WorldWideScience

Sample records for antibody cm6 suggests

  1. Modelling Virus and Antibody Dynamics during Dengue Virus Infection Suggests a Role for Antibody in Virus Clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah E Clapham

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an infection of increasing global importance, yet uncertainty remains regarding critical aspects of its virology, immunology and epidemiology. One unanswered question is how infection is controlled and cleared during a dengue infection. Antibody is thought to play a role, but little past work has examined the kinetics of both virus and antibody during natural infections. We present data on multiple virus and antibody titres measurements recorded sequentially during infection from 53 Vietnamese dengue patients. We fit mechanistic mathematical models of the dynamics of viral replication and the host immune response to these data. These models fit the data well. The model with antibody removing virus fits the data best, but with a role suggested for ADCC or other infected cell clearance mechanisms. Our analysis therefore shows that the observed viral and antibody kinetics are consistent with antibody playing a key role in controlling viral replication. This work gives quantitative insight into the relationship between antibody levels and the efficiency of viral clearance. It will inform the future development of mechanistic models of how vaccines and antivirals might modify the course of natural dengue infection.

  2. HLA-C antibodies in women with recurrent miscarriage suggests that antibody mediated rejection is one of the mechanisms leading to recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuleman, T; van Beelen, E; Kaaja, R J; van Lith, J M M; Claas, F H J; Bloemenkamp, K W M

    2016-08-01

    HLA-C is the only polymorphic classical HLA I antigen expressed on trophoblast cells. It is known that higher incidence of C4d deposition on trophoblast cells is present in women with recurrent miscarriage. C4d is a footprint of antibody-mediated classical complement activation. Therefore, this study hypothesize that antibodies against HLA-C may play a role in the occurrence of unexplained consecutive recurrent miscarriage. Present case control study compared the incidence of HLA-C specific antibodies in 95 women with at least three consecutive miscarriages and 105 women with uneventful pregnancy. In the first trimester of the next pregnancy, presence and specificity of HLA antibodies were determined and their complement fixing ability. The incidence of HLA antibodies was compared with uni- and multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for possible confounders. Although in general a higher incidence of HLA antibodies was found in women with recurrent miscarriage 31.6% vs. in control subjects 9.5% (adjusted OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.0-9.5), the contribution of antibodies against HLA-C was significantly higher in women with recurrent miscarriage (9.5%) compared to women with uneventful pregnancy (1%) (adjusted OR 11.0, 95% CI 1.3-89.0). In contrast to the control group, HLA-C antibodies in the recurrent miscarriage group were more often able to bind complement. The higher incidence of antibodies specific for HLA-C in women with recurrent miscarriage suggests that HLA-C antibodies may be involved in the aetiology of unexplained consecutive recurrent miscarriage. PMID:27172837

  3. Intestinal barrier gene variants may not explain the increased levels of antigliadin antibodies, suggesting other mechanisms than altered permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Victorien M.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Weijerman, Michel E.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M. W.; Mearin, M. Luisa; Wapenaar, Martin C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Schreurs, Marco W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Various genes may influence intestinal barrier function, including MAGI2, MY09B, and PARD3, which are associated with celiac disease. Because direct measurement of intestinal permeability is difficult, antibodies against gliadin (AGA) and Baker's yeast (anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies [ASCA

  4. Seroprevalence of alphavirus antibodies in a cross-sectional study in southwestern Tanzania suggests endemic circulation of chikungunya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Weller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To date, Alphavirus infections and their most prominent member, chikungunya fever, a viral disease which first became apparent in Tanzania in 1953, have been very little investigated in regions without epidemic occurrence. Few data exist on burden of disease and socio-economic and environmental covariates disposing to infection. METHODS: A cross-sectional seroprevalence study was undertaken in 1,215 persons from Mbeya region, South-Western Tanzania, to determine the seroprevalence of anti-Alphavirus IgG antibodies, and to investigate associated risk factors. RESULTS: 18% of 1,215 samples were positive for Alphavirus IgG. Seropositivity was associated with participant age, low to intermediate elevation, flat terrain and with IgG positivity for Rift Valley fever, Flaviviridae, and rickettsiae of the spotted fever group. When comparing the geographical distribution of Alphavirus seropositivity to that of Rift Valley fever, it was obvious that Alphaviruses had spread more widely throughout the study area, while Rift Valley fever was concentrated along the shore of Lake Malawi. CONCLUSION: Alphavirus infections may contribute significantly to the febrile disease burden in the study area, and are associated with several arthropod-borne infections. Their spread seems only limited by factors affecting mosquitoes, and seems less restricted than that of Rift Valley fever.

  5. Anti-CD antibody microarray for human leukocyte morphology examination allows analyzing rare cell populations and suggesting preliminary diagnosis in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvastunova, Alina N; Kuznetsova, Sofya A; Al-Radi, Liubov S; Vylegzhanina, Alexandra V; Zakirova, Anna O; Fedyanina, Olga S; Filatov, Alexander V; Vorobjev, Ivan A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method for leukocyte sorting by a microarray of anti-cluster-of-differentiation (anti-CD) antibodies and for preparation of the bound cells for morphological or cytochemical examination. The procedure results in a "sorted" smear with cells positive for certain surface antigens localised in predefined areas. The morphology and cytochemistry of the microarray-captured normal and neoplastic peripheral blood mononuclear cells are identical to the same characteristics in a smear. The microarray permits to determine the proportions of cells positive for the CD antigens on the microarray panel with high correlation with flow cytometry. Using the anti-CD microarray we show that normal granular lymphocytes and lymphocytes with radial segmentation of the nuclei are positive for CD3, CD8, CD16 or CD56 but not for CD4 or CD19. We also show that the described technique permits to obtain a pure leukemic cell population or to separate two leukemic cell populations on different antibody spots and to study their morphology or cytochemistry directly on the microarray. In cases of leukemias/lymphomas when circulating neoplastic cells are morphologically distinct, preliminary diagnosis can be suggested from full analysis of cell morphology, cytochemistry and their binding pattern on the microarray. PMID:26212756

  6. Patterns of human papillomavirus DNA and antibody positivity in young males and females, suggesting a site-specific natural course of infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Henrike J; Bogaards, Johannes A; van der Klis, Fiona R M; Scherpenisse, Mirte; Boot, Hein J; King, Audrey J; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Rossen, John

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To monitor the impact of human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 vaccine on HPV infection dynamics in the Netherlands, we started an ongoing study in sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics in 2009. Here, we analyze baseline type-specific HPV DNA and HPV-specific antibody positivity ra

  7. Anti-CD antibody microarray for human leukocyte morphology examination allows analyzing rare cell populations and suggesting preliminary diagnosis in leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Alina N. Khvastunova; Kuznetsova, Sofya A.; Al-Radi, Liubov S.; Alexandra V. Vylegzhanina; Anna O. Zakirova; Olga S. Fedyanina; Filatov, Alexander V.; Vorobjev, Ivan A.; Fazly Ataullakhanov

    2015-01-01

    We describe a method for leukocyte sorting by a microarray of anti-cluster-of-differentiation (anti-CD) antibodies and for preparation of the bound cells for morphological or cytochemical examination. The procedure results in a “sorted” smear with cells positive for certain surface antigens localised in predefined areas. The morphology and cytochemistry of the microarray-captured normal and neoplastic peripheral blood mononuclear cells are identical to the same characteristics in a smear. The...

  8. Anti-proteinase 3 antibodies in diffuse systemic sclerosis (SSc with normotensive renal impairment: is it suggestive for an overlapping between SSc and idiopathic vasculitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Campanella

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To test the prevalence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA in systemic sclerosis (SSc and to verify a possible association of ANCA with normotensive renal involvement in SSc. Patients and methods: 51 patients affected by SSc, 35 with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc and 16 with limited scleroderma (lSSc, were tested for ANCA by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF on human ethanol and formalin-acetone-fixed granulocytes (before and after DNase treatment, by conventional enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA and by capture-ELISA. Results. Six out of 51 selected SSc patients had ANCA by IIF (11.7% and five presented a perinuclear/nuclear atypical ANCA pattern. In all cases we only found anti-proteinase3 (aPR3 antibodies. All ANCA positive patients had diffuse form of SSc (17.1%, all were anti-Scl70 positive (aScl70, five patients had proteinuria, three had microscopic haematuria. All ANCA positive patients were normotensive with normal renin plasma levels, the mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR was higher in this group compared to the other SSc patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that aPR3 is not rare in dSSc. According to the clinical and serological findings and to the recent literature, we can hypothesise that when ANCA are found in SSc, an overlapping of scleroderma with systemic necrotizing vasculitis should be suspected.

  9. Global off-line evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP continental hydrological system used in the CNRM-CM6 climate model for the next CMIP6 exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decharme, Bertrand; Vergnes, Jean-Pierre; Minvielle, Marie; Colin, Jeanne; Delire, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The land surface hydrology represents an active component of the climate system. It is likely to influence the water and energy exchanges at the land surface, the ocean salinity and temperature at the mouth of the largest rivers, and the climate at least at the regional scale. In climate models, the continental hydrology is simulated via Land Surface Models (LSM), which compute water and energy budgets at the surface, coupled to River Routing Model (RRM), which convert the runoff simulated by the LSMs into river discharge in order to transfer the continental fresh water into the oceans and then to close the global hydrological cycle. Validating these Continental Hydrological Systems (CHS) at the global scale is therefore a crucial task, which requires off-line simulations driven by realistic atmospheric fluxes to avoid the systematic biases commonly found in the atmospheric models. In the CNRM-CM6 climate model of Météo-France, that will be used for the next Coupled Climate Intercomparison Project phase 6 (CMIP6) exercise, the land surface hydrology is simulated using the ISBA-TRIP CHS coupled via the OASIS-MCT coupler. The ISBA LSM solves explicitly the one dimensional Fourier law for soil temperature and the mixed form of the Richards equation for soil moisture using a 14-layers discretization over 12m depths. For the snowpack, a discretization using 12 layers allows the explicit representation of some snow key processes as its viscosity, its compaction due to wind, its age and its albedo on the visible and near infrared spectra. The TRIP RRM uses a global river channel network at 0.5° resolution. It is based on a three prognostic equations for the surface stream water, the seasonal floodplains, and the groundwater. The streamflow velocity is computed using the Maning's formula. The floodplain reservoir fills when the river height exceeds the river bankfull height and vice-versa. The flood interacts with the ISBA soil hydrology through infiltration and with

  10. Oral administration of recombinant Neisseria meningitidis PorA genetically fused to H. pylori HpaA antigen increases antibody levels in mouse serum, suggesting that PorA behaves as a putative adjuvant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Abel E; Manzo, Ricardo A; Soto, Daniel A; Barrientos, Magaly J; Maldonado, Aurora E; Mosqueira, Macarena; Avila, Anastasia; Touma, Jorge; Bruce, Elsa; Harris, Paul R; Venegas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane protein PorA from a Chilean strain was purified as a recombinant protein. PorA mixed with AbISCO induced bactericidal antibodies against N. meningitidis in mice. When PorA was fused to the Helicobacter pylori HpaA antigen gene, the specific response against H. pylori protein increased. Splenocytes from PorA-immunized mice were stimulated with PorA, and an increase in the secretion of IL-4 was observed compared with that of IFN-γ. Moreover, in an immunoglobulin sub-typing analysis, a substantially higher IgG1 level was found compared with IgG2a levels, suggesting a Th2-type immune response. This study revealed a peculiar behavior of the purified recombinant PorA protein per se in the absence of AbISCO as an adjuvant. Therefore, the resistance of PorA to proteolytic enzymes, such as those in the gastrointestinal tract, was analyzed, because this is an important feature for an oral protein adjuvant. Finally, we found that PorA fused to the H. pylori HpaA antigen, when expressed in Lactococcus lactis and administered orally, could enhance the antibody response against the HpaA antigen approximately 3 fold. These observations strongly suggest that PorA behaves as an effective oral adjuvant. PMID:25750999

  11. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; ...

  12. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease.

  13. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease. PMID:27494228

  14. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  15. Open to Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Reading, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Offers (1) suggestions for improving college students' study skills; (2) a system for keeping track of parent, teacher, and community contacts; (3) suggestions for motivating students using tic tac toe; (4) suggestions for using etymology to improve word retention; (5) a word search grid; and (6) suggestions for using postcards in remedial reading…

  16. Pathogenic role of antiphospholipid antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, J. E.; de Groot, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is characterized by recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy in association with antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. The pathogenic mechanisms in APS that lead to in vivo injury are incompletely understood. Recent evidence suggests that AP

  17. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    linker for yeast surface display of scFv and scFab fragments, we compared a series of different Gly-Ser-based linkers in display and antigen binding proficiency. We show that these formats of the model antibody can accommodate linkers of different lengths and that introduction of alanine or glutamate......-2. Based on the presented data we suggest that affinity maturation of the model antibody proceeds through multiple incremental steps of subtle improvements. We moreover conclude that the best affinity improved candidates are likely to be obtained through optimization of both the antigen...... fragments by in vivo homologous recombination large combinatorial antibody libraries can easily be generated. We have optimized ordered assembly of three CDR fragments into a gapped vector and observed increased transformation efficiency in a yeast strain carrying a deletion of the SGS1 helicase...

  18. Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenkranz, S.

    2003-01-01

    Based on arguments of the `reference- dependent' theory of consumer choice we assume that a retailer's discount of a manufacturer's suggested retail price changes consumers' demand. We can show that the producer benefits from suggesting a retail price. If consumers are additionally sufficiently `los

  19. [Therapy and suggestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrucand, D; Paille, F

    1986-12-01

    Therapy and suggestion are closely related. That is clear for the ancient time: primitive medicine gives a good place to the Word. In plant, animal or mineral remedies, the suggestion is clearly preponderant. Towards the end of the 19th century, the "Ecole de Nancy" sets up a real theory of the suggestion, and Bernheim, its leader, bases hypnosis, then psychotherapy on this concept. Thereafter Coué will bring up the "conscious autosuggestion". Today, despite the progress of scientific medicine, the part of suggestion is still very important in medical therapy (with or without drugs), or in chirurgical therapy; this part is also very important in psychotherapies, whatever has been said in this field. This has to be known and used consciously in the doctor-patient relation, which is always essential in the therapeutic effectiveness.

  20. Attitudes to Suggestions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PETER; JOHNSON

    2007-01-01

    As an Australian expat teaching English in China for over four years, I often encourage my students to not only learn the English language but also try to understand Western culture. This includes the fact that Westerners frequently initiate proactive suggestions on any aspects of soci-

  1. Suggestions for Teaching Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Na-na

    2013-01-01

    Teacher development and teaching practice(TP) have caught the eyes of researchers at home and abroad for many years. Many western scholars hold that reflective teaching is an efficient way to promote teacher development, but traditional TP is prevailing in China. Based on the merits and demerits of traditional TP and reflective TP, the author hopes to provide some suggestions for the people involved to promote the development of teacher education.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are antibodies having single specificity for a given antigen site (epitope). The development of hybridoma technology and the relative ease by which MAbs can be prepared has revolutionized many aspects of serological applications in diagnosis and differentiation of disease producing agents. The property of monospecificity offers advantages in diagnostic applications over polyclonal sera in that tests can be defined exactly with regard to the antigen detected and the affinity of reaction between the given antigenic site and the monoclonal reagent. In addition, MAbs offer better possibilities for test standardization, because the same reagent can be used in different laboratories. Such an MAb can be supplied by a central laboratory or 'grown' from hybridoma cells, ensuring that the resultant product is identical from laboratory to laboratory and that the part of the test involving the MAb reaction is the same. The methodologies for inoculation regimes, mice, cloning methods, selection of fusion partners, etc., have been validated extensively in developed country laboratories. The decision to establish a MAb production facility must be examined on a strict cost-benefit basis, since it is still expensive to produce a product. There are many MAbs available that should be sought to allow exploitation in developing tests. If a production facility is envisaged, it should produce reagents for national needs, i.e. there should be a clear problem oriented approach whereby exact needs are defined. In the field of veterinary applications, MAbs are the central reagent in many immunoassays based on the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The development of specific tests for diagnosing diseases is dominated by MAbs and has been fuelled by a strong research base, mainly in developed countries allied to developing countries through the study of related diseases. Thus, there are very many assays dependent on MAbs, some of which form the basis of

  3. Monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  4. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  5. Functional effects of anticardiolipin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E N; Pierangeli, S S

    1996-10-01

    The 'lupus anticoagulant' phenomenon is the best documented functional effect of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies, occurring either by inhibition of the prothrombinase and/or Factor X activation reactions. Understanding the mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent coagulation reactions may yield important clues about their 'thrombogenic effects' in vivo. We conducted a series of studies to determine the specificity, diversity, and mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent reactions. Results showed that purified immunoglobulins with lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin activities were absorbed by negatively charged phospholipids and both activities were recovered from the phospholipid-antibody precipitate. Purified aPL antibodies inhibited the prothrombinase reaction in a plasma free system in which beta 2-glycoprotein 1 (beta 2-GP1) was absent. Affinity purified aPL antibodies had 25-50 times the inhibitory activity of immunoglobulin preparations. The phospholipid binding proteins, beta 2-GPI and placental anticoagulant protein I (PAP I), independently inhibited the prothrombinase reaction, and when these proteins were combined with aPL, inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction was additive. Antibodies of syphilis had no inhibitory effect, partially accounted for by lack of specificity for phosphotidylserine (PS). Although aPL antibodies inhibited the protein C activation reaction, there was no correlation of these activities with inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction. Together, these results show that aPL exert their effects by interaction with negatively charged phospholipids, in particular phosphotidylserine, but lack of correlation between inhibition of the prothrombinase and protein C activation reactions, suggests that the nature of the coagulation protein is also important. PMID:8902763

  6. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, 67Ga and 131I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  7. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  8. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen-...... for combating HER2+ breast cancer. © 2013 by Tabriz University of Medical Sciences.......Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen......-binding fragments in cancer targeting and therapy. VHHs express low immunogenicity, are highly robust and easy to manufacture and have the ability to recognize hidden or uncommon epitopes. We highlight the utility of VHH in design of new molecular, multifunctional particulate and immune cell-based systems...

  9. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  10. Acute skin reaction suggestive of pembrolizumab-induced radiosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibaud, Vincent; David, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Resseguier, Sarah; Radut, Roxana; Attal, Justine; Meyer, Nicolas; Delord, Jean-Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The combination of localized radiotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors represents a promising therapeutic strategy for various cancers, including metastatic melanoma. Radiation therapy may enhance tumor antigen presentation and cytokine release, which may optimize the systemic antitumor immune response induced by these immunotherapeutic antibodies, with a potential delayed abscopal effect. However, clinical experience of using immune checkpoint inhibitors with concurrent radiotherapy remains scarce. We report here for the first time a case suggestive of acute skin radiosensitization induced by pembrolizumab, with a suggestive time relationship between the completion of ionizing radiation, drug administration, and rapid onset of the skin reaction. This suggests that radiation therapy may also interact rapidly with anti-programmed-death 1 antibodies. Therefore, caution should be exercised when prescribing this combination therapy in advanced cancers.

  11. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the baby is Rh-positive and the mother's antibody status is negative for anti-D, the mother is given additional RhIG. This test also may be used to help diagnose autoimmune-related hemolytic anemia ... when a person produces antibodies against his or her own RBC antigens. This ...

  12. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  13. Endemic Burkitt lymphoma is associated with strength and diversity of Plasmodium falciparum malaria stage-specific antigen antibody response

    OpenAIRE

    Aka, Peter; Vila, Maria Candida; Jariwala, Amar; Nkrumah, Francis; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Yagi, Masanori; Palacpac, Nirianne Marie Q.; Periago, Maria V.; Neequaye, Janet; Kiruthu, Christine; Tougan, Takahiro; Levine, Paul H; Robert J. Biggar; Ruth M Pfeiffer; Bhatia, Kishor

    2013-01-01

    eBL was positively associated with anti–HRP-II antibodies and inversely associated with anti-SE36 antibodies.Anti–HRP-II antibodies suggest that recent malaria infection triggers the onset of eBL; anti-SE36 antibodies suggest long-term infection and immunity.

  14. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies. PMID:27236551

  15. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  17. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition. PMID:25723164

  18. Suggestions on photons and fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Alvargonzalez, R

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we suggest a configuration of photons consistent with a spin $\\hbar$, and a configuration of the fermions coherent with a spin $\\hbar/2$. These suggested configurations open the way to further analyses which lead to the following conclusions: - There cannot exist elementary particles of spin $\\hbar/2$ with a mass inferior to $1m_e$ or with a radius greater than $1l_e$. - The electrostatic force derives from the centrifugal forces inherent to the spin and are propagated by photons. - The derivation of the electrostatic force explains the existence of positive and negative charges and Coulomb's law. - The enormous differences between the centrifugal forces and the centripetal forces at the surface of the protons give rise to quantic fluctuations of space which generate the energy flows necessary for equilibrium. These energy flows can explain gravitation and the strong force. - The mass of the proton, $m_p$, and the mass of the neutron, $m_n$, must each have a concrete value required for the cohes...

  19. HIV Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: HIV Screening Tests; AIDS Test; AIDS Screen; HIV Serology; ...

  20. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood may be due to: Chronic liver disease Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Myositis (inflammatory muscle disease) ... Saunders; 2011:chap 51. Read More Antibody Arthritis Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Liver disease Scleroderma Systemic ...

  1. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  2. Anti Rh Hemolytic Disease due to Anti C Antibody: Is Testing for Anti D Antibodies Enough?

    OpenAIRE

    Negi, Gita; Singh, Gaur Dushyant

    2011-01-01

    Rh blood group system is a complex blood group system. Rh antibodies are produced in Rh negative individuals following exposure to foreign RBCs after transfusion or pregnancy. Anti C is a rare cause of hemolytic disease of newborn and is very scarcely reported in the literature. The aim of the present case report of Hemolytic disease caused by Anti C antibody is to bring out the fact that antibodies other than anti D should be considered in cases that give a suggestive history but no evidence...

  3. Antibody tumor penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  4. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transg...

  5. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi;

    2014-01-01

    for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  6. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  7. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Mahan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  8. Engineering antibodies for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, Eric T; Jiang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The advent of modern antibody engineering has led to numerous successes in the application of these proteins for cancer therapy in the 13 years since the first Food and Drug Administration approval, which has stimulated active interest in developing more and better drugs based on these molecules. A wide range of tools for discovering and engineering antibodies has been brought to bear on this challenge in the past two decades. Here, we summarize mechanisms of monoclonal antibody therapeutic activity, challenges to effective antibody-based treatment, existing technologies for antibody engineering, and current concepts for engineering new antibody formats and antibody alternatives as next generation biopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment.

  9. Plasma antibody levels in periodontitis patients and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graswinckel, JEM; van der Velden, U; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Hoek, FJ; Loos, BG

    2004-01-01

    Background: A major aspect of the adaptive host response in periodontitis is the production of antibodies. Several risk and susceptibility factors for periodontitis, including smoking, age and composition of the subgingival microflora, have also been suggested to influence antibody production. Aim:

  10. Differentiation of Behcet's disease from inflammatory bowel diseases: Anti-saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody and anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is sometimes difficult and challenging. Hereby, we suggested the utility of anti-saccharomyces cerevisiae antibody (ASCA) and anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (p-ANCA) in the differential diagnosis of BD from IBD.

  11. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  13. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  14. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  15. Antibody-Based Strategies to Prevent and Treat Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram eSasisekharan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Passive immunization using antibodies has been suggested to offer several benefits in comparison to other antiviral treatment options. The potential for seasonal protection arising from a single injection of antibodies is appealing and has been pursued for a number of infectious agents. However, until recently, antibody-based strategies to combat infectious agents has been hampered due to the fact that typical antibodies have been found to be strain-specific, with the virus evolving resistance in many cases. The discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs in, for example, influenza, dengue virus, and HIV, which bind to multiple, structurally-diverse strains has provided renewed interest in this area. This review will focus on new technologies that enable the discovery of bNAbs, the challenges and opportunities of immunotherapies as an important addition to existing antiviral therapy, and the role of antibody discovery in informing rational vaccine discovery – with agents targeting influenza specifically addressed. Multiple agents have entered the clinic and raise the possibility that a single antibody or small combination of antibodies can effectively neutralize a wide variety of strains. However, challenges remain - including combating escape variants, pharmacodynamics of antibody distribution, and development of efficacy biomarkers beyond virologic endpoints.

  16. Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Systemic Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awa Oumar Touré

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLs could be associated with an increased risk of vascular pathologies in systemic scleroderma. The aim of our study was to search for APLs in patients affected by systemic scleroderma and to evaluate their involvement in the clinical manifestations of this disease. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study, from January 2009 until August 2010, with patients received at the Department of Dermatology (Dakar, Senegal. Blood samples were taken at the hematology laboratory and were analyzed for the presence of APLs. Results: Forty patients were recruited. Various types of either isolated or associated APLs were found in 23 patients, i.e. 57.5% of the study population. The most frequently encountered antibody was IgG anti-β2 GPI (37.5% of the patients, followed by anticardiolipins (17.5% and lupus anticoagulants (5%. No statistically significant association of positive antiphospholipid-related tests to any of the scleroderma complications could be demonstrated. Conclusion: A high proportion of patients showing association of systemic scleroderma and APLs suggests the presence of a morbid correlation between these 2 pathologies. It would be useful to follow a cohort of patients affected by systemic scleroderma in order to monitor vascular complications following confirmation of the presence of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  17. Recombinant antibodies and tumor targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikholvaezin, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Different antibody derived constructs are rapidly advancing as putative tools for treatment of malignant diseases. Antibody engineering has added significant new technologies to modify size, affinities, solubility, stability and biodistribution properties for immunoconjugates. In the present thesis, the aim was to increase our knowledge on how new recombinant antibodies could be tailored to optimize localization to experimental tumors in mice. One hybridoma, producing the monoclonal antibody ...

  18. Development of syngeneic monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies to mouse monoclonal anti-asialoglycoprotein receptor antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai M

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Anti-idiotype antibodies (Ab2 play an important role in the homeostasis of immune responses and are related to the development and the disease activity of certain autoimmune diseases. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is considered one of the target antigens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune chronic active hepatitis (AIH. We previously developed a mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 8D7 which recognizes rat and human ASGPR. In this study, to help investigate the anti-ASGPR antibody-anti-idiotype antibody network in patients with AIH, we developed a syngeneic mouse monoclonal Ab2 to the 8D7 anti-ASGPR antibody (Ab1. One clone, designated as 3C8, tested positive for specific reactivity to 8D7-Ab1 and did not bind to other irrelevant immunoglobulins. By competitive inhibition assays, the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to liver membrane extracts, i.e., the crude antigen preparation, was inhibited by 3C8-Ab2 in a dose-dependent manner, and the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to 3C8-Ab2 was inhibited by the liver membrane extracts. In the immunohistochemical analysis, 3C8-Ab2 blocked the specific staining of sinusoidal margins of rat hepatocytes by 8D7-Ab1. These results suggest that 3C8 anti-idiotype antibody recognizes the specific idiotypic determinants within the antigen-binding site of 8D7-Ab1.

  19. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  20. Measles and canine distemper virus antibodies in patients with multiple sclerosis determined by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibodies against measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) were measured by solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) of sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 28 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and matched neurological controls. When the groups were compared for MV antibody titers and CDV antibody titers of sera and MV/CDV serum antibody titer ratios, no significant difference was found. The CDV antibody titers and the MV antibody titers were in good correlation. CDV antibodies showed RIA titration curves typical of low avidity antibodies. In tests for MV antibodies in CSF, 82% of the MS patients and 19% of the controls were positive, whereas 36% of the MS patients and 4% of the controls were positive in CDV RIA. The correlation between MV and CDV antibody levels, the low avidity of CDV antibodies and the fact that absorption of the specimens with MV antigen abolished all CDV antibody activity suggest that the CDV antibodies are MV antibodies cross-reacting with CDV. It is concluded that canine distemper virus is unlikely to be involved in the etiology of multiple sclerosis. (author)

  1. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin. PMID:23098305

  2. Engineering antibodies by yeast display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, Eric T; Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Price, J Vincent

    2012-10-15

    Since its first application to antibody engineering 15 years ago, yeast display technology has been developed into a highly potent tool for both affinity maturing lead molecules and isolating novel antibodies and antibody-like species. Robust approaches to the creation of diversity, construction of yeast libraries, and library screening or selection have been elaborated, improving the quality of engineered molecules and certainty of success in an antibody engineering campaign and positioning yeast display as one of the premier antibody engineering technologies currently in use. Here, we summarize the history of antibody engineering by yeast surface display, approaches used in its application, and a number of examples highlighting the utility of this method for antibody engineering.

  3. Antiphospholipid Antibody and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴竞生

    2008-01-01

    @@ Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) APA is a big category for all kinds of negative charge phospholipid or lecithin - a protein complex autoantibodies or the same antibody, through its recognition of antigen (target protein) different, and phospholipids or lecithin - protein complex combination of various rely on the interference Phospholipid clotting and anti-coagulation factor, and promote endothelial cells, platelets, complement activation and play a role. APA including lupus anticoagulant(LA) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA), In addition, there are anti-β2 glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI) antibody, anti-prothrombin (a- PT) antibody, anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibody and anti-phosphatidylserine antibody, and so on. APA as the main target of phospholipid-binding protein, including β2-GPI, prothrombin, annexin, protein C (PC) and protein S (PS), plasminogen, and so on.

  4. [A spectrum of neurological diseases with anti-VGKC antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nagado, Tatsui

    2007-11-01

    Anti-VGKC antibody causing peripheral nerve hyperexcitability is already an established clinical entity. Recently, many patients with non-herpetic limbic encephalitis (NHLE) with anti-VGKC antibody have been reported. The characteristic clinical features are low serum Na+ concentration and good response to immunotherapy. Anti-VGK antibody positive NHLE is relatively frequent among immune-mediated NHLE. It is important to know that this disease is responsive to immunotherapy. Furthermore, anti-VGKC antibody is also positive in some intractable epilepsies. These findings suggest that anti-VGKC is correlated with hyperexcitability in both the peripheral and central nervous system and that the spectrum of anti-VGKC antibody syndrome is now expanding.

  5. The Role of Complement in Antibody Therapy for Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibroe, Peter P; Helvig, Shen Y; Moein Moghimi, S

    2014-04-01

    The complement system is part of the innate immune system, eliciting central immunoregulatory functions. Detection of foreign surfaces is either achieved through complement-specific patternrecognition molecules or mediated by antigen recognition of antibodies. Immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgG, and IgM all have the potential to initiate a complement response, with the efficiency and response development closely related to the antibody isotype, multimeric state, and degree of glycosylation. A group of serum proteins constitutes the central effector functions of complement, thus allowing direct cell lysis, opsonization, and inflammation. These effector functions can be used in antibody therapies, especially against infectious diseases, as the target membranes lack complement regulatory proteins. The relative contribution of each function and the interplay with direct antibody-mediated clearance is not fully exploited, thus suggesting an option for further rational optimization of antibody therapies.

  6. Detection of novel diagnostic antibodies in ankylosing spondylitis: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaden, Dana H F; De Winter, Liesbeth M; Somers, Veerle

    2016-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a debilitating, chronic, rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation and new bone formation resulting in fusion of the spine and sacroiliac joints. Since early treatment is impeded by a delayed diagnosis, it is highly important to find new biomarkers that improve early diagnosis and may also contribute to a better assessment of disease activity, prognosis and therapy response in AS. Because of the absence of rheumatoid factor, AS was long assumed to have a seronegative character and antibodies are thus not considered a hallmark of the disease. However, emerging evidence suggests plasma cells and autoantibodies to be involved in the disease course. In this review, the role of B cells and antibodies in AS is discussed. Furthermore, an overview is provided of antibodies identified in AS up till now, and their diagnostic potential. Many of these antibody responses were based on small study populations and further validation is lacking. Moreover, most were identified by a hypothesis-driven approach and thus limited to antibodies against targets that are already known to be involved in AS pathogenesis. Hence, we propose an unbiased approach to identify novel diagnostic antibodies. The already successfully applied techniques cDNA phage display and serological antigen selection will be used to identify antibodies against both known and new antigen targets in AS plasma. These newly identified antibodies will enhance early diagnosis of AS and provide more insight into the underlying disease pathology, resulting in a more effective treatment strategy and eventually an improved disease outcome. PMID:27288842

  7. Detection of novel diagnostic antibodies in ankylosing spondylitis: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaden, Dana H F; De Winter, Liesbeth M; Somers, Veerle

    2016-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a debilitating, chronic, rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation and new bone formation resulting in fusion of the spine and sacroiliac joints. Since early treatment is impeded by a delayed diagnosis, it is highly important to find new biomarkers that improve early diagnosis and may also contribute to a better assessment of disease activity, prognosis and therapy response in AS. Because of the absence of rheumatoid factor, AS was long assumed to have a seronegative character and antibodies are thus not considered a hallmark of the disease. However, emerging evidence suggests plasma cells and autoantibodies to be involved in the disease course. In this review, the role of B cells and antibodies in AS is discussed. Furthermore, an overview is provided of antibodies identified in AS up till now, and their diagnostic potential. Many of these antibody responses were based on small study populations and further validation is lacking. Moreover, most were identified by a hypothesis-driven approach and thus limited to antibodies against targets that are already known to be involved in AS pathogenesis. Hence, we propose an unbiased approach to identify novel diagnostic antibodies. The already successfully applied techniques cDNA phage display and serological antigen selection will be used to identify antibodies against both known and new antigen targets in AS plasma. These newly identified antibodies will enhance early diagnosis of AS and provide more insight into the underlying disease pathology, resulting in a more effective treatment strategy and eventually an improved disease outcome.

  8. Treatment of leukemia with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouros, G; Scheinberg, D A

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to radioimmunotherapy of solid disease, wherein the primary obstacle to success is access of radiolabeled antibody to antigen-positive cells, in the treatment of leukemia delivering a lethal absorbed dose to the isolated cell appears to be the primary obstacle. The isolated cell is defined as one that is exposed only to self-irradiation (from internalized or surface-bound radiolabeled antibody) and to irradiation from free antibody in the blood. It is isolated in the sense that the particulate (beta, electron, alpha) emissions from its nearest neighboring antigen-positive cell do not contribute to its absorbed dose. Disease in the bone marrow and other tissues, since it is confined to a smaller volume, is more easily eradicated because the absorbed dose to a given cell nucleus is enhanced by emissions from adjacent cells (a smaller fraction of the emission energy is 'wasted'). The optimization simulations presented above for the M195 antibody suggest that the optimum dose of antibody that should be administered is that required to yield a concentration within the distribution volume of the antibody that is approximately equal to the concentration of antigen sites as determined by the tumor burden. Although not specifically considered in the modeling example presented above, antibody internalization and catabolism may be expected to play an important role in radioimmunotherapy treatment planning of leukemia. Depending upon the kinetics of internalization and catabolism, the absorbed dose to the red marrow and to antigen-positive cells may be reduced considerably, since catabolism, assuming that it is followed by rapid extrusion of the radioactive label, would decrease the cells' exposure time considerably. The recently demonstrated effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in certain cases of B-cell lymphoma and in reducing tumor burden in acute myelogenous leukemia suggests that radioimmunotherapy is beginning to fulfill the promise held when it was initially

  9. Neutralizing antibodies in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirjam B Zeisel; Samira Fafi-Kremer; Isabel Fofana; Heidi Barth; Fran(c)oise Stoll-Keller; Michel Doffo(e)l; Thomas F Baumert

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of hepatitis world-wide. The majority of infected individuals develop chronic hepatitis which can then progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous viral clearance occurs in about 20%-30% of acutely infected individuals and results in resolution of infection without sequaelae. Both viral and host factors appear to play an important role for resolution of acute infection. A large body of evidence suggests that a strong, multispecific and long-lasting cellular immune response appears to be important for control of viral infection in acute hepatitis C. Due too the lack of convenient neutralization assays,the impact of neutralizing responses for control of viral infection had been less defined. In recent years, the development of robust tissue culture model systems for HCV entry and infection has finally allowed study of antibody-mediated neutralization and to gain further insights into viral targets of host neutralizing responses.In addition, detailed analysis of antibody-mediated neutralization in individual patients as well as cohorts with well defined viral isolates has enabled the study of neutralizing responses in the course of HCV infection and characterization of the impact of neutralizing antibodies for control of viral infection. This review will summarize recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralization and its impact for HCV pathogenesis.(C) 2007 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.

  10. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Presenting with Hemichorea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yezenash Ayalew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old Bangladeshi lady presented to neurology with a three-month history of involuntary movements of her right arm, associated with loss of power. There was progression to the right leg, and she subsequently developed episodes of slurred speech and blurred vision. At the time of presentation, she was 12 weeks pregnant and the symptoms were reported to have started at conception. Past medical history was unremarkable apart from one first trimester miscarriage and there was no significant family history suggestive of a hereditary neurological condition. MRI of the head revealed no abnormalities but serology showed positive antinuclear antibodies (ANAs at a titre of 1/400. Further investigations revealed strongly positive anticardiolipin antibodies (>120 and positive lupus anticoagulant antibodies. The patient had a second miscarriage at 19 weeks gestation strengthening the possibility that the chorea was related to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and she was started on a reducing dose of Prednisolone 40 mg daily and aspirin 300 mg daily. Six months later, she had complete resolution of neurological symptoms. There are several reports of chorea as a feature of antiphospholipid syndrome, but no clear consensus on underlying pathophysiology.

  11. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  12. Antibody dependent enhancement of frog virus 3 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Emily

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses included in the family Iridoviridae are large, icosahedral, dsDNA viruses that are subdivided into 5 genera. Frog virus 3 (FV3 is the type species of the genus Ranavirus and the best studied iridovirus at the molecular level. Typically, antibodies directed against a virus act to neutralize the virus and limit infection. Antibody dependent enhancement occurs when viral antibodies enhance infectivity of the virus rather than neutralize it. Results Here we show that anti-FV3 serum present at the time of FV3 infection enhances infectivity of the virus in two non-immune teleost cell lines. We found that antibody dependent enhancement of FV3 was dependent on the Fc portion of anti-FV3 antibodies but not related to complement. Furthermore, the presence of anti-FV3 serum during an FV3 infection in a non-immune mammalian cell line resulted in neutralization of the virus. Our results suggest that a cell surface receptor specific to teleost cell lines is responsible for the enhancement. Conclusions This report represents the first evidence of antibody dependent enhancement in iridoviruses. The data suggests that anti-FV3 serum can either neutralize or enhance viral infection and that enhancement is related to a novel antibody dependent enhancement pathway found in teleosts that is Fc dependent.

  13. Pathogenic and Epiphenomenal Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Pavlovic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The discoveries of natural and the development of manufactured highly efficient catalytic antibodies (abzymes opens the door to many practical applications. One of the most fascinating is the use of such antibodies in human therapy and prevention (vaccination, of cancer, AIDS, autoimmune diseases. A special entity of naturally occurring DNA hydrolytic anti-DNA antibodies is emerging within past decades linked to autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis (MS, Sjogren Syndrome (SS, B - Chronic lymphocytic leucosis (B-CLL, and Multiple Myeloma (MM. The origin of the antibodies is unknown. The underlying mechanisms of these activities are suggested to be penetration into the living cells and translocation in the nucleus, with recognition of the specific binding sites at particular (ss or ds DNA. There are controversies in the literature whether hydrolysis is a sequence-specific event. The interplay between anti-DNA antibodies and DNA is not yet elucidated. This molecular “twist” also suggests that anti-DNA antibodies with DNA hydrolytic capacity could be the organism's immune response to a microbial attack, with microbial DNA, or specific genes within microbial DNA sequence, as a target for neutralization. The catalytic antibody-based approach can become a key tool in selective chemotherapeutic strategies.

  14. Phosphorylcholine allows for evasion of bactericidal antibody by Haemophilus influenzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Clark

    Full Text Available The human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae has the ability to quickly adapt to different host environments through phase variation of multiple structures on its lipooligosaccharide (LPS, including phosphorylcholine (ChoP. During colonization with H. influenzae, there is a selection for ChoP+ phase variants. In a murine model of nasopharyngeal colonization, this selection is lost in the absence of adaptive immunity. Based on previous data highlighting the importance of natural antibody in limiting H. influenzae colonization, the effect of ChoP expression on antibody binding and its bactericidal activity was investigated. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that ChoP+ phase variants had decreased binding of antibody to LPS epitopes compared to ChoP- phase variants. This difference in antibody binding correlated with increased survival of ChoP+ phase variants in the presence of antibody-dependent, complement-mediated killing. ChoP+ phase variants were also more resistant to trypsin digestion, suggesting a general effect on the physical properties of the outer membrane. Moreover, ChoP-mediated protection against antibody binding correlated with increased resilience of outer membrane integrity. Collectively, these data suggest that ChoP expression provides a selective advantage during colonization through ChoP-mediated effects on the accessibility of bactericidal antibody to the cell surface.

  15. VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saidi

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sera from children 1 - 6 years of age, representative of a large serum collection, were tested for the prevalence of antibodies against different viruses. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI antibodies were found in 68% for measles; 61 % for rubella; 75'% for influenza A2/Hong Kong/68, 16% for influenza B/Md./59, 0% for group A arboviruses, 10% for group B arboviruses, 3% for phlebotomus fever group and 4% for Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever (C-CHF group of arboviruses Poliomyelitis-neutralizing antibodies for type 1, 2 and 3 were 90%; 85% and 84%~ respectively. Antibody to EH virus was detected in 84% of the sera by immuno-fluorescence. None of the sera were positive for hepatitis-B antigen or antibody by immuno-precipitation test. The prevalence of some viral antibodies found in this survey are compared with results obtained from surveys in other parts of the country.

  16. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approv...

  17. Empowered Antibody Therapies - IBC conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Jens

    2010-10-01

    The Empowered Antibody Therapies conference, held in Burlingame, CA, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of multispecific antibodies. This conference report highlights selected presentations on DVD-Igs from Abbott Laboratories, ImmTACs from Immunocore, 'Dock-and-Lock' technology from Immunomedics, the bispecific BiTE antibody blinatumomab from Micromet, and Triomabs from TRION Pharma and Fresenius Biotech. PMID:20878591

  18. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  19. [Nephrotoxicity of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, M L; Depierreux, M; Florquin, S; Abramowicz, D; De Pauw, L; Kinnaert, P; Vereerstraeten, P; Goldman, M

    1991-01-01

    The OKT3 monoclonal antibody entails a transient acute nephrotoxicity when used either to prevent or to treat renal allograft rejection. This nephrotoxicity was reproduced experimentally in mice injected with 145-2C11, an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody which shares many properties with OKT3. Both clinical and experimental data suggest that the renal lesions are due to the systemic release of cytokines that occurs prior to the immunosuppression. Pre-treatment with corticosteroids before the injection of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody mitigates both the release of cytokines and the nephrotoxicity, in a dose-dependent manner. Experimental data suggest that very high doses of methylprednisolone (50 mg/kg) administered 2 to 3 hours before the monoclonal antibody are necessary to obtain an optimal protection. PMID:1827878

  20. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA are predominantly IgG autoantibodies directed against constituents of primary granules of neutrophils and monocytes’ lysosomes. Although several antigenic targets have been identified, those ANCA directed to proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, whereas the importance of other ANCA remains unknown. Both are strongly associated with small vessel vasculitides, the ANCA-associated vasculitides, which include Wegener’s granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome, and the localised forms of these diseases (eg, pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis. ANCA is a useful serological test to assist in diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides. 85-95% of patients with Wegener’s granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and pauci-immune necrotising and crescentic glomerulonephritis have serum ANCA. ANCA directed to either proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are clinically relevant, yet the relevance of other ANCA remains unknown. Besides their diagnostic potential, ANCA might be valuable in disease monitoring. In addition, data seem to confirm the long-disputed pathogenic role of these antibodies. There is increasing evidence that myeloperoxidase- ANCA are directly involved in the pathogenesis of necrotizing vasculitis. This is less clear for proteinase 3-ANCA, markers for Wegener’s granulomatosis. With respect to proteinase 3-ANCA, complementary proteinase 3, a peptide translated from the antisense DNA strand of proteinase 3 and homologous to several microbial peptides, may be involved in induction of proteinase 3-antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies.

  1. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Damage in Keratinocytes by Pemphigus Vulgaris Antibodies*

    OpenAIRE

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Chen, Yumay; Deng, Wu; Chernyavsky, Alex; Marchenko, Steve; Wang, Ping H.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggested that mitochondrial antibodies contribute to pemphigus vulgaris (PV).Results: PV sera elicited mitochondrial damage, and mitochondria-protecting drugs exhibited protective effect in cell culture and mouse skin.Conclusion: PV antibodies altered O2 respiration, disrupted electron transfer chain, and increased reactive oxygen species.Significance: Results provide the mechanism of therapeutic action and justify the use of mitochondria-protecting drugs in PV.T...

  2. Targeting of Antibodies using Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Missailidis, Sotiris

    2003-01-01

    The chapter presents a methodology for the rapid selection of aptamers against antibody targets. It is a detailed account of the various methodological steps that describe the selection of aptamers, including PCR steps, buffers to be used, target immobilisation, partitioning and amplification of aptamers, clonning and sequencing, to results in high affinity and specificity ligands for the chosen target antibody.

  3. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptide...

  4. Suggestibility and negative priming: two replication studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Daniel; Brown, Richard J

    2002-07-01

    Research suggests that inhibiting the effect of irrelevant stimuli on subsequent thought and action (cognitive inhibition) may be an important component of suggestibility. Two small correlation studies were conducted to address the relationship between different aspects of suggestibility and individual differences in cognitive inhibition, operationalized as the degree of negative priming generated by to-be-ignored stimuli in a semantic categorization task. The first study found significant positive correlations between negative priming, hypnotic suggestibility, and creative imagination; a significant negative correlation was obtained between negative priming and interrogative suggestibility, demonstrating the discriminant validity of the study results. The second study replicated the correlation between negative priming and hypnotic suggestibility, using a different suggestibility measurement procedure that assessed subjective experience and hypnotic involuntariness as well as objective responses to suggestions. These studies support the notion that the ability to engage in cognitive inhibition may be an important component of hypnotic responsivity and maybe of other forms of suggestibility.

  5. Interferon β-1b-neutralizing antibodies 5 years after clinically isolated syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, H-P; Freedman, M S; Polman, C H;

    2011-01-01

    To determine the frequency and consequences of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) in patients with a first event suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon β-1b (IFNβ-1b).......To determine the frequency and consequences of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) in patients with a first event suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon β-1b (IFNβ-1b)....

  6. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  7. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed.

