrations of Serum Immunoglobulin Free Light Chains in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients in Relation to Disease Activity, Inflammatory Status, B Cell Activity and Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette H Draborg

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the concentration of serum immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients and investigated its association with various disease parameters in order to evaluate the role of FLCs as a potential biomarker in SLE. Furthermore, FLCs' association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV antibodies was examined.Using a nephelometric assay, κFLC and λFLC concentrations were quantified in sera from 45 SLE patients and 40 healthy controls. SLE patients with renal insufficiency were excluded in order to preclude high concentrations of serum FLCs due to decreased clearance.Serum FLC concentrations were significantly elevated in SLE patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.0001 also after adjusting for Ig levels (p<0.0001. The concentration of serum FLCs correlated with a global disease activity (SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI score of the SLE patients (r = 0.399, p = 0.007. Furthermore, concentrations of FLCs correlated with titers of dsDNA antibodies (r = 0.383, p = 0.009, and FLC levels and SLEDAI scores correlated in the anti-dsDNA-positive SLE patients, but not in anti-dsDNA-negative SLE patients. Total immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA concentrations correlated with FLC concentrations and elevated FLC levels were additionally shown to associate with the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein and also with complement consumption determined by low C4 in SLE patients. Collectively, results indicated that elevated serum FLCs reflects increased B cell activity in relation to inflammation. SLE patients had an increased seropositivity of EBV-directed antibodies that did not associate with elevated FLC concentrations. An explanation for this could be that serum FLC concentrations reflect the current EBV activity (reactivation whereas EBV-directed antibodies reflect the extent of previous infection/reactivations.SLE patients have elevated concentrations of serum FLCs that correlate with global disease

  2. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  3. Elevated Concentrations of Serum Immunoglobulin Free Light Chains in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients in Relation to Disease Activity, Inflammatory Status, B Cell Activity and Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draborg, Anette H; Lydolph, Magnus; Westergaard, Marie

    2015-01-01

    , FLCs' association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibodies was examined. METHODS: Using a nephelometric assay, κFLC and λFLC concentrations were quantified in sera from 45 SLE patients and 40 healthy controls. SLE patients with renal insufficiency were excluded in order to preclude high concentrations......OBJECTIVE: In this study, we examined the concentration of serum immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and investigated its association with various disease parameters in order to evaluate the role of FLCs as a potential biomarker in SLE. Furthermore...... of serum FLCs due to decreased clearance. RESULTS: Serum FLC concentrations were significantly elevated in SLE patients compared to healthy controls (pdisease activity (SLE disease activity...

  4. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  5. Accuracy of a point-of-care ELISA test kit for predicting the presence of protective canine parvovirus and canine distemper virus antibody concentrations in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litster, A L; Pressler, B; Volpe, A; Dubovi, E

    2012-08-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) are highly infectious and often fatal diseases with worldwide distributions, and are important population management considerations in animal shelters. A point-of-care ELISA test kit is available to detect serum antibodies to CPV and CDV, and presumptively to predict protective status. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the test compared to CPV hemagglutination inhibition titers and CDV serum neutralization titers determined by a reference laboratory, using sera collected from dogs housed at animal shelters. The ELISA test was used under both field and laboratory conditions and duplicate specimens were processed using an extra wash step. The test kit yielded accurate results (CPV: sensitivity 92.3%, specificity 93.5%; CDV: sensitivity 75.7%, specificity 91.8%) under field conditions. CDV sensitivity was improved by performing the test under laboratory conditions and using an optical density (OD) meter (laboratory performed 94.0%; OD 88.1%). Point-of-care ELISA testing for serum CPV and CDV antibody titers was demonstrated to be a useful tool for determining antibody status when making decisions regarding the need for CPV and/or CDV vaccination and also in animal shelters for population management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cairo conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, A J

    1994-09-03

    The United Nations Conference on Population and Development in Cairo in September, 1994, will evoke criticism of the inability of governments to act quickly enough to avert demographic and environmental crises. Rapid population growth has clear implications for public health. Globally there now occur anthropogenic changes in atmospheric composition, the degradation of fertile lands and ocean fisheries, an accelerating loss of biodiversity, and the social and ecological problems of massive urbanization. In the future, per capita consumption levels will increase in burgeoning populations of developing countries, thus adding to the environmental impacts of overconsuming rich countries. By the end of the decade there will be over six billion people, of whom one half will live in cities. These demographic and environmental trends, if translated into climatic change, regional food shortages, and weakened ecosystems, would adversely affect human health. The World Health Organization is likely to concentrate only on accessible family planning and promotion of health for women and families. Continuing asymmetric child-saving aid, unaccompanied by substantial aid to help mobilize the social and economic resources needed to reduce fertility, may delay the demographic transition in poor countries and potentiate future public health disasters. As a result of recent reductions in fertility, even in Sub-Saharan Africa, average family sizes have been halved. Yet the demographic momentum will double population by 2050. The biosphere is a complex of ecosystems and, if unsustained, it could not fulfill the productive, cleansing, and protective functions on which life depends. The Cairo conference must therefore recognize that sustaining human health is a prime reason for concern about population growth and models of economic development.

  7. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  8. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs) as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 di...

  9. ANA (Antinuclear Antibody Test)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as ratios. For example, the result 1:320 means that one part blood sample was mixed with 320 parts of a diluting ... name "antinuclear". My doctor told me my ANA test is ... normal concentration of these antibodies. This is one of the tools in diagnosing lupus as well ...

  10. Monoclonal antibody-based immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, P; Reischl, U

    1998-01-01

    An immunoassay may be defined as an assay that employs an immunological reagent, usually an antibody, to confer specificity for the ligand being measured. As a corollary to this, the discovery, and subsequent development, of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has greatly expanded the application and use of immunoassays. Polyclonal reagents, with their associated problems of specificity and quality control, have now been largely replaced by readily available MAbs of potential immortality and well-defined specificity and affinity. This has resulted, in the last two decades, in a great expansion in the range of immunoassays available and also a significant improvement in their reproducibility and reliability.

  11. Rapid Isolation of a Single-Chain Antibody against the Cyanobacterial Toxin Microcystin-LR by Phage Display and Its Use in the Immunoaffinity Concentration of Microcystins from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhiney, Jacqui; Drever, Mathew; Lawton, Linda A.; Porter, Andy J.

    2002-01-01

    A naïve (unimmunized) human semisynthetic phage display library was employed to isolate recombinant antibody fragments against the cyanobacterial hepatotoxin microcystin-LR. Selected antibody scFv genes were cloned into a soluble expression vector and expressed in Escherichia coli for characterization against purified microcystin-LR by competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The most sensitive single-chain antibody (scAb) isolated was capable of detecting microcystin-LR at levels below the World Health Organization limit in drinking water (1 μg liter−1) and cross-reacted with three other purified microcystin variants (microcystin-RR, -LW, and -LF) and the related cyanotoxin nodularin. Extracts of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa were assayed by ELISA, and quantifications of microcystins in toxic samples showed good correlation with analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Immobilized scAb was also used to prepare immunoaffinity columns, which were assessed for the ability to concentrate microcystin-LR from water for subsequent analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Anti-microcystin-LR scAb was immobilized on columns via a hexahistidine tag, ensuring maximum exposure of antigen binding sites, and the performance of the columns was evaluated by directly applying 150 ml of distilled water spiked with 4 μg of purified microcystin-LR. The procedure was simple, and a recovery rate of 94% was achieved following elution in 1 ml of 100% methanol. Large-scale, low-cost production of anti-microcystin-LR scAb in E. coli is an exciting prospect for the development of biosensors and on-line monitoring systems for microcystins and will also facilitate a range of immunoaffinity applications for the cleanup and concentration of these toxins from environmental samples. PMID:12406716

  12. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  13. Conference summary: Theory and phoneymenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F. E.

    1998-01-01

    This is a written version of the talk that I gave at the end of the Conference. It concentrates on the status of light flavoured hadrons with emphasis on gluonic excitations. The experimental aspects of the conference are summarized by E. Klempt

  14. The effect of freeze-dried antibody concentrations on its stability in the presence of trehalose and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin: a Box-Behnken statistical design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Homa; Khalili, Fatemeh; Amini, Mohsen; Vatanara, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed at preparation and optimization of stable freeze-dried immunoglobulin G (IgG) applying proper amount of antibody with efficient combination of trehalose and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD). Response surface methodology was employed through a three-factor, three-level Box-Behnken design. Amounts of IgG (X 1 ), trehalose (X 2 ) and HPβCD (X 3 ) were independent variables. Aggregation following process (Y 1 ), after one month at 45 °C (Y 2 ), upon two month at 45 °C (Y 3 ) and beta-sheet content of IgG (Y 4 ) were determined as dependent variables. Results were fitted to quadratic models (except for beta-sheet content), describing the inherent relationship between main factors. Optimized formulation composed of 55.85 mg IgG, 52.51 mg trehalose and 16.01 mg HPβCD was prepared. The calculated responses of the optimized formulation were as follows: Y 1  = 0.19%, Y 2  = 0.78%, Y 3  = 1.88% and Y 4  = 68.60%, respectively. The thermal analysis confirmed the amorphous nature of optimum formulation and the integrity of IgG was shown to be favorably preserved. Validation of the optimization study demonstrated high degree of prognostic ability. The DOE study successfully predicted the optimum values of antibody as well as stabilizers for desirable process and storage stabilization of freeze-dried IgG.

  15. Associations between blood gastrin, ghrelin, leptin, pepsinogen and Ostertagia ostertagi antibody concentrations and voluntary feed intake in calves exposed to a trickle infection with O. ostertagi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, A B; Warren, M; Upjohn, M; Jackson, B; Jones, J; Charlier, J; Fox, M T

    2009-06-10

    Twenty-five, castrated male Holstein-cross calves, between 4 and 5 months of age, weighing 156.5+/-12.2 kg and reared under conditions designed to minimise the risk of parasitic infection, were allocated to one of the five treatment groups on the basis of initial bodyweight. The groups were (1) ad libitum (ad lib) fed controls (ALC); (2) ad lib fed infected (INF) and treated with topical eprinomectin on Day 56; (3) controls pair-fed with the INF group (PFC); (4) ad lib fed controls treated with eprinomectin on Days 0 and 56 (E-ALC) and (5) ad lib fed, infected and treated with eprinomectin on Days 0 and 56 (E-INF). Infection comprised a trickle infection with the equivalent of 10,000 larvae of Ostertagia ostertagi per day from Day 0 to Day 56 and the study concluded on Day 77. Parameters measured throughout the study included: liveweight, feed intake, faecal egg counts; plasma pepsinogen, gastrin, ghrelin and leptin; plasma antibodies to adult O. ostertagi. No significant differences in feed intake or liveweight gain were observed between any of the different groups, a finding thought to result from the high quality of feed offered. Significant differences between the INF and control groups however were observed in faecal egg counts, plasma pepsinogen, gastrin and O. ostertagi antibodies, which were all elevated, and leptin, which was reduced. Values of these parameters for the E-INF group were intermediate between the INF and ALC groups. Plasma ghrelin showed no association with either feed intake or parasitism. Further studies are needed to fully elucidate the roles of various biochemical and neuroendocrine mediators for inappetence in ruminants with parasitic gastroenteritis.

  16. High Concentrations of Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 Detected in Serum from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Be Explained by Non-Specific Antibody Reactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Makoveichuk

    Full Text Available Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4 is suggested to be a master regulator of plasma triglyceride metabolism. Our aim was to study whether the previously reported high levels of ANGPTL4 detected in serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA by ELISA was due to any specific molecular form of this protein (oligomers, monomers or fragments. ANGPTL4 levels were first determined in serum from 68 RA patients and 43 age and sex matched control subjects and the mean values differed by a factor of 5.0. Then, ANGPTL4 was analyzed after size exclusion chromatography (SEC of serum samples. With serum from one of the RA patients with high levels of ANGPTL4, the dominant reactivity was found in fractions corresponding to high-molecular weight proteins. In addition, a minor peak of reactivity eluting late from the column was found both in the patient and in controls. By the use of HeteroBlock®, and by careful selection of antibodies, we documented non-specific reactions for ANGPTL4 in 39% of samples from the RA patients, most likely due to cross-reactivity of the antibodies with rheumatoid factor (RF. The corresponding figure for control subjects was 6.3%. After corrections for non-specific reactions, the mean level of ANGPTL4 in serum from RA patients was still significantly higher than in control individuals (mean levels were 101±62 and 67±39 ng/ml respectively, P = 0.02. We re-analyzed samples from our previously published studies on ANGPL4 levels in patients on hemodialysis and patients with diabetes type 2. These samples did not show false positive reactions. The levels of ANGPTL4 were comparable to those detected previously.

  17. High Concentrations of Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 Detected in Serum from Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Be Explained by Non-Specific Antibody Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoveichuk, Elena; Ruge, Toralph; Nilsson, Solveig; Södergren, Anna; Olivecrona, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is suggested to be a master regulator of plasma triglyceride metabolism. Our aim was to study whether the previously reported high levels of ANGPTL4 detected in serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by ELISA was due to any specific molecular form of this protein (oligomers, monomers or fragments). ANGPTL4 levels were first determined in serum from 68 RA patients and 43 age and sex matched control subjects and the mean values differed by a factor of 5.0. Then, ANGPTL4 was analyzed after size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of serum samples. With serum from one of the RA patients with high levels of ANGPTL4, the dominant reactivity was found in fractions corresponding to high-molecular weight proteins. In addition, a minor peak of reactivity eluting late from the column was found both in the patient and in controls. By the use of HeteroBlock®, and by careful selection of antibodies, we documented non-specific reactions for ANGPTL4 in 39% of samples from the RA patients, most likely due to cross-reactivity of the antibodies with rheumatoid factor (RF). The corresponding figure for control subjects was 6.3%. After corrections for non-specific reactions, the mean level of ANGPTL4 in serum from RA patients was still significantly higher than in control individuals (mean levels were 101±62 and 67±39 ng/ml respectively, P = 0.02). We re-analyzed samples from our previously published studies on ANGPL4 levels in patients on hemodialysis and patients with diabetes type 2. These samples did not show false positive reactions. The levels of ANGPTL4 were comparable to those detected previously.

  18. INTERCARTO CONFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Tikunov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The InterCarto conferences are thematically organized to target one of the most pressing problems of modern geography—creation and use of geographical information systems (GISs as effective tools for achieving sustainable development of territories. Over the years, from 1994 to 2009, 1872 participants from 51 countries and 156 cities, who made 1494 reports, attended the conferences. There were 1508 participants from 49 regions of Russia making 1340 presentations. The conferences hosted 31 different sections, most popular of which were Environmental GIS-Projects: Development and Experience, Sustainable Development and Innovative Projects, GIS: the Theory and Methodology, Projects for Russia and Regions, and GIS-Technologies and Digital Mapping. The next annual InterCarto-InterGIS conference will take place in December 2011. The Russian component of the conference will be held in the Altay Kray followed by another meeting on Bali, Indonesia

  19. Radioimmunoassay method for detection of gonorrhea antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A novel radioimmunoassay for the detection of gonorrhea antibodies in serum is described. A radionuclide is bound to gonorrhea antigens produced by a growth culture. In the presence of gonorrhea antibodies in the serum, an antigen-antibody conjugate is formed, the concentration of which can be measured with conventional radiometric methods. The radioimmunoassay is highly specific

  20. Optimization of elution salt concentration in stepwise elution of protein chromatography using linear gradient elution data. Reducing residual protein A by cation-exchange chromatography in monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kadoya, Toshihiko; Endo, Naomi; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2006-05-05

    Our simple method for optimization of the elution salt concentration in stepwise elution was applied to the actual protein separation system, which involves several difficulties such as detection of the target. As a model separation system, reducing residual protein A by cation-exchange chromatography in human monoclonal antibody (hMab) purification was chosen. We carried out linear gradient elution experiments and obtained the data for the peak salt concentration of hMab and residual protein A, respectively. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was applied to the measurement of the residual protein A. From these data, we calculated the distribution coefficient of the hMab and the residual protein A as a function of salt concentration. The optimal salt concentration of stepwise elution to reduce the residual protein A from the hMab was determined based on the relationship between the distribution coefficient and the salt concentration. Using the optimized condition, we successfully performed the separation, resulting in high recovery of hMab and the elimination of residual protein A.

  1. A single dose of a neuron-binding human monoclonal antibody improves brainstem NAA concentrations, a biomarker for density of spinal cord axons, in a model of progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Watzlawik, Jens O; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-04-29

    Intracerebral infection of susceptible mouse strains with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) results in chronic demyelinating disease with progressive axonal loss and neurologic dysfunction similar to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). We previously showed that as the disease progresses, a marked decrease in brainstem N-acetyl aspartate (NAA; metabolite associated with neuronal integrity) concentrations, reflecting axon health, is measured. We also demonstrated stimulation of neurite outgrowth by a neuron-binding natural human antibody, IgM12. Treatment with either the serum-derived or recombinant human immunoglobulin M 12 (HIgM12) preserved functional motor activity in the TMEV model. In this study, we examined IgM-mediated changes in brainstem NAA concentrations and central nervous system (CNS) pathology. (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) showed that treatment with HIgM12 significantly increased brainstem NAA concentrations compared to controls in TMEV-infected mice. Pathologic analysis demonstrated a significant preservation of axons in the spinal cord of animals treated with HIgM12. This study links drug efficacy of slowing deficits with axon preservation and NAA concentrations in the brainstem in a model of progressive MS. HIgM12-mediated changes of NAA concentrations in the brainstem are a surrogate marker of axon injury/preservation throughout the spinal cord. This study provides proof-of-concept that a neuron-reactive human IgM can be therapeutic and provides a biomarker for clinical trials.

  2. Stratification of Antibody-Positive Subjects by Antibody Level Reveals an Impact of Immunogenicity on Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A.; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J.; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic....

  3. Radioimmunoassay with heterologous antibody (hetero-antibody RIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Atsushi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Itoh, Zen; Wakabayashi, Katsumi

    1991-01-01

    To develop a homologous radioimmunoassay (RIA) for a hormone of a small or rare animal often meets difficulty in collecting a large amount of purified antigen required for antibody production. On the other hand, to employ a heterologous RIA to estimate the hormone often gives poor sensitivity. To overcome this difficulty, a 'hetero-antibody' RIA was studied. In a hetero-antibody RIA system, a purified preparation of a hormone is used for radioiodination and standardization and a heterologous antibody to the hormone is used for the first antibody. Canine motilin and rat LH were selected as examples, and anti-porcine motilin and anti-hCG, anti-hCGβ or anti-ovine LHβ was used as the heterologous antibody. The sensitivities of the hetero-antibody RIAs were much higher than those of heterologous RIAs in any case, showing that these hetero-antibody RIA systems were suitable for practical use. To clarify the principle of hetero-antibody RIA, antiserum to porcine motilin was fractionated on an affinity column where canine motilin was immobilized. The fraction bound had greater constants of affinity with both porcine and canine motilins than the rest of the antibody fractions. This fraction also reacted with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence common to porcine and canine motilins in a competitive binding test with labeled canine motilin. These results suggest that an antibody population having high affinity and cross-reactivity is present in polyclonal antiserum and indicate that the population can be used in hetero-antibody RIA at an appropriate concentration. (author)

  4. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  5. Serum Concentration of Anti-TNF Antibodies, Adverse Effects and Quality of Life in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Remission on Maintenance Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandse, Johannan F.; Vos, Laura M. C.; Jansen, Jeroen; Schakel, Toos; Ponsioen, Cyriel I. J.; van den Brink, Gijs R.; D'Haens, Geert R.; Löwenberg, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: High serum concentrations of infliximab [IFX] and adalimumab [ADA] may be associated with adverse effects in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]. We aimed to investigate whether high anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] trough levels [TLs] were associated with toxicity

  6. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    biological processes and is intended to catalyze a reaction for which no real enzyme is ... the reaction. In order to enhance the rates of chemical reactions, enzymes, ..... of such antibodies has already been exploited in the production of a biosensor. ..... tant to the pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries for the synthesis ...

  7. Prevalence of IgG antibodies to human parvovirus B19 in haemophilia children treated with recombinant factor (F)VIII only or with at least one plasma-derived FVIII or FIX concentrate: results from the French haemophilia cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboulaud, Valérie; Parquet, Armelle; Tahiri, Cedric; Claeyssens, Ségolène; Potard, Valérie; Faradji, Albert; Peynet, Jocelyne; Costagliola, Dominique

    2002-02-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19) has been transmitted by some brands of virally attenuated plasma-derived factor VIII (FVIII) or IX (FIX) concentrates. To quantify the differences of human parvovirus B19 risk transmission between albumin-stabilized recombinant factor and plasma-derived factor, we studied the prevalence of IgG antibodies to B19 (anti-B19) in 193 haemophiliac children between 1 and 6-years of age who had previously been treated with albumin-stabilized recombinant FVIII only (n = 104), and in children previously treated with solvent/detergent high-purity non-immunopurified and non-nanofiltered FVIII or IX concentrates (n = 89). Association between the prevalence of anti-B19 and the treatment group was analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Age, severity and type of haemophilia, number of cumulative days of exposure to factor VIII or IX, previous history of red blood cells or plasma transfusion were considered as potential confounding variables. A higher prevalence of anti-B19 was found in children previously treated with solvent/detergent high-purity non-immunopurified and non-nanofiltered FVIII or IX concentrates than in children treated with albumin- stabilized recombinant FVIII only (OR: 22.3; CI: 7.9-62.8), independently of the other factors studied.

  8. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; ...

  9. Stratification of antibody-positive subjects by antibody level reveals an impact of immunogenicity on pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic. The antibody responses displayed a wide range of relative concentrations (30 ng/mL to >13 μg/mL) and peaked at various times during the study. To evaluate the impact of immunogenicity on PK, AMG 317 concentration data were analyzed following stratification by dose group, time point, antibody status (positive or negative), and antibody level (relative concentration). With dose group as a stratifying variable, a moderate reduction in AMG 317 levels (AMG 317 levels was revealed when antibody data was stratified by both time point and antibody level. In general, high ADA concentrations (>500 ng/mL) and later time points (week 12) were associated with significantly (up to 97%) lower trough AMG 317 concentrations. The use of quasi-quantitative antibody data and appropriate statistical methods was critical for the most comprehensive evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity on PK.

  10. Mendel conference

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected accepted papers of Mendel conference that has been held in Brno, Czech Republic in June 2015. The book contents three chapters which represent recent advances in soft computing including intelligent image processing and bio-inspired robotics.: Chapter 1: Evolutionary Computing, and Swarm intelligence, Chapter 2: Neural Networks, Self-organization, and Machine Learning, and Chapter3: Intelligent Image Processing, and Bio-inspired Robotics. The Mendel conference was established in 1995, and it carries the name of the scientist and Augustinian priest Gregor J. Mendel who discovered the famous Laws of Heredity. In 2015 we are commemorating 150 years since Mendel's lectures, which he presented in Brno on February and March 1865. The main aim of the conference was to create a periodical possibility for students, academics and researchers to exchange their ideas and novel research methods.  .

  11. Berkeley Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-10-15

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved.

  12. Berkeley Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    To a regular observer at annual international meetings, progress in particle physics from one year to the next sometimes might seem ponderously slow. But shift the timescale and the result is startling. Opening his summary of the 1986 International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Berkeley, California, from 16-23 July, Steve Weinberg first recalled the 1966 Conference, also held in Berkeley. Then the preoccupations were current algebra, hadron resonances and the interpretation of scattering in terms of Regge poles, and the theory of weak interactions. Physics certainly has moved

  13. Antibody-Based Immunotoxins for the Treatment of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nurit Becker; Itai Benhar

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based immunotoxins comprise an important group in targeted cancer therapeutics. These chimeric proteins are a form of biological guided missiles that combine a targeting moiety with a potent effector molecule. The targeting moiety is mostly a monoclonal antibody (MAb) or a recombinant antibody-based fragment that confers target specificity to the immunotoxin. The effector domain is a potent protein toxin of bacterial or plant origin, which, following binding to the target cells, unde...

  14. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2016-02-29

    Feb 29, 2016 ... In addition, there are persistent problems with leadership and planning, vaccine stock management, supply chain capacity and quality, provider-parent communication, and financial sustainability. The conference delegates agreed to move from talking to taking concrete actions around children's health, and ...

  15. Glasgow conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-10-15

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge.

  16. Conference summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.J.

    1975-10-01

    A brief review is given of the main results presented at the International Conference on Heavy Ion Sources, October 27--30, 1975. The sections are as follows: highlights, general observations, fundamental processes in sources, positive ion sources, negative ion sources, beam formation and emittance measurements, stripping, accelerators and experiments, and future prospects

  17. Lisbon Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Although no major physics discoveries were announced, the European Physical Society's International Conference on High Energy Physics, held in Lisbon from 9-15 July, was significant in that it showed the emerging pattern of physics for the 1980s

  18. Conference report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    Bloomberg Philanthropies. The conference theme “from research to implementation” emphasised the importance of connecting knowledge around violence with injury prevention, while stressing the need to address the multitude of transnational public health challenges. In speaking to this theme, the. Tampere Declaration ...

  19. Conference Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Richard

    1982-01-01

    Presents an overview of the management planning technique known as Break Even Analysis and outlines its use as a tool in financial planning for organizations intending to conduct or sponsor a conference, seminar, or workshop. Three figures illustrating Break Even Analysis concepts and a Break Even Analysis worksheet are included. (JL)

  20. Conference proceedings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-08-07

    Aug 7, 2015 ... Conference was organized in June 2-6, 2014 at the Yaoundé Mont Febe Hotel, in Cameroon. Under the theme«Practice .... while the implementation of family planning in African HIV programs will favor safe contraception ... equipment. The WHO-stepwise approach for the global strategy for the prevention ...

  1. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The papers presented at this conference cover the fields of thermalhydraulics, nuclear plant design and operation, licensing, decontamination, restoration and dismantling of nuclear power facilities, services to the nuclear industry, new applications of nuclear technology, reactor physics and fuel cycles, accelerator-breeders, fusion research and lasers

  2. Viscosity of high concentration protein formulations of monoclonal antibodies of the IgG1 and IgG4 subclass - Prediction of viscosity through protein-protein interaction measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Martin S; Kalonia, Devendra S; Parshad, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the relation between protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and solution viscosity at high protein concentration using three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), two of the IgG4 subclass and one of the IgG1 subclass. A range of methods was used to quantify the PPI...... low or high protein concentration determined using DLS. The PPI measurements were correlated with solution viscosity (measured by DLS using polystyrene nanospheres and ultrasonic shear rheology) as a function of pH (4-9) and ionic strength (10, 50 and 150mM). Our measurements showed that the highest...... solution viscosity was observed under conditions with the most negative kD, the highest apparent radius and the lowest net charge. An increase in ionic strength resulted in a change in the nature of the PPI at low pH from repulsive to attractive. In the neutral to alkaline pH region the mAbs behaved...

  3. BEAUTY'99 Conference Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerola, Paula

    2000-01-01

    Investigations of B hadrons are expected to break new ground in measuring CP-violation effects. This series of BEAUTY conferences, originating from the 1993 conference in Liblice, has contributed significantly in developing ideas of CP-violation measurements using B hadrons and formulating and comparing critically the B-physics experiments. In the '99 conference in Bled we saw the ripening of the field and the first fruit emerging - Tevatron have produced beautiful B-physics results and more are expected to come with the next run, while the B-physics experiments at DESY, SLAC and KEK are starting their operation. The longer-term projects at LHC and Tevatron have taken their shape and detailed prototyping work is going on. Meanwhile, on the phenomenological side, there has been impressive theoretical progress in understanding deeper the 'standard' measurements and proposing new signatures. In this summary, I will highlight the status of the field as presented in the conference, concentrating on signatures, experiments and R and D programmes

  4. Refolding Technologies for Antibody Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Arakawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Refolding is one of the production technologies for pharmaceutical grade antibody fragments. Detergents and denaturants are primarily used to solubilize the insoluble proteins. The solubilized and denatured proteins are refolded by reducing the concentration of the denaturants or detergents. Several refolding technologies have been used for antibody fragments, comprising dilution, dialysis, solid phase solvent exchange and size exclusion chromatography, as reviewed here. Aggregation suppressor or folding-assisting agents, including arginine hydrochloride, ionic liquids and detergents or denaturants at low concentrations, are included in the refolding solvent to enhance refolding yield.

  5. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    National and international aspects of climate change were the central concern of this conference organized by the Alliance for Responsible Environmental Alternatives (AREA). AREA is a coalition of industry, labour and municipalities from across Canada which was created to reflect the views and represent the interests of Canadians in the Climate Change Debate. Ways and means of optimizing Canada's response to the Global Climate Change Challenge were discussed. Discussions emphasized issues regarding the effectiveness of voluntary mechanisms to reduce greenhouse gases, as opposed to government-mandated actions for achieving climate change targets. The issue of how a differentiated system for emission reduction targets and timetables can be implemented was also debated. The economic implications of climate change were outlined. Canada's national agenda and the likely outcomes of the Conference of Parties (COP 4) in Buenos Aires also received much attention. tabs., figs

  6. SIGEF Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Terceño-Gómez, Antonio; Ferrer-Comalat, Joan; Merigó-Lindahl, José; Linares-Mustarós, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of selected papers presented at the SIGEF conference, held at the Faculty of Economics and Business of the University of Girona (Spain), 06-08 July, 2015. This edition of the conference has been presented with the slogan “Scientific methods for the treatment of uncertainty in social sciences”. There are different ways for dealing with uncertainty in management. The book focuses on soft computing theories and their role in assessing uncertainty in a complex world. It gives a comprehensive overview of quantitative management topics and discusses some of the most recent developments in all the areas of business and management in soft computing including Decision Making, Expert Systems and Forgotten Effects Theory, Forecasting Models, Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy Sets, Modelling and Simulation Techniques, Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms and Optimization and Control. The book might be of great interest for anyone working in the area of management and business economics and might be es...

  7. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  8. Applications of recombinant antibodies in plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Angelika; Torrance, Lesley

    2002-09-01

    Summary Advances in molecular biology have made it possible to produce antibody fragments comprising the binding domains of antibody molecules in diverse heterologous systems, such as Escherichia coli, insect cells, or plants. Antibody fragments specific for a wide range of antigens, including plant pathogens, have been obtained by cloning V-genes from lymphoid tissue, or by selection from large naive phage display libraries, thus avoiding the need for immunization. The antibody fragments have been expressed as fusion proteins to create different functional molecules, and fully recombinant assays have been devised to detect plant viruses. The defined binding properties and unlimited cheap supply of antibody fusion proteins make them useful components of standardized immunoassays. The expression of antibody fragments in plants was shown to confer resistance to several plant pathogens. However, the antibodies usually only slowed the progress of infection and durable 'plantibody' resistance has yet to be demonstrated. In future, it is anticipated that antibody fragments from large libraries will be essential tools in high-throughput approaches to post-genomics research, such as the assignment of gene function, characterization of spatio-temporal patterns of protein expression, and elucidation of protein-protein interactions.