  8. Phospho-Specific Antibody Probes of Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hidemasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kasahara, Kousuke; Inagaki, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) form one of the major cytoskeletal systems in the cytoplasm or beneath the nuclear membrane. Accumulating data have suggested that IF protein phosphorylation dramatically changes IF structure/dynamics in cells. For the production of an antibody recognizing site-specific protein phosphorylation (a site- and phosphorylation state-specific antibody), we first employed a strategy to immunize animals with an in vitro-phosphorylated polypeptide or a phosphopeptide (corresponding to a phosphorylated residue and its surrounding sequence of amino acids), instead of a phosphorylated protein. Our established methodology not only improves the chance of obtaining a phospho-specific antibody but also has the advantage that one can predesign a targeted phosphorylation site. It is now applied to the production of an antibody recognizing other types of site-specific posttranslational modification, such as acetylation or methylation. The use of such an antibody in immunocytochemistry enables us to analyze spatiotemporal distribution of site-specific IF protein phosphorylation. The antibody is of great use to identify a protein kinase responsible for in vivo IF protein phosphorylation and to monitor intracellular kinase activities through IF protein phosphorylation. Here, we present an overview of our methodology and describe stepwise approaches for the antibody characterization. We also provide some examples of analyses for IF protein phosphorylation involved in mitosis and signal transduction.

  9. Seroprevalence of dengue virus antibodies in healthy Jamaicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michelle G; Vickers, Ivan E; Salas, Rose Alba; Smikle, Monica F

    2009-01-01

    Dengue fever, a mosquito borne viral infection, is endemic to Jamaica. The seroprevalence of dengue IgG and IgM antibodies were determined in 277 healthy Jamaicans by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The seroprevalence of dengue IgG antibodies was 100% (277/277) while dengue IgM antibodies were found in 3.6% (10/277). A statistically significant association was found between the presence of dengue IgM antibodies and gender (males 10/105, 9.5% vs females 0/172, 0.0%); chi(2) = 17.0, p=0.000.The high seroprevalence rate of dengue IgG antibodies and the presence of dengue IgM in the healthy population are in keeping with the endemicity of the virus in Jamaica. Therefore tests for dengue IgG antibodies are of limited usefulness in Jamaica and can be safely excluded from diagnostic testing as a cost saving measure. Serological diagnosis of current dengue infection should be centred around the dengue IgM tests although the limitations in the predictive values of such tests should also be considered. The results also suggest that the risk of emergence of the more severe forms of dengue, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) in the Jamaican population, due to the presence of enhancing antibodies, is high. PMID:19996526

  10. Anti-Cardiolipin Antibody in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza S. Jahromi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Myocardial infarction is the combined result of environmental and personal factors. Data concerning the relation between anti-Phospholipid (aPL antibodies and myocardial infarction in subjects without evidence of overt autoimmune disease are conflicting. Anticardiolipin antibody is detected in various diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. The study of Anticardiolipin antibody in Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI might shed light on etiologic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes. The purpose of the present study was to determine association of plasma aPL antibodies, namely, anti-Cardiolipin (aCL antibodies, with AMI. Approach: This study recruited 45 patients with the diagnosis of AMI according to WHO criteria in their first 24 h of admission. Thirty six matched individuals were studied as the control group with normal coronary artery angiography. Samples were tested for IgG-class antibodies to cardiolipin by an ELISA and the results were compared. Results: There were not significant differences between plasma level of aCLAs IgG in the patients with AMI on admission ant the control group. Also aCLAs IgG was not correlated with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, sex, age and smoking. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that aCLAs IgG are not indicative of hypercoagulable state in patients with AMI.

  11. Sending Hidden Data via Google Suggest

    CERN Document Server

    Bialczak, Piotr; Szczypiorski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Google Suggest is a service incorporated within Google Web Search which was created to help user find the right search phrase by proposing the autocompleting popular phrases while typing. The paper presents a new network steganography method called StegSuggest which utilizes suggestions generated by Google Suggest as a hidden data carrier. The detailed description of the method's idea is backed up with the analysis of the network traffic generated by the Google Suggest to prove its feasibility. The traffic analysis was also performed to discover the occurrence of two TCP options: Window Scale and Timestamp which StegSuggest uses to operate. Estimation of method steganographic bandwidth proves that it is possible to insert 100 bits of steganogram into every suggestions list sent by Google Suggest service.

  12. Reinventing suggestion systems for continuous improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuring, Roel W.; Luijten, Harald

    2001-01-01

    This article reports an experiment to increase the effectiveness of a suggestion system by deliberately applying principles of the kaizen and performance management. Design rules for suggestion systems are derived from these theories. The suggestion system that resulted differs from traditional sugg

  13. Dynamics of circulating antibodies against Trichinella spiralis after application of anthelmintics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corba, J; Cerman, J; Spaldonová, R

    1977-01-01

    Formation and dynamics of circulating antibodies were studied in mice experimentally inefected with T. spiralis and treated with mebendazole. Latex-fixation tube was used in the experiment. In the control group of untreated mice the antibodies were detected on the 21st day after infection. The antibody level reached the maximum on day 76 and low titres were found still on day 207 after infection. In mice treated with mebendazole in the intestinal phase of trichinellosis, the antibodies were detected 10 or 7 days earlier than in the control group. At this time the antibody level reached the maximum and then it decreased gradually until no antibodies were detected on days 66-76. This phenomenon correlated with postmortem examination and suggested that the formation and dynamics of circulating antibodies against T. spiralis are directly dependent on the effectiveness of the treatment.

  14. Detection of serum antitrichomonal antibodies in urogenital trichomoniasis by immunofluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt R

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis is a frequently encountered genital pathogen in both males and females. In females, vaginitis due to this parasite is one of the most common manifestation. The indirect fluorescent technique (IFA test was carried out to detect antitrichomonal antibodies in 370 female patients using whole cell antigen. Seventy one (19.18% gave positive reaction for either of the class IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies. The level of the IgG class antibodies was found to be higher i.e. 58 (81.69% than IgM 11 (15.27% antibodies, which may be suggestive of past infection or a prolonged manifestation by the organisms.

  15. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C L

    1980-11-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by individual sera. Removal of the glycoside side chains from native type II collagen had no effect on its antigenicity. The findings suggest that these patients produce highly specific antibodies which react with the triple helix of type II collagen.

  16. Hypnotizability, not suggestion, influences false memory development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasse, Michelle N; Elkins, Gary R; Weaver, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotizability influences the development of false memories. In Experiment 1, participants heard a positive or negative suggestion regarding hypnosis and then listened to 8 Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm lists in a hypnotic state. Neither hypnosis nor prehypnotic suggestion affected memory. Highly hypnotizable participants were more accurate in recall and recognition. In Experiment 2, suggestions were delivered in the form of feedback. Participants heard a positive or negative suggestion about their performance prior to either the encoding or retrieval of 8 DRM lists. Neither accurate nor false memories were affected by the suggestion. Highly hypnotizable individuals recognized fewer critical lures if they received a negative suggestion about their performance. These results highlight the unusual role of hypnotizability in the creation of false memories. PMID:25365130

  17. Therapeutic monoclonal antibody for Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro eAlmeida

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis that affects either humans or animals and occurs worldwide. This subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent, Sporothrix schenckii. S. schenckii exhibits a considerable genetic variability, where recently, was suggesting that this taxon consists of a complex of species. Sporotrichosis is caused by traumatic inoculation of the fungus, which is a ubiquitous environmental saprophyte that can be isolated from soil and plant debris. The infection is limited to the cutaneous forms but, recently, occurrences of more severe clinical forms of this mycosis were described, especially among immunocompromized individuals. The immunological mechanisms involved in prevention and control of sporotrichosis are still not very well understood. Some works suggest that cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in protecting the host against S. schenckii. In contrast, the role of the humoral immune response in protection against this fungus have not been studied in detail. In a previous study, we showed that antigens secreted by S. schenckii induce a specific humoral response in infected animals, mainly against the 70-kDa molecules, indicating a possible participation of specific antibodies to this molecule in infection control. In an other work of the our group, we produced a mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein of S. schenckii in order to better understand the effect of passive immunization of mice infected with S. schenckii. Results showed a significant reduction in the number of CFU in organs of mice when the mAb was injected before and during S. schenckii infection. Similar results were observed when T-cell deficient mice were used. Drugs of choice in the treatment of sporothrichosis require long periods and frequently relapses are observed, mainly in immunocompromized patients. The strong protection induced by mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein makes it a strong candidate for a

  18. Polyclonal Antibody Therapies for Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Simon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection has emerged as a growing worldwide health problem. The colitis of Clostridium difficile infection results from the synergistic action of C. difficile secreted toxins A and B upon the colon mucosa. A human monoclonal IgG anti-toxin has demonstrated the ability in combination therapy to reduce mortality in C. difficile challenged hamsters. This antibody is currently in a clinical trial for the treatment of human Clostridium difficile infection. More than one group of investigators has considered using polyclonal bovine colostral antibodies to toxins A and B as an oral passive immunization. A significant proportion of the healthy human population possesses polyclonal antibodies to the Clostridium difficile toxins. We have demonstrated that polyclonal IgA derived from the pooled plasma of healthy donors possesses specificity to toxins A and B and can neutralize these toxins in a cell-based assay. This suggests that secretory IgA prepared from such pooled plasma IgA may be able to be used as an oral treatment for Clostridium difficile infection.

  19. How antibodies alter the cell entry pathway of dengue virus particles in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Nunez, Nilda V.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P.I.; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Flipse, Jacky; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus (DENV) infection plays an important role in the exacerbation of DENV-induced disease. To understand how antibodies influence the fate of DENV particles, we explored the cell entry pathway of DENV in the absence and presence of antibodies in macrophage-like P388D1 cells. Recent studies unraveled that both mature and immature DENV particles contribute to ADE, hence, both particles were studied. We observed that antibody-opsonized DENV enters P388D1 cells through a different pathway than non-opsonized DENV. Antibody-mediated DENV entry was dependent on FcγRs, pH, Eps15, dynamin, actin, PI3K, Rab5, and Rab7. In the absence of antibodies, DENV cell entry was FcγR, PI3K, and Rab5-independent. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently-labeled particles revealed that actin-mediated membrane protrusions facilitate virus uptake. In fact, actin protrusions were found to actively search and capture antibody-bound virus particles distantly located from the cell body, a phenomenon that is not observed in the absence of antibodies. Overall, similar results were seen for antibody-opsonized standard and antibody-bound immature DENV preparations, indicating that the maturation status of the virus does not control the entry pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that antibodies alter the cell entry pathway of DENV and trigger a novel mechanism of initial virus-cell contact. PMID:27385443

  20. A novel antibody discovery platform identifies anti-influenza A broadly neutralizing antibodies from human memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Chen, Yan; Varkey, Reena; Kallewaard, Nicole; Koksal, Adem C; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Herren; Chowdhury, Partha S; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2016-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody isolation directly from circulating human B cells is a powerful tool to delineate humoral responses to pathological conditions and discover antibody therapeutics. We have developed a platform aimed at improving the efficiencies of B cell selection and V gene recovery. Here, memory B cells are activated and amplified using Epstein-Barr virus infection, co-cultured with CHO-muCD40L cells, and then assessed by functional screenings. An in vitro transcription and translation (IVTT) approach was used to analyze variable (V) genes recovered from each B cell sample and identify the relevant heavy/light chain pair(s). We achieved efficient amplification and activation of memory B cells, and eliminated the need to: 1) seed B cells at clonal level (≤1 cell/well) or perform limited dilution cloning; 2) immortalize B cells; or 3) assemble V genes into an IgG expression vector to confirm the relevant heavy/light chain pairing. Cross-reactive antibodies targeting a conserved epitope on influenza A hemagglutinin were successfully isolated from a healthy donor. In-depth analysis of the isolated antibodies suggested their potential uses as anti-influenza A antibody therapeutics and uncovered a distinct affinity maturation pathway. Importantly, our results showed that cognate heavy/light chain pairings contributed to both the expression level and binding abilities of our newly isolated VH1-69 family, influenza A neutralizing antibodies, contrasting with previous observations that light chains do not significantly contribute to the function of this group of antibodies. Our results further suggest the potential use of the IVTT as a powerful antibody developability assessment tool. PMID:27049174

  1. Maltreated Children's Memory: Accuracy, Suggestibility, and Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Mitchell L.; Goodman, Gail S.; Qin, Jianjian; Davis, Suzanne; Crayton, John

    2007-01-01

    Memory, suggestibility, stress arousal, and trauma-related psychopathology were examined in 328 3- to 16-year-olds involved in forensic investigations of abuse and neglect. Children's memory and suggestibility were assessed for a medical examination and venipuncture. Being older and scoring higher in cognitive functioning were related to fewer…

  2. Query term suggestion in academic search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, S.; Sappelli, M.; Kraaij, W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate query term suggestion in the context of academic professional search. Our overall goal is to support scientists in their information seeking tasks. We set up an interactive search system in which terms are extracted from clicked documents and suggested to the user before e

  3. Antibody producing capacity to the bacteriophage phi X174 in yersinia arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bucknall, R.; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Laitinen, O; Jones, J V

    1987-01-01

    Antibody production in response to the primary immunogen bacteriophage phi X174 was investigated in 14 patients with previous yersinia arthritis (YA) and in 15 controls. HLA-B27 occurred in 10 patients with YA and in three controls. After primary and secondary immunisation the antibody responses were essentially similar both in patients with YA and controls. Consequently our results suggest that antibody response to a foreign antigen does not differ between patients with YA and a normal contr...

  4. Antibody Response to Actinomyces Antigen and Dental Caries Experience: Implications for Caries Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Martin; Owen, Willis L; Avery, Kevin T

    2005-01-01

    Fluoridated dentifrices reduce dental caries in subjects who perform effective oral hygiene. Actinomyces naeslundii increases in teeth-adherent microbial biofilms (plaques) in these subjects, and a well-characterized serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response (Actinomyces antibody [A-Ab]) is also increased. Other studies suggest that a serum IgG antibody response to streptococcal d-alanyl poly(glycerophosphate) (S-Ab) may indicate caries experience associated strongly with gingival health...

  5. Antibody to a molecular marker of cell position inhibits synapse formation in retina.

    OpenAIRE

    Trisler, D.; Bekenstein, J; Daniels, M P

    1986-01-01

    A topographic gradient of TOP molecules in retina can be used to identify neuron position. Antibody to TOP from hybridoma cells that were injected into in vivo embryo eyes diffused into the retina and bound in a topographic gradient of [antibody.TOP] ([Ab.TOP]) complexes. Synapse formation in retina was inhibited in the presence of anti-TOP antibody. This suggests that TOP is involved in synapse formation and that recognition of position by neurons is necessary for normal synapse formation.

  6. Soya protein antibodies in man: their occurrence and possible relevance in coeliac disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Haeney, M. R.; Goodwin, B. J.; Barratt, M E; Mike, N.; Asquith, P.

    1982-01-01

    Circulating antibodies to soya-derived protein antigens have been measured in patients with duodenitis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and coeliac disease. Significantly raised antibody titres were found frequently in the coeliac group, particularly those patients showing a suboptimal response to a gluten-free diet, but rarely in subjects with other gastrointestinal diseases. Antisoya activity was not necessarily accompanied by antibodies to other common dietary antigens. We suggest that...

  7. The antineutrophil antibody in uveitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, D W

    1991-01-01

    Ninety eight patients with uveitis of various types were tested for the presence of the antineutrophil antibody or ANCA by an indirect immunofluorescence method. This antibody is found in patients with diseases associated with small vessel vasculitis, including Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyarteritis. Eleven true positive cases were found. A positive test was not associated with the anatomical site of the uveitis but was related to the time course of the disease. In particular ...

  8. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  9. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author)

  10. Radioimmunoguided surgery using monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential proficiency of radioimmunoguided surgery in the intraoperative detection of tumors was assessed using labeled monoclonal antibody B72.3 in 66 patients with tissue-proved tumor. Monoclonal antibody B72.3 was injected 5 to 42 days preoperatively, and the hand-held gamma-detecting probe was used intraoperatively to detect the presence of tumor. Intraoperative probe counts of less than 20 every 2 seconds, or tumor-to-adjacent normal tissue ratios less than 2:1 were considered negative (system failure). Positive probe counts were detected in 5 of 6 patients with primary colon cancer (83 percent), in 31 of 39 patients with recurrent colon cancer (79 percent), in 4 of 5 patients with gastric cancer (80 percent), in 3 of 8 patients with breast cancer (37.5 percent), and in 4 of 8 patients with ovarian cancer (50 percent) undergoing second-look procedures. Additional patients in each group were scored as borderline positive. Overall, radioimmunoguided surgery using B72.3 identified tumors in 47 patients (71.2 percent), bordered on positive in 6 patients (9.1 percent), and failed to identify tumor in 13 patients (19.7 percent). Improved selection of patients for antigen-positive tumors, the use of higher affinity second-generation antibodies, alternate routes of antibody administration, alternate radionuclides, and more sophisticatedly bioengineered antibodies and antibody combinations should all lead to improvements in radioimmunoguided surgery

  11. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  13. Induction Technique: Beyond Simple Response to Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabasz, Arreed; Barabasz, Marianne

    2016-10-01

    The hypnotic induction is intended to induce hypnosis. This implies that what is sought is intended to go beyond what might be wrought by mere suggestion, expectancy, and social influence. The experimentally controlled research showing that the induction makes a difference and how small changes in wording of suggestions can produce orthogonal responses is briefly reviewed. This article explains the principles of induction and three critical phases of hypnotic induction in detail. An arm levitation scripted protocol demonstrating how to respond to the patient using the three phases to maximize responses to hypnotic suggestions is presented. PMID:27586048

  14. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies are...

  15. Suggestions for Preview in Learning English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun; Na

    2015-01-01

    Among the factors which affect the efficiency of learning English,preview stands out as an increasingly significant one in English studying.Some constructive suggestions about the preview are given to apply in the preview of English.

  16. Smoking Harms Black Americans' Kidneys, Study Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159032.html Smoking Harms Black Americans' Kidneys, Study Suggests Researchers say ... 25, 2016 WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking may pose a significant risk to kidney health ...

  17. Suggestions for Preview in Learning English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Na

    2015-01-01

    Among the factors which affect the efficiency of learning English, preview stands out as an increasingly significant one in English studying.Some constructive suggestions about the preview are given to apply in the preview of English.

  18. B cells mediate chronic allograft rejection independently of antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Ng, Yue-Harn; Singh, Tripti; Jiang, Ke; Sheriff, Khaleefathullah A; Ippolito, Renee; Zahalka, Salwa; Li, Qi; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Ramaswami, Balathiripurasundari; Lund, Frances E; Chalasani, Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Chronic rejection is the primary cause of long-term failure of transplanted organs and is often viewed as an antibody-dependent process. Chronic rejection, however, is also observed in mice and humans with no detectable circulating alloantibodies, suggesting that antibody-independent pathways may also contribute to pathogenesis of transplant rejection. Here, we have provided direct evidence that chronic rejection of vascularized heart allografts occurs in the complete absence of antibodies, but requires the presence of B cells. Mice that were deficient for antibodies but not B cells experienced the same chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which is a pathognomonic feature of chronic rejection, as WT mice; however, mice that were deficient for both B cells and antibodies were protected from CAV. B cells contributed to CAV by supporting splenic lymphoid architecture, T cell cytokine production, and infiltration of T cells into graft vessels. In chimeric mice, in which B cells were present but could not present antigen, both T cell responses and CAV were markedly reduced. These findings establish that chronic rejection can occur in the complete absence of antibodies and that B cells contribute to this process by supporting T cell responses through antigen presentation and maintenance of lymphoid architecture.

  19. B cells mediate chronic allograft rejection independently of antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Ng, Yue-Harn; Singh, Tripti; Jiang, Ke; Sheriff, Khaleefathullah A; Ippolito, Renee; Zahalka, Salwa; Li, Qi; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Ramaswami, Balathiripurasundari; Lund, Frances E; Chalasani, Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Chronic rejection is the primary cause of long-term failure of transplanted organs and is often viewed as an antibody-dependent process. Chronic rejection, however, is also observed in mice and humans with no detectable circulating alloantibodies, suggesting that antibody-independent pathways may also contribute to pathogenesis of transplant rejection. Here, we have provided direct evidence that chronic rejection of vascularized heart allografts occurs in the complete absence of antibodies, but requires the presence of B cells. Mice that were deficient for antibodies but not B cells experienced the same chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which is a pathognomonic feature of chronic rejection, as WT mice; however, mice that were deficient for both B cells and antibodies were protected from CAV. B cells contributed to CAV by supporting splenic lymphoid architecture, T cell cytokine production, and infiltration of T cells into graft vessels. In chimeric mice, in which B cells were present but could not present antigen, both T cell responses and CAV were markedly reduced. These findings establish that chronic rejection can occur in the complete absence of antibodies and that B cells contribute to this process by supporting T cell responses through antigen presentation and maintenance of lymphoid architecture. PMID:24509079

  20. Bipolar disorder and antithyroid antibodies: review and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchetta, Alberto; Traccis, Francesco; Mosca, Enrica; Serra, Alessandra; Tamburini, Giorgio; Loviselli, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Mood disorders and circulating thyroid antibodies are very prevalent in the population and their concomitant occurrence may be due to chance. However, thyroid antibodies have been repeatedly hypothesized to play a role in specific forms of mood disorders. Potentially related forms include treatment-refractory cases, severe or atypical depression, and depression at specific phases of a woman's life (early gestation, postpartum depression, perimenopausal). With regard to bipolar disorder, studies of specific subgroups (rapid cycling, mixed, or depressive bipolar) have reported associations with thyroid antibodies. Offspring of bipolar subjects were found more vulnerable to develop thyroid antibodies independently from the vulnerability to develop psychiatric disorders. A twin study suggested thyroid antibodies among possible endophenotypes for bipolar disorder. Severe encephalopathies have been reported in association with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Cases with pure psychiatric presentation are being reported, the antithyroid antibodies being probably markers of some other autoimmune disorders affecting the brain. Vasculitis resulting in abnormalities in cortical perfusion is one of the possible mechanisms. PMID:26869176

  1. Suggestions for Customer Strategy Updates : Finnish Customs

    OpenAIRE

    Kaisto, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    The case organization Finnish Customs wanted to be provided with new suggestions for their customer strategy updates. The first objective of this study was to study how the needs of the partnership and key customers are met in the customer strategy and provide suggestions for improvements. Another objective was to research the legislation influencing the customer strategy development. The customer strategy was created in 2004 and it was combined with other strategies in 2013. The customer...

  2. The functional anatomy of suggested limb paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Quinton; Oakley, David A; Toone, Brian; Bell, Vaughan; Walsh, Eamonn; Marquand, Andre F; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Williams, Steven C R; Mehta, Mitul A; Halligan, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Suggestions of limb paralysis in highly hypnotically suggestible subjects have been employed to successfully model conversion disorders, revealing similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb. However, previous studies differ with regard to the executive regions involved during involuntary inhibition of the affected limb. This difference may have arisen as previous studies did not control for differences in hypnosis depth between conditions and/or include subjective measures to explore the experience of suggested paralysis. In the current study we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the functional anatomy of left and right upper limb movements in eight healthy subjects selected for high hypnotic suggestibility during (i) hypnosis (NORMAL) and (ii) attempted movement following additional left upper limb paralysis suggestions (PARALYSIS). Contrast of left upper limb motor function during NORMAL relative to PARALYSIS conditions revealed greater activation of contralateral M1/S1 and ipsilateral cerebellum, consistent with the engagement of these regions in the completion of movements. By contrast, two significant observations were noted in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions. In conjunction with reports of attempts to move the paralysed limb, greater supplementary motor area (SMA) activation was observed, a finding consistent with the role of SMA in motor intention and planning. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA 24) was also significantly more active in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions - suggesting that ACC (BA 24) may be implicated in involuntary, as well as voluntary inhibition of prepotent motor responses.

  3. Antibody Responses After Analytic Treatment Interruption in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Individuals on Early Initiated Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Bricault, Christine A.; Shields, Jennifer; Bayne, Madeleine; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Seaman, Michael S.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    The examination of antibody responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals in the setting of antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption can provide insight into the evolution of antibody responses during viral rebound. In this study, we assessed antibody responses in 20 subjects in AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5187, wherein subjects were treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection, underwent analytic treatment interruption, and subsequently demonstrated viral rebound. Our data suggest that early initiation of ART arrests the maturation of HIV-1-specific antibody responses, preventing epitope diversification of antibody binding and the development of functional neutralizing capacity. Antibody responses do not appear permanently blunted, however, because viral rebound triggered the resumption of antibody maturation in our study. We also found that antibody responses measured by these assays did not predict imminent viral rebound. These data have important implications for the HIV-1 vaccine and eradication fields.

  4. Production of recombinant antibodies using bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Shukra, A. M.; Sridevi, N. V.; Dev Chandran,; Kapil Maithal,

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant antibody fragments such as Fab, scFv, diabodies, triabodies, single domain antibodies and minibodies have recently emerged as potential alternatives to monoclonal antibodies, which can be engineered using phage display technology. These antibodies match the strengths of conventionally produced monoclonal antibodies and offer advantages for the development of immunodiagnostic kits and assays. These fragments not only retain the specificity of the whole monoclonal ...

  5. Measuring Children's Suggestibility in Forensic Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpini, Laura; Melis, Manuela; Petralia, Stefania; Rosenberg, Melina D

    2016-01-01

    According to the scientific literature, childrens' cognitive development is not complete until adolescence. Therefore, the problems inherent in children serving as witnesses are crucial. In preschool-aged children, false memories may be identified because of misinformation and insight bias. Additionally, they are susceptible of suggestions. The aim of this study was to verify the levels of suggestibility in children between three and 5 years of age. Ninety-two children were examined (44 male, 48 female; M = 4.5 years, SD = 9.62). We used the correlation coefficient (Pearson's r) and the averages variance by SPSS statistical program. The results concluded that: younger children are almost always more susceptible to suggestibility. The dimension of immediate recall was negatively correlates with that of total suggestibility (r = -0.357 p < 0.001). Social compliance and source monitoring errors contribute to patterns of suggestibility, because older children shift their answers more often (r = 0.394 p < 0.001). Younger children change their answers more times (r = -0.395 p < 0.001). PMID:27404406

  6. Anticardiolipin antibodies in pathogenesis of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Dragan

    2010-01-01

    [(236.05 ± 5.10 × 109] in the control group. Activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time were statistically significantly prolonged (p < 0.05 in pregnant women with spontaneous abortions compared to controls, suggest anticoagulant activity. Conclusion. In pregnant women with spontaneous abortions compared to healthy pregnant women slightly positive correlation of LAC with aCL antibodies of both classes, as well as a positive correlation of aCL antibodies with antib2GP1 IgG exist. On the other hand, hemostatic parameters values suggest an anticoagulatnt status in the blood of pregnant women with spontaneous abortions.

  7. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  8. Characterization of single chain antibody targets through yeast two hybrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vielemeyer Ole

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to their unique ability to bind their targets with high fidelity, antibodies are used widely not only in biomedical research, but also in many clinical applications. Recombinant antibodies, including single chain variable fragments (scFv, are gaining momentum because they allow powerful in vitro selection and manipulation without loss of function. Regardless of the ultimate application or type of antibody used, precise understanding of the interaction between the antibody's binding site and its specific target epitope(s is of great importance. However, such data is frequently difficult to obtain. Results We describe an approach that allows detailed characterization of a given antibody's target(s using the yeast two-hybrid system. Several recombinant scFv were used as bait and screened against highly complex cDNA libraries. Systematic sequencing of all retained clones and statistical analysis allowed efficient ranking of the prey fragments. Multiple alignment of the obtained cDNA fragments provided a selected interacting domain (SID, efficiently narrowing the epitope-containing region. Interactions between antibodies and their respective targets were characterized for several scFv. For AA2 and ROF7, two conformation-specific sensors that exclusively bind the activated forms of the small GTPases Rab6 and Rab1 respectively, only fragments expressing the entire target protein's core region were retained. This strongly suggested interaction with a non-linear epitope. For two other scFv, TA10 and SF9, which recognize the large proteins giantin and non-muscle myosin IIA, respectively, precise antibody-binding regions within the target were defined. Finally, for some antibodies, secondary targets within and across species could be revealed. Conclusions Our method, utilizing the yeast two-hybrid technology and scFv as bait, is a simple yet powerful approach for the detailed characterization of antibody targets. It allows precise

  9. Heterogeneity of Polyneuropathy Associated with Anti-MAG Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Magy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG antibodies is an immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathy. The pathophysiology of this condition is likely to involve anti-MAG antibody deposition on myelin sheaths of the peripheral nerves and it is supposed to be distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP, another immune-mediated demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. In this series, we have retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory findings from 60 patients with polyneuropathy, IgM gammopathy, and anti-MAG antibodies. We found that the clinical picture in these patients is highly variable suggesting a direct link between the monoclonal gammopathy and the neuropathy. Conversely, one-third of patients had a CIDP-like phenotype on electrodiagnostic testing and this was correlated with a low titer of anti-MAG antibodies and the absence of widening of myelin lamellae. Our data suggest that polyneuropathy associated with anti-MAG antibodies is less homogeneous than previously said and that the pathophysiology of the condition is likely to be heterogeneous as well with the self-antigen being MAG in most of the patients but possibly being another component of myelin in the others.

  10. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies of Shrimp White Spot Syndrome Virus Envelope Protein VP28

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-gang GU; Jun-fa YUAN; Ge-lin XU; Li-juan LI; Ni LIU; Cong ZHANG; Jian-hong ZHANG; Zheng-li SHI

    2007-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with purified White spot syndrome virus (WSSV).Six monoclonal antibody cell lines were selected by ELISA with VP28 protein expressed in E.coll in vitro neutralization experiments showed that 4 of them could inhibit the virus infection in crayfish.Westernblot suggested that all these monoclonal antibodies were against the conformational structure of VP28.The monoclonal antibody 7B4 was labeled with colloidal gold particles and used to locate the VP28 on virus envelope by immunogold labeling.These monoclonal antibodies could be used to develop immunological diagnosis methods for WSSV infection.

  11. Potential for novel MUC1 glycopeptide-specific antibody in passive cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2013-01-01

    MUC1 is an important target for antibodies in passive cancer immunotherapy. Antibodies against mucin glycans or mucin peptide backbone alone may give rise to cross reactivity with normal tissues. Therefore, attempts to identify antibodies against cancer-specific MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes havebeen...... made. We recently demonstrated that a monoclonal antibody against the immunodominant Tn-MUC1 (GalNAc-α-MUC1) antigen induced ADCC in breast cancer cell lines, suggesting the feasibility of targeting combined glycopeptide epitopes in future passive cancer immunotherapy....

  12. Novel antimalarial antibodies highlight the importance of the antibody Fc region in mediating protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleass, Richard J; Ogun, Solabomi A; McGuinness, David H; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Holder, Anthony A; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-12-15

    Parasite drug resistance and difficulties in developing effective vaccines have precipitated the search for alternative therapies for malaria. The success of passive immunization suggests that immunoglobulin (Ig)-based therapies are effective. To further explore the mechanism(s) by which antibody mediates its protective effect, we generated human chimeric IgG1 and IgA1 and a single-chain diabody specific for the C-terminal 19-kDa region of Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119), a major target of protective immune responses. These novel human reagents triggered in vitro phagocytosis of merozoites but, unlike their parental mouse IgG2b, failed to protect against parasite challenge in vivo. Therefore, the Fc region appears critical for mediating protection in vivo, at least for this MSP119 epitope. Such antibodies may serve as prototype therapeutic agents, and as useful tools in the development of in vitro neutralization assays with Plasmodium parasites. PMID:12855589

  13. Antibody levels after regular childhood vaccinations in the immunological screening of children with recurrent otitis media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiertsema, S.P.; Sanders, E.A.M.; Veenhoven, R.H.; Heerbeek, N. van; Hof, S. van den; Berbers, G.A.; Rijkers, G.T.

    2004-01-01

    Recurrent otitis media may be related to defects in specific antibody production, as suggested previously. This might be reflected in lower antibody responses to vaccinations administered in the context of the national childhood vaccination program in children suffering from recurrent otitis media.

  14. Immunoglobulin M and G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Rowe, P; Bennett, S;

    1993-01-01

    -GLURP489-1271 antibodies and clinical immunity is not clear; asymptomatically infected children aged 5 to 8 years had significantly higher levels of IgG than clinically ill children of the same age, suggesting that antibodies to the carboxy-terminal part of the GLURP may contribute to immunity to P....... falciparum. However, this was not significant for younger children....

  15. Prevalence of antibodies to canine parvovirus and distemper virus in wolves in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Brynn; Hebblewhite, Mark; Ezenwa, Vanessa; Shury, Todd; Merrill, Evelyn H; Paquet, Paul C; Schmiegelow, Fiona; Seip, Dale; Skinner, Geoff; Webb, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Wild carnivores are often exposed to diseases via contact with peridomestic host species that travel through the wildland-urban interfaces. To determine the antibody prevalences and relationships to human activity for two common canid pathogens, we sampled 99 wolves (Canis lupus) from 2000 to 2008 for antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) in Banff and Jasper National Parks and surrounding areas of the Canadian Rockies. This population was the source for wolves reintroduced into the Northern Rockies of the US. Of 99 wolves sampled, 94 had detectable antibody to CPV (95%), 24 were antibody-positive for CDV (24%), and 24 had antibodies to both pathogens (24%). We tested whether antibody prevalences for CPV and CDV were higher closer to human activity (roads, town sites, First Nation reserves) and as a function of sex and age class. Wolves ≥2 yr old were more likely to be have antibodies to CPV. For CDV, male wolves, wolves ≥2 yr, and those closer to First Nation reserves were more likely to have antibodies. Overall, however, we found minimal support for human influence on antibody prevalence for CDV and CPV. The similarity between our antibody prevalence results and results from recent studies in Yellowstone National Park suggests that at least in the case of CDV, and perhaps CPV, these could be important pathogens with potential effects on wolf populations. PMID:22247375

  16. Lepromatous leprosy patients produce antibodies that recognise non-bilayer lipid arrangements containing mycolic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Baeza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate structure of the tubular hexagonal phase II are present in a bilayer of lipids. Antibodies that recognise these arrangements have been described in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and/or systemic lupus erythematosus and in those with preeclampsia; these antibodies have also been documented in an experimental murine model of lupus, in which they are associated with immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate the presence of antibodies against non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements containing mycolic acids in the sera of lepromatous leprosy (LL patients, but not those of healthy volunteers. The presence of antibodies that recognise these non-bilayer lipid arrangements may contribute to the hypergammaglobulinaemia observed in LL patients. We also found IgM and IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies in 77% of the patients. This positive correlation between the anti-mycolic-non-bilayer arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies suggests that both types of antibodies are produced by a common mechanism, as was demonstrated in the experimental murine model of lupus, in which there was a correlation between the anti-non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Antibodies to non-bilayer lipid arrangements may represent a previously unrecognised pathogenic mechanism in LL and the detection of these antibodies may be a tool for the early diagnosis of LL patients.

  17. Studies and Suggestions on Prewriting Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shigao; Dai, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies and suggests the need for writing instruction by which students can experience writing as a creative process in exploring and communicating meaning. The prewriting activities generate ideas which can encourage a free flow of thoughts and help students discover both what they want to say and how to say it on paper. Through the…

  18. Suggestions on Training MTI Translators and Interpreters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岩

    2013-01-01

    This article gives a brief review of the current state of training MTI translators and interpreters.After analyzing the problems that exist in course of the training,the author,as a student of MTI,puts forth some suggestions to improve the MTI training in colleges and universities to train practical translators and interpreters from the point of view of learning.

  19. Leadership Theories--Managing Practices, Challenges, Suggestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    A shortage of community college executives due to the number of retirements occurring among current leaders is predicted. An examination of three leadership theories--servant-leadership, business leadership and transformational leadership--suggests techniques for potential community college leaders. Servant-leaders focus on the needs of their…

  20. Teaching Software Engineering: Problems and Suggestions

    OpenAIRE

    Osama Shata

    2011-01-01

    Teaching Software Engineering is a challenging task. This paper presents some problems encountered during teaching the course of software engineering to computer science and computer engineering students for few offerings. We present problems encountered and which are related to its title and contents and present suggested solutions.

  1. Accounting: Suggested Content for Postsecondary Tax Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Patricia H.; Morgan, Samuel D.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys of community college graduates and of certified public accountants were made to determine employment relevance of the accounting curriculum. The article suggests topics from the study data which should be included in taxation courses, e.g., income tax accounting, corporate taxation accounting, and tax law. (MF)

  2. Suggested Universals in the Ontogenesis of Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobin, Dan I.

    This paper represents a preliminary attempt to determine universals of grammatical development in children. On the basis of language acquisition data, a limited number of findings are presented in the form of suggested developmental universals. These universals are grouped according to the psychological variables which may determine them, in the…

  3. Three Suggestions to Improve Medical English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄佳丽

    2012-01-01

    As a kind of ESP,medical English teaching has an important impact on both English teachers and medical students.A good medical English teaching can help the medical students to improve themselves smoothly and easily in the medical area.In this article,three suggestions were provided for the medical English teachers to improve their English teaching in medical field.

  4. Rewarding Useful Suggestions in an Organizational Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajko Vidic

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: Do organizational unit leaders reward useful suggestions? How does the rewarding of useful employee suggestions encourage creativity and effectiveness? Purpose: On the basis of group conversations through focus groups, to determine whether rewarding effects the creativity and performance of employees. Method: Quantitative method using focus groups. Results: The results of the research study showed that the organizational unit appropriately rewards useful suggestions and that this has an impact on employee creativity and efficiency. In addition, the massive inventive activity is a system that effectively influences the success of business. Organization: Massive inventive activity has become a system in which increasingly more employees from different organizational units are becoming a part of. An important role is by managers, who are responsible for creating a positive atmosphere and encourage employees into innovative thinking, performance, and rewarding of useful suggestions. Society: The research shows that this is part of the organizational culture and that it is necessary to transfer to new employees. Originality: This is the first such research in our organizational unit. Limitations/Future Research: The research study was conducted in only one organizational unit of the company.

  5. Suggestions for Structuring a Research Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, James D.; Reiser, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers often experience difficulty as they attempt to prepare journal articles that describe their work. The purpose of this article is to provide researchers in the field of education with a series of suggestions as to how to clearly structure each section of a research manuscript that they intend to submit for publication in a scholarly…

  6. Qualitative Research Articles: Guidelines, Suggestions and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescentini, Alberto; Mainardi, Giuditta

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give ideas and suggestions to avoid some typical problems of qualitative articles. The aim is not to debate quality in qualitative research but to indicate some practical solutions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses the design of qualitative research and the structure of a qualitative article…

  7. Teaching Software Engineering: Problems and Suggestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Shata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching Software Engineering is a challenging task. This paper presents some problems encountered during teaching the course of software engineering to computer science and computer engineering students for few offerings. We present problems encountered and which are related to its title and contents and present suggested solutions.

  8. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases. PMID:15844826

  9. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015. PMID:26651519

  10. Interaction of secretory immunoglobulin A antibodies with Naegleria fowleri trophozoites and collagen type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Mineko; Serrano-Luna, José de Jesús; Rojas-Hernández, Saúl; Campos-Rodríguez, Rafael; Tsutsumi, Victor

    2003-03-01

    In this work, we analyzed the in vitro interaction of human secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) antibodies with Naegleria fowleri trophozoites and the capacity of these antibodies to inhibit amoeba adherence to collagen type I. We also studied N. fowleri antigens that are recognized by sIgA, using immunoblot assays. Immunocytochemical analysis of the interaction showed a redistribution of antigens on the surface of trophozoites by sIgA antibodies. Ultrastructural analysis of antibody-amoeba interaction showed that besides the patching and cap formation, parasites were capable of eliminating the antigen-antibody complex produced on the surface. sIgA antibodies were capable of inhibiting the in vitro adhesion of trophozoites to collagen type I. We suggest that nonsymptomatic infections by N. fowleri may stimulate a local specific immunity that prevents trophozoite adhesion and invasion of nasal mucosa.

  11. Newly formed skeletal muscle fibers are prone to false positive immunostaining by rabbit antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Kliem, Anette; Schrøder, Henrik Daa;

    2011-01-01

    Reports on muscle biology and regeneration often implicate immuno(cyto/histo)chemical protein characterization using rabbit polyclonal antibodies. In this study we demonstrate that newly formed myofibers are especially prone to false positive staining by rabbit antibodies and this unwanted staining...... is only recognized (1) by a negative muscle tissue control that does not harbor the protein to be examined (fx. from knockout mouse) or (2) by use of a nonsense rabbit antibody that has been prepared in the same way as the antibody of interest. However, many muscle immuno(cyto/histo)chemical studies...... only rely on controls that reveal non-specific binding by the secondary antibody and neglect that the primary rabbit antibody itself may cause false positive staining of the muscle. We suggest that reliable immuno-based protein detection in newly formed muscle fibers at least requires a nonsense rabbit...

  12. Lineage tracing of human B cells reveals the in vivo landscape of human antibody class switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horns, Felix; Vollmers, Christopher; Croote, Derek; Mackey, Sally F; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Antibody class switching is a feature of the adaptive immune system which enables diversification of the effector properties of antibodies. Even though class switching is essential for mounting a protective response to pathogens, the in vivo patterns and lineage characteristics of antibody class switching have remained uncharacterized in living humans. Here we comprehensively measured the landscape of antibody class switching in human adult twins using antibody repertoire sequencing. The map identifies how antibodies of every class are created and delineates a two-tiered hierarchy of class switch pathways. Using somatic hypermutations as a molecular clock, we discovered that closely related B cells often switch to the same class, but lose coherence as somatic mutations accumulate. Such correlations between closely related cells exist when purified B cells class switch in vitro, suggesting that class switch recombination is directed toward specific isotypes by a cell-autonomous imprinted state. PMID:27481325

  13. Development of radioactivity labelling method of new antibody by using the antibody engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With an aim to develop a method to produce labelled antibodies with low immunogenicity, two recombinant fusion proteins; scFv-His and scFv-MTβ were produced using gene engineering techniques. The former was constructed with scFv-antibody and histidine hexamer, a metal-chelated protein (or peptide). The latter was done with scFv-antibody and β-domain of metallothionein. Then, antigen-binding activity and metal-binding activity of these fusion proteins were determined using gel-filtration chromatography and ELISA. The main antigen-binding activity of scFv-His preparation was detected in a domain of about 25-30 kDa, which agreed with the peak of 29 kDa corresponding to the presumed molecular weight for the protein. Whereas the antigen-binding activity of scFv-MTβ was found in a domain of 30-35 kDa, which agreed with 32 kDa, the presumed molecular weight of scFv-MTβ. Gel-filtration chromatography of scFv-His preparation after the addition of Cu2+ ion revealed an optical absorption at 280 nm and a Cu-peak near at 14 kDa. These results suggested that the metal affinity of the histidine-hexamer was too weak to chelate Cu2+ in a solution. The chromatography of scFv-MTβ preparation added with Cd2+ showed a peak of Cd appeared around a position of about 20 kDa but the peak was not coincident with that of the antigen-binding activity (ca. 30 kDa), suggesting that the present preparation of scFv-MTβ had no Cd-binding activity due to metal-exchange reaction. Based on these results, problems on the production of recombinant scFv-antibody fused with metal-binding domain of cystein-binding type or histidine-binding one were discussed. (M.N.)

  14. Antibodies against interferon-beta in neuromyelitis optica patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asgari, Nasrin; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Steenstrup, Troels;

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an antibody-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the CNS. A poor response to treatment with recombinant interferon beta (IFN-ß) in NMO patients has been suggested, although the precise mechanisms remain uncertain. We analyzed occurrence and clinical consequences...

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study of Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ilyas Kamboh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APA may lead to the development of primary or secondary antiphospholipid syndrome. Although the genetic basis of APA has been suggested, the identity of the underlying genes is largely unknown. In this study, we have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS in an effort to identify susceptibility loci/genes for three main APA: anticardiolipin antibodies (ACL, lupus anticoagulant (LAC, and anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-β2GPI. Methods. DNA samples were genotyped using the Affymetrix 6.0 array containing 906,600 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Association of SNPs with the antibody status (positive/negative was tested using logistic regression under the additive model. Results. We have identified a number of suggestive novel loci with Psuggestive loci are potential candidates for the production of APA. We have replicated the previously reported associations of HLA genes and APOH with APA but these were not the top loci. Conclusions. We have identified a number of suggestive novel loci for APA that will stimulate follow-up studies in independent and larger samples to replicate our findings.

  16. A role for anti-HSP60 antibodies in arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Bennike, Tue; Christiansen, Gunna;

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the high sequence similarity between HSP60 proteins, found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, it has been suggested, but never concluded, that anti-HSP60 antibodies could be of importance in the pathology of arthritis diseases explained by a concept named molecular mimicry...

  17. Epigenetics of the antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and miRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR), and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and miRNAs modulate the expression of critical elements of that machinery, such as activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), as well as factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks instruct the maturation of antibody responses. Their dysregulation plays an important role in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens, such as those of microbial pathogens, and self-antigens, such as those targeted in autoimmunity, and B cell neoplasia.

  18. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  19. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive......Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...

  20. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies.

  1. Simple nonlinear models suggest variable star universality

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, John F; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-01-01

    Dramatically improved data from observatories like the CoRoT and Kepler spacecraft have recently facilitated nonlinear time series analysis and phenomenological modeling of variable stars, including the search for strange (aka fractal) or chaotic dynamics. We recently argued [Lindner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 (2015) 054101] that the Kepler data includes "golden" stars, whose luminosities vary quasiperiodically with two frequencies nearly in the golden ratio, and whose secondary frequencies exhibit power-law scaling with exponent near -1.5, suggesting strange nonchaotic dynamics and singular spectra. Here we use a series of phenomenological models to make plausible the connection between golden stars and fractal spectra. We thereby suggest that at least some features of variable star dynamics reflect universal nonlinear phenomena common to even simple systems.

  2. [Suggestions to improve dentist-endodontist collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalegui, B; Zabalegui, I; Flores, L

    1989-01-01

    Referrals from the general dentist to the endodontist are in some occasions complicated with lack of proper communication among dentist-patient-specialist, resulting in the loss of confidence or even the patient. Suggestions to improve this communication are discussed, which will provide the patient a higher confidence in the indicated endodontic treatment and a better dental service. It will also enhance the prestige of the general dentists' and specialists' practice. PMID:2640034

  3. [Suggestions to improve dentist-endodontist collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalegui, B; Zabalegui, I; Flores, L

    1989-01-01

    Referrals from the general dentist to the endodontist are in some occasions complicated with lack of proper communication among dentist-patient-specialist, resulting in the loss of confidence or even the patient. Suggestions to improve this communication are discussed, which will provide the patient a higher confidence in the indicated endodontic treatment and a better dental service. It will also enhance the prestige of the general dentists' and specialists' practice.

  4. Reducing suggestibility in child witness interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Memon, Amina; Holley, Angela; Wark, Linsey; Bull, Ray; Koehnken, Guenter

    1996-01-01

    This study set out to test the prediction that a Cognitive Interview may increase resistance to subsequent misleading suggestions in child witness interviews. The misleading information was presented in the form of questions both prior to, and after, a cognitive or structured interview to 8 and 9 year old witnesses to a video-taped event. Use of the cognitive interview resulted in more correct responses to post-interview questions than did the structured interview eventhough there was not qui...

  5. Radioimmunotherapy with engineered antibody fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have developed and begun evaluating radiometal-chelated (213Bi) engineered antibody fragments as radioimmunotherapy agents that target the HER2/neu (c-erbB-2) antigen. The diabody format was found to have 40-fold greater affinity for HER2/neu and to be associated with significantly greater tumor localization than is achieved with scFv molecule. It is shown that short-lived isotopes like 213Bi would be most effective when used in conjunction with antibodies that targeted diffuse malignancies (leukemia or lymphoma) or when used for very rapid pretargeted radioimmunotherapy application in which the radioisotope is conjugated to a very small ligand

  6. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  7. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  8. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  9. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  10. Yeast killer toxin-like anti-idiotypic antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    POLONELLI, L.; Morace, G

    1988-01-01

    Anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Ids) were raised in a rabbit against a murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralizing the yeast killer toxin produced by a strain of Pichia (Hansenula) anomala. In an immunodiffusion test, the anti-Ids produced in the rabbit recognized the antigen-binding site of the MAb used as the immunogen (KT4) but not that of another heterologous MAb. The absence of any significant cross-reactivity among the anti-Ids raised in a rabbit for a heterologous MAb suggested that ...

  11. Guidelines and Suggestions for Balloon Gondola Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility is responsible for ensuring that science payloads meet the appropriate design requirements. The ultimate goal is to ensure that payloads stay within the allowable launch limits as well as survive the termination event. The purpose of this presentation is to provide some general guidelines for Gondola Design. These include rules and reasons on why CSBF has a certain preference and location for certain components within the gondola as well as other suggestions. Additionally, some recommendations are given on how to avoid common pitfalls.

  12. Suggestions about Taxi Service in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李颖

    2006-01-01

    @@ No matter what kinds1 of work we are engaged in, we usually play the role of the customers2 in life. Maybe we offer service to our clients, but at the same time, we get service from other people. So, to the society3, it is very important of the level of the service occupations4. In this essay, I want to talk about the service of the taxi in Beijing5. Because there are some problems in this service occupation, I will give three suggestions to these problems6.

  13. Natural antibodies in paracoccidioidomycosis Anticorpos naturais na paracoccidioidomicose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelinda S. Unterkircher

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent attention has been focused on the natural antibodies as a component of natural immunity and as integral part of the idiotypic network. However, their functional role in different infections has rarely been studied. This work was undertaken to investigate the presence of natural antibodies in paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM. In addition, we analyzed anti-P. brasiliensis antibodies and their distribution in IgG subclasses in order to acquire better knowledge about the humoral immune response in this mycosis. Our findings show that the natural antibody response is not very much increased in PCM when compared with other parasite infections and this response is restricted to a few specificities, suggesting that P. brasiliensis moderately triggers CD5+ B cells. The anti-actin antibody was the main antibody specificity found in PCM. Specific antibodies to P. brasiliensis were mainly found in the IgG1 subclass in chronic patients of PCM.Recente atenção tem sido dada aos anticorpos naturais como componentes da imunidade natural e como parte integrante da rede idiotípica. Todavia, seu papel funcional em diferentes infecções tem, raramente, sido estudado. O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar a presença de anticorpos naturais na paracoccidioidomicose (PCM. Em adição, analisamos os anticorpos específicos anti-P. brasiliensis e sua distribuição em subclasses a fim de adquirir mais conhecimento sobre a resposta imune humoral nesta micose. Nossos achados mostram que a resposta de anticorpos naturais não é acentuada na PCM quando comparada com outras infecções por parasitas e, é restrita a poucas especificidades, sugerindo que o P. brasiliensis estimula moderadamente as células B CD5+. O anticorpo anti-actina foi a principal especificidade encontrada na PCM. Os anticorpos especificos para P. brasiliensis, nos pacientes crônicos, eram, principalmente, da subclasse IgG1.

  14. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (Harvard-Med); (IIT); (NCSU); (UPENN); (Manchester); (Orthovita)

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  15. A universal strategy for stable intracellular antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaki-Loewenstein, Shelly; Zfania, Rahely; Hyland, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Benhar, Itai

    2005-08-01

    The expression of intracellular antibodies (intrabodies) in mammalian cells has provided a powerful tool to manipulate microbial and cellular signalling pathways in a highly precise manner. However, several technical hurdles have thus far restricted their more widespread use. In particular, single-chain antibodies (scFvs) have been reported to fold poorly in the reducing environment of the cytoplasm and as such there has been a reluctance to use scFv-phage libraries as a source of intrabodies unless a preselection step was applied to identify these rare scFvs that could fold properly in the absence of disulfide bonds. Recently, we reported that scFvs can be efficiently expressed within the cytoplasm of bacteria when fused at the C-terminus of the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP). Here, we demonstrate that such MBP-scFvs are similarly stabilized when expressed in the mammalian cell cytoplasm as well as other compartments. This was demonstrated by comparing MBP-scFv fusions to the corresponding unfused scFvs that activate a defective beta-galactosidase enzyme, others that neutralize the wild-type beta-galactosidase enzyme, and an antibody that blocks the epidermal growth factor receptor. In all cases, the MBP-scFvs significantly outperformed their unfused counterparts. Our results suggest that fusion of scFvs to MBP, and possibly to other "chaperones in the context of a fusion protein", may provide a universal approach for efficient expression of intrabodies in the mammalian cell cytoplasm. This strategy should allow investigators to bypass much of the in vitro scFv characterization that is often not predictive of in vivo intrabody function and provide a more efficient use of large native and synthetic scFv-phage libraries already in existence to identify intrabodies that will be active in vivo.

  16. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  17. Adhesion between peptides/antibodies and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, J.; Paetzell, E.; Bogorad, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to measure the adhesion forces between the receptors on breast cancer cells specific to human luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptides and antibodies specific to the EphA2 receptor. The adhesion forces between LHRH-coated AFM tips and human MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells) were shown to be about five times greater than those between LHRH-coated AFM tips and normal Hs578Bst breast cells. Similarly, those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and breast cancer cells were over five times greater than those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and normal breast cells. The results suggest that AFM can be used for the detection of breast cancer cells in biopsies. The implications of the results are also discussed for the early detection and localized treatment of cancer.

  18. Ultrasonographic findings of early abortion: suggested predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate predictable ultrasonographic findings of early abortion. To investigate objective rules for the screening of abortion. Ultrasonographic examination of 111 early pregnancies between the sixth and ninth week in women who had regular 28 day menstrual cycles was performed. Ultrasonographic measurements of the gestational sac, crown rump length and fetal heart rate were performed using a linear array real time transducer with doppler ultrasonogram. All measurements of 17 early abortions were compared to those of 94 normal pregnancies. Most of early aborted pregnancies were classified correctly by discriminant analysis with G-SAC and CRL (G-SAC=0.5 CRL + 15, sensitivity 76.5%, specificity 96.8%). With the addition of FHR, 94.1% of early abortions could be predicted. In conclusion, ultrasonographic findings of early intrauterine growth retardation, small gestational sac and bradycardia can be predictable signs suggestive of poor prognosis of early pregnancies

  19. Extant mammal body masses suggest punctuated equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Tiina M; Bokma, Folmer

    2008-10-01

    Is gradual microevolutionary change within species simultaneously the source of macroevolutionary differentiation between species? Since its first publication, Darwin's original idea that phenotypic differences between species develop gradually over time, as the accumulation of small selection-induced changes in successive generations has been challenged by palaeontologists claiming that, instead, new species quickly acquire their phenotypes to remain virtually unchanged until going extinct again. This controversy, widely known as the 'punctuated equilibrium' debate, remained unresolved, largely owing to the difficulty of distinguishing biological species from fossil remains. We analysed body masses of 2143 existing mammal species on a phylogeny comprising 4510 (i.e. nearly all) extant species to estimate rates of gradual (anagenetic) and speciational (cladogenetic) evolution. Our Bayesian estimates from mammals as well as separate sub-clades such as primates and carnivores suggest that gradual evolution is responsible for only a small part of body size variation between mammal species. PMID:18595835

  20. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation.

  1. Focusing antibody responses against distraction and loss in diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    Pathogens are complex and evolving fast. They have developed full ranges of disguises to divert immune responses and often manage to escape recognition and thereby outpace natural immunity. A prominent example is the scarce and staggered development of broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly mutable viruses. It remains unclear under what evolutionary conditions these exceptional antibodies could emerge and dominate the response. To address this challenge, we construct an individual-based stochastic model of the Darwinian evolution of antibody-producing immune cells. We consider complexity of viral epitopes, vary seeding diversity of the immune cell population, and allow a time varying population size and extinction - new aspects essential for designing a realistic vaccine. We show that various temporal statistics of antigenic environments would select distinct evolutionary paths that lead to predominantly non-neutralizing, strain-specific or broadly neutralizing antibody responses. We suggest strategies to focus antibody responses on the targeted vulnerability of the virus and confer selective advantage to cross-reactive lineages. This implies a new step toward an effective vaccine against rapidly mutating complex pathogens. This work is supported by NIH.

  2. Characterization of fully functional spray-on antibody thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors recently demonstrated that fully functional Escherichia coli O157:H7 antibody thin films can be prepared using a simple pneumatic nebulizer on glass surface [1]. This paper focuses on the investigation of the morphology and physical properties of these films with the aim to better understand their performance. A series of E. coli O157:H7 antibody spray-on thin films were investigated by ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), immunoassays, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscope (AFM) and contact angle analysis. These data were compared to measurements on films prepared with the biotin–avidin covalent bonding scheme. The investigation showed that films created by a 2 min pneumatic spray deposition time can capture antigens similar as the avidin–biotin wet-chemical method. The results also suggests that an influential factor for the comparable capture cell ability between sprayed and covalent films is an increased antibody surface coverage for the sprayed films (non-equilibrium technique), which compensates for the lack of its antibody orientation. There was no significant antibody denaturation detected on any of the sprayed films. Both techniques led to the formation of cluster-aggregates, a factor that seems unavoidable due to the natural tendency of protein to cluster. The avidin–biotin bridge films generally had a higher roughness, which manifested itself in a higher wettability compared to the sprayed films.

  3. Indirect ELISA and indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay for detecting the antibody against murine norovirus S7 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yota; Tohya, Yukinobu; Ike, Fumio; Kajita, Ayako; Park, Sang-Jin; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Kyuwa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate murine norovirus (MNV) infection in laboratory mice, we attempted to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system and an indirect immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) assay for detecting the anti-MNV-S7 antibody in mice. MNV-S7, which was isolated in Japan, was used in both assays. The antigen for ELISA was prepared by ultracentrifugation of culture supernatants of RAW 264 cells infected with MNV-S7. Positive sera were obtained from 6-week-old, female C57BL/6JJcl mice inoculated orally with MNV-S7. IFA against infected RAW 264 cells was able to discriminate positive sera from negative sera. Indirect ELISA was performed using 96-well ELISA plates coated with formalin-treated MNV-S7 antigen. In this ELISA system, mouse sera obtained 2 weeks after infection or later showed significantly high OD values and were judged positive. An equal level of anti-MNV-S7 antibody response was observed in BALB/cAJcl, C57BL/6JJcl, DBA/2JJcl, and Jcl:ICR mice; whereas, C3H/HeJJcl mice demonstrated slightly lower antibody production 4 weeks after infection. We also used this ELISA system to evaluate 77 murine serum samples obtained from 15 conventional mouse rooms in research facilities in Japan and found that approximately half of the serum samples contained antibody to MNV-S7. We found that some serum samples were negative for antibodies to mouse hepatitis virus and Mycoplasma pulmonis but positive for antibody to MNV-S7. The results suggest that the MNV infection is more prevalent than other infections such as mouse hepatitis virus and Mycoplasma pulmonis in conventional mouse colonies in Japan, as is the case in other areas of the world.

  4. Clearance of injected radioactively labelled antibodies to tumour products by liposome-bound second antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liposomes containing anti-goat immunoglobulin were injected 24 h after administration of 125I-labelled goat antibody against the carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) to groups of nude mice bearing human tumour xenografts, and normal mice. Controls in each group received radioactively labelled anti-CEA only. In liposome-treated mice, blood 125I levels were lower than those of controls 30 min to 24 h after liposome administration, with corresponding accumulation of 125I activity in the liver and spleen for the first 2 h after liposome injection. [14C]Cholesterol or sup(99m)Tc labels in the bilayer were eliminated rapidly from the blood, with uptake in the liver and spleen. In xenograft-bearing mice, 125I activity detected in the tumours up to 6 h after liposome injection was identical to that detected in the tumours of controls. However, 24 h after liposome injection a reduction in the tumour concentration of 125I-labelled anti-CEA was obtained, but the tumour/blood radioactivity was still increased. In two mice given 27 μmol lipid, the blood radioactivity count after 24 h was only 5% of that in the controls. In rabbits, 2 h after administration of liposomes containing anti-goat second antibody, the circulating 125I activity had dropped by 28-40%. The results suggest that administration of liposome-entrapped second antibody approximately 2 h prior to external scintigraphy may clear circulating radioactively labelled primary antibody by up to 50%. (Auth.)

  5. Combining somatic mutations present in different in vivo affinity-matured antibodies isolated from immunized Lama glama yields ultra-potent antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarenbeek, Alex; Blanchetot, Christophe; Schragel, Georg; Sadi, Ava S; Ongenae, Nico; Hemrika, Wieger; Wijdenes, John; Spinelli, Silvia; Desmyter, Aline; Cambillau, Christian; Hultberg, Anna; Kretz-Rommel, Anke; Dreier, Torsten; De Haard, Hans J W; Roovers, Rob C

    2016-04-01

    Highly potent human antibodies are required to therapeutically neutralize cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) that is involved in many inflammatory diseases and malignancies. Although a number of mutagenesis approaches exist to perform antibody affinity maturation, these may cause antibody instability and production issues. Thus, a robust and easy antibody affinity maturation strategy to increase antibody potency remains highly desirable. By immunizing llama, cloning the 'immune' antibody repertoire and using phage display, we selected a diverse set of IL-6 antagonistic Fabs. Heavy chain shuffling was performed on the Fab with lowest off-rate, resulting in a panel of variants with even lower off-rate. Structural analysis of the Fab:IL-6 complex suggests that the increased affinity was partly due to a serine to tyrosine switch in HCDR2. This translated into neutralizing capacity in an in vivo model of IL-6 induced SAA production. Finally, a novel Fab library was designed, encoding all variations found in the natural repertoire of VH genes identified after heavy chain shuffling. High stringency selections resulted in identification of a Fab with 250-fold increased potency when re-formatted into IgG1. Compared with a heavily engineered anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody currently in clinical development, this IgG was at least equally potent, showing the engineering process to have had led to a highly potent anti-IL-6 antibody. PMID:26945588

  6. The use of monoclonal antibodies in competitive ELISA for the detection of antibodies to rinderpest and peste des petits ruminants viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monoclonal antibody against the haemagglutinin of rinderpest virus has been used in a competitive ELISA (C-ELISA) for the detection of antibodies to rinderpest virus in cattle, sheep, goat and game sera. Unlike the indirect ELISA and the virus neutralisation test (VNT), the C-ELISA detects only antibodies to rinderpest virus and gives no cross-reactivity with antibodies to peste des petits ruminants (PPR) virus. Antibodies to a wide range of strains of rinderpest virus have been detected using this assay, suggesting its suitability for both sero-monitoring and sero-surveillance. Analysis of C-ELISA results from the examination of field sera shows a much greater separation of negative and positive populations as compared to the indirect ELISA. A further monoclonal antibody against the H protein of PPR has also been found suitable for use in a C-ELISA for the detection of antibodies to PPR virus. The use of these two C-ELISA's has made possible rapid differential sero-diagnosis without recourse to cross-VNT testing. The use of monoclonal antibody-based assays will allow much greater standardisation of rinderpest and PPR diagnosis, and following field-trials the C-ELISA will replace the indirect ELISA for sero-monitoring throughout the Pan African Rinderpest Campaign. (author). 3 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  7. Alternative affinity tools: more attractive than antibodies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, V.J.B.; Levisson, M.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Smidt, H.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies are the most successful affinity tools used today, in both fundamental and applied research (diagnostics, purification and therapeutics). Nonetheless, antibodies do have their limitations, including high production costs and low stability. Alternative affinity tools based on nucleic acids

  8. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  9. [Neuroimmunological diseases associated with VGKC complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels(VGKC) were first identified by radioimmunoassay of radioisotope labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were found only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in Morvan's syndrome and in a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins(for example LGI-1, Caspr-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now usually known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most common in limbic encephalitis with SIADH. Caspr-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability.

  10. Evaluation of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody seroconversion induced by minocycline, sulfasalazine, or penicillamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, HK; Slot, MC; Pan, GL; Weissbach, CA; Niles, JL; Merkel, PA

    2000-01-01

    Objective, Case reports have suggested that minocycline, sulfasalazine, and penicillamine are associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive vasculitis, This study evaluated ANCA seroconversion due to these agents in serum samples prospectively collected in randomized, double-bl

  11. Ligation of Fc gamma receptor IIB inhibits antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kuan Rong; Zhang, Summer Li-Xin; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Chan, Ying Kai; Chow, Angelia; Lim, Angeline Pei Chiew; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hanson, Brendon J; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2011-07-26

    The interaction of antibodies, dengue virus (DENV), and monocytes can result in either immunity or enhanced virus infection. These opposing outcomes of dengue antibodies have hampered dengue vaccine development. Recent studies have shown that antibodies neutralize DENV by either preventing virus attachment to cellular receptors or inhibiting viral fusion intracellularly. However, whether the antibody blocks attachment or fusion, the resulting immune complexes are expected to be phagocytosed by Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells and cleared from circulation. This suggests that only antibodies that are able to block fusion intracellularly would be able to neutralize DENV upon FcγR-mediated uptake by monocytes whereas other antibodies would have resulted in enhancement of DENV replication. Using convalescent sera from dengue patients, we observed that neutralization of the homologous serotypes occurred despite FcγR-mediated uptake. However, FcγR-mediated uptake appeared to be inhibited when neutralized heterologous DENV serotypes were used instead. We demonstrate that this inhibition occurred through the formation of viral aggregates by antibodies in a concentration-dependent manner. Aggregation of viruses enabled antibodies to cross-link the inhibitory FcγRIIB, which is expressed at low levels but which inhibits FcγR-mediated phagocytosis and hence prevents antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV infection in monocytes. PMID:21746897

  12. Antibody responses in allogeneic radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras, free of graft-versus-host disease, has been achieved using serologic elimination of Thy 1+ cells from donor bone marrow. Humoral immune function was not restored in these animals as evidenced by lack of primary antibody responses to a T cell-dependent antigen, namely, sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) both in vivo and in vitro. No evidence for a suppressor cell-mediated mechanism was found. Using separated chimera spleen cell populations and specific helper cell soluble mediators, the functional capabilities of chimera B cells, T cells, and macrophages were assessed. These findings suggested that the failure of chimeras to produce antibody is not the result of impaired B cell, T cell, or macrophage function, but rather, that it is due to ineffective cellular interactions. Physiologic cellular interactions depend upon the sharing of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) determinants between interacting cells. However, the self-recognition repertoire of developing T cells may be influenced by the environment which these cells differentiate such that they learn to recognize host MHC determinants as self. These findings support the interpretation that the immunologic hyporeactivity of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras reflects the role of the host environment in restricting the interactive capabilities of donor-derived cells

  13. Production and Screening of Monoclonal Peptide Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Mortensen, Anne; Schiolborg, Annette; Friis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Hybridoma technology is a remarkable and indispensable tool for generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies not only serve as powerful research and diagnostic reagents, but have also emerged as the most rapidly expanding class of therapeutic biologicals. In this chapter, an overview of hybridoma technology and the laboratory procedures used routinely for hybridoma production and antibody screening are presented, including characterization of peptide antibodies.

  14. Virus Strain Discrimination Using Recombinant Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Boonham, N.; Barker, I.

    2002-01-01

    Most routine testing for plant viruses is currently carried out using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Traditional methods of antibody production however can be time consuming and require the use of expensive cell culture facilities. Recombinant antibody technology however is starting to make an impact in this area, enabling the selection of antibody fragments in a few weeks compared with the many months associated with traditional methods and requires only basic microbiological faciliti...

  15. Sequence and structural analysis of antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis focusses on the sequence and structural analysis of antibodies and has fallen into three main areas. First I developed a method to assess how typical an antibody sequence is of the expressed human antibody repertoire. My hypothesis was that the more \\humanlike" an antibody sequence is (in other words how typical it is of the expressed human repertoire), the less likely it is to elicit an immune response when used in vivo in humans. In practi...

  16. Pattern Genes Suggest Functional Connectivity of Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangmei; Pan, Jianbo; Cai, Meichun; Yao, Lixia; Ji, Zhiliang

    2016-05-01

    Human organ, as the basic structural and functional unit in human body, is made of a large community of different cell types that organically bound together. Each organ usually exerts highly specified physiological function; while several related organs work smartly together to perform complicated body functions. In this study, we present a computational effort to understand the roles of genes in building functional connection between organs. More specifically, we mined multiple transcriptome datasets sampled from 36 human organs and tissues, and quantitatively identified 3,149 genes whose expressions showed consensus modularly patterns: specific to one organ/tissue, selectively expressed in several functionally related tissues and ubiquitously expressed. These pattern genes imply intrinsic connections between organs. According to the expression abundance of the 766 selective genes, we consistently cluster the 36 human organs/tissues into seven functional groups: adipose & gland, brain, muscle, immune, metabolism, mucoid and nerve conduction. The organs and tissues in each group either work together to form organ systems or coordinate to perform particular body functions. The particular roles of specific genes and selective genes suggest that they could not only be used to mechanistically explore organ functions, but also be designed for selective biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  17. Tag Correspondence Model for User Tag Suggestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂存超; 刘知远; 孙茂松

    2015-01-01

    Some microblog services encourage users to annotate themselves with multiple tags, indicating their attributes and interests. User tags play an important role for personalized recommendation and information retrieval. In order to better understand the semantics of user tags, we propose Tag Correspondence Model (TCM) to identify complex correspondences of tags from the rich context of microblog users. The correspondence of a tag is referred to as a unique element in the context which is semantically correlated with this tag. In TCM, we divide the context of a microblog user into various sources (such as short messages, user profile, and neighbors). With a collection of users with annotated tags, TCM can automatically learn the correspondences of user tags from multiple sources. With the learned correspondences, we are able to interpret implicit semantics of tags. Moreover, for the users who have not annotated any tags, TCM can suggest tags according to users’ context information. Extensive experiments on a real-world dataset demonstrate that our method can effciently identify correspondences of tags, which may eventually represent semantic meanings of tags.

  18. Suggested use of vaccines in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothydev Kesavadev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes has emerged as a disease of major public health importance in India affecting the rich and the poor alike. Conventionally, comprehensive diabetes management is aimed at preventing micro and macro vascular complications. However, morbidity and mortality due to infections are also significant. In developing countries like India, the concept of adult immunization is far from reality. Recently the H1N1 pandemic has triggered the necessity for considering immunization in all age groups for the prevention of vaccine-preventable fatal infectious diseases. Considering the economics of immunization in a developing country, providing free vaccines to all adults may not be a practical solution, although the free universal immunization program for children is in existence for several decades. There is no consensus on the use of vaccines in diabetes subjects in India. However, there are some clinics offering routine pneumococcal, influenza and other vaccinations. Patients with diabetes have a deranged immune system making them more prone for infections. Hospitalization and death due to pneumococcal disease and influenza are higher in diabetes patients. They, like other healthy individuals, have a normal humoral response to vaccination with clinically significant benefits. The American Diabetes Association, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization, United Kingdom Guidelines and a number of other scientific organizations have well defined guidelines for vaccination in diabetes. In this article we make some suggestions for clinicians in India, regarding use of vaccines in subjects with diabetes.

  19. Immunoglobulin G4: an odd antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Aalberse; S.O. Stapel; J. Schuurman; T. Rispens

    2009-01-01

    Despite its well-known association with IgE-mediated allergy, IgG4 antibodies still have several poorly understood characteristics. IgG4 is a very dynamic antibody: the antibody is involved in a continuous process of half-molecules (i.e. a heavy and attached light-chain) exchange. This process, also

  20. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  1. Selection of apoptotic cell specific human antibodies from adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Grönwall

    Full Text Available Autoreactive antibodies that recognize neo-determinants on apoptotic cells in mice have been proposed to have protective, homeostatic and immunoregulatory properties, although our knowledge about the equivalent antibodies in humans has been much more limited. In the current study, human monoclonal antibodies with binding specificity for apoptotic cells were isolated from the bone marrow of healthy adults using phage display technology. These antibodies were shown to recognize phosphorylcholine (PC-associated neo-determinants. Interestingly, three of the four identified apoptotic cell-specific antibody clones were encoded by VH3 region rearrangements with germline or nearly germline configuration without evidence of somatic hypermutation. Importantly, the different identified antibody clones had diverse heavy chain CDR3 and deduced binding surfaces as suggested by structure modeling. This may suggest a potentially great heterogeneity in human antibodies recognizing PC-related epitopes on apoptotic cells. To re-construct the postulated structural format of the parental anti-PC antibody, the dominant clone was also expressed as a recombinant human polymeric IgM, which revealed a substantially increased binding reactivity, with dose-dependent and antigen-inhibitable binding of apoptotic cells. Our findings may have implication for improved prognostic testing and therapeutic interventions in human inflammatory disease.

  2. The detection of antibodies against peste des petits ruminants virus in cattle, sheep and goats and the possible implications to rinderpest control programmes.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, J.; McKay, J A

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody-based competitive ELISA (C-ELISA) have been used for the specific measurement of antibodies to both rinderpest and peste des petits ruminants (PPR) viruses in cattle, sheep and goats. Examination of serum samples from sheep and goats in Gambia, before and after vaccination with rinderpest vaccine, suggested that antibodies to PPR virus could prevent an immune response to the rinderpest vaccine. Cattle sera from Nigeria and Ghana showed a high prevalence of antibody against...

  3. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    alteration in IgM affinity occurred at a late stage, as serum IgM levels increased, in cats which progressed to develop GN. These findings suggested that an increase in both serum IgG and IgM anti-HSA values, in particular IgM, was associated with the development of a more severe immune complex renal disease in these cats. Although there was no evidence that differences in the average affinity of either the IgG or IgM antibody populations for HSA, were associated with the development of disease, the increase in IgM values was also accompanied by a concomitant alteration in IgM affinity for antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1430350

  4. The role of antibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, M; Stassen, M H W

    2002-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease associated with antibodies directed to the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. These antibodies reduce the number of receptors. Autoantibodies against AChR and other muscle antigens can be used for the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and related disorders. The origin and the role of these antibodies in the disease are discussed. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, an experimental model closely mimicking the disease, has provided answers to many questions about the role of antibodies, complement macrophages and AChR anchor proteins. Genetically modified anti-AChR antibodies may also be used in the future to treat myasthenia. PMID:12220686

  5. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  6. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  7. Monoclonal Antibody Therapies against Anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaochun Chen; Mahtab Moayeri; Robert Purcell

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax is a highly lethal infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. It not only causes natural infection in humans but also poses a great threat as an emerging bioterror agent. The lethality of anthrax is primarily attributed to the two major virulence factors: toxins and capsule. An extensive effort has been made to generate therapeutically useful monoclonal antibodies to each of the virulence components: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and ede...

  8. Antibody Peptide Based Antifungal Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Giovati, Laura; Zanello, Pier Paolo; Sperindè, Martina; Ciociola, Tecla; Polonelli, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections still represent relevant human illnesses worldwide and some are accompanied by unacceptably high mortality rates. The limited current availability of effective and safe antifungal agents makes the development of new drugs and approaches of antifungal vaccination/immunotherapy every day more needed. Among them, small antibody(Ab)-derived peptides are arousing great expectations as new potential antifungal agents. In this topic, the search path from the study of the yeast kill...

  9. Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Veterinary Parasitology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein in 1975, heralded a new era in antibody research. Mouse hybridomas were the first reliable source of monoclonal antibodies. The generation of monoclonal antibodies from species other than rats and mice, has developed slowly over the last 30 years. The advent of antibody engineering and realization of the advantages of non murine antibodies has increased their relevance recently. However, in the area of veterinary parasitology, monoclonal antibodies are just beginning to fulfill the promises inherent in their great specificity for recognizing and selectively binding to antigens. This review describes the recent advances in the application of monoclonal antibodies for immunodiagnosis / prophylaxis and immunotherapy of parasitic diseases. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 183-188

  10. HIV-1 binding and neutralizing antibodies of injecting drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Ouverney

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a stronger seroreactivity against some synthetic peptides responsible for inducing neutralizing antibodies in injecting drug users (IDU compared to that of individuals sexually infected with HIV-1 (S, but the effectiveness in terms of the neutralizing ability of these antibodies has not been evaluated. Our objective was to study the humoral immune response of IDU by determining the specificity of their antibodies and the presence of neutralizing antibodies. The neutralization capacity against the HIV-1 isolate MN (genotype B, the primary HIV-1 isolate 95BRRJ021 (genotype F, and the seroreactivity with peptides known to induce neutralizing antibodies, from the V2 and V3 loops of different HIV-1 subtypes, were analyzed. Seroreactivity indicates that IDU plasma are more likely to recognize a broader range of peptides than S plasma, with significantly higher titers, especially of V3 peptides. Similar neutralization frequencies of the MN isolate were observed in plasma of the IDU (16/47 and S (20/60 groups in the 1:10 dilution. The neutralization of the 95BRRJ021 isolate was more frequently observed for plasma from the S group (15/23 than from the IDU group (15/47, P = 0.0108. No correlation between neutralization and seroreactivity with the peptides tested was observed. These results suggest that an important factor responsible for the extensive and broad humoral immune response observed in IDU is their infection route. There was very little difference in neutralizing antibody response between the IDU and S groups despite their differences in seroreactivity and health status.

  11. Plasma antibody levels (IgG1، IgG2) in periodontitis and control groups

    OpenAIRE

    Mosavi M.; Khoshkhonejad AA.; Golestan B.; Bahrami N; Mohamadnia AR.; Sadrimanesh R.; Beik zade B.

    2009-01-01

    "nBackground and Aim: A major aspect of the adaptive host response in periodontitis is the antibodies. Several risk and susceptibility factors for periodontitis, including smoking, age and composition of the subgingival microflora, have also been suggested to influence antibody production. The present study was conducted to investigate plasma levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies in periodontitis patients of Caucasian Iranian heritage referred to dental faculty, Tehran University of...

  12. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  13. Avian influenza virus antibodies in Pacific Coast Red Knots (Calidris canutus rufa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, James A.; DeCicco, Lucas H.; Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Krauss, Scott; Hall, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence of avian influenza virus (AIV) antibodies in the western Atlantic subspecies of Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) is among the highest for any shorebird. To assess whether the frequency of detection of AIV antibodies is high for the species in general or restricted only to C. c. rufa, we sampled the northeastern Pacific Coast subspecies of Red Knot (Calidris canutus roselaari) breeding in northwestern Alaska. Antibodies were detected in 90% of adults and none of the chicks sampled. Viral shedding was not detected in adults or chicks. These results suggest a predisposition of Red Knots to AIV infection. High antibody titers to subtypes H3 and H4 were detected, whereas low to intermediate antibody levels were found for subtypes H10 and H11. These four subtypes have previously been detected in shorebirds at Delaware Bay (at the border of New Jersey and Delaware) and in waterfowl along the Pacific Coast of North America.

  14. Impact of Fighting on Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Virus Vaccine in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sheng; Li, Xin; Wan, Min; Hua, Li; Xiao, Yue; Dong, Boqi; Liu, Jialin; Diao, Wenzhen; Yu, Yongli; Wang, Liying

    2015-11-01

    Antibody responses to vaccines can be influenced by various behavioral and psychosocial factors. Few reports exist on the impact of fighting on antibody response to vaccines. This study unexpectedly found that fighting could significantly enhance antibody production in male mice immunized with hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines. To confirm the finding, a mouse-fighting model was established in which it was observed that only intense fighting, not mild fighting, enhanced the antibody response to HBV surface antigen in male mice, and that the frequency of fighting and active attacks during fighting showed no obvious relationship with the antibody levels in the male mice that experienced fighting. In addition, fighting can cause significant upregulation of CD80 in CD11c(+) cells in the spleen of male mice. These data suggest that fighting could influence the humoral immune response in individuals immunized with vaccines or infected with microbes. PMID:26417964

  15. Development of precipitating antibody in chickens experimentally infested with northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Acari: Macronyssidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murano, T; Namiki, K; Uchino, T; Shimizu, S; Fujisaki, K

    1989-06-01

    In order to examine the immune response of chickens to different population levels of mites, a microscopic slide modification of the Ouchterlony double-gel diffusion technique was adopted for examination of circulating antibody against the extract of northern fowl mite, Ornithonyssus sylviarum. Precipitating antibodies were detected in all the chickens infested with the mite. One to three clearly defined precipitation lines appeared in almost all the serum samples of infested birds. Titers of antibody correlated with population levels of the mite on chickens, and no differences in antibody development of hens and roosters were distinguished. These results suggest that the titration of precipitating antibodies appears to be useful for the assessment of mite population levels on chickens. PMID:2505245

  16. Epitope-specific antibody levels in tuberculosis: biomarkers of protection, disease and response to treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham H Bothamley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies restricted to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can measure epitope-specific antibody levels in a competition assay. Immunodominant epitopes were defined from clinical samples and related to the clinical spectrum of disease. Antibody to the immunodominant epitopes was associated with HLA-DR15. Occupational exposure showed a different response and was consistent with recognition of dormancy related proteins and protection despite exposure to tuberculosis. Studies in leprosy revealed the importance of immune deviation and the relationships between T and B cell epitopes. During treatment, antibody levels increased, epitope spreading occurred, but the affinity constants remained the same after further antigen exposure, suggesting constraints on the process of epitope selection. Epitope-specific antibody levels have a potential role as biomarkers for new vaccines which might prevent the progression of latent to active tuberculosis and as tools to measure treatment effects on subpopulations of tubercle bacilli.

  17. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  18. Increased levels of anti-glycan antibodies in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirche TO

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of Crohn's disease (CD is increased in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA have been suggested as a screening tool to detect CD in CF. Recently, several new anti-glycan antibodies have been reported in CD. Materials and methods The sera of 119 CF patients of various age groups were prospectively screened for ASCA type IgG (gASCA, anti-laminaribioside carbohydrate IgG antibodies (ALCA, anti-chitobioside carbohydrate IgA antibodies (ACCA, and anti-mannobioside carbohydrate IgG antibodies (AMCA. The frequency of these anti-glycan antibodies was then compared in patients with CD, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and healthy volunteers. Results A significant number of CF patients were positive for gASCA (51.3% [41.6-60.6] and up to three other anti-glycan antibodies concurrently. Serum levels of anti-glycan antibodies in CF and CD were not related to parameters of inflammation. Despite the well-documented difference in clinical course between male and female CF patients no gender difference of anti-glycan antibodies was found. In contrast, there was a significant positive correlation between anti-glycan markers and age in CF patients. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate for the first time the increased frequency of a panel of anti-glycan antibodies in CF and provide a link between the presence of these serological biomarkers and patient's age. Anti-glycan antibody profiling may therefore become a valuable tool in the care of patients with CF.

  19. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  20. Effects of tau domain-specific antibodies and intravenous immunoglobulin on tau aggregation and aggregate degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves-Villanueva, Jose O; Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Loeffler, David A; Martić, Sanela

    2015-01-20

    Tau pathology, including neurofibrillary tangles, develops in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aggregation and hyperphosphorylation of tau are potential therapeutic targets for AD. Administration of anti-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology in transgenic "tauopathy" mice; however, the optimal tau epitopes and conformations to target are unclear. Also unknown is whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products, currently being evaluated in AD trials, exert effects on pathological tau. This study examined the effects of anti-tau antibodies targeting different tau epitopes and the IVIG Gammagard on tau aggregation and preformed tau aggregates. Tau aggregation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the binding affinity of the anti-tau antibodies for tau was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Antibodies used were anti-tau 1-150 ("D-8"), anti-tau 259-266 ("Paired-262"), anti-tau 341-360 ("A-10"), and anti-tau 404-441 ("Tau-46"), which bind to tau's N-terminus, microtubule binding domain (MBD) repeat sequences R1 and R4, and the C-terminus, respectively. The antibodies Paired-262 and A-10, but not D-8 and Tau-46, reduced tau fibrillization and degraded preformed tau aggregates, whereas the IVIG reduced tau aggregation but did not alter preformed aggregates. The binding affinities of the antibodies for the epitope for which they were specific did not appear to be related to their effects on tau aggregation. These results confirm that antibody binding to tau's MBD repeat sequences may inhibit tau aggregation and indicate that such antibodies may also degrade preformed tau aggregates. In the presence of anti-tau antibodies, the resulting tau morphologies were antigen-dependent. The results also suggested the possibility of different pathways regulating antibody-mediated inhibition of tau aggregation and antibody-mediated degradation of preformed tau aggregates. PMID:25545358

  1. Production in vitro of antibodies directed against alloantigen-specific recognition sites on T cells and on lymphocytotoxic HLA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, D P; Blajchman, M A; Joseph, S; Roberge, B; Smith, E K; Ludwin, D

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the mechanism of immunological unresponsiveness in a recipient (P.S.) with a long-term functioning renal allograft. P.S., whose HLA type is A1, A30; B14, B18; DR1, w8; DRw52; DQw1 and in whose serum we had earlier demonstrated the presence of antiidiotypic antibodies, received a kidney from a cadaver donor of HLA type A1, A10, B8 in March, 1970. Peripheral blood B lymphocytes from the patient were transformed with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and by the cluster-picking technique a B cell line was propagated with continuous production of antibodies. Antiidiotypic antibodies with two distinct biological functions were demonstrable; one specifically inhibiting the lymphocytotoxic activity of anti-HLA-B8, B5, and DR3 reference typing sera, and the other specifically inhibiting proliferative responses in MLC of the recipient's lymphocytes and of third party cells sharing B14, DR1, DQw1 with the patient against stimulator cells carrying B8, DR3 antigens. Immunodepletion experiments demonstrated that the inhibitory activity was associated with the IgM fraction. Absorption experiments suggested that different antibodies may be responsible for the inhibition of lymphocytotoxic activity of anti-HLA sera and of the proliferative responses in MLC. Antiidiotypic antibodies have been postulated to be important in maintaining allograft tolerance in vivo, thereby enhancing renal allograft survival. The availability of such antibodies in large quantities, produced in vitro, could provide antisera for the immunochemical characterization of specific idiotypic receptors on immunoglobulins and T lymphocytes. PMID:2970351

  2. Neutralizing Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Associated with Successful Cure after Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yun Shan; Peng, Kaitian; Chia, Wan Ni; Siau, Anthony; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Gruner, Anne-Charlotte; Preiser, Peter; Mayxay, Mayfong; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Nosten, Francois; White, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    An effective antibody response can assist drug treatment to contribute to better parasite clearance in malaria patients. To examine this, sera were obtained from two groups of adult patients with acute falciparum malaria, prior to drug treatment: patients who (1) have subsequent recrudescent infection, or (2) were cured by Day 28 following treatment. Using a Plasmodium falciparum antigen library, we examined the antibody specificities in these sera. While the antibody repertoire of both sera groups was extremely broad and varied, there was a differential antibody profile between the two groups of sera. The proportion of cured patients with antibodies against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 was higher than the proportion of patients with recrudescent infection. The presence of these antibodies was associated with higher odds of treatment cure. Sera containing all six antibodies impaired the invasion of P. falciparum clinical isolates into erythrocytes. These results suggest that antibodies specific against EXP1, MSP3, GLURP, RAMA, SEA and EBA181 in P. falciparum infections could assist anti-malarial drug treatment and contribute to the resolution of the malarial infection. PMID:27427762

  3. Kinetics of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody internalization: effects of affinity, bivalency, and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael M.; Thurber, Greg M.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical analyses suggest that the cellular internalization and catabolism of bound antibodies contribute significantly to poor penetration into tumors. Here we quantitatively assess the internalization of antibodies and antibody fragments against the commonly targeted antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Although CEA is often referred to as a non-internalizing or shed antigen, anti-CEA antibodies and antibody fragments are shown to be slowly endocytosed by LS174T cells with a half-time of 10–16 h, a time scale consistent with the metabolic turnover rate of CEA in the absence of antibody. Anti-CEA single chain variable fragments (scFvs) with significant differences in affinity, stability against protease digestion, and valency exhibit similar uptake rates of bound antibody. In contrast, one anti-CEA IgG exhibits unique binding and trafficking properties with twice as many molecules bound per cell at saturation and significantly faster cellular internalization after binding. The internalization rates measured herein can be used in simple computational models to predict the microdistribution of these antibodies in tumor spheroids. PMID:18408925

  4. Expression of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Duan, F; Liu, P; Wang, P F; Wang, M X

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of anti-SRP19 antibody in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to determine the expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies in muscle tissues of autoimmune necrotizing myopathy patients. Results demonstrated that anti-SRP19 antibody was expressed in 71.4% (20/28) of muscle tissue specimens from patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy. Anti-SRP19 antibody expression was mainly localized in cytoplasm of necrotic muscle fibers surrounding the small blood vessels and interstitial cells. There were no significant differences in the age, course of disease, muscle, and creatine kinase levels between patients with positive or negative expression of anti-SRP19 antibodies. The expression levels of anti-SRP19, serum anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as anti-Ro-52, anti- SSA, anti-Sm, and anti-Jo-1 antibodies were not significantly different among groups. This study demonstrates that anti-SRP19 antibody is highly expressed in muscle tissues of patients with autoimmune necrotizing myopathy, and suggests that this protein may be involved in the origin and progression of the disease. PMID:27525944

  5. Two Escape Mechanisms of Influenza A Virus to a Broadly Neutralizing Stalk-Binding Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ning; Swem, Lee R.; Reichelt, Mike; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Luis, Elizabeth; Park, Summer; Fouts, Ashley; Lupardus, Patrick; Wu, Thomas D.; Li, Olga; McBride, Jacqueline; Lawrence, Michael; Xu, Min; Tan, Man-Wah

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the stalk region of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) are effective in blocking virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The highly conserved epitopes recognized by these antibodies are critical for the membrane fusion function of HA and therefore less likely to be permissive for virus mutational escape. Here we report three resistant viruses of the A/Perth/16/2009 strain that were selected in the presence of a broadly neutralizing stalk-binding antibody. The three resistant viruses harbor three different mutations in the HA stalk: (1) Gln387Lys; (2) Asp391Tyr; (3) Asp391Gly. The Gln387Lys mutation completely abolishes binding of the antibody to the HA stalk epitope. The other two mutations, Asp391Tyr and Asp391Gly, do not affect antibody binding at neutral pH and only slightly reduce binding at low pH. Interestingly, they enhance the fusion ability of the HA, representing a novel mechanism that allows productive membrane fusion even in the presence of antibody and hence virus escape from antibody neutralization. Therefore, these mutations illustrate two different resistance mechanisms used by IAV to escape broadly neutralizing stalk-binding antibodies. Compared to the wild type virus, the resistant viruses release fewer progeny viral particles during replication and are more sensitive to Tamiflu, suggesting reduced viral fitness. PMID:27351973

  6. Production and characterization of polyclonal antibody against a synthetic peptide from β-actin protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazila Amini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Antibodies against actin, as one of the most widely studied structural and multifunctional housekeeping proteins in eukaryotic cells, are used as internal loading controls in western blot analyses. The aim of this study was to produce polyclonal antibody against a synthetic peptide derived from N-terminal region of β-actin protein to be used as a protein loading control in western blot and other assay systems. Materials and Methods: A synthetic peptide derived from β-actin protein was designed and conjugated to Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH (and used to immunize a white New Zealand rabbit. The antibody was purified from serum by affinity chromatography column. The purity of the antibody was determined by SDS-PAGE and its ability to recognize the immunizing peptide was measured by ELISA. The reactivity of the antibody with β-actin protein in a panel of different cell lysates was then evaluated by western blot. In addition, the reactivity of the antibody with the corresponding protein was also evaluated by Immunocytochemistry and Immunohistochemistry in different samples. Results: The antibody could recognize the immunizing peptide in ELISA. It could also recognize            β-actin protein in western blot as well as in immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Conclusion: Our data suggest that this antibody may be used as an internal control in western blot analyses as well as in other immunological applications such as ELISA,immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry.

  7. Characterization of conformation-sensitive antibodies to ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand cleavage protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuben E Sauna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The zinc metalloprotease ADAMTS13 is a multidomain protein that cleaves von Willebrand Factor (VWF and is implicated in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanism of this protein is an important goal. Conformation sensitive antibodies have been used to monitor protein conformation and to decipher the molecular mechanism of proteins as well as to distinguish functional and non-functional mutants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have characterized several antibodies against ADAMTS13, both monoclonal and polyclonal. We have used flow cytometry to estimate the binding of these antibodies to ADAMTS13 and demonstrate that antibodies raised against the TSP and disintegrin domains detect conformation changes in the ADAMTS13. Thus for example, increased binding of these antibodies was detected in the presence of the substrate (VWF, mainly at 37 degrees C and not at 4 degrees C. These antibodies could also detect differences between wild-type ADAMTS13 and the catalytically deficient mutant (P475S. The flow cytometry approach also allows us to estimate the reactivity of the antibody as well as its apparent affinity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that these antibodies may serve as useful reagents to distinguish functional and non-functional ADAMTS13 and analyze conformational transitions to understand the catalytic mechanism.