  9. Glasgow conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    1994-01-01

    The biennial 'Rochester' International Conferences on High Energy Physics which tick the rhythm of high energy physics progress reflect the dominance of the 'Standard Model' - the picture of electroweak and quark/gluon interactions in a simple framework of six weaklyinteracting particles (leptons) and six quarks. Despite its limited intellectual appeal, after a decade of intense probing the Standard Model still refuses to budge

  10. Washington Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981 Particle Accelerator Conference was held in Washington from 11-13 March. It was the ninth in the series of meetings organized in the USA which differ from the 'International' meetings in their coverage of the full range of accelerator engineering and technology, including applications outside e field of high energy physics. The Conference took place under the cloud of further budget cuts for Fiscal Year 1982 in the USA which the Department of Energy has applied in line with the financial policy of the new administration. Coming on top of many years of budget trimming which have reduced the number of high energy physics Laboratories funded by the DOE to three (Brookhaven, Fermilab, Stanford - Cornell is funded by the National Science Foundation) and reduced the exploitation of these Laboratories to less than half of their potential, the new cuts did not exactly help to boost morale. Nevertheless, the huge amount of tailed work in accelerator physics and technology which was presented at the Conference showed how alive the field is

  11. Influence of airborne pollen counts and length of pollen season of selected allergenic plants on the concentration of sIgE antibodies on the population of Bratislava, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Ščevková

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective. The association between airborne pollen counts or duration of pollen season and allergy symptoms is not always distinguished. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between pollen exposure (annual total pollen quantity and main pollen season length of selected allergenic plants in the atmosphere of Bratislava, and concentration of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE in serum of patients with seasonal allergy during 2002–2003. Materials and methods. The concentration of pollen was monitored by a Burkard volumetric pollen trap. At the same time, 198 pollen allergic patients were testing to determine the values of sIgE antibodies against selected pollen allergens; a panel of 8 purified allergens was used. Results. The highest percentages of sensitization were detected for Poaceae and [i]Ambrosia[/i] pollen allergens. The most abundant airborne pollen types were Urticaceae, [i]Betula[/i], [i]Populus[/i], Fraxinus, Pinus and Poaceae. The length of the pollen season varied. The longest pollen season was that of the [i]Plantago[/i] – 105 days, and the shortest, [i]Corylus[/i] – 20 days. A significant correlation was found between annual total pollen quantity and median sIgE values, especially in 2002. Conclusions. A strong and significant positive correlation was observed between pollen counts, excluding [i]Betula[/i], and sIgE levels in both analysed years. The correlation was weaker and negative in the case of length of pollen season and sIgE values.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies directed to E1 glycoprotein of rubella virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umino, Y.; Sato, A.; Katow, S.; Matsuno, T.; Sugiura, A.

    1985-01-01

    We have prepared four monoclonal antibodies to rubella virus E1 glycoprotein. Three nonoverlapping antigenic sites were delineated on E1 protein by competitive binding assays. Antibodies binding to one site were characterized by high hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer but poor neutralizing activity. The addition of antiglobulin conferred neutralizing activity. Antibodies directed to two other antigenic sites had modest hemolysis inhibition but little or no HI and neutralizing activities. The addition of antiglobulin markedly augmented HI activity but had little effect on neutralizing activity. Epitopes defined by three antibodies were conserved among four rubella virus strains examined. (Author)

  13. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The 113 papers presented at this conference covered the areas of 1) fuel design, development and production; 2) nuclear plant safety; 3) nuclear instrumentation; 4) public and regulatory matters; 5) developments and opportunities in fusion; 6) fuel behaviour under normal operating conditions; 7) nuclear plant design and operations; 8) materials science and technology; 9) nuclear power issues; 10) fusion technology; 11) fuel behaviour under accident conditions; 12) large scale fuel channel replacement programs; 13) thermalhydraulics experimental studies; 14) reactor physics and analysis; 15) applications of accelerators; 16) fission product release and severe fuel damage under accident conditions; 17) thermalhydraulics modeling and assessments; 18) waste management and the environment; and 20) new reactor concepts

  14. NATO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lynn, W

    1975-01-01

    The contents of this volume involve selection, emendation and up-dating of papers presented at the NATO Conference "Mathe­ matical Analysis of Decision problems in Ecology" in Istanbul, Turkey, July 9-13, 1973. It was sponsored by the System Sciences Division of NATO directed by Dr. B. Bayraktar with local arrange­ ments administered by Dr. Ilhami Karayalcin, professor of the Department of Industrial Engineering at the Technical University of Istanbul. It was organized by A. Charnes, University professor across the University of Texas System, and Walter R.Lynn, Di­ rector of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell Unjversity. The objective of the conference was to bring together a group of leading researchers from the major sciences involved in eco­ logical problems and to present the current state of progress in research of a mathematical nature which might assist in the solu­ tion of these problems. Although their presentations are not herein recorded, the key­ note address of Dr....

  15. EGC Conferences

    CERN Document Server

    Ritschard, Gilbert; Pinaud, Bruno; Venturini, Gilles; Zighed, Djamel; Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Management

    This book is a collection of representative and novel works done in Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Clustering and Classification that were originally presented in French at the EGC'2012 Conference held in Bordeaux, France, on January 2012. This conference was the 12th edition of this event, which takes place each year and which is now successful and well-known in the French-speaking community. This community was structured in 2003 by the foundation of the French-speaking EGC society (EGC in French stands for ``Extraction et Gestion des Connaissances'' and means ``Knowledge Discovery and Management'', or KDM). This book is intended to be read by all researchers interested in these fields, including PhD or MSc students, and researchers from public or private laboratories. It concerns both theoretical and practical aspects of KDM. The book is structured in two parts called ``Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining'' and ``Classification and Feature Extraction or Selection''. The first part (6 chapters) deals with...

  16. Munich conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-10-15

    'The Standard Model has survived impact for another year', declared Don Perkins of Oxford, summarizing the 24th International Conference on High Energy Physics held in Munich from 4-10 August. 'But is this a triumph or a frustration for physics?' he added. The twin pillars of the Standard Model, the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, and the field theory (quantum chromodynamics) of the quark-gluon interactions responsible for the strong nuclear force, have not trembled since the electroweak unification went to the textbooks in 1983, but from time to time small cracks have appeared which might have gone on to shake the theory severely, if not undermine it. Major conference summarizers have got used to singing the praises of the Standard Model, but this year at Munich even detailed examination failed to reveal any serious cracks, while looking deeper into physics even some anomalous results hinting at gaps in understanding have either gone away or have diminished credibility.

  17. Munich conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    'The Standard Model has survived impact for another year', declared Don Perkins of Oxford, summarizing the 24th International Conference on High Energy Physics held in Munich from 4-10 August. 'But is this a triumph or a frustration for physics?' he added. The twin pillars of the Standard Model, the electroweak unification of electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force, and the field theory (quantum chromodynamics) of the quark-gluon interactions responsible for the strong nuclear force, have not trembled since the electroweak unification went to the textbooks in 1983, but from time to time small cracks have appeared which might have gone on to shake the theory severely, if not undermine it. Major conference summarizers have got used to singing the praises of the Standard Model, but this year at Munich even detailed examination failed to reveal any serious cracks, while looking deeper into physics even some anomalous results hinting at gaps in understanding have either gone away or have diminished credibility

  18. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics 2016: The Antibody Society's annual meeting, December 11-15, 2016, San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrick, James W; Alfenito, Mark R; Scott, Jamie K; Parren, Paul W H I; Burton, Dennis R; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Lemere, Cynthia A; Messer, Anne; Huston, James S; Carter, Paul J; Veldman, Trudi; Chester, Kerry A; Schuurman, Janine; Adams, Gregory P; Reichert, Janice M

    Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the largest meeting devoted to antibody science and technology and the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in San Diego, CA on December 11-15, 2016. Each of 14 sessions will include six presentations by leading industry and academic experts. In this meeting preview, the session chairs discuss the relevance of their topics to current and future antibody therapeutics development. Session topics include bispecifics and designer polyclonal antibodies; antibodies for neurodegenerative diseases; the interface between passive and active immunotherapy; antibodies for non-cancer indications; novel antibody display, selection and screening technologies; novel checkpoint modulators / immuno-oncology; engineering antibodies for T-cell therapy; novel engineering strategies to enhance antibody functions; and the biological Impact of Fc receptor engagement. The meeting will open with keynote speakers Dennis R. Burton (The Scripps Research Institute), who will review progress toward a neutralizing antibody-based HIV vaccine; Olivera J. Finn, (University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine), who will discuss prophylactic cancer vaccines as a source of therapeutic antibodies; and Paul Richardson (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute), who will provide a clinical update on daratumumab for multiple myeloma. In a featured presentation, a representative of the World Health Organization's INN expert group will provide a perspective on antibody naming. "Antibodies to watch in 2017" and progress on The Antibody Society's 2016 initiatives will be presented during the Society's special session. In addition, two pre-conference workshops covering ways to accelerate antibody drugs to the clinic and the applications of next-generation sequencing in antibody discovery and engineering will be held on Sunday December 11, 2016.

  19. Monoclonal antibody hapten radiopharmaceutical delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, D.A.; McTigue, M.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred μg of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CHA255 with a binding constant Kb of 4 x 10 9 was complexed with indium-111 labelled BLEDTA II, BLEDTA IV, benzyl EDTA, and an EDTA conjugate of Fab. The 24-h tumour and organ distribution of BALB/c mice bearing KHJJ tumours was studied for each compound alone, the antibody complex, and 3 h following a chelate chase of the antibody complex. Whole body biological half-life was measured for 7 days with and without a chelate chase for each antibody complex. The 24-h whole body counts dropped 20 to 60% and blood concentration fell over 89% within 3 h of administering the chelate chase. Theoretical equivalent human organ doses were calculated from the 24-h organ concentrations, effective half-life, and MIRD 11 S values (absorbed dose per cumulated activity). Liver and spleen were the target organs, with the dose ranging from 0.50 to 3.91 rads mCi -1 . The reduction in organ radiation dose varied up to 95% following the chelate chase. Rapid selective renal clearance of chelate labelled radiopharmaceuticals by competitive inhibition (chelate chase) of their reversible binding to monoclonal antibodies enhances tumour imaging and improves the radiation dosimetry. (author)

  20. Title - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited)

    OpenAIRE

    Lohrey, MC; Lawrence, AS

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited) "Notes" - EFARS - Conference (Uninvited) In preparation (Publication status) Yes, full paperYes, abstract onlyNo (Peer reviewed?) "Add a comment" - EFARS - Conference - Uninvited

  1. Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This volume contains the unedited proceedings of the Second Annual Conference on Managing Electricity Price Volatility. There were a total of eleven papers presented, dealing with a variety of issues affecting price volatility. Subjects treated included: new power generation development in Alberta; an analysis of electricity supply and demand to predict future price volatility; the effect of government intervention in the Alberta electricity market; risk management in volatile energy markets; an analysis of Alberta's capacity to supply its own internal electric power needs; the impact of increased electricity import and export capacity on price fluctuation in Alberta; improving market liquidity in Alberta; using weather derivatives to offset price risk; the impact of natural gas prices on electricity price volatility; capitalizing on advancements in online trading; and strategies for businesses to keep operating through times of price volatility. In most cases only overhead viewgraphs are available

  2. MUSME Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Eusebio

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of MUSME 2014, held at Huatulco in Oaxaca, Mexico, October 2014. Topics include analysis and synthesis of mechanisms; dynamics of multibody systems; design algorithms for mechatronic systems; simulation procedures and results; prototypes and their performance; robots and micromachines; experimental validations; theory of mechatronic simulation; mechatronic systems; and control of mechatronic systems. The MUSME symposium on Multibody Systems and Mechatronics was held under the auspices of IFToMM, the International Federation for Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science, and FeIbIM, the Iberoamerican Federation of Mechanical Engineering. Since the first symposium in 2002, MUSME events have been characterised by the way they stimulate the integration between the various mechatronics and multibody systems dynamics disciplines, present a forum for facilitating contacts among researchers and students mainly in South American countries, and serve as a joint conference for the ...

  3. Antibody-mediated Prevention of Fusarium Mycotoxins in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cai Liao

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium mycotoxins directly accumulated in grains during the infection of wheat and other cereal crops by Fusarium head blight (FHB pathogens are detrimental to humans and domesticated animals. Prevention of the mycotoxins via the development of FHB-resistant varieties has been a challenge due to the scarcity of natural resistance against FHB pathogens. Various antibodies specific to Fusarium fungi and mycotoxins are widely used in immunoassays and antibody-mediated resistance in planta against Fusarium pathogens has been demonstrated. Antibodies fused to antifungal proteins have been shown to confer a very significantly enhanced Fusarium resistance in transgenic plants. Thus, antibody fusions hold great promise as an effective tool for the prevention of mycotoxin contaminations in cereal grains. This review highlights the utilization of protective antibodies derived from phage display to increase endogenous resistance of wheat to FHB pathogens and consequently to reduce mycotoxins in field. The role played by Fusarium-specific antibody in the resistance is also discussed.

  4. Conference summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Tim [Inta Communication Limited for European Service Network/ DG Research, Trillium House, 32 New Street, St. Neots, Cambridge PE19 1AJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The summaries were derived from presentations, interviews and discussions at the conference. The summaries are given at two levels, overall for the conference and for specific sessions as follows: 1) Overall Conference: 'A Sound Scientific Basis for Serious Decisions; 2) Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues: 'Promoting Safety and Protecting Society'; 3) Session on P and T: 'Partitioning and Transmutation: A Technical Fix or Technical Training?'; 4) Sessions on Geological Disposal and Research Networking: 'No Technical Barriers to Geological Disposal'. First an overall summary of Euradwaste '04 is presented. Significant progress was made on the technical and scientific basis for geological disposal of radioactive waste during the European Commission's Fifth EURATOM Framework Programme for Research (FP5). Deep geological disposal is technically feasible now and can demonstrate the guarantees of long-term isolation and protection of the public. In parallel, socio-political studies have produced methodologies for constructive dialogue with potential host communities that reflect the honesty and openness expected by a democratic society. A harmonized legislative framework for nuclear safety and waste disposal across the enlarged European Union is currently being discussed. Disposal in deep (> 300 metre) geological repositories, the favoured strategy in Europe for long-lived high-level radioactive waste, is now possible. The Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues are summarized as follows. The opening day of Euradwaste '04 focused on European Commission policy, including the proposed Directives on disposal of radioactive waste and nuclear safety and socio-political aspects including governance and decision making, public perception/acceptance of waste disposal and its sustainability. A decision on the proposed package will now be made after Union enlargement. Public agreement on the siting of

  5. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology.

  6. Conference Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    A total of 18 papers were presented at the 2003 Annual Executive Conference of the Canadian Gas Association held at St. Andrews, NB, from June 25th to June 28th. Titles of the presentations were as follows: (1) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Pierre Marcel Desjardins; (2) 'Positioning natural gas in a transforming world' by Jean-Paul Theoret; (3) 'Perceptions of natural gas' by Noel Sampson; (4) 'Energy efficiency as an opportunity for the natural gas industry' by Peter Love; (5) 'Natural gas R and D - NRCan perspective' by Graham R. Campbell; (6) 'Impact of earned media on corporate perceptions in the gas industry' by Michael Coates; (7) 'Moving forward with an initiative for natural gas technology innovation' by Emmanuel Morin; (8) 'Natural gas R and D - No more dodging the issue' by Chuck Szmurlo; (9) 'Meeting the technology needs of the gas industry and the gas consumer' by Stanley S. Borys; (10) 'Market signals' by John Wellard; (11) 'Future sources of Canadian natural gas' by Rick Hyndman; (12) 'The state of supply: Northeast U.S. perspective' by Tom Kiley; (13) 'AGA's priorities and perspectives' by Dick Reiten; (14) 'Global energy issues: Recent development in policy and business' by Gerald Doucet; (15) 'Keeping the distribution cart behind the horse: Why finding more offshore gas is much more important than completing the natural gas grid, including for New Brunswick' by Brian Lee Crowley; (16) 'Environmental opportunities and challenges for the gas industry' by Manfred Klein; (17) 'The potential for natural gas demand destruction' by Timothy Partridge; and (18) 'Pushing the envelope on gas supply' by Roland R. George. In most instances only speaking notes and view graphs are available

  7. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  8. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  9. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood of ...

  10. Nuclear medicine: Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Sakahara, H.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Torizuka, K.; Yokoyama, A.

    1986-01-01

    Antitumor monoclonal antibody was successfully labeled with Tc-99m by using dithiosemicarbazone (DTS) as a bifunctional chelating agent. In the first step, DTS was coupled to antibody without loss of immunoreactivity; the compound then efficiently formed a neutral 1:1 chelate with pentavalent or tetravalent Tc-99m. Imaging with Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody to human osteosarcoma (OST-7) clearly displayed a small tumor in nude mice at 6 and 24 hours after intravenous administration. The tumor-to-blood ratio of the Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody was higher than that of a radioiodinated antibody and similar to that of an In-111-labeled antibody. Thus, conjugation of DTS to monoclonal antibody followed by radiometalation is a simple and efficient method of preparing Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody

  11. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  12. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  13. Hepatitis A virus antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.; Kselikova, M.; Urbankova, J.

    1980-01-01

    A description is presented of a radioimmunoassay designed to prove the presence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus (HA Ab, anti-Ha) using an Abbott HAVAB set. This proof as well as the proof of the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis B virus is based on competition between a normal antibody against hepatitis A virus and a 125 I-labelled antibody for the binding sites of a specific antigen spread all over the surface of a tiny ball; this is then indirect proof of the antibody under investigation. The method is described of reading the results from the number of impulses per 60 seconds: the higher the titre of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in the serum examined, the lower the activity of the specimen concerned. The rate is reported of incidence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in a total of 68 convalescents after hepatitis A; the antibody was found in 94.1%. The immunoglobulin made from the convalescents' plasma showed the presence of antibodies in dilutions as high as 1:250 000 while the comparable ratio for normal immunoglobulin Norga was only 1:2500. Differences are discussed in the time incidence of the antibodies against the hepatitis A virus, the antibodies against the surface antigen of hepatitis B, and the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis V virus. (author)

  14. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  15. Monoclonal antibodies: potential role in radiation therapy and oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Specificity, which is a hallmark of the immune system, will be used in radiation oncology in both diagnosis and therapy through the application of radiolabelled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antigenic specificities, antibody preparations, and the tumor as a target for radiolabelled antibody is reviewed. Several clinical situations, i.e. single tumor cell suspensions, intraperitoneal single cells and masses, and solid tumors are reviewed in regard to both immune antibody targeting and specific differences between tumors in these regions. The concentration of tumor associated antigens is introductory to radiolabelled antibodies in diagnosis. In the radiation therapy of solid tumors, data regarding tumor dose, tumor effective half-life, varied antibody preparations, and the use of radiolabelled antibody as a method of tumor implantation is discussed using antiferritin 131 I-IgG as a model in hepatoma. The theoretical applications of monoclonal antibody integrated in cancer therapy are then presented as a new goal for future development

  16. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  17. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  18. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  19. The dog that did not bark: malaria vaccines without antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heppner, D.G.; Schwenk, R.J.; Arnot, D.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Luty, A.J.F.

    2007-01-01

    To date, the only pre-blood stage vaccine to confer protection against malaria in field trials elicits both antigen-specific antibody and T-cell responses. Recent clinical trials of new heterologous prime-boost malaria vaccine regimens using DNA, fowlpox or MVA, have chiefly elicited T-cell

  20. INFCE plenary conference documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document consists of the reports to the First INFCE Plenary Conference (November 1978) by the Working Groups a Plenary Conference of its actions and decisions, the Communique of the Final INFCE Plenary Conference (February 1980), and a list of all documents in the IAEA depository for INFCE

  1. Conferences are like swans

    OpenAIRE

    Corker, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Chris Corker was the lead on bringing the 2011 Higher Education Research Scholarship Group Conference to fruition, both in the months preceding the event and on the day. In this viewpoint, Chris shares his experiences of conference administration and delivery, and explores how conferences and swans have more in common that you would imagine.

  2. COAL Conference Poster

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Taylor Alexander; McGibbney, Lewis John

    2017-01-01

    COAL Conference Poster This archive contains the COAL conference poster for the AGU Fall Meeting 2017 by Taylor Alexander Brown. The Inkscape SVG source is available at https://github.com/capstone-coal/coal-conference-poster/ under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license.

  3. International Conference on Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    OMICS International, (conference series) the World Class Open Access Publisher and Scientific Event Organizer is hosting “International Conference on physics” which is going to be the biggest conference dedicated to Physics. The theme “Highlighting innovations and challenges in the field of Physics” and it features a three day conference addressing the major breakthroughs, challenges and the solutions adopted. The conference will be held during June 27-29, 2016 at New Orleans, USA. Will be published in: http://physics.conferenceseries.com/

  4. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    The typical conference consists of a series of PowerPoint presentations that tend to render participants passive. Students of learning have long abandoned the transfer model that underlies such one-way communication. We propose an al-ternative theory of conferences that sees them as a forum...... for learning, mutual inspiration and human flourishing. We offer five design principles that specify how conferences may engage participants more and hence increase their learning. In the research-and-development effort reported here, our team collaborated with conference organizers in Denmark to introduce...... and facilitate a variety of simple learning techniques at thirty one- and two-day conferences of up to 300 participants each. We present ten of these techniques and data evaluating them. We conclude that if conference organizers allocate a fraction of the total conference time to facilitated processes...

  5. The effect of immunomodulators on the immunogenicity of TNF-blocking therapeutic monoclonal antibodies: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krieckaert, C.L.; Bartelds, G.M.; Lems, W.F.; Wolbink, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have revolutionized the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. Immunogenicity against these antibodies has been shown to be clinically important: it is associated with shorter response duration because of diminishing concentrations in the blood and with

  6. AINSE's 40th anniversary conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Highlights of 40 years of activity of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) were the main focus of this conference. Topics covered include nuclear physics, plasma physics, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, neutron diffraction, nuclear techniques of analysis and other relevant aspects of nuclear science and technology. The conference handbook contains the summaries of the 78 papers and posters presented and the list of participants

  7. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  8. Expression of recombinant Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André eFrenzel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with human-like post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  9. Conference report: formulating better medicines for children: 4th European Paediatric Formulation Initiative conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jennifer; Mills, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The fourth annual European Paediatric Formulation Initiative (EuPFI) conference on Formulating Better Medicines for Children was held on 19-20 September 2012 at the Institute of Molecular Genetics Congress Centre, Prague, Czech Republic. The 2-day conference concentrated on the latest advances, challenges and opportunities for developing medicinal products and administration devices for pediatric use, both from European and US perspectives. It was aimed specifically at providing exposure to emerging practical applications, and for illustrating remedies utilized by pediatric drug-development teams to overcome hurdles faced in developing medicines for pediatric patients. The conference format included plenary talks, focus sessions on each of the EuPFI work streams (extemporaneous preparations, excipients, pediatric administration devices, taste masking and taste assessment, age-appropriate formulations), case studies, soapbox sessions and a parallel poster display. This conference report summarizes the keynote lectures and also gives a flavor of other presentations and posters from the conference.

  10. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  11. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Also known as What Is Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders ...

  12. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, November 29, 2011, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and... reliability that were identified in earlier Commission technical conferences. The conference also will discuss...

  13. International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Cryocoolers 13

    2005-01-01

    This is the 13th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature super-capacitor applications.

  14. CONFERENCE: Computers and accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-01-15

    In September of last year a Conference on 'Computers in Accelerator Design and Operation' was held in West Berlin attracting some 160 specialists including many from outside Europe. It was a Europhysics Conference, organized by the Hahn-Meitner Institute with Roman Zelazny as Conference Chairman, postponed from an earlier intended venue in Warsaw. The aim was to bring together specialists in the fields of accelerator design, computer control and accelerator operation.

  15. Cell-free synthesis of functional antibody fragments to provide a structural basis for antibody-antigen interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi Matsuda

    Full Text Available Growing numbers of therapeutic antibodies offer excellent treatment strategies for many diseases. Elucidation of the interaction between a potential therapeutic antibody and its target protein by structural analysis reveals the mechanism of action and offers useful information for developing rational antibody designs for improved affinity. Here, we developed a rapid, high-yield cell-free system using dialysis mode to synthesize antibody fragments for the structural analysis of antibody-antigen complexes. Optimal synthesis conditions of fragments (Fv and Fab of the anti-EGFR antibody 059-152 were rapidly determined in a day by using a 30-μl-scale unit. The concentration of supplemented disulfide isomerase, DsbC, was critical to obtaining soluble antibody fragments. The optimal conditions were directly applicable to a 9-ml-scale reaction, with linear scalable yields of more than 1 mg/ml. Analyses of purified 059-152-Fv and Fab showed that the cell-free synthesized antibody fragments were disulfide-bridged, with antigen binding activity comparable to that of clinical antibodies. Examination of the crystal structure of cell-free synthesized 059-152-Fv in complex with the extracellular domain of human EGFR revealed that the epitope of 059-152-Fv broadly covers the EGF binding surface on domain III, including residues that formed critical hydrogen bonds with EGF (Asp355EGFR, Gln384EGFR, H409EGFR, and Lys465EGFR, so that the antibody inhibited EGFR activation. We further demonstrated the application of the cell-free system to site-specific integration of non-natural amino acids for antibody engineering, which would expand the availability of therapeutic antibodies based on structural information and rational design. This cell-free system could be an ideal antibody-fragment production platform for functional and structural analysis of potential therapeutic antibodies and for engineered antibody development.

  16. Conference proceedings ISES 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; Peerstrup Ahrendt, Line; Malmkvist, Jens

    The 10th Internatinal Equitation Science Conference is held i Denmark from August 6th - 9th 2014. This book of proceedings contaions abstracts of 35 oral and 57 poster presentations within the conference themes Equine Stress, Learning and Training as well as free papers.......The 10th Internatinal Equitation Science Conference is held i Denmark from August 6th - 9th 2014. This book of proceedings contaions abstracts of 35 oral and 57 poster presentations within the conference themes Equine Stress, Learning and Training as well as free papers....

  17. Anti-glucagon antibodies in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergely, A; Koranyi, L; Halmos, T; Zsombok, M; Peterfy, F; Csizer, Z; Salamon, F; Tako, J

    1973-01-01

    Anti-insulin antibodies appear in the sera of patients treated with insulin lastingly. A high anti-insulin antibody level results in the development of insulin resistance. Most of the insulin preparations available on the market contain also glucagon as an impurity. It was therefore to be expected that in part of the patients, who had been treated with insulin lastingly, antibodies would be produced also against glucagon, and the presence of these was actually demonstrated. It is to be assumed that the anti-glucagon antibodies play a role in the pathomechanism of diabetes mellitus, mainly in its labile form. The possible presence of anti-glucagon antibodies must be taken into account when the glucagon concentration in the sera of diabetics is to be determined by means of radioimmunoassay (RIA). The specific antibodies in the serum give false results in the quantitative determination of glucagon. We have tested the sera of 10 diabetics who had been treated with insulin for at least 6 years. All patients were given protamine zinc and crystalline insulin preparations.

  18. Radiolabelled antibodies in imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaw, B.A.; Haber, E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent technological advances make it possible to produce pure (monoclonal) antibodies in unlimited quantities without the need for continuous immunization of animals and to label these antibodies with a variety of radionuclides which can be traced by single-photon computed tomography. An outline review of the state of the art is presented, with particular reference to the imaging of myocardial infarcts and to tumour imaging studies using labelled monoclonal antibodies (sup(99m)Tc and 125 I). Lengthy bibliography. (U.K.)

  19. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C J [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  20. 2012 HIV Diagnostics Conference: the molecular diagnostics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Bernard M; Pandori, Mark

    2013-04-01

    2012 HIV Diagnostic Conference Atlanta, GA, USA, 12-14 December 2012. This report highlights the presentations and discussions from the 2012 National HIV Diagnostic Conference held in Atlanta (GA, USA), on 12-14 December 2012. Reflecting changes in the evolving field of HIV diagnostics, the conference provided a forum for evaluating developments in molecular diagnostics and their role in HIV diagnosis. In 2010, the HIV Diagnostics Conference concluded with the proposal of a new diagnostic algorithm which included nucleic acid testing to resolve discordant screening and supplemental antibody test results. The 2012 meeting, picking up where the 2010 meeting left off, focused on scientific presentations that assessed this new algorithm and the role played by RNA testing and new developments in molecular diagnostics, including detection of total and integrated HIV-1 DNA, detection and quantification of HIV-2 RNA, and rapid formats for detection of HIV-1 RNA.

  1. The antibody response against human and chimeric anti-TNF therapeutic antibodies primarily targets the TNF binding region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, K. A.; Hart, M. H.; de Groot, E. R.; Kruithof, S.; Aarden, L. A.; Wolbink, G. J.; Rispens, T.

    2015-01-01

    In a subset of patients, anti tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapeutic antibodies are immunogenic, resulting in the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). Neutralising ADAs compete with TNF for its binding site and reduces the effective serum concentration, causing clinical non-response. It is

  2. A generalized quantitative antibody homeostasis model: maintenance of global antibody equilibrium by effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József

    2017-11-01

    The homeostasis of antibodies can be characterized as a balanced production, target-binding and receptor-mediated elimination regulated by an interaction network, which controls B-cell development and selection. Recently, we proposed a quantitative model to describe how the concentration and affinity of interacting partners generates a network. Here we argue that this physical, quantitative approach can be extended for the interpretation of effector functions of antibodies. We define global antibody equilibrium as the zone of molar equivalence of free antibody, free antigen and immune complex concentrations and of dissociation constant of apparent affinity: [Ab]=[Ag]=[AbAg]= K D . This zone corresponds to the biologically relevant K D range of reversible interactions. We show that thermodynamic and kinetic properties of antibody-antigen interactions correlate with immunological functions. The formation of stable, long-lived immune complexes correspond to a decrease of entropy and is a prerequisite for the generation of higher-order complexes. As the energy of formation of complexes increases, we observe a gradual shift from silent clearance to inflammatory reactions. These rules can also be applied to complement activation-related immune effector processes, linking the physicochemical principles of innate and adaptive humoral responses. Affinity of the receptors mediating effector functions shows a wide range of affinities, allowing the continuous sampling of antibody-bound antigen over the complete range of concentrations. The generation of multivalent, multicomponent complexes triggers effector functions by crosslinking these receptors on effector cells with increasing enzymatic degradation potential. Thus, antibody homeostasis is a thermodynamic system with complex network properties, nested into the host organism by proper immunoregulatory and effector pathways. Maintenance of global antibody equilibrium is achieved by innate qualitative signals modulating a

  3. Enhancement of anamnestic immunospecific antibody response in orally immunized chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayo, Susan; Carlsson, Hans-Erik; Zagon, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Production of immunospecific egg yolk antibodies (IgY antibodies) in egg laying hens through oral immunization is an attractive alternative to conventional antibody production in mammals for economic reasons as well as for animal welfare reasons. Oral immunization results in a systemic humoral...... of the immunization in week 18, demonstrating the presence of memory cells following the two initial oral immunizations. Considering that oral immunization results in approximately ten times lower concentrations of immunospecific antibodies in the egg yolk, compared to traditional subcutaneous immunization schemes...

  4. Application of murine monoclonal antibodies to the serodiagnosis of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanyl, J.; Coates, A.R.M.; Krambovitis, E.