  8. Antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis heat shock proteins in women with tubal factor infertility are associated with prior infection by C. trachomatis but not by C. pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, K; Osser, S; Birkelund, Svend;

    1999-01-01

    The antibody response to heat shock proteins 60 and 10 were studied in 163 patients with tubal factor infertility and in 163 age-matched pregnant women. The associations of these antibodies with specific antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis and to Chlamydia pneumoniae as well as with antibodies to...... shock proteins and to C. trachomatis but no independent influence of antibodies to C. pneumoniae. No interaction between C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae suggesting a synergistic effect was found although the heat shock proteins from these two organisms are immunologically similar. Antibodies to the...... the common chlamydial lipopolysaccharide antigen were studied. Patients with tubal factor infertility had significantly higher frequencies and titres of all antibodies except to C. pneumoniae. In a logistic regression model an association was found between the prevalence of antibodies to the heat...

  9. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  10. Factors associated with persistence of red blood cell antibodies in woman after pregnancies complicated by fetal alloimmune haemolytic disease treated with intrauterine transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduin, Esther P; Brand, Anneke; van de Watering, Leo M G; Claas, Frans H J; Oepkes, Dick; Lopriore, Enrico; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Schonewille, Henk

    2015-02-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) antibodies can persist for decades or decrease quickly to undetectable levels. Antibody persistence has not been systematically studied. Women whose children are treated with intrauterine transfusions (IUT) for haemolytic disease of the fetus (HDFN) often produce additional antibodies, which can be evoked by the intrauterine transfusion or by fetomaternal haemorrhage during the procedure. Factors associated with persistence of both the antibodies responsible for HDFN and additional antibodies were studied in 260 women whose children were treated with IUT between 1988 and 2008. They possessed 499 (205 anti-D and 294 non-D) antibodies after the last IUT. After a median follow-up of 8·7 years, all 260 antibodies primarily responsible for HDFN had persisted. Additional antibodies directed against antigens of the children persisted in 70·6%, and in 32·3% if they were not child-specific (P < 0·001). Antibodies induced by irradiated IUT persisted in only 7·1%. Multivariate analyses showed that non-HDFN antibody persistence was dependent on the antibody titre and specificity. In conclusion, persistence of antibodies mainly depends on antibody strength and specificity. Difference between fetal or non-fetal immunogens suggests maintenance of antigenic stimulation possibly by long-term fetomaternal chimerism. PMID:25244566

  11. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  12. Antibodies and IL-3 support helminth-induced basophil expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Tina; Esser, Julia; Prati, Moira; Kulagin, Manuel; Stettler, Rebecca; Zaiss, Mario M; Hewitson, James P; Merky, Patrick; Verbeek, Joseph S; Bourquin, Carole; Camberis, Mali; Prout, Melanie; Maizels, Rick M; Le Gros, Graham; Harris, Nicola L

    2012-09-11

    Basophils are powerful mediators of Th2 immunity and are present in increased numbers during allergic inflammation and helminth infection. Despite their ability to potentiate Th2 immunity the mechanisms regulating basophil development remain largely unknown. We have found a unique role for isotype-switched antibodies in promoting helminth-induced basophil production following infection of mice with Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri or Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. H. polygyrus bakeri-induced basophil expansion was found to occur within the bone marrow, and to a lesser extent the spleen, and was IL-3 dependent. IL-3 was largely produced by CD4(+)CD49b(+)NK1.1(-) effector T cells at these sites, and required the IL-4Rα chain. However, antibody-deficient mice exhibited defective basophil mobilization despite intact T-cell IL-3 production, and supplementation of mice with immune serum could promote basophilia independently of required IL-4Rα signaling. Helminth-induced eosinophilia was not affected by the deficiency in isotype-switched antibodies, suggesting a direct effect on basophils rather than through priming of Th2 responses. Although normal type 2 immunity occurred in the basopenic mice following primary infection with H. polygyrus bakeri, parasite rejection following challenge infection was impaired. These data reveal a role for isotype-switched antibodies in promoting basophil expansion and effector function following helminth infection. PMID:22930820

  13. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Wheeler, Deric L., E-mail: dlwheeler@wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  14. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  15. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally. PMID:18179828

  16. Stabilization of antibody fragments in adverse environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, H; Grant, S D; Harris, W J; Porter, A J

    1998-08-01

    Antibody fragments have the potential to be used as sensitive and specific binding agents in a broad range of industrial applications. Genetic manipulation has been used to design a series of antibody fragment configurations with a flexible linker and/or a disulphide bond between the heavy chain and light chain of an antibody fragment against the herbicide atrazine. The thermostability and stability to a range of denaturants, polar and non-polar solvents, surfactants and proteases have been compared. It has been found that a novel antibody fragment construct (STAB: stabilized antibody) containing both a flexible linker and a disulphide bond can be effectively produced and shows greatly improved stability in these diverse environments. These STABs should be useful in environmental diagnostics and remediation, and may provide a generic approach for stabilizing antibody fragments in formulations containing detergents and penetrants for topical application in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

  17. Antibodies induced by multi-epitope vaccine showed inhibitory activity against heterologous influenza A virus (H3N2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jian; WU Fan; WEI Wei; CHEN Yinghua

    2006-01-01

    In this study, recognition of 4 recombinant viral proteins (GST-NHA1) by the antibodies induced by multi-epitope vaccine was testified. Inhibitory activities of these antibodies were also investigated in vitro against four heterologous influenza A viruses (H3N2). Three epitope-specific antibodies purified by affinity chromatography could reduce the plaque formation. Interestingly, the three neutralizing antibodies in combination showed obvious enhancement of inhibitory activity, suggesting that the development of recombinant multi-epitope vaccine might be an effective way against viral mutation.

  18. Passive Immunization with Melanin-Binding Monoclonal Antibodies Prolongs Survival of Mice with Lethal Cryptococcus neoformans Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Rosas, Ángel L.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2001-01-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to melanin prolonged the survival of and reduced the fungal burden in Cryptococcus neoformans-infected mice in comparison to controls. MAbs to melanin reduced the growth rate of in vitro-melanized C. neoformans cells, suggesting a new mechanism of antibody-mediated protection.

  19. Effect of diethylcarbamazine on serum antibodies to feline infectious peritonitis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, L W

    1988-02-01

    In preceding studies by the author, use of the immunomodulator drug diethylcarbamazine resulted in the detection of antibodies to feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigen in nine feline leukaemia virus infected cats that had previously given negative results to this antibody. In the present report, seven diethylcarbamazine-treated cats developed higher serum antibody titres to feline infectious peritonitis more frequently than did seven untreated controls. Since feline infectious peritonitis is caused by a coronavirus, these results suggest that diethylcarbamazine treatment could be exploited for vaccination and treatment strategies for non-retroviral in addition to retroviral infections.

  20. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and cardiac rhythm disturbances: Present and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Pardo, Irene; Villuendas, Roger; Salvador-Corres, Iñaki; Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Olivé, Alejandro; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2015-04-01

    Several case reports, small case series, and original research papers have recently suggested that the action of certain auto-antibodies related to connective tissue diseases may be responsible for significant cardiac rhythm disturbances in adults. The relationship between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and congenital complete atrioventricular block is well recognized in the fetal heart. Herein we review the emerging evidences of the link to increased levels of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies with rhythm disorders of unknown origin in the adult. Confirmation of this distinct etiology may eventually be the basis for new therapies.

  1. Antinuclear antibodies in scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease and "primary" Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, M; Mejia, G; Lavalle, C; Cortes, J J; Reyes, P A

    1988-03-01

    The diversity of antibodies in patients with scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease or "primary" Raynaud's phenomenon could be used as a laboratory aid in the clinical diagnosis. In serum samples of 75 patients we screened for antinuclear antibodies (HEp 2 cells), anti DNA, soluble nucleoprotein and extractable nuclear antigens (Sm, rRNP, U1-nRNP, SSA/Ro, SSB/La and Scl-70). Distinctive antinuclear antibodies pattern was identified in each group of patients. This immunologic profile is valuable for clinical diagnosis and the preferential association of certain autoantibodies with some diseases and not with others, suggest an antigen-driven stimulus for its production.

  2. Detection of antibodies to single-stranded DNA in naturally acquired and experimentally induced viral hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive ''Farr'' assay, utilizing 125I-labelled DNA was developed for detecting antibody to single-stranded DNA (anti-ssDNA). The test was shown to be specific and as sensitive as assays using 14C-labelled DNA, for the detection of antibody in patients with connective tissue diseases. Groups of sera from patients with naturally acquired viral hepatitis and experimentally infected chimpanzees were tested for anti-ssDNA by the 125I assay and by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). No consistent pattern was observed with either technique, indicating the elevated levels of this antibody are not as reliable markers of parenchymal liver damage as had been previously suggested

  3. Serologic survey for Coxiella burnetii phase II antibodies among slaughterhouse workers in Kerman, southeast of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Khalili; Morteza Mosavi; Hamzeh Ghobadian Diali; Hossein Norouzian Mirza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the presence of antibodies against phase II among slaughterhouse workers in Kerman, southeast of Iran.Methods:sorbent assay using phase II Coxiella burnetii as the antigen [kit (Virion\\Serion, Wurzburg, Germany) according to the manufacturer’s protocol].Results:The antibody titers of the serum samples were measured by enzyme-linked immuno Conclusions: Our findings suggest that slaughterhouse workers in Kerman area have a higher risk of infection and should consider potential infection with Coxiella burnetii. The positive rate of IgG antibody was 68% in the slaughterhouse workers.

  4. Bilateral Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion Associated with the Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pria Anand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old woman presented with a right-hemispheric stroke 1 year after she had suffered a left-hemispheric stroke. Her diagnostic workup was notable for bilateral occlusions of the internal carotid arteries at their origins and a positive lupus anticoagulant antibody test. There was no evidence of carotid dissection or another identifiable cause for her carotid occlusions. These findings suggest that the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome may be implicated in the pathological changes that resulted in occlusions of the extracranial internal carotid arteries. Young stroke patients who present with unexplained internal carotid artery occlusions may benefit from testing for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies.

  5. Differential recognition of calmodulin-enzyme complexes by a conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody having an absolute requirement for Ca2+ has been produced from mice immunized with a mixture of calmodulin and calmodulin-binding proteins. Radioimmune assays were developed for the determination of its specificity. The epitope for this antibody resides on the COOH-terminal half of the mammalian protein. Plant calmodulin or toponin C had little reactivity. The apparent affinity of the antibody for calmodulin was increased approximately 60-fold in the presence of heart calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase. The presence of heart phosphodiesterase in the radioimmune assay greatly enhanced the sensitivity for calmodulin. The intrinsic calmodulin subunit of phosphorylase kinase and calmodulin which was bound to brain phosphodiesterases was also recognized with high affinity by the antibody. In direct binding experiments, most of the calmodulin-binding proteins studied were unreactive with the antibody. This selectivity allowed purification of heart and two brain calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isozymes on immobilized antibody affinity columns. The data suggest that the binding of ligands to Ca2+/calmodulin induce conformation changes in calmodulin which alter reactivity with the anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody. The differential antibody reactivity toward calmodulin-enzyme complexes indicates that target proteins either induce very different conformations in calmodulin and/or interact with different geometries relative to the antibody binding site. The anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody should be useful for the purification of other calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterases as well as isozymes of phosphorylase kinase

  6. Induction of multi-epitope specific antibodies against HIV-1 by multi-epitope vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Some neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 envelope proteins were highly effective to inhibit the infection of different strains in vitro, and existed in the infected individuals with very low levels. We suggested multi-epitope-vaccine as a new strategy to increase levels of neutralizing antibodies and the abilities against HIV mutation in vivo. Two candidate multi-epitope-vaccines induced antibodies with predefined multi-epitope-specificity in rhesus macaque. These antibodies recognized corresponding neutralizing epitopes on epitope-peptides, gp41 peptides, V3 loop peptide, rsgp41 and rgp120. Besides, three candidate epitope-vaccines in combination (another kind of multi-epitopevaccines) showed similar potency to induce predefined multiple immune responses in rabbits. These results suggest that multi-epitope-vaccines may be a new strategy to induce multi-antiviral activities against HIV-1 infection and mutafions.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies as diagnostics; an appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use.

  8. Snake venom antibodies in Ecuadorian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theakston, R D; Reid, H A; Larrick, J W; Kaplan, J; Yost, J A

    1981-10-01

    Serum samples from 223 Waorani Indians, a tribe in eastern Ecuador, were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies to snake venom. Seventy-eight per cent were positive, confirming the highest incidence and mortality from snake bite poisoning yet recorded in the world. Most samples were positive for more than one venom antibody. Antibodies were found to venoms of Bothrops viper in 60% of positive cases, of Micrurus coral snake in 21%, and of the bushmaster, Lachesis muta, in 18%. Further studies are needed to determine whether high venom-antibody levels afford protection against further snake envenoming. PMID:7299877

  9. Sequence and structual analysis of antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis focuses on the sequence and structural analysis of antibodies and has fallen into three main areas. First I developed a method to assess how typical an antibody sequence is of the expressed human antibody repertoire. My hypothesis was that the more "human like" an antibody sequence is (in other words how typical it is of the expressed human repertoire), the less likely it is to elicit an immune response when used in vivo in humans. In practice, I found that, ...

  10. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody against Syringate Derivatives: Application of Immunochemical Detection of Methyl Syringate in Honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoji; Fujinaka, Rie; Juri, Maki; Yoshiki, Yui; Ishisaka, Akari; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Nitta, Yoko; Ishikawa, Hirohito

    2016-08-24

    Syringic acid is one of the key skeletal structures of plant-derived chemicals. The derivatives of syringic acid have certain biological functions. In this study, a monoclonal antibody to syringic acid-based phytochemicals was prepared and characterized. The obtained antibody reacted with methyl syringate, syringic acid, and leonurine. Methyl syringate is a characteristic compound found in manuka honey, other honey varieties, and plants. Manuka honey was fractionated using HPLC, and the reactivity of the fractions with the antibody was examined. The antibody reacted with the fraction in which methyl syringate was eluted. The amount of methyl syringate in honeys as estimated by ELISA using the antibody had a good linearity compared with that estimated by HPLC. These results suggest that the antibody is applicable for the immunochemical detection of syringic acid derivatives in plants and foods. PMID:27477590

  11. Enhanced antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis by chimeric monoclonal antibodies with tandemly repeated Fc domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Ootsubo, Michiko; Fukazawa, Mizuki; Motoi, Sotaro; Konakahara, Shu; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with tandemly repeated Fc domains, which were developed by introducing tandem repeats of Fc domains downstream of 2 Fab domains, augmented binding avidities for all Fcγ receptors, resulting in enhanced antibody (Ab)-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we investigated regarding Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) mediated by these chimeric mAbs, which is considered one of the most important mechanisms that kills tumor cells, using two-color flow cytometric methods. ADCP mediated by T3-Ab, a chimeric mAb with 3 tandemly repeated Fc domains, was 5 times more potent than that by native anti-CD20 M-Ab (M-Ab hereafter). Furthermore, T3-Ab-mediated ADCP was resistant to competitive inhibition by intravenous Ig (IVIG), although M-Ab-mediated ADCP decreased in the presence of IVIG. An Fcγ receptor-blocking study demonstrated that T3-Ab mediated ADCP via both FcγRIA and FcγRIIA, whereas M-Ab mediated ADCP exclusively via FcγRIA. These results suggest that chimeric mAbs with tandemly repeated Fc domains enhance ADCP as well as ADCC, and that Fc multimerization may significantly enhance the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. PMID:21215693

  12. Antibodies to human fetal erythroid cells from a nonimmune phage antibody library

    OpenAIRE

    Huie, Michael A.; Cheung, Mei-Chi; Muench, Marcus O.; Becerril, Baltazar; Kan, Yuet W.; Marks, James D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to isolate fetal nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) from the maternal circulation makes possible prenatal genetic analysis without the need for diagnostic procedures that are invasive for the fetus. Such isolation requires antibodies specific to fetal NRBCs. To generate a panel of antibodies to antigens present on fetal NRBCs, a new type of nonimmune phage antibody library was generated in which multiple copies of antibody fragments are displayed on each pha...

  13. High level transient production of recombinant antibodies and antibody fusion proteins in HEK293 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Volker; Büssow, Konrad; Wagner, Andreas; Weber, Susanne; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand of monospecific high affinity binding reagents, particularly monoclonal antibodies, has been steadily increasing over the last years. Enhanced throughput of antibody generation has been addressed by optimizing in vitro selection using phage display which moved the major bottleneck to the production and purification of recombinant antibodies in an end-user friendly format. Single chain (sc)Fv antibody fragments require additional tags for detection and are not as suitable...

  14. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC with cerebellar involvement in a teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Langille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  15. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) with cerebellar involvement in a teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Megan M; Desai, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  16. Serologic survey for antibodies to canine distemper virus in collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) populations in Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Ted H; Heffelfinger, James R; Olding, Ronald J; Wesche, Shannon Lynn; Reggiardo, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    In 1989, a disease outbreak was observed among collared peccaries (javelina, Tayassu tajacu) in southern Arizona (USA) and canine distemper virus (CDV) was isolated from affected animals. Subsequently, 364 sera were collected from hunter-harvested javelina over a 4 yr period (1993-96) and were tested for antibody to CDV. Neutralizing antibody to CDV was detected in 58% of the serum samples suggesting that CDV infection is probably enzootic in the collared peccary populations of southern Arizona.

  17. Induction of epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies against West Nile virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, Theodore; Nybakken, Grant E; Austin, S Kyle; Xu, Qing; Bramson, Jonathan; Loeb, Mark; Throsby, Mark; Fremont, Daved H; Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S

    2007-11-01

    Previous studies have established that an epitope on the lateral ridge of domain III (DIII-lr) of West Nile virus (WNV) envelope (E) protein is recognized by strongly neutralizing type-specific antibodies. In contrast, an epitope against the fusion loop in domain II (DII-fl) is recognized by flavivirus cross-reactive antibodies with less neutralizing potential. Using gain- and loss-of-function E proteins and wild-type and variant WNV reporter virus particles, we evaluated the expression pattern and activity of antibodies against the DIII-lr and DII-fl epitopes in mouse and human serum after WNV infection. In mice, immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to the DIII-lr epitope were detected at low levels at day 6 after infection. However, compared to IgG responses against other epitopes in DI and DII, which were readily detected at day 8, the development of IgG against DIII-lr epitope was delayed and did not appear consistently until day 15. This late time point is notable since almost all death after WNV infection in mice occurs by day 12. Nonetheless, at later time points, DIII-lr antibodies accumulated and comprised a significant fraction of the DIII-specific IgG response. In sera from infected humans, DIII-lr antibodies were detected at low levels and did not correlate with clinical outcome. In contrast, antibodies to the DII-fl were detected in all human serum samples and encompassed a significant percentage of the anti-E protein response. Our experiments suggest that the highly neutralizing DIII-lr IgG antibodies have little significant role in primary infection and that the antibody response of humans may be skewed toward the induction of cross-reactive, less-neutralizing antibodies.

  18. Induction of Epitope-Specific Neutralizing Antibodies against West Nile Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliphant, Theodore; Nybakken, Grant E.; Austin, S. Kyle; Xu, Qing; Bramson, Jonathan; Loeb, Mark; Throsby, Mark; Fremont, Daved H.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have established that an epitope on the lateral ridge of domain III (DIII-lr) of West Nile virus (WNV) envelope (E) protein is recognized by strongly neutralizing type-specific antibodies. In contrast, an epitope against the fusion loop in domain II (DII-fl) is recognized by flavivirus cross-reactive antibodies with less neutralizing potential. Using gain- and loss-of-function E proteins and wild-type and variant WNV reporter virus particles, we evaluated the expression pattern and activity of antibodies against the DIII-lr and DII-fl epitopes in mouse and human serum after WNV infection. In mice, immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to the DIII-lr epitope were detected at low levels at day 6 after infection. However, compared to IgG responses against other epitopes in DI and DII, which were readily detected at day 8, the development of IgG against DIII-lr epitope was delayed and did not appear consistently until day 15. This late time point is notable since almost all death after WNV infection in mice occurs by day 12. Nonetheless, at later time points, DIII-lr antibodies accumulated and comprised a significant fraction of the DIII-specific IgG response. In sera from infected humans, DIII-lr antibodies were detected at low levels and did not correlate with clinical outcome. In contrast, antibodies to the DII-fl were detected in all human serum samples and encompassed a significant percentage of the anti-E protein response. Our experiments suggest that the highly neutralizing DIII-lr IgG antibodies have little significant role in primary infection and that the antibody response of humans may be skewed toward the induction of cross-reactive, less-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:17715236

  19. Enhanced neutralization of HIV by antibodies displayed on the S-layer of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Mark; Lewis, Christopher J; Nomellini, John F; Horwitz, Marc S; Smit, John; Cavacini, Lisa A

    2011-12-01

    Innovative methods of prevention are needed to stop the more than two million new HIV-1 infections annually, particularly in women. Local application of anti-HIV antibodies has been shown to be effective at preventing infection in nonhuman primates; however, the concentrations needed are cost prohibitive. Display of antibodies on a particulate platform will likely prolong effectiveness of these anti-HIV agents and lower the cost of goods. Here, we demonstrate that the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and its highly expressed surface-layer (S-layer) protein can provide this antibody display platform. Caulobacters displaying protein G, alone or with CD4 codisplay, successfully captured HIV-1-specific antibodies and demonstrated functional neutralization. Compared to soluble antibodies, a neutralizing anti-HIV antibody displayed on Caulobacter was as effective or more effective at neutralizing diverse HIV-1 isolates. Moreover, when an antibody reactive with an epitope induced by CD4 binding (CD4i) was codisplayed with CD4, there was significant enhancement in HIV-1 neutralization. These results suggest that caulobacters displaying anti-HIV antibodies offer a distinct improvement in the use of antibodies as microbicides. Furthermore, these reagents can specifically evaluate anti-HIV antibodies in concert with other HIV-1 blocking agents to assess the most suitable tools for conversion to scFvs, allowing for direct display within the S-layer protein and further reducing cost of goods. In summary, C. crescentus, which can be easily produced and chemically stabilized at low cost, is well suited for engineering as an effective platform, offering an inexpensive way to produce and deliver HIV-1-specific microbicides.

  20. Autoantibodies to neuronal surface antigens in thyroid antibody-positive and -negative limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Tuzun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Thyroid antibodies (Thy-Abs are frequently detected in various autoimmune disorders in coexistence with other systemic autoantibodies. In association with an encephalopathy, they are often taken as evidence of Hashimoto′s encephalitis (HE. However, the presence of Thy-Abs in a cohort of limbic encephalitis (LE patients and their association with anti-neuronal autoimmunity has not been explored. Patients and Methods : We investigated thyroid and anti-neuronal antibodies in the sera of 24 LE patients without identified tumors by cell-based assay and radioimmunoassay and evaluated their clinical features. Results : There was a female predominance in Thy-Ab-positive LE patients. Five of the eight Thy-Ab-positive patients and six of the 16 Thy-Ab-negative patients had antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR or undefined surface antigens on cultured hippocampal neurons. There were trends towards fewer VGKC antibodies (1/8 vs. 5/16, P = 0.159 and more NMDAR antibodies (2/8 vs. 1/16, P = 0.095 among the Thy-Ab-positive LE patients; antibodies to undefined surface antigens were only identified in Thy-Ab-positive patients (2/8 vs. 0/16, P = 0.018. There were no distinguishing clinical features between Thy-Ab-positive patients with and without neuronal antibodies. However, patients with anti-neuronal antibodies showed a better treatment response. Conclusion : Thy-Abs can be found in a high proportion of patients with non-paraneoplastic LE, often in association with antibodies to specific or as yet undefined neuronal surface antigens. These results suggest that acute idiopathic encephalitis patients with Thy-Abs should be closely monitored for ion-channel antibodies and it should not be assumed that they have HE.

  1. Neural stem cells as a novel platform for tumor-specific delivery of therapeutic antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T Frank

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant monoclonal antibodies have emerged as important tools for cancer therapy. Despite the promise shown by antibody-based therapies, the large molecular size of antibodies limits their ability to efficiently penetrate solid tumors and precludes efficient crossing of the blood-brain-barrier into the central nervous system (CNS. Consequently, poorly vascularized solid tumors and CNS metastases cannot be effectively treated by intravenously-injected antibodies. The inherent tumor-tropic properties of human neural stem cells (NSCs can potentially be harnessed to overcome these obstacles and significantly improve cancer immunotherapy. Intravenously-delivered NSCs preferentially migrate to primary and metastatic tumor sites within and outside the CNS. Therefore, we hypothesized that NSCs could serve as an ideal cellular delivery platform for targeting antibodies to malignant tumors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As proof-of-concept, we selected Herceptin (trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody widely used to treat HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. HER2 overexpression in breast cancer is highly correlated with CNS metastases, which are inaccessible to trastuzumab therapy. Therefore, NSC-mediated delivery of trastuzumab may improve its therapeutic efficacy. Here we report, for the first time, that human NSCs can be genetically modified to secrete anti-HER2 immunoglobulin molecules. These NSC-secreted antibodies assemble properly, possess tumor cell-binding affinity and specificity, and can effectively inhibit the proliferation of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells in vitro. We also demonstrate that immunoglobulin-secreting NSCs exhibit preferential tropism to tumor cells in vivo, and can deliver antibodies to human breast cancer xenografts in mice. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these results suggest that NSCs modified to secrete HER2-targeting antibodies constitute a promising novel platform for targeted cancer immunotherapy. Specifically

  2. Long-term outcome of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease treated with immunoadsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Biesenbach

    Full Text Available Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM antibody disease may lead to acute crescentic glomerulonephritis with poor renal prognosis. Current therapy favours plasma exchange (PE for removal of pathogenic antibodies. Immunoadsorption (IAS is superior to PE regarding efficiency of antibody-removal and safety. Apart from anecdotal data, there is no systemic analysis of the long-term effects of IAS on anti-GBM-disease and antibody kinetics.To examine the long-term effect of high-frequency IAS combined with standard immunosuppression on patient and renal survival in patients with anti-GBM-disease and to quantify antibody removal and kinetics through IAS.Retrospective review of patients treated with IAS for anti-GBM-antibody disease confirmed by biopsy and/or anti-GBM-antibodies.University Hospital of Vienna, Austria.10 patients with anti-GBM-disease treated with IAS.Patient and renal survival, renal histology, anti-GBM-antibodies.Anti-GBM-antibodies were reduced by the first 9 IAS treatments (mean number of 23 to negative levels in all patients. Renal survival was 40% at diagnosis, 70% after the end of IAS, 63% after one year and 50% at the end of observation (mean 84 months, range 9 to 186. Dialysis dependency was successfully reversed in three of six patients. Patient survival was 90% at the end of observation.IAS efficiently eliminates anti-GBM-antibodies suggesting non-inferiority to PE with regard to renal and patient survival. Hence IAS should be considered as a valuable treatment option for anti-GBM-disease, especially in patients presenting with a high percentage of crescents and dialysis dependency due to an unusual high proportion of responders.

  3. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  4. Association of gliadin antibodies, HLA alleles, and schizophrenia in Cuban population patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Galván

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several lines of evidence have suggested an interesting link between gluten ingestion and schizophrenia. For example, increased levels of gliadin and transglutaminase antibodies have been observed in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: To verify these observations we compared the prevalence of gliadin and transglutaminse antibodies, as well as the presence of the HLA alleles, HLA DQA1*0501-DQB1*02 (DQ2 and HLA-DQA1*0301-DQB1*0302 (DQ8, among patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. A total of 108 patients with schizophrenia and 60 healthy controls were evaluated. Gliadin antibodies were determined by a visual semiquantitative assay and tissue transglutaminase antibodies were determined both by one-step immunochromatografic assay and ELISA. HLA typing was performed by PCR amplification using sequence-specific primers for each allele. Results: We found a strong association between the presence of gliadin antibodies and schizophrenia (OR 3.488; 95% CI, 1.43-8.44. However, tissue transglutaminase antibodies were not detected in either group neither by immunochromatograpic or ELISA. No significant association was found for the DQ2 or DQ8 heterodimer and the disease, but a significant positive association between schizophrenia and HLA alleles DQA1*0301 and DQB1*02 was present (OR = 2.80; 95% CI, 1.27-6.17, and OR = 2.37, 95% CI, 1.24-4.53, respectively. Conclusions: The present study showed that the presence of gliadin antibodies was not correlated with the presence of HLA DQA1*0301 or DQB1*02 alleles within the group of patients with schizophrenia. Our study replicates the findings that anti-gliadin antibodies are associated with schizophrenia but also suggests that the presence of these antibodies and the HLA alleles DQB1*02 and DQA1*0301 are independently associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  5. Iron as the Key Modulator of Hepcidin Expression in Erythroid Antibody-Mediated Hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythroid hypoplasia (EH is a rare complication associated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO therapies, due to development of anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly clarified. Our aim was to manage a rat model of antibody-mediated EH induced by rHuEPO and study the impact on iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Wistar rats treated during 9 weeks with a high rHuEPO dose (200 IU developed EH, as shown by anemia, reduced erythroblasts, reticulocytopenia, and plasmatic anti-rHuEPO antibodies. Serum iron was increased and associated with mRNA overexpression of hepatic hepcidin and other iron regulatory mediators and downregulation of matriptase-2; overexpression of divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin was observed in duodenum and liver. Decreased EPO expression was observed in kidney and liver, while EPO receptor was overexpressed in liver. Endogenous EPO levels were normal, suggesting that anti-rHuEPO antibodies blunted EPO function. Our results suggest that anti-rHuEPO antibodies inhibit erythropoiesis causing anemia. This leads to a serum iron increase, which seems to stimulate hepcidin expression despite no evidence of inflammation, thus suggesting iron as the key modulator of hepcidin synthesis. These findings might contribute to improving new therapeutic strategies against rHuEPO resistance and/or development of antibody-mediated EH in patients under rHuEPO therapy.

  6. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  7. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  8. "Unconventional" Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Against HIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are recognized to be one of the essential elements of the adaptive immune response that must be induced by an effective vaccine against HIV. However, only a limited number of antibodies have been identified to neutralize a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 and attempts to induce such antibodies by immunization were unsuccessful. The difficulties to generate such antibodies are mainly due to intrinsic properties of HIV-1 envelope spikes, such as high sequence diversity, heavy glycosylation, and inducible and transient nature of certain epitopes. In vitro neutralizing antibodies are identified using "conventional" neutralization assay which uses phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs as target cells. Thus, in essence the assay evaluates HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Recently, several laboratories including us demonstrated that some monoclonal antibodies and HIV-1-specific polyclonal IgG purified from patient sera, although they do not have neutralizing activity when tested by the "conventional" neutralization assay, do exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity in "unconventional" ways. The neutralizing activity of these antibodies and IgG fractions is acquired through post-translational modifications, through opsonization of virus particles into macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDCs), or through expression of antibodies on the surface of HIV-1-susceptible cells. This review will focus on recent findings of this area and point out their potential applications in the development of preventive strategies against HIV.

  9. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B;

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy...... and the use of a transversal illumination setup....

  10. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. Antibod

  11. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the

  12. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  13. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  14. Nephritogenic Lupus Antibodies Recognize Glomerular Basement Membrane-Associated Chromatin Fragments Released from Apoptotic Intraglomerular Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaaji, Manar; Mortensen, Elin; Jørgensen, Leif; Olsen, Randi; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies to dsDNA represent a classification criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus. Subpopulations of these antibodies are involved in lupus nephritis. No known marker separates nephritogenic from non-nephritogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies. It is not clear whether specificity for glomerular target antigens or intrinsic antibody-affinity for dsDNA or nucleosomes is a critical parameter. Furthermore, it is still controversial whether glomerular target antigen(s) is constituted by nucleosomes or by non-nucleosomal glomerular structures. Previously, we have demonstrated that antibodies eluted from murine nephritic kidneys recognize nucleosomes, but not other glomerular antigens. In this study, we determined the structures that bind nephritogenic autoantibodies in vivo by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy, and colocalization immune electron microscopy using experimental antibodies to dsDNA, to histones and transcription factors, or to laminin. The data obtained are consistent and point at glomerular basement membrane-associated nucleosomes as target structures for the nephritogenic autoantibodies. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling or caspase-3 assays demonstrate that lupus nephritis is linked to intraglomerular cell apoptosis. The data suggest that nucleosomes are released by apoptosis and associate with glomerulus basement membranes, which may then be targeted by pathogenic anti-nucleosome antibodies. Thus, apoptotic nucleosomes may represent both inducer and target structures for nephritogenic autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:16723695

  15. Antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone in patients with posterior laryngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Hillevi; Alm, Ragnar; Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-01-01

    Patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders express antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in serum. One common cause of posterior laryngitis (PL) is extra-esophageal reflux, but a functional etiology has also been suggested. The aim of this study was to scrutinize patients with PL with regard to the presence of GnRH antibodies and to examine the association between antibodies and symptoms and reflux. Consecutive PL patients were included after examination. Serum was analyzed for the presence of antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and expressed as relative units (RU). Two age- and gender-matched healthy subjects per case served as controls. The prevalence of IgM GnRH antibodies in patients was 35% compared with 28% in controls (P = 0.06), with higher levels in patients (0.8 (0.3-2.2) RU) than in controls (0.2 (0.1-0.6) RU) (P = 0.007). The corresponding IgG antibody prevalences were 43% and 4%, respectively (P = 0.001), with no difference in levels (P = 0.70). There was no association between antibodies and clinical findings.

  16. In-situ Detection of Squalane in Sedimentary Organic Matter Using Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. V.; Corsetti, F. A.; Moldowan, J. M.; Fago, F.; Caron, D.

    2008-12-01

    Sedimentary geolipids can serve as powerful tools for reconstructing ancient ecosystems, but only if investigators can demonstrate that the hydrocarbons are indigenous to their host rocks. The association of molecules with primary sedimentary fabrics could indicate a syngenetic relationship. However, traditional biomarker analyses require extraction from large quantities of powdered rock, confounding detailed spatial correlations. Biological studies commonly use antibodies as extremely sensitive molecular probes. When coupled with fluorescent labels, antibodies allow for the visual localization of molecules. Here we show that monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to geolipid compounds can be used for in situ detection and labeling of such compounds in mineral-bound organic macerals. Monoclonal antibodies to squalene, produced for human health studies, also react with the geolipid, squalane. We show that squalene antibodies do not react with other common sedimentary hydrocarbons. We also show that squalane antibodies bind specifically to isolated organic-rich lamina in Eocene-age, squalane-containing rocks. These results suggest that squalane is confined to discrete organo-sedimentary fabrics within those rocks, providing evidence for its syngeneity. The chemical similarity of squalane to other sedimentary hydrocarbons hints at the potential for developing monoclonal antibodies to a variety of biomarkers that could then be localized in rocks, sediments, and extant cells.

  17. Clinical characteristics of children with positive anti-SSA/SSB antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lin, Yu-Tsan; Lee, Jyh-Hong; Wang, Li-Chieh; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to characterize the manifestations of clinical symptoms and signs, primary rheumatic diseases, and other autoantibodies in pediatric patients with positive anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies. Subjects under age 18 with positive anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies were screened and enrolled in a tertiary hospital in Taiwan. Data were collected via medical records,including age, gender, onset of the primary rheumatic disease, clinical symptoms and signs, and the medication used. Schirmer test for Sjögren's syndrome (SS) screening was performed in all enrolled patients. Among twenty enrolled subjects, seventeen of them had systemic lupus erythematosus; four of them were diagnosed as SS with positive Schirmer test. In addition to antinuclear antibodies and anti-DNA antibodies, other common autoantibodies were anti-RNP antibodies (50 %) and anti-Sm antibodies(30 %). The most common symptoms were arthritis (60 %)followed by malar rash (40 %). In conclusion, we observed that a low proportion of childhood SS (4/20) exists in our patients with positive SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies. It is suggested that clinicians should focus more on the clinical symptoms in these patients, rather than undertaking invasive diagnostic interventions to rule out Sjögren's syndrome.

  18. Dengue Virus (DENV) Neutralizing Antibody Kinetics in Children After Symptomatic Primary and Postprimary DENV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Hannah E; Rodriguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Azman, Andrew S; Althouse, Benjamin M; Salje, Henrik; Gibbons, Robert V; Rothman, Alan L; Jarman, Richard G; Nisalak, Ananda; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Vaughn, David W; Green, Sharone; Yoon, In-Kyu; Cummings, Derek A T

    2016-05-01

    The immune response to dengue virus (DENV) infection is complex and not fully understood. Using longitudinal data from 181 children with dengue in Thailand who were followed for up to 3 years, we describe neutralizing antibody kinetics following symptomatic DENV infection. We observed that antibody titers varied by serotype, homotypic vs heterotypic responses, and primary versus postprimary infections. The rates of change in antibody titers over time varied between primary and postprimary responses. For primary infections, titers increased from convalescence to 6 months. By comparing homotypic and heterotypic antibody titers, we saw an increase in type specificity from convalescence to 6 months for primary DENV3 infections but not primary DENV1 infections. In postprimary cases, there was a decrease in titers from convalescence up until 6 months after infection. Beginning 1 year after both primary and postprimary infections, there was evidence of increasing antibody titers, with greater increases in children with lower titers, suggesting that antibody titers were boosted due to infection and that higher levels of neutralizing antibody may be more likely to confer a sterilizing immune response. These findings may help to model virus transmission dynamics and provide baseline data to support the development of vaccines and therapeutics.

  19. Parallel immunizations of rabbits using the same antigen yield antibodies with similar, but not identical, epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hjelm

    Full Text Available A problem for the generation of polyclonal antibodies is the potential difficulties for obtaining a renewable resource due to batch-to-batch variations when the same antigen is immunized into several separate animals. Here, we have investigated this issue by determining the epitopes of antibodies generated from parallel immunizations of rabbits with recombinant antigens corresponding to ten human protein targets. The epitopes were mapped by both a suspension bead array approach using overlapping synthetic 15-mer peptides and a bacterial display approach using expression of random fragments of the antigen on the surface of bacteria. Both methods determined antibody binding with the aid of fluorescent-based analysis. In addition, one polyclonal antibody was fractionated by peptide-specific affinity capture for in-depth comparison of epitopes. The results show that the same antigen immunized in several rabbits yields polyclonal antibodies with similar epitopes, but with larger differences in the relative amounts of antibodies to the different epitopes. In some cases, unique epitopes were observed for one of the immunizations. The results suggest that polyclonal antibodies generated by repeated immunizations do not display an identical epitope pattern, although many of the epitopes are similar.

  20. Antibody to eosinophil cationic protein suppresses dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuko Shichijo; Kazuya Makiyama; Chun-Yang Wen; Mutsumi Matsuu; Toshiyuki Nakayama; Masahiro Nakashima; Makoto Ihara; Ichiro Sekine

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To produce an antibody against rat eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and to examine the effects of the antibody in rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis.METHODS: An antibody was raised against rat ECP. Rats were treated with 3% DSS in drinking water for 7 d and received the antibody or normal serum. The colons were exarmined histologically and correlated with clinical symptoms.Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were estimated as a grade of inflammation.RESULTS: The ECP antibody stained the activated eosinophils around the injured crypts in the colonic mucosa.Antibody treatment reduced the severity of colonic ulceration and acute clinical symptoms (diarrhea and/or blood-stained stool). Body weight gain was significantly greater and the colon length was significantly longer in anti-ECP-treated rats than in normal serum-treated rats. Expression of ECP in activated eosinophils was associated with the presence of erosions and inflammation. The number of Ki-67-positive cells in the regenerated surface epithelium increased in anti-ECP-treated rats compared with normal serum-treated rats. Western blot analysis revealed reduced expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in anti-ECP-treated rats.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that treatment with ECP antibody, improved DSS-induced colitis in rats, possibly by increasing the regenerative activity of the colonic epithelium and downregulation of the immune response,and suggest that anti-ECP may promote intestinal wound healing in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC).

  1. A Monoclonal Antibody Based Capture ELISA for Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B: Toxin Detection in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry H. Stanker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a serious foodborne neuroparalytic disease, caused by botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT, produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Seven toxin serotypes (A–H have been described. The majority of human cases of botulism are caused by serotypes A and B followed by E and F. We report here a group of serotype B specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs capable of binding toxin under physiological conditions. Thus, they serve as capture antibodies for a sandwich (capture ELISA. The antibodies were generated using recombinant peptide fragments corresponding to the receptor-binding domain of the toxin heavy chain as immunogen. Their binding properties suggest that they bind a complex epitope with dissociation constants (KD’s for individual antibodies ranging from 10 to 48 × 10−11 M. Assay performance for all possible combinations of capture-detector antibody pairs was evaluated and the antibody pair resulting in the lowest level of detection (L.O.D., ~20 pg/mL was determined. Toxin was detected in spiked dairy samples with good recoveries at concentrations as low as 0.5 pg/mL and in ground beef samples at levels as low as 2 ng/g. Thus, the sandwich ELISA described here uses mAb for both the capture and detector antibodies (binding different epitopes on the toxin molecule and readily detects toxin in those food samples tested.

  2. [Antibody response to Ascaris lumbricoides among the children population in the Ustí Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J; Stiborová, I; Pohorská, J; Dobiásová, L; Král, V

    2005-11-01

    A group of 156 children aged between 10 and 12 years were screened for IgG and IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides. The study subjects were 64 children of Romany origin and 92 children from the majority population. IgG antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides were detected in 112 (71.8%) children. No difference in the prevalence of IgG antibodies was found between Romany children and those from the majority population. As many as 34.1% of the study subjects had IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides, again with no difference between the two ethnic groups. Children with IgG antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides had significantly higher total IgE levels compared to those who had tested IgG negative. To demonstrate induction of a non-specific IgE response was one of the study objectives. The high prevalence rates of IgG and IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides are suggestive of a high frequency of cross- and non-specific reactions. Possible effect of cross-reactivity to other antigens on the specific IgG and IgE antibody response to Ascaris lumbricoides is discussed.

  3. Epitope specificity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M Anthony; Pazgier, Marzena; Haynes, Barton F; Ferrari, Guido

    2013-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] has been suggested to play an important role in control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 [HIV-1] viral load and protection from infection. ADCC antibody responses have been mapped to multiple linear and conformational epitopes within the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Many epitopes targeted by antibodies that mediate ADCC overlap with those recognized by antibodies capable of virus neutralization. In addition, recent studies conducted with human monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1 infected individuals and HIV-1 vaccine-candidate vaccinees have identified a number of antibodies that lack the ability to capture primary HIV-1 isolates or mediate neutralizing activity, but are able to bind to the surface of infected CD4+ T cells and mediate ADCC. Of note, the conformational changes in the gp120 that may not exclusively relate to binding of the CD4 molecule are important in exposing epitopes recognized by ADCC responses. Here we discuss the HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by ADCC antibodies in the context of the potential protective capacities of ADCC. PMID:24191939

  4. Nephritogenic lupus antibodies recognize glomerular basement membrane-associated chromatin fragments released from apoptotic intraglomerular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaaji, Manar; Mortensen, Elin; Jørgensen, Leif; Olsen, Randi; Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2006-06-01

    Antibodies to dsDNA represent a classification criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus. Subpopulations of these antibodies are involved in lupus nephritis. No known marker separates nephritogenic from non-nephritogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies. It is not clear whether specificity for glomerular target antigens or intrinsic antibody-affinity for dsDNA or nucleosomes is a critical parameter. Furthermore, it is still controversial whether glomerular target antigen(s) is constituted by nucleosomes or by non-nucleosomal glomerular structures. Previously, we have demonstrated that antibodies eluted from murine nephritic kidneys recognize nucleosomes, but not other glomerular antigens. In this study, we determined the structures that bind nephritogenic autoantibodies in vivo by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy, and colocalization immune electron microscopy using experimental antibodies to dsDNA, to histones and transcription factors, or to laminin. The data obtained are consistent and point at glomerular basement membrane-associated nucleosomes as target structures for the nephritogenic autoantibodies. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling or caspase-3 assays demonstrate that lupus nephritis is linked to intraglomerular cell apoptosis. The data suggest that nucleosomes are released by apoptosis and associate with glomerulus basement membranes, which may then be targeted by pathogenic anti-nucleosome antibodies. Thus, apoptotic nucleosomes may represent both inducer and target structures for nephritogenic autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  5. Improved detection suggests all Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel polyomavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Scott J Rodig; Cheng, Jingwei; Wardzala, Jacek; Dorosario, Andrew; Scanlon, Jessica J.; Laga, Alvaro C.; Martinez-Fernandez, Alejandro; Barletta, Justine A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Sadasivam, Subhashini; Holloway, Dustin T.; Cooper, Dylan J.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Wang, Linda C; DeCaprio, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A human polyomavirus was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) specimens. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) genome undergoes clonal integration into the host cell chromosomes of MCC tumors and expresses small T antigen and truncated large T antigen. Previous studies have consistently reported that MCPyV can be detected in approximately 80% of all MCC tumors. We sought to increase the sensitivity of detection of MCPyV in MCC by developing antibodies capable of detecting large T...

  6. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. PMID:26104192

  7. Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The antibody activity of antibody was not affected by irradiation at an irradiation dose of below 8 MR and low temperatures. Immobilization of peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG goat IgG, anti-peroxidase, peroxidase, and anti-alpha-fetoprotein was carried out with hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers. The activity of the immobilized enzyme-labeled antibody membranes varied with the thickness of the membranes and increased with decreasing membrane thickness. The activity of the immobilized antibody particles was varied by particle size. Immobilized anti-alpha-fetoprotein particles and membranes can be used for the assay of alpha-fetoprotein by the antigen-antibody reaction, such as a solid-phase sandwich method with high sensitivity

  8. Affinity improvement of a therapeutic antibody by structure-based computational design: generation of electrostatic interactions in the transition state stabilizes the antibody-antigen complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Kiyoshi

    Full Text Available The optimization of antibodies is a desirable goal towards the development of better therapeutic strategies. The antibody 11K2 was previously developed as a therapeutic tool for inflammatory diseases, and displays very high affinity (4.6 pM for its antigen the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1. We have employed a virtual library of mutations of 11K2 to identify antibody variants of potentially higher affinity, and to establish benchmarks in the engineering of a mature therapeutic antibody. The most promising candidates identified in the virtual screening were examined by surface plasmon resonance to validate the computational predictions, and to characterize their binding affinity and key thermodynamic properties in detail. Only mutations in the light-chain of the antibody are effective at enhancing its affinity for the antigen in vitro, suggesting that the interaction surface of the heavy-chain (dominated by the hot-spot residue Phe101 is not amenable to optimization. The single-mutation with the highest affinity is L-N31R (4.6-fold higher affinity than wild-type antibody. Importantly, all the single-mutations showing increase affinity incorporate a charged residue (Arg, Asp, or Glu. The characterization of the relevant thermodynamic parameters clarifies the energetic mechanism. Essentially, the formation of new electrostatic interactions early in the binding reaction coordinate (transition state or earlier benefits the durability of the antibody-antigen complex. The combination of in silico calculations and thermodynamic analysis is an effective strategy to improve the affinity of a matured therapeutic antibody.

  9. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  10. Antinucleosome antibodies as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of renal pathological activity in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, W T; Chen, Y M; Lan, J L; Chen, H H; Chen, Y H; Chen, D Y; Hsieh, C W; Wen, M C

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the correlation between antinucleosome antibodies and renal pathological activity in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN). We evaluated 36 patients with proliferative LN, 14 non-renal lupus patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Lupus activity was assessed using the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group 2004 (BILAG 2004) index, serum anti-double stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) levels, serum complement levels and daily urinary protein levels. All 36 lupus nephritis patients received renal biopsy. Antinucleosome antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that levels of serum antinucleosome antibodies were significantly higher in LN patients (median 90.35 units/ml, interquartile range [IQR] 37.38-135.23) than in non-renal SLE patients (median 5.45 units/ml, IQR 2.6-28.93, p antibodies were positively correlated with BILAG index (Spearman's r = 0.645, p antibodies were negatively correlated with serum levels of C3 (r(s) = -0.400, p antibodies were positively correlated with the histological activity index of LN (r(s) = 0.368, p antibodies and the histological chronicity index. In conclusion, the serum level of antinucleosome antibodies is a potential biomarker for early recognition of renal involvement and evaluation of disease activity in SLE. Our preliminary results suggested that serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies might be a potential biomarker in evaluating pathological activity of LN.

  11. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  12. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Christian [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Madshus, Inger Helene [Institute of Pathology, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Stang, Espen, E-mail: espsta@rr-research.no [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-12-10

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  13. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: ► Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. ► Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. ► Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. ► Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  14. Anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and cardiac arrhythmias in the adult: facts and hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzerini, P E; Capecchi, P L; Laghi-Pasini, F

    2010-09-01

    It is well established that the passive trans-placental passage of anti-Ro/SSA antibodies from mother to foetus is associated with the risk to develop an uncommon syndrome named neonatal lupus (NLE), where the congenital heart block represents the most severe clinical feature. Recent evidence demonstrated that also adult heart, classically considered invulnerable to the anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, may represent a target of the arrhythmogenicity of these autoantibodies. In particular, the prolongation of the QTc interval appears the most frequent abnormality observed in adults with circulating anti-Ro/SSA antibodies, with some data suggesting an association with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias, also life threatening. Moreover, even though the association between anti-Ro/SSA antibodies and conduction disturbances is undoubtedly less evident in adults than in infants, from the accurate dissection of the literature data the possibility arises that sometimes also the adult cardiac conduction tissue may be affected by such antibodies. The exact arrhythmogenic mechanisms involved in foetus/newborns and adults, respectively, have not been completely clarified as yet. However, increasing evidence suggests that anti-Ro/SSA antibodies may trigger rhythm disturbances through an inhibiting cross-reaction with several cardiac ionic channels, particularly the calcium channels (L-type and T-type), but also the potassium channel hERG, whose different expression and involvement in the cardiac electrophysiology during lifespan might account for the occurrence of age-related differences.

  15. Technological progresses in monoclonal antibody production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Costa, Ana Rita; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become vitally important to modern medicine and are currently one of the major biopharmaceutical products in development. However, the high clinical dose requirements of mAbs demand a greater biomanufacturing capacity, leading to the development of new technologies for their large-scale production, with mammalian cell culture dominating the scenario. Although some companies have tried to meet these demands by creating bioreactors of increased capacity, the optimization of cell culture productivity in normal bioreactors appears as a better strategy. This review describes the main technological progresses made with this intent, presenting the advantages and limitations of each production system, as well as suggestions for improvements. New and upgraded bioreactors have emerged both for adherent and suspension cell culture, with disposable reactors attracting increased interest in the last years. Furthermore, the strategies and technologies used to control culture parameters are in constant evolution, aiming at the on-line multiparameter monitoring and considering now parameters not seen as relevant for process optimization in the past. All progresses being made have as primary goal the development of highly productive and economic mAb manufacturing processes that will allow the rapid introduction of the product in the biopharmaceutical market at more accessible prices. PMID:20043321

  16. Antibody conjugated graphene nanocomposites for pathogen detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sign, Chandan; Sumana, Gajjala

    2016-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), due to its excellent electrochemical properties and large surface area, known to be highly suitable material for biosensing application. Here, we report in situ synthesis of silver nanopaticles (AgNPs) onto the GO sheets for the electrochemical detection of Salmonella typhimurium (S.typhimurium). The GO-AgNPs composites have been deposited onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate by the electrophoretic deposition technique. Carbodiimide coupling (EDC-NHS) has been used for the immobilization of antibodies of Salmonella typhimurium (anti-S.typhimurium) for detection of S.typhimurium. The electron microscopy and UV-visible studies reveal successful synthesis GO-AgNPs composites while FT-IR studies suggest the proper immobilization of anti-S.typhi. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) has been utilized for detection using anti-S.typhi/GOAgNPs/ITO based immunoelectrode as a function of S.typhimurium concentration. The fabricated immunosensor shows improved sensitivity of 33.04 μACFU-1mLcm-2 in a wide detection range of 101 to 106 CFUmL-1. This immunosensor may be utilized for the detection of other food borne pathogens like aflatoxin and E.coli also.

  17. Hepatitis B and A virus antibodies in alcoholic steatosis and cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Aldershvile, J; Henriksen, J;

    1982-01-01

    Sera from 74 alcoholics with cirrhosis and 63 alcoholics with steatosis were tested for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen, to hepatitis B core antigen, and to hepatitis A virus by radioimmunoassay or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. No significant difference between the two groups...... of alcoholics could be found concerning the prevalence of these antibodies. The total group of patients had antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen, or both, significantly (p less than 0.001) more often (26%) than sex- and age-matched controls (4%). No significant difference...... suggest that hepatitis B virus does not play a major role in the progression of alcoholic liver disease, but longitudinal studies are needed to solve this problem. The reason for the increased prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis B virus in these patients is unknown....

  18. Protective Antibodies against Placental Malaria and Poor Outcomes during Pregnancy, Benin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Denoeud-Ndam, Lise; Doritchamou, Justin;

    2015-01-01

    Placental malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes that bind to placental tissue. Binding is mediated by VAR2CSA, a parasite antigen coded by the var gene, which interacts with chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). Consequences include maternal anemia and fetal growth retardation....... Antibody-mediated immunity to placental malaria is acquired during successive pregnancies, but the target of VAR2CSA-specific protective antibodies is unclear. We assessed VAR2CSA-specific antibodies in pregnant women and analyzed their relationships with protection against placental infection, preterm...... infection, preterm birth, and low birthweight. These data suggest that antibodies against VAR2CSA N-terminal region mediate immunity to placental malaria and associated outcomes. Our results validate current vaccine development efforts with VAR2CSA N-terminal constructs....

  19. Cross-reactivity and phospholipase A2 neutralization of anti-irradiated Bothrops jararaca venom antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detoxified Bothrops jararaca venom, immunized rabbits with the toxoid obtained and investigated cross-reactivity of the antibodies obtained against autologous and heterelogous venoms was presented. It was also investigated the ability of the IgGs, purified by affinity chromatography, from those sera to neutralize phospholipase. A2, an ubiquous enzyme in animal venoms. Results indicate that venom irradiation leads to an attenuation of toxicity of 84%. Cross-reactivity was investigated by ELISA and Western blot and all venoms were reactive to the antibodies. On what refers to phospholipase A2 activity neutralization, the antibodies neutralized autologous venoms efficiently and, curiously, other venoms from the same genus were not neutralized, while Lachesis muta venom, a remote related specier, was neutralized by this serum. These data suggest that irradiation preserve important epitopes for induction of neutralizing antibodies and that these epitopes are not shared by all venoms assayed. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  20. A novel bispecific antibody, S-Fab, induces potent cancer cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; He, Ping; Zhou, Changhua; Jing, Li; Dong, Bin; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Yawei; Miao, Ji; Wang, Zhong; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies that engage immune cells to kill cancer cells have been actively studied in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we present a novel bispecific format, S-Fab, fabricated by linking a single-domain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen VHH to a conventional anti-CD3 Fab. In contrast to most bispecific antibodies, the S-Fab bispecific antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from bacteria. The purified S-Fab is stable in serum and is able to recruit T cells to drive potent cancer cell killing. In xenograft models, the S-Fab antibody suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our study suggested that the bispecific S-Fab format can be applied to a wide range of immunotherapies.

  1. Anti-Self Phosphatidylserine Antibodies Recognize Uninfected Erythrocytes Promoting Malarial Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Arias, Cristina; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Gallego-Delgado, Julio; Rudlaff, Rachel; Fernandez, Clemente; Roussel, Camille; Götz, Anton; Gonzalez, Sandra; Mohanty, Akshaya; Mohanty, Sanjib; Wassmer, Samuel; Buffet, Pierre; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Rodriguez, Ana

    2016-02-10

    Plasmodium species, the parasitic agents of malaria, invade erythrocytes to reproduce, resulting in erythrocyte loss. However, a greater loss is caused by the elimination of uninfected erythrocytes, sometimes long after infection has been cleared. Using a mouse model, we found that Plasmodium infection induces the generation of anti-self antibodies that bind to the surface of uninfected erythrocytes from infected, but not uninfected, mice. These antibodies recognize phosphatidylserine, which is exposed on the surface of a fraction of uninfected erythrocytes during malaria. We find that phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes are reticulocytes expressing high levels of CD47, a "do-not-eat-me" signal, but the binding of anti-phosphatidylserine antibodies mediates their phagocytosis, contributing to anemia. In human patients with late postmalarial anemia, we found a strong inverse correlation between the levels of anti-phosphatidylserine antibodies and plasma hemoglobin, suggesting a similar role in humans. Inhibition of this pathway may be exploited for treating malarial anemia.

  2. Structural basis for quinine-dependent antibody binding to platelet integrin αIIbβ3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianghai; Zhu, Jieqing; Bougie, Daniel W; Aster, Richard H; Springer, Timothy A

    2015-10-29

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is caused by antibodies that react with specific platelet-membrane glycoproteins when the provoking drug is present. More than 100 drugs have been implicated as triggers for this condition, quinine being one of the most common. The cause of DITP in most cases appears to be a drug-induced antibody that binds to a platelet membrane glycoprotein only when the drug is present. How a soluble drug promotes binding of an otherwise nonreactive immunoglobulin to its target, leading to platelet destruction, is uncertain, in part because of the difficulties of working with polyclonal human antibodies usually available only in small quantities. Recently, quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies were developed that recognize a defined epitope on the β-propeller domain of the platelet integrin αIIb subunit (GPIIb) only when the drug is present and closely mimic the behavior of antibodies found in human patients with quinine-induced thrombocytopenia in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of quinine to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of these antibodies and define in crystal structures the changes induced in the CDR by this interaction. Because no detectable binding of quinine to the target integrin could be demonstrated in previous studies, the findings indicate that a hybrid paratope consisting of quinine and reconfigured antibody CDR plays a critical role in recognition of its target epitope by an antibody and suggest that, in this type of drug-induced immunologic injury, the primary reaction involves binding of the drug to antibody CDRs, causing it to acquire specificity for a site on a platelet integrin.

  3. Anti-β2 Glycoprotein-I Antibody in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shojaei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Ischemic cardiac manifestations have been reported in a various percentage of patients with anti-phospholipid antibodies. Data concerning the relation between anti- Phospholipid (aPL antibodies and myocardial infarction in subjects without evidence of overt autoimmune disease are conflicting. Anti-beta2 glycoprotein-I (anti-beta2-GPI antibody is detected in various diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. The study of anti-beta2-GPI antibody in Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI might shed light on etiologic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes. The purpose of the present study was to determine association of plasma aPL antibodies, namely, antibeta2- GPI antibodies, with AMI. This study was designed to investigate whether prevalence of antibeta2- GPI antibodies, in patients who had acute myocardial infarction and to analyze their relationship with traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Approach: We investigated the prevalence of anti-beta2- GPI IgG in a well characterized group of patients with AMI as a case group. Sera from 74 patients with AMI and from 76 healthy subjects, matched for age and sex as a control group. Using ELISA to evaluate the presence of IgG isotype of anti-beta2-GPI autoantibodies in their sera. Results: The prevalence of anti-beta2-GPI IgG in the control group (10.50% resulted significantly lower than in patients with AMI (37.80% (pConclusion: Our findings suggest that anti-beta2-GPI IgG antibodies seemed to behave as independent risk factors for myocardial infarction, which may represent a link between autoimmunity and atherosclerosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Further studies with bigger patients are needed to explore association of anti-β2-GPI IgG with STEMI and NSTEMI.

  4. Utilisation of antibody microarrays for the selection of specific and informative antibodies from recombinant library binders of unknown quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kibat, Janek; Schirrmann, Thomas; Knape, Matthias J;

    2016-01-01

    Many diagnostic and therapeutic concepts require antibodies of high specificity. Recombinant binder libraries and related selection approaches allow the efficient isolation of antibodies against almost every target of interest. Nevertheless, it cannot be guaranteed that selected antibodies perfor...

  5. Combinatorial antibody libraries: new advances, new immunological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Immunochemists have become quite proficient in engineering existing antibody molecules to control their pharmacological properties. However, in terms of generating new antibodies, the combinatorial antibody library has become a central feature of modern immunochemistry. These libraries are essentially an immune system in a test tube and enable the selection of antibodies without the constraints of whole animal or cell-based systems. This Review provides an overview of how antibody libraries are constructed and discusses what can be learnt from these synthetic systems. In particular, the Review focuses on new biological insights from antibody libraries - such as the concept of 'SOS antibodies' - and the growing use of intracellular antibodies to perturb cellular functions.

  6. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodis, Ioannis; Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  7. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Parodis

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204 or without (n = 294 LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous, before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes. Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8. Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all, but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are

  8. Structure Based Antibody-Like Peptidomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I. Greene

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb and soluble receptors represent new classes of therapeutic agents for treatment of several diseases. High affinity and high specificity biologics can be utilized for variety of clinical purposes. Monoclonal antibodies have been used as diagnostic agents when coupled with radionuclide, immune modulatory agents or in the treatment of cancers. Among other limitations of using large molecules for therapy the actual cost of biologics has become an issue. There is an effort among chemists and biologists to reduce the size of biologics which includes monoclonal antibodies and receptors without a reduction of biological efficacy. Single chain antibody, camel antibodies, Fv fragments are examples of this type of deconstructive process. Small high-affinity peptides have been identified using phage screening. Our laboratory used a structure-based approach to develop small-size peptidomimetics from the three-dimensional structure of proteins with immunoglobulin folds as exemplified by CD4 and antibodies. Peptides derived either from the receptor or their cognate ligand mimics the functions of the parental macromolecule. These constrained peptides not only provide a platform for developing small molecule drugs, but also provide insight into the atomic features of protein-protein interactions. A general overview of the reduction of monoclonal antibodies to small exocyclic peptide and its prospects as a useful diagnostic and as a drug in the treatment of cancer are discussed.

  9. Next generation of antibody therapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenping Zhu; Li Yan

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become a major class of therapeutic agents providing effective altematives to treating various human diseases. To date, 15 mAbs have been approved by regulatory agencies in the world for clinical use in oncology indications. The selectivity and specificity, the unique pharmacokinetics, and the ability to engage and activate the host immune system differentiate these biologics from traditional small molecule anticancer drugs. mAb-basod regimens have brought clinical benefits, including improvements in overall survival, to patients with a variety of cancers. Many challenges still remain, however, to fully realize the potential of these new medicines. With our further understanding of cancer biology, mechanism of antibody action, and advancement of antibody engineering technologies, many novel antibody formats or antibody-derived molecules are emerging as promising new generation therapeutics. Carefully designed and engineered, they retain the advantage of specificity and selectivity of original antibodies, but in the meantime acquire additional special features such as improved pharmacokinetics, increased selectivity, and enhanced anticancer efficacy. Promising clinical results are being generated with these newly improved antibody-based therapeutics.

  10. Studies on Purification of Methamidophos Monoclonal Antibodies and Comoarative Immunoactivity of Purified Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU-QING ZHAO; YUAN-MING SUN; CHUN-YAN ZHANG; XIAO-YU HUANG; HOU-RUI ZHANG; ZHEN-YU ZHU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To purify Methamidophos (Met) monoclonal antibodies with two methods andcompare immune activity of purified antibodies. Method Caprylic acid ammonium sulphateprecipition (CAASP) method and Sepharose protein-A (SPA) affinity chromatography method wereused to purify Met monoclonal antibodies, UV spectrum scanning was used to determine proteincontent and recovery of purified antibodies, sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gelelectrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to analyze the purity of purified antibodies, and enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine immune activity of purified antibodies.Results Antibody protein content and recovery rate with CAASP method were 7.62 mg/mL and8.05% respectively, antibody protein content and recovery rate with SPA method were 6.45 mg/mLand 5.52% respectively. Purity of antibodies purified by SPA method was higher than that by CAASPmethod. The half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) of antibodies purified by SPA to Met was181.26 μg/mL, and the linear working range and the limit of quantification (LOD) were 2.43-3896.01μg/mL and 1.03 μg/mL, respectively. The IC50 of antibodies purified by CAASP to Met was 352.82μg/mL, and the linear working range and LOD were 10.91-11412.29 ug/mL and 3.42 μg/mL,respectively. Conclusion Antibodies purified by SPA method are better than those by CAASPmethod, and Met monoclonal antibodies purified by SPA method can be used to prepare gold-labelledtesting paper for analyzing Met residue in vegetable and drink water.

  11. Tau passive immunotherapy in mutant P301L mice: antibody affinity versus specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina d'Abramo

    Full Text Available The use of antibodies to treat neurodegenerative diseases has undergone rapid development in the past decade. To date, immunotherapeutic approaches to Alzheimer's disease have mostly targeted amyloid beta as it is a secreted protein that can be found in plasma and CSF and is consequently accessible to circulating antibodies. Few recent publications have suggested the utility of treatment of tau pathology with monoclonal antibodies to tau. Our laboratory has begun a systematic study of different classes of tau monoclonal antibodies using mutant P301L mice. Three or seven months old mutant tau mice were inoculated weekly with tau monoclonal antibodies at a dose of 10 mg/Kg, until seven or ten months of age were reached respectively. Our data strongly support the notion that in P301L animals treated with MC1, a conformational monoclonal antibody specific for PHF-tau, the rate of development of tau pathology is effectively reduced, while injecting DA31, a high affinity tau sequence antibody, does not exert such benefit. MC1 appears superior to DA31 in overall effects, suggesting that specificity is more important than affinity in therapeutic applications. Unfortunately the survival rate of the P301L treated mice was not improved when immunizing either with MC1 or PHF1, a high affinity phospho-tau antibody previously reported to be efficacious in reducing pathological tau. These data demonstrate that passive immunotherapy in mutant tau models may be efficacious in reducing the development of tau pathology, but a great deal of work remains to be done to carefully select the tau epitopes to target.

  12. Immunocytochemical and Immunohistochemical Staining with Peptide Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Tina; Pedersen, Klaus Boberg; Hougaard, David; Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies are particularly useful for immunocytochemistry (ICC) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), where antigens may denature due to fixation of tissues and cells. Peptide antibodies can be made to any defined sequence, including unknown putative proteins and posttranslationally modified sequences. Moreover, the availability of large amounts of the antigen (peptide) allows inhibition/adsorption controls, which are important in ICC/IHC, due to the many possibilities for false-positive reactions caused by immunoglobulin Fc receptors, nonspecific reactions, and cross-reactivity of primary and secondary antibodies with other antigens and endogenous immunoglobulins, respectively. Here, simple protocols for ICC and IHC are described together with recommendations for appropriate controls.

  13. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  14. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  15. Reshaping Human Antibodies: Grafting an Antilysozyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeyen, Martine; Milstein, Cesar; Winter, Greg

    1988-03-01

    The production of therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology has proved difficult, and this has prompted the ``humanizing'' of mouse monoclonal antibodies by recombinant DNA techniques. It was shown previously that the binding site for a small hapten could be grafted from the heavy-chain variable domain of a mouse antibody to that of a human myeloma protein by transplanting the hypervariable loops. It is now shown that a large binding site for a protein antigen (lysozyme) can also be transplanted from mouse to human heavy chain. The success of such constructions may be facilitated by an induced-fit mechanism.

  16. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  17. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  18. Encephalitis with refractory seizures, status epilepticus, and antibodies to the GABAA receptor: A case series, characterisation of the antigen, and analysis of the effects of antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Petit-Pedrol (Mar); T. Armangue (Thaís); X. Peng (Xiaoyu); L. Bataller (Luis); T. Cellucci (Tania); R. Davis (Rebecca); L. McCracken (Lindsey); E. Martinez-Hernandez (Eugenia); W.P. Mason (Warren); M.C. Kruer (Michael); D.G. Ritacco (David); W. Grisold (Wolfgang); M.J. Meaney; C. Alcalá (Carmen); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); M.J. Titulaer (Maarten); R. Balice-Gordon (Rita); F. Graus (Francesc); J. Dalmau (Josep)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Increasing evidence suggests that seizures and status epilepticus can be immune-mediated. We aimed to describe the clinical features of a new epileptic disorder, and to establish the target antigen and the effects of patients' antibodies on neuronal cultures. Methods: In this

  19. Monospecific antibody against Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase protects from Pertussis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Faiz Kazi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Acellular pertussis vaccines has been largely accepted world-wide however, there are reports about limitedantibody response against these vaccines suggesting that multiple antigens should be included in acellular vaccinesto attain full protection. The aim of present study was to evaluate the role of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase as aprotective antigen.Materials and methods: Highly mono-specific antibody against adenylate cyclase (AC was raised in rabbits usingnitrocellulose bound adenylate cyclase and the specificity was assessed by immuoblotting. B.pertussis 18-323, wasincubated with the mono-specific serum and without serum as a control. Mice were challenged intra-nasally and pathophysiolgicalresponses were recorded.Results: The production of B.pertussis adenylate cyclase monospecific antibody that successfully recognized on immunoblotand gave protection against fatality (p< 0.01 and lung consolidation (p <0.01. Mouse weight gain showedsignificant difference (p< 0.05.Conclusion: These preliminary results highlight the role of the B.pertussis adenylate cyclase as a potential pertussisvaccine candidate. B.pertussis AC exhibited significant protection against pertussis in murine model. J Microbiol InfectDis 2012; 2(2: 36-43Key words: Pertussis; monospecific; antibody; passive-protection

  20. Structural Basis of Zika Virus-Specific Antibody Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Fernandez, Estefania; Dowd, Kimberly A; Speer, Scott D; Platt, Derek J; Gorman, Matthew J; Govero, Jennifer; Nelson, Christopher A; Pierson, Theodore C; Diamond, Michael S; Fremont, Daved H

    2016-08-11

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy has emerged as a global public health problem because of its ability to cause severe congenital disease. Here, we developed six mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against ZIKV including four (ZV-48, ZV-54, ZV-64, and ZV-67) that were ZIKV specific and neutralized infection of African, Asian, and American strains to varying degrees. X-ray crystallographic and competition binding analyses of Fab fragments and scFvs defined three spatially distinct epitopes in DIII of the envelope protein corresponding to the lateral ridge (ZV-54 and ZV-67), C-C' loop (ZV-48 and ZV-64), and ABDE sheet (ZV-2) regions. In vivo passive transfer studies revealed protective activity of DIII-lateral ridge specific neutralizing mAbs in a mouse model of ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that DIII is targeted by multiple type-specific antibodies with distinct neutralizing activity, which provides a path for developing prophylactic antibodies for use in pregnancy or designing epitope-specific vaccines against ZIKV. PMID:27475895

  1. Role of MICA antibodies in solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lei; Li, Zhengyu; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Guangheng; Xu, Chuan; Sun, Zhaolin; Mei, Hong

    2014-02-01

    As a potential transplant antigen, major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) antigen, has attracted increased attention because of its possible role in solid organ transplantation. There are two MICA forms, and MICA antibodies and soluble MICA (sMICA) have been found in the serum of transplant recipients. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for original reports of clinical studies involving the effect of MICA on outcomes of renal, heart, lung, and liver transplantation. In addition to the human leukocyte antigen antigens, which elicit a strong immune response, the polymorphic MICA antigens induce production of MICA antibodies and sMICA. A number of clinical studies have shown that MICA antibodies correlate with an increased incidence of rejection and a decreased allograft survival rate following renal or heart transplantation. Although it is clearly associated with chronic rejection of lung allografts, no such correlation was found for liver transplantation. Moreover, sMICA showed a negative association with acute rejection (AR) and may be a good predictor of heart transplant outcomes. These data suggest MICA expression patterns and regulatory function may be tissue specific and that different transplants have different organ-specific outcomes.

  2. Antibody Response against Parvovirus in Patients with Inflammatory Rheumatological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Raeisi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some viral infections have been suggested to trigger or cause autoimmune diseases. One of these viruses is parvovirus B19 which can have various rheumatologic manifestations. In this study we investigated the association between parvovirus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosis(SLE, systemic sclerosis(SSc and undifferentiated arthritis at the Rheumatological Clinic, Imam Khomeini hospital. Methods: In this sectional case-control study, IgM and IgG antibodies against parvovirus B19 were measured with ELISA in 41 patients with RA, 28 patients with SLE, 13 patients with SSc, 8 patients with undifferentiated arthritis as well as 90 healthy controls. The ELISA kit (DRG, Germany was semi-quantitative and qualititative. Results: Parvovirus B19 IgM was detected in one patient with RA, one with SSc and four in the control group. IgG anti- B19-specific antibody was detected in 58.5% of RA patients, 67.9% of SLE patients, 69. 2% of SSc patients, 87.5% of undifferentiated arthritis patients as compared to 53.3% of controls. The results were compared between the patient and control groups(p>0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, there was no significant correlation for the antibody titer against parvovirus B19 in the patient and control group. The highly positive response of IgG against parvovirus in undifferentiated arthritis implies the need for more research.

  3. Activation of human complement by immunoglobulin G antigranulocyte antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, P K; Currie, M S; Logue, G L

    1982-01-01

    The ability of antigranulocyte antibody to fix the third component of complement (C3) to the granulocyte surface was investigated by an assay that quantitates the binding of monoclonal anti-C3 antibody to paraformaldehyde-fixed cells preincubated with Felty's syndrome serum in the presence of human complement. The sera from 7 of 13 patients with Felty's syndrome bound two to three times as much C3 to granulocytes as sera from patients with uncomplicated rheumatoid arthritis. The complement-activating ability of Felty's syndrome serum seemed to reside in the monomeric IgG-containing serum fraction. For those sera capable of activating complement, the amount of C3 fixed to granulocytes was proportional to the amount of granulocyte-binding IgG present in the serum. Thus, complement fixation appeared to be a consequence of the binding of antigranulocyte antibody to the cell surface. These studies suggest a role for complement-mediated injury in the pathophysiology of immune granulocytopenia, as has been demonstrated for immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:7174786

  4. Are Onconeural Antibodies a Clinical Phenomenology in Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs occur in patients with cancer and can cause clinical symptoms and signs of dysfunction of the nervous system that are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinical syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer (SCLC, lymphoma, and gynecological tumors. The finding of highly specific antibodies directed against onconeural antigens has revolutionized the diagnosis and promoted the understanding of these syndromes and led to the current hypothesis of an autoimmune pathophysiology. Accumulating data strongly suggested direct pathogenicity of these antibodies. The field of PNS has expanded rapidly in the past few years with the discovery of limbic encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65, the voltage (VGKC-gated potassium channel complex, the methyl (N-NMDA-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA (B receptors, and so forth. Despite this, the clinical spectrum of these diseases has not yet been fully investigated. The clinical importance of these conditions lies in their frequent response to immunotherapies and, less commonly, their association with distinctive tumors. This review provides an overview on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of PNS, with emphasis on the role of antibodies in limbic encephalitis.

  5. Pegfilgrastim Enhances the Antitumor Effect of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Sébastien; Mathé, Doriane; Chettab, Kamel; Evesque, Anne; Matera, Eva-Laure; Trédan, Olivier; Dumontet, Charles

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic mAbs exert antitumor activity through various mechanisms, including apoptotic signalization, complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) or phagocytosis (ADCP). G-CSF and GM-CSF have been reported to increase the activity of antibodies in preclinical models and in clinical trials. To determine the potential role of pegfilgrastim as an enhancer of anticancer antibodies, we performed a comparative study of filgrastim and pegfilgrastim. We found that pegfilgrastim was significantly more potent than filgrastim in murine xenograft models treated with mAbs. This was observed with rituximab in CD20(+) models and with trastuzumab in HER2(+) models. Stimulation with pegfilgrastim was associated with significant enhancement of leukocyte content in spleen as well as mobilization of activated monocytes/granulocytes from the spleen to the tumor bed. These results suggest that pegfilgrastim could constitute a potent adjuvant for immunotherapy with mAbs possessing ADCC/ADCP properties. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1238-47. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26988998

  6. ANTITUMOR EFFECTS OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY FAB′ FRAGMENT CONTAINING IMMUNOCONJUGATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小云; 甄永苏

    2002-01-01

    Objective.Using monoclonal antibody (mAb) Fab′ fragment to develop mAb immunoconjugates for cancer. Methods.Fab′ fragment of mAb 3A5 was prepared by digestion of the antibody with pepsin and then reduced by dithiothreitol (DTT),while Fab′ fragment of mAb 3D6 was obtained by digestion of the antibody with ficin and subsequently reduced by β mercaptoethanol.The conjugation between Fab′ fragment and pingyangmycin (PYM),an antitumor antibiotic,was mediated by dextran T 40.Immunoreactivity of Fab′ PYM conjugates with cancer cells was determined by ELISA,and the cytotoxicity of those conjugates to cancer cells was determined by clonogenic assay.Antitumor effects of the Fab′ PYM conjugates were evaluated by subcutaneously transplanted tumors in mice. Results.The molecular weight of Fab′ fragment was approximately 53 kD,while the average molecular weight of Fab′ PYM conjugate was 170 kD.The Fab′ PYM conjugates showed immunoreactivity with antigen relevant cancer cells and selective cytotoxicity against target cells.Administered intravenously,Fab′ PYM conjugates were more effective against the growth of tumors in mice than free PYM and PYM conjugated with intact mAb. Conclusion.Fab′ PYM conjugate may be capable of targeting cancer cells and effectively inhibiting tumor growth,suggesting its therapeutic potential in cancer treatment.

  7. Determinism and stochasticity during maturation of the zebrafish antibody repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ning; Weinstein, Joshua A.; Penland, Lolita; White, Richard A.; Fisher, Daniel S.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    It is thought that the adaptive immune system of immature organisms follows a more deterministic program of antibody creation than is found in adults. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the diversifying antibody repertoire in zebrafish over five developmental time points. We found that the immune system begins in a highly stereotyped state with preferential use of a small number of V (variable) D (diverse) J (joining) gene segment combinations, but that this stereotypy decreases dramatically as the zebrafish mature, with many of the top VDJ combinations observed in 2-wk-old zebrafish virtually disappearing by 1 mo. However, we discovered that, in the primary repertoire, there are strong correlations in VDJ use that increase with zebrafish maturity, suggesting that VDJ recombination involves a level of deterministic programming that is unexpected. This stereotypy is masked by the complex diversification processes of antibody maturation; the variation and lack of correlation in full repertoires between individuals appears to be derived from randomness in clonal expansion during the affinity maturation process. These data provide a window into the mechanisms of VDJ recombination and diversity creation and allow us to better understand how the adaptive immune system achieves diversity. PMID:21393572

  8. Post-transplant donor-specific antibody production and graft outcome in kidney transplantation: results of sixteen-year monitoring by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Borrelli, Laura; Scornajenghi, Alessandra; Iaria, Giuseppe; Tisone, Giuseppe; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-01-01

    Our data show that monitoring by sensitive flow cytometric techniques of the de novo production of anti-HLA antibodies in patients receiving kidney transplantation is a useful and noninvasive tool to identify the onset of an immune response towards the graft before any clinical manifestation of antibody-mediated graft injury. Consequently prospective posttransplant monitoring of anti-HLA donor-directed antibodies may offer the chance to realize an effective clinical intervention in order to prevent graft dysfunction and to prolong graft survival. The long follow-up period of the study allowed us to demonstrate a very low graft survival rate in patients who developed donor-specific HLA antibodies in comparison with patients who did not have antibodies, thus confirming the "humoral theory of transplantation". The posttransplant production of anti-HLA antibodies can predict not only graft failure but also chronic dysfunction of the graft. Moreover, our findings suggest that graft survival is influenced by the epitope- and locus-specificity of anti-HLA donor-directed antibodies. The interval between antibody appearance and loss of graft function was short in some patients but reached several years in others. Moreover, some patients showed consistent production of antibodies for many years and an uneventful clinical status. These findings suggest a mechanism of graft "accommodation" or the production of "harmless" antibodies. Immunosuppressive drug combinations able to inhibit T and B cell activation are useful tools to prevent the humoral immune response against graft and consequently to prolong graft survival.

  9. Radioimmunological proof of thyroglobulin antibodies in humans by the use of a double antibody method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid antibodies, especially thyroglobulin antibodies, allow themselves to be proven with the double antibody method, in competitive radio binding assays and with the solid phase technique. These methods offer advantages relative to sensitivity and quantifiability. In this work a sensitive radioimmunoassay as a double antibody method was worked out whereby a 125 I-thyroglobulin/thyroglobulin antibody immune complex was precipitated out using anti-human immunoglobulin. The measured results from the radioimmunoassay show a good correlation with the results of the immune histological findings. A high to very high Tg antibody level occurs with autoimmune thyroiditis (80%), primary hypothyroidism (74%) and hyperthyroidism (70%). The control values with healthy people came to less than 5% specific binding. In correlation with the results of other authors this method is advantageous relative to test start and evaluation procedures. (orig.)

  10. Eggshell spottiness reflects maternally transferred antibodies in blue tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Grégoire, Arnaud; Staszewski, Vincent; Guerreiro, Romain; Perret, Philippe; Boulinier, Thierry; Doutrelant, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Blue-green and brown-spotted eggshells in birds have been proposed as sexual signals of female physiological condition and egg quality, reflecting maternal investment in the egg. Testing this hypothesis requires linking eggshell coloration to egg content, which is lacking for brown protoporphyrin-based pigmentation. As protoporphyrins can induce oxidative stress, and a large amount in eggshells should indicate either high female and egg quality if it reflects the female's high oxidative tolerance, or conversely poor quality if it reflects female physiological stress. Different studies supported either predictions but are difficult to compare given the methodological differences in eggshell-spottiness measurements. Using the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus as a model species, we aimed at disentangling both predictions in testing if brown-spotted eggshell could reflect the quality of maternal investment in antibodies and carotenoids in the egg, and at improving between-study comparisons in correlating several common measurements of eggshell coloration (spectral and digital measures, spotted surface, pigmentation indices). We found that these color variables were weakly correlated highlighting the need for comparable quantitative measurements between studies and for multivariate regressions incorporating several eggshell-color characteristics. When evaluating the potential signaling function of brown-spotted eggshells, we thus searched for the brown eggshell-color variables that best predicted the maternal transfer of antibodies and carotenoids to egg yolks. We also tested the effects of several parental traits and breeding parameters potentially affecting this transfer. While eggshell coloration did not relate to yolk carotenoids, the eggs with larger and less evenly-distributed spots had higher antibody concentrations, suggesting that both the quantity and distribution of brown pigments reflected the transfer of maternal immune compounds in egg yolks. As yolk antibody

  11. Eggshell spottiness reflects maternally transferred antibodies in blue tits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jeanne Holveck

    Full Text Available Blue-green and brown-spotted eggshells in birds have been proposed as sexual signals of female physiological condition and egg quality, reflecting maternal investment in the egg. Testing this hypothesis requires linking eggshell coloration to egg content, which is lacking for brown protoporphyrin-based pigmentation. As protoporphyrins can induce oxidative stress, and a large amount in eggshells should indicate either high female and egg quality if it reflects the female's high oxidative tolerance, or conversely poor quality if it reflects female physiological stress. Different studies supported either predictions but are difficult to compare given the methodological differences in eggshell-spottiness measurements. Using the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus as a model species, we aimed at disentangling both predictions in testing if brown-spotted eggshell could reflect the quality of maternal investment in antibodies and carotenoids in the egg, and at improving between-study comparisons in correlating several common measurements of eggshell coloration (spectral and digital measures, spotted surface, pigmentation indices. We found that these color variables were weakly correlated highlighting the need for comparable quantitative measurements between studies and for multivariate regressions incorporating several eggshell-color characteristics. When evaluating the potential signaling function of brown-spotted eggshells, we thus searched for the brown eggshell-color variables that best predicted the maternal transfer of antibodies and carotenoids to egg yolks. We also tested the effects of several parental traits and breeding parameters potentially affecting this transfer. While eggshell coloration did not relate to yolk carotenoids, the eggs with larger and less evenly-distributed spots had higher antibody concentrations, suggesting that both the quantity and distribution of brown pigments reflected the transfer of maternal immune compounds in egg yolks

  12. Characterization of M2 antibodies in asymptomatic Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hua Jiang; Ren-Qian Zhong; Xiao-Yun Fan; Yin Hu; Feng An; Jian-Wen Sun; Xian-Tao Kong

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of M2 antibodies specific for pdmary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) in asymptomatic Chinese and identify patients with early PBC.METHODS: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ElISA)tests for M2 antibodies to recombinant protein were performed in 5 011 subjects (age range, 26-85 years; mean age: 45.81±15.02 years) who took an annual physical examination. M2-positive subjects were further analyzed for immunoglobulin (Ig) classes and subclasses of M2 antibodies.Clinical, biochemical and immunological data were obtained for M2-positive subjects. In addition, ultrasonography (US)or endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP)was performed to exclude any disorders other than PBC.RESULTS: M2 antibodies were detected in 8 (0.16%) of the 5 0LL subjects studied. Of the 8 subjects, 7 were female and 1 was male (age range: 40-74 years). An unexplained increase of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) values, often to striking levels,was detected in 4 M2-positive subjects, 3 of them accorded with the diagnostic criteria recommended by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, even though they had no symptoms of PBC (such as fatigue, pruritus or jaundice).Liver biopsy was performed in two M2-positive subjects and the histology was compatible with PBC in both cases.CONCLUSION: Our data, while not assessing the true prevalence of asymptomatic PBC in the general population,suggest that asymptomatic PBC is much more common in China than has been supposed.

  13. Chemical biology: How to minimalize antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    The success of antibodies as pharmaceuticals has triggered interest in crafting much smaller mimics. A crucial step forward has been taken with the chemical synthesis of small molecules that recruit immune cells to attack cancer cells.

  14. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  15. Localization of tumors by radiolabelled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of utilizing radiolabelled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigens for determining the site of tumors which produce or are associated with carcinoembryonic antigen is disclosed. 3 claims, no drawings

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Antibody Internalization with Novel Monoclonal Antibodies against Alexa Fluorophores

    OpenAIRE

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G.; Lai, Michelle; D’Alessio, Joseph A.; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of inte...

  17. Stimulation of protective antibodies against type Ia and Ib group B streptococci by a type Ia polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine.

    OpenAIRE

    Wessels, M R; Paoletti, L C; Rodewald, A K; Michon, F; DiFabio, J; Jennings, H J; Kasper, D L

    1993-01-01

    Antisera elicited by type Ia group B streptococci (GBS) contain antibodies that react with both type Ia and type Ib strains. Previous studies suggested that antibodies elicited by type Ia organisms recognized a carbohydrate antigen or epitope common to Ia and Ib strains. We now report the synthesis and immunogenicity testing of a type Ia polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid (Ia-TT) conjugate vaccine. Ia-TT elicited type Ia polysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in all three of the rabbi...

  18. Influenza-Specific Antibody-Dependent Phagocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Vanderven, Hillary; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Johnston, Angus; Rockman, Steven; Laurie, Karen; Barr, Ian; Reading, Patrick; Lichtfuss, Marit; Stephen J Kent

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunity to human influenza A virus (IAV) infection is only partially understood. Broadly non-neutralizing antibodies may assist in reducing disease but have not been well characterized. Methods We measured internalization of opsonized, influenza protein-coated fluorescent beads and live IAV into a monocytic cell line to study antibody-dependent phagocytosis (ADP) against multiple influenza hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. We analyzed influenza HA-specific ADP in healthy human donors, ...

  19. Single-domain antibodies for brain targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Lalatsa, Katerina; Moreira Leite, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Smaller recombinant antibody fragments as single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are emerging as credible alternatives because of their target specificity, high affinity, and cost-effective recombinant production. sdAbs have been forged into multivalent and multispecif ic therapeutics, or targeting moieties, that are able to shuttle their linked therapeutic cargo (i.e., drugs, nanoparticles, toxins, enzymes, and radionuclides) to the receptor of interest. Their ability to permeate across the blood ...

  20. Improvement of a low pH antigen-antibody dissociation procedure for ELISA measurement of circulating anti-Aβ antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugen Kenneth E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior work from our group found that acid dissociation (pH 2.5 incubation of serum from APP transgenic mice vaccinated against Aβ increased the apparent anti-Aβ titers, suggesting antibody masking by antigen in the ELISA assay. Subsequently, we found that pH 2.5 incubation of serum from unvaccinated non-transgenic mice showed antibody binding to Aβ1–42, but no increase when other proteins, including shorter Aβ peptides, coated the ELISA plate. To investigate further the effects of low pH incubation on apparent anti-Aβ1–42 signals, we examined normal sera from nonTg unvaccinated mice, nonTg mice vaccinated with Aβ peptide (to produce authentic anti-Aβ antibodies or a monoclonal antibody against Aβ (6E10 using competitive-inhibition ELISA and Aβ epitope mapping assays. In addition, we examined use of a less stringent low pH procedure at pH 3.5, to ascertain if it had the same effects as the pH 2.5 procedure. Results We believe there are three distinct effects of pH 2.5 incubation.; A an artifactual increase in binding to full length Aβ by mouse immunoglobulin which has low affinity for Aβ, B an inactivation of anti-Aβ antibodies that is time dependent and C unmasking of high affinity anti-Aβ antibodies when high levels of circulating Aβ is present in APP transgenic mice. All three reactions can interact to produce the final ELISA signal. Incubation of sera from unvaccinated nonTg mice at pH 2.5 enhanced ELISA signals by process A. Conversely, pH 2.5 incubation of sera from vaccinated nonTg mice with caused a time dependent reduction of antibody signal by process B (overcoming the increase caused by A. The artifactual anti-Aβ ELISA signal enhanced by pH 2.5 incubation of normal mouse sera could not be effectively competed by low to moderate concentrations of Aβ, nor bind to shorter Aβ peptides in a manner similar to authentic anti-Aβ antibodies. Incubation of mouse sera at pH 3.5 caused neither an apparent

  1. Neutralizing Antibody Response and Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in HIV-1-Infected Individuals from Guinea-Bissau and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borggren, Marie; Jensen, Sanne Skov; Heyndrickx, Leo; Palm, Angelica A; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Jespersen, Sanne; da Silva, Zacarias José; Karlsson, Ingrid; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2016-05-01

    The development of therapeutic and prophylactic HIV vaccines for African countries is urgently needed, but the question of what immunogens to use needs to be answered. One approach is to include HIV envelope immunogens derived from HIV-positive individuals from a geographically concentrated epidemic with more limited viral genetic diversity for a region-based vaccine. To address if there is a basis for a regional selected antibody vaccine, we have screened two regionally separate cohorts from Guinea-Bissau and Denmark for neutralizing antibody activity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against local and nonlocal circulating HIV-1 strains. The neutralizing activity did not demonstrate higher potential against local circulating strains according to geography and subtype determination, but the plasma from Danish individuals demonstrated significantly higher inhibitory activity than that from Guinea-Bissau individuals against both local and nonlocal virus strains. Interestingly, an opposite pattern was observed with ADCC activity, where Guinea-Bissau individual plasma demonstrated higher activity than Danish plasma and was specifically against the local circulating subtype. Thus, on basis of samples from these two cohorts, no local-specific neutralizing activity was detected, but a local ADCC response was identified in the Guinea-Bissau samples, suggesting potential use of regional immunogens for an ADCC-inducing vaccine. PMID:26621287

  2. Neutralizing antibody response in the patients with hand, foot and mouth disease to enterovirus 71 and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Liye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a significant pathogen causing large outbreaks in China for the past 3 years. Developing an EV71 vaccine is urgently needed to stop the spread of the disease; however, the adaptive immune response of humans to EV71 infection remains unclear. We examined the neutralizing antibody titers in HFMD patients and compared them to those of asymptomatic healthy children and young adults. We found that 80% of HFMD patients became positive for neutralizing antibodies against EV71 (GMT = 24.3 one day after the onset of illness. The antibody titers in the patients peaked two days (GMT = 79.5 after the illness appeared and were comparable to the level of adults (GMT = 45.2. Noticeably, the antibody response was not correlated with disease severity, suggesting that cellular immune response, besides neutralizing antibodies, could play critical role in controlling the outcome of EV71 infection in humans.

  3. Physical activity and natural anti-VIP antibodies: potential role in breast and prostate cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Veljkovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is convincing evidence from numerous clinical and epidemiological studies that physical activity can reduce the risk for breast and prostate cancer. The biological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain elusive. Herein we suggest a role for naturally produced antibodies reactive with the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP in the suppression of breast and prostate cancer, which we believe could offer a possible molecular mechanism underlying control of these cancers by physical exercise. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We found that sera from individuals having breast and prostate cancers have decreased titers of VIP natural antibodies as demonstrated by a lower reactivity against peptide NTM1, having similar informational and structural properties as VIP. In contrast, sera collected from elite athletes, exhibited titers of natural NTM1-reactive antibodies that are significantly increased, suggesting that physical activity boosts production of these antibodies. SIGNIFICANCE: Presented results suggest that physical exercise stimulates production of natural anti-VIP antibodies and likely results in suppression of VIP. This, in turn, may play a protective role against breast and prostate cancers. Physical exercise should be further investigated as a potential tool in the treatment of these diseases.

  4. IMPORTANCE OF RESEARCH HLA ANTIBODIES CLASS I AND II, AND MICA ANTIBODIES IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of HLA and MICA antibodies in patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation and their influence on the course of post-transplant period. Determination of HLA antibodies class I and II, and MICA antibodies was performed on a platform of Luminex (xMAP-tech- nology using sets LABScreen ONE LAMBDA (U.S.. A total of 156 patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Revealed the presence of HLA and MICA antibodies in the serum of 31.4% of patients. Regraf- ted patients increased the content of antibodies to the antigens of HLA system was noted in 88.2% of cases, 47% met the combination of antibodies to the I, II classes and MICA. In patients awaiting first kidney transplantation, HLA and MICA antibodies were determined in 23.7% of cases. The presence of pretransplant HLA and MICA antibodies had a significant influence on the course of post-transplant period. Patients with the presence of HLA and MICA in 50% of cases delayed graft function. Sessions of plasmapheresis can reduce the concentration of HLA and MICA antibodies on average by 61.1%. 