    1982-01-01

    The immune response during infectious diseases leads to a rise in antibody titre to the various different antigenic determinants of the causative organism. The response is further complicated by the fact that it is relatively unusual for one individual to respond to all antigenic components of an organism. Demonstration of the specific immune response of an infected host by serological tests is often hampered by the broad cross-reactivity between several bacterial antigens. The authors report on a serodiagnostic application of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAB), specific for a human pathogen, M. tuberculosis by a technique which is applicable in principle to the serodiagnosis of many other infectious diseases. The serum diagnostic test is based on the competitive inhibition by human sera of the binding of 125 I-labelled murine monoclonal antibodies to M. tuberculosis-coated polyvinyl plates. Five monoclonal antibodies binding to distinct antigenic determinants of the organism were used as structural probes which conferred their stringent combining site specificities to the polyclonal mixture of antibodies from patients' sera. When compared with healthy controls, increased titres of inhibitory antibodies were found in about 70% of patients with active tuberculosis. The diagnostic value of the individual monoclonal antibodies as well as the benefit from the use of multiple specificity probes has been qualified

  5. Antibody recognition of Z-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafer, E.M.; Moeller, A.; Valle, R.P.C.; Nordheim, V.A.; Rich, A.; Stollar, B.D.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge)

    1983-01-01

    To measure serological reactions under physiological ionic strength, we prepared a brominated (Bl) poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), which forms a stable Z helix in solutions of low salt concentration. Mice and rabbits were immunized with this polymer complexed with the basic protein methylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA), and it was discovered that the Z-DNA helix is a strong immunogen. Various antibody populations were purified from the rabbit serum by quantitative immunoprecipitation. Spleen cells from the mice were used for the preparation of hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies. Anti-Z-DNA antibodies were also raised by immunizing animals with poly(dG-dm 5 C).poly(dG-dm 5 C) under conditions where it was reported to be in the left-handed Z conformation as well as unmodified poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) that was in the right-handed B conformation: both were complexed with MBSA. Z-DNA reactive antibodies were found in both murine and human SLE. A Z-DNA-specific as well as a dDNA and Z-DNA cross-reactive antibody population were distinguished by affinity chromatography of the SLE sera. The specificities of the various anti-Z-DNA antibody populations were measured by direct-binding and competitive radioimmunoassays, using synthetic polymers of defined structure under various ionic strengths. These studies allow us to map the possible antigenic sites for these antibodies, which serve as a model for DNA-protein recognition. The findings also established the usefulness of the antibodies as biochemical probes for Z-DNA. 29 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  6. Monoclonal antibodies in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.Y.T.; Sikora, K.

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) can be used to differentiate between normal and neoplastic cells and thus exploited for diagnostic and, ultimately, therapeutic gain. The evidence for the existence of human tumour antigens is reviewed. Several areas of diagnosis are already benefiting from the application of the monoclonal technology. Immunohistology can help the pathologist with difficult diagnostic problems. New classifications of lymphoma and leukaemia can be based on specific surface molecules. Similarly, the detection of shed tumour antigens is already established as part of the routine assessment of many patients with common solid tumours. Isotopically labeled monoclonal antibodies have been used to localise primary and metastatic tumours. The use of antibodies in this way is not only a promising diagnostic tool but also the first step in studying the possibility of arming antibodies to provide therapeutic agents. Such trials are currently in progress. (Auth.)

  7. Future of antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Duncan; O'Leary, Rhona; Pujar, Narahari S

    2007-03-15

    Antibody purification seems to be safely ensconced in a platform, now well-established by way of multiple commercialized antibody processes. However, natural evolution compels us to peer into the future. This is driven not only by a large, projected increase in the number of antibody therapies, but also by dramatic improvements in upstream productivity, and process economics. Although disruptive technologies have yet escaped downstream processes, evolution of the so-called platform is already evident in antibody processes in late-stage development. Here we perform a wide survey of technologies that are competing to be part of that platform, and provide our [inherently dangerous] assessment of those that have the most promise.

  8. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  9. Radiation`96. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia.

  10. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base

  11. Radiation`96. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia.

  12. FPGAworld CONFERENCE2009 SEPTEMBER

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The FPGAworld Conference addresses aspects of digital and hardware/software system engineering on FPGA technology. It is a discussion and network forum for students, researchers and engineers working on industrial and research projects, state-of-the-art investigations, development and applications. The book contains some presentations; for more information see (www.fpgaworld.com/conference).

  13. Major Biomass Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top Scientists, Industry and Government Leaders to Gather for Major Biomass Conference America, South America and Europe will focus on building a sustainable, profitable biomass business at the Third Biomass Conference of the Americas in Montreal. Scheduled presentations will cover all biomass

  14. Hamburg Accelerator Conference (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Edmund J.N. [CERN Accelerator School (Switzerland)

    1992-11-15

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). The HEACC Conference traditionally reviews the status of all major accelerator projects whether they are already running like clockwork, still in the construction phase, or waiting impatiently for financial approval.

  15. Program of the Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The International Conference SES 2006 (Secure Energy Supply, Bezpecna dodavka energie) was realised in Bratislava, during September 26 - 29, 2006 in the hotel Crowne Plaza and deals with most important problems of world and Slovak energetics. Objective of this Conference was discussion of experience and information concerning strategic aspects of energy supply safety and the development of the Slovak and European Energy Industry

  16. Vehicular Networking Conference (VNC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altintas, O.; Chen, W.; Heijenk, Geert; Dressler, F.; Ekici, E.; Kargl, Frank; Shigeno, H.; Dietzel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    On behalf of the Organizing Committee, we would like to welcome you to the third edition of the IEEE Vehicular Networking Conference (IEEE VNC 2011) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. IEEE VNC is a unique conference sponsored by both the IEEE Communications Society and the IEEE Intelligent

  17. Radiation'96. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia

  18. Hamburg Accelerator Conference (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Edmund J.N.

    1992-01-01

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). The HEACC Conference traditionally reviews the status of all major accelerator projects whether they are already running like clockwork, still in the construction phase, or waiting impatiently for financial approval

  19. Male Partner Risk Behaviors Are Associated With Reactive Rapid HIV Antibody Tests Among Pregnant Mexican Women: Implications for Prevention of Vertical and Sexual HIV Transmission in Concentrated HIV Epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Estela; Kendall, Tamil

    2015-01-01

    Mexico's policies on antenatal HIV testing are contradictory, and little is known about social and behavioral characteristics that increase pregnant Mexican women's risks of acquiring HIV. We analyzed the association between risk behaviors reported by pregnant women for themselves and their male partners, and women's rapid HIV antibody test results from a large national sample. Three quarters of pregnant women with a reactive test did not report risk behaviors for themselves and one third did not report risk behaviors for themselves or their male partners. In the retrospective case-control analysis, other than reporting multiple sexual partners, reactive pregnant women reported risk behaviors did not differ from nonreactive women's behaviors. However, reactive pregnant women were significantly more likely to have reported risk behaviors for male partners. Our findings support universal offer of antenatal HIV testing and suggest that HIV prevention for women should focus on reducing risk of HIV acquisition within stable relationships. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibody tumor penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  1. Threats, protests greet conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, D

    1994-09-04

    In preparation for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, Egypt has deployed 14,000 police to protect participants from threatened violence. The Vatican has joined forces with Muslim fundamentalists to condemn the conference as a vehicle for imposing Western ideals, particularly abortion, on Third world countries. In addition, the opposition is raising the specter of a descent of homosexuals onto Cairo and Muslim fundamentalists have threatened to murder Western representatives. A suit filed by Islamic lawyers, aimed at stopping the conference, failed. Sudan and Saudi Arabia plan to boycott the conference, and it remains uncertain whether Libya will be represented. Conference organizers have not been deterred by the threats and note that the controversy has drawn public attention to the central issues under debate.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  3. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C J [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference.

  4. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.J.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the foreword, technical program, the author index and of the papers (1-60) presented at the conference

  5. To conference or not to conference

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    can travel throughout the world, from Cape to Cairo, from Jakarta to. Istanbul, from San ... Is there any real advantage of going to conferences in the era of electronic ... to register and travel, and the time off work, are justified, although we are.

  6. Study on quantification of HBs-antibody by immunoradiometric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Yuichi; Itoi, Yoshihiro; Kajiyama, Shizuo

    1989-01-01

    Quantification of HBs-antibody assay was carried out using a commercialized assay kit and standard solutions of HBs-antibody recognised as 1 st reference preparation of hepatitis B immunogloblin by WHO. Standard curve of HBs-antibody was drawn with the function of 3D-spline and the correlation factor was obtained as r = 0.999. Coefficient of intra-assay variance was 3.8 % and that of inter-assay variance was 7.8 %. Dilution tests showed satisfactory results in the range of 2-16 times. Correlation between value of cut-off indices and concentration of HBs-antibody was obtained as the formula of y = 2.599 x-3.894 (r = 0.992) and 2.1 of cut-off index corresponded to about 5 mIU/ml of HBs-antibody concentration. (author)

  7. Radioimmunoassay of class-specific antibodies (RIACA): chicken antibodies to DNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viljanen, M.K.; Granfors, K.; Toivanen, P.

    1977-01-01

    A radioimmunological method for the quantitation of class-specific antibodies has been developed. The method allows the quantitation of nanogram per ml concentrations of IgG and IgM-anti-DNP antibodies without any physical or chemical pretreatment of the sample. DNP was coupled covalently to a cyanogen bromide activated paper disk with the augmentation of lysine molecule. Anti-DNP antibodies were allowed to react with the coupled DNP and then quantitated by their capacity to bind 125 I-labelled anti-chicken-μ or anti-chicken-γ. The inter-assay variation coefficients ranged from 8.1 to 14.7% and the mean standard deviations of duplicate determinations were about 11%. The combination of this method with the exact immunoradiometric quantitation of the total serum IgM and IgG, and with an immunoabsorption technique, makes it possible to quantitate class-specific antibodies on weight units

  8. European TRIGA owners' conference. Papers and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The conference covers the following topics, concerning TRIGA reactors: Experience in the Operation and Maintenance and utilization of TRIGA reactors; reactor upgrading; irradiation facilities; fuel management; air-concentration measurements; nuclear tests; use of TRIGA in nuclear medicine and biology; reactor design, fuel and performance; failures and other research activities

  9. Metabolomics reveals distinct, antibody-independent, molecular signatures of MS, AQP4-antibody and MOG-antibody disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurynczyk, Maciej; Probert, Fay; Yeo, Tianrong; Tackley, George; Claridge, Tim D W; Cavey, Ana; Woodhall, Mark R; Arora, Siddharth; Winkler, Torsten; Schiffer, Eric; Vincent, Angela; DeLuca, Gabriele; Sibson, Nicola R; Isabel Leite, M; Waters, Patrick; Anthony, Daniel C; Palace, Jacqueline

    2017-12-06

    The overlapping clinical features of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-antibody (Ab) neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-Ab disease mean that detection of disease specific serum antibodies is the gold standard in diagnostics. However, antibody levels are not prognostic and may become undetectable after treatment or during remission. Therefore, there is still a need to discover antibody-independent biomarkers. We sought to discover whether plasma metabolic profiling could provide biomarkers of these three diseases and explore if the metabolic differences are independent of antibody titre. Plasma samples from 108 patients (34 RRMS, 54 AQP4-Ab NMOSD, and 20 MOG-Ab disease) were analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy followed by lipoprotein profiling. Orthogonal partial-least squares discriminatory analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify significant differences in the plasma metabolite concentrations and produce models (mathematical algorithms) capable of identifying these diseases. In all instances, the models were highly discriminatory, with a distinct metabolite pattern identified for each disease. In addition, OPLS-DA identified AQP4-Ab NMOSD patient samples with low/undetectable antibody levels with an accuracy of 92%. The AQP4-Ab NMOSD metabolic profile was characterised by decreased levels of scyllo-inositol and small high density lipoprotein particles along with an increase in large low density lipoprotein particles relative to both RRMS and MOG-Ab disease. RRMS plasma exhibited increased histidine and glucose, along with decreased lactate, alanine, and large high density lipoproteins while MOG-Ab disease plasma was defined by increases in formate and leucine coupled with decreased myo-inositol. Despite overlap in clinical measures in these three diseases, the distinct plasma metabolic patterns support their distinct serological profiles and confirm that these

  10. Otto Toeplitz Memorial Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    A conference in operator theory and its applications commemorating the 100th anniversary of the birth of the distinguished German mathematician Otto Toeplitz, organized by the University of Tel Aviv together with German Mathematical Society, took place in Tel Aviv, Israel, from May 11th to 15th, 1981. I give here a broad very subjective overview of the proceedings of the conference for the benefit of readers of TTSP; for those interested in further details, a forthcoming volume in the Birkhaeuser series Operator Theory: Advances and Applications will consist of expanded written versions of most of the talks given at the conference

  11. The 26. CLI national conference. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, Pierre-Franck; Niel, Jean-Christophe; Legrand, Henri; Dumont, Jean-Jacques; Lachaume, Jean-Luc; Delalonde, Jean-Claude; Sene, Monique; Le Deaut, Jean Yves; Charles, Thierry; Sasseigne, Philippe; Fournier, Nicolas; Murith, Christophe; Rivasi, Michele; Perissat, Frederic; KESSLER, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    This document gathers contributions presented during a conference held in December 2014. After introduction speeches and a focus of some updates by ANCCLI and ASN representatives, this conference comprised two round tables. The first one addressed the continuation of nuclear reactor operation after their fourth safety re-examination, with contributions by representatives of the ASN, of the ANCCLI, of the IRSN, and of EDF. The second one addressed the issue of a European harmonisation regarding actions of protection of populations in case of a nuclear accident, with interventions of representatives of a CLI, of the ASN, of the Swiss federal office for public health, of an NGO (Nuclear Transparency Watch), and of a departmental prefect

  12. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    little support amongst serious students of learning. The professional conference as a forum for knowledge sharing is in dire need of a new learning theory and a more enlightened practice. The notion of human flourishing is offered as basis for theory, and four simple design principles for the so......The typical one-day conference attended by managers or professionals in search of inspiration is packed with PowerPoint presentations and offers little opportunity for involvement or knowledge sharing. Behind the conventional conference format lurks the transfer model of learning, which finds......-called “learning conference” are proposed: People go to conferences to 1. get concise input, 2. interpret it in the light of their ongoing concerns, 3. talk about their current projects and 4. meet the other attendees and be inspired by them. Six practical techniques that induce attendees to do these things...

  13. EVOLVE 2014 International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Tantar, Emilia; Sun, Jian-Qiao; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Qian; Schütze, Oliver; Emmerich, Michael; Legrand, Pierrick; Moral, Pierre; Coello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This volume encloses research articles that were presented at the EVOLVE 2014 International Conference in Beijing, China, July 1–4, 2014.The book gathers contributions that emerged from the conference tracks, ranging from probability to set oriented numerics and evolutionary computation; all complemented by the bridging purpose of the conference, e.g. Complex Networks and Landscape Analysis, or by the more application oriented perspective. The novelty of the volume, when considering the EVOLVE series, comes from targeting also the practitioner’s view. This is supported by the Machine Learning Applied to Networks and Practical Aspects of Evolutionary Algorithms tracks, providing surveys on new application areas, as in the networking area and useful insights in the development of evolutionary techniques, from a practitioner’s perspective. Complementary to these directions, the conference tracks supporting the volume, follow on the individual advancements of the subareas constituting the scope of the confe...

  14. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  15. Conference on radioecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    32 abstracts of contributions presented at the conference and covering all aspects of radioecology are included. The lecturers were mainly from Czechoslovakia; contributions from the USSR, France, Belgium, Hungary, Bulgaria, etc., however, were also presented. (P.A.)

  16. Ranking Operations Management conferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Gupta, Sushil; Laptaned, U

    2007-01-01

    Several publications have appeared in the field of Operations Management which rank Operations Management related journals. Several ranking systems exist for journals based on , for example, perceived relevance and quality, citation, and author affiliation. Many academics also publish at conferences

  17. Photos of the conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Åhman

    1984-05-01

    Full Text Available Birgitta  Åhman is the photographer of the series of pictures from the conference, also for the cover photo of the full paper edition showing Kongsvold Mountain Hut and Biological Station.

  18. Radiolabelled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    A steadily growing number of tumor-associated antigens are used to raise antibodies used for the detection of human tumors by external imaging, a technique termed immunoscintigraphy. The majority of these clinical antibody studies are performed using Iodine-131, which is cheap, readily available and easily attached to protein. It has the disadvantage of having a high energy gamma emission (365 keV) which is poorly detected by modern cameras, so that increasing use is now being made of more appropriate labels with lower energies for imaging, such as Iodine-123, Indium-111 and Technetium-99m. A number of research centres in the United Kingdom are currently involved in the production of tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies, only a small number of which are finally selected for diagnostic use. These developments represent a major area of advancement in Nuclear Medicine and when used for imaging are capable of providing diagnostic information complimentary to other diagnostic techniques

  19. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  20. Japan Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    At the international level, the high energy accelerator scene evolves rapidly and the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators is where its strong pulse can best be felt. This year, the Conference was held for the first time in Japan, with the 14th meeting in the series having been hosted in August by the Japanese KEK National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba. The venue was a recognition of the premier accelerator physics and technology status achieved by this diligent nation

  1. 2nd SUMO Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume contains the conference proceedings of the Simulation of Urban Mobility (SUMO) conference 2014, Berlin. The included research papers cover a wide range of topics in traffic planning and simulation, including open data, vehicular communication, e-mobility, urban mobility, multimodal traffic as well as usage approaches. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.  

  2. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  3. Japan Accelerator Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-11-15

    At the international level, the high energy accelerator scene evolves rapidly and the International Conference on High Energy Accelerators is where its strong pulse can best be felt. This year, the Conference was held for the first time in Japan, with the 14th meeting in the series having been hosted in August by the Japanese KEK National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba. The venue was a recognition of the premier accelerator physics and technology status achieved by this diligent nation.

  4. Conference Report: The BPS Annual Conference 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Roncaglia

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will review four papers presented at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference held this year in London held over a 3 day period. The Conference included a variety of scientific presentations and discussions through symposia, roundtable discussions, single papers and poster sessions. Although numerous papers took an experimental approach, few applied any type of qualitative methodology. The topics covered within the different psychological disciplines spanned from early childhood through old age; I have chosen four papers that covered a life course perspective and took into consideration clinical issues as well. The first paper discusses a grounded theory approach used to analyse a play therapy session between therapist and child. The second review reports some recent findings in the way the brains of people on the autistic spectrum disorder might function. The third paper discusses positive psychology and how such an emerging movement has influenced new research in the field. The last paper reviewed will discuss the issue of the ageing process, and I will present some arguments related to the useful application of qualitative methodologies within this area of research. In conclusion, I will highlight some personal reflections on the Conference and the need for a greater balance between qualitative and quantitative methodologies to be used in collaboration rather than as antagonists. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0402176

  5. Conference scene: DGVS spring conference 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolligs, Frank Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The 3rd annual DGVS Spring Conference of the German Society for Gastroenterology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Verdauungs- und Stoffwechselkrankheiten) was held at the Seminaris Campus Hotel in Berlin, Germany, on 8-9 May, 2009. The conference was organized by Roland Schmid and Matthias Ebert from the Technical University of Munich, Germany. The central theme of the meeting was 'translational gastrointestinal oncology: towards personalized medicine and individualized therapy'. The conference covered talks on markers for diagnosis, screening and surveillance of colorectal cancer, targets for molecular therapy, response prediction in clinical oncology, development and integration of molecular imaging in gastrointestinal oncology and translational research in clinical trial design. Owing to the broad array of topics and limitations of space, this article will focus on biomarkers, response prediction and the integration of biomarkers into clinical trials. Presentations mentioned in this summary were given by Matthias Ebert (Technical University of Munich, Germany), Esmeralda Heiden (Epigenomics, Berlin, Germany), Frank Kolligs (University of Munich, Germany), Florian Lordick (University of Heidelberg, Germany), Hans Jorgen Nielsen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Anke Reinacher-Schick (University of Bochum, Germany), Christoph Röcken (University of Berlin, Germany), Wolff Schmiegel (University of Bochum, Germany) and Thomas Seufferlein (University of Halle, Germany).

  6. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook

    1979-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  7. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  8. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity...... to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  9. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    Yeast surface display is an effective tool for antibody affinity maturation because yeast can be used as an all-in-one workhorse to assemble, display and screen diversified antibody libraries. By employing the natural ability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently recombine multiple DNA...... laboratory conditions. A particular emphasis was put on using molecular techniques in conjunction with microenvironmental measurements (O2, pH, irradiance), a combination that is rarely found but provides a much more detailed understanding of “cause and effect” in complex natural systems...

  10. World Energy Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, G.; Schilling, H.D.

    1979-01-01

    After making some general remarks about goals, tasks, and works of the World Energy Conference the topics and the frame of the 11th World Energy Conference which will take place in Munich from 8th to 12th September 1980 are outlined. This conference is held under the general topic 'energy for our world' and deals with the reciprocal relation between energy supply, environment, and society. The main part of the publication presented here is the German version of the most important sections of the investigation 'World Energy-Looking Ahead to 2020' by the Conservation Commission (CC) of the World Energy Conference. Added to this is the German original brief version of a report by the Mining-Research Company (Bergbau-Forschung GmbH) to the CC which deals with the estimation of the world's coal resources and their future availability. This report was presented on the 10th World Energy Conference in Istanbul together with the corresponding reports concerning the other energy sources. Finally, an introduction to the technical programme for the 11th World Energy Conference 1980 is given. (UA) [de

  11. Antibody-radioisotope conjugates for tumor localization and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    In principle, anti-tumor antibodies can be used to carry radioactivity to tumors for in-vivo diagnosis and treatment of cancer. First, for diagnostic purposes, an antibody that targets a specific antigen (for example, the p97 antigen of human melanoma tumor), is labeled with a tracer amount of radioactivity. When this antibody-radioisotope conjugate is injected into the blood stream, the antibody carries the radioactivity throughout the body and in time, percolates through all the tissues of the body. Because the tumor has specific antigens to which the antibody can bind, the antibody conjugate progressively accumulates in the tumor. Using conventional nuclear medicine imaging equipment, the body of the patient is scanned for radioactivity content, and a map of the distribution of the radioactivity is displayed on photographic film. The tumor shows up as a dense area of radio-activity. These same antibody-radioisotope conjugates may be used for therapy of tumors, except that in this case large amounts of radioactivity are loaded on the antibody. After localization of the conjugate there is sufficient radiation deposited in the tumor of radiotherapy. The success of this approach in the clinic is determined in large measure by the concentration gradient that can be achieved between tissue antibody conjugate in tumor versus normal tissue

  12. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  13. Prediction of antibody persistency from antibody titres to natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Erik H; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2012-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients.......In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients....

  14. Human monoclonal antibodies: the residual challenge of antibody immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Herman

    2014-01-01

    One of the major reasons for seeking human monoclonal antibodies has been to eliminate immunogenicity seen with rodent antibodies. Thus far, there has yet been no approach which absolutely abolishes that risk for cell-binding antibodies. In this short article, I draw attention to classical work which shows that monomeric immunoglobulins are intrinsically tolerogenic if they can be prevented from creating aggregates or immune complexes. Based on these classical studies two approaches for active tolerization to therapeutic antibodies are described.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  16. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    these unusual antibodies can effectively be displayed on the cell surface. 5 Additionally, we successfully prepared cDNA from lymphocytes derived...from cow peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes, amplified this cDNA by PCR with VH gene specific primers, and this “library” has been cloned into

  17. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out for sure? If antibody tests and/or symptoms suggest celiac disease, the physician needs to establish the diagnosis by ... who is still experiencing symptoms, to establish the diagnosis or to rule out celiac disease as a part of establishing another diagnosis. Find ...

  18. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MACRA MACRAlerts MACRA FAQs MACRA Glossary MACRA Resources Position Statements Insurance Advocacy Current Issues Tools & Resources Practice Resources ... a medical or health condition. Resources Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) in Spanish (Español) Download Print-Friendly PDF ... Join Donate © 2018 American College ...

  19. Next Generation Antibody Therapeutics Using Bispecific Antibody Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Nearly fifty monoclonal antibodies have been approved to date, and the market for monoclonal antibodies is expected to continue to grow. Since global competition in the field of antibody therapeutics is intense, we need to establish novel antibody engineering technologies to provide true benefit for patients, with differentiated product values. Bispecific antibodies are among the next generation of antibody therapeutics that can bind to two different target antigens by the two arms of immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecule, and are thus believed to be applicable to various therapeutic needs. Until recently, large scale manufacturing of human IgG bispecific antibody was impossible. We have established a technology, named asymmetric re-engineering technology (ART)-Ig, to enable large scale manufacturing of bispecific antibodies. Three examples of next generation antibody therapeutics using ART-Ig technology are described. Recent updates on bispecific antibodies against factor IXa and factor X for the treatment of hemophilia A, bispecific antibodies against a tumor specific antigen and T cell surface marker CD3 for cancer immunotherapy, and bispecific antibodies against two different epitopes of soluble antigen with pH-dependent binding property for the elimination of soluble antigen from plasma are also described.

  20. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Hart

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  1. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Peter J; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Siggins, Matthew K; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A; Goulding, David A; Crump, John A; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  2. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  3. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2014-01-01

    for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http

  4. Biodistribution mechanisms of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Mohammad; Bornstein, Gadi Gazit; Suria, Hamza

    2010-03-01

    The monoclonal antibody market continues to witness an impressive rate of growth and has become the leading source of expansion in the biologic segment within the pharmaceutical industry. Currently marketed monoclonal antibodies target a diverse array of antigens. These antigens are distributed in a variety of tissues such as tumors, lungs, synovial fluid, psoriatic plaques, and lymph nodes. As the concentration of drug at the proximity of the biological receptor determines the magnitude of the observed pharmacological responses, a significant consideration in effective therapeutic application of monoclonal antibodies is a thorough understanding of the processes that regulate antibody biodistribution. Monoclonal antibody distribution is affected by factors such as molecular weight, blood flow, tissue and tumor heterogeneity, structure and porosity, target antigen density, turnover rate, and the target antigen expression profile.

  5. [A spectrum of neurological diseases with anti-VGKC antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nagado, Tatsui

    2007-11-01

    Anti-VGKC antibody causing peripheral nerve hyperexcitability is already an established clinical entity. Recently, many patients with non-herpetic limbic encephalitis (NHLE) with anti-VGKC antibody have been reported. The characteristic clinical features are low serum Na+ concentration and good response to immunotherapy. Anti-VGK antibody positive NHLE is relatively frequent among immune-mediated NHLE. It is important to know that this disease is responsive to immunotherapy. Furthermore, anti-VGKC antibody is also positive in some intractable epilepsies. These findings suggest that anti-VGKC is correlated with hyperexcitability in both the peripheral and central nervous system and that the spectrum of anti-VGKC antibody syndrome is now expanding.

  6. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Edgue, G.; Twyman, R.M.; Beiss, V.; Fischer, R.; Sack, M.

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of a...

  7. 2nd Bozeman Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, John

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains a collection of papers delivered by the partici­ pants at the second Conference on Computation and Control held at Mon­ tana State University in Bozeman, Montana from August 1-7, 1990. The conference, as well as this proceedings, attests to the vitality and cohesion between the control theorist and the numerical analyst that was adver­ tised by the first Conference on Computation and Control in 1988. The proceedings of that initial conference was published by Birkhiiuser Boston as the first volume of this same series entitled Computation and Control, Proceedings of the Bozeman Conference, Bozeman, Montana, 1988. Control theory and numerical analysis are both, by their very nature, interdisciplinary subjects as evidenced by their interaction with other fields of mathematics and engineering. While it is clear that new control or es­ timation algorithms and new feedback design methodologies will need to be implemented computationally, it is likewise clear that new problems in computation...

  8. Quantitative cumulative biodistribution of antibodies in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Victor; Palma, Enzo; Tesar, Devin B; Mundo, Eduardo E; Bumbaca, Daniela; Torres, Elizabeth K; Reyes, Noe A; Shen, Ben Q; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta; Khawli, Leslie A; Boswell, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in antibody recycling in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and thus it influences the systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of immunoglobulin G (IgG). However, considerably less is known about FcRn’s role in the metabolism of IgG within individual tissues after intravenous administration. To elucidate the organ distribution and gain insight into the metabolism of humanized IgG1 antibodies with different binding affinities FcRn, comparative biodistribution studies in normal CD-1 mice were conducted. Here, we generated variants of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D-specific antibody (humanized anti-gD) with increased and decreased FcRn binding affinity by genetic engineering without affecting antigen specificity. These antibodies were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, purified and paired radiolabeled with iodine-125 and indium-111. Equal amounts of I-125-labeled and In-111-labeled antibodies were mixed and intravenously administered into mice at 5 mg/kg. This approach allowed us to measure both the real-time IgG uptake (I-125) and cumulative uptake of IgG and catabolites (In-111) in individual tissues up to 1 week post-injection. The PK and distribution of the wild-type IgG and the variant with enhanced binding for FcRn were largely similar to each other, but vastly different for the rapidly cleared low-FcRn-binding variant. Uptake in individual tissues varied across time, FcRn binding affinity, and radiolabeling method. The liver and spleen emerged as the most concentrated sites of IgG catabolism in the absence of FcRn protection. These data provide an increased understanding of FcRn’s role in antibody PK and catabolism at the tissue level. PMID:24572100

  9. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  10. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii r...

  12. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed.

  13. Conferences and Family Reunions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sutherland

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Professional associations and conferences have similarities with and differences from families and family reunions. This comparison can illustrate some ways professional associations can approach the integration of new members and the planning of conferences in order to facilitate membership development and leadership renewal. Unlike family reunions, professional conferences are not closed events that require a shared culture in order to fully participate; they are events that should show the constant change and development of practice that is representative of the profession – for both members and non-members. Some of the topics explored in the article are: making it easy for outsiders to contribute, considering the tastes of new members, making it easy to volunteer in a meaningful way, and remembering who the future of the organization is. These simple considerations will assist in opening professional associations to new participants and help them to maintain their relevance and vitality over time.

  14. Low Energy Conference 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    11 of the 19 presentations have been indexed for the database. The following national organisations jointly organised the Low-energy Conference 2009: The Norwegian Society for the Conservation of Nature, the Norwegian Society of Engineers and Technologists, Norwegian Technology, the Federation of Norwegian Industries and the Low-Energy Program. Energy efficiency is often given little attention in the ongoing debates concerning different initiatives in order to reduce greenhouse emissions. The aim of the conference was to set energy efficiency on the agenda as an important environmental instrument. Both the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - IPCC and the International Energy Agency - IEA regard energy efficiency as one of the fastest and most effective ways of reducing greenhouse emissions. Despite of this little is done. Many countries are ahead of Norway - why are we lagging behind? The Low-Energy conference has a broad approach: Nigel Jollands from the International Energy Agency -IEA puts energy efficiency in a global perspective. Soeren Rise from Teqniq in Denmark informs about the Danes' energy saving agreement, which appears to have been a success. The conference increased the competencies on concrete energy efficiency solutions, how to speed up the marketing of energy-friendly buildings and technologies, possibilities through industry and the impact of EU-directives and other instruments in order to trigger the potential. The conference closed with a discussion panel of leading energy politicians. The conference contributed to raise the debate in advance of the General election in Norway and the climate negotiations in Copenhagen during the autumn 2009. (EW)

  15. Less is More: A Comparison of Antibody-Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates of Different Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byzova, Nadezhda A; Safenkova, Irina V; Slutskaya, Elvira S; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2017-11-15

    This comprehensive study is related to gold nanoparticles (GNPs) conjugated with antibodies. The goal of the study is to determine the minimal concentration of antibodies for conjugate synthesis when the conjugates have high antigen-capturing activity. Two systems were studied: gold nanoparticles conjugated with monoclonal antibodies (mAb-GNP) specific to Helicobacter pylori and gold nanoparticles conjugated with polyclonal antibodies (pAb-GNP) specific to mouse immunoglobulins. Several conjugates were synthesized with different GNP-to-antibody molar ratios (from 1:1 to 1:245) through nondirectional and noncovalent immobilization on a surface of GNPs with a diameter of 25.3 ± 4.6 nm. The maximal antigen-capturing activities and equilibrium constants of the conjugates correlate with the formation of a constant hydrodynamic radius of the conjugates for mAb-GNP (GNP to antibody molar ratio 1:58) and with the stabilizing concentration by flocculation curves for pAb-GNP (GNP to antibody molar ratio 1:116). The application of the conjugates to the lateral flow immunoassay shows that the antibody concentrations used for the conjugation can be reduced (below the stabilizing concentration) without losing activity for the mAb-GNP conjugates. The findings highlight that the optimal concentration of antibodies immobilized on the surface of GNPs is not always equal to the stabilizing concentration determined by the flocculation curve.