  5. Improved detection suggests all Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodig, Scott J; Cheng, Jingwei; Wardzala, Jacek; DoRosario, Andrew; Scanlon, Jessica J; Laga, Alvaro C; Martinez-Fernandez, Alejandro; Barletta, Justine A; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Sadasivam, Subhashini; Holloway, Dustin T; Cooper, Dylan J; Kupper, Thomas S; Wang, Linda C; DeCaprio, James A

    2012-12-01

    A human polyomavirus was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) specimens. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) genome undergoes clonal integration into the host cell chromosomes of MCC tumors and expresses small T antigen and truncated large T antigen. Previous studies have consistently reported that MCPyV can be detected in approximately 80% of all MCC tumors. We sought to increase the sensitivity of detection of MCPyV in MCC by developing antibodies capable of detecting large T antigen by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we expanded the repertoire of quantitative PCR primers specific for MCPyV to improve the detection of viral DNA in MCC. Here we report that a novel monoclonal antibody detected MCPyV large T antigen expression in 56 of 58 (97%) unique MCC tumors. PCR analysis specifically detected viral DNA in all 60 unique MCC tumors tested. We also detected inactivating point substitution mutations of TP53 in the two MCC specimens that lacked large T antigen expression and in only 1 of 56 tumors positive for large T antigen. These results indicate that MCPyV is present in MCC tumors more frequently than previously reported and that mutations in TP53 tend to occur in MCC tumors that fail to express MCPyV large T antigen. PMID:23114601

  6. Improved detection suggests all Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel polyomavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodig, Scott J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Wardzala, Jacek; DoRosario, Andrew; Scanlon, Jessica J.; Laga, Alvaro C.; Martinez-Fernandez, Alejandro; Barletta, Justine A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Sadasivam, Subhashini; Holloway, Dustin T.; Cooper, Dylan J.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Wang, Linda C.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2012-01-01

    A human polyomavirus was recently discovered in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) specimens. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) genome undergoes clonal integration into the host cell chromosomes of MCC tumors and expresses small T antigen and truncated large T antigen. Previous studies have consistently reported that MCPyV can be detected in approximately 80% of all MCC tumors. We sought to increase the sensitivity of detection of MCPyV in MCC by developing antibodies capable of detecting large T antigen by immunohistochemistry. In addition, we expanded the repertoire of quantitative PCR primers specific for MCPyV to improve the detection of viral DNA in MCC. Here we report that a novel monoclonal antibody detected MCPyV large T antigen expression in 56 of 58 (97%) unique MCC tumors. PCR analysis specifically detected viral DNA in all 60 unique MCC tumors tested. We also detected inactivating point substitution mutations of TP53 in the two MCC specimens that lacked large T antigen expression and in only 1 of 56 tumors positive for large T antigen. These results indicate that MCPyV is present in MCC tumors more frequently than previously reported and that mutations in TP53 tend to occur in MCC tumors that fail to express MCPyV large T antigen. PMID:23114601

  7. Antibody-Conjugated Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Arruebo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have found their way into the fields of Biotechnology and Medicine. Nanoparticles by themselves offer specific physicochemical properties that they do not exhibit in bulk form, where materials show constant physical properties regardless of size. Antibodies are nanosize biological products that are part of the specific immune system. In addition to their own properties as pathogens or toxin neutralizers, as well as in the recruitment of immune elements (complement, improving phagocytosis, cytotoxicity antibody dependent by natural killer cells, etc., they could carry several elements (toxins, drugs, fluorochroms, or even nanoparticles, etc. and be used in several diagnostic procedures, or even in therapy to destroy a specific target. The conjugation of antibodies to nanoparticles can generate a product that combines the properties of both. For example, they can combine the small size of nanoparticles and their special thermal, imaging, drug carrier, or magnetic characteristics with the abilities of antibodies, such as specific and selective recognition. The hybrid product will show versatility and specificity. In this review, we analyse both antibodies and nanoparticles, focusing especially on the recent developments for antibody-conjugated nanoparticles, offering the researcher an overview of the different applications and possibilities of these hybrid carriers.

  8. Standardization of anti-DNA antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, David S

    2013-07-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and represent important biomarkers for clinical and research purposes. These antibodies are part of a family of antibodies to nucleosomes and bind to conserved sites widely present on DNA. While the value of anti-DNA as a biomarker is well established, the assay for these antibodies has involved a variety of DNA sources and systems to detect DNA-anti-DNA interactions. The influence of these variations on antibody detection has complicated assay standardization. As an antigen, DNA has unique features since it is a highly charged polymer that has structural heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can affect antigenicity which can vary on the basis of DNA origin, size, conformation and mobility. In addition, as a polymer, DNA can promote patterns of antibody binding based on monogamous or bivalent interaction which require an extended polynucleotide structure. Understanding the nature of DNA as an antigen can facilitate interpretation of serological tests and underpin efforts at better standardization.

  9. Quality control of antibodies for assay development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Sarah; Seitz, Harald

    2016-09-25

    Antibodies are used as powerful tools in basic research, for example, in biomarker identification, and in various forms for diagnostics, for example, identification of allergies or autoimmune diseases. Due to their robustness and ease of handling, immunoassays are favourite methods for investigation of various biological or medical questions. Nevertheless in many cases, additional analyses such as mass spectrometry are used to validate or confirm the results of immunoassays. To minimize the workload and to increase confidence in immunoassays, there are urgent needs for antibodies which are both highly specific and well validated. Unfortunately many commercially available antibodies are neither well characterized nor fully tested for cross-reactivities. Adequate quality control and validation of an antibody is time-consuming and can be frustrating. Such validation needs to be performed for every assay/application. However, where an antibody validation is successful, a highly specific and stable reagent will be on hand. This article describes the validation processes of antibodies, including some often neglected factors, as well as unspecific binding to other sample compounds in a multiparameter diagnostic assay. The validation consists of different immunological methods, with important assay controls, and is performed in relation to the development of a diagnostic test. PMID:26873787

  10. Increased levels of IgG antibodies against human HSP60 in patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Hjelholt

    Full Text Available Spondyloarthritis (SpA comprises a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases, with strong association to human leukocyte antigen (HLA-B27. A triggering bacterial infection has been considered as the cause of SpA, and bacterial heat shock protein (HSP seems to be a strong T cell antigen. Since bacterial and human HSP60, also named HSPD1, are highly homologous, cross-reactivity has been suggested in disease initiation. In this study, levels of antibodies against bacterial and human HSP60 were analysed in SpA patients and healthy controls, and the association between such antibodies and disease severity in relation to HLA-B27 was evaluated.Serum samples from 82 patients and 50 controls were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for immunoglobulin (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 antibodies against human HSP60 and HSP60 from Chlamydia trachomatis, Salmonella enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni. Disease severity was assessed by the clinical scorings Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI. Levels of IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies against human HSP60, but not antibodies against bacterial HSP60, were elevated in the SpA group compared with the control group. Association between IgG3 antibodies against human HSP60 and BASMI was shown in HLA-B27⁺ patients. Only weak correlation between antibodies against bacterial and human HSP60 was seen, and there was no indication of cross-reaction. These results suggest that antibodies against human HSP60 is associated with SpA, however, the theory that antibodies against human HSP60 is a specific part of the aetiology, through cross-reaction to bacterial HSP60, cannot be supported by results from this study. We suggest that the association between elevated levels of antibodies against human HSP60 and disease may reflect a general activation of the immune system and an increased

  11. Phage displayed peptides and anti-idiotype antibodies recognised by a monoclonal antibody directed against a diagnostic antigen of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengurić, D R; Dungu, B; Thiaucourt, F; du Plessis, D H

    2001-07-26

    A monoclonal antibody (Mab 4.52) raised against Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp) cell lysate was used as a template to obtain substitute antigens recognised by its paratope. Two approaches were investigated: a 17-mer random peptide library displayed on the surface of a filamentous phage was screened by panning on the immobilised Mab 4.52 and anti-idiotype antibodies were generated by immunising a chicken with the F(ab')(2) fragments of the antibody. Analysis of the peptide sequences displayed by the isolated phages identified two peptides. Both contained two cysteine residues and had identical or similar amino acids in positions 5 (P), 8 (I/L) and 13 (L). The fusion phages were also recognised by Mab 4.52 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and binding was shown by surface plasmon resonance. One of the peptides was a markedly better inhibitor (67%) of the binding of Mab 4.52 to its original antigen than the other (20%) at 1mg/ml. After absorption, to remove isotypic and allotypic reactivities, the anti-idiotype IgY was specifically recognised by Mab 4.52 in ELISA and was able to inhibit its binding to the original antigen, whereas anti-idiotype antibodies raised against a bluetongue virus-specific antibody had no effect. In spite of unequivocal binding of the anti-idiotype antibodies and the fusion phages to the paratope of Mab 4.52, goat antisera appeared not to react with either of the surrogate antigens. In contrast, the test sera bound to the original antigen suggesting that Mab 4.52 does not recognise exactly the same antigenic site as antibodies in the goat antisera. PMID:11376960

  12. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  13. Human C-C chemokine receptor 3 monoclonal antibody inhibits pulmonary inflammation in allergic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai WANG; Hua-hao SHEN; Wen LI; Hua-qiong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the effect of C-C chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) blockade on pulmonary inflammation and mucus production in allergic mice. Methods:We used the synthetic peptide of the CCR3 NH2-terminal as the immunizing antigen and generated murine monoclonal antibody against the human CCR3. In addition,the generated antibody was administered to mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. The inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage,cytokine levels,pulmonary histopathology,and mucus secretion were examined. Results:The Western blotting analysis indicated that the generated antibody bound to CCR3 specifically. The allergic mice treated with the antihuman CCR3 antibody exhibited a significant reduction of pulmonary inflammation accompanied with the alteration of cytokine. Conclusion:The antibody we generated was specific to CCR3. The inhibition of airway inflammation and mucus overproduction by the antibody suggested that the blockade of CCR3 is an appealing therapeutical target for asthma. The present research may provide an experimental basis for the further study of this agent.

  14. Neobenedenia melleni-Specific Antibodies Are Associated with Protection after Continuous Exposure in Mozambique Tilapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Kishimori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neobenedenia melleni is a significant monogenean pathogen of fish in aquaculture facilities and public aquaria. Immunity after exposure to live N. melleni is well established, but the mechanisms of immunity remain unclear. In this study, tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus were continuously exposed to N. melleni over a four-month period and assessed for immunity as determined by a reduction in the number of parasites dislodged from the experimental animals during freshwater immersion. Specific mucosal and systemic antibody levels were by determined via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. At 45 days postexposure (DPE, fish displayed high parasite loads and baseline levels of mucosal antibodies. At 102 and 120 DPE parasite loads were significantly decreased, and antibody levels were significantly increased for mucus and plasma samples. The correlation between immunity (reduction in parasite load and an increased humoral antibody response suggests a key role of antibody in the immune response. This is the first report of immunity against N. melleni that is associated with specific mucosal or systemic antibodies.

  15. Seroprevalence of Leptospiral Antibodies among Healthy Municipal Service Workers in Selangor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhailah Samsudin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Municipal service workers have been found to have an occupational risk of leptospirosis. Study among municipality workers shows high seropositivity of leptospiral antibodies detected among town cleaners and garbage collectors. Objective. Aims of this study were to determine seroprevalence of leptospiral antibodies and distribution of serovars detected in samples among municipal service workers. Methodology. Cross-sectional study involved 89 municipal service workers in Selangor. Blood samples were taken and serological test was done using MAT following standard procedures. Results. Seropositivity of leptospiral antibodies among municipal service workers was 34.8%. Serovars identified were strains of Sarawak, Copenhageni, Hardjobovis, Lai, Bataviae, Patoc, Celledoni, Hardjoprajitno, Tarrasovi, and Pomona. There were 31 workers with positive leptospiral antibodies. All of them were frequently exposed towards leptospirosis. Significant associations have been reported between seropositivity of leptospiral antibodies with job category (P=0.021 and worker’s nationality (P=0.014 among municipal service workers. Conclusion. High seropositivity of leptospiral antibodies detected among municipal service workers which was associated with job category and nationality of workers. The significant findings from this study suggest that health education programs and safe work practice should be considered to prevent leptospirosis among municipal service workers in future.

  16. Biodistribution Analyses of a Near-Infrared, Fluorescently Labeled, Bispecific Monoclonal Antibody Using Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Norman C; Wilson, George G; Huang, Qihui; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Sachsenmeier, Kris F

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, biodistribution analyses of pharmaceutical compounds in preclinical animal models have become an integral part of drug development. Here we report on the use of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in a mouse xenograft model to identify tissues that nonspecifically retained a bispecific antibody under development. Although our bispecific antibody bound both the epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin growth factor 1 receptor are expressed on H358, nonsmall-cell lung carcinoma cells, the fluorescence from labeled bispecific antibody was less intense than expected in xenografted tumors. Imaging analyses of live mice and major organs revealed that the majority of the Alexa Fluor 750 labeled bispecific antibody was sequestered in the liver within 2 h of injection. However, results varied depending on which near-infrared fluorophore was used, and fluorescence from the livers of mice injected with bispecific antibody labeled with Alexa Fluor 680 was less pronounced than those labeled with Alexa Fluor 750. The tissue distribution of control antibodies remained unaffected by label and suggests that the retention of fluorophores in the liver may differ. Given these precautions, these results support the incorporation of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in biotherapeutic development strategies.

  17. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarmistha Devi Aribam

    Full Text Available Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  18. Antibodies against Ku protein in sera from patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaneva, M; Arnett, F C

    1989-01-01

    Immunoaffinity-purified Ku protein was used to screen sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, myositis and Sjögren's syndrome for anti-Ku antibodies in a quantitative immunoblot assay. Sixteen percent of the 159 studied sera were reactive with the Ku protein; significantly increased frequencies of anti-Ku antibodies were found in SLE (19%) and scleroderma (14%) sera. Patients with myositis and Sjögren's syndrome showed similar frequencies. All positive sera had antibodies to the 86 kD subunit of Ku protein; only one serum did not react with 70 kD subunit. Frequencies of other autoantibodies were compared in anti-Ku positive and negative patients. Only anti-Sm antibodies, especially in the absence of anti-nRNP, appear to be associated with the presence of anti-Ku antibodies. A strong correlation between anti-Ku antibodies and the class II HLA antigen DQw1 (89% of the positive sera) was observed, suggesting participation of MHC genes in the mounting of the anti-Ku immune response. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2665976

  19. Antinuclear antibodies in rheumatic disease: a proposal for a function-based classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, D S

    2012-09-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are a diverse group of autoantibodies that bind macromolecular components of the cell nucleus. While some ANAs occur in normal individuals, others are expressed almost exclusively in patients with rheumatic disease and serve as markers for diagnosis and prognosis. Despite the clinical associations of ANAs, the relationship of these antibodies to specific disease manifestations is often unknown because the target antigens are intracellular molecules that are ubiquitously expressed. In systemic lupus erythematosus, the role of ANAs in disease manifestations is better understood, especially for antibodies to DNA and related nucleosomal antigens. These antibodies can promote nephritis by the formation of immune complexes that are deposited in the kidney. In addition, anti-DNA, along with antibodies to RNA-binding proteins such as anti-Sm, can induce non-specific immune abnormalities based on the induction of type interferon 1 by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Despite ANA expression in rheumatic disease, studies in animal models of inflammation and tissue injury indicate that antibodies to certain nuclear molecules such as HMGB1 have protective effects. Together, these considerations suggest a function-based classification of ANAs based on their expression in normal and autoimmune individuals as well as their capacity to induce or attenuate immunological disturbances. This classification provides a framework to elucidate the serological features of rheumatic disease and the often uncertain relationship between ANA expression and disease manifestations.

  20. Lineage tracing of human B cells reveals the in vivo landscape of human antibody class switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horns, Felix; Vollmers, Christopher; Croote, Derek; Mackey, Sally F; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Antibody class switching is a feature of the adaptive immune system which enables diversification of the effector properties of antibodies. Even though class switching is essential for mounting a protective response to pathogens, the in vivo patterns and lineage characteristics of antibody class switching have remained uncharacterized in living humans. Here we comprehensively measured the landscape of antibody class switching in human adult twins using antibody repertoire sequencing. The map identifies how antibodies of every class are created and delineates a two-tiered hierarchy of class switch pathways. Using somatic hypermutations as a molecular clock, we discovered that closely related B cells often switch to the same class, but lose coherence as somatic mutations accumulate. Such correlations between closely related cells exist when purified B cells class switch in vitro, suggesting that class switch recombination is directed toward specific isotypes by a cell-autonomous imprinted state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16578.001 PMID:27481325

  1. Biodistribution Analyses of a Near-Infrared, Fluorescently Labeled, Bispecific Monoclonal Antibody Using Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Norman C; Wilson, George G; Huang, Qihui; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Sachsenmeier, Kris F

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, biodistribution analyses of pharmaceutical compounds in preclinical animal models have become an integral part of drug development. Here we report on the use of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in a mouse xenograft model to identify tissues that nonspecifically retained a bispecific antibody under development. Although our bispecific antibody bound both the epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin growth factor 1 receptor are expressed on H358, nonsmall-cell lung carcinoma cells, the fluorescence from labeled bispecific antibody was less intense than expected in xenografted tumors. Imaging analyses of live mice and major organs revealed that the majority of the Alexa Fluor 750 labeled bispecific antibody was sequestered in the liver within 2 h of injection. However, results varied depending on which near-infrared fluorophore was used, and fluorescence from the livers of mice injected with bispecific antibody labeled with Alexa Fluor 680 was less pronounced than those labeled with Alexa Fluor 750. The tissue distribution of control antibodies remained unaffected by label and suggests that the retention of fluorophores in the liver may differ. Given these precautions, these results support the incorporation of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in biotherapeutic development strategies. PMID:27053562

  2. A survey of antibodies to pestivirus in sheep in the Republic of Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Neill Ronan G

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Sera from 1,448 adult ewes in 91 flocks, representing all 26 counties in the Republic of Ireland, were examined for pestivirus antibodies using a commercially available ELISA which detected IgG1 antibody to border disease virus. Eighty-one sheep (5.6% in 42 flocks (46.0% were antibody-positive. Within infected flocks, the mean seroprevalence level was 11.4% with a range of 6.3% to 30.0%. The highest antibody prevalence was detected in sheep from central lowland counties of Ireland. Comparative neutralisation testing of 42 ELISA-positive sera detected geometric mean antibody titres of 136 to the NADL strain of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV, 92 to the Moredun strain of border disease virus and 21 to the 137/4 strain of border disease virus. These results suggest that BVDV may be the major ruminant pestivirus infecting sheep in Ireland. Although there are high numbers of infected flocks, many sheep within such flocks remain antibody-negative and are at risk of giving birth to lambs with congenital border disease.

  3. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST INFLUENZA VIRUS IN NON-VACCINATED EQUINES FROM THE BRAZILIAN PANTANAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Gaíva E Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of antibodies against Equine Influenza Virus (EIV was determined in 529 equines living on ranches in the municipality of Poconé, Pantanal area of Brazil, by means of the hemagglutination inhibition test, using subtype H3N8 as antigen. The distribution and possible association among positive animal and ranches were evaluated by the chi-square test, spatial autoregressive and multiple linear regression models. The prevalence of antibodies against EIV was estimated at 45.2% (95% CI 30.2 - 61.1% with titers ranging from 20 to 1,280 HAU. Seropositive equines were found on 92.0% of the surveyed ranches. Equine from non-flooded ranches (66.5% and negativity in equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV (61.7% were associated with antibodies against EIV. No spatial correlation was found among the ranches, but the ones located in non-flooded areas were associated with antibodies against EIV. A negative correlation was found between the prevalence of antibodies against EIV and the presence of EIAV positive animals on the ranches. The high prevalence of antibodies against EIV detected in this study suggests that the virus is circulating among the animals, and this statistical analysis indicates that the movement and aggregation of animals are factors associated to the transmission of the virus in the region.

  4. On the Effects of Suggested Prices in Gasoline Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Faber (Riemer); M.C.W. Janssen (Maarten)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis article analyzes the role of suggested prices in the Dutch retail market for gasoline. Suggested prices are announced by large oil companies with the suggestion that retailers follow them. There are at least two competing rationales for the existence of suggested prices: they may ei

  5. The Western Tradition of Suggestion and Lozanov's Suggestology/Suggestopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, W. Jane

    It is argued that while Georgi Lozanov's suggestology and suggestopedic methods are informed by work in the field of suggestion in the former Soviet bloc, his work has also been influenced by work on suggestion in the west, particularly in France, where suggestion is a more controversial technique. For Lozanov, suggestion is a normal phenomenon…

  6. A single-domain antibody-linked Fab bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab has potent cytotoxicity against Her2-expressing tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aifen; Xing, Jieyu; Li, Li; Zhou, Changhua; Dong, Bin; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Her2, which is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, has achieved significant clinical benefits in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we describe a novel bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab targeting Her2 by linking a single domain anti-CD16 VHH to the trastuzumab Fab. The Her2-S-Fab antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and drive potent cancer cell killing in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. In xenograft model, the Her2-S-Fab suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our results suggest that the bispecific Her2-S-Fab may provide a valid alternative to Her2 positive cancer therapy. PMID:27112931

  7. A single-domain antibody-linked Fab bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab has potent cytotoxicity against Her2-expressing tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aifen; Xing, Jieyu; Li, Li; Zhou, Changhua; Dong, Bin; He, Ping; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Her2, which is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer therapy. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, has achieved significant clinical benefits in metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we describe a novel bispecific antibody Her2-S-Fab targeting Her2 by linking a single domain anti-CD16 VHH to the trastuzumab Fab. The Her2-S-Fab antibody can be efficiently expressed and purified from Escherichia coli, and drive potent cancer cell killing in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells. In xenograft model, the Her2-S-Fab suppresses tumor growth in the presence of human immune cells. Our results suggest that the bispecific Her2-S-Fab may provide a valid alternative to Her2 positive cancer therapy.

  8. Preexisting Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Activating Antibody Responses Are Stable Longitudinally and Cross-reactive Responses Are Not Boosted by Recent Influenza Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkenburg, Sophie A; Zhang, Yanyu; Chan, Ka Y; Leung, Kathy; Wu, Joseph T; Poon, Leo L M

    2016-10-15

    Cross-reactive influenza virus-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC)-activating antibodies are readily detected in healthy adults. However, little is known about the kinetics of these ADCC responses. We used retrospective serial blood samples from healthy donors to investigate this topic. All donors had ADCC responses against 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus (A[H1N1]pdm09) and avian influenza A(H7N9) virus hemagglutinins (HAs) despite being seronegative for these viruses in standard hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization serological assays. A(H1N1)pdm09 exposure did not boost ADCC responses specific for H7 HA antigens. H7 HA ADCC responses were variable longitudinally within donors, suggesting that these cross-reactive antibodies are unstable. We found no correlation between ADCC responses to the H7 HA and either influenza virus-specific immunoglobulin G1 concentration or age. PMID:27493238

  9. Serum major-histocompatibility-complex class Ⅰ-related chain A antibody detection for the evaluation of graft dysfunction in renal allograft recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming; LU Fu-ming; QU Lian-xi; HE Jun; YUAN Xiao-niao; GU Yong

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to the well-known antibodies against human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-induced kidney-graft rejection, polymorphic major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) class Ⅰ-related chain A (MICA) antigens can elicit antibodies and have been suggested to play a role in the antibody-mediated allograft rejection (AMR). We carded out a prospective study of MICA antibodies in post-renal transplant patients to determine the association between MICA antibodies, C4d staining, histological features, and graft outcome.Methods We tested 52 patients who had biopsy results due to graft dysfunction. The MICA antibodies in concurrent sera were determined by Luminex. All patients were followed up for one year after renal biopsy. The influence of antibody production on the function of graft was analyzed.Results Antibodies against MICA were positive in 15 out of the 52 patients (28.9%). The presence of MICA antibodies was associated with renal-allograft deterioration. During one-year follow-up, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decreased (24.0±3.4)% among recipients with anti-MICA antibodies. However, among recipients without anti-MICA antibodies, the eGFR has declined only (8.4+3.0)% (P=0.017). The association between C4d staining,histological features and MICA antibody production was found no significant difference.Conclusion Besides anti-HLA antibodies, the presence of post-transplant MICA antibody is associated with poor graft outcome and increases the risk of graft failure.

  10. The impact of pretransplant donor-specific antibodies on graft outcome in renal transplantation: a six-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias David-Neto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The significance of pretransplant, donor-specific antibodies on long-term patient outcomes is a subject of debate. This study evaluated the impact and the presence or absence of donor-specific antibodies after kidney transplantation on short- and long-term graft outcomes. METHODS: We analyzed the frequency and dynamics of pretransplant donor-specific antibodies following renal transplantation from a randomized trial that was conducted from 2002 to 2004 and correlated these findings with patient outcomes through 2009. Transplants were performed against a complement-dependent T- and B-negative crossmatch. Pre- and posttransplant sera were available from 94 of the 118 patients (80%. Antibodies were detected using a solid-phase (LuminexH, single-bead assay, and all tests were performed simultaneously. RESULTS: Sixteen patients exhibited pretransplant donor-specific antibodies, but only 3 of these patients (19% developed antibody-mediated rejection and 2 of them experienced early graft losses. Excluding these 2 losses, 6 of 14 patients exhibited donor-specific antibodies at the final follow-up exam, whereas 8 of these patients (57% exhibited complete clearance of the donor-specific antibodies. Five other patients developed ''de novo'' posttransplant donor-specific antibodies. Death-censored graft survival was similar in patients with pretransplant donor-specific and non-donor-specific antibodies after a mean follow-up period of 70 months. CONCLUSION: Pretransplant donor-specific antibodies with a negative complement-dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch are associated with a risk for the development of antibody-mediated rejection, although survival rates are similar when patients transpose the first months after receiving the graft. Our data also suggest that early posttransplant donor-specific antibody monitoring should increase knowledge of antibody dynamics and their impact on long-term graft outcome.

  11. Cuban Monoclonal Antibodies for Radioimmunodiagnosis and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancer Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Centre of Molecular Immunology produces monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer diseases. We are mainly focus on two target systems; one is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) because there is a tremendous relationship between the EGF/EGF-R system and several human tumours such as lung, head and neck, ovarian breast and brain cancers; the second one is the ganglioside system, the relevance of certain gangliosides in tumour growth and metastatic dissemination has been well documented, GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside is particularly interesting due to its restrictive expression in normal human tissues. Nimotuzumab (h-R3) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) that was obtained by complementarity-determining regions grafting of a murine mAb (ior egf/r3) to a human framework having remarkable antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic, and antiangiogenic effects. A Phase I clinical trial was performed to evaluate the toxicity and clinical effect of an intracavitary (intracerebral) administration of a single dose of nimotuzumab (h-R3) labelled with increasing doses of 188Re. All patients bearing astrocytomas grade III/IV should be treated previously with conventional therapies and have an EGF-R overexpression in the tumour, demonstrated by immunohistochemical study. Maximal tolerated dose was 3 mg of the h-R3 labelled with 10 mCi of 188Re. The radioimmunoconjugate showed a high retention in the surgical created resection cavity and the brain adjacent tissues with a mean value of 85.5% of the injected dose one hour post-administration. This radioimmunoconjugate may be relatively safe and a promising therapeutic approach for treating high grade gliomas. GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside is particularly interesting due to its restrictive expression in normal human tissues according to immunohistochemical studies, using either polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies. But both immunohistochemical and biochemical methods have strongly suggested its over-expression in human breast and colon

  12. Polyclonal antibody cocktails generated using DNA vaccine technology protect in murine models of orthopoxvirus disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballantyne John

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we demonstrated that DNA vaccination of nonhuman primates (NHP with a small subset of vaccinia virus (VACV immunogens (L1, A27, A33, B5 protects against lethal monkeypox virus challenge. The L1 and A27 components of this vaccine target the mature virion (MV whereas A33 and B5 target the enveloped virion (EV. Results Here, we demonstrated that the antibodies produced in vaccinated NHPs were sufficient to confer protection in a murine model of lethal Orthopoxvirus infection. We further explored the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce immunogen-specific polyclonal antibodies that could then be combined into cocktails as potential immunoprophylactic/therapeutics. Specifically, we used DNA vaccines delivered by muscle electroporation to produce polyclonal antibodies against the L1, A27, A33, and B5 in New Zealand white rabbits. The polyclonal antibodies neutralized both MV and EV in cell culture. The ability of antibody cocktails consisting of anti-MV, anti-EV, or a combination of anti-MV/EV to protect BALB/c mice was evaluated as was the efficacy of the anti-MV/EV mixture in a mouse model of progressive vaccinia. In addition to evaluating weight loss and lethality, bioimaging technology was used to characterize the spread of the VACV infections in mice. We found that the anti-EV cocktail, but not the anti-MV cocktail, limited virus spread and lethality. Conclusions A combination of anti-MV/EV antibodies was significantly more protective than anti-EV antibodies alone. These data suggest that DNA vaccine technology could be used to produce a polyclonal antibody cocktail as a possible product to replace vaccinia immune globulin.

  13. Isolation and chimerization of a highly neutralizing antibody conferring passive protection against lethal Bacillus anthracis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronit Rosenfeld

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated that the passive transfer of protective antigen (PA-neutralizing antibodies can protect animals against Bacillus anthracis infection. The standard protocol for the isolation of PA-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies is based upon a primary selection of the highest PA-binders by ELISA, and usually yields only few candidates antibodies. We demonstrated that by applying a PA-neutralization functionality-based screen as the primary criterion for positive clones, it was possible to isolate more than 100 PA-neutralizing antibodies, some of which exhibited no measurable anti-PA titers in ELISA. Among the large panel of neutralizing antibodies identified, mAb 29 demonstrated the most potent activity, and was therefore chimerized. The variable region genes of the mAb 29 were fused to human constant region genes, to form the chimeric 29 antibody (cAb 29. Guinea pigs were fully protected against infection by 40LD(50B. anthracis spores following two separate administrations with 10 mg/kg of cAb 29: the first administration was given before the challenge, and a second dose was administered on day 4 following exposure. Moreover, animals that survived the challenge and developed endogenous PA-neutralizing antibodies with neutralizing titers above 100 were fully protected against repeat challenges with 40LD(50 of B. anthracis spores. The data presented here emphasize the importance of toxin neutralization-based screens for the efficient isolation of protective antibodies that were probably overlooked in the standard screening protocol. The protective activity of the chimeric cAb 29 demonstrated in this study suggest that it may serve as an effective immunotherapeutic agent against anthrax.

  14. Enhancement of monoclonal antibody uptake in human colon tumor xenografts following irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalofonos, H.; Rowlinson, G.; Epenetos, A.A. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (England))

    1990-01-01

    Indium-111-labeled AUA1 tumor-associated monoclonal antibody raised against an antigen of colon adenocarcinoma was used to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on antibody uptake by the LoVo adenocarcinoma cell line grown as a xenograft in nude mice. Tumors were exposed to single doses of external X-irradiation of between 400 and 1600 cGy followed, 24 h later, by administration of specific or nonspecific antibody. Animals were sacrificed 3 days after antibody administration. At doses higher than 400 cGy, tumor uptake with both specific and nonspecific antibody was significantly increased. No difference in changes in tumor volume was observed between the groups receiving irradiation and the controls. Specific antibody uptake by tumors was always significantly higher than nonspecific having an approximate 4-fold binding advantage. Vascular permeability and the vascular volume of irradiated and control tumors was measured 24 and 72 h after irradiation, using iodine-125-labeled nonspecific antibody and labelling of the red blood cells in vivo with 99mTcO4. At doses higher than 400 cGy, vascular permeability in the tumor 24 h after irradiation was significantly increased (P less than 0.05), while the vascular volume decreased (P less than 0.001) compared to control values. However at 72 h after irradiation there was no difference between treated and control groups. The results obtained in this study suggest a potential value of external irradiation to increase monoclonal antibody uptake by tumors governed mainly by the increased vascular permeability of the tumor vasculature soon after the irradiation exposure.

  15. Modeling bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two cell membrane targets indicates the importance of surface diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengers, Bram G; McGinty, Sean; Nouri, Fatma Z; Argungu, Maryam; Hawkins, Emma; Hadji, Aymen; Weber, Andrew; Taylor, Adam; Sepp, Armin

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a mathematical framework for describing a bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two independent membrane-bound targets that are expressed on the same cell surface. The bispecific antibody in solution binds either of the two targets first, and then cross-links with the second one while on the cell surface, subject to rate-limiting lateral diffusion step within the lifetime of the monovalently engaged antibody-antigen complex. At experimental densities, only a small fraction of the free targets is expected to lie within the reach of the antibody binding sites at any time. Using ordinary differential equation and Monte Carlo simulation-based models, we validated this approach against an independently published anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab experimental data set. As a result of dimensional reduction, the cell surface reaction is expected to be so rapid that, in agreement with the experimental data, no monovalently bound bispecific antibody binary complexes accumulate until cross-linking is complete. The dissociation of the bispecific antibody from the ternary cross-linked complex is expected to be significantly slower than that from either of the monovalently bound variants. We estimate that the effective affinity of the bivalently bound bispecific antibody is enhanced for about 4 orders of magnitude over that of the monovalently bound species. This avidity enhancement allows for the highly specific binding of anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab to the cells that are positive for both target antigens over those that express only one or the other We suggest that the lateral diffusion of target antigens in the cell membrane also plays a key role in the avidity effect of natural antibodies and other bivalent ligands in their interactions with their respective cell surface receptors. PMID:27097222

  16. Maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies are associated with reduced birth weight in thrombocytopenic neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, J; Husebekk, A; Acharya, G; Flo, K; Stuge, T B; Skogen, B; Straume, B; Tiller, H

    2016-02-01

    In this comparative cross-sectional study, possible associations between maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies and birth weight in neonatal thrombocytopenia are explored. Although commonly detected in pregnancies and generally regarded as harmless, it has been suggested that such antibodies might be associated with fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). As a link between FNAIT due to human platelet antigen 1a-specific antibodies and reduced birth weight in boys has previously been demonstrated, we wanted to explore whether maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies might also affect birth weight. To examine this, suspected cases of FNAIT referred to the Norwegian National Unit for Platelet Immunology during the period 1998-2009 were identified. Pregnancies where the only finding was maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies were included. An unselected group of pregnant women participating in a prospective study investigating maternal-fetal hemodynamics at the University Hospital North Norway during the years 2006-2010 served as controls. Twenty-nine percent of controls had anti-HLA class I antibodies. The thrombocytopenic neonates had a significantly lower adjusted birth weight (linear regression, P=0.036) and significantly higher odds of being small for gestational age (OR=6.72, P<0.001) compared with controls. Increasing anti-HLA class I antibody levels in the mother were significantly associated with lower birth weight and placental weight among thrombocytopenic neonates, but not among controls. These results indicate that maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies in thrombocytopenic neonates are associated with reduced fetal growth. Further studies are needed to test if placental function is affected.

  17. Enhancement of monoclonal antibody uptake in human colon tumor xenografts following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-111-labeled AUA1 tumor-associated monoclonal antibody raised against an antigen of colon adenocarcinoma was used to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on antibody uptake by the LoVo adenocarcinoma cell line grown as a xenograft in nude mice. Tumors were exposed to single doses of external X-irradiation of between 400 and 1600 cGy followed, 24 h later, by administration of specific or nonspecific antibody. Animals were sacrificed 3 days after antibody administration. At doses higher than 400 cGy, tumor uptake with both specific and nonspecific antibody was significantly increased. No difference in changes in tumor volume was observed between the groups receiving irradiation and the controls. Specific antibody uptake by tumors was always significantly higher than nonspecific having an approximate 4-fold binding advantage. Vascular permeability and the vascular volume of irradiated and control tumors was measured 24 and 72 h after irradiation, using iodine-125-labeled nonspecific antibody and labelling of the red blood cells in vivo with 99mTcO4. At doses higher than 400 cGy, vascular permeability in the tumor 24 h after irradiation was significantly increased (P less than 0.05), while the vascular volume decreased (P less than 0.001) compared to control values. However at 72 h after irradiation there was no difference between treated and control groups. The results obtained in this study suggest a potential value of external irradiation to increase monoclonal antibody uptake by tumors governed mainly by the increased vascular permeability of the tumor vasculature soon after the irradiation exposure

  18. Microdistribution of fluorescently-labeled monoclonal antibody in a peritoneal dissemination model of ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Mikako; Paik, David S.; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2010-02-01

    The microdistribution of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies within a tumor is important for determining clinical response. Nonuniform microdistribution predicts therapy failure. Herein, we developed a semiquantitative method for measuring microdistribution of an antibody within a tumor using in situ fluorescence microscopy and sought to modulate the microdistribution by altering the route and timing of antibody dosing. The microdistribution of a fluorescently-labeled antibody, trastuzumab (50-μg and 150-μg intraperitoneal injection (i.p.), and 100-μg intravenous injection (i.v.)) was evaluated in a peritoneal dissemination mouse model of ovarian cancer. In addition, we evaluated the microdistribution of concurrently-injected (30-μg i.p. and 100-μg i.v.) or serial (two doses of 30-μg i.p.) trastuzumab using in situ multicolor fluorescence microscopy. After the administration of 50-μg i.p. and 100-μg i.v. trastuzumab fluorescence imaging showed no significant difference in the central to peripheral signal ratio (C/P ratio) and demonstrated a peripheral-dominant accumulation, whereas administration of 150-μg i.p. trastuzumab showed relatively uniform, central dominant accumulation. With concurrent-i.p.-i.v. injections trastuzumab showed slightly higher C/P ratio than concurrently-injected i.p. trastuzumab. Moreover, in the serial injection study, the second injection of trastuzumab distributed more centrally than the first injection, while no difference was observed in the control group. Our results suggest that injection routes do not affect the microdistribution pattern of antibody in small peritoneal disseminations. However, increasing the dose results in a more uniform antibody distribution within peritoneal nodules. Furthermore, the serial i.p. injection of antibody can modify the microdistribution within tumor nodules. This work has implications for the optimal delivery of antibody based cancer therapies.

  19. Acquisition of growth-inhibitory antibodies against blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona J McCallum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies that inhibit the growth of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum may play an important role in acquired and vaccine-induced immunity in humans. However, the acquisition and activity of these antibodies is not well understood. METHODS: We tested dialysed serum and purified immunoglobulins from Kenyan children and adults for inhibition of P. falciparum blood-stage growth in vitro using different parasite lines. Serum antibodies were measured by ELISA to blood-stage parasite antigens, extracted from P. falciparum schizonts, and to recombinant merozoite surface protein 1 (42 kDa C-terminal fragment, MSP1-42. RESULTS: Antibodies to blood-stage antigens present in schizont protein extract and to recombinant MSP1-42 significantly increased with age and were highly correlated. In contrast, growth-inhibitory activity was not strongly associated with age and tended to decline marginally with increasing age and exposure, with young children demonstrating the highest inhibitory activity. Comparison of growth-inhibitory activity among samples collected from the same population at different time points suggested that malaria transmission intensity influenced the level of growth-inhibitory antibodies. Antibodies to recombinant MSP1-42 were not associated with growth inhibition and high immunoglobulin G levels were poorly predictive of inhibitory activity. The level of inhibitory activity against different isolates varied. CONCLUSIONS: Children can acquire growth-inhibitory antibodies at a young age, but once they are acquired they do not appear to be boosted by on-going exposure. Inhibitory antibodies may play a role in protection from early childhood malaria.

  20. On the Meaning of Affinity Limits in B-Cell Epitope Prediction for Antipeptide Antibody-Mediated Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Eugenio C. Caoili

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available B-cell epitope prediction aims to aid the design of peptide-based immunogens (e.g., vaccines for eliciting antipeptide antibodies that protect against disease, but such antibodies fail to confer protection and even promote disease if they bind with low affinity. Hence, the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB was searched to obtain published thermodynamic and kinetic data on binding interactions of antipeptide antibodies. The data suggest that the affinity of the antibodies for their immunizing peptides appears to be limited in a manner consistent with previously proposed kinetic constraints on affinity maturation in vivo and that cross-reaction of the antibodies with proteins tends to occur with lower affinity than the corresponding reaction of the antibodies with their immunizing peptides. These observations better inform B-cell epitope prediction to avoid overestimating the affinity for both active and passive immunization; whereas active immunization is subject to limitations of affinity maturation in vivo and of the capacity to accumulate endogenous antibodies, passive immunization may transcend such limitations, possibly with the aid of artificial affinity-selection processes and of protein engineering. Additionally, protein disorder warrants further investigation as a possible supplementary criterion for B-cell epitope prediction, where such disorder obviates thermodynamically unfavorable protein structural adjustments in cross-reactions between antipeptide antibodies and proteins.

  1. Screening for genes involved in antibody response to sheep red blood cells in the chicken, Gallus gallus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tuoyu; Guan, Xiaojing; Smith, Edward J

    2015-09-01

    Antibody response, an important trait in both agriculture and biomedicine, plays a part in protecting animals from infection. Dissecting molecular basis of antibody response may improve artificial selection for natural disease resistance in livestock and poultry. A number of genetic markers associated with antibody response have been identified in the chicken and mouse by linkage-based association studies, which only define genomic regions by genetic markers but do not pinpoint genes for antibody response. In contrast, global expression profiling has been applied to define the molecular bases of a variety of biological traits through identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Here, we employed Affimetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays to identify differentially expressed genes for antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) using chickens challenged with and without SRBC or chickens with high and low anti-SRBC titers. The DEGs include those with known (i.e., MHC class I and IgH genes) or unknown function in antibody response. Classification test of these genes suggested that the response of the chicken to intravenous injection of SRBC involved multiple biological processes, including response to stress or other different stimuli, sugar, carbohydrate or protein binding, and cell or soluble fraction, in addition to antibody response. This preliminary study thus provides an insight into molecular basis of antibody response to SRBC in the chicken.

  2. Monitoring the systemic human memory B cell compartment of melanoma patients for anti-tumor IgG antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Gilbert

    Full Text Available Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10 to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10 (P<0.0001. Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21 (P<0.0001. Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800 compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600 produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer.

  3. Characterization of a Large Panel of Rabbit Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV-1 gp120 and Isolation of Novel Neutralizing Antibodies against the V3 Loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Qin

    Full Text Available We recently reported the induction of potent, cross-clade neutralizing antibodies (nAbs against Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1 in rabbits using gp120 based on an M-group consensus sequence. To better characterize these antibodies, 93 hybridomas were generated, which represent the largest panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs ever generated from a vaccinated rabbit. The single most frequently recognized epitope of the isolated mAbs was at the very C-terminal end of the protein (APTKAKRRVVEREKR, followed by the V3 loop. A total of seven anti-V3 loop mAbs were isolated, two of which (10A3 and 10A37 exhibited neutralizing activity. In contrast to 10A3 and most other anti-V3 loop nAbs, 10A37 was atypical with its epitope positioned more towards the C-terminal half of the loop. To our knowledge, 10A37 is the most potent and broadly neutralizing anti-V3 loop mAb induced by vaccination. Interestingly, all seven anti-V3 loop mAbs competed with PGT121, suggesting a possibility that early induction of potent anti-V3 loop antibodies could prevent induction of more broadly neutralizing PGT121-like antibodies that target the conserved base of the V3 loop stem.

  4. Antinuclear antibody testing: discordance between commercial laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeles, Aryeh M; Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel; Abeles, Micha; Honiden, Shyoko

    2016-07-01

    Antinuclear antibody (ANA) test results frequently affect the course of patients' evaluations, diagnosis, and treatment, but different laboratory centers may yield conflicting results. This study investigated the degree of agreement between laboratory results in a group of subjects who had ANA testing performed at two commercial laboratories. This was a chart review study, in which all ANA tests ordered by the authors from one commercial laboratory over a 4-year period were queried. Corresponding patient charts were reviewed, and if ANA testing had also been performed at the second commercial laboratory, subjects were entered into the study. The primary measurement was agreement between paired ANA results, and we performed sensitivity analysis using varying criteria defining agreement (criteria A to criteria D [strictest to most lenient definition of agreement]). Other data captured included relevant data obtained through the course of evaluation (e.g., presenting complaints, exam findings, other laboratory data) and final diagnoses. Of 101 paired ANA tests, there was 18 % agreement according to the strictest criteria and 42 % according to the most lenient. Of the seven subjects with ANA-associated rheumatic disease, none of the paired tests were in agreement according to criteria A (two agreed according to criteria D). Our findings demonstrate poor agreement between paired ANA tests performed at two commercial laboratories. The low level of agreement may have far-reaching clinical implications. Specifically, this finding calls into question the reliability of ANA testing as it is currently performed and suggests that results may in part depend upon the laboratory center to which patients are referred. PMID:27044430

  5. A multi-Fc-species system for recombinant antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Nizak Clément; Vielemeyer Ole; El Marjou Ahmed; Moutel Sandrine; Benaroch Philippe; Dübel Stefan; Perez Franck

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic projects often suffer from a lack of functional validation creating a strong demand for specific and versatile antibodies. Antibody phage display represents an attractive approach to select rapidly in vitro the equivalent of monoclonal antibodies, like single chain Fv antibodies, in an inexpensive and animal free way. However, so far, recombinant antibodies have not managed to impose themselves as efficient alternatives to natural anti...

  6. A recombinant, fully human monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity constructed from phage-displayed antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, GA; Heijnen, IAFM; Cuomo, ME; Koningsberger, JC; Boel, E; de Vries, ARV; Loyson, SAJ; Helfrich, W; Henegouwen, GPV; van Meijer, M; de Kruif, J; Logtenberg, T

    1999-01-01

    A single-chain Fv antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated Ep-CAM molecule was isolated from a semisynthetic phage display library and converted into an intact, fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (huMab), The purified huMab had an affinity of 5 nM and effectively mediated tumor cell kil

  7. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  8. The antibody mining toolbox: an open source tool for the rapid analysis of antibody repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Kiss, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput screening methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The high cost and the need for bioinformatics experts and powerful computer clusters, however, have limited the general use of deep sequencing in antibody selections. Here, we describe the AbMining ToolBox, an open source software package for the straightforward analysis of antibody libraries sequenced by the three main next generation sequencing platforms (454, Ion Torrent, MiSeq). The ToolBox is able to identify heavy chain CDR3s as effectively as more computationally intense software, and can be easily adapted to analyze other portions of antibody variable genes, as well as the selection outputs of libraries based on different scaffolds. The software runs on all common operating systems (Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), on standard personal computers, and sequence analysis of 1-2 million reads can be accomplished in 10-15 min, a fraction of the time of competing software. Use of the ToolBox will allow the average researcher to incorporate deep sequence analysis into routine selections from antibody display libraries. PMID:24423623

  9. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Olivia B; Estevez, Carlos; Yu, Qingzhong; Suarez, David L

    2013-04-15

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere with vaccine antigen processing that reduces the subsequent immune response. Once MAb titers are depleted, the chick will respond to vaccination, but they are also susceptible to viral infection. This study examines the effect of MAb on seroconversion to different viral-vectored avian influenza virus (AIV) vaccines. Chicks were given passively transferred antibodies (PTA) using AIV hyperimmunized serum, and subsequently vaccinated with a fowlpox-AIV recombinant vaccine (FPr) or a Newcastle disease virus-AIV recombinant vaccine (NDVr). Our results indicate that passively transferred antibodies led to significant reduction of seroconversion and clinical protection from virulent challenge in recombinant virus vaccinated chicks thus demonstrating maternal antibody interference to vaccination. The passive antibody transfer model system provides an important tool to evaluate maternal antibody interference to vaccination. PMID:23398721

  10. Antibodies Produced in Response to Cryptococcus neoformans Pulmonary Infection in Mice Have Characteristics of Nonprotective Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Casadevall, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Murine cryptocococcal pulmonary infection elicited serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG to the capsular polysaccharide, but only IgG stained yeast cells in alveoli. Both isotypes produced punctuate immunofluorescence patterns on yeast cells like those of nonprotective antibodies. The difficulties involved in associating humoral immunity with protection in murine cryptocococcal infection could reflect nonprotective antibody responses.

  11. A study on associations between antiprothrombin antibodies, antiplasminogen antibodies and thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmelink, MJA; De Groot, PG; Derksen, RHWM

    2003-01-01

    Anti-prothrombin antibodies area frequent cause of lupus anticoagulant (LAC), a thrombotic risk factor. Prothrombin shares structural homology with plasminogen, a kringle protein with an important role in fibrinolysis. Cross-reactivity between antiprothrombin antibodies and plasminogen has been desc

  12. Imaging thrombus with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-111-hydroxyquinoline labelled platelets, though useful in the detection of thrombus, have not gained widespread use owing to the time and technical skill required for their preparation. A study was therefore conducted evaluating a new method of imaging thrombus with platelets radiolabelled with a 111In labelled monoclonal antibody, P256, directed to the platelet surface glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa. When the number of receptors occupied by P256 was less than 3% of the total available on the platelet surface platelet function, as assessed by platelet aggregometry, was undisturbed. P256 was radiolabelled with 111In using diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, which achieved a specific activity of 185 MBq (5 mCi)/mg. No impairment of immunoreactivity was detected at this specific activity. Platelets were labelled with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in vitro in two patients at a receptor occupancy of 6% and in vivo - that is, by direct intravenous injection of P256 - in six patients at a receptor occupancy of 1%. In vivo recovery and biodistribution kinetics suggested that after in vitro labelling platelets were minimally activated. The 111In kinetics recorded after intravenous P256 suggested rapid and efficient radiolabelling of platelets and gave no indication of platelet activation. Of the six patients who received intravenous P256, three had documented thrombus, tow of whom gave positive results on P256 platelet scintigraphy. The third subject had chromic deep venous thrombosis and was scintigraphically negative. Imaging thrombus using a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody directed to platelets appears to offer great potential as a simple, non-invasive approach to the diagnosis of thrombosis. 3 refs. (Author)

  13. Family study of pediatric patients with primary antibody deficiencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Rezaei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID and selective IgA deficiency (SIGAD are the most common primary antibody deficiencies. These two diseases may have coincidence in one family and SIGAD can progress to CVID which suggest common underlying genetic defects between SIGAD and CVID. This study was designed to find the prevalence of multiple cases in families of Iranian patients with CVID or SIGAD.Serum samples were collected from all available first-degree relatives of 37 patients (23 patients with CVID and 14 with SIGAD to check the levels of immunoglobulin and their subclasses and detect antibody deficiencies.First degree family members of 37 patients (106 individuals were enrolled in this study. Thirty two percent of patients had multiple cases in their families. The frequency of primary antibody deficiency in the first relatives of the patients was estimated to be one per 9 family members. Most of the patients found among family members were siblings of the primary patients. Analysis in SIGAD family members showed that IgG and IgA levels in families with multiple cases were significantly lower than family members without multiple cases (p values of 0.048 and 0.021, respectively.Rate of families with multiple cases in Iran is more than the previous studies in other countries. This rate was not affected by the consanguinity of parents (p=0.081 or immunoglobulin level of the patients. Because of higher risk for the prevalence of these disorders in those with a positive family history of immunodeficiency, family screening programs in the patients with CVID and SIGAD can be suggested to be prioritized..

  14. Analysis of EEG features of neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-hua WEI

    2016-09-01

    and slow wave distribution decreased in recovery stage.  Conclusions Some presentations of EEG, such as early background activities may be correlated with disease relapse or fluctuation. The incompatibility of EEG and head MRI suggests the importance of functional examinations in patients with neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis. EEG features vary in different stages. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.09.010

  15. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  16. A case of human immunodeficiency virus infection with cerebellar ataxia that suggested by an association with autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Shigeto; Kondo, Takayuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Sadayuki

    2016-04-28

    We report a case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that showed subacute progressive cerebellar ataxia without HIV encephalopathy or other encephalopathies, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy or encephalitis of other human herpes virus (HHV) infections. A 43-year-old man exhibited unsteady gait. Neurological examination disclosed ataxia of the trunk and lower extremities. Personality change and dementia were absent. Magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any abnormal finding, including of the cerebellum. The serum HIV-1-RNA was 1.2 × 10(5) copies/ml, and the absolute CD4 lymphocyte count was 141 cells/ml. Remarkably, the serum anti-Yo antibody, as an anti-cerebellar antibody of paraneoplastic syndrome, and anti-gliadin antibody, associated with celiac disease or gluten ataxia, were positive. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulin G index was 1.2 (< 0.8), and oligoclonal bands were present. PCR of the CSF was negative for HIV, JC virus, other HHVs, and mycosis. Previous reports presented HIV-infected patients with concurrent autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome, autoimmune thrombocytopenia, vasculitis, polymyositis and dermatomyositis, sarcoidosis, Graves' disease, and hepatic diseases. These might have been present in patients with a CD4 T lymphocyte count of more than 200 cells/ml. On the other hand, paraneoplastic syndrome, gluten ataxia, cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody, and Hashimoto's encephalopathy might manifest as autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. As regards the association of HIV infection and autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, a previous report suggested that anti-gliadin antibody was detected in about 30% of HIV-infected children, though there is no reference to an association with cerebellar ataxia. Moreover, to our knowledge, detection of anti-Yo antibody in an HIV-infected patient with cerebellar ataxia has not been reported

  17. Resistance of Subtype C HIV-1 Strains to Anti-V3 Loop Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Almond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1’s subtype C V3 loop consensus sequence exhibits increased resistance to anti-V3 antibody-mediated neutralization as compared to the subtype B consensus sequence. The dynamic 3D structure of the consensus C V3 loop crown, visualized by ab initio folding, suggested that the resistance derives from structural rigidity and non-β-strand secondary protein structure in the N-terminal strand of the β-hairpin of the V3 loop crown, which is where most known anti-V3 loop antibodies bind. The observation of either rigidity or non-β-strand structure in this region correlated with observed resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization in a series of chimeric pseudovirus (psV mutants. The results suggest the presence of an epitope-independent, neutralization-relevant structural difference in the antibody-targeted region of the V3 loop crown between subtype C and subtype B, a difference that we hypothesize may contribute to the divergent pattern of global spread between these subtypes. As antibodies to a variable loop were recently identified as an inverse correlate of risk for HIV infection, the structure-function relationships discussed in this study may have relevance to HIV vaccine research.

  18. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES FOR SELECTED CANINE PATHOGENS AMONG WOLVES (CANIS LUPUS) FROM THE ALASKA PENINSULA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Dominique E; Benson, Anna-Marie

    2016-07-01

    We collected blood samples from wolves ( Canis lupus ) on the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, US, 2006-11 and tested sera for antibodies to canine adenovirus (CAV), canine coronavirus (CCV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine herpesvirus (CHV), canine parainfluenza (CPI), canine parvovirus (CPV), Neospora caninum , and Toxoplasma gondii . Detected antibody prevalence was 90% for CAV, 28% for CCV, 12% for CDV, 93% for CHV, 0% for CPI, 20% for CPV, 0% for N. caninum, and 86% for T. gondii . Prevalence of CCV antibodies suggested a seasonal pattern with higher prevalence during spring (43%) than in fall (11%). Prevalence of CCV antibodies also declined during the 6-yr study with high prevalence during spring 2006-08 (80%, n=24) and low prevalence during spring 2009-11 (4%, n=24). Prevalence of N. caninum and T. gondii antibodies were highly variable in the study area during 2006-11. Results suggested that some pathogens might be enzootic on the Alaska Peninsula (e.g., CAV and CHV) while others may be epizootic (e.g., CCV, N. caninum , T. gondii ). PMID:27195683

  19. High-affinity uranyl-specific antibodies suitable for cellular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have proved to be valuable models for the study of protein-metal interactions, and previous reports have described very specific antibodies to chelated metal ions, including uranyl. We raised specific mAbs against UO22+-DCP-BSA (DCP, 1, 10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) to generate new sets of antibodies that might cross-react with various complexed forms of uranyl in different environments for further application in the field of toxicology. Using counter-screening with UO22+-DCP-casein, we selected two highly specific mAbs against uranyl-DCP (KD = 10-100 pM): U04S and U08S. Competitive assays in the presence of different metal ions (UO22+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Ca2+) showed that uranyl in solution can act as a good competitor, suggesting some antibody ability to cross-react with chelating groups other than DCP in the UO22+ equatorial coordination plane. Interestingly, one of the antibodies could be used for revealing uranyl cations in cell samples. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analyses after immuno-labeling revealed the interaction of uranyl with human kidney cells HK2. The intracellular accumulation of uranyl could be directly visualized by metal-immunostaining using fluorescent-labeled mAb. Our results suggest that U04S mAb epitopes mostly include the uranyl fraction and its para-topes can accommodate a wide variety of chelating groups. (authors)

  20. Proteome-wide Anti-HCV and Anti-HIV Antibody Profiling for Predicting and Monitoring Response to HCV Treatment in HIV Co-infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbelo, Peter D.; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Ching, Kathryn H.; Issa, Alexandra T.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Murphy, Alison A; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Masur, Henry; Polis, Michael A.; Kottilil, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    We quantified antibody responses to the HCV proteome that are associated with sustained virologic response (SVR) in HIV/HCV co-infected patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Analysis of pre- and post-treatment samples revealed significant decreases in the combined anti-core, anti-E1 and anti-NS4 HCV antibody titers in those with SVR, but not in the relapsers or non-responders. Furthermore, anti-p24 HIV antibody titers inversely correlated with treatment response. These results suggest that profiling anti-HCV antibody is useful for monitoring HCV therapy especially in discriminating between relapsers and SVRs at 48 weeks. PMID:20684729

  1. Platform for high-throughput antibody selection using synthetically-designed antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batonick, Melissa; Holland, Erika G; Busygina, Valeria; Alderman, Dawn; Kay, Brian K; Weiner, Michael P; Kiss, Margaret M

    2016-09-25

    Synthetic humanized antibody libraries are frequently generated by random incorporation of changes at multiple positions in the antibody hypervariable regions. Although these libraries have very large theoretical diversities (>10(20)), the practical diversity that can be achieved by transformation of Escherichia coli is limited to about 10(10). To constrain the practical diversity to sequences that more closely mimic the diversity of natural human antibodies, we generated a scFv phage library using entirely pre-defined complementarity determining regions (CDR). We have used this library to select for novel antibodies against four human protein targets and demonstrate that identification of enriched sequences at each of the six CDRs in early selection rounds can be used to reconstruct a consensus antibody with selectivity for the target. PMID:26607994

  2. Antibody engineering using phage display with a coiled-coil heterodimeric Fv antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Wang

    Full Text Available A Fab-like antibody binding unit, ccFv, in which a pair of heterodimeric coiled-coil domains was fused to V(H and V(L for Fv stabilization, was constructed for an anti-VEGF antibody. The anti-VEGF ccFv showed the same binding affinity as scFv but significantly improved stability and phage display level. Furthermore, phage display libraries in the ccFv format were constructed for humanization and affinity maturation of the anti-VEGF antibody. A panel of V(H frameworks and V(H-CDR3 variants, with a significant improvement in affinity and expressibility in both E. coli and yeast systems, was isolated from the ccFv phage libraries. These results demonstrate the potential application of the ccFv antibody format in antibody engineering.

  3. Dietary germanium biotite supplementation enhances the induction of antibody responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yoo, Han Sang; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential ability of germanium biotite (GB) to stimulate the production of antibodies specific for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). To this aim, we measured the total FMDV-specific antibody responses and IgM production after vaccination against FMD both experimentally and in the field. GB supplementation with FMDV vaccination stimulated the production of anti-FMDV antibodies, and effectively increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. These results suggest that GB may be a novel al...

  4. Rare and transient anti-D antibody response in D(-) liver transplant recipients transfused with D(+) red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burin des Roziers, N; Ibanez, C; Samuel, D; Francoz, C; Idri, S; François, A; Mortelecque, R; Bierling, P; Pirenne, F

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted on 20 D(-) liver transplant (LT) recipients transfused with D(+) RBCs perioperatively and screened for RBC antibodies between 2 and 6 months later. None developed anti-D detectable by the indirect antiglobulin test. Two patients produced weak anti-D that reacted only with papain-treated RBCs at 10 and 11 days without any sign of immune haemolysis. Antibodies became quickly undetectable. These data suggest an unusual pattern of alloimmunization in LT recipients with rapid, weak and transient antibody response and support the safety of transfusing D(+) RBCs in most of D(-) patients during LT surgery. PMID:26918570

  5. [Mechanisms of the stimulating effect of brain antibodies on the Ca2 current in the neuron membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solntseva, E I; Pozdniakova, A L; Savich, V; Khorvat, I; Iankovich, B

    1987-11-01

    Antibodies against rat brain microsomes induce a 16 +/- 3% increase in the amplitude of Ca-current (ICa) in snail neurons. Ca-ions block ICa in dose-dependent and potential-dependent manner. Antibodies against microsomes decrease the effectiveness of ICa blockade by Ca-ions: a 85 +/- 10% increase in ICa is observed and I-V curve is normalized. It is suggested that an enhancing effect of antibodies on ICa and the elimination of blocking Ca-effect on ICa are connected with the weakening of divalent cations binding by the anionic groups of calcium channels. PMID:2445395

  6. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  7. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy. PMID:26808665

  8. Cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J; Arita, Y; Bystryn, J C

    1993-06-01

    Patients with vitiligo have been found to have circulating antibodies to pigment cells. To evaluate the functional activity of these antibodies, a highly sensitive europium release assay was used to compare complement-mediated cytolysis of human melanocytes by sera of 56 patients with vitiligo (20 with active disease, 25 with inactive disease, 11 with unidentified disease activity) and 47 control individuals. Significant melanocyte lysis was mediated by 32 (57%) of the patients with vitiligo but by only three (6%) of the control sera (p < 0.001), and by 17 (85%) of 20 patients with active vitiligo versus 11 (44%) of 25 patients with inactive disease (p < 0.025). Mean melanocyte lysis by vitiligo sera was 24% versus 6% by control sera (p < 0.0001). A subset of 12 vitiligo sera with high titers of cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes (34% mean cytolysis) reacted minimally (< 2% mean cytolysis) to a panel of control cells that included human and murine melanomas, human fibroblasts, lung carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. These findings indicate that antibodies present in patients with vitiligo have the functional ability to selectively kill melanocytes and are more common in active disease. These observations support, but do not prove, the hypothesis that vitiligo is an autoimmune disease and that anti-pigment cell antibodies have a role in inducing the disease. PMID:8496621

  9. Pregnancy Problems More Likely with Baby Boys, Study Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 160159.html Pregnancy Problems More Likely With Baby Boys, Study Suggests Gender-related differences seem to start ... are more likely when women are carrying baby boys, new research suggests. After analyzing more than half ...

  10. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123

  11. Suggestions on Writing for Publication in Language Learning Journals

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, George M.

    1999-01-01

    This article provides suggestions on writing for journals in the field of language learning. These suggestions are presented in three sections. The first section discusses how to begin. Suggestions in this section are that we appreciate the benefits of writing for publication, develop good ideas, work efficiently, ponder options as to what type of writing to do, choose a good topic, consider replication of other's research, and cooperate with others. The second section presents suggestions on...

  12. Solid-phase radioimmunoassay for measurement of circulating antibody titres to wheat gliadin and its subfractions in patients with adult coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciclitira, P.J.; Ellis, H.J. (Guy' s Hospital, London (UK)); Evans, D.J. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK))

    1983-08-26

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay for the measurement of circulating antibody titres to wheat gliadin is described. Using this assay, the authors have measured antibody titres to unfractionated gliadin in normal healthy controls, in coeliac patients on a gluten-free or a normal diet, and in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. High titres of antibodies to unfractionated gliadin were observed only in the patients with untreated coeliac disease. Antibody titres to ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., ..gamma.. and ..omega.. gliadin subfractions were measured in patients with untreated coeliac disease and compared with titres in normal controls. Patients with untreated coeliac disease had higher antibody titres to the gliadin subfractions. No specific pattern of circulating antibody titres to gliadin subfractions was observed in the untreated coeliac patients which would provide a diagnostic profile. These results suggest shared antigenicity between the gliadin subfractions.

  13. [Anti-phospholipase A2 receptor (anti-PLA2R) antibodies and idiopathic membranous nephropathy: which role in diagnosis and prognosis of this disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netti, Giuseppe Stefano; Ranieri, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) as a major antigen in idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN) was a breakthrough in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease, establishing iMN as an autoimmune disease. Subsequent studies confirmed that detection of circulating antibodies against PLA2R was positive in approximately 70% of incident iMN patients. We discuss several studies that have suggested the potential role of measuring PLA2R antibodies for clinical practice. Recently, it has been shown that the presence of PLA2R antibodies supported a diagnosis of iMN, changes in antibody levels were related to clinical disease activity, disappearance of antibodies preceded and predicted subsequent decrease of proteinuria and high titers of antibodies were associated with a low likelihood spontaneous remission.

  14. Seroprevalence of malarial antibodies in Galapagos penguins (Spheniscus mendiculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jamie L; McCutchan, Thomas F; Vargas, F Hernan; Deem, Sharon L; Cruz, Marilyn; Hartman, Daniel A; Parker, Patricia G

    2013-10-01

    A parasite species of the genus Plasmodium has recently been documented in the endangered Galapagos penguin (Spheniscus mendiculus). Avian malaria causes high mortality in several species after initial exposure and there is great concern for the conservation of the endemic Galapagos penguin. Using a Plasmodium spp. circumsporozoite protein antigen, we standardized an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to test the level of exposure in this small population, as indicated by seroprevalence. Sera from adult and juvenile Galapagos penguins collected between 2004 and 2009 on the Galapagos archipelago were tested for the presence of anti- Plasmodium spp. antibodies. Penguins were also tested for the prevalence of avian malaria parasite DNA using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening. Total seroprevalence of malarial antibodies in this sample group was 97.2%, which suggests high exposure to the parasite and low Plasmodium-induced mortality. However, total prevalence of Plasmodium parasite DNA by PCR screening was 9.2%, and this suggests that parasite prevalence may be under-detected through PCR screening. Multiple detection methods may be necessary to measure the real extent of Plasmodium exposure on the archipelago.

  15. Antinuclear antibodies are not increased in the early phase of Borrelia infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiewak, R.W.; Stojek, NM; Chmielewska-Badora, J

    2004-01-01

    In the literature, there are case reports suggesting that Borrelia burgdorferi infection may induce autoimmune diseases dependent on antinuclear antibodies (ANA). The present study was undertaken in order to verify this possibility in a prospective manner. The study group comprised 78 consecutive pa

  16. A bacterial signal peptidase enhances processing of a recombinant single chain antibody fragment in insect cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ailor, E; Pathmanathan, J; Jongbloed, JDH; Betenbaugh, MJ

    1999-01-01

    The production of an antibody single chain fragment (scFv) in insect cells was accompanied by the formation of an insoluble intracellular precursor even with the inclusion of the bee melittin signal peptide. The presence of the precursor polypeptide suggests a limitation in the processing of the sig

  17. Administration of an anti-interleukin 2 receptor monoclonal antibody prolongs cardiac allograft survival in mice

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Administration of the monoclonal antibody M7/20, which binds to the murine interleukin-2 (IL) receptor, significantly prolongs cardiac allograft survival in two H-2-incompatible strain combinations of inbred mice. The results support the important role of the IL-2 receptor in the mechanism of graft rejection, and suggest its suitability as a target for immunosuppressive therapy.

  18. INADEQUATE ANTIBODY-RESPONSE AGAINST RESPIRATORY VIRAL-INFECTION IN LONG-SURVIVING RAT LUNG ALLOGRAFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTER, JB; GROEN, M; VANDERLOGT, K; WILDEVUUR, CRH; PROP, J

    1995-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients suffer from a high number of viral infections. It has been suggested that the defense against viral infections is impaired in lung transplants, Therefore, we investigated in rat lung transplants whether antibody responses against an intrapulmonary viral infection were impa

  19. Antibody-based biological toxin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menking, D.E.; Goode, M.T. [Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a direct competition assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin, Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B or ricin were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) - labeled toxins. In the indirect competition assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified anti-toxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or anti-toxin IgG in a dose dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  20. Origin and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Celli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are detected in the serum of patients with a variety of conditions, including autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus, infectious (syphilis, AIDS and lymphoproliferative disorders (paraproteinemia, myeloma, lymphocytic leukemias. Thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and other clinical complications are currently associated with a subgroup of aPL designating the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast, aPL from patients with infectious disorders are not associated with any clinical manifestation. These findings led to increased interest in the origin and pathogenesis of aPL. Here we present the clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome and review the origin of aPL, the characteristics of experimentally induced aPL and their historical background. Within this context, we discuss the most probable pathogenic mechanisms induced by these antibodies.

  1. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Zhe; Coljee, Vincent W; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2013-11-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  3. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were obtained from hybrid myelomas, following fusion of mouse NSI myeloma cells with mouse spleen cells. Ten different antibodies were obtained from 4 separate fusions. Eight antibodies were of the IgG1 subclass. Affinities of antibodies for TSH were in the range 2 x 108-5 x 1010 M-1. Five of the antibodies were specific for TSH and did not react with LH, FSH or hCG. The remaining antibodies reacted with all these hormones and were assumed to recognise their common (α) subunit. The 5 specific antibodies fell into 3 subgroups recognising distinct antigenic determinants, whereas the 5 non-specific antibodies recognised a single determinant or closely related set of sites. It is concluded that these antibodies should be valuable reagents for use in sensitive and specific two-site immunoradiometric assays. (Auth.)

  4. Correlation of serum antithyroid microsomal antibody and autologous serum skin test in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria

    OpenAIRE

    Snehal Balvant Lunge; Milind Borkar; Sushil Pande

    2015-01-01

    Background: About 25–45% of patients of chronic urticaria (CU) have been stated to have histamine releasing autoantibodies in their blood. The term autoimmune urticaria is increasingly being accepted for this subgroup of patients. Review of the literature suggests high autologous serum skin test (ASST) positivity and presence of antithyroid microsomal antibodies in patients with autoimmune urticaria. Aims: To study prevalence of ASST positivity and antithyroid microsomal antibodies in chronic...

  5. A bispecific antibody effectively neutralizes all four serotypes of dengue virus by simultaneous blocking virus attachment and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin; Deng, Yongqiang; Wang, Huajing; Ji, Guanghui; Tan, Wenlong; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Hui; Xia, Tian; Meng, Yanchun; Wang, Chao; Yu, Xiaojie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bohua; Qin, E-De; Dai, Jianxin; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Guo, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    Although dengue virus (DENV) infection severely threatens the health of humans, no specific antiviral drugs are currently approved for clinical use against DENV infection. Attachment and fusion are 2 critical steps for the flavivirus infection, and the corresponding functional epitopes are located at E protein domain III (E-DIII) and domain II (E-DII), respectively. Here, we constructed a bispecific antibody (DVD-1A1D-2A10) based on the 2 well-characterized anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies 1A1D-2 (1A1D) and 2A10G6 (2A10). The 1A1D antibody binds E-DIII and can block the virus attaching to the cell surface, while the 2A10 antibody binds E-DII and is able to prevent the virus from fusing with the endosomal membrane. Our data showed that DVD-1A1D-2A10 retained the antigen-binding activity of both parental antibodies. Importantly, it was demonstrated to be significantly more effective at neutralizing DENV than its parental antibodies both in vitro and in vivo, even better than the combination of them. To eliminate the potential antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) effect, this bispecific antibody was successfully engineered to prevent Fc-γ-R interaction. Overall, we generated a bispecific anti-DENV antibody targeting both attachment and fusion stages, and this bispecific antibody broadly neutralized all 4 serotypes of DENV without risk of ADE, suggesting that it has great potential as a novel antiviral strategy against DENV. PMID:26905804

  6. V(H)3 antibody response to immunization with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in middle-aged and elderly persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpa, Jose A; Valayam, Josemon; Musher, Daniel M; Rossen, Roger D; Pirofski, Liise-anne; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C

    2011-03-01

    Pneumococcal disease continues to cause substantial morbidity and mortality among the elderly. Older adults may have high levels of anticapsular antibody after vaccination, but their antibodies show decreased functional activity. In addition, the protective effect of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) seems to cease as early as 3 to 5 years postvaccination. Recently, it was suggested that PPV elicits human antibodies that use predominantly V(H)3 gene segments and induce a repertoire shift with increased V(H)3 expression in peripheral B cells. Here we compared V(H)3-idiotypic antibody responses in middle-aged and elderly subjects receiving PPV as initial immunization or revaccination. We studied pre- and postvaccination sera from 36 (18 vaccine-naïve and 18 previously immunized subjects) middle-aged and 40 (22 vaccine-naïve and 18 previously immunized subjects) elderly adults who received 23-valent PPV. Concentrations of IgGs to four individual serotypes (6B, 14, 19F, and 23F) and of V(H)3-idiotypic antibodies (detected by the monoclonal antibody D12) to the whole pneumococcal vaccine were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PPV elicited significant IgG and V(H)3-idiotypic antibody responses in middle-aged and elderly subjects, regardless of whether they were vaccine naïve or undergoing revaccination. Age did not influence the magnitude of the antibody responses, as evidenced by similar postvaccination IgG and V(H)3 antibody levels in both groups, even after stratifying by prior vaccine status. Furthermore, we found similar proportions (around 50%) of elderly and middle-aged subjects experiencing 2-fold increases in V(H)3 antibody titers after vaccination. Age or repeated immunization does not appear to affect the V(H)3-idiotypic immunogenicity of PPV among middle-aged and elderly adults.

  7. Anti-DNA antibodies--quintessential biomarkers of SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, David S

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies that recognize and bind to DNA (anti-DNA antibodies) are serological hallmarks of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and key markers for diagnosis and disease activity. In addition to common use in the clinic, anti-DNA antibody testing now also determines eligibility for clinical trials, raising important questions about the nature of the antibody-antigen interaction. At present, no 'gold standard' for serological assessment exists, and anti-DNA antibody binding can be measured with a variety of assay formats, which differ in the nature of the DNA substrates and in the conditions for binding and detection of antibodies. A mechanism called monogamous bivalency--in which high avidity results from simultaneous interaction of IgG Fab sites with a single polynucleotide chain--determines anti-DNA antibody binding; this mechanism might affect antibody detection in different assay formats. Although anti-DNA antibodies can promote pathogenesis by depositing in the kidney or driving cytokine production, they are not all alike, pathologically, and anti-DNA antibody expression does not necessarily correlate with active disease. Levels of anti-DNA antibodies in patients with SLE can vary over time, distinguishing anti-DNA antibodies from other pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. Elucidation of the binding specificities and the pathogenic roles of anti-DNA antibodies in SLE should enable improvements in the design of informative assays for both clinical and research purposes.

  8. The maturation of antibody technology for the HIV epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnall, Wendy R; Beasley, Matthew D; Center, Rob J; Parsons, Matthew S; Kiefel, Ben R; Kent, Stephen J

    2014-08-01

    Antibodies are one of our most useful biological tools. Indeed, improvements in antibody-based technologies have ushered in a new era of antibody-based therapeutics, research and diagnostic tools. Although improved technologies have led to the development of therapeutic antibodies for treatment of malignancies and inflammatory conditions, the use of advanced antibody technology in the therapy of viral infections is in its infancy. Non-human primate studies have demonstrated that antibodies against the HIV envelope can both prevent viral infection and control viremia. Despite the obvious potential of antibody therapies against HIV, there remain limitations in production and purification capacity that require further research. Recent advances in recombinant antibody technology have led to the development of a range of novel antibody fragments, such as single-domain nanobodies and bispecific antibodies, that are capable of targeting cancer cells to cytotoxic T cells. Novel antibody production techniques have also been designed, allowing antibodies to be obtained from non-mammalian cells, bovine colostrum and the periplasm and cytoplasm of bacteria. These advances may allow large-scale production of HIV antibodies that are capable of protecting against HIV infection or serving as therapeutics that reduce the need for life-long antiretroviral treatment. This review summarises recent advances in antibody-based technologies and discusses the possibilities and challenges of using these advances to design prophylactics and therapeutics against HIV. PMID:24797582

  9. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  10. Utility of feline coronavirus antibody tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addie, Diane D; le Poder, Sophie; Burr, Paul; Decaro, Nicola; Graham, Elizabeth; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Jarrett, Oswald; McDonald, Michael; Meli, Marina L

    2015-02-01

    Eight different tests for antibodies to feline coronavirus (FCoV) were evaluated for attributes that are important in situations in veterinary practice. We compared four indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT), one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (FCoV Immunocomb; Biogal) and three rapid immunochromatographic (RIM) tests against a panel of samples designated by consensus as positive or negative. Specificity was 100% for all but the two IFATs based on transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), at 83.3% and 97.5%. The IFAT and ELISA tests were best for obtaining an antibody titre and for working in the presence of virus. The RIM tests were the best for obtaining a result quickly (10-15 mins); of these, the Speed F-Corona was the most sensitive, at 92.4%, followed by FASTest feline infectious peritonitis (FIP; 84.6%) and Anigen Rapid FCoV antibody test (64.1%). Sensitivity was 100% for the ELISA, one FCoV IFAT and one TGEV IFAT; and 98.2% for a second TGEV IFA and 96.1% for a second FCoV IFAT. All tests worked with effusions, even when only blood products were stipulated in the instruction manual. The ELISA and Anigen RIM tests were best for small quantities of sample. The most appropriate FCoV antibody test to use depends on the reason for testing: in excluding a diagnosis of FIP, sensitivity, specificity, small sample quantity, rapidity and ability to work in the presence of virus all matter. For FCoV screening, speed and sensitivity are important, and for FCoV elimination antibody titre is essential. PMID:24966245

  11. Broadly-Reactive Neutralizing and Non-neutralizing Antibodies Directed against the H7 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Reveal Divergent Mechanisms of Protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene S Tan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the early spring of 2013, Chinese health authorities reported several cases of H7N9 influenza virus infections in humans. Since then the virus has established itself at the human-animal interface in Eastern China and continues to cause several hundred infections annually. In order to characterize the antibody response to the H7N9 virus we generated several mouse monoclonal antibodies against the hemagglutinin of the A/Shanghai/1/13 (H7N9 virus. Of particular note are two monoclonal antibodies, 1B2 and 1H5, that show broad reactivity to divergent H7 hemagglutinins. Monoclonal antibody 1B2 binds to viruses of the Eurasian and North American H7 lineages and monoclonal antibody 1H5 reacts broadly to virus isolates of the Eurasian lineage. Interestingly, 1B2 shows broad hemagglutination inhibiting and neutralizing activity, while 1H5 fails to inhibit hemagglutination and demonstrates no neutralizing activity in vitro. However, both monoclonal antibodies were highly protective in an in vivo passive transfer challenge model in mice, even at low doses. Experiments using mutant antibodies that lack the ability for Fc/Fc-receptor and Fc/complement interactions suggest that the protection provided by mAb 1H5 is, at least in part, mediated by the Fc-fragment of the mAb. These findings highlight that a protective response to a pathogen may not only be due to neutralizing antibodies, but can also be the result of highly efficacious non-neutralizing antibodies not readily detected by classical in vitro neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition assays. This is of interest because H7 influenza virus vaccines induce only low hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers while eliciting robust antibody titers as measured by ELISA. Our data suggest that these binding but non-neutralizing antibodies contribute to protection in vivo.

  12. Antibodies for detecting and quantifying anticoagulant agents

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador, Juan Pablo; Marco, María Pilar

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to the design of haptens that are structurally related to coumarin oral anticoagulant compounds (COAC), to be used for the production of specific antibodies against said type of substances and the subsequent use thereof for the development of diagnosis tools for use in laboratories or in point-of-care (PoC) devices. In particular, the produced antibodies have been used to develop a diagnosis tool that enables the plasma levels of COAC to be quantified in pat...

  13. Basic immunology of antibody targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibody targeted radiotherapy brings an important new treatment modality to Radiation oncology clinic. Radiation dose to tumor and normal tissues are determined by a complex interplay of antibody, antigen, tumor, radionuclide, and host-related factors. A basic understanding of these immunologic and physiologic factors is important to optimally utilize this therapy in the clinic. Preclinical and clinical studies need to be continued to broaden our understanding and to develop new strategies to further improve the efficacy of this promising form of targeted therapy

  14. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy. Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is now playing a great role not only in diagnostic application but also in therapy of cancer patients. Under the concept of targeted radiotherapy, a number of radiopharmaceuticals based on radiolabelled biomolecules had been evaluated for treatment of cancer by many investigators. Of these, monoclonal antibodies and some small specific peptides labelled with beta emitting radiometals such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188 or Y-90, are being introduced into clinical trials. The objective of this project is to develop laboratory procedures to label monoclonal antibodies, peptide or other proteins with beta emitting radionuclides to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purpose

  15. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is now playing a great role not only in diagnostic application but also in therapy of cancer patients. Under the concept of targeted radiotherapy, a number of radiopharmaceuticals based on radiolabelled biomolecules had been evaluated for treatment of cancer by many investigators. Of these, monoclonal antibodies and some small specific peptides labelled with beta emitting radiometals such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188 or Y-90, are being introduced into clinical trials. The objective of this project is to develop laboratory procedures to label monoclonal antibodies, peptide or other proteins with beta emitting radionuclides to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purpose

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection. PMID:8067276

  17. Preparation and epitope characterization of monoclonal antibodies against firefly luciferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐沁; 丁建芳; 胡红雨; 许根俊

    1999-01-01

    The 6-His tagged firefly luciferase was highly expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography and gel filtration. After immunizing Balb/c mice with the antigen, 6 hybridomas clones were found to secrete monoelonal antibodies (mAbs) and the mAbs were also purified separately. The competitive binding experiments show that 2 mAbs can bind heat-denatured antigen or its proteolytic fragments but not the native lueiferase, suggesting that their epitopes might be accommodated in the internal segments of the protein. On the other hand, the other 4 mAbs are capable of binding both native and denatured antigens. It infers that their epitopes locate in the segments on the protein surface. The results also suggest that the six mAbs are all sequence-specific.

  18. Modeling single cell antibody excretion on a biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Ivan; Baumgartner, Wolfgang; van der Velden, Thomas J G; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Schasfoort, Richard B M

    2016-07-01

    We simulated, using Comsol Multiphysics, the excretion of antibodies by single hybridoma cells and their subsequent binding on a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor. The purpose was to confirm that SPRi is suitable to accurately quantify antibody (anti-EpCAM) excretion. The model showed that antibody loss by diffusion away from the sensor was less than 1%. Unexpectedly, more than 99% of the excreted antibodies were captured on the sensor. These data prove the remarkable phenomenon that the SPRi output of cellular antibody excretion and its subsequent binding, performed under the conditions described here, is directly usable for quantification of single cell antibody production rates. PMID:27040182

  19. Protection from avian influenza H5N1 virus infection with antibody-impregnated filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukamoto Masaya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is worldwide concern over the possibility of a new influenza pandemic originating from the highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses. We herein demonstrate that functional air filters impregnated with ostrich antibodies against the hemagglutinin of the H5N1 virus protect chickens from death by H5N1 transmission. These results suggest that the use of ostrich antibody-impregnated filters might be a powerful way to prevent the transmission of H5N1.

  20. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes. PMID:27330002

  1. Serum and colostral antibody production in cows immunized with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Randall; Kim, Skaison; Patel, Rutvij; Scola, Michele; Hartman, Deborah; Tracey, Daniel; Fox, Barbara S

    2016-06-01

    The use of hyper-immune bovine colostrum as a human therapeutic platform is an emerging technology with potential to deliver the efficacy of antibody therapeutics with the convenience and safety of oral or topical application. It is necessary to understand how the bovine immune system responds to immunization with foreign proteins, both in terms of the serum antibody response and the transfer of antigen-specific antibodies into the colostrum to enable efficient large-scale production of therapeutic antibodies. We have immunized 25 cows with recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF) and measured the levels of rhTNF-specific antibodies in the serum and colostrum of these animals. We observed a decline of 84±9% in serum IgG1 concentrations in the final weeks of pregnancy that presumably reflects rapid transport of IgG1 into colostrum. The serum IgG2 levels remained constant, such that the serum IgG1 to IgG2 ratio was 1:20 at parturition. We observed substantial animal-to-animal variability in the levels of anti-rhTNF antibodies in both serum and colostrum samples. In particular, a subset of 4 cows had extraordinarily high colostral anti-rhTNF antibody production. Only a weak correlation was found between the peak serum anti-rhTNF activity and the colostral anti-rhTNF activity in these animals. The 4 cows with high colostral anti-rhTNF activities trended toward higher serum IgG1 loss relative to average colostral anti-rhTNF producers, but this difference was not statistically significant in this small sample. The high-anti-rhTNF-producing cows also exhibited a greater proportion of rhTNF-specific antibodies that bound to bovine IgG1- and IgG2-specific detection antibodies relative to the total anti-rhTNF immunoglobulin population. This finding suggests that the isotype distribution of the anti-rhTNF response is varied between individuals and genetic or environmental factors may increase the yield of antigen-specific colostral antibodies. PMID:27040787

  2. Autonomic responses to suggestions for cold and warmth in hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, A; Mariauzouls, C; Wyler, F; Bircher, A J; Wyler-Harper, J

    1999-02-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate whether suggestions for cold or warmth during hypnosis affect fingertip skin temperature. Hypnosis without specific suggestions for cold or warmth ('neutral hypnosis') caused a drop in respiration frequency, however, pulse rate, fingertip skin temperature, and electrodermal activity were not affected. The cold and warmth suggestions decreased and increased fingertip skin temperature, respectively. Compared with the neutral trance phase, the other three autonomic variables measured were also affected by suggestions for cold. However, there was no association between the changes in autonomic variables induced by suggestions and hypnotizability scores measured by the 'Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale for Adults'. Fingertip skin temperature was mostly affected when the images used for the cold and warmth suggestions during hypnosis included experiences of physical temperature and psychological stress or relaxation, indicating that the psychological content of the imagery amplified the autonomic response.

  3. The consequences of suggesting false childhood food events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Daniel M; Scoboria, Alan; Arnold, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We combined data across eight published experiments (N=1369) to examine the formation and consequences of false autobiographical beliefs and memories. Our path models revealed that the formation of false autobiographical belief fully mediated the pathway between suggesting to people that they had experienced a positive or negative food-related event in the past and current preference for that food. Suggestion indirectly affected intention to eat the food via change in autobiographical belief. The development of belief with and without memory produced similar changes in food preferences and behavior intention, indicating that belief in the event drives changes in suggestion-related attitudes. Finally, positive suggestions (e.g., "you loved asparagus the first time you tried it") yielded stronger effects than negative suggestions (e.g., "you got sick eating egg salad"). These findings show that false autobiographical suggestions lead to the development of autobiographical beliefs, which in turn, have consequences for one's attitudes and behaviors. PMID:25613303

  4. False Memories for Suggestions: The Impact of Conceptual Elaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Zaragoza, Maria S.; Mitchell, Karen J.; Payment, Kristie; Drivdahl, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Relatively little attention has been paid to the potential role that reflecting on the meaning and implications of suggested events (i.e., conceptual elaboration) might play in promoting the creation of false memories. Two experiments assessed whether encouraging repeated conceptual elaboration, would, like perceptual elaboration, increase false memory for suggested events. Results showed that conceptual elaboration of suggested events more often resulted in high confidence false memories (Ex...

  5. Evaluation of the potency of the anti-idiotypic antibody Ab2/3H6 mimicking gp41 as an HIV-1 vaccine in a rabbit prime/boost study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mader

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope protein harbors several conserved epitopes that are recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. One of these neutralizing sites, the MPER region of gp41, is targeted by one of the most potent and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody, 2F5. Different vaccination strategies and a lot of efforts have been undertaken to induce MPER neutralizing antibodies but little success has been achieved so far. We tried to consider the alternative anti-idiotypic vaccination approach for induction of 2F5-like antibodies. The previously developed and characterized anti-idiotypic antibody Ab2/3H6 was expressed as antibody fragment fusion protein with C-terminally attached immune-modulators and used for immunization of rabbits to induce antibodies specific for HIV-1. Only those rabbits immunized with immunogens fused with the immune-modulators developed HIV-1 specific antibodies. Anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies were affinity purified using a two-step affinity purification protocol which revealed that only little amount of the total rabbit IgG fraction contained HIV-1 specific antibodies. The characterization of the induced anti-anti-idiotypic antibodies showed specificity for the linear epitope of 2F5 GGGELDKWASL and the HIV-1 envelope protein gp140. Despite specificity for the linear epitope and the truncated HIV-1 envelope protein these antibodies were not able to exhibit virus neutralization activities. These results suggest that Ab2/3H6 alone might not be suitable as a vaccine.

  6. HIV-1 subtype C superinfected individuals mount low autologous neutralizing antibody responses prior to intrasubtype superinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basu Debby

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential role of antibodies in protection against intra-subtype HIV-1 superinfection remains to be understood. We compared the early neutralizing antibody (NAb responses in three individuals, who were superinfected within one year of primary infection, to ten matched non-superinfected controls from a Zambian cohort of subtype C transmission cases. Sequence analysis of single genome amplified full-length envs from a previous study showed limited diversification in the individuals who became superinfected with the same HIV-1 subtype within year one post-seroconversion. We hypothesized that this reflected a blunted NAb response, which may have made these individuals more susceptible to superinfection. Results Neutralization assays showed that autologous plasma NAb responses to the earliest, and in some cases transmitted/founder, virus were delayed and had low to undetectable titers in all three superinfected individuals prior to superinfection. In contrast, NAbs with a median IC50 titer of 1896 were detected as early as three months post-seroconversion in non-superinfected controls. Early plasma NAbs in all subjects showed limited but variable levels of heterologous neutralization breadth. Superinfected individuals also exhibited a trend toward lower levels of gp120- and V1V2-specific IgG binding antibodies but higher gp120-specific plasma IgA binding antibodies. Conclusions These data suggest that the lack of development of IgG antibodies, as reflected in autologous NAbs as well as gp120 and V1V2 binding antibodies to the primary infection virus, combined with potentially competing, non-protective IgA antibodies, may increase susceptibility to superinfection in the context of settings where a single HIV-1 subtype predominates.

  7. Phase Transitions in Antibody Solutions: from Pharmaceuticals to Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George; Dana Farber Cancer Institute Collaboration; Amgen Inc. Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Antibodies are very important proteins. Natural antibodies play essential role in the immune system of human body. Pharmaceutical antibodies are used as drugs. Antibodies are also indispensable tools in biomedical research and diagnostics. Recently, a number of observations of phase transitions of pharmaceutical antibodies have been reported. These phase transitions are undesirable from the perspective of colloid stability of drug solutions in processing and storage, but can be used for protein purification, X-ray crystallography, and improving pharmokinetics of drugs. Phase transitions of antibodies can also take place in human body, particularly in multiple myeloma patients who overproduce monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies, in some cases, crystallize at body temperature and cause severe complications called cryoglobulinemia. I will present the results of our current studies on phase transitions of both pharmaceutical antibodies and cryoglobulinemia-associated antibodies. These studies have shown that different antibodies have different propensity to undergo phase transitions, but their phase behavior has universal features which are remarkably different from those of spherical proteins. I will discuss how studies of phase behavior can be useful in assessing colloid stability of pharmaceutical antibodies and in early diagnostics of cryoglobulinemia, as well as general implications of the fact that some antibodies can precipitate at physiological conditions.

  8. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  9. Antibody-based imaging strategies for cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warram, Jason M.; de Boer, Esther; Sorace, Anna G.; Chung, Thomas K.; Kim, Hyunki; Pleijhuis, Rick G.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2014-01-01

    Although mainly developed for preclinical research and therapeutic use, antibodies have high antigen specificity, which can be used as a courier to selectively deliver a diagnostic probe or therapeutic agent to cancer. It is generally accepted that the optimal antigen for imaging will depend on both

  10. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  11. JDIP Genomics, Antibodies, and Proteomics Core Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JDIP Genomics, Proteomics, and Antibodies Core has developed several resources that are available for use by JDIP researchers. Five tasks have been completed or are in progress: Task 1 – Transposon mutants: Nearly 24,000 gene disruption M. paratuberculosis mutants are now available for JDIP re...

  12. New Antibody Conjugates in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serengulam V. Govindan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting of radiation, drugs, and protein toxins to cancers selectively with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs has been a topic of considerable interest and an area of continued development. Radioimmunotherapy (RAIT of lymphoma using directly labeled MAbs is of current interest after approval of two radiolabeled anti-CD20 MAbs, as illustrated with the near 100% overall response rate obtained in a recent clinical trial using an investigational radiolabeled anti-CD22 MAb, 90Y-epratuzumab. The advantage of pretargeted RAIT over directly labeled MAbs is continuing to be validated in preclinical models of lymphoma and solid tumors. Importantly, the advantages of combining RAIT with radiation sensitizers, with immunotherapy, or a drug conjugate targeting a different antigen are being studied clinically and preclinically. The area of drug-conjugated antibodies is progressing with encouraging data published for the trastuzumab-DM1 conjugate in a phase I clinical trial in HER2-positive breast cancer. The Dock-and-Lock platform technology has contributed to the design and the evaluation of complex antibody-cytokine and antibody-toxin conjugates. This review describes the advances made in these areas, with illustrations taken from advances made in the authors' institutions.