  16. CONFERENCE: Nuclear visions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Last summer, four hundred visitors of about 30 different nationalities descended on the ancient town of Visby on the Swedish island of Gotland for the Second International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions. For the conference itself, sessions were organized not according to conventional topics like low, intermediate and high energy reactions, but along phenomena-related lines that brought listeners together instead of splitting them up. Examples were 'phase transitions', 'new facilities' and 'breaking nuclear matter into pieces'

  17. VMEbus in physics conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The first conference ''VMEbus in Physics'' was held at CERN on 7th and 8th October 1985. The conference surveyed the applications of the VMEbus standards in physics, with special emphasis on particle physics and accelerator control. Developments in the definition of the standards and in the formation of users groups were discussed. Manufacturer's representatives were given the opportunity to appreciate the requirements of the fast-growing VMEbus market in the physics community. These proceedings contain the unedited text of the oral and poster presentations given on that occasion. (orig.)

  18. CONFERENCE: Linacs at Seeheim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-07-15

    The 12th Linear Accelerator Conference, organized by GSI Darmstadt, was held from 8-11 May at the Lufthansa Schulungszentrum in Seeheim, West Germany. It was the first of this series of Linac Accelerator Conferences - started in 1961 with 20 participants and 17 contributions at Brookhaven - held outside North America. In Seeheim, 32 invited talks, 11 oral and 98 poster papers were presented to more than 250 participants from the USA, Canada, Europe, Japan, the USSR and China, representing 39 research institutions and 12 industrial laboratories.

  19. International conference, ICPRAM 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, J; Fred, Ana; Pattern recognition : applications and methods : revised selected papers

    2013-01-01

    This edited book includes extended and revised versions of a set of selected papers from the First International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPRAM 2012), held in Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal, from 6 to 8 February, 2012, sponsored by the Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information Control and Communication (INSTICC) and held in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and Pattern Analysis, Statistical Modelling and Computational Learning (PASCAL2). The conference brought together researchers, engineers and practitioners interested on the areas of Pattern Recognition, both from theoretical and application perspectives.

  20. Internet conferences in glycobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, B J; Doughty, S W; Parretti, M F; Tennison, J; Wilson, I

    1997-09-01

    In this article we describe recent activities in the use of electronic conferencing in glycobiology focusing on our experiences with the organization and development of the Second Electronic Glycoscience Conference (EGC-2), which was held on the Internet and World Wide Web in September 1996. EGC-2 involved the presentation and discussion of scientific research results in a virtual conferencing environment which incorporated virtual replicas of many activities usually observed at a physical conference in addition to features unique to the electronic medium. Highlights of the scientific program and technical developments in the design and use of these facilities are briefly described. EGC-3 will be held in October 1997.

  1. The learning conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    /methodology/approach: A typical full-day conference is analyzed. It has six hours of podium talk and twenty-five minutes for delegates to become involved. What model of learning can possibly lie behind this? The transfer model, which assumes learners to be empty vessels. An alternative view is that conference delegates...... are described: Individual reflection, the buzz dyad, ?You have won two consultants, free of charge?, facilitated group work, the knowledge exchange, and lunch with gaffer tape. Originality/value: This paper introduces modern learning theory and techniques into an educational context which has resisted...

  2. CONFERENCE: Linacs at Seeheim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The 12th Linear Accelerator Conference, organized by GSI Darmstadt, was held from 8-11 May at the Lufthansa Schulungszentrum in Seeheim, West Germany. It was the first of this series of Linac Accelerator Conferences - started in 1961 with 20 participants and 17 contributions at Brookhaven - held outside North America. In Seeheim, 32 invited talks, 11 oral and 98 poster papers were presented to more than 250 participants from the USA, Canada, Europe, Japan, the USSR and China, representing 39 research institutions and 12 industrial laboratories

  3. Radioimmunodetection of human melanoma tumor xenografts with human monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomibuchi, Makoto; Saxton, R.E.; Lake, R.R.; Katano, Mitsuo; Irie, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    A human IgM monoclonal antibody has been established that defines a tumor-associated membrane antigen expressed on human melanoma cells. The antigen has been identified as the ganglioside GD2. In this paper, the authors describe the potential usefulness of the human monoclonal antibody for radioimaging. Nude mice bearing tumors derived from a human melanoma cell line were used as a model. Antibody activity was degradated significantly after labeling with 131 I by the use of a modified chloramine-T method. After testing various concentrations, labeled antibody of a specific activity of 2.8μCi/μg produced the best results. Balb/c nude mice bearing a GD2-positive M14 melanoma cell line were injected with 10-30μg of labeled antibody, and its radiolocalization in different organs and in the whole body were evaluated. The best tumor image was obtained on Day 6. The labeled antibody uptake ratio between tumor and muscle was 9.2:1; the ratio between tumor and liver was 1.4:1. These studies represent the first report of experimental tumor imaging with human monoclonal antibody. Human monoclonals will probably prove to be superior reagents for tumor imaging in melanoma patients if the problem of anti-body radiolysis is resolved. (author)

  4. A mechanistic compartmental model for total antibody uptake in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M; Dane Wittrup, K

    2012-12-07

    Antibodies are under development to treat a variety of cancers, such as lymphomas, colon, and breast cancer. A major limitation to greater efficacy for this class of drugs is poor distribution in vivo. Localization of antibodies occurs slowly, often in insufficient therapeutic amounts, and distributes heterogeneously throughout the tumor. While the microdistribution around individual vessels is important for many therapies, the total amount of antibody localized in the tumor is paramount for many applications such as imaging, determining the therapeutic index with antibody drug conjugates, and dosing in radioimmunotherapy. With imaging and pretargeted therapeutic strategies, the time course of uptake is critical in determining when to take an image or deliver a secondary reagent. We present here a simple mechanistic model of antibody uptake and retention that captures the major rates that determine the time course of antibody concentration within a tumor including dose, affinity, plasma clearance, target expression, internalization, permeability, and vascularization. Since many of the parameters are known or can be estimated in vitro, this model can approximate the time course of antibody concentration in tumors to aid in experimental design, data interpretation, and strategies to improve localization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical use of antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Hoer, Gustav; Cox, P.H.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies as tumour specific carrier molecules for therapeutic agents or as in vivo diagnostic reagents when labelled with radionuclides or NMR signal enhancers is attracting more and more attention. The potential is enormous but the technical problems are also considerable requiring the concerted action of many different scientific disciplines. This volume is based upon a symposium organised in Frankfurt in 1990 under the auspices of the European Association of Nuclear Medicines' Specialist Task Groups on Cardiology and the Utility of Labelled Antibodies. It gives a multidisciplinary review of the state of the art and of problems to be solved as well as recording the not inconsiderable successes which have been booked to date. The book will be of value as a reference to both clinicians and research scientists. refs.; figs.; tabs

  6. Delta antibody radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kselikova, M; Urbankova, J

    1985-11-15

    The principle and procedure are described of the radioimmunoassay of delta antibody (delta-Ab) using the ABBOTT ANTI-DELTA kit by Abbott Co. A description is given of the kit, the working procedure and the method of evaluation. The results are reported of the incidence of delta-Ab in sera of patients with viral hepatitis B, in haemophiliacs, carriers of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and blood donors. The presence was detected of delta-Ab in one HBsAg carrier. The necessity is emphasized of delta-Ab determinations in the blood of donors in view of the antibody transfer with blood and blood preparations.

  7. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  8. Veterans in Society Conference 2014: Humanizing the Discourse (Conference Program)

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Tech. Department of English. Center for the Study of Rhetoric in Society; Virginia Tech. Veterans Studies Group

    2014-01-01

    This program lists the daily sessions, presentations, and events that took place during the 2014 Veterans in Society Conference, which was held from April 27-28, 2014 at the Hotel Roanoke in Roanoke, VA. This program also includes speaker and presenter bios, descriptions of unrecorded conference events, and a letter from conference co-chair Jim Dubinsky, the director of Virginia Tech's Center for the Study of Rhetoric in Society. The 2014 Veterans in Society Conference: Humanizing the Discour...

  9. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. This... technical support for webcasts and offers the option of listening to the meeting via phone-bridge for a fee...

  10. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. The authors have studied the binding of 125 I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind =Ka[Ag total]/1 + Ka[Ag total]. Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10 8 M -1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging

  11. Immunosignature: Serum Antibody Profiling for Cancer Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapoval, Andrei I; Legutki, J Bart; Stafford, Philip; Trebukhov, Andrey V; Johnston, Stephen A; Shoikhet, Yakov N; Lazarev, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for preclinical diagnosis of cancer are valuable tools for detection of malignant tumors at early stages in groups at risk and screening healthy people, as well as monitoring disease recurrence after treatment of cancer. However the complexity of the body's response to the pathological processes makes it virtually impossible to evaluate this response to the development of the disease using a single biomarker that is present in the serum at low concentrations. An alternative approach to standard biomarker analysis is called immunosignature. Instead of going after biomarkers themselves this approach rely on the analysis of the humoral immune response to molecular changes associated with the development of pathological processes. It is known that antibodies are produced in response to proteins expressed during cancer development. Accordingly, the changes in antibody repertoire associated with tumor growth can serve as biomarkers of cancer. Immunosignature is a highly sensitive method for antibody repertoire analysis utilizing high density peptide microarrays. In the present review we discuss modern methods for antibody detection, as well as describe the principles and applications of immunosignature in research and clinical practice.

  12. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Leonard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131 I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  13. Quantitative relationship between antibody affinity and antibody avidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griswold, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between antibody avidity, measured by the dissociation of the antigen-antibody bond in antigen excess, and antibody affinity was studied. Complexes of radiolabelled antigen and antibody of known affinity were prepared in vitro and allowed to stand for seven days to reach equilibrium. Then nonlabelled antigen in one hundred fold excess was added to dissociate the complexes. After an appropriate incubation the fraction of antigen bound to antibody was measured by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method. The dissociation index was the fraction bound in the experimental sample divided by the fraction bound in the control. The correlation coefficient between the dissociation index and the antibody binding constant was 0.92 for early dissociation and 0.98 for late dissociation. The regression equation relating the binding constant to the dissociation index was K = 6.4(DI) + 6.25, where DI is the late dissociation index and K is the logarithm to the base 10 of the binding constant. There is a high correlation between avidity and affinity of antibody. Antibody affinity can be estimated from avidity data. The stability of antigen-antibody complexes can be predicted from antibody affinity

  14. Anti-idiotypes against a monoclonal anti-haloperidol antibody bind to dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elazar, Z.; Kanety, H.; Schreiber, M.; Fuchs, S.

    1988-01-01

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies were raised in rabbits by immunization with a monoclonal anti-haloperidol antibody. Some of these anti-idiotypic antibodies bind in a concentration dependent manner to bovine striatal membranes. Following affinity purification, these antibodies inhibit haloperidol binding to striatal membranes and deplete [ 3 H]-spiperone binding sites from a solubilized preparation of striatal membranes. It is thus concluded that these anti-idiotypic antibodies are an internal image of haloperidol and as such can interact with D 2 -dopamine receptors

  15. Santa Fe Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The 10th USA National Particle Accelerator Conference was hosted this year by the Los Alamos National Laboratory in Santa Fe from 21-23 March. It was a resounding success in emphasizing the ferment of activity in the accelerator field. About 900 people registered and about 500 papers were presented in invited and contributed talks and poster sessions

  16. Annual Conference Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  17. International Nuclear Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    We are pleased to announce that the 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference (INPC2016) will take place in Adelaide (Australia) from September 11-16, 2016. The 25th INPC was held in Firenze in 2013 and the 24th INPC in Vancouver, Canada, in 2010. The Conference is organized by the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter at the University of Adelaide, together with the Australian National University and ANSTO. It is also sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by a number of organisations, including AUSHEP, BNL, CoEPP, GSI and JLab. INPC 2016 will be held in the heart of Adelaide at the Convention Centre on the banks of the River Torrens. It will consist of 5 days of conference presentations, with plenary sessions in the mornings, up to ten parallel sessions in the afternoons, poster sessions and a public lecture. The Conference will officially start in the evening of Sunday 11th September with Registration and a Reception and will end late on the afternoon of Fri...

  18. Hamburg Accelerator Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Edmund J.N. [CERN Accelerator School (Switzerland)

    1992-10-15

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). A natural highlight was the recent commissioning success of the HERA electron-proton collider at Hamburg's DESY Laboratory and its first high energy electron-proton collision data. This gave the meeting the feel of a family event celebrating a newborn.

  19. Bioenergy 93 conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In this report the presentations given in the Bioenergy 93 Conference are published. The papers are grouped as follows: Opening addresses, biomass implementation strategies, nordic bioenergy research programs, production, handling and conversion of biofuels, combustion technology of biofuels and bioenergy visions

  20. Leader Training Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan-Ohio Regional Educational Lab., Inc., Detroit.

    The purpose of this conference was to prepare key people in the field of education to function as inservice education leaders in their respective settings. It called for participants to learn what the MOREL inservice education program is and what it hopes to accomplish, to identify the role and functions of the inservice education leader, and to…

  1. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, Evan [American Institute of Chemical Engineers

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  2. Vienna wirechamber conference 98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This volume of the Vienna wirechamber conference 1998 contains abstracts of lectures and abstracts of poster sessions of the following topics: high energy physics, gaseous detectors, radiation detectors, calorimetry, drift chambers, wire spark chambers, tracking chambers, neutron detectors, particle detection, muon spectrometry, nuclear medicine. (Suda)

  3. CONFERENCE: Quark matter 88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    The 'Quark Matter' Conference caters for physicists studying nuclear matter under extreme conditions. The hope is that relativistic (high energy) heavy ion collisions allow formation of the long-awaited quark-gluon plasma, where the inter-quark 'colour' force is no longer confined inside nucleon-like dimensions

  4. Transactions: student conference, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Papers presented at this conference covered the topics of CANDU reactor physics, control systems and steam generators; imaging in neutron radiography; cooling systems for a SLOWPOKE reactor; accelerator breeders; the investigation of point defects using positrons; neutron and gamma detectors; fusion reaction kinetics; and heavy ion fusion

  5. International waste management conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the international waste management conference. Topics covered include: Quality assurance in the OCR WM program; Leading the spirit of quality; Dept. of Energy hazardous waste remedial actions program; management of hazardous waste projects; and System management and quality assurance

  6. Microbicides 2006 conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGowan Ian

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities.

  7. Hamburg Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Edmund J.N.

    1992-01-01

    From 20-24 July, Hamburg welcomed the Fifteenth International Conference on High Energy Accelerators (HEACC). A natural highlight was the recent commissioning success of the HERA electron-proton collider at Hamburg's DESY Laboratory and its first high energy electron-proton collision data. This gave the meeting the feel of a family event celebrating a newborn

  8. Grammar! A Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lid, Ed.; Boaks, Peter, Ed.

    Papers from a conference on the teaching of grammar, particularly in second language instruction, include: "Grammar: Acquisition and Use" (Richard Johnstone); "Grammar and Communication" (Brian Page); "Linguistic Progression and Increasing Independence" (Bernardette Holmes); "La grammaire? C'est du bricolage!" ("Grammar? That's Hardware!") (Barry…

  9. Wire chamber conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, W.; Neuhofer, G.; Regler, M.

    1986-02-01

    This booklet contains program and the abstracts of the papers presented at the conference, most of them dealing with performance testing of various types of wire chambers. The publication of proceedings is planned as a special issue of 'Nuclear instruments and methods' later on. All abstracts are in English. An author index for the book of abstracts is given. (A.N.)

  10. Santa Fe Linac Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The 1981 Linear Accelerator Conference, organized by Los Alamos National Laboratory, was held from 19-23 October in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The surroundings were superb and helped to ensure a successful meeting. There were more than two hundred and twenty participants, with good representation from Japan and Western Europe

  11. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  12. Indico CONFERENCE: Define the Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    In this tutorial you are going to learn how to define the programme of a conference in Indico. The program of your conference is divided in different “tracks”. Tracks represent the subject matter of the conference, such as “Online Computing”, “Offline Computing”, and so on.

  13. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conference summaries. Canadian Nuclear Association 29. annual conference; Canadian Nuclear Society 10. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers from the twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Abstracts were also prepared for the 102 papers from the tenth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society

  15. Conference summaries. Canadian Nuclear Association 29. annual conference; Canadian Nuclear Society 10. annual conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers from the twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Abstracts were also prepared for the 102 papers from the tenth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society.

  16. NIH Consensus Conference. Acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-04

    To provide clinicians, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of the use and effectiveness of acupuncture to treat a variety of conditions. A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member panel representing the fields of acupuncture, pain, psychology, psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, drug abuse, family practice, internal medicine, health policy, epidemiology, statistics, physiology, biophysics, and the representatives of the public. In addition, 25 experts from these same fields presented data to the panel and a conference audience of 1200. Presentations and discussions were divided into 3 phases over 2 1/2 days: (1) presentations by investigators working in areas relevant to the consensus questions during a 2-day public session; (2) questions and statements from conference attendees during open discussion periods that were part of the public session; and (3) closed deliberations by the panel during the remainder of the second day and morning of the third. The conference was organized and supported by the Office of Alternative Medicine and the Office of Medical Applications of Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. The literature, produced from January 1970 to October 1997, was searched through MEDLINE, Allied and Alternative Medicine, EMBASE, and MANTIS, as well as through a hand search of 9 journals that were not indexed by the National Library of Medicine. An extensive bibliography of 2302 references was provided to the panel and the conference audience. Expert speakers prepared abstracts of their own conference presentations with relevant citations from the literature. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. The panel, answering predefined questions, developed their conclusions based on the scientific evidence presented in the open forum and scientific literature. The panel composed a draft statement, which was read in its entirety and circulated to the experts and the audience

  17. Concentrated Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2014-01-01

    This entry summarizes the main theoretical contributions and empirical findings in relation to concentrated ownership from a law and economics perspective. The various forms of concentrated ownership are described as well as analyzed from the perspective of the legal protection of investors......, especially minority shareholders. Concentrated ownership is associated with benefits and costs. Concentrated ownership may reduce agency costs by increased monitoring of top management. However, concentrated ownership may also provide dominating owners with private benefits of control....

  18. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A High-Throughput Antibody-Based Microarray Typing Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashan Perera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Many rapid methods have been developed for screening foods for the presence of pathogenic microorganisms. Rapid methods that have the additional ability to identify microorganisms via multiplexed immunological recognition have the potential for classification or typing of microbial contaminants thus facilitating epidemiological investigations that aim to identify outbreaks and trace back the contamination to its source. This manuscript introduces a novel, high throughput typing platform that employs microarrayed multiwell plate substrates and laser-induced fluorescence of the nucleic acid intercalating dye/stain SYBR Gold for detection of antibody-captured bacteria. The aim of this study was to use this platform for comparison of different sets of antibodies raised against the same pathogens as well as demonstrate its potential effectiveness for serotyping. To that end, two sets of antibodies raised against each of the “Big Six” non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC as well as E. coli O157:H7 were array-printed into microtiter plates, and serial dilutions of the bacteria were added and subsequently detected. Though antibody specificity was not sufficient for the development of an STEC serotyping method, the STEC antibody sets performed reasonably well exhibiting that specificity increased at lower capture antibody concentrations or, conversely, at lower bacterial target concentrations. The favorable results indicated that with sufficiently selective and ideally concentrated sets of biorecognition elements (e.g., antibodies or aptamers, this high-throughput platform can be used to rapidly type microbial isolates derived from food samples within ca. 80 min of total assay time. It can also potentially be used to detect the pathogens from food enrichments and at least serve as a platform for testing antibodies.

  20. Wake Conference 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The 52 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2017 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland, Sweden. The Wake Conference series began in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 the conference took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it went back to where it started, Visby, and this time it once again takes place at Uppsala University’s Gotland campus, May 30 th - June 1 st . Modern wind turbines are today clustered in large farms with a total production capacity reaching those of a nuclear power plant. When placed in a wind farm, the turbines will be fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. This wake interaction results in a decreased power production, caused by the lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of wind farms. The increased importance and interest in the field of wake and wind farm aerodynamics can be seen in the increased number of scientific articles on the subject. For example, on the Web of Science citation index, the number citations on the topic ‘wind turbine wakes’ increased from about 50 in 2006 to more than 3800 in 2016. This citation growth essentially shows that the growth in the global production of electrical energy has become a scientific problem to be solved by scientists and engineers. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global climate change, the wind industry’s growth must continue. A part of making this growth possible will require research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. This conference is aimed at scientists and PhD students working in the field of wake dynamics. The conference covers the following subject areas: Wake and

  1. An educational conference in a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Gordon

    2011-12-01

    Western Sussex Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust comprises the District General Hospitals of Worthing and Chichester. Both hospitals have successful postgraduate medical education centres, providing training for junior doctors and continuing professional development for senior doctors. Until now, there have been limited multi-professional teaching and learning activities available. The two hospitals have recently merged. The education executive felt that workplace learning had become undervalued since the implementation of Modernising Medical Careers in the UK. The executive wanted to provide a multi-professional conference on Workplace Learning, both to support the merger and to promote the value of workplace and multi-professional learning. The conference topic covering the 'how' of workplace learning was innovative. Many educational conferences concentrate on the organisation and evaluation of classroom learning, rather than on how learning can be facilitated in the workplace during ordinary working practice. It was also innovative to ensure that the presenters were representative of the multi-professional workforce. The presentations were limited to 8 minutes each to promote high-impact short presentations. The talks were recorded for publishing on the trust's intranet and the internet. A committed team in a district general hospital can provide a high-quality educational conference with wide appeal. Local health care professionals can produce short high-impact presentations. The use of modern information technology and audio-visual systems can make the presentations available to both local and worldwide audiences. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  2. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...... and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...

  3. Cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenberg, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a perspective of the use of antibodies to target diagnostic isotopes to tumors. Antibodies with reasonable specificity can be developed against almost any substance. If selective targeting to cancer cells can be achieved, the prospects for a selective therapy are equally intriguing. But the development of cancer detection, or imaging, with radiolabeled antibodies has depended upon advances in a number of different areas, including cancer immunology and immunochemistry for identifying suitable antigen targets and antibodies to these targets, tumor biology for model systems, radiochemistry for he attachment of radionuclides to antibodies, molecular biology for reengineering the antibodies for safer and more effective use in humans, and nuclear medicine for providing the best imaging protocols and instrumentation to detect minute amounts of elevated radioactivity against a background of considerable noise. Accordingly, this book has been organized to address the advances that are being made in many of these areas

  4. Antibodies against oligodendrocytes in serum and CSF in multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases: 125I-protein A studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steck, A.J.; Link, H.

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies against oligodendrocytes were determined in pairs of unconcentrated CSF serum from 12 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 25 control patients including 10 with aseptic meningoencephalitis (AM), using a 125 I-protein A microassay. Antibody levels in serum and in CSF did not differ between MS and controls. Calculating the antibody index equal to (CSF/serum antibodies against oligodendrocytes):(CSF/serum albumin) in analogy to the CSF IgG index, thereby compensating for influence of serum antibody concentration as well as altered blood-brain barrier, no evidence was obtained for intrathecal antibody production in the patients with MS. Those with AM had higher antibody index values, probably reflecting intrathecal synthesis. Antibodies against oligodendrocytes seem to be regular component of CSF and serum in neurological diseases; intrathecal antibody production is less frequent in MS than in AM. (author)

  5. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  6. Computational Intelligence : International Joint Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rosa, Agostinho; Cadenas, José; Dourado, António; Madani, Kurosh; Filipe, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The present book includes a set of selected extended papers from the sixth International Joint Conference on Computational Intelligence (IJCCI 2014), held in Rome, Italy, from 22 to 24 October 2014. The conference was composed by three co-located conferences:  The International Conference on Evolutionary Computation Theory and Applications (ECTA), the International Conference on Fuzzy Computation Theory and Applications (FCTA), and the International Conference on Neural Computation Theory and Applications (NCTA). Recent progresses in scientific developments and applications in these three areas are reported in this book. IJCCI received 210 submissions, from 51 countries, in all continents. After a double blind paper review performed by the Program Committee, 15% were accepted as full papers and thus selected for oral presentation. Additional papers were accepted as short papers and posters. A further selection was made after the Conference, based also on the assessment of presentation quality and audience in...

  7. Indico CONFERENCE tutorial

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Manzoni, Alex Marc

    2017-01-01

    This short tutorial explains how to create a CONFERENCE in indico and how to handle abstracts and registration forms, in detail: Timestamps: 1:01 - Programme  2:28 - Call for abstracts  11:50 - Abstract submission  13:41 - Abstract Review 15:41 - The Judge's Role 17:23 - Registration forms' creation 23:34 - Candidate participant's registration/application 25:54 - Customisation of Indico pages - Layout 28:08 - Customisation of Indico pages - Menus 29:47 - Configuring Event reminders and import into calendaring tools   See HERE a recent presentation by Pedro about the above steps in the life of an indico CONFERENCE event.

  8. 7th IAASS Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rongier, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The 7th IAASS Conference, “Space Safety is No Accident” is an invitation to reflect and exchange information on a number of topics in space safety and sustainability of national and international interest. The conference is also a forum to promote mutual understanding, trust and the widest possible international cooperation in such matters. The once exclusive “club” of nations with autonomous sub-orbital and orbital space access capabilities is becoming crowded with fresh and ambitious new entrants. New commercial spaceports are starting operations and others are being built. In the manned spaceflight arena a commercial market is becoming a tangible reality with suborbital spaceflights and government use of commercial services for cargo and crew transportation to orbit. Besides the national ambitions in space, the international cooperation both civil and commercial is also gaining momentum. In the meantime robotic space exploration will accelerate and with it the need to internationally better regulat...

  9. Annual conference SAEE 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The role of economical support instruments in the successful and efficient propagation of renewable forms of energy was the issue addressed by the 2009 conference of the Swiss Association for Energy Economics. Topics covered include production conditions, resource annuities and remuneration for the feeding-in of power generated from renewable forms of energy, a review of instruments for the encouragement of the use of renewable forms of energy from the economics point of view and the appraisal of support instruments from the economic policy point of view. Contributions presented in the second session include a review of global and national potentials for the use of renewable forms of energy, a review of instruments and their effect on the market from the point of view of an energy utility active at national and European levels, and, finally, the question if economic instruments are needed to support investments in renewable forms of energy is posed. A podium session concluded the conference

  10. UKSG Annual Conference 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Dutta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available UKSG offered four free places for students to attend the 2012 Conference, made possible with generous support from Elsevier, whose contribution is very much appreciated. Those eligible to apply were students enrolled on Library & Information and Publishing degree courses, and the successful applicants were (Ieft to right as photographed against the River Clyde: Stuart Lawson (University of Brighton, Jennifer Lovatt (Oxford Brookes University, Gopal Dutta (University of Sheffield and Lydia Lantzsch (Oxford Brookes University. The four have allowed us to take a peek at the diaries they kept during the conference. The extracts below give us a flavour of the event including the plenary and breakout sessions, the debates and the stamina of those who kept the dancing going!

  11. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  12. 2013 APPLEPIES Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a thorough overview of cutting-edge research on electronics applications relevant to industry, the environment, and society at large. A wide spectrum of application domains are covered, from automotive to space and from health to security, and special attention is devoted to the use of embedded devices and sensors for imaging, communication, and control. The book is based on the 2013 APPLEPIES Conference, held in Rome, which brought together researchers and stakeholders to consider the most significant current trends in the field of applied electronics and to debate visions for the future. Areas covered by the conference included information communication technology; biotechnology and biomedical imaging; space; secure, clean, and efficient energy; the environment; and smart, green, and integrated transport. As electronics technology continues to develop apace, constantly meeting previously unthinkable targets, further attention needs to be directed toward the electronics applications and th...

  13. The third Geneva Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1964-12-15

    Full text: On 31 August 1964, the Third United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy (more familiarly known as the 'Third Geneva') was opened at the Palais des Nations in Geneva by the Secretary-General of the United Nations, U Thant. It was somewhat narrower in scope than the previous conferences held in 1935 and 1958, the emphasis being on nuclear power and closely related topics; the conference showed that recent progress in this field had provided more than ample material for a major international gathering. All three conferences have been organized by the United Nations, but on this occasion responsibility for the scientific aspects was delegated to IAEA. The UN Scientific Advisory Committee provided advice and guidance on the scientific side. Under the presidency of Professor V. S. Emelyanov (USSR) the conference sat from 31 August to 9 September, to deal with a programme divided into eight general sessions and 36 technical sessions, for which a total of nearly 750 papers were presented. About 1800 delegates and advisers, representing 75 countries as well as UN agencies, attended; in addition there were some 2000 observers. The central theme of the conference was experience in the construction and operation of power reactors and recent advances in power technology, together with forecasts of future developments. Nuclear fuels and reactor materials, health and safety, waste disposal, and economics of nuclear power figured largely. Technical sessions were devoted to such subjects as the technical and economic aspects of the power reactor systems currently in operation or being built, and the main lines of development towards more advanced systems and development of the fast breeder. Parallel lines of development of alternative systems were also considered - some, such as organic reactors, having already been the subject of extensive trials, while others are in the conceptual stage. 'Package' power plants designed for easy

  14. IEEE conference record -- Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This conference covers the following areas: computational plasma physics; vacuum electronic; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasmas; plasma, electron, and ion sources; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; space plasmas; plasma processing; ball lightning/spherical plasma configurations; plasma processing; fast wave devices; magnetic fusion; basic phenomena in partially ionized plasma; dense plasma focus; plasma diagnostics; basic phenomena in weakly ionized gases; fast opening switches; MHD; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; intense ion and electron beams; laser-produced plasmas; microwave plasma interactions; EM and ETH launchers; solid state plasmas and switches; intense beam microwaves; and plasmas for lighting. Separate abstracts were prepared for 416 papers in this conference

  15. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  16. The third Geneva Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Full text: On 31 August 1964, the Third United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy (more familiarly known as the 'Third Geneva') was opened at the Palais des Nations in Geneva by the Secretary-General of the United Nations, U Thant. It was somewhat narrower in scope than the previous conferences held in 1935 and 1958, the emphasis being on nuclear power and closely related topics; the conference showed that recent progress in this field had provided more than ample material for a major international gathering. All three conferences have been organized by the United Nations, but on this occasion responsibility for the scientific aspects was delegated to IAEA. The UN Scientific Advisory Committee provided advice and guidance on the scientific side. Under the presidency of Professor V. S. Emelyanov (USSR) the conference sat from 31 August to 9 September, to deal with a programme divided into eight general sessions and 36 technical sessions, for which a total of nearly 750 papers were presented. About 1800 delegates and advisers, representing 75 countries as well as UN agencies, attended; in addition there were some 2000 observers. The central theme of the conference was experience in the construction and operation of power reactors and recent advances in power technology, together with forecasts of future developments. Nuclear fuels and reactor materials, health and safety, waste disposal, and economics of nuclear power figured largely. Technical sessions were devoted to such subjects as the technical and economic aspects of the power reactor systems currently in operation or being built, and the main lines of development towards more advanced systems and development of the fast breeder. Parallel lines of development of alternative systems were also considered - some, such as organic reactors, having already been the subject of extensive trials, while others are in the conceptual stage. 'Package' power plants designed for easy

  17. XIX Edoardo Amaldi Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Abousahl, Said; Plastino, Wolfango

    2016-01-01

    This book, comprising contributions presented at the XIX Edoardo Amaldi Conference, examines important aspects of international cooperation aimed at enhancing nuclear safety, security, safeguards (the “3S”), and non-proliferation, thereby assisting in the development and maintenance of the verification regime and progress toward a nuclear weapon-free world. The Conference served as a forum where eminent scientists, diplomats, and policymakers could compare national perspectives and update international collaborations. The book opens by addressing the political, institutional, and legal dimensions of the 3S and non-proliferation; current challenges are discussed and attempts made to identify possible solutions and future improvements. Subsequent sections consider scientific developments that can contribute to increased effectiveness in the implementation of international regimes, particularly in critical areas, technology foresight, and the ongoing evaluation of current capabilities. The closing sections d...

  18. Elliptical concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Botella, Angel; Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2006-10-10

    Nonimaging optics is a field devoted to the design of optical components for applications such as solar concentration or illumination. In this field, many different techniques have been used to produce optical devices, including the use of reflective and refractive components or inverse engineering techniques. However, many of these optical components are based on translational symmetries, rotational symmetries, or free-form surfaces. We study a new family of nonimaging concentrators called elliptical concentrators. This new family of concentrators provides new capabilities and can have different configurations, either homofocal or nonhomofocal. Translational and rotational concentrators can be considered as particular cases of elliptical concentrators.

  19. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  20. Vienna Wire Chamber Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    After those of 1978 and 1980, a third Wire Chamber Conference was held from 15-18 February in the Technical University of Vienna. Eight invited speakers covered the field from sophisticated applications in biology and medicine, via software, to the state of the art of gaseous detectors. In some forty other talks the speakers tackled in more detail the topics of gaseous detectors, calorimetry and associated electronics and software

  1. Vancouver Accelerator Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1985-06-15

    Anyone who contends that particle physics is conducted in an ivory tower, not contributing to other fields of science or to humanity at large, should have attended the 1985 Particle Accelerator Conference in Vancouver. Over a thousand participants contributed 781 papers and only a fraction were actually related to accelerators for high energy physics. The majority of present developments are in the service of other fields of science, for alternative power sources, for medicine, for industrial applications, etc.

  2. Computing Conference at Bologna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    From 9-12 September a Europhysics Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics, organized by the Computational Physics Group of the European Physical Society, was held in Bologna, attracting some 150 participants. Its purpose was contact and exchange of information between experimental physicists (from both fields of research) and computer experts (on whom the successful outcome of the research has become increasingly dependent)

  3. CONFERENCE: Nordic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Around 80 physicists from eleven countries fought heavy snowstorms and 20-below temperatures at the winter resort of Spåtind, Norway, for the 8th Nordic Meeting on Elementary Particle Physics in January. This biennial conference is a traditional meeting place for Nordic particle physicists, and especially for the young research students, but also draws participants from other countries. This year's meeting was organized by the Division of Particle Physics of the Swedish Physical Society

  4. Incineration conference 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the 1990 incineration conference. The proceedings are organized under the following headings: Regulations- international comparison, Current trends in facility design, Oxygen enhancement, Metals, Off-gas treatment, Operating experience: transportable, Materials, Operating experience: R/A and mixed, Incineration of specific wastes, Medical waste management, Ash qualification, Ash solidification/ immobilization, Innovative technologies, Operating experience : medical waste, Instrumentation and monitoring, process control and modeling, Risk assessment/management, Operating considerations

  5. Vancouver Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Anyone who contends that particle physics is conducted in an ivory tower, not contributing to other fields of science or to humanity at large, should have attended the 1985 Particle Accelerator Conference in Vancouver. Over a thousand participants contributed 781 papers and only a fraction were actually related to accelerators for high energy physics. The majority of present developments are in the service of other fields of science, for alternative power sources, for medicine, for industrial applications, etc

  6. Interan '82 conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrusnik, I.

    1982-01-01

    The conference was held on September 20 to 23, 1982, in Karlovy Vary and was devoted to analytical problems related to the determination of water and air pollution. Some of the papers presented in session ''Water'' dealt with the analysis of water contaminated by nuclear power plants, and the use of tracer techniques. The session devoted to the atmosphere heard several papers devoted to the use of neutron activation analysis for analyzing air pollution. (Ha)

  7. Chicago particle accelerator conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Naturally, emphasis at the Particle Accelerator Conference in Chicago in March was on work in the US, just as the newly instituted European Particle Accelerator Conference places emphasis on work in the 'old continent'. All will come together at the international conference in Japan in August. The proposed US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) was highlighted in the opening talk at Chicago. Progress on this inchoate project to explore the TeV (1000 GeV) energy region by colliding 20 TeV proton beams was reported by the recently-appointed Director of the SSC Laboratory, Roy Schwitters. He reviewed the physics challenges and described progress and plans towards full authorization of construction.This year, the SSC conceptual design will be transformed into a 'site specific' report, now that the location at Waxahachie in Ellis County, Texas, has been selected. The Central Design Group, based in Berkeley for the past few years, will soon move to the Waxahachie region. The top management structure is taking shape and an International Advisory Committee is being formed

  8. International Conference Medical Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text : The second edition of the international conference Medical radiation : research and applications which took place in Marrakech (Morocco) from 7 to 9 April 2010, was designed to bring together researchers and physicians from different countries who dedicated their talents and time to this endeavour. The conference's program defined goals were is to identify the most reliable techniques among the several tested so far and to establish the most practical standardized methodologies, taking into account such recent technological development in radiation medical research. The scientific objectives of this conference are as follows : present the state of the art of the various topics of the congress, give a progress report on the impact of the interaction of the various scientific and technical disciplinary fields (Medicine, Biology, Mathematics, Physics,..) on the applications of radiations in medicine, promote the interdisciplinary efforts of research among researchers, present new technologies and research and development tasks prepared in the field of medical radiations, contribute to the emergence of new ideas of research and development of new collaborations [fr

  9. Conference on Logical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Remmel, Jeffrey; Shore, Richard; Sweedler, Moss; Progress in Computer Science and Applied Logic

    1993-01-01

    The twenty-six papers in this volume reflect the wide and still expanding range of Anil Nerode's work. A conference on Logical Methods was held in honor of Nerode's sixtieth birthday (4 June 1992) at the Mathematical Sciences Institute, Cornell University, 1-3 June 1992. Some of the conference papers are here, but others are from students, co-workers and other colleagues. The intention of the conference was to look forward, and to see the directions currently being pursued, in the development of work by, or with, Nerode. Here is a brief summary of the contents of this book. We give a retrospective view of Nerode's work. A number of specific areas are readily discerned: recursive equivalence types, recursive algebra and model theory, the theory of Turing degrees and r.e. sets, polynomial-time computability and computer science. Nerode began with automata theory and has also taken a keen interest in the history of mathematics. All these areas are represented. The one area missing is Nerode's applied mathematica...

  10. Chicago particle accelerator conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, Brian

    1989-06-15

    Naturally, emphasis at the Particle Accelerator Conference in Chicago in March was on work in the US, just as the newly instituted European Particle Accelerator Conference places emphasis on work in the 'old continent'. All will come together at the international conference in Japan in August. The proposed US Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) was highlighted in the opening talk at Chicago. Progress on this inchoate project to explore the TeV (1000 GeV) energy region by colliding 20 TeV proton beams was reported by the recently-appointed Director of the SSC Laboratory, Roy Schwitters. He reviewed the physics challenges and described progress and plans towards full authorization of construction.This year, the SSC conceptual design will be transformed into a 'site specific' report, now that the location at Waxahachie in Ellis County, Texas, has been selected. The Central Design Group, based in Berkeley for the past few years, will soon move to the Waxahachie region. The top management structure is taking shape and an International Advisory Committee is being formed.

  11. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  12. Concentration risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentration risk has been gaining a special dimension in the contemporary financial and economic environment. Financial institutions are exposed to this risk mainly in the field of lending, mostly through their credit activities and concentration of credit portfolios. This refers to the concentration of different exposures within a single risk category (credit risk, market risk, operational risk, liquidity risk.

  13. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  14. Architecture of conference control functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausar, Nadia; Crowcroft, Jon

    1999-11-01

    Conference control is an integral part in many-to-many communications that is used to manage and co-ordinate multiple users in conferences. There are different types of conferences which require different types of control. Some of the features of conference control may be user invoked while others are for internal management of a conference. In recent years, ITU (International Telecommunication Union) and IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) have standardized two main models of conferencing, each system providing a set of conference control functionalities that are not easily provided in the other one. This paper analyzes the main activities appropriate for different types of conferences and presents an architecture for conference control called GCCP (Generic Conference Control Protocol). GCCP interworks different types of conferencing and provides a set of conference control functions that can be invoked by users directly. As an example of interworking, interoperation of IETF's SIP and ITU's H.323 call control functions have been examined here. This paper shows that a careful analysis of a conferencing architecture can provide a set of control functions essential for any group communication model that can be extensible if needed.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against plant viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, E.; Dietzgen, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Ever since antigenic properties of plant viruses were discovered antisera have been raised and used for plant virus diagnosis and for the analysis of virus structure as well. From the early qualitative diagnosis method of precipitating the virus in clarified sap of an infected plant and the first quantitative application of the precipitin test vast progress has been made with regard to the development of highly sensitive and highly quantitative methods for virus detection. Of equal importance was the improvement of methods for separating virus from host cell components since the specificity of antisera raised against a virus could be increased by using an antigen for immunization highly concentrated and largely freed from contaminating host substances. The introduction of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) into plant virology allows detection of virus in nanogram quantities. Still, the conventionally raised antisera, no matter how pure an antigen was used for immunization, are polyclonal. They contain products of thousands of different antibody-secreting plasma cell clones which can be directed against all antigenic determinants (epitopes) of the virus, but also against antigens of the host plant that may not have been entirely separated from the immunizing virus during the purification procedure. Even after cross adsorption of polyclonal antisera some residual heterogeneity can be expected to remain. Within these boundaries the information gained with polyclonal antisera on virus structure and on virus diagnosis has to be interpreted

  16. Basic studies on the tumor imaging using antibodies to human alpha-fetoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakahara, Harumi; Endo, Keigo; Nakashima, Tetsuo; Ohta, Hitoya; Torizuka, Kanji

    1984-01-01

    Using polyclonal antibodies to human α-fetoprotein (AFP), the effect of iodination on the antibody activity and tumor accumulation of radioiodinated antibodies in tumor bearing nude mice were examined. Antibodies, obtained from horse antiserum and purified by affinity chromatography, were iodinated by the chloramine-T method and their antibody activity was evaluated using RIA and Scatchard plot analysis. When high concentrations of chloramine-T were used or more than 2.6 iodine atoms were incorporated per antibody molecule, the antigen binding capacity rather than the affinity constant was affected by the iodination. The antibody activity was completely destroyed at an iodine to antibody molar ratio of 15.4. Antibodies, however, which were iodinated under low concentrations of chloramine-T and contained less than 0.8 iodines per antibody molecule, showed almost full retention of their antibody activity. Nude mice transplanted with AFP producing human testicular tumor or AFP non-producing human urinary bladder tumor were administered intravenously with 131 I-labeled antibodies to human AFP. Scintigrams were taken at 1, 2, 4 and 7 days after the injection of labeled antibodies. At day 7, nude mice were sacrificed and organs and tumor were removed, weighed and counted. In nude mice bearing testicular tumor, tumor image became gradually clear with decreasing background activity and tumor to blood ratio, obtained, was 0.82 for testicular tumor compared to 0.42 for bladder tumor. These results indicated a specific in vivo localization of 131 I-labeled antihuman AFP antibodies in AFP producing tumor. (author)

  17. Conference Report: The First ATLAS.ti User Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine C. Evers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This report on the First ATLAS.ti User Conference shares our impressions and experiences as longstanding ATLAS.ti users and trainers about the First ATLAS.ti User Conference in Berlin 2013. The origins, conceptual principles and development of the program are outlined, the conference themes discussed and experiences shared. Finally, the future of the program is discussed. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1401197

  18. Concentrator Photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Antonio L

    2007-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar-energy conversion is one of the most promising technologies for generating renewable energy, and conversion of concentrated sunlight can lead to reduced cost for solar electricity. In fact, photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight insures an efficient and cost-effective sustainable power resource. This book gives an overview of all components, e.g. cells, concentrators, modules and systems, for systems of concentrator photovoltaics. The authors report on significant results related to design, technology, and applications, and also cover the fundamental physics and market considerations. Specific contributions include: theory and practice of sunlight concentrators; an overview of concentrator PV activities; a description of concentrator solar cells; design and technology of modules and systems; manufacturing aspects; and a market study.

  19. Solar-hydrogen generation and solar concentration (Conference Presentation)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulima, Oleg V.; Chinello, Enrico; Conibeer, Gavin; Modestino, Miquel A.; Schüttauf, Jan-Willem; Lambelet, David; Delfino, Antonio; Domine, Didier; Faes, Antonin; Despeisse, Matthieu; Bailat, Julien; Psaltis, Demetri; Fernandez Rivas, David; Ballif, Christophe; Moser, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We successfully demonstrated and reported the highest solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with crystalline silicon cells and Earth-abundant electrocatalysts under unconcentrated solar radiation. The combination of hetero-junction silicon cells and a 3D printed Platinum/Iridium-Oxide electrolyzer has been

  20. Antibody-Based Immunotoxins for the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit Becker

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibody-based immunotoxins comprise an important group in targeted cancer therapeutics. These chimeric proteins are a form of biological guided missiles that combine a targeting moiety with a potent effector molecule. The targeting moiety is mostly a monoclonal antibody (MAb or a recombinant antibody-based fragment that confers target specificity to the immunotoxin. The effector domain is a potent protein toxin of bacterial or plant origin, which, following binding to the target cells, undergoes internalization and causes cell death. Over time and following research progression, immunotoxins become better fitted to their purpose, losing immunogenic fragments and non-specific targeting moieties. Many immunotoxins have gone through clinical evaluation. Some of these have been shown to be active and work is progressing with them in the form of further clinical trials. Others, mostly developed in the previous century, failed to generate a response in patients, or even caused undesired side effects. This article reviews the antibody and protein-toxin based immunotoxins that were clinically evaluated up to the present day.

  1. A binary plasmid system for shuffling combinatorial antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, T A; Roben, P; O'Kennedy, R; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Lerner, R A

    1992-11-01

    We have used a binary system of replicon-compatible plasmids to test the potential for promiscuous recombination of heavy and light chains within sets of human Fab fragments isolated from combinatorial antibody libraries. Antibody molecules showed a surprising amount of promiscuity in that a particular heavy chain could recombine with multiple light chains with retention of binding to a protein antigen. The degree to which a given heavy chain productively paired with any light chain to bind antigen varied from 43% to 100% and depended strongly on the heavy-chain sequence. Such productive crosses resulted in a set of Fab fragments of similar apparent binding constants, which seemed to differ mainly in the amount of active Fab fragment produced in the bacterial cell. The dominance of the heavy chain in the antibody-antigen interaction was further explored in a set of directed crosses, in which heavy and light chains derived from antigen-specific clones were crossed with nonrelated heavy and light chains. In these crosses, an Fab fragment retained antigen binding only if it contained a heavy chain from an antigen-specific clone. In no case did the light chain confer detectable affinity when paired with indifferent heavy chains. The surprising promiscuity of heavy chains has ramifications for the evaluation of the diversity of combinatorial libraries made against protein antigens and should allow the combination of one such promiscuous heavy chain with an engineered light chain to form an Fab fragment carrying synthetic cofactors to assist in antibody catalysis.

  2. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibodies may or may not be associated with adverse reactions, and identification of the specific type of RBC ... the only things that can cause a transfusion reaction. The recipient's immune ... or to drugs that the donor may have taken. Rarely, antibodies in the plasma ...

  3. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery....... To better understand the underlying mechanisms of antibody-antigen interaction here we present a pipeline developed by us to structurally classify immunoglobulin antigen binding sites and to infer key sequence residues and other variables that have a prominent role in each structural class....

  4. Computational Intelligence : International Joint Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Dourado, António; Rosa, Agostinho; Filipe, Joaquim; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    The present book includes a set of selected extended papers from the fifth International Joint Conference on Computational Intelligence (IJCCI 2013), held in Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal, from 20 to 22 September 2013. The conference was composed by three co-located conferences:  The International Conference on Evolutionary Computation Theory and Applications (ECTA), the International Conference on Fuzzy Computation Theory and Applications (FCTA), and the International Conference on Neural Computation Theory and Applications (NCTA). Recent progresses in scientific developments and applications in these three areas are reported in this book. IJCCI received 111 submissions, from 30 countries, in all continents. After a double blind paper review performed by the Program Committee, only 24 submissions were accepted as full papers and thus selected for oral presentation, leading to a full paper acceptance ratio of 22%. Additional papers were accepted as short papers and posters. A further selection was made after ...

  5. Joint US/German Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gulledge, Thomas; Jones, Albert

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings volume contains selected and refereed contributions that were presented at the conference on "Recent Developments and New Perspectives of Operations Research in the Area of Production Planning and Control" in Hagen/Germany, 25. - 26. June 1992. This conference was organized with the cooperation of the FernuniversiHit Hagen and was jointly hosted by the "Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Operations Research (DGOR)" and the "Manufacturing Special Interest Group of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA-SIGMA)". For the organization of the conference we received generous financial support from the sponsors listed at the end of this volume. We wish to express our appreciation to all supporters for their contributions. This conference was the successor of the JOInt ORSA/DGOR-conference in Gaithersburg/Maryland, USA, on the 30. and 31. July 1991. Both OR-societies committed themselves in 1989 to host joint conferences on special topics of interest from the field of operations research. This goal ...

  6. A "Trojan horse" bispecific-antibody strategy for broad protection against ebolaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wec, Anna Z; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Herbert, Andrew S; Howell, Katie A; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Bakken, Russell R; Mittler, Eva; Christin, John R; Shulenin, Sergey; Jangra, Rohit K; Bharrhan, Sushma; Kuehne, Ana I; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Flyak, Andrew I; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Crowe, James E; Aman, M Javad; Dye, John M; Lai, Jonathan R; Chandran, Kartik

    2016-10-21

    There is an urgent need for monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapies that broadly protect against Ebola virus and other filoviruses. The conserved, essential interaction between the filovirus glycoprotein, GP, and its entry receptor Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) provides an attractive target for such mAbs but is shielded by multiple mechanisms, including physical sequestration in late endosomes. Here, we describe a bispecific-antibody strategy to target this interaction, in which mAbs specific for NPC1 or the GP receptor-binding site are coupled to a mAb against a conserved, surface-exposed GP epitope. Bispecific antibodies, but not parent mAbs, neutralized all known ebolaviruses by coopting viral particles themselves for endosomal delivery and conferred postexposure protection against multiple ebolaviruses in mice. Such "Trojan horse" bispecific antibodies have potential as broad antifilovirus immunotherapeutics. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. The Effect of Induced Antibodies with Respect to Neutralization, Clearance Rate and Functional Activity in a Rabbit/Infliximab Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken Lumby; Søgaard Teisner, Ane; Kjeldsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic antibodies are a developing field for treatment of an expanding number of inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease. Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is frequently hampered by development of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) that may compromise the treatment. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: We addressed this issue in a rabbit model of treatment with the anti-tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antibody, infliximab (IFX). We developed an inhibition ELISA to selectively measure absolute concentrations of neutralizing antibodies and another ELISA for measuring the concentration...... of functional IFX in the circulation. RESULTS: We found that the concentration of functional IFX was inversely proportional to the concentration of neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSION: Administration of IFX to rabbits showed diversity in immune responses/tolerance toward IFX, corresponding to responses observed...

  8. Vancouver Cyclotron Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Although no longer on the high energy frontier, the cyclotron field is still a major scientific growth area. Its progress is highlighted at the international conference on cyclotron design, development and utilization held at intervals of about three years, under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). Vancouver, surrounded by mountains, water and some cyclotrons, provided a pleasant setting for the 13th Conference, held last summer. With over 200 cyclotrons in operation around the world, the attendance, 241 delegates and 26 industrial exhibitors, was a near record, reflecting the flourishing state of the field. The early sessions covered the initial operation of new or upgraded cyclotron facilities. Major facilities completed since the previous Conference in Berlin in May 1989 included the 400 MeV ring cyclotron at Osaka, the U400M cyclotron at Dubna which will be coupled to the U400 to give 20 MeV nucléon uranium beams, the 130 MeV cyclotron at Jyvaskyla (in Finland, the furthest north!), the 110 MeV JAERI machine in Japan, and the 65 MeV proton therapy cyclotron in Nice. Among the facility upgrades were the KFA cyclotron at Julich which will inject the 2.5 GeV storage ring COSY, and the addition of an FM mode to the K=200 CW mode at Uppsala to give protons up to 180 MeV. The impressive current of 1.5 mA at 72 MeV obtained from the PSI Injector II will soon be injected into the 590 MeV ring

  9. IgE antibodies in toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna; Kemona, Halina

    2014-05-15

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. At least a third of the world human population is infected with the parasite, making it one of the most successful parasitic infections. Primary maternal infection may cause health-threatening sequelae for the fetus, or even cause death of the uterus. Reactivation of a latent infection in immune deficiency conditions such as AIDS and organ transplantation can cause fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of chorioretinitis, especially in individuals with impaired immune systems. In the acute phase, directly after invading the body, T. gondii begins to multiply rapidly. In the majority of cases acquired toxoplasmosis is asymptomatic. In the second week of infection, specific IgM antibodies are present in the blood. IgE antibodies appear at the same time, slightly preceding specific IgA antibodies. The concentration of IgE can be one of the parameters used for diagnosing an infection with T. gondii. Laboratory diagnosis, i.e. IgE and serologic assays, plays the main role in the diagnosis of congenital infection and assists in the confirmatory diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis and ocular toxoplasmosis. This article is a review of IgE in toxoplasmosis.

  10. 15th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    This is the 15th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocooler Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  11. 14th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2007-01-01

    This is the 14th volume in the conference series. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  12. International conference on string theory

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The Strings 2017 conference is part of the "Strings" series of annual conferences, that bring the entire string theory community together. It will include reviews of major developments in the field, and specialized talks on specific topics. There will also be several public lectures given by conference participants, a pre-Strings school at the Technion, and a post-Strings workshop at the Weizmann Institute.

  13. National Physics Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oancea, Margareta; Sandu, Doina; Calboreanu, Rodica

    2000-01-01

    The National Physics Conference organized annually by the Romanian Physical Society has been held in Constanta, Romania on September 21-23, 2000. It covered the following 12 sections: - 1. Astrophysics and High Energy (9 reports); - 2. Atomic and Molecular Physics (20 reports); - 3. Nuclear Physics (18 reports); - 4. Technical and Engineering Physics (34 reports); - 5. Condensed Matter Physics (67 reports); - 6. Optics and Quantum Electronics (12 reports); - 7. Plasma Physics (27 reports); - 8. Biophysics (30 reports); - 9. Physics for Energy (17 reports); - 10. Mathematical and Computational Physics (20 reports); -11. Physics and Education (8 reports); - 12. Earth and Environmental Physics (16 reports). The proceedings contains mainly short communications

  14. Proceedings: pellet fuels conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-12-31

    The conference brought together professionals from the process- engineered-fuels (PEF), utility, paper, plastics, and boiler industries. Although the last two decades have produced technical breakthroughs, efforts to advance PEF must now focus on increasing commercial breakthroughs. Successful commercialization will depend on increasing supplier, consumer, and regulator confidence and support by demonstrating the performance and value of PEF products. Speakers provided updates on how PEF technology is evolving with respect to technical, economic, and regulatory challenges. Actions critical toward full commercialization of PEF were then considered. Discussion groups addressed materials sourcing, fuel processing and transportation, combustion, and ash handling.

  15. 2nd UNet conference

    CERN Document Server

    Menasche, Daniel; Sabir, Essaïd; Pellegrini, Francesco; Benjillali, Mustapha

    2017-01-01

    This volume offers the proceedings of the 2nd UNet conference, held in Casablanca May 30 - June 1, 2016. It presents new trends and findings in hot topics related to ubiquitous computing/networking, covered in three tracks and three special sessions: Main Track 1: Context-Awareness and Autonomy Paradigms Track Main Track 2: Mobile Edge Networking and Virtualization Track Main Track 3: Enablers, Challenges and Applications Special Session 1: Smart Cities and Urban Informatics for Sustainable Development Special Session 2: Unmanned Aerial Vehicles From Theory to Applications Special Session 3: From Data to Knowledge: Big Data applications and solutions.

  16. Dynamical Systems Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gils, S; Hoveijn, I; Takens, F; Nonlinear Dynamical Systems and Chaos

    1996-01-01

    Symmetries in dynamical systems, "KAM theory and other perturbation theories", "Infinite dimensional systems", "Time series analysis" and "Numerical continuation and bifurcation analysis" were the main topics of the December 1995 Dynamical Systems Conference held in Groningen in honour of Johann Bernoulli. They now form the core of this work which seeks to present the state of the art in various branches of the theory of dynamical systems. A number of articles have a survey character whereas others deal with recent results in current research. It contains interesting material for all members of the dynamical systems community, ranging from geometric and analytic aspects from a mathematical point of view to applications in various sciences.

  17. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton (bar p) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, bar NN scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, bar N annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy bar p's, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with bar p (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new bar p facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime (≥ 2 GeV/c)

  18. CONFERENCE: Muon spin rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Erik

    1986-11-15

    An international physics conference centred on muons without a word about leptons, weak interactions, EMC effects, exotic decay modes or any other standard high energy physics jargon. Could such a thing even have been imagined ten years ago? Yet about 120 physicists and chemists from 16 nations gathered at the end of June in Uppsala (Sweden) for their fourth meeting on Muon Spin Rotation, Relaxation and Resonance, without worrying about the muon as an elementary particle. This reflects how the experimental techniques based on the muon spin interactions have reached maturity and are widely recognized by condensed matter physicists and specialized chemists as useful tools.

  19. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  20. MICHIGAN: Cyclotron conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    A sense of excitement was in the air as cyclotron physicists and engineers from 17 countries convened on 30 April for the opening of the Tenth International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications. Some 50 years after its invention, the redoubtable cyclotron remains a topic of compelling current interest. Cyclotron experts gathered at Michigan State University's Kellogg Center to hear of latest developments, of progress and successes on new machines which had come into operation, of new projects which were underway, and of dreams which lay ahead

  1. MICHIGAN: Cyclotron conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-10-15

    A sense of excitement was in the air as cyclotron physicists and engineers from 17 countries convened on 30 April for the opening of the Tenth International Conference on Cyclotrons and Their Applications. Some 50 years after its invention, the redoubtable cyclotron remains a topic of compelling current interest. Cyclotron experts gathered at Michigan State University's Kellogg Center to hear of latest developments, of progress and successes on new machines which had come into operation, of new projects which were underway, and of dreams which lay ahead.

  2. Quark search conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of (or perhaps because of) the present doctrine of total quark confinement held by the majority of particle theorists, experimental searches for free fractional charge and other anomalous stable particles in ordinary matter have been increasing in number during recent years, using a range of techniques of increasing sophistication and sensitivity. As a result, researchers in this area had a conference to themselves in June. About 40 participants and 150 observers gathered at San Francisco State University to report progress and discuss future plans, with representatives present from almost every group involved in quark searches

  3. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews

  4. New perspectives on recombinant human antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Kruif (John); A.-R. van der Vuurst de Vries (Anne); L. Cilenti (L.); E. Boel (E.); W. van Ewijk (Willem); T. Logtenberg (Ton)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe limited potential of murine monoclonal antibodies for human immunotherapy has driven recent progress in recombinant antibody technology. Here, de Kruif and colleagues report on advances in the development and use of phage-antibody-display libraries.

  5. Measurement of antibodies to tubulin by radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, G M; Cowin, P; Whitehouse, J M.A. [CRC Medical Oncology Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, U.K.

    1979-07-24

    A solid-phase double antibody radioimmunoassay capable of measuring antibody to tubulin, the principal component of microtubules, is described. This assay is simple, combining sensitivity with specificity and also allowing determination of antibody subclasses.

  6. Radioimmunological demonstration of DNA specific antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falck, P [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin-Buch. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung

    1976-01-01

    Using /sup 125/I chemically labelled denatured (d) and native (n) DNA, specifically binding antibodies were demonstrated in the sera of Lupus erythemathodes patients by means of the Farr technique. (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ was used to separate the immunologically bound /sup 125/I-d-DNA. For /sup 125/I-n-DNA the use of a secondary antiserum for the precipitation of the primary immune complex is advantageous. The influence of antigen concentration upon the binding rate was studied. Titre determinations can be made with the proposed method.

  7. 17th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2012-01-01

    Cryocoolers 17 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 17th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Los Angeles, California, on July 9-12, 2012. The program of this conference consisted of 94 papers; of these, 71 are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  8. 16th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2011-01-01

    Cryocoolers 16 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 16th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 17-20, 2010. The program of this conference consisted of 116 papers; of these, 89 are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  9. 4th International Cryocoolers Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, George; Knox, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    The Cryocoolers 4 proceedings archives the contributions of leading international experts at the 4th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Easton, Maryland on September 25-26, 1986. About 170 people attended the conference representing 11 countries, 14 universities, 21 government laboratories and 60 industrial companies. Thirty-one papers were presented describing advancements and applications of cryocoolers in the temperature range below 80K. This year's conference was sponsored by the David Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center of Annapolis, Maryland, and the conference proceedings reproduced here was published by them.

  10. Does vaccination ensure protection? Assessing diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels in a population of healthy children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, Ewelina; Wysocki, Jacek; Kałużna, Ewelina; Świątek-Kościelna, Bogna; Wysocka-Leszczyńska, Joanna; Michalak, Michał; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vaccination effectiveness is proven when the disease does not develop after a patient is exposed to the pathogen. In the case of rare diseases, vaccination effectiveness is assessed by monitoring specific antibody levels in the population. Such recurrent analyses allow the evaluation of vaccination programs. The primary schedule of diphtheria and tetanus vaccinations is similar in various countries, with differences mainly in the number and timing of booster doses. The aim of the study was to assess diphtheria and tetanus antibody concentrations in a population of healthy children. Diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels were analyzed in a group of 324 children aged 18 to 180 months. All children were vaccinated in accordance with the Polish vaccination schedule. Specific antibody concentrations greater than 0.1 IU/mL were considered protective against tetanus or diphtheria. Levels above 1.0 were considered to ensure long-term protection. Protective levels of diphtheria antibodies were found in 229 patients (70.46%), and of tetanus in 306 patients (94.15%). Statistically significant differences were found in tetanus antibody levels in different age groups. Mean concentrations and the percentage of children with high tetanus antibody titers increased with age. No similar correlation was found for diphtheria antibodies. High diphtheria antibody levels co-occurred in 72% of the children with high tetanus antibody levels; 95% of the children with low tetanus antibody levels had low levels of diphtheria antibodies. The percentage of children with protective diphtheria antibody levels is lower than that in the case of tetanus antibodies, both in Poland and abroad, but the high proportion of children without diphtheria protection in Poland is an exception. This is all the more puzzling when taking into account that Polish children are administered a total of 5 doses containing a high concentration of diphtheria toxoid, at intervals shorter than 5 years. The

  11. Crisis or Conference! Master List for Conference Planners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Tony

    This conference organizer's guide contains 42 lists of ideas, reminders, things to check, and questions to ask when a person is planning an event such as a conference, workshop, or training session. Written from a British point of view, the guide is organized into four parts in chronological order: preplanning, planning, onsite, and…

  12. 20. AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The 20th AINSE plasma science and technology conference was held at Flinders University of South Australia on 13-14 February 1995. Topics under discussion included plasma physics studies, current status of rotamak devices, plasma processing and material studies. The handbook contains the conference program, 54 abstracts and a list of participants.

  13. 20. AINSE plasma science and technology conference. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The 20th AINSE plasma science and technology conference was held at Flinders University of South Australia on 13-14 February 1995. Topics under discussion included plasma physics studies, current status of rotamak devices, plasma processing and material studies. The handbook contains the conference program, 54 abstracts and a list of participants

  14. Annual conference SAEE 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Technical and economic challenges of a 1 t CO 2 society was the topic addressed by the 2008 annual conference of the Swiss Association for Energy Economics. One tonne of carbon dioxide per head and year as a long-term energy strategy is the theme of a presentation made by professor Konstantin Boulouchos from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich, Switzerland. Professor Dr. Rainhard Madlener from the Institute for Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behaviour in Aachen, Germany, took a look at the one-ton CO 2 vision as a focus for technical development. Professor Thomas F. Rutherford from the ETH presented an economic analysis of one-ton CO 2 scenarios. Eduard Schumacher, former Chairman of the Board at the IWB utility in Basel, Switzerland, presented examples of how energy policy can be implemented, using the IWB's activities as an example. Hansruedi Kunz, Head of the Energy Department in the Building Department of the Canton of Zurich discussed the chances offered and the problems posed by the implementation of measures that are to lead to the meeting of energy visions for the year 2050. A podium and discussion session completed the conference

  15. 24. CLI national conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, Jean-Christophe; Jamet, Philippe; Delalonde, Jean-Claude; Revol, Henri; Lallier, Michel; Gaillard, Pierre; Jeffroy, Francois; Miniere, Dominique; Moulin, Ludovic; Charre, Jean-Pierre; Andrieux, Jean-Luc; Dubuis, Thierry; Giusti, Charles; Quintin, Christophe; Riviere, Emmanuel

    2012-12-01

    This document gathers contributions presented during a conference held in December 2012. After introduction speeches, a focus of some updates and an assessment of ANCCLI activities, this conference comprised two round tables. The first one addressed social, organisational and human factors in the nuclear field. It comprised a presentation of works performed by a CLI on these issues and of how CLIs address these issues, a presentation on the evolution of the notion of human factor with a progressive integration of organisational and societal dimensions, with a presentation of ASN actions in this respect (creation of a dialogue structure). Debates have been an occasion to discuss issues like staff and abilities turnover within EDF, subcontracting, and the culture of doubt. The second round table addressed the perception of risks and public information in the case of a nuclear incident or accident which does not require an emergency plan. Beside a presentation on an accident which occurred in the Centraco plant in 2011, the participants discussed how to organise information, the perception of the notion of nuclear safety in France, the difficulty to accept the 'small risk', an initiative of automatic information implemented by industrials in Dunkirk

  16. History of NAMES Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    -Russian International Centre was demonstrated. By the high standards of the reports presented, as well as by its overall organization, the second Seminar met the standards of an international conference. Reviews of state-of-the-art developments in materials science were given by leading scientists from Moscow and from the Lorraine region. The three days of the seminar were structured into four main themes: Functional Materials Coatings, Films and Surface Engineering Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies The Environment and three Round Table discussions: Defining practical means of carrying out Franco-Russian collaborations in technology transfer and innovation Materials science ARCUS: Lorraine-Russian collaboration in materials science and the environment 32 oral and 25 poster presentations within four sections were given by a total of 110 participants. NAMES 2007, the 3rd Franco-Russian Seminar on New Achievements in Materials and Environmental Sciences, took place in Metz, France on 7-9 November 2007. The conference highlights fundamentals and development of the five main themes connected to the Lorraine-Russia ARCUS project with possible extension to other topics. The five main subjects included in the ARCUS project are: Bulk-surface-interface material sciences Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies Environment and natural resources Plasma physics—ITER project Vibrational dynamics The first, second and third NAMES conferences were financially supported by the following organizations: Ambassade de France à Moscou Communauté Urbaine du Grand Nancy Région Lorraine Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine Université de Metz Université Henry Poincaré CNRS ANVAR Federal Agency on Science and Innovations of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation Moscow Committee on Science and Technologies Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys (Technological University) The 4th conference is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of

  17. 2008 Gordon Research Conference on Catalysis [Conference summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soled, Stuart L.; Gray, Nancy Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The GRC on Catalysis is one of the most prestigious catalysis conferences as it brings together leading researchers from around the world to discuss their latest, most exciting work in catalysis. The 2008 conference will continue this tradition. The conference will cover a variety of themes including new catalytic materials, theoretical and experimental approaches to improve understanding of kinetics and transport phenomena, and state of the art nanoscale characterization probes to monitor active sites. The conference promotes interactions among established researchers and young scientists. It provides a venue for students to meet, talk to and learn from some of the world leading researchers in the area. It also gives them a platform for displaying their own work during the poster sessions. The informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the presentations and posters, and ability to meet many outstanding colleagues makes this an excellent conference.

  18. Antibodies to a recombinant glutamate-rich Plasmodium falciparum protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogh, B; Petersen, E; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    1992-01-01

    /RESA) (EENV)6 were examined in 423 individuals (age range 30 days-78 years) living in a malaria holoendemic area of Liberia. In the 5-9-year-old age group, subjects with anti-GLURP489-1271 antibody concentrations greater than the mean value of the group had lower parasite densities than those with low...

  19. A fully automated primary screening system for the discovery of therapeutic antibodies directly from B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, Simon; Howells, Louise; O'Dowd, Victoria; Starkie, Dale; Whale, Kevin; Saunders, Mark; Lee, David; Lightwood, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    For a therapeutic antibody to succeed, it must meet a range of potency, stability, and specificity criteria. Many of these characteristics are conferred by the amino acid sequence of the heavy and light chain variable regions and, for this reason, can be screened for during antibody selection. However, it is important to consider that antibodies satisfying all these criteria may be of low frequency in an immunized animal; for this reason, it is essential to have a mechanism that allows for efficient sampling of the immune repertoire. UCB's core antibody discovery platform combines high-throughput B cell culture screening and the identification and isolation of single, antigen-specific IgG-secreting B cells through a proprietary technique called the "fluorescent foci" method. Using state-of-the-art automation to facilitate primary screening, extremely efficient interrogation of the natural antibody repertoire is made possible; more than 1 billion immune B cells can now be screened to provide a useful starting point from which to identify the rare therapeutic antibody. This article will describe the design, construction, and commissioning of a bespoke automated screening platform and two examples of how it was used to screen for antibodies against two targets. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  20. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Noy-Porat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1 that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication.

  1. Building Bridges through Scientific Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierath, Juleen R

    2016-01-01

    Getting together to exchange ideas, forge collaborations, and disseminate knowledge is a long-standing tradition of scientific communities. How conferences are serving the community, what their current challenges are, and what is in store for the future of conferences are the topics covered...

  2. Organization and planning of conferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, S.R.

    1976-05-01

    The author uses as an example of conference planning The First International Topical Conference on Electron Beam Research and Technology which was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 3-6, 1975. Guidelines are given through all phases of planning up to and during the meeting

  3. International conference on plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, V.P.; Sitenko, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    A brief report on the 6th International conference on plasma physics and on the 6th International Congress on plasma waves and plasma instabilities, which have taken place in summer 1984 in Losanne, is presented. Main items of the conference are enlightened, such as the general theory of a plasma, laboratory plasma, thermonuclear plasma, cosmic plasma and astrophysics

  4. The Writing Conference as Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of the conversational roles taken on by students and teachers during college-level writing conferences. Uses the performative theory of Erving Goffman to analyze these role patterns. Illuminates the specific performative demands presented by writing conferences on both students and teachers. (HB)

  5. 2017 Gordon Conference on Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubukov, Andrey [Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN (United States)

    2017-11-14

    The DOE award was for a 2017 Gordon Research conference on Superconductivity (GRC). The objective of GRC is to interchange the information about the latest theoretical and experimental developments in the area of superconductivity and to select most perspective directions for future research in this area.The goal of the Gordon Conference on Superconductivity is to present and discuss the latest results in the field of modern superconductivity, discuss new ideas and new directions of research in the area. It is a long-standing tradition of the Gordon conference on Superconductivity that the vast majority of participants are junior scientists. Funding for the conference would primarily be used to support junior researchers, particularly from under-represented groups. We had more 10 female speakers, some of them junior researchers, and some funding was used to support these speakers. The conference was held together with Gordon Research Seminar on Superconductivity, where almost all speakers and participants were junior scientists.

  6. 4th European Turbulence Conference

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The European Turbulence Conferences have been organized under the auspices of the European Mechanics Committee (Euromech) to provide a forum for discussion and exchange of recent and new results in the field of turbulence. The first conference was organized in Lyon in 1986 with 152 participants. The second and third conferences were held in Berlin (1988) and Stockholm (1990) with 165 and 172 participants respectively. The fourth was organized in Delft from 30 June to 3 July 1992 by the J.M. Burgers Centre. There were 214 participants from 22 countries. This steadily growing number of participants demonstrates both the success and need for this type of conference. The main topics of the Fourth European Turbulence Conference were: Dynamical Systems and Transition; Statistical Physics and Turbulence; Experiments and Novel Experimental Techniques; Particles and Bubbles in Turbulence; Simulation Methods; Coherent Structures; Turbulence Modelling and Compressibility Effects. In addition a special session was held o...

  7. 28th Linear Accelerator Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Facco, Alberto; McCausey, Amy; Schaa, Volker R W

    2017-01-01

    The 28th Linear Accelerator Conference, LINAC 16, to take place at the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center in East Lansing, Michigan, on 25-30 September 2016. This conference is the main bi-yearly gathering for the world-wide community of linac specialists. It provides a unique opportunity to hear about the latest advances of projects and developments concerning hadron and lepton linacs, and their applications. In the tradition of previous LINAC conferences, plenary sessions including invited speakers are scheduled every day. Poster sessions will be held on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. There will also be two special events on Sunday, 25 September 2016, namely a student poster session and an evening reception for registrants and their companions at the Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center. Participants are also warmly invited to join an outing to Lake Michigan and the beautiful surroundings on Wednesday afternoon, and to visit the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams on Friday afternoon, after the formal...

  8. Thermodynamic Mechanism for the Evasion of Antibody Neutralization in Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the epitopes of antigenic proteins can confer viral resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. However, the fundamental properties that characterize epitope residues and how mutations affect antibody binding to alter virus susceptibility to neutralization remain largely unknown. To address these questions, we used an ensemble-based algorithm to characterize the effects of mutations on the thermodynamics of protein conformational fluctuations. We applied this method to the envelope protein domain III (ED3) of two medically important flaviviruses: West Nile and dengue 2. We determined an intimate relationship between the susceptibility of a residue to thermodynamic perturbations and epitope location. This relationship allows the successful identification of the primary epitopes in each ED3, despite their high sequence and structural similarity. Mutations that allow the ED3 to evade detection by the antibody either increase or decrease conformational fluctuations of the epitopes through local effects or long-range interactions. Spatially distant interactions originate in the redistribution of conformations of the ED3 ensembles, not through a mechanically connected array of contiguous amino acids. These results reconcile previous observations of evasion of neutralization by mutations at a distance from the epitopes. Finally, we established a quantitative correlation between subtle changes in the conformational fluctuations of the epitope and large defects in antibody binding affinity. This correlation suggests that mutations that allow viral growth, while reducing neutralization, do not generate significant structural changes and underscores the importance of protein fluctuations and long-range interactions in the mechanism of antibody-mediated neutralization resistance. PMID:24950171

  9. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  10. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  11. Use of peptide antibodies to probe for the mitoxantrone resistance-associated protein MXR/BCRP/ABCP/ABCG2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Jensen, Ulla; Hansen, Alastair

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies have characterized the ABC half-transporter associated with mitoxantrone resistance in human cancer cell lines. Encoded by the ABCG2 gene, overexpression confers resistance to camptothecins, as well as to mitoxantrone. We developed four polyclonal antibodies against peptides corres...

  12. Istanbul Bridge Conference 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Gülkan, Polat; Mahmoud, Khaled

    2016-01-01

      The book includes peer-reviewed contributions selected from presentations given at the Istanbul Bridge Conference 2014, held from August 11 – 13 in Istanbul, Turkey. It reports on the current challenges in bridge engineering faced by professionals around the globe, giving a special emphasis to recently developed techniques, innovations and opportunities. The book covers key topics in the field, including modeling and analysis methods; construction and erection techniques; design for extreme events and condition assessment and structural health monitoring. There is a balanced presentation of theory, research and practice. This book, which provides the readers with a comprehensive and timely reference guide on current practices in bridge engineering, is intended for professionals, academic researchers and students alike.

  13. International Logistics Science Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Hompel, Michael; Meier, J

    2014-01-01

    The importance of logistics in all its variations is still increasing. New technologies emerge, new planning methods and algorithms are developed, only to face a market with a growing complexity and the need of weighting monetary costs against ecological impact. Mastering these challenges requires a scientific viewpoint on logistics, but always with applications in mind. This volume presents up-to-date logistics research in all its diversity and interconnectedness. It grew out of the “International Logistics Science Conference” (ILSC) held in Dortmund in September 2013, bringing together leading scientists and young academics from nine different countries. The conference was jointly organized by the “Efficiency Cluster Logistics” and the “Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics”. The Program Committee used a double blind review process to choose the 12 strongest contributions, which were then grouped in four areas: - Sustainability logistics, including electric mobility, smart inform...

  14. 11th radiochemical conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasil, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The conference met in four sesions which discussed: Separation methods, Radioanalytical methods, Labelled compounds and Miscellaneous. The first session discussed extraction methods, ion exchange and chromatographic separation of radioisotopes. The second session heard papers on the application of these methods, e.g., in geochemistry, on the use of radioactive tracers in radiochemical analysis and the use of activation analysis in the determination of trace elements. The third session heard papers on the preparation of labelled organic compounds with isotopes 3 H, 14 C, radioiodine and 32 P, on the preparation of RIA kits and on the chemistry and radiopharmacology of technetium compounds. The other contributions which could not be heard in any of the three sessions discussed, e.g., the preparation of elements on the cyclotron and microtron, the production of a new 99m Tc-generator, the participation of the IAEA in processing low- and medium-level radioactive wastes, etc. (E.S.)

  15. International Conference UMC 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Hübner, Wolfgang; Rasing, Theo; Chantrell, Roy

    2015-01-01

    This volume on Ultrafast Magnetism is a collection of articles presented at the international “Ultrafast Magnetization Conference” held at the Congress Center in Strasbourg, France, from October 28th to November 1st, 2013. This first conference, which is intended to be held every two years, received a wonderful attendance and gathered scientists from 27 countries in the field of Femtomagnetism, encompassing many theoretical and experimental research subjects related to the spins dynamics in bulk or nanostructured materials. The participants appreciated this unique opportunity for discussing new ideas and debating on various physical interpretations of the reported phenomena. The format of a single session with many oral contributions as well as extensive time for poster presentations allowed researchers to have a detailed overview of the field. Importantly, one could sense that, in addition to studying fundamental magnetic phenomena, ultrafast magnetism has entered in a phase where applied physics and eng...

  16. Nostradamus conference 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guanrong; Rössler, Otto; Snasel, Vaclav; Abraham, Ajith; Nostradamus 2013: Prediction, Modeling and Analysis of Complex Systems

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of behavior of the dynamical systems, analysis and modeling of its structure is vitally important problem in engineering, economy and science today. Examples of such systems can be seen in the world around us and of course in almost every scientific discipline including such “exotic” domains like the earth’s atmosphere, turbulent fluids, economies (exchange rate and stock markets), population growth, physics (control of plasma), information flow in social networks and its dynamics, chemistry and complex networks. To understand such dynamics and to use it in research or industrial applications, it is important to create its models. For this purpose there is rich spectra of methods, from classical like ARMA models or Box Jenkins method to such modern ones like evolutionary computation, neural networks, fuzzy logic, fractal geometry, deterministic chaos and more. This proceeding book is a collection of the accepted papers to conference Nostradamus that has been held in Ostrava, Czech Republic. P...

  17. Stardust Final Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Minisci, Edmondo; Summerer, Leopold; McGinty, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Space debris and asteroid impacts pose a very real, very near-term threat to Earth. In order to help study and mitigate these risks, the Stardust program was formed in 2013. This training and research network was devoted to developing and mastering techniques such as removal, deflection, exploitation, and tracking. This book is a collection of many of the topics addressed at the Final Stardust Conference, describing the latest in asteroid monitoring and how engineering efforts can help us reduce space debris. It is a selection of studies bringing together specialists from universities, research institutions, and industry, tasked with the mission of pushing the boundaries of space research with innovative ideas and visionary concepts. Topics covered by the Symposium: Orbital and Attitude Dynamics Modeling Long Term Orbit and Attitude Evolution Particle Cloud Modeling and Simulation Collision and Impact Modelling and Simulation, Re-entry Modeling and Simulation Asteroid Origins and Characterization Orbit and A...

  18. Madrid Physics Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-11-15

    Hard on the heels of the Lepton-Photon Symposium at Stanford in August came the International Europhysics Conference on High Energy Physics in Madrid from 6-13 September. With the two meetings held so close together, there was much overlap in the physics reported, although some teams were able to use the extra month to present new results. A notable example was the Mark II team working at Stanford's SLC linear collider, who presented new limits on the number of allowed neutrinos.The Madrid meeting attracted about 600 participants from all over the world. An initial three days of parallel sessions followed by four days of plenary talks could cover the field in depth and in breadth.

  19. COMPDYN 2011 Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Fragiadakis, Michalis; Plevris, Vagelis; Computational Methods in Earthquake Engineering v.2

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an insight on advanced methods and concepts for the design and analysis of structures against earthquake loading. This second volume is a collection of 28 chapters written by leading experts in the field of structural analysis and earthquake engineering. Emphasis is given on current state-of-the-art methods and concepts in computing methods and their application in engineering practice. The book content is suitable for both practicing engineers and academics, covering a wide variety of topics in an effort to assist the timely dissemination of research findings for the mitigation of seismic risk. Due to the devastating socioeconomic consequences of seismic events, the topic is of great scientific interest and is expected to be of valuable help to scientists and engineers. The chapters of this volume are extended versions of selected papers presented at the COMPDYN 2011 conference, held in the island of Corfu, Greece, under the auspices of the European Community on Computational Methods in Ap...

  20. The Geometry Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Bárány, Imre; Vilcu, Costin

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents easy-to-understand yet surprising properties obtained using topological, geometric and graph theoretic tools in the areas covered by the Geometry Conference that took place in Mulhouse, France from September 7–11, 2014 in honour of Tudor Zamfirescu on the occasion of his 70th anniversary. The contributions address subjects in convexity and discrete geometry, in distance geometry or with geometrical flavor in combinatorics, graph theory or non-linear analysis. Written by top experts, these papers highlight the close connections between these fields, as well as ties to other domains of geometry and their reciprocal influence. They offer an overview on recent developments in geometry and its border with discrete mathematics, and provide answers to several open questions. The volume addresses a large audience in mathematics, including researchers and graduate students interested in geometry and geometrical problems.

  1. Conference on Multibody Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Multibody Dynamics : Computational Methods and Applications

    2014-01-01

    By having its origin in analytical and continuum mechanics, as well as in computer science and applied mathematics, multibody dynamics provides a basis for analysis and virtual prototyping of innovative applications in many fields of contemporary engineering. With the utilization of computational models and algorithms that classically belonged to different fields of applied science, multibody dynamics delivers reliable simulation platforms for diverse highly-developed industrial products such as vehicle and railway systems, aeronautical and space vehicles, robotic manipulators, smart structures, biomechanical applications and nano-technologies. The chapters of this volume are based on the revised and extended versions of the selected scientific papers from amongst 255 original contributions that have been accepted to be presented within the program of the distinguished international ECCOMAS conference. It reflects state-of-the-art in the advances of multibody dynamics, providing excellent insight in the recen...

  2. Antibodies to watch in 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplon, Hélène; Reichert, Janice M.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pace of antibody therapeutics development accelerated in 2017, and this faster pace is projected to continue through 2018. Notably, the annual number of antibody therapeutics granted a first approval in either the European Union (EU) or United States (US) reached double-digits (total of 10) for the first time in 2017. The 10 antibodies granted approvals are: brodalumab, dupilumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, benralizumab, ocrelizumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, avelumab, duvalumab, and emicizumab. Brodalumab, however, had already been approved in Japan in 2016. As of December 1, 2017, nine antibody therapeutics (ibalizumab, burosumab, tildrakizumab, caplacizumab, erenumab, fremanezumab, galcanezumab, romosozumab, mogamulizumab) were in regulatory review in the EU or US, and regulatory actions on their marketing applications are expected by the end of 2018. Based on company announcements and estimated clinical study primary completion dates, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 12 antibody therapeutics that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted by the end of 2018. Of the 12 candidates, 8 are for non-cancer indications (lanadelumab, crizanlizumab, ravulizumab, eptinezumab, risankizumab, satralizumab, brolucizumab, PRO140) and 4 are for cancer (sacituzumab govitecan, moxetumomab pasudotox, cemiplimab, ublituximab). Additional antibody therapeutics to watch in 2018 include 19 mAbs undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies with primary completion dates in late 2017 or during 2018. Of these mAbs, 9 are for non-cancer indications (lampalizumab, roledumab, emapalumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, etrolizumab, NEOD001, gantenerumab, anifrolumab) and 10 are for cancer indications (tremelimumab, isatuximab, BCD-100, carotuximab, camrelizumab, IBI308, glembatumumab vedotin, mirvetuximab soravtansine, oportuzumab monatox, L19IL2/L19TNF). Positive clinical study results may enable marketing application

  3. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  4. Analysis of a solid-phase radioimmunoassay for antibodies to cytoplasmic antigen fractions of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauch, H.; Bromback, J.

    1981-01-01

    An indirect solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in individual polystyrene microtiter cups has been adapted for measurement of antibody to various cytoplasmic and carbohydrate antigen fractions of Candida albicans. The assay was optimized for sensitivity, precision and linearization of serum dilution curves. The optimized procedure allows computerized measurement of anti-Candida antibodies and can be used for measurement of antibody over a wide concentration range. The procedure obviates variation due to changes in day-to-day counts as a result of isotope decay and end-point antibody dilutions. The assay has been used to demonstrate a Poisson-like distribution of antibody levels in the sera of persons showing no symptoms of candidiasis. The minimum antibody level detectable by the assay is about two orders of magnitude lower than the lowest level found in human serum and 4 orders of magnitude lower than the most sensitive test used hitherto, the hemagglutination test. (Auth.)

  5. 2010 Gordon Research Conference On Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

  6. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed.

  8. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  9. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  10. Targeting Antibodies to Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors by Pyrene Hydrazide Modification of Heavy Chain Carbohydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET studies have used immobilized antibodies as the ligand binding moiety. However, antibodies are not optimal for CNT-FET detection due to their large size and charge. Their size can prevent ligands from reaching within the Debye length of the CNTs and a layer of charged antibodies on the circuits can drown out any ligand signal. In an attempt to minimize the antibody footprint on CNT-FETs, we examined whether pyrene hydrazide modification of antibody carbohydrates could reduce the concentration required to functionalize CNT circuits. The carbohydrates are almost exclusively on the antibody Fc region and this site-specific modification could mediate uniform antibody orientation on the CNTs. We compared the hydrazide modification of anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibodies to pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester-coated CNTs and carbodiimide-mediated antibody CNT attachment. Our results show that the pyrene hydrazide modification was superior to those methods with respect to bacteria detection and less than 1 nM labeled antibody was required to functionalize the circuits.

  11. Method of stably radiolabeling antibodies with technetium and rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, C.H.; Reba, R.C.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for labeling antibodies or antibody fragments with radionuclides of technetium or rhenium to obtain stable labeling, comprising: reacting a reduced radioisotope of technetium or rhenium with an antibody or antibody fragment, or a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated antibody or antibody fragment, in the presence of free or carrier-bound diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The amount of DTPA is sufficient to substantially completely inhibit binding of the reduced technetium or rhenium to nonstable binding sites of the antibody or antibody fragment, or the DTPA-conjugated antibody or antibody fragment. The resultant stably labeled antibody or antibody fragment, or DTPA[conjugated antibody or antibody fragment is recovered

  12. European Research Reactor Conference (RRFM) 2015: Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    In 2015 the European Research Reactor Conference, RRFM, took place in Bucharest, Romania. The conference programme resolved around a series of plenary sessions dedicated to the latest global developments with regards to research reactor technology and management. Parallel sessions focused on all areas of the fuel cycle of research reactors, their utilisation, operation and management as well as new research reactor projects and Innovative methods in reactor physics and thermo-hydraulics. The European Research Reactor Conference also gave special attention to safety and security of research reactors

  13. European Research Reactor Conference (RRFM) 2016: Conference Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 European Research Reactor Conference, RRFM, took place in Berlin, Germany. The conference programme resolved around a series of plenary sessions dedicated to the latest global developments with regards to research reactor technology and management. Parallel sessions focused on all areas of the fuel cycle of research reactors, their utilisation, operation and management as well as new research reactor projects and Innovative methods in reactor physics and thermo-hydraulics. The European Research Reactor Conference also gave special attention to safety and security of research reactors.

  14. Computational Biology Support: RECOMB Conference Series (Conference Support)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Waterman

    2006-06-15

    This funding was support for student and postdoctoral attendance at the Annual Recomb Conference from 2001 to 2005. The RECOMB Conference series was founded in 1997 to provide a scientific forum for theoretical advances in computational biology and their applications in molecular biology and medicine. The conference series aims at attracting research contributions in all areas of computational molecular biology. Typical, but not exclusive, the topics of interest are: Genomics, Molecular sequence analysis, Recognition of genes and regulatory elements, Molecular evolution, Protein structure, Structural genomics, Gene Expression, Gene Networks, Drug Design, Combinatorial libraries, Computational proteomics, and Structural and functional genomics. The origins of the conference came from the mathematical and computational side of the field, and there remains to be a certain focus on computational advances. However, the effective use of computational techniques to biological innovation is also an important aspect of the conference. The conference had a growing number of attendees, topping 300 in recent years and often exceeding 500. The conference program includes between 30 and 40 contributed papers, that are selected by a international program committee with around 30 experts during a rigorous review process rivaling the editorial procedure for top-rate scientific journals. In previous years papers selection has been made from up to 130--200 submissions from well over a dozen countries. 10-page extended abstracts of the contributed papers are collected in a volume published by ACM Press and Springer, and are available at the conference. Full versions of a selection of the papers are published annually in a special issue of the Journal of Computational Biology devoted to the RECOMB Conference. A further point in the program is a lively poster session. From 120-300 posters have been presented each year at RECOMB 2000. One of the highlights of each RECOMB conference is a

  15. Conference Report: 5th Annual Georgia Conference on Information Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ziegler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The 5th annual Georgia Conference on Information Literacy took place in Savannah, Georgia on October 3-4, 2008. Since its inception, this conference has drawn participants from across the United States and even a few from abroad. Jointly sponsored by the Zach S. Henderson Library, the Department of Writing and Linguistics, the College of Education, and the Center for Continuing Education at Georgia Southern University, the conference offers both theoretical and practical discussions of the complex issues involved in teaching students how to find, interpret and use information in emerging electronic technologies against the backdrop of one of America’s loveliest cities.

  16. The 9. European nuclear conference; La 9. conference nucleaire europeenne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurel, V.; Lewis, D.; Smirnov, V.P.; Gutierrez, J.E.; Paulin, Ph.; Markov, D.V.; Smirnov, A.V.; Polenok, V.S.; Horhoianu, G.; Olteanu, G.; Van der Schaaf, B.; Gavillet, D.; Lapena, J.; Ohms, C.; Roth, A.; Van Dyck, St.; Mardon, J.P.; Thomas, A.; Cipiere, M.F.; Faidy, C.; Hedin, F.; Delnondedieu, M.; Chassignole, B.; Doudet, L.; Dupond, O.; Kang, K.; Park, K.; Kim, K.; Ha, J.; Hoon-Seok, Jung; Yong-koo, Lee; Kwang-Ho, Kim; Seungwoo, Paek; Heui-Joo, Choi; Do-Hee, Ahn; Kwang-Rag, Kim; Minsoo, Lee; Sung-Paal, Yim; Hongsuk, Chung; Detroux, P.; Meessen, O.; Defloor, J.; Lars-Erik, Holm; Barescut, J.C.; Vacquier, B.; Laurier, D.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.; Oudalova, A.; Geras' kin, St.; Dikarev, V.; Dikareva, N.; Chernonog, E.; Yang-Geun, Chung; Gab-Bock, Lee; Sun-Young, Bang; Yong-Sun, Lee; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Frank, D.; Lacoste, V.; Pihet, P.; Lacronique, J.F.; Chauliac, C.; Verwaerde, D.; Pavageau, O.; Zaetta, A.; Varaine, F.; Warin, D.; Hudelot, J.P.; Bioux, Ph.; Klann, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D' auria, F.; Yung Kwon, Jin; Chul Jin, Chol; Mihalache, M.; Radu, V.; Pavelescu, M.; Schneidesch, Ch.R.; Jinzhao, Zhang; Dalleur, J.P.; Nuttin, A.; Meplan, O.; Wilson, J.; Perdu, F.; Campioni, G.; Mounier, C.; Sigrist, J.F.; Laine, Ch.; Broc, D.; Robbe, M.F.; Cariou, Y.; Seok-Kyun, Yoon; Win, Naing; Myung-Hyun, Kim; Kyung, Hee; Fridman, E.; Shwageraus, E.; Galperin, A.; Meplan, O.; Laulan, O.; Mechel-Sendis, F.; Belgaid, M.; Kadem, F.; Amokrane, A.; Hamidouche, T.; El-Khider, Si-Ahmed

    2005-11-15

    This issue gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the ninth European nuclear conference (ENC-2005). The main part of the conference is split into 20 sessions. These sessions cover all technical aspects of nuclear power, from reactor design to waste management, without forgetting experimental and research reactors, reactor dismantling, economy, resources, safety, radioprotection and education issues. Perspectives of a nuclear renaissance are clearly visible in the world. This renaissance, mainly due to political, economical, societal and ecological factors, is fuelled by scientific and technical progress. This conference was the opportunity to present together these aspects of nuclear power and to analyze their mutual interactions.

  17. Structural identification and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to rat angiotensinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, M.

    1984-01-01

    Balb/c mice were immunised in vivo using angiotensinogen obtained from rats. In order to confirm that an immunoreaction had taken place, the concentration of specific antibodies was determined in selected sera on the basis of a radioimmunological method. In view of the fact that the affinity of the antibodies of the three monoclonal lines isolated here was calculated to be in the order of 10 7 l/mol it appears that their main field of use in affinity chromatography would be the purification of angiotensinogen from rats. (orig./MG) [de

  18. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  19. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, L.M.; Wilk, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  20. PREFACE: The Irago Conference 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Okada, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Irago Conference 2012 - 360 degree outlook on critical scientific and technological challenges for a sustainable society Organized by the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology, the Irago Conference, held recently (15-16 November) in Aichi, Japan, aimed to enhance mutual understanding between scientists, engineers and policymakers. Over 180 participants tackled topics ranging from energy and natural resources to public health and disaster prevention. The 360-degree outlook of the conference impressed speakers and guests. ''This conference has been extremely informative,'' noted Robert Gellar from the University of Tokyo. ''A unique conference with experts from a range of backgrounds,'' agreed Uracha Ruktanonchai from the National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) in Thailand. Similarly, G P Li, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Irvine commented that he had been ''able to think the unthinkable'' as a range of topics came together. The conference was streamed live on Ustream to ensure that researchers from across the world could benefit from thought-provoking presentations examining global issues such as energy, disaster mitigation and nanotechnology. ''This was wonderful,'' said Oussama Khatib from Stanford University, ''A good recipe of speakers from such a range of backgrounds.'' Manuscripts submitted to the organizers were peer-reviewed, and the papers in this proceedings were accepted for Journal of Physics: Conference Series. In addition to the formal speaker programme, graduate-student sessions provided a platform for graduate students to describe their latest findings as oral presentations. A series of excursions to relevant locations, such as the Tahara megasolar region under construction and a local car-manufacturing factory, gave participants the opportunity to further consider practical applications of their research in industry

  1. Radioiodination of antibodies for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the great potential of radioiodinated antibody for the detection and treatment of cancer, the present article deals with the various techniques of radioiodination of antibody and their uses. Topics include methods of iodination of antibody, advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and effects of radioiodination on the antibody molecules with respect to their physiochemical and immunologic reactivity. In addition, the clinical usefulness of radioiodinated antibodies is discussed. (Auth.)

  2. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics

  3. AINSE conference on radiation biology and chemistry. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The conference handbook contains 60 oral and poster presentations dealing with recent advances in radiation chemistry applied to biological studies, radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers as well as to solid state chemical physics.

  4. 13th AINSE radiation biology conference: conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The forty one papers presented at this conference covered the areas of radiation induced lesions, apoptosis, genetics and radiobiological consequences of low level radiation exposure, clinical applications of radiation, mammalian cells radiosensitivity and radiation-activated proteins

  5. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgue, Gueven; Twyman, Richard M; Beiss, Veronique; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as 'green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of antibodies, ranging from laboratory-scale expression to industrial-scale manufacturing. The key features of plant-based production include safety, speed, low cost, and convenience, allowing newcomers to rapidly master the technology and use it to its full advantage. Manufacturing in plants has recently achieved significant milestones and offers more than just an alternative to established microbial and mammalian cell platforms. The use of plants for product development in particular offers the power and flexibility to easily coexpress many different genes, allowing the plug-and-play construction of novel bionanomaterials, perfectly complementing existing approaches based on plant virus-like particles. As well as producing single antibodies for applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry, plants can be used to produce antibody-based supramolecular structures and scaffolds as a new generation of green bionanomaterials that promise a bright future based on clean and renewable nanotechnology applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1462. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1462 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Antibody Selection for Cancer Target Validation of FSH-Receptor in Immunohistochemical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Moeker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH-receptor (FSHR has been reported to be an attractive target for antibody therapy in human cancer. However, divergent immunohistochemical (IHC findings have been reported for FSHR expression in tumor tissues, which could be due to the specificity of the antibodies used. Methods: Three frequently used antibodies (sc-7798, sc-13935, and FSHR323 were validated for their suitability in an immunohistochemical study for FSHR expression in different tissues. As quality control, two potential therapeutic anti-hFSHR Ylanthia® antibodies (Y010913, Y010916 were used. The specificity criteria for selection of antibodies were binding to native hFSHR of different sources, and no binding to non-related proteins. The ability of antibodies to stain the paraffin-embedded Flp-In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO/FSHR cells was tested after application of different epitope retrieval methods. Results: From the five tested anti-hFSHR antibodies, only Y010913, Y010916, and FSHR323 showed specific binding to native, cell-presented hFSHR. Since Ylanthia® antibodies were selected to specifically recognize native FSHR, as required for a potential therapeutic antibody candidate, FSHR323 was the only antibody to detect the receptor in IHC/histochemical settings on transfected cells, and at markedly lower, physiological concentrations (ex., in Sertoli cells of human testes. The pattern of FSH323 staining noticed for ovarian, prostatic, and renal adenocarcinomas indicated that FSHR was expressed mainly in the peripheral tumor blood vessels. Conclusion: Of all published IHC antibodies tested, only antibody FSHR323 proved suitable for target validation of hFSHR in an IHC setting for cancer. Our studies could not confirm the previously reported FSHR overexpression in ovarian and prostate cancer cells. Instead, specific overexpression in peripheral tumor blood vessels could be confirmed after thorough validation of the antibodies used.

  7. Antibody-nanoparticle conjugates to enhance the sensitivity of ELISA-based detection methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M Billingsley

    Full Text Available Accurate antigen detection is imperative for clinicians to diagnose disease, assess treatment success, and predict patient prognosis. The most common technique used for the detection of disease-associated biomarkers is the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In an ELISA, primary antibodies are incubated with biological samples containing the biomarker of interest. Then, detectible secondary antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP bind the primary antibodies. Upon addition of a color-changing substrate, the samples provide a colorimetric signal that directly correlates to the targeted biomarker concentration. While ELISAs are effective for analyzing samples with high biomarker content, they lack the sensitivity required to analyze samples with low antigen levels. We hypothesized that the sensitivity of ELISAs could be enhanced by replacing freely delivered primary antibodies with antibody-nanoparticle conjugates that provide excess binding sites for detectible secondary antibodies, ultimately leading to increased signal. Here, we investigated the use of nanoshells (NS decorated with antibodies specific to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR as a model system (EGFR-NS. We incubated one healthy and two breast cancer cell lines, each expressing different levels of EGFR, with EGFR-NS, untargeted NS, or unconjugated EGFR antibodies, as well as detectable secondary antibodies. We found that EGFR-NS consistently increased signal intensity relative to unconjugated EGFR antibodies, with a substantial 13-fold enhancement from cells expressing high levels of EGFR. Additionally, 40x more unconjugated antibodies were required to detect EGFR compared to those conjugated to NS. Our results demonstrate that antibody-nanoparticle conjugates lower the detection limit of traditional ELISAs and support further investigation of this strategy with other antibodies and nanoparticles. Owing to their enhanced sensitivity, we anticipate that

  8. Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium and calcium channels in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoie, H J Marian; de Baets, Mark; Renier, Willy; Lang, Bethan; Vincent, Angela

    2006-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of antibodies to ion channels in patients with long standing epilepsy. Although the CNS is thought to be protected from circulating antibodies by the blood brain barrier, glutamate receptor antibodies have been reported in Rasmussen's encephalitis, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies have been found in a few patients with epilepsy, and antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) have been found in a non-paraneoplastic form of limbic encephalitis (with amnesia and seizures) that responds to immunosuppressive therapy. We retrospectively screened sera from female epilepsy patients (n=106) for autoantibodies to VGKC (Kv 1.1, 1.2 or 1.6), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) (P/Q-type), and GAD. All positive results, based on the values of control data [McKnight, K., Jiang, Y., et al. (2005). Serum antibodies in epilepsy and seizure-associated disorders. Neurology 65, 1730-1735], were retested at lower serum concentrations, and results compared with previously published control data. Demographics, medical history, and epilepsy related information was gathered. The studied group consisted predominantly of patients with long standing drug resistant epilepsy. VGKC antibodies were raised (>100 pM) in six patients. VGCC antibodies (>45 pM) were slightly raised in only one patient. GAD antibodies were VGKC antibodies differed from previously described patients with limbic encephalitis-like syndrome, and were not different with respect to seizure type, age at first seizure, duration of epilepsy, or use of anti-epileptic drugs from the VGKC antibody negative patients. The results demonstrate that antibodies to VGKC are present in 6% of patients with typical long-standing epilepsy, but whether these antibodies are pathogenic or secondary to the primary disease process needs to be determined.

  9. International Conference on Cosmic Rays

    CERN Multimedia

    W.O. LOCK

    1964-01-01

    Towards the end of last year the 8th International conference on cosmic rays, held under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (I.U.P.A.P.) and the Department of Atomic Energy of the Government of India, was held at Jaipur, India. Among the participants was W.O. Lock, head of CERN's Emulsion Group, who gave an invited talk on recent work in the field of what is normally known as high-energy physics — though in the context of this conference such energies seem quite low. In this article, Dr. Lock gives a general review of the conference and of the subjects discussed.

  10. Conference on High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Conference on High Energy Physics (HEP 2016) will be held from August 24 to 26, 2016 in Xi'an, China. This Conference will cover issues on High Energy Physics. It dedicates to creating a stage for exchanging the latest research results and sharing the advanced research methods. HEP 2016 will be an important platform for inspiring international and interdisciplinary exchange at the forefront of High Energy Physics. The Conference will bring together researchers, engineers, technicians and academicians from all over the world, and we cordially invite you to take this opportunity to join us for academic exchange and visit the ancient city of Xi’an.

  11. The 9. European nuclear conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurel, V.; Lewis, D.; Smirnov, V.P.; Gutierrez, J.E.; Paulin, Ph.; Markov, D.V.; Smirnov, A.V.; Polenok, V.S.; Horhoianu, G.; Olteanu, G.; Van der Schaaf, B.; Gavillet, D.; Lapena, J.; Ohms, C.; Roth, A.; Van Dyck, St.; Mardon, J.P.; Thomas, A.; Cipiere, M.F.; Faidy, C.; Hedin, F.; Delnondedieu, M.; Chassignole, B.; Doudet, L.; Dupond, O.; Kang, K.; Park, K.; Kim, K.; Ha, J.; Hoon-Seok, Jung; Yong-koo, Lee; Kwang-Ho, Kim; Seungwoo, Paek; Heui-Joo, Choi; Do-Hee, Ahn; Kwang-Rag, Kim; Minsoo, Lee; Sung-Paal, Yim; Hongsuk, Chung; Detroux, P.; Meessen, O.; Defloor, J.; Lars-Erik, Holm; Barescut, J.C.; Vacquier, B.; Laurier, D.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.; Oudalova, A.; Geras'kin, St.; Dikarev, V.; Dikareva, N.; Chernonog, E.; Yang-Geun, Chung; Gab-Bock, Lee; Sun-Young, Bang; Yong-Sun, Lee; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Frank, D.; Lacoste, V.; Pihet, P.; Lacronique, J.F.; Chauliac, C.; Verwaerde, D.; Pavageau, O.; Zaetta, A.; Varaine, F.; Warin, D.; Hudelot, J.P.; Bioux, Ph.; Klann, R.; Petruzzi, A.; D'auria, F.; Yung Kwon, Jin; Chul Jin, Chol; Mihalache, M.; Radu, V.; Pavelescu, M.; Schneidesch, Ch.R.; Jinzhao, Zhang; Dalleur, J.P.; Nuttin, A.; Meplan, O.; Wilson, J.; Perdu, F.; Campioni, G.; Mounier, C.; Sigrist, J.F.; Laine, Ch.; Broc, D.; Robbe, M.F.; Cariou, Y.; Seok-Kyun, Yoon; Win, Naing; Myung-Hyun, Kim; Kyung, Hee; Fridman, E.; Shwageraus, E.; Galperin, A.; Meplan, O.; Laulan, O.; Mechel-Sendis, F.; Belgaid, M.; Kadem, F.; Amokrane, A.; Hamidouche, T.; El-Khider, Si-Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    This issue gathers the abstracts of the papers presented at the ninth European nuclear conference (ENC-2005). The main part of the conference is split into 20 sessions. These sessions cover all technical aspects of nuclear power, from reactor design to waste management, without forgetting experimental and research reactors, reactor dismantling, economy, resources, safety, radioprotection and education issues. Perspectives of a nuclear renaissance are clearly visible in the world. This renaissance, mainly due to political, economical, societal and ecological factors, is fuelled by scientific and technical progress. This conference was the opportunity to present together these aspects of nuclear power and to analyze their mutual interactions

  12. International Conference on Algebraic Topology

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Ralph; Miller, Haynes; Ravenel, Douglas

    1989-01-01

    These are proceedings of an International Conference on Algebraic Topology, held 28 July through 1 August, 1986, at Arcata, California. The conference served in part to mark the 25th anniversary of the journal Topology and 60th birthday of Edgar H. Brown. It preceded ICM 86 in Berkeley, and was conceived as a successor to the Aarhus conferences of 1978 and 1982. Some thirty papers are included in this volume, mostly at a research level. Subjects include cyclic homology, H-spaces, transformation groups, real and rational homotopy theory, acyclic manifolds, the homotopy theory of classifying spaces, instantons and loop spaces, and complex bordism.

  13. AINSE`s 40th anniversary conference. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Highlights of 40 years of activity of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) were the main focus of this conference. Topics covered include nuclear physics, plasma physics, radiation chemistry, radiation biology, neutron diffraction, nuclear techniques of analysis and other relevant aspects of nuclear science and technology. The conference handbook contains the summaries of the 78 papers and posters presented and the list of participants

  14. 20th IAEA fusion energy conference 2004. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The 20th International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fusion Energy Conference (FEC) was held in Vilamoura, Portugal, from 1 to 6 November 2004. The Instituto Superior Tecnico through the Centro de Fusao Nuclear on behalf of the Portuguese Government and the Association EURATOM/IST hosted the conference. The IAEA wishes to express its gratitude to the host. More than 600 delegates representing 33 countries and three international organizations attended the Fusion Energy Conference 2004. The Programme Committee accepted a total of some 437 papers for presentation at the conference. The scientific experimental and theoretical papers have been grouped with respect to the following themes: Overview on magnetic and inertial fusion; Advanced Scenarios and Steady State; Edge Localized Modes; Fusion Technology; Transport Theory; Beta Limits; Hybrid Scenarios; H-mode and Transport; ITER; Alfven Modes and Wave Heating; Operational Limits and Momentum Transport; Energetic Particles and Stability; Neoclassical Tearing Modes; Transport and Turbulence; Inertial Fusion; Configuration Effects and Transport; and Plasma-wall Interaction. The conference adjourned with the announcement of the next IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, which will be held for the first time in the People's Republic of China, in the city of Chengdu, October 16-22, 2006

  15. Isotypes of Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Association with Rheumatoid Factors and Citrulline-Dependent Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Wulff Westergaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the humoral immune response against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and to compare it with the two major autoantibody types in RA, plasma samples from 77 RA patients, 28 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and 28 healthy controls (HCs were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Increased percentages of positives and concentrations of IgG/IgA/IgM antibodies against the latent EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1 were observed in RA patients compared to SLE patients and HCs. Increased concentrations and percentages of positives of IgG/IgA/IgM against the early lytic EBV antigen diffuse (EAD were also found in RA patients compared to HCs but were highest in SLE patients. Furthermore, associations between the elevated EBNA-1 IgA and EBNA-1 IgM levels and the presence of IgM and IgA rheumatoid factors (RFs and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs, IgG and between elevated IgA concentrations against EAD and the presence of RFs and ACPAs in RA patients were found. Thus, RA patients had elevated antibodies of all isotypes characteristic of latent EBV infection (whereas SLE patients had elevated antibodies characteristic of lytic EBV infection. Notably, for IgM and IgA (but not IgG, these were associated with the presence of characteristic RA autoantibodies.

  16. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  17. An immunochemical method for the quantitation of insulin antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, W.G.; Kelly, U.

    1980-01-01

    A 125 I-labelled insulin binding assay is described in which IgG antibody is precipitated by the addition of an optimal concentration of second antibody. Other features include the removal of unlabelled insulin from test sera prior to assay and the use of 22 Na as a volume marker. This approach overcomes problems associated with previous assays for insulin antibodies. Clear differences are seen in the IgG insulin binding capacity (IBC) of sera from patients with insulin resistance and injection site lipo-atrophy when compared with insulin-treated diabetics who lack such complications. The precision and flexibility of this technique make it particularly suitable for studies of the immune response to different species and forms of insulin. (Auth.)

  18. Interactions between nucleic acids and antibodies to Z-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng, M.; Hartmann, B.; Malfoy, B.; Pilet, J.; Ramstein, J.; Sage, E.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we report some properties of the antibodies to Z-DNA. To determine more precisely the antigenic determinant, the interactions between the antibodies and several polynucleotides have been studied. We found that the antibodies bind very weakly to poly(dI-br 5 dC).(dI-br 5 dC). This polynucleotide can adopt the Z conformation in high salt concentration, as we have demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, from the study of the exchange rate of the protons involved in hydrogen bonds in this polynucleotide and from previous studies on poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) (Ramstein and Leng 1980; Pilet and Leng 1982), we propose a quantitative description of the dynamic structure of the Z form. 34 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  19. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  20. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  1. European Metals Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Vereecken, Jean

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains the papers that will be presented at 'EMC '91 '-the European Metals Conference-to be held in Brussels, Belgium, from 15 to 20 September 1991, and organized by Benelux Metallurgie, GDMB (Gesellschaft Deutscher Metallhutten­ und Bergleute) and IMM (the Institution of Mining and Metallurgy). 'EMC '91' is the first of an intended major series organized at the European level with the aim of bringing together all those who are involved with the extraction and processing of non-ferrous metals-European metallurgists and their international colleagues-to provide them with the opportunity to exchange views on the state and evolution of their industry. The programme covers all the different aspects of the metallurgy of non-ferrous metals from mining to fabricated products. Particular attention is being paid to the European non -ferrous industry with respect to changes in demand, the technology used, pressures on the environment and the competitive position of manufacturers. The contributions of the...

  2. 11 World power conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masters, R.

    1981-01-01

    Papers presented to the 11 World power conference ''Power for our peace'' held in Munich in September, 1980 are shortly surveyed. A few papers were devoted to nuclear power, that represents its present- state-of-the-art in the world. Except for the paper presented by experts of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and a number of others, there is carefulness and realism with respect to nuclear power in the most part of the papers; its forecasted growth rates are rather moderate. Even in the IEA paper the total world nuclear installed capacity in 1985 is evaluated about 550 GW, that is substantially smaller earlier evaluations. It is acknowledged that the primary energy production almost in all countries will increase mainly due to nuclear power and coal. But there are no answers to the problems related to management of the nuclear power development and to the public opinion in many countries. It is underlined that the problems of world power supply can be solved only on an international basis [ru

  3. Gas conference Paris 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of Gaz d'Aujourd'hui journal contains the proceedings of the 2013 edition of the annual French gas conference. These proceedings comprise 7 talks, 5 round-tables and 9 workshops: 1 - Opening talk (H. Malherbe); 2 - Defending the natural gas position in the energy mix (G. Mestralet); 3 - The new youth of natural gas (P. Sauquet); 4 - Round-table No.1: the natural gas market perspectives; 5 - Round-table No.2: natural gas in France's energy transition; 6 - Answering the energy transition challenges (B. Lescoeur); 7 - Round-table No.3: towards an integrated European market in 2014?; 8 - Building up the European gas market (P. de Ladoucette); 9 - Workshop No.1: the big client's strategies in the gas market; 10 - Workshop No.2: the fuel gas perspectives in terrestrial mobility; 11 - Workshop No.3: gas innovations; 12 - The 2030 and 2050 strategy of the European Union policy (B. Devlin); 13 - Round-table No.4: Decentralized production and local development; 14 - Workshop No.4: Gas and maritime transport; 15 - Workshop No.5: bio-methane, vector of the energy transition; 16 - Workshop No.6: Evolution of the storage activity; 17 - Workshop No.7: Dwellings renovation and natural gas development; 18 - Workshop No.8: Is the target model of gas a reality?; 19 - Workshop No.9: Non-conventional gases in the world; 20 - Round-table No.5: Actors' strategy; 21 - Closing talk (J. Ferrier)

  4. Washington Accelerator Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Highlights of the 1993 Particle Accelerator Conference, held in Washington in May, were picked out in the previous issue (page 18). Talks on the big hadron colliders reflected the sea-change in the accelerator world where the scale, complexity and cost of the front-line projects has slowed the pace of developments (not unlike the scene in particle physics itself). Speaking before the anti-SSC vote in the House of Representatives in June, Dick Briggs reviewed the situation at the SSC Superconducting Supercollider in Ellis County, Texas. The linac building is near completion and the Low Energy Booster will be ready to receive components early next year. Tunnelling for the Main Ring is advancing rapidly with four boring machines in action. Five miles of tunnel have been completed since January and the pace has now stepped up to nearly a mile each week. The superconducting magnet news is good. Following the successful initial string test of a half cell of the magnet lattice, a two-ring full cell with all associated services is being assembled. The mechanical robustness of the magnet design was confirmed when a dipole was taken to 9.7 T when cooled to 1.8 K. In the Magnet Test Lab itself, ten test stands are installed and equipped

  5. Conference considers low fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    At present, at least 51 countries--representing 44% of the world's population--are showing below-replacement fertility rates. In some of these countries, where the number of new births is not adequate to replace aging populations, this trend is problematic. In other countries, most notably China, declining fertility has conferred significant benefits. At an Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) Population Commission meeting held in New York in 1997, staff from China's State Statistical Bureau reported the country has a current total fertility rate of 1.8. The birth rate remains high, however, because of the large numbers of Chinese women in the 15-49 year reproductive age group (336 million in 1997). Also buffering the impact of a low fertility rate is a large labor surplus (130 million excess workers in rural China). To keep fertility below the replacement level, China plans to improve the quality of its family planning service, enhance poverty alleviation programs, and increase incentives for small families in rural areas. China's low fertility rate has provided an important impetus for economic development.

  6. Proceedings: Condenser technology conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsou, J.L.; Mussalli, Y.G.

    1991-08-01

    Seam surface condenser and associated systems performance strongly affects availability and heat rate in nuclear and fossil power plants. Thirty-six papers presented at a 1990 conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of condenser problems and solutions. This report contains papers on life extension, performance improvement, corrosion and failure analysis, fouling prevention, and recommendation for future R ampersand D. The information represents recent work on condenser problems and solutions to improve the procurement, operation, and maintenance functions of power plant personnel. Several key points follow: A nuclear and a fossil power plant report show that replacing titanium tube bundles improves condenser availability and performance. One paper reports 10 years of experience with enhanced heat transfer tubes in utility condensers. The newly developed enhanced condenser tubes could further improve condensing heat transfer. A new resistance summation method improves the accuracy of condenser performance prediction, especially for stainless steel and titanium tubed condensers. Several papers describe improved condenser fouling monitoring techniques, including a review of zebra mussel issues

  7. Washington Accelerator Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-09-15

    Highlights of the 1993 Particle Accelerator Conference, held in Washington in May, were picked out in the previous issue (page 18). Talks on the big hadron colliders reflected the sea-change in the accelerator world where the scale, complexity and cost of the front-line projects has slowed the pace of developments (not unlike the scene in particle physics itself). Speaking before the anti-SSC vote in the House of Representatives in June, Dick Briggs reviewed the situation at the SSC Superconducting Supercollider in Ellis County, Texas. The linac building is near completion and the Low Energy Booster will be ready to receive components early next year. Tunnelling for the Main Ring is advancing rapidly with four boring machines in action. Five miles of tunnel have been completed since January and the pace has now stepped up to nearly a mile each week. The superconducting magnet news is good. Following the successful initial string test of a half cell of the magnet lattice, a two-ring full cell with all associated services is being assembled. The mechanical robustness of the magnet design was confirmed when a dipole was taken to 9.7 T when cooled to 1.8 K. In the Magnet Test Lab itself, ten test stands are installed and equipped.

  8. Proceedings of the Fifth International Mobile Satellite Conference 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrey, T. (Compiler); Rigley, J. (Compiler); Anderson, Louise (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Satellite-based mobile communications systems provide voice and data communications to users over a vast geographic area. The users may communicate via mobile or hand-held terminals, which may also provide access to terrestrial communications services. While previous International Mobile Satellite Conferences have concentrated on technical advances and the increasing worldwide commercial activities, this conference focuses on the next generation of mobile satellite services. The approximately 80 papers included here cover sessions in the following areas: networking and protocols; code division multiple access technologies; demand, economics and technology issues; current and planned systems; propagation; terminal technology; modulation and coding advances; spacecraft technology; advanced systems; and applications and experiments.

  9. 10. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  10. International Conference on Robot Ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Sequeira, Joao; Tokhi, Mohammad; Kadar, Endre; Virk, Gurvinder

    2017-01-01

    This book contains the Proceedings of the International Conference on Robot Ethics, held in Lisbon on October 23 and 24, 2015. The conference provided a multidisciplinary forum for discussing central and evolving issues concerning safety and ethics that have arisen in various contexts where robotic technologies are being applied. The papers are intended to promote the formulation of more precise safety standards and ethical frameworks for the rapidly changing field of robotic applications. The conference was held at Pavilhão do Conhecimento/Ciência Viva in Lisbon and brought together leading researchers and industry representatives, promoting a dialogue that combines different perspectives and experiences to arrive at viable solutions for ethical problems in the context of robotics. The conference topics included but were not limited to emerging ethical, safety, legal and societal problems in the following domains: • Service/Social Robots: Robots performing tasks in human environments and involving close ...

  11. Climate Leadership Awards and Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh annual Climate Leadership Awards Dinner will be held during the 2018 Climate Leadership Conference; the event publicly recognize individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  12. 1988 linear accelerator conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This report contains papers presented at the 1988 Linear Accelerator Conference. A few topics covered are beam dynamics; beam transport; superconducting components; free electron lasers; ion sources; and klystron research

  13. 18th International Cryocooler Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Cryocoolers 18 Cryocoolers 18 archives developments and performance measurements in the field of cryocoolers based on the contributions of leading international experts at the 18th International Cryocooler Conference that was held in Syracuse, New York, on June 9-12, 2014. The program of this conference lead to the 76 peer-reviewed papers that are published here. Over the years the International Cryocoolers Conference has become the preeminent worldwide conference for the presentation of the latest developments and test experiences with cryocoolers. The typical applications of this technology include cooling space and terrestrial infrared focal plane arrays, space x-ray detectors, medical applications, and a growing number of high-temperature superconductor applications.

  14. 1982 Australian coal conference papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This third Australian coal conference included papers discussing the market for coal, finance and investment, use of computers, mining, coal research, coal preparation and waste disposal, marketing and trade, and the transport of coal. All papers have been individually abstracted.

  15. The power of change conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Business aspects of the electrical power utility industry in Canada were discussed in these proceedings of The Power of Change Conference, held in Vancouver, BC on April 9-11, 1995. Topics of discussion included the future of the electric utility industry in Canada, integrated resource planning, rate design, load forecasting, regulatory changes, supplier relationships, training needs and economic and demographic outlooks. These proceedings were accompanied by proceedings from four other conferences in a digital CD-ROM format

  16. The 1990 utility tax conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This article reports on the Sixth Annual Utility Tax Conference held in Washington, D.C. in October. Topics of the conference concerned tax issues associated with depreciable assets, employee benefits plans, valuation on utility property, pollution control, and restructuring and reorganization. Also discussed briefly were the tax changes being considered at that time as part of the negotiation of the details of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act

  17. 4th Machining Innovations Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This contributed volume contains the research results presented at the 4th Machining Innovations Conference, Hannover, September 2013. The topic of the conference are new production technologies in aerospace industry and the focus is on energy efficient machine tools as well as sustainable process planning. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  18. 9. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  19. DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 Human IgG Antibody Produced by AnaptysBio, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Quality Testing MS2 coat protein (MS2CP) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...primarily relied on the performance of an antibody in an enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with little regard for quantifying the full spectrum...Protection, and Multi-Year Stabilization, in High Concentration Protein Solutions, Using Ionic Liquids. Chem. Commun. (Camb) 2007, 26, 2714–2716. 3. Bio

  20. Human antibodies to immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munster, P.J.J. van; Nadorp, J.H.S.M.; Shuurman, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the sera of 12 out of 27 individuals with IgA deficiency (serum level below 0.02 mg IgA/m) class-specific anti-IgA antibodies were demonstrated by haemagglutination. These sera showed false-positive results in a solid-phase inhibition radioimmunoassay (RIST) (apparent IgA concentration between 0.6 and 13.7 μg IgA/ml) indicating that the RIST is not an appropriate test for the analysis of serum of IgA seficient individuals. A modification of the RIST is proposed (titration RIA) that permits differentiation between low levels of IgA and class-specific anti-IgA antibodies. With this test IgA deficient individuals could be classified as those with low but detectable levels of IgA and those with class-specific anti-IgA antibodies. A computer procedure was developed to calculate both the amount and the avidity (K) of the anti-IgA antibodies and to simulate the assay system. The K value calculated from experimental points proved to be an overestimation of the K value which fitted most adequately in the simulation. The comparison of the results with clinical findings indicated a possible correlation between the amount and the avidity of the anti-IgA antibodies and the appearence of anaphylactic reactions after transfusion of IgA. (Auth.)

  1. Relative Contribution of Dengue IgG Antibodies Acquired during Gestation or Breastfeeding in Mediating Dengue Disease Enhancement and Protection in Type I Interferon Receptor-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pei Xuan; Ong, Li Ching; Libau, Eshele Anak; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes a spectrum of diseases ranging from self-limiting dengue fever to severe conditions such as haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to explain the occurrence of severe dengue whereby pre-existing binding but non-neutralising antibodies enhance DENV infection. The ADE phenomenon is supported by epidemiological findings that infants that born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk to develop severe dengue upon primary infection. The role of maternally acquired dengue-specific antibodies in disease enhancement was recently recapitulated in a mouse model where mice born to DENV1-immune mothers experienced enhanced disease severity upon DENV2 infection. Here, this study investigates the relative contribution of maternal dengue-specific antibodies acquired during gestation and breastfeeding in dengue disease. Using a surrogate breastfeeding mother experimental approach, we showed that majority of the maternal dengue-specific antibodies were acquired during breastfeeding and conferred an extended enhancement window. On the other hand, in the context of homologous infection, breastfeeding conferred protection. Furthermore, measurement of dengue-specific antibody titres over time in mice born to dengue immune mothers revealed a biphasic pattern of antibody decay as reported in humans. Our work provides evidence of the potential contribution of breast milk-acquired dengue-specific IgG antibodies in enhancement and protection against dengue. Should such contribution be established in humans as well, it may have important implications for the development of guidelines to dengue-immune breastfeeding mothers.

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  3. Topics in Number Theory Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, George; Ono, Ken

    1999-01-01

    From July 31 through August 3,1997, the Pennsylvania State University hosted the Topics in Number Theory Conference. The conference was organized by Ken Ono and myself. By writing the preface, I am afforded the opportunity to express my gratitude to Ken for beng the inspiring and driving force behind the whole conference. Without his energy, enthusiasm and skill the entire event would never have occurred. We are extremely grateful to the sponsors of the conference: The National Sci­ ence Foundation, The Penn State Conference Center and the Penn State Depart­ ment of Mathematics. The object in this conference was to provide a variety of presentations giving a current picture of recent, significant work in number theory. There were eight plenary lectures: H. Darmon (McGill University), "Non-vanishing of L-functions and their derivatives modulo p. " A. Granville (University of Georgia), "Mean values of multiplicative functions. " C. Pomerance (University of Georgia), "Recent results in primality testing. " C. ...

  4. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, D. C. (Compiler); McCauley, D. E. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held July 14-16, 1998 at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications. It was the third NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 125 investigations and 100 principal investigators in FY98, almost all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement scheduled for release in late 1998 by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the Marshall Space Flight Center microgravity research facilities was held on July 16, 1998. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference.

  5. Targeting to cells of fluorescent liposomes covalently coupled with monoclonal antibody or protein A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leserman, Lee D.; Barbet, Jacques; Kourilsky, François; Weinstein, John N.

    1980-12-01

    Many applications envisioned for liposomes in cell biology and chemotherapy require their direction to specific cellular targets1-3. The ability to use antibody as a means of conferring specificity to liposomes would markedly increase their usefulness. We report here a method for covalently coupling soluble proteins, including monoclonal antibody and Staphylococcus aureus protein A (ref. 4), to small sonicated liposomes, by using the heterobifunctional cross-linking reagent N-hydroxysuccinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP, Pharmacia). Liposomes bearing covalently coupled mouse monoclonal antibody against human β2-microglobulin [antibody B1.1G6 (IgG2a, κ) (B. Malissen et al., in preparation)] bound specifically to human, but not to mouse cells. Liposomes bearing protein A became bound to human cells previously incubated with the B1.1G6 antibody, but not to cells incubated without antibody. The coupling method results in efficient binding of protein to the liposomes without aggregation and without denaturation of the coupled ligand; at least 60% of liposomes bound functional protein. Further, liposomes did not leak encapsulated carboxyfluorescein (CF) as a consequence of the reaction.

  6. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarmistha Devi Aribam

    Full Text Available Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  7. Correlation of pharmacodynamic activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses to anti-IL-21R antibody therapeutics following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaulding Vikki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-IL-21R antibodies are potential therapeutics for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This study evaluated correlations between the pharmacodynamic (PD activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses of human anti-IL-21R antibodies Ab-01 and Ab-02 following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys. Methods The PD assay was based on the ability of recombinant human IL-21 (rhuIL-21 to induce expression of the IL-2RA gene in cynomolgus monkey whole blood samples ex vivo. Monkeys screened for responsiveness to rhuIL-21 stimulation using the PD assay, were given a single 10 mg/kg IV dosage of Ab-01, Ab-02, or a control antibody (3/group, and blood samples were evaluated for PD activity (inhibition of IL-2RA expression for up to 148 days. Anti-IL-21R antibody concentrations and anti-product antibody responses were measured in serum using immunoassays and flow cytometry. Results Following IV administration of Ab-01 and Ab-02 to cynomolgus monkeys, PD activity was observed as early as 5 minutes (first time point sampled. This PD activity had good correlation with the serum concentrations and anti-product antibody responses throughout the study. The mean terminal half-life (t1/2 was ~10.6 and 2.3 days for Ab-01 and Ab-02, respectively. PD activity was lost at ~5-13 weeks for Ab-01 and at ~2 weeks for Ab-02, when serum concentrations were relatively low. The estimated minimum concentrations needed to maintain PD activity were ~4-6 nM for Ab-01 and ~2.5 nM for Ab-02, and were consistent with the respective KD values for binding to human IL-21R. For Ab-01, there was noticeable inter-animal variability in t1/2 values (~6-14 days and the resulting PD profiles, which correlated with the onset of anti-product antibody formation. While all three Ab-01-dosed animals were positive for anti-Ab-01 antibodies, only one monkey (with the shortest t1/2 and the earliest loss of PD activity had evidence of neutralizing anti-Ab-01

  8. Stable integration and expression of a cry1Ia gene conferring resistance to fall armyworm and boll weevil in cotton plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carliane Rc; Monnerat, Rose; Lima, Liziane M; Martins, Érica S; Melo Filho, Péricles A; Pinheiro, Morganna Pn; Santos, Roseane C

    2016-08-01

    Boll weevil is a serious pest of cotton crop. Effective control involves applications of chemical insecticides, increasing the cost of production and environmental pollution. The current genetically modified Bt crops have allowed great benefits to farmers but show activity limited to lepidopteran pests. This work reports on procedures adopted for integration and expression of a cry transgene conferring resistance to boll weevil and fall armyworm by using molecular tools. Four Brazilian cotton cultivars were microinjected with a minimal linear cassette generating 1248 putative lines. Complete gene integration was found in only one line (T0-34) containing one copy of cry1Ia detected by Southern blot. Protein was expressed in high concentration at 45 days after emergence (dae), decreasing by approximately 50% at 90 dae. Toxicity of the cry protein was demonstrated in feeding bioassays revealing 56.7% mortality to boll weevil fed buds and 88.1% mortality to fall armyworm fed leaves. A binding of cry1Ia antibody was found in the midgut of boll weevils fed on T0-34 buds in an immunodetection assay. The gene introduced into plants confers resistance to boll weevil and fall armyworm. Transmission of the transgene occurred normally to T1 progeny. All plants showed phenotypically normal growth, with fertile flowers and abundant seeds. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Serum Antibody Biomarkers for ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    typically developing control. US, unaffected sibling control. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...typically developing (TD) children (e.g., Warren et al., 1990; Singh, 2009). The goal of this study is to identify a serum antibody biomarker for ASD using...50% less IgG1 antibody in ASD boys vs . TD boys (p=0.0096). The level of ASD1 binding to the AM group was the same as to the ASD boys. These data

  10. Two-monoclonal-antibody sandwich-type assay for thyrotropin, with use of an avidin-biotin separation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odell, W.D.; Griffin, J.; Zahradnik, R.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive, specific, noncompetitive, sandwich-type radioimmunoassay for human thyrotropin (hTSH), which can be performed in 30 min. The assay involves two monoclonal antibodies, selected for high affinity and specificity and also for reaction against antigenic sites on hTSH that are distal from each other. One of these antibodies is labeled with 125 I; the other is conjugated covalently to biotin. Polystyrene beads were also conjugated covalently to biotin. After conjugation, the beads were incubated with avidin. These beads represent a rapid, simple method for separating hTSH-bound antibody from free antibody. The biotin-antibody-hTSH- 125 I-labeled antibody complexes bind to the beads and hTSH concentration is directly related to counts per minute. This assay can detect hTSH at a concentration of 0.06 milli-unit/L in serum

  11. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  12. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  13. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  14. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  15. Insulin radioimmunoassay kit (125I) using polyethyleneglycol (PEG) and a double antibody separation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borza, Virginia; Chariton, Delfina; Neacsu, Elena

    1997-01-01

    Insulin is a polypeptide hormone formed from proinsulin in the b-cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. It has a widespread effect on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. Diabetes mellitus is the result of an insulin deficiency brought about either by insufficient insulin secretion or by rapid insulin catabolism. The determination of the insulin level is important for differential etiologic diagnosis and subsequent therapy and prognosis. Insulin radioimmunoassay kit provides a sensitive, precise and specific assay for insulin concentration in serum. Standard and insulin in the patient sample compete with tracer for binding sites on an insulin antibody. The antigen-antibody combination, which forms during incubation time, will be separated from free insulin by different methods. The separation technique using the double antibody technique combined with Polyethyleneglycol (PEG) is presented. The results are compared with the separation method using PEG alone and with double antibody technique. Antiserum to insulin was produced in rats immunized with porcine insulin, while rabbits immunized with rat-g globulin were used as a source for the second antibody.The tested PEG was PEG 6000. The best results were obtained using the double antibody at a 1/50 dilution combined with 7.5 PEG solutions. The time for precipitating the antibody bound fraction by this technique was established to be 30 minutes. The results obtained using this method as separation technique for insulin - antibody complex were better than those obtained using the double antibody techniques or PEG as precipitating agent alone. (authors)

  16. Predicting HIV-1 transmission and antibody neutralization efficacy in vivo from stoichiometric parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver F Brandenberg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The potential of broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the HIV-1 envelope trimer to prevent HIV-1 transmission has opened new avenues for therapies and vaccines. However, their implementation remains challenging and would profit from a deepened mechanistic understanding of HIV-antibody interactions and the mucosal transmission process. In this study we experimentally determined stoichiometric parameters of the HIV-1 trimer-antibody interaction, confirming that binding of one antibody is sufficient for trimer neutralization. This defines numerical requirements for HIV-1 virion neutralization and thereby enables mathematical modelling of in vitro and in vivo antibody neutralization efficacy. The model we developed accurately predicts antibody efficacy in animal passive immunization studies and provides estimates for protective mucosal antibody concentrations. Furthermore, we derive estimates of the probability for a single virion to start host infection and the risks of male-to-female HIV-1 transmission per sexual intercourse. Our work thereby delivers comprehensive quantitative insights into both the molecular principles governing HIV-antibody interactions and the initial steps of mucosal HIV-1 transmission. These insights, alongside the underlying, adaptable modelling framework presented here, will be valuable for supporting in silico pre-trial planning and post-hoc evaluation of HIV-1 vaccination or antibody treatment trials.

  17. Anti-influenza Hyperimmune Immunoglobulin Enhances Fc-functional Antibody Immunity during Human Influenza Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderven, Hillary A; Wragg, Kathleen; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Kristensen, Anne B; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Wheatley, Adam K; Wentworth, Deborah; Wines, Bruce D; Hogarth, P Mark; Rockman, Steve; Kent, Stephen J

    2018-05-31

    New treatments for severe influenza are needed. Passive transfer of influenza-specific hyperimmune pooled immunoglobulin (Flu-IVIG) boosts neutralising antibody responses to past strains in influenza-infected subjects. The effect of Flu-IVIG on antibodies with Fc-mediated functions, which may target diverse influenza strains, is unclear. We studied the capacity of Flu-IVIG, relative to standard IVIG, to bind to Fc receptors and mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in vitro. The effect of Flu-IVIG infusion, compared to placebo infusion, was examined in serial plasma samples from 24 subjects with confirmed influenza infection in the INSIGHT FLU005 pilot study. Flu-IVIG contains higher concentrations of Fc-functional antibodies than IVIG against a diverse range of influenza hemagglutinins. Following infusion of Flu-IVIG into influenza-infected subjects, a transient increase in Fc-functional antibodies was present for 1-3 days against infecting and non-infecting strains of influenza. Flu-IVIG contains antibodies with Fc-mediated functions against influenza virus and passive transfer of Flu-IVIG increases anti-influenza Fc-functional antibodies in the plasma of influenza-infected subjects. Enhancement of Fc-functional antibodies to a diverse range of influenza strains suggests that Flu-IVIG infusion could prove useful in the context of novel influenza virus infections, when there may be minimal or no neutralising antibodies in the Flu-IVIG preparation.

  18. Neutralizing antibody fails to impact the course of Ebola virus infection in monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendelien B Oswald

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prophylaxis with high doses of neutralizing antibody typically offers protection against challenge with viruses producing acute infections. In this study, we have investigated the ability of the neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, KZ52, to protect against Ebola virus in rhesus macaques. This antibody was previously shown to fully protect guinea pigs from infection. Four rhesus macaques were given 50 mg/kg of neutralizing human monoclonal antibody KZ52 intravenously 1 d before challenge with 1,000 plaque-forming units of Ebola virus, followed by a second dose of 50 mg/kg antibody 4 d after challenge. A control animal was exposed to virus in the absence of antibody treatment. Passive transfer of the neutralizing human monoclonal antibody not only failed to protect macaques against challenge with Ebola virus but also had a minimal effect on the explosive viral replication following infection. We show that the inability of antibody to impact infection was not due to neutralization escape. It appears that Ebola virus has a mechanism of infection propagation in vivo in macaques that is uniquely insensitive even to high concentrations of neutralizing antibody.

  19. Tritium conference days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, J.; Lebaron-Jacobs, L.; Sene, M.; Devin, P.; Chretien, V.; Le Guen, B.; Guetat, Ph.; Baglan, N.; Ansoborlo, E.; Boyer, C.; Masson, M.; Bailly-Du-Bois, P.; Jenkinson, St.; Wakeford, R.; Saintigny, Y.; Romeo, P.H.; Thompson, P.; Leterq, D.; Chastagner, F.; Cortes, P.; Philippe, M.; Paquet, F.; Fournier, M.

    2009-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Twenty presentations out of 21 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - tritium in the environment (J. Garnier-Laplace); 2 - status of knowledge about tritium impact on health (L. Lebaron-Jacobs); 3 - tritium, discrete but present everywhere (M. Sene); 4 - management of tritium effluents from Areva NC La Hague site - related impact and monitoring (P. Devin); 5 - tritium effluents and impact in the vicinity of EDF's power plants (V. Chretien and B. Le Guen); 6 - contribution of CEA-Valduc centre monitoring to the knowledge of atmospheric tritiated water transfers to the different compartments of the environment (P. Guetat); 7 - tritium analysis in environment samples: constraints and means (N. Baglan); 8 - organically-linked tritium: the analyst view (E. Ansoborlo); 9 - study of tritium transfers to plants via OBT/HTO air and OBT/HTO free (C. Boyer); 10 - tritium in the British Channel (M. Masson and P. Bailly-Du-Bois); 11 - tritium in British coastal waters (S. Jenkinson); 12 - recent results from epidemiology (R. Wakeford); 13 - effects of tritiated thymidine on hematopoietic stem cells (P.H. Romeo); 14 - tritium management issue in Canada: the point of view from authorities (P. Thompson); 15 - experience feedback of the detritiation process of Valduc centre (D. Leterq); 16 - difficulties linked with tritiated wastes confinement (F. Chastagner); 17 - optimisation of tritium management in the ITER project (P. Cortes); 18 - elements of thought about the management of tritium generated by nuclear facilities (M. Philippe); 19 - CIPR's position about the calculation of doses and risks linked with tritium exposure (F. Paquet); 20 - tritium think tanks (M. Fournier). (J.S.)

  20. 10th Conference on Bayesian Nonparametrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-08

    RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. North Carolina State University 2701 Sullivan Drive Admin Srvcs III, Box 7514 Raleigh, NC 27695 -7514 ABSTRACT...the conference. The findings from the conference is widely disseminated. The conference web site displays slides of the talks presented in the...being published by the Electronic Journal of Statistics consisting of about 20 papers read at the conference. The conference web site displays

  1. Tumor detection using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Powe, J.; Hammond, N.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotope conjugated to monoclonal antibody products has been used for imaging tumors targeted by the antibody. As imaging progresses, new sets of procedural and technical questions arise. In this chapter, we discuss several current problems in imaging tumor with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody. These include (1) methods for selection of specific antibody and, once the particular antibody is selected, which fragment form is to be used; (2) imaging procedures: what are the optimum imaging parameters, such as optimum time for imaging after administration of tracer and considerations regarding background subtraction; and (3) noninvasive quantitative techniques: quantitation of localization of antibody indirectly from quantitative information in the images.100 references

  2. Bispecific antibodies targeting human CD73

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bispecific antibody targeting CD73. In particular, the present invention relates to a bispecific antibody targeting different epitopes on CD73 or a bispecific antibody targeting an epitope on CD73 and an epitope on a different antigen.......The present invention relates to a bispecific antibody targeting CD73. In particular, the present invention relates to a bispecific antibody targeting different epitopes on CD73 or a bispecific antibody targeting an epitope on CD73 and an epitope on a different antigen....

  3. Influence of affinity on antibody determination in microtiter ELISA systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, J.H.; Voss, E.W. Jr.; Butler, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretically, all immunoassays are affinity (Ka) dependent when the product of the antibody (Ab) Ka and the free epitope concentration is less than 10. Thus, the degree of dependence on Ka depends on the concentration of available antigen in the system. The authors examined the binding of 125 I-anti-fluorescein (a-FLU) monoclonal antibodies of different affinities to FLU-gelatin adsorbed on Immunlon 2 microtiter plates. Data obtained were in general agreement with our theoretical predictions; the percent of 125 I-a-FLU which bound correlated with Ka, as did the shape of the titration curves. Measurement of 5 a-FLU monoclonals by the ELISA showed that the determination of Ab concentrations depends on the FLU-gelatin concentration, epitope density, and on the relationship between the Kas of test samples and the reference standard Ab preparation. Thus the ELISA is Ka dependent and should not be used routinely to estimate the absolute amount to Ab in unknown samples. However, the Ka dependency of the ELISA might provide a convenient assay for the estimation of the relative functional Ka (rfKa) of antibody preparations

  4. The biodistribution study of 99mTc labelled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody in tumor bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Zongxin

    1992-01-01

    The author report the optimal condition of 99m Tc labelling with anti-CEA monoclonal antibody using chelating of 99m Tc with dimethylformamide. The labelling rate of this method is 60%-80%, the radiochemical purity of labelling antibody over 90% and maintain its better immuno activity. The biodistribution of the tumor bearing nude mice demonstrates that as compared with the control group, 24 hours after the intraperitoneal injection the injected labelled antibody has its specific concentration in tumor tissue

  5. EDITORIAL: International MEMS Conference 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Francis E. H.; Jianmin, Miao; Iliescu, Ciprian

    2006-04-01

    The International MEMS conference (iMEMS2006) organized by the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and Nanyang Technological University aims to provide a platform for academicians, professionals and industrialists in various related fields from all over the world to share and learn from each other. Of great interest is the incorporation of the theme of life sciences application using MEMS. It is the desire of this conference to initiate collaboration and form network of cooperation. This has continued to be the objective of iMEMS since its inception in 1997. The technological advance of MEMS over the past few decades has been truly exciting in terms of development and applications. In order to participate in this rapid development, a conference involving delegates from within the MEMS community and outside the community is very meaningful and timely. With the receipt of over 200 articles, delegates related to MEMS field from all over the world will share their perspectives on topics such as MEMS/MST Design, MEMS Teaching and Education, MEMS/MST Packaging, MEMS/MST Fabrication, Microsystems Applications, System Integration, Wearable Devices, MEMSWear and BioMEMS. Invited speakers and delegates from outside the field have also been involved to provide challenges, especially in the life sciences field, for the MEMS community to potentially address. The proceedings of the conference will be published as an issue in the online Journal of Physics: Conference Series and this can reach a wider audience and will facilitate the reference and citation of the work presented in the conference. We wish to express our deep gratitude to the International Scientific Committee members and the organizing committee members for contributing to the success of this conference. We would like to thank all the delegates, speakers and sponsors from all over the world for presenting and sharing their perspectives on topics related to MEMS and the challenges that MEMS can

  6. Conference Proceedings: Photography and Britishness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Willcock

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The video-recordings presented here were made at the conference Photography and Britishness, held at the Yale Center for British Art on November 4 – 5, 2016. The conference was the result of a collaboration between the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London, and the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino—three research institutions that have a converging interest in British art. The conference sought to investigate the various ways in which notions of “Britishness” have been communicated, inflected, and contested through the photographic image. It was not a conference about the history of photography in Britain, or about British photography. Rather, it sought to consider the nature of the relationship between photography and Britishness: the notion that photography can capture images of Britishness, at the same time that our sense of what Britishness constitutes is produced by the photographic image. A key question for the conference was whether Britishness can have a photographic referent—or whether it is itself an effect of representation. Speakers at the conference approached these questions from a wide range of perspectives and focusing on a diverse number of photographic materials—from family albums and studio portraits to advertisements, reportage, and aerial photography—which demonstrated the complexities and instabilities not only of the term Britishness, but also of the medium of photography. The conference was opened with an introduction by John Tagg. The videos included here are presented in the order they were delivered.

  7. Antibody response to booster vaccination with tetanus and diphtheria in adults exposed to perfluorinated alkylates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, Katrine; Shamim, Zaiba; Ryder, Lars P.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to perfluorinated alkylate substances (PFASs) may induce immunosuppression in humans and animal models. In this exploratory study, 12 healthy adult volunteers were recruited. With each subject, serum-PFAS concentrations were measured and their antibody responses...... prospectively followed for 30 days after a booster vaccination with diphtheria and tetanus. The results indicated that serum-PFAS concentrations were positively correlated and positively associated with age and male sex. The specific antibody concentrations in serum were increased from Day 4 to Day 10 post......-booster, after which a constant concentration was reached. Serum PFAS concentrations showed significant negative associations with the rate of increase in the antibody responses. Interestingly, this effect was particularly strong for the longer-chain PFASs. All significant associations remained significant after...

  8. Antibodies to autoantigen targets in myasthenia and their value in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Dedaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis is a classic autoimmune disease, which clinical manifestations in the form of weakness and abnormal muscle fatigue, due to the damaging effect of polyclonal antibodies to different structures of the neuromuscular synapse and muscles. The study of autoimmune substrate with myasthenia is routine in many clinics dealing with the problems of neuromuscular pathology, and the identification of high concentration of serum antibodies to a number of antigenic structures is the gold standard in diagnosis.Determination of serum antibodies to various autoimmune targets is an important tool in clinical practice. The majority of patients shows the high concentration of antibodies to AchR that gives the opportunity to use it as an important diagnostic criterion. The specificity of changes in the concentration of AchR-antibodies due to pathogenetic treatment allows to objectify the suppression of autoimmune aggression and evaluate the reliability of remission. However, the absence of AchR-antibodies when there are clear clinical and electromyography signs of myasthenia gravis suggests an autoimmune attack against a number of other targets, the most studied of which is the MuSK. On the contrary, patients with myasthenia gravis associated with thymoma, almost always have a higher level of AchR-antibodies. The presence of thymoma is accompanied by the generation of antibodies to titin and RyR, which is also observed in persons with late-onset myasthenia without thymoma. High concentration of antibodies to these structures can be interpreted as a reliable sign of thymoma in patients younger than 60 years.

  9. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  10. Purification of immunoreactive radiolabeled moniclonal antibodies with anti-iodiotypic moniclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temponi, M.; Pupa, S.; Ferrone, S.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described to purify immunoreactive moniclonal antibodies from radiolabeled monoclonal antibody preparations. The method is based on incubation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies with insolubilized anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to idiotopes within the antigen-combining site of monoclonal antibodies to be purified an elution of bound monoclonal antibodies with a low pH buffer. The immunoreactive fraction of the purified monoclonal antibodies was at least 82%; the yeald was at least 73%. The purification procedure did not cause any detectable change in the affinity constant of the eluted monoclonal antibodies. The method is simple and rapid; the requirement for anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to idiotopes within the antigen-combining site of the antibodies to be purified is not likely to represent a major limitation in the broad application of the present method, since the hybridoma technology has greatly facilitated the development of anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies. (author). 12 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Dengue antibodies in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Silva, Rejane Cristina; Eid, Andressa Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is an urban arbovirus whose etiologic agent is a virus of the genus Flavorius with four distinct antigen serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4) that is transmitted to humans through the bite of the mosquito Aedes aegypti. The Campo Mourão region in Brazil is endemic for dengue fever. OBTECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies specific to the four serotypes of dengue in donors of the blood donor service in the city of Campo Mourão. Epidemiological records were evaluated and 4 mL of peripheral blood from 213 blood donors were collected in tubes without anticoagulant. Serum was then obtained and immunochromatographic tests were undertaken (Imuno-Rápido Dengue IgM/IgG(TM)). Individuals involved in the study answered a social and epidemiological questionnaire on data which included age, gender and diagnosis of dengue. Only three (1.4%) of the 213 blood tests were positive for IgG anti-dengue antibodies. No donors with IgM antibody, which identifies acute infection, were identified. The results of the current analysis show that the introduction of quantitative or molecular serological methods to determine the presence of anti-dengue antibodies or the detection of the dengue virus in blood donors in endemic regions should be established so that the quality of blood transfusions is guaranteed.

  12. Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Reu, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    This collection represents a single volume of technical papers presented at the Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference organized by the Society for Experimental Mechanics and Sandia National Laboratories and held in Philadelphia, PA, November 7-10, 2016. The volume presents early findings from experimental, standards development and various other investigations concerning digital image correlation - an important area within Experimental Mechanics. The area of Digital Image Correlation has been an integral track within the SEM Annual Conference spearheaded by Professor Michael Sutton from the University of South Carolina. In 2016, the SEM and Sandia joined their collaborative strengths to launch a standing fall meeting focusing specifically on developments in the area of Digital Image Correlation. The contributed papers within this volume span numerous technical aspects of DIC including standards development for the industry. .

  13. Probing cocaine-antibody interactions in buffer and human serum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthu Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available Despite progress in cocaine immunotherapy, the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of antibodies which bind to cocaine and its metabolites are not well understood. It is also not clear how the interactions between them differ in a complex matrix such as the serum present in the human body. In the present study, we have used microscale thermophoresis (MST, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR we have evaluated the affinity properties of a representative mouse monoclonal (mAb08 as well as those of polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mouse and human patient serum.MST analysis of fluorescently tagged mAb08 binding to cocaine reveals an approximately 15 fold decrease in its equilibrium dissociation constant in 20-50% human serum compared with that in saline buffer. A similar trend was also found using enriched polyclonal antibodies purified from vaccinated mice and patient serum, for which we have used fluorescently tagged bovine serum albumin conjugated to succinyl norcocaine (BSA-SNC. This conjugate closely mimics both cocaine and the hapten used to raise these antibodies. The ITC data also revealed that cocaine has a moderate affinity of about 2 µM to 20% human serum and very little interaction with human serum albumin or nonspecific human IgG at that concentration range. In a SPR inhibition experiment, the binding of mAb08 to immobilized BSA-SNC was inhibited by cocaine and benzoylecgonine in a highly competitive manner, whereas the purified polyclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans and mice, revealed preferential selectivity to pharmacologically active cocaine but not to the inactive metabolite benzoylecgonine. We have also developed a simple binding model to simulate the challenges associated with cocaine immunotherapy using the variable quantitative and kinetic properties of the antibodies.High sensitivity calorimetric determination of antibody binding to cocaine and its metabolites provide

  14. Annual Conference SAEE 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Financing new nuclear power plants in a deregulated market was the issue addressed by the 2010 conference of the Swiss Association for Energy Economics. Stefan Hirschberg of the Paul Scherrer Institute first gave an overview of the internal and external costs of nuclear and other electricity supply technologies. Vincent Rits of the Prognos company presented a worldwide review of the current status of nuclear energy for power production and its prospects, showing that despite the construction of plants at new locations the total installed power will not be significantly different from today's figure, i.e. of the order of 400 GW. This even if the plants built in the 70es and 80es are systematically replaced at the end of their life time by new ones in the next decades. Boris Zuercher of the Avenir Suisse 'think tank' raised the question: 'Are nuclear power plants too big to fail?'. Using arguments from the lessons recently learned from the worldwide financial crisis, he concluded his analysis by pointing out the fact that electricity utilities in Switzerland have already been bailed out by the state, because they are owned by the regional governments and the big cities, even though they are operating as private companies in a (soon completely) deregulated market. Risk management is missing, so Zuercher, and the risks are covered by the state. Benoit Gaillochet of Axa Private Equity presented an appraisal of investments in nuclear power projects by a global financial player. For him, a number of key issues need to be addressed in order to make nuclear projects eligible for infrastructure investors; in particular, the long-term economic viability of these projects is critical. Kaspar Mueller from the Ellipson company critically evaluated future investments in nuclear energy from the financial point of view. The currently available data on the real financial balance of the electric utilities do not provide confidence for future investors. There are serious doubts about

  15. Staphylococcal enterotoxin-specific IgE antibodies in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Fumihito; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Kaneko, Miho; Ichiyama, Takashi; Mukouyama, Tokuko; Furukawa, Susumu

    2004-06-01

    The authors clarified the clinical significance of the measurement of serum concentrations of specific IgE antibodies to staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) A- and SEB in atopic dermatitis (AD). The serum concentrations of SEA- and SEB-specific IgE antibodies in 140 pediatric patients with AD were measured with an immuno CAP -radioallergosorbent test system (RAST). To check the cross-reaction of specific IgE antibodies to SEA/SEB and other allergens, the CAP RAST fluorescent enzyme immunoassay inhibition test was performed. Forty-seven patients (33.6%) tested positive for either SEA- or SEB-specific IgE antibodies. School children showed higher positive rates of SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies than infants or young children. The patients with severe AD and those with exacerbation of symptoms in summer, had higher positive rates of SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies than patients with mild AD or those with exacerbation in winter. In addition, the positive rates of specific IgE antibodies to both dog-dander and cat-dander were higher in patients with positive SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies than in patients with negative ones. No cross-reactions occurred among specific IgE antibodies to SEA/SEB and dog/cat dander with one patient's serum, which had positive IgE-specific antibodies against cat/dog dander and SEA/SEB. The positive rate of SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies in the patients with dogs and/or cats as pets was 48.4%, which was higher than in those with no pets. Atopic dermatitis patients who exhibit high positive rates of SEA/SEB-specific IgE antibodies were found to be school children, severe cases, cases with high serum concentrations of total IgE, cases with exacerbation in summer, and cases with dogs and/or cats as pets. The measurement of serum concentrations of specific IgE antibodies to SEA and SEB, thus has some value for evaluating AD patients.

  16. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Many Routes to an Antibody Heavy-Chain CDR3: Necessary, Yet Insufficient, for Specific Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Angelo, Sara; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Erasmus, M. Frank; Hraber, Peter; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2018-01-01

    Because of its great potential for diversity, the immunoglobulin heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) is taken as an antibody molecule’s most important component in conferring binding activity and specificity. For this reason, HCDR3s have been used as unique identifiers to investigate adaptive immune responses in vivo and to characterize in vitro selection outputs where display systems were employed. Here, we show that many different HCDR3s can be identified within a target-specific antibody population after in vitro selection. For each identified HCDR3, a number of different antibodies bearing differences elsewhere can be found. In such selected populations, all antibodies with the same HCDR3 recognize the target, albeit at different affinities. In contrast, within unselected populations, the majority of antibodies with the same HCDR3 sequence do not bind the target. In one HCDR3 examined in depth, all target-specific antibodies were derived from the same VDJ rearrangement, while non-binding antibodies with the same HCDR3 were derived from many different V and D gene rearrangements. Careful examination of previously published in vivo datasets reveals that HCDR3s shared between, and within, different individuals can also originate from rearrangements of different V and D genes, with up to 26 different rearrangements yielding the same identical HCDR3 sequence. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that the same HCDR3 can be generated by many different rearrangements, but that specific target binding is an outcome of unique rearrangements and VL pairing: the HCDR3 is necessary, albeit insufficient, for specific antibody binding. PMID:29568296

  18. Expression of recombinant multi-coloured fluorescent antibodies in gor -/trxB- E. coli cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiv Anatoliy

    2011-11-01

    trafficking studies. Assembling the single chain antibody with monomeric fluorescent protein linker facilitates optimal variable domain pairing and alters the isoelectric point of the recombinant 4D5-8 protein conferring solubility at physiological pH 7.4. The efficient intracellular expression of these functional molecules opens up the possibility of developing an alternative approach for tagging intracellular targets with fluorescent proteins for a range of molecular cell biology imaging studies.

  19. Comparison of efficacies of bovine immune colostral antibody and each immunoglobulin class against verotoxin 2, flagellum and somatic cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, Tetsurou; Kuribayashi, Takashi; Honjo, Toshio; Yamamoto, Shizuo

    2013-04-01

    The efficacy of bovine immune colostral (colostral) antibodies against verotoxin (VT) 2, flagellum and somatic cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 in mice was determined. Three major immunoglobulin (Ig) classes were isolated from the colostral antibody against VT2 by affinity chromatography and were used for estimation. Mice inoculated with VT2 were administered each Ig class from the colostral antibody, colostral antibody (colostral whey containing antibody) or serum antibody against VT2 at 1 hour after VT2 inoculation. All control mice (20/20) died after administration of sterilized saline instead of the colostral antibody. The survival rate was 93.3% (14/15) after administration of S-IgA or IgM antibody, or colostral antibody. Survival rates for IgG antibody and serum antibody administration were 80% (12/15) and 60% (9/15), respectively. Serum concentrations of VT2, which was absorbed from the small intestine in mice after administration of VT2 and colostral antibody, were measured by fluorescence enzyme immunoassay (FEIA). Serum concentrations of VT2 after administration of colostral antibody were lower than those after administration of sterilized saline. Mice inoculated with VT2-producing E. coli 157:H7 were administered anti-flagellum or anti-somatic colostral antibodies. Survival rates for E. coli O157:H7-infected mice administered the anti-flagellum and anti-somatic colostral antibodies were 52.4% (11/21) and 22.2% (4/18), respectively. Furthermore, survival rates increased to 89.5% (17/19) with combined administration of anti-flagellum and anti-VT2 colostral antibodies. These results suggest that colostral antibodies against VT2, flagellum and somatic cells are effective against E. coli O157:H7 infection. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Multiplex serology of paraneoplastic antineuronal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Maat (Peter); E. Brouwer (Eric); E. Hulsenboom (Esther); M.M. van Duijn (Martijn); M.W.J. Schreurs (Marco); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); P.A. Smitt (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractParaneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are devastating neurological disorders secondary to cancer, associated with onconeural autoantibodies. Such antibodies are directed against neuronal antigens aberrantly expressed by the tumor. The detection of onconeural antibodies in a patient