  13. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  14. Ebola Virus Antibodies in Fruit Bats, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin J Olival; Islam, Ariful; Yu, Meng; Anthony, Simon J.; Jonathan H Epstein; Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Khan, Salah Uddin; Crameri, Gary; Wang, Lin-Fa; Lipkin, W. Ian; Luby, Stephen P.; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To determine geographic range for Ebola virus, we tested 276 bats in Bangladesh. Five (3.5%) bats were positive for antibodies against Ebola Zaire and Reston viruses; no virus was detected by PCR. These bats might be a reservoir for Ebola or Ebola-like viruses, and extend the range of filoviruses to mainland Asia.

  15. Greasing the SCIDs for Universal Flu Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yewdell, Jonathan W.; Ince, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Previews In this issue, Nakamura et al. describe a robust SCID mouse-based method for isolating human monoclonal antibodies of desired specificity from adoptively transferred human B cells. As proof-of principle, they isolate human mAbs that could potentially be used to treat or prevent human infection with any influenza A virus strain. PMID:23870308

  16. Burkholderia pseudomallei Antibodies in Children, Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Pheaktra, Ngoun; Putchhat, Hor; Sin, Lina; Sen, Bun; Kumar, Varun; Langla, Sayan; Peacock, Sharon J.; Nicholas P. Day

    2008-01-01

    Antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei were detected in 16% of children in Siem Reap, Cambodia. This organism was isolated from 30% of rice paddies in the surrounding vicinity. Despite the lack of reported indigenous cases, melioidosis is likely to occur in Cambodia.

  17. IgA as therapeutic antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2015-01-01

    This review is focused on the promises of IgA as a new therapeutic antibody. For more than 30 years IgG molecules have been used in the clinic in the fields of oncology, hematology, auto immune diseases and infections. However, IgA might be a good alternative, since it recruits different effector ce

  18. A sequence in subdomain 2 of DBL1α of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 induces strain transcending antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Blomqvist

    Full Text Available Immunity to severe malaria is the first level of immunity acquired to Plasmodium falciparum. Antibodies to the variant antigen PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 present at the surface of the parasitized red blood cell (pRBC confer protection by blocking microvascular sequestration. Here we have generated antibodies to peptide sequences of subdomain 2 of PfEMP1-DBL1α previously identified to be associated with severe or mild malaria. A set of sera generated to the amino acid sequence KLQTLTLHQVREYWWALNRKEVWKA, containing the motif ALNRKE, stained the live pRBC. 50% of parasites tested (7/14 were positive both in flow cytometry and immunofluorescence assays with live pRBCs including both laboratory strains and in vitro adapted clinical isolates. Antibodies that reacted selectively with the sequence REYWWALNRKEVWKA in a 15-mer peptide array of DBL1α-domains were also found to react with the pRBC surface. By utilizing a peptide array to map the binding properties of the elicited anti-DBL1α antibodies, the amino acids WxxNRx were found essential for antibody binding. Complementary experiments using 135 degenerate RDSM peptide sequences obtained from 93 Ugandan patient-isolates showed that antibody binding occurred when the amino acids WxLNRKE/D were present in the peptide. The data suggests that the ALNRKE sequence motif, associated with severe malaria, induces strain-transcending antibodies that react with the pRBC surface.

  19. Triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI): phage display and antibodies as tools for finding target regions to inhibit catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Ayala, Víctor; Belmont, Iaraset; Abraham, Landa

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antibodies against triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI) can alter its enzymatic catalysis. In the present study, we used antibodies produced against the NH2-terminal region of TTPI (1/3NH2TTPI) and the phage display technology to find target regions to inhibit TTPI activity. As a first step, we obtained polyclonal antibodies against non-conserved regions from the 1/3NH2TTPI, which had an inhibitory effect of about 74 % on catalytic activity. Afterward, they were used to screen a library of phage-displayed dodecapeptides; as a result, 41 phage mimotope clones were isolated and grouped according to their amino acid sequence, finding the consensus A1 (VPTXPI), A2 (VPTXXI), B (LTPGQ), and D (DPLPR). Antibodies against selected phage mimotope clones were obtained by rabbit's immunization; these ones clearly recognized TTPI by both Western blot and ELISA. However, only the mimotope PDTS16 (DSVTPTSVMAVA) clone, which belongs to the VPTXXI consensus, raised antibodies capable of inhibiting the TTPI catalytic activity in 45 %. Anti-PDTS16 antibodies were confronted to several synthetic peptides that encompass the 1/3NH2TTPI, and they only recognized three, which share the motif FDTLQK belonging to the helix-α1 in TTPI. This suggests that this motif is the main part of the epitope recognized by anti-PDTS16 antibodies and revealed its importance for TTPI catalysis.

  20. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. → Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. → The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. → The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  1. Human anti-rhinosporidial antibody does not cause metabolic inactivation or morphological damage in endospores of Rhinosporidium seeberi, in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseculeratne S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the use of the MTT-reduction and Evan′s blue-staining tests for the assessment of the viability and morphological integrity, respectively, of rhinosporidial endospores after exposure to sera from rhinosporidial patients with high titres of anti-rhinosporidial antibody. Sera from three patients, with nasal, ocular and disseminated rhinosporidiosis respectively were used, with human serum without anti-rhinosporidial antibody for comparison, with or without added fresh guinea pig serum as a source of complement. All four sera tested, with or without guinea-pig serum, had no effect on the morphological integrity or the viability of the endospores and it is suggested that anti-rhinosporidial antibody has no direct protective role against the endospores, the infective stage, in rhinosporidiosis. This finding is compatible with the occurrence of chronicity, recurrence and dissemination that are characteristic of rhinosporidiosis despite the presence of high titres of anti-rhinosporidial antibody in patients with these clinical characteristics. The possible occurrence of humoral mechanisms of immunity that involve anti-rhinosporidial antibody with cells such as leucocytes and NK cells, in vivo, cannot yet be discounted, although the presence of high titres of anti-rhinosporidial antibody in patients with chronic, recurrent and disseminated lesions might indicate that such antibody is non-protective in vivo.

  2. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, Anwar M. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Van Domselaar, Gary [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi [National Institute for the Control of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, Beijing (China); She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Sui, Jianhua [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); He, Runtao [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Marasco, Wayne A. [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Li, Xuguang, E-mail: Sean.Li@hc-sc.gc.ca [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. {yields} Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  3. Protective role of antibodies induced by Brucella melitensis B115 against B. melitensis and Brucella abortus infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adone, Rosanna; Francia, Massimiliano; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Pesciaroli, Michele; Pasquali, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that antibodies specific for O-PS antigen of Brucella smooth strains are involved in the protective immunity of brucellosis. Since the rough strain Brucella melitensis B115 was able to protect mice against wild Brucella strains brucellosis despite the lack of anti-OPS antibodies, in this study we evaluated the biological significance of antibodies induced by this strain, directed to antigens other than O-PS, passively tranferred to untreated mice prior to infection with Brucella abortus 2308 and B. melitensis 16M virulent strains. The protective ability of specific antisera collected from mice vaccinated with B. melitensis B115, B. abortus RB51 and B. abortus S19 strains was compared. The results indicated that antibodies induced by B115 were able to confer a satisfactory protection, especially against B. abortus 2308, similar to that conferred by the antiserum S19, while the RB51 antiserum was ineffective. These findings suggest that antibodies induced by B115 could act as opsonins as well as antibodies anti-O-PS, thus triggering more efficient internalization and degradation of bacteria within phagocytes. This is the first study assessing the efficacy of antibodies directed to antigens other than O-PS in the course of brucellosis infection. PMID:22521283

  4. Structures of HIV-1-Env V1V2 with broadly neutralizing antibodies reveal commonalities that enable vaccine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jason; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Max M.; Davenport, Thaddeus M.; Guttman, Miklos; Bailer, Robert T.; Chambers, Michael; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; DeKosky, Brandon J.; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Druz, Aliaksandr; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Jarosinski, Marissa C.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Lemmin, Thomas M.; Leung, Sherman; Louder, Mark K.; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Narpala, Sandeep; Pancera, Marie; Stuckey, Jonathan; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Mullikin, James C.; Baxa, Ulrich; Georgiou, George; McDermott, Adrian B.; Bonsignori, Mattia; Haynes, Barton F.; Moore, Penny L.; Morris, Lynn; Lee, Kelly K.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV-1-Env V1V2 arise in multiple donors. However, atomic-level interactions had only been determined with antibodies from a single donor, making commonalities in recognition uncertain. Here we report the co-crystal structure of V1V2 with antibody CH03 from a second donor and model Env interactions of antibody CAP256-VRC26 from a third. These V1V2-directed bNAbs utilized strand-strand interactions between a protruding antibody loop and a V1V2 strand, but differed in their N-glycan recognition. Ontogeny analysis indicated protruding loops to develop early, with glycan interactions maturing over time. Altogether, the multidonor information suggested V1V2-directed bNAbs to form an ‘extended class’, for which we engineered ontogeny-specific antigens: Env trimers with chimeric V1V2s that interacted with inferred ancestor and intermediate antibodies. The ontogeny-based design of vaccine antigens described here may provide a general means for eliciting antibodies of a desired class. PMID:26689967

  5. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A. (UWASH); (Progenics); (ICL); (Weill-Med); (NIH); (JSTA); (Scripps); (Oxford)

    2015-10-15

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man{sub 9} at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short {beta}-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  6. Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Pf 155, a Major Antigen of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Lundgren, Katarina; Berzins, Klavs; Wahlin, Birgitta; Perlmann, Hedvig; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Carlsson, Jan; Wahlgren, Mats; Perlmann, Peter; Bjorkman, Anders

    1986-01-01

    Pf 155, a protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, is strongly immunogenic in humans and is believed to be a prime candidate for the preparation of a vaccine. Human monoclonal antibodies to Pf 155 were obtained by cloning B cells that had been prepared from an immune donor and transformed with Epstein-Barr virus. When examined by indirect immunofluorescence, these antibodies stained the surface of infected erythrocytes, free merozoites, segmented schizonts, and gametocytes. They bound to a major polypeptide with a relative molecular weight of 155K and to two minor ones (135K and 120K), all having high affinity for human glycophorin. The antibodies strongly inhibited merozoite reinvasion in vitro, suggesting that they might be appropriate reagents for therapeutic administration in vivo.

  7. Autophagy-associated dengue vesicles promote viral transmission avoiding antibody neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Wei; Mettling, Clément; Wu, Shang-Rung; Yu, Chia-Yi; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Yea-Lih

    2016-01-01

    One of the major defense mechanisms against virus spread in vivo is the blocking of viral infectibility by neutralizing antibodies. We describe here the identification of infectious autophagy-associated dengue vesicles released from infected cells. These vesicles contain viral proteins E, NS1, prM/M, and viral RNA, as well as host lipid droplets and LC3-II, an autophagy marker. The viral RNA can be protected within the autophagic organelles since anti-dengue neutralizing antibodies do not have an effect on the vesicle-mediated transmission that is able to initiate a new round of infection in target cells. Importantly, such infectious vesicles were also detected in a patient serum. Our study suggests that autophagy machinery plays a new role in dengue virus transmission. This discovery explains the inefficiency of neutralizing antibody upon dengue infection as a potential immune evasion mechanism in vivo. PMID:27558165

  8. Autophagy-associated dengue vesicles promote viral transmission avoiding antibody neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Wei; Mettling, Clément; Wu, Shang-Rung; Yu, Chia-Yi; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Yea-Lih

    2016-01-01

    One of the major defense mechanisms against virus spread in vivo is the blocking of viral infectibility by neutralizing antibodies. We describe here the identification of infectious autophagy-associated dengue vesicles released from infected cells. These vesicles contain viral proteins E, NS1, prM/M, and viral RNA, as well as host lipid droplets and LC3-II, an autophagy marker. The viral RNA can be protected within the autophagic organelles since anti-dengue neutralizing antibodies do not have an effect on the vesicle-mediated transmission that is able to initiate a new round of infection in target cells. Importantly, such infectious vesicles were also detected in a patient serum. Our study suggests that autophagy machinery plays a new role in dengue virus transmission. This discovery explains the inefficiency of neutralizing antibody upon dengue infection as a potential immune evasion mechanism in vivo. PMID:27558165

  9. Ionizing radiation delivered by specific antibody is therapeutic against a fungal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Nakouzi, Antonio; Bryan, Ruth A.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2003-09-01

    There is an urgent need for new antimicrobial therapies to combat drug resistance, new pathogens, and the relative inefficacy of current therapy in compromised hosts. Ionizing radiation can kill microorganisms quickly and efficiently, but this modality has not been exploited as a therapeutic antimicrobial strategy. We have developed methods to target ionizing radiation to a fungal cell by labeling a specific mAb with the therapeutic radioisotopes Rhenium-188 and Bismuth-213. Radiolabeled antibody killed cells of human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro, thus converting an antibody with no inherent antifungal activity into a microbicidal molecule. Administration of radiolabeled antibody to mice with C. neoformans infection delivered 213Bi and 188Re to the sites of infection, reduced their organ fungal burden, and significantly prolonged their survival without apparent toxicity. This study establishes the principle that targeted radiation can be used for the therapy of an infectious disease, and suggests that it may have wide applicability as an antimicrobial strategy.

  10. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to the edta extract of Leptospira interrogans, serovar icterohaemorrhagiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Terezinha de Queiroz Leite

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (MABs ivere produced against an etbylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA extract of Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae being characterized by gel precipitation as IgM and IgG (IgGl and IgG2b. The EDTA extract was detected as several bands by silver staining in SDS-PAGE. In the Western blot the bands around 20 KDa reacted with a monoclonal antibody, 47B4D6, and was oxidized by periodate and was not digested by pronase, suggesting that the determinant is of carbohydrate nature, lmmunocytochemistry, using colloidal gold labeling, showed that an EDTA extract determinant recognized by monoclonal antibody 47B4D6, is localized under the outer envelope of serovar icterohaemorrhagiae. Hoe AIAB raised against the EDTA extract was not able to protect hamsters from lethal challenge with virulent homologous leptospires.

  11. Protective monotherapy against lethal Ebola virus infection by a potently neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Davide; Misasi, John; Mulangu, Sabue; Stanley, Daphne A; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wollen, Suzanne; Ploquin, Aurélie; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Staupe, Ryan P; Bailey, Michael; Shi, Wei; Choe, Misook; Marcus, Hadar; Thompson, Emily A; Cagigi, Alberto; Silacci, Chiara; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Perez, Laurent; Sallusto, Federica; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Agatic, Gloria; Cameroni, Elisabetta; Kisalu, Neville; Gordon, Ingelise; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean-Jacques; Trefry, John C; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sullivan, Nancy J

    2016-03-18

    Ebola virus disease in humans is highly lethal, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. There is no licensed treatment or vaccine against the virus, underscoring the need for efficacious countermeasures. We ascertained that a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit Ebola virus disease outbreak maintained circulating antibodies against the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein for more than a decade after infection. From this survivor we isolated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize recent and previous outbreak variants of Ebola virus and mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Strikingly, monotherapy with mAb114 protected macaques when given as late as 5 days after challenge. Treatment with a single human mAb suggests that a simplified therapeutic strategy for human Ebola infection may be possible.

  12. Development of novel monoclonal antibodies that define differentiation stages of human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Kortesidis, Angela; Zannettino, Andrew C W;

    2011-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are currently being introduced for cell therapy, yet, antibodies specific for native and differentiated MSCs are required for their identification prior to clinical use. Herein, high quality antibodies against MSC surface proteins were developed by immunizing...... differentiation. Interestingly, undifferentiated cells revealed a sole cytoplasmic distribution pattern of Collagen VI, which however changed to an extracellular matrix appearance upon osteogenic- and adipogenic differentiation. In relation to this, we found that STRO-1(+/-)/Collagen VI(-) sorted hMSC contained...... fewer differentiated alkaline phosphatase(+) cells compared to STRO-1(+/-)/Collagen VI(+) hMSC, suggesting that Collagen VI on the cell membrane exclusively defines differentiated MSCs. In conclusion, we have generated a panel of high quality antibodies to be used for characterization of MSCs, and in...

  13. Regulation of antibody synthesis in the X-irradiated Mexican axolotl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlemagne, J.

    1981-09-01

    The effects of X-irradiation were studied on the Mexican axolotl antibody synthesis. To reduce the anti-horse red blood cell (HRBC) antibody titers, 150 rd and smaller doses are ineffective, 200-450 rd are increasingly effective, and 700 rd are maximally effective (and lethal). A significant enhancement of the anti-HRBC titers was observed in low doses (50-150 rd X-irradiated animals). This enhancement was also observed when a low X-ray dose was applied only on the thymic areas. In whole body, but thymus area-shielded, 100 rd X-irradiated animals, the anti-HRBC titers were similar to those of the nonirradiated, HRBC-immunized control group. To explain these phenomena, it is suggested that a radiosensitive, adult thymectomy-sensitive and hydrocortisone-sensitive suppressor T cell subpopulation regulates the antibody synthesis in the axolotl.

  14. Protective monotherapy against lethal Ebola virus infection by a potently neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Davide; Misasi, John; Mulangu, Sabue; Stanley, Daphne A; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wollen, Suzanne; Ploquin, Aurélie; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Staupe, Ryan P; Bailey, Michael; Shi, Wei; Choe, Misook; Marcus, Hadar; Thompson, Emily A; Cagigi, Alberto; Silacci, Chiara; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Perez, Laurent; Sallusto, Federica; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Agatic, Gloria; Cameroni, Elisabetta; Kisalu, Neville; Gordon, Ingelise; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Muyembe-Tamfun, Jean-Jacques; Trefry, John C; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sullivan, Nancy J

    2016-03-18

    Ebola virus disease in humans is highly lethal, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. There is no licensed treatment or vaccine against the virus, underscoring the need for efficacious countermeasures. We ascertained that a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit Ebola virus disease outbreak maintained circulating antibodies against the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein for more than a decade after infection. From this survivor we isolated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize recent and previous outbreak variants of Ebola virus and mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Strikingly, monotherapy with mAb114 protected macaques when given as late as 5 days after challenge. Treatment with a single human mAb suggests that a simplified therapeutic strategy for human Ebola infection may be possible. PMID:26917593

  15. Defensiveness, trait anxiety, and Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen antibody titers in healthy college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterling, B A; Antoni, M H; Kumar, M; Schneiderman, N

    1993-03-01

    The relationship of individual differences in repressive coping styles with differences in antibody titer to Epstein-Barr viral capsid antigen (EBV-VCA) were investigated in a normal, healthy college population made up of people previously exposed to EBV. Each of 54 1st-year undergraduates completed a battery of physical-status questions and items pertaining to potential behavioral immunomodulatory confounds, along with the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (T-MAS) and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MC-SDS). Ss reporting high and middle levels of anxiety had higher antibody titers to EBV, suggesting poorer immune control over the latent virus, as compared with the low-anxious group. Similarly, high-defensive Ss had higher antibody titers than their low-defensive counterparts, and neither group differed from the middle group. PMID:8500440

  16. Children's and adults' reactions to magical and ordinary suggestion: are suggestibility and magical thinking psychologically close relatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotsky, Eugene

    2007-11-01

    In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-year-old children and adults were asked to imagine various types of objects. The experimenter then attempted to change the image of those objects in participants' minds by either suggesting that the objects may change against the participants' will, or by asking participants to change the objects as a favor to the experimenter. Two types of suggestive causation were employed: Magical-suggestion (a magic spell was cast with the aim of changing the imagined objects) and ordinary-suggestion (participants were told that the objects in their minds could alter against their will). Ordinary-suggestion was as effective as magical-suggestion in changing the participants' imagined objects. For adults, a direct request for compliance produced a stronger effect than did magical suggestion. This effect was not found in children. In Experiment 2, the two types of suggestion were tested on an alternative type of imagined objects. Adult participants were asked to imagine their futures. It was then proposed that (a) a magic spell could be cast on their futures with the aim of changing them either for the worse or for the better (magical-suggestion), or (b) changing a numerical pattern on a computer screen could change their futures (ordinary-suggestion). All participants denied that changing a numerical pattern on a computer screen could affect their lives, yet in their actions they demonstrated an element of belief in this possibility. As in Experiment 1, in Experiment 2 ordinary suggestion was as effective as magical suggestion. The hypothesis of an historic contiguity between magical causality and ordinary suggestion is discussed. PMID:17931466

  17. Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching in Foreign Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Kay U.

    The suggestive-accelerative approach to foreign language instruction is described. This method, first used in Bulgaria by Georgi Lozanov, emphasizes bringing the imagination to bear on the learning task, in a relaxed classroom environment. After establishing a calm atmosphere through direct and indirect suggestion, the teacher proceeds to…

  18. Enhancing business intelligence by means of suggestive reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Atika; Raj, Ram Gopal; Tahir, Muhammad; Cambria, Erik; Syed, Karim Bux Shah

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate identification and classification of online reviews to satisfy the needs of current and potential users pose a critical challenge for the business environment. This paper focuses on a specific kind of reviews: the suggestive type. Suggestions have a significant influence on both consumers' choices and designers' understanding and, hence, they are key for tasks such as brand positioning and social media marketing. The proposed approach consists of three main steps: (1) classify comparative and suggestive sentences; (2) categorize suggestive sentences into different types, either explicit or implicit locutions; (3) perform sentiment analysis on the classified reviews. A range of supervised machine learning approaches and feature sets are evaluated to tackle the problem of suggestive opinion mining. Experimental results for all three tasks are obtained on a dataset of mobile phone reviews and demonstrate that extending a bag-of-words representation with suggestive and comparative patterns is ideal for distinguishing suggestive sentences. In particular, it is observed that classifying suggestive sentences into implicit and explicit locutions works best when using a mixed sequential rule feature representation. Sentiment analysis achieves maximum performance when employing additional preprocessing in the form of negation handling and target masking, combined with sentiment lexicons. PMID:25054188

  19. Enhancing Business Intelligence by Means of Suggestive Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atika Qazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate identification and classification of online reviews to satisfy the needs of current and potential users pose a critical challenge for the business environment. This paper focuses on a specific kind of reviews: the suggestive type. Suggestions have a significant influence on both consumers’ choices and designers’ understanding and, hence, they are key for tasks such as brand positioning and social media marketing. The proposed approach consists of three main steps: (1 classify comparative and suggestive sentences; (2 categorize suggestive sentences into different types, either explicit or implicit locutions; (3 perform sentiment analysis on the classified reviews. A range of supervised machine learning approaches and feature sets are evaluated to tackle the problem of suggestive opinion mining. Experimental results for all three tasks are obtained on a dataset of mobile phone reviews and demonstrate that extending a bag-of-words representation with suggestive and comparative patterns is ideal for distinguishing suggestive sentences. In particular, it is observed that classifying suggestive sentences into implicit and explicit locutions works best when using a mixed sequential rule feature representation. Sentiment analysis achieves maximum performance when employing additional preprocessing in the form of negation handling and target masking, combined with sentiment lexicons.

  20. Enhancing Business Intelligence by Means of Suggestive Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Atika

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate identification and classification of online reviews to satisfy the needs of current and potential users pose a critical challenge for the business environment. This paper focuses on a specific kind of reviews: the suggestive type. Suggestions have a significant influence on both consumers' choices and designers' understanding and, hence, they are key for tasks such as brand positioning and social media marketing. The proposed approach consists of three main steps: (1) classify comparative and suggestive sentences; (2) categorize suggestive sentences into different types, either explicit or implicit locutions; (3) perform sentiment analysis on the classified reviews. A range of supervised machine learning approaches and feature sets are evaluated to tackle the problem of suggestive opinion mining. Experimental results for all three tasks are obtained on a dataset of mobile phone reviews and demonstrate that extending a bag-of-words representation with suggestive and comparative patterns is ideal for distinguishing suggestive sentences. In particular, it is observed that classifying suggestive sentences into implicit and explicit locutions works best when using a mixed sequential rule feature representation. Sentiment analysis achieves maximum performance when employing additional preprocessing in the form of negation handling and target masking, combined with sentiment lexicons. PMID:25054188

  1. Enhancing business intelligence by means of suggestive reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Atika; Raj, Ram Gopal; Tahir, Muhammad; Cambria, Erik; Syed, Karim Bux Shah

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate identification and classification of online reviews to satisfy the needs of current and potential users pose a critical challenge for the business environment. This paper focuses on a specific kind of reviews: the suggestive type. Suggestions have a significant influence on both consumers' choices and designers' understanding and, hence, they are key for tasks such as brand positioning and social media marketing. The proposed approach consists of three main steps: (1) classify comparative and suggestive sentences; (2) categorize suggestive sentences into different types, either explicit or implicit locutions; (3) perform sentiment analysis on the classified reviews. A range of supervised machine learning approaches and feature sets are evaluated to tackle the problem of suggestive opinion mining. Experimental results for all three tasks are obtained on a dataset of mobile phone reviews and demonstrate that extending a bag-of-words representation with suggestive and comparative patterns is ideal for distinguishing suggestive sentences. In particular, it is observed that classifying suggestive sentences into implicit and explicit locutions works best when using a mixed sequential rule feature representation. Sentiment analysis achieves maximum performance when employing additional preprocessing in the form of negation handling and target masking, combined with sentiment lexicons.

  2. Using suggestion to model different types of automatic writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, E; Mehta, M A; Oakley, D A; Guilmette, D N; Gabay, A; Halligan, P W; Deeley, Q

    2014-05-01

    Our sense of self includes awareness of our thoughts and movements, and our control over them. This feeling can be altered or lost in neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in phenomena such as "automatic writing" whereby writing is attributed to an external source. Here, we employed suggestion in highly hypnotically suggestible participants to model various experiences of automatic writing during a sentence completion task. Results showed that the induction of hypnosis, without additional suggestion, was associated with a small but significant reduction of control, ownership, and awareness for writing. Targeted suggestions produced a double dissociation between thought and movement components of writing, for both feelings of control and ownership, and additionally, reduced awareness of writing. Overall, suggestion produced selective alterations in the control, ownership, and awareness of thought and motor components of writing, thus enabling key aspects of automatic writing, observed across different clinical and cultural settings, to be modelled.

  3. Anti-idiotypic antibody: A new strategy for the development of a growth hormone receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hainan; Zheng, Xin; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Li, Steven

    2015-11-01

    In general, traditional growth hormone receptor antagonist can be divided into two major classes: growth hormone (GH) analogues and anti-growth hormone receptor (GHR) antibodies. Herein, we tried to explore a new class of growth hormone receptor (GHR) antagonist that may have potential advantages over the traditional antagonists. For this, we developed a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody growth hormone, termed CG-86. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize and evaluate this antibody, and the results from a competitive receptor-binding assay, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) and epitope mapping demonstrate that CG-86 behaved as a typical Ab2β. Next, we examined its antagonistic activity using in vitro cell models, and the results showed that CG-86 could effectively inhibit growth hormone receptor-mediated signalling and effectively inhibit growth hormone-induced Ba/F3-GHR638 proliferation. In summary, these studies show that an anti-idiotypic antibody (CG-86) has promise as a novel growth hormone receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the current findings also suggest that anti-idiotypic antibody may represent a novel strategy to produce a new class of growth hormone receptor antagonist, and this strategy may be applied with other cytokines or growth factors.

  4. Inhibition of HCV 3a genotype entry through Host CD81 and HCV E2 antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Usman A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HCV causes acute and chronic hepatitis which can eventually lead to permanent liver damage hepatocellular carcinoma and death. HCV glycoproteins play an important role in HCV entry by binding with CD81 receptors. Hence inhibition of virus at entry step is an important target to identify antiviral drugs against HCV. Methods and result The present study elaborated the role of CD81 and HCV glycoprotein E2 in HCV entry using retroviral pseudo-particles of 3a local genotype. Our results demonstrated that HCV specific antibody E2 and host antibody CD81 showed dose- dependent inhibition of HCV entry. HCV E2 antibody showed 50% reduction at a concentration of 1.5 ± 1 μg while CD81 exhibited 50% reduction at a concentration of 0.8 ± 1 μg. In addition, data obtained with HCVpp were also confirmed with the infection of whole virus of HCV genotype 3a in liver cells. Conclusion Our data suggest that HCV specific E2 and host CD81 antibodies reduce HCVpp entry and full length viral particle and combination of host and HCV specific antibodies showed synergistic effect in reducing the viral titer.

  5. Survey for West Nile virus antibodies in wild ducks, 2004-06, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Erik K.; Jankowski, Mark D.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Franson, J. Christian

    2016-01-01

    Detection of West Nile virus (WNV) in ducks has been reported in North America in isolated cases of mortality in wild waterbirds and following outbreaks in farmed ducks. Although the virus has been noted as an apparent incidental finding in several species of ducks, little is known about the prevalence of exposure or the outcome of infection with WNV in wild ducks in North America. From 2004–06, we collected sera from 1,406 wild-caught American Wigeon (Anas americana), Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) ducks at national wildlife refuges (NWRs) in North Dakota and Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) at NWRs in South Carolina and Tennessee. We measured the prevalence of previous exposure to WNV in these ducks by measuring WNV antibodies and evaluated variation in exposure among species, age, and year. Additionally, we evaluated the performance of a commercial antibody to wild bird immunoglobulin in duck species that varied in their phylogenetic relatedness to the bird species the antibody was directed against. As determined by a screening immunoassay and a confirmatory plaque reduction neutralization assay, the prevalence of WNV antibody was 10%. In light of experimental studies that show ducks to be relatively resistant to mortality caused by WNV, the antibody prevalence we detected suggests that wild ducks may be less-frequently exposed to WNV than expected for birds inhabiting wetlands where they may acquire infection from mosquitoes.

  6. Pentavalent single-domain antibodies reduce Campylobacter jejuni motility and colonization in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riazi

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the world, with symptoms ranging from acute diarrhea to severe neurological disorders. Contaminated poultry meat is a major source of C. jejuni infection, and therefore, strategies to reduce this organism in poultry, are expected to reduce the incidence of Campylobacter-associated diseases. We have investigated whether oral administration of C. jejuni-specific single-domain antibodies would reduce bacterial colonization levels in chickens. Llama single-domain antibodies specific for C. jejuni were isolated from a phage display library generated from the heavy chain IgG variable domain repertoire of a llama immunized with C. jejuni flagella. Two flagella-specific single-domain antibodies were pentamerized to yield high avidity antibodies capable of multivalent binding to the target antigen. When administered orally to C. jejuni-infected two-day old chicks, the pentabodies significantly reduced C. jejuni colonization in the ceca. In vitro, the motility of the bacteria was also reduced in the presence of the flagella-specific pentabodies, suggesting the mechanism of action is through either direct interference with flagellar motility or antibody-mediated aggregation. Fluorescent microscopy and Western blot analyses revealed specific binding of the anti-flagella pentabodies to the C. jejuni flagellin.

  7. Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies: Its effect on thyroid gland and breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha Kandi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid peroxidase (TPO is a key enzyme in the synthesis of thyroid hormone. TPO is involved in thyroid hormone synthesis (organification and coupling reactions. TPO is a major antigen corresponding to thyroid-microsomal autoantibodies. Anti-TPO auto antibodies are very important to diagnose autoimmune thyroid diseases and also in estimating its clinical course. Autoimmune thyroid disease is detected mostly by measuring circulating antibodies to thyroglobulin which is uncommon measurement of antibodies to TPO that gives reliable information about autoimmune thyroid disease. Eighty percent of Grave′s disease patients have high levels of antiTPO antibodies. About 4% of subclinical hypothyroid patients with positive TPO antibodies develop clinical hypothyroidism. There is always a controversy on the relationship between breast cancer and thyroid disorders. As these tissues, i.e., breast and thyroid, originate embryologically from the same type of cells, hypothyroid/hyperthyroid females are more prone to develop benign or malignant breast tumors. The studies on breast cancer patients indicate increased thyroid disorders in breast cancer patients, most commonly Hashimoto′s thyroiditis accounts to increased thyroid disorders in these patients. This is independent of hormonal receptor status of the patient. These findings suggest the usefulness of screening for thyroid disease in any patient with breast cancer.

  8. Monoclonal anti-vasopressin (VP) antibodies penetrate into VP neurons, in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlet, A J; Leon-Henri, B P; Robert, F R; Arahmani, A; Fernette, B M; Burlet, C R

    1987-01-01

    The fate of monoclonal anti-vasopressin antibodies (VP-MAbs) injected in vivo into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the rat brain was studied by immunocytochemistry. Depending on the post survival time, VP-MAbs contained in an ascites fluid were stained at different levels of the VP neurons: the cytoplasm of the PVN neurons, the fibres of the median eminence and the granular layer of the Gyrus Dentatus. The identification of endogenous peptides synthesized by PVN neurons showed that the VP-MAbs uptake was specific: it did not appear either in the oxytocinergic neurons or in the non immunoreactive neurons of the Brattleboro rat brain, this rat being genetically incapable of synthesizing central VP. Conversely, VP-MAbs only penetrated into the VP neurons: ascites fluid containing monoclonal antibodies prepared against bovine thyroglobulin (the carrier conjugated to VP in our immunizations) was neither stained in magnocellular neurons nor carried in nerve fibres. The neuronal uptake and transport of VP-MAbs occurred in vivo: they were totally inhibited by heating of the ascites fluid at 56 degrees C for 30 min; this treatment did not alter the VP-MAbs themselves but probably destroyed some thermic sensitive component essential to the macromolecule internalization. The biological effects of antibodies injected in vivo have been reported. The results described here suggest that some specific antibodies passively transferred into the brain could act directly on the peptide synthesis recognized by the antibodies. PMID:3556490

  9. Intravitreally Injected Anti-VEGF Antibody Reduces Brown Fat in Neonatal Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hyun Jo

    Full Text Available Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF agents are the mainstay treatment for various angiogenesis-related retinal diseases. Currently, bevacizumab, a recombinant humanized anti-VEGF antibody, is trailed in retinopathy of prematurity, a vasoproliferative retinal disorder in premature infants. However, the risks of systemic complications after intravitreal injection of anti-VEGF antibody in infants are not well understood. In this study, we show that intravitreally injected anti-VEGF antibody is transported into the systemic circulation into the periphery where it reduces brown fat in neonatal C57BL/6 mice. A considerable amount of anti-VEGF antibody was detected in serum after intravitreal injection. Furthermore, in interscapular brown adipose tissue, we found lipid droplet accumulation, decreased VEGF levels, loss of vascular network, and decreased expression of mitochondria-related genes, Ppargc1a and Ucp1, all of which are characteristics of "whitening" of brown fat. With increasing age and body weight, brown fat restored its morphology and vascularity. Our results show that there is a transient, but significant impact of intravitreally administered anti-VEGF antibody on brown adipose tissue in neonatal mice. We suggest that more attention should be focused on the metabolic and developmental significance of brown adipose tissue in bevacizumab treated retinopathy of prematurity infants.

  10. Repeated epitope in the recombinant epitope-peptide could enhance ELDKWA-epitope-specific antibody response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zuqiang; WANG Zuguang; CHEN Yinghua

    2005-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis suggested by us that epitope-vaccine may be a new strategy against HIV mutation, we have studied several neutralizing epitopes on HIV envelope proteins. However we do not know whether a repeated epitope in a recombinant epitope-peptide can enhance epitope-specific antibody response or not. ELDKWA-epitope (aa669-674) on the C-domain of HIV-1 gp41 is a neutralizing epitope defined by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2F5 with broad neutralizing activity. In this study, we designed and prepared a series of the recombinant epitope-peptides bearing 1, 4 and 8 copies of ELDKWA-epitope respectively. In the comparison of the antisera induced by the three recombinant antigens, an obviously increased titre of ELDKWA-epitope-specific antibody was observed in the case of four and eight repeated epitopes. In flow cytometry analysis, the epitope-specific antibodies in both antisera showed stronger activity to bind the transfected CHO-WT cells that stably express HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surfaces. These experimental results indicated that repeated epitope in the recombinant epitope-peptide could enhance ELDKWA-epitope-specific antibody response, which could contribute to designing an effective recombinant epitope-vaccine.

  11. [Detection of influenza B virus antibodies in different age groups using hemagglutination inhibition tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonuvar, S; Kocabeyoğlu, O; Emekdaş

    1991-01-01

    Antibody levels against influenza B virus were investigated by using hemagglutination-inhibition (HA-I) tests in 402 sera obtained from different age groups. Hemagglutination antigens were obtained by production of influenza B virus (B/Singapur/LLC 6201) in trypsinized Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cell cultured and they were used in tests. In 355 out of 402 sera (88.3%) antibodies against influenza B virus were detected at titers varying between 1/20 and 1/1280. However in 47 sera (11.7%) no antibodies were detected at 1/20 titer. High titers of antibody (1/640-1/1280) were not detected in none of the sera obtained from an age group between 1 and 14. However high titer antibodies were detected in 15.6% of the sera from an age group between 26 and 35, in the 17.3% of the sera from a group above 50 years of age. Our findings suggest that the increase in the rates of seropositivity against influenza B virus depends on getting older and, that the infections by this virus may be widely seen in our country.

  12. Integrin receptors on tumor cells facilitate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J; Powers, Gordon D; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high antibody concentration, revealing a dose limiting effect. A similar effect was also observed with primary human NK cells. The effect was erased after IFN-γ treatment of tumor cells resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1. Furthermore, killing of the same tumor cells induced by Herceptin antibody was significantly impaired in the presence of CNTO 95Ala-Ala antibody variant that blocks αV integrins but is incapable of binding to CD16. These data suggest that αV integrins on tumor cells could compensate for the loss of ICAM-1 molecules, thereby facilitating ADCC by NK cells. Thus, NK cells could exercise cytolytic activity against ICAM-1 deficient tumor cells in the absence of proinflammatory cytokines, emphasizing the importance of NK cells in tumor-specific immunity at early stages of cancer. PMID:24810893

  13. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits triosephosphate isomerase activity of Taenia solium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Víctor, Sanabria-Ayala; Yolanda, Medina-Flores; Araceli, Zavala-Carballo; Lucía, Jiménez; Abraham, Landa

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we obtained and characterized partially a monoclonal antibody (4H11D10B11 mAb) against triosephosphate isomerase from Taenia solium (TTPI). This antibody recognized the enzyme by both ELISA and western blot and was able to inhibit its enzymatic activity in 74%. Moreover, the antigen-binding fragments (Fabs), products of digestion of the monoclonal antibody with papain, retained almost the same inhibitory effect. We determined the binding site by ELISA; synthetic peptides containing sequences from different non-conserved regions of the TTPI were confronted to the 4H11D10B11 mAb. The epitope recognized by the monoclonal antibody was located on peptide TTPI-56 (ATPAQAQEVHKVVRDWIRKHVDAGIADKARI), and an analysis of mimotopes, obtained with the 4H11D10B11 mAb, suggests that the epitope spans the sequence WIRKHVDAGIAD, residues 193-204 of the enzyme. This epitope is located within helix 6, next to loop 6, an essential active loop during catalysis. The antibody did not recognize triosephosphate isomerase from man and pig, definitive and intermediary hosts of T. solium, respectively. Furthermore, it did not bind to the catalytic site, since kinetic analysis demonstrated that inhibition had a non-competitive profile.

  14. Antipeptide antibody that specifically inhibits insulin receptor autophosphorylation and protein kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two site-specific antibodies that immunoprecipitate the human insulin receptor have been prepared by immunizing rabbits with chemically synthesized peptides derived from the cDNA-predicted amino acid sequence of the β subunit of the proreceptor. Antibodies to the carboxyl terminus (AbP5) and to a domain around tyrosine-960 (AbP4) specifically recognize the β subunit of the receptor on immunoblots. Both antibodies immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin-receptor complexes and the autophosphorylated receptor. Although neither antibody inhibited insulin binding to the receptor, both insulin-dependent autophosphorylation and exogenous substrate phosphorylation were inhibited by AbP4. Inhibition by AbP4 was dependent upon the phosphorylation state of the receptor; it was not detected when the receptor was autophosphorylated prior to addition of AbP4. AbP4 did not inhibit activity of the related epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor tyrosine protein kinase nor did it inhibit the activity of cAMP-dependent kinase or protein kinase C. The observation that an antibody directed to residues 952-967 of the proreceptor neutralizes the protein kinase activity of the β subunit suggest that this region may play a critical role in the function of the hormone-dependent, protein tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor

  15. [Use of leukocyte-filtered, cytomegalovirus-antibody negative and irradiated cellular blood products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, B G; Albrechtsen, D H; Evensen, S A; Leivestad, T

    1990-01-10

    This paper presents both quality requirements and indications for use of leucocyte-filtered, cytomegalovirus antibody negative and irradiated cellular blood products at Rikshospitalet. Emphasis is placed on the use of standardized buffycoat depleted red cells or platelet concentrates for filtration, and the selection of leucocyte filters with high capacity and ease of bedside application. Leucocyte counts as low as 1-2 10(5) per unit are recommended after filtration in order to avoid HLA-antibody production. For bedside filtration, our choice was RC100 and PL100 (Pall) for red cells and platelets respectively. For laboratory use we prefer, for economic reasons, to use Sepacell R500 (Asahi) and Imugard IG500 (Terumo) for red cells and platelets respectively. Leucocyte-filtered blood products are considered indicated in all pre-transplant transfusions, in post-transplant HLA-sensitized patients, in other patients with febrile transfusion reactions, and in patients with an expected protracted platelet requirement. CMV antibody negative products are recommended for all immuno-deficient patients and pregnant women negative for CMV antibody. Irradiated blood products are used in the treatment of immuno-deficient patients receiving large amounts of blood, and in all severely immuno-compromised patients. In emergency situations where CMV antibody negative and/or irradiated blood products cannot be supplied, leucocyte filtration is suggested. PMID:2154061

  16. Prevalence of IgA Antibodies to Endomysium and Tissue Transglutaminase in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R Gillett

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis has been described in several case reports and small screening studies, with varying prevalence rates. Stored sera from 378 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis were tested for immunoglobulin (Ig A endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Ten patients were positive for both antibodies (2.6%; five of these patients had had small bowel biopsies confirming celiac disease. A further 44 patients (11.6% had raised titres of IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody but were negative for IgA endomysium antibody. The increased prevalence of celiac-related antibodies in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis suggests that the two conditions are associated, although the reason for the association remains unclear. Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis should be considered to be at high risk for celiac disease. Although liver biochemistry does not improve when these patients are fed a gluten-free diet, the complications of untreated celiac disease warrant the identification and treatment of the condition in this population.

  17. Class specific antibody responses to newborn larva antigens during Trichinella spiralis human infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendez-Loredo B.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A follow-up study of the class antibody responses to newborn larva (NBL antigens in individuals involved in an outbreak of human trichinellosis was carried out by ELISA assays. The data showed that similar kinetics of antibody responses of different magnitude developed in trichinellosis patients; it was low by week 3, a peak raised by week 5 and decreased from week 7 up to the end of the study. The IgA-ELISA assay was the most sensitive and specific while the IgM was the least sensitive and specific. IgA antibodies to NBL antigens were detected in 80 % of patients while IgE, IgG and IgM responses were observed in 44, 31 and 19 % of the patients by week 3, respectively. From weeks 5 to 7, IgA antibodies were found in 89 to 100 % of the patients while lower percentages (0-82 % were found for the other isotypes. Reactivity of IgA, IgE, IgG and IgM to NBL antigens decreased from week 37 to 57 after infection (0-38 %. These results suggest that detection of IgA antibodies may be useful for early diagnosis and epidemiological studies in human trichinellosis.

  18. Detection of antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., and Toxoplasma gondii in horses from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangoudoubiyam, S; Oliveira, J B; Víquez, C; Gómez-García, A; González, O; Romero, J J; Kwok, O C H; Dubey, J P; Howe, D K

    2011-06-01

    Serum samples from 315 horses from Costa Rica, Central America, were examined for the presence of antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., and Toxoplasma gondii by using the surface antigen (SAG) SnSAG2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the NhSAG1 ELISA, and the modified agglutination test, respectively. Anti- S. neurona antibodies were found in 42.2% of the horses by using the SnSAG2 ELISA. Anti- Neospora spp. antibodies were found in only 3.5% of the horses by using the NhSAG1 ELISA, and only 1 of these horses was confirmed seropositive by Western blot. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 34.0% of the horses tested, which is higher than in previous reports from North and South America. The finding of anti- S. neurona antibodies in horses from geographical areas where Didelphis marsupialis has wide distribution suggests that D. marsupialis is a potential definitive host for this parasite and a source of infection for these horses. PMID:21506839

  19. Structural basis for Marburg virus neutralization by a cross-reactive human antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Takao; Fusco, Marnie L; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Lee, Jeffrey E; Flyak, Andrew I; Matsuoka, Rei; Kohda, Daisuke; Yanagi, Yusuke; Hammel, Michal; Crowe, James E; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2015-02-26

    The filoviruses, including Marburg and Ebola, express a single glycoprotein on their surface, termed GP, which is responsible for attachment and entry of target cells. Filovirus GPs differ by up to 70% in protein sequence, and no antibodies are yet described that cross-react among them. Here, we present the 3.6 Å crystal structure of Marburg virus GP in complex with a cross-reactive antibody from a human survivor, and a lower resolution structure of the antibody bound to Ebola virus GP. The antibody, MR78, recognizes a GP1 epitope conserved across the filovirus family, which likely represents the binding site of their NPC1 receptor. Indeed, MR78 blocks binding of the essential NPC1 domain C. These structures and additional small-angle X-ray scattering of mucin-containing MARV and EBOV GPs suggest why such antibodies were not previously elicited in studies of Ebola virus, and provide critical templates for development of immunotherapeutics and inhibitors of entry. PMID:25723165

  20. Prophylactic and therapeutic activity of fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against Influenza A M2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwerder Myriam

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influenza virus infection is a prevalent disease in humans. Antibodies against hemagglutinin have been shown to prevent infection and hence hemagglutinin is the major constituent of current vaccines. Antibodies directed against the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 have also been shown to mediate protection against Influenza A infection in various animal models. Active vaccination is generally considered the best approach to combat viral diseases. However, passive immunization is an attractive alternative, particularly in acutely exposed or immune compromized individuals, young children and the elderly. We recently described a novel method for the rapid isolation of natural human antibodies by mammalian cell display. Here we used this approach to isolate human monoclonal antibodies directed against the highly conserved extracellular domain of the Influenza A M2 protein. The identified antibodies bound M2 peptide with high affinities, recognized native cell-surface expressed M2 and protected mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Moreover, therapeutic treatment up to 2 days after infection was effective, suggesting that M2-specific monoclonals have a great potential as immunotherapeutic agents against Influenza infection